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Sample records for adenylyl cyclase protein

  1. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  2. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  3. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, cap, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamukai, M; Gerst, J; Field, J; Riggs, M; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M; Young, D

    1992-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and studied a gene, cap, encoding a protein that is associated with adenylyl cyclase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This protein shares significant sequence homology with the adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CAP is a bifunctional protein; the N-terminal domain appears to be involved in cellular responsiveness to RAS, whereas loss of the C-terminal portion is associated with morphological and nutritional defects. S. pombe cap can suppress phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal CAP domain in S. cerevisiae but does not suppress phenotypes associated with deletion of the N-terminal domain. Analysis of cap disruptants also mapped the function of cap to two domains. The functional loss of the C-terminal region of S. pombe cap results in abnormal cellular morphology, slow growth, and failure to grow at 37 degrees C. Increases in mating and sporulation were observed when the entire gene was disrupted. Overproduction of both cap and adenylyl cyclase results in highly elongated large cells that are sterile and have measurably higher levels of adenylyl cyclase activity. Our results indicate that cap is required for the proper function of S. pombe adenylyl cyclase but that the C-terminal domain of cap has other functions that are shared with the C-terminal domain of S. cerevisiae CAP. Images PMID:1550959

  4. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  5. Coiled-coil interaction of N-terminal 36 residues of cyclase-associated protein with adenylyl cyclase is sufficient for its function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ras pathway.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Y; Shima, F; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1998-10-23

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, association with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is required for proper response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras proteins. We show here that a small segment comprising the N-terminal 36 amino acid residues of CAP is sufficient for association with adenylyl cyclase as well as for its function in the Ras-adenylyl cyclase pathway as assayed by the ability to confer RAS2(Val-19)-dependent heat shock sensitivity to yeast cells. The CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase was mapped to a segment of 119 amino acid residues near its C terminus. Both of these regions contained tandem repetitions of a heptad motif alphaXXalphaXXX (where alpha represents a hydrophobic amino acid and X represents any amino acid), suggesting a coiled-coil interaction. When mutants of CAP defective in associating with adenylyl cyclase were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, they were found to carry substitution mutations in one of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats. Furthermore, mutations of the key hydrophobic residues in the heptad repeats of adenylyl cyclase also resulted in loss of association with CAP. These results indicate the coiled-coil mechanism as a basis of the CAP-adenylyl cyclase interaction.

  6. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  7. The metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase is a tumor suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Diaz, Ana; Nardin, Charlee; Saviola, Anthony J.; Shaw, Fiona; Plitt, Tamar; Yang, Xia; Wolchok, Jedd; Pirog, Edyta C.; Desman, Garrett; Sboner, Andrea; Zhang, Tuo; Xiang, Jenny; Merghoub, Taha; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Zippin, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    cAMP signaling pathways can both stimulate and inhibit the development of cancer; however, the sources of cAMP important for tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a non-canonical, evolutionarily conserved, nutrient- and pH-sensing source of cAMP. sAC has been implicated in the metastatic potential of certain cancers, and it is differentially localized in human cancers as compared to benign tissues. We now show that sAC expression is reduced in many human cancers. Loss of sAC increases cellular transformation in vitro and malignant progression in vivo. These data identify the metabolic/pH sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase as a previously unappreciated tumor suppressor protein. PMID:27323809

  8. Analysis of the function of the 70-kilodalton cyclase-associated protein (CAP) by using mutants of yeast adenylyl cyclase defective in CAP binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T

    1993-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase forms a complex with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP). By in vitro mutagenesis, we assigned a CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase to a small segment near its C terminus and created mutants which lost the ability to bind CAP. CAP binding was assessed first by observing the ability of the overproduced C-terminal 150 residues of adenylyl cyclase to sequester CAP, thereby suppressing the heat shock sensitivity of yeast cells bearing the activated RAS2 gene (RAS2Val-19), and then by immunoprecipitability of adenylyl cyclase activity with anti-CAP antibody and by direct measurement of the amount of CAP bound. Yeast cells whose chromosomal adenylyl cyclase genes were replaced by the CAP-nonbinding mutants possessed adenylyl cyclase activity fully responsive to RAS2 protein in vitro. However, they did not exhibit sensitivity to heat shock in the RAS2Val-19 background. When glucose-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was measured in these mutants carrying RAS2Val-19, a rapid transient rise indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells was observed and a high peak level and following persistent elevation of the cAMP concentration characteristic of RAS2Val-19 were abolished. In contrast, in the wild-type RAS2 background, similar cyclase gene replacement did not affect the glucose-induced cAMP response. These results suggest that the association with CAP, although not involved in the in vivo response to the wild-type RAS2 protein, is somehow required for the exaggerated response of adenylyl cyclase to activated RAS2.

  9. Adenylyl Cyclase-Associated Protein 1 in the Development of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kakurina, G V; Kondakova, I V; Cheremisina, O V; Shishkin, D A; Choinzonov, E L

    2016-03-01

    We compared the content of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) in the blood and tissues of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (with and without regional metastases), patients with chronic inflammatory diseases aggravated by laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, and healthy individuals. The data suggest that serum CAP1 concentration correlated with the depth of primary tumor invasion and the presence of regional metastases. In cancer patients, the serum level of CAP1 was lower than in patients with laryngeal and laryngopharyngeal dysplasia, which can be of importance for differential and timely diagnostics of malignant tumors.

  10. Adenylyl cyclase 3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) complex mediates the anti-migratory effect of forskolin in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Sierra N; Graves, Sarai H; Dains-McGahee, Clayton; Friedman, Emilee M; Hassan, Humma; Witkowski, Piotr; Sabbatini, Maria E

    2017-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal human malignancies. A better understanding of the intracellular mechanism of migration and invasion is urgently needed to develop treatment that will suppress metastases and improve overall survival. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is a second messenger that has shown to regulate migration and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. The rise of cyclic AMP suppressed migration and invasion of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells. Cyclic AMP is formed from cytosolic ATP by the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). There are ten isoforms of ACs; nine are anchored in the plasma membrane and one is soluble. What remains unknown is the extent to which the expression of transmembrane AC isoforms is both modified in pancreatic cancer and mediates the inhibitory effect of forskolin on cell motility. Using real-time PCR analysis, ADCY3 was found to be highly expressed in pancreatic tumor tissues, resulting in a constitutive increase in cyclic AMP levels. On the other hand, ADCY2 was down-regulated. Migration, invasion, and filopodia formation in two different pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines, HPAC and PANC-1 deficient in AC1 or AC3, were studied. We found that AC3, upon stimulation with forskolin, enhanced cyclic AMP levels and inhibited cell migration and invasion. Unlikely to be due to a cytotoxic effect, the inhibitory effects of forskolin involved the quick formation of AC3/adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1)/G-actin complex, which inhibited filopodia formation and cell motility. Using Western blotting analysis, forskolin, through AC3 activation, caused phosphorylation of CREB, but not ERK. The effect of CREB phosphorylation is likely to be associated with long-term signaling changes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Isolation of a cotton CAP gene: a homologue of adenylyl cyclase-associated protein highly expressed during fiber elongation.

    PubMed

    Kawai, M; Aotsuka, S; Uchimiya, H

    1998-12-01

    The cDNA encoding CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was isolated from a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fiber cDNA library. The cDNA (GhCAP) contained an open reading frame that encoded 471 amino acid residues. RNA blot analysis showed that the cotton CAP gene was expressed mainly in young fibers.

  12. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  13. Molecular Characterization of Adenylyl Cyclase Complex Proteins Using Versatile Protein-Tagging Plasmid Systems in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    So, Yee-Seul; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Jung, Kwang-Woo; Huh, Won-Ki; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2017-02-28

    In this study, we aimed to generate a series of versatile tagging plasmids that can be used in diverse molecular biological studies of the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We constructed 12 plasmids that can be used to tag a protein of interest with a GFP, mCherry, 4×FLAG, or 6×HA, along with nourseothricin-, neomycin-, or hygromycin-resistant selection markers. Using this tagging plasmid set, we explored the adenylyl cyclase complex (ACC), consisting of adenylyl cyclase (Cac1) and its associated protein Aca1, in the cAMP-signaling pathway, which is critical for the pathogenicity of C. neoformans. We found that Cac1-mCherry and Aca1-GFP were mainly colocalized as punctate forms in the cell membrane and nonnuclear cellular organelles. We also demonstrated that Cac1 and Aca1 interacted in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation, using Cac1-6×HA and Aca1-4×FLAG tagging strains. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation further confirmed the in vivo interaction of Cac1 and Aca1 in live cells. Finally, protein pull-down experiments using aca1Δ::ACA1-GFP and aca1Δ::ACA1- GFP cac1Δ strains and comparative mass spectrometry analysis identified Cac1 and a number of other novel ACC-interacting proteins. Thus, this versatile tagging plasmid system will facilitate diverse mechanistic studies in C. neoformans and further our understanding of its biology.

  14. Modulation of Escherichia coli Adenylyl Cyclase Activity by Catalytic-Site Mutants of Protein IIAGlc of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Prasad; Kamireddi, Madhavi

    1998-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated form of the glucose-specific phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is an activator of adenylyl cyclase and that unphosphorylated IIAGlc has no effect on the basal activity of adenylyl cyclase. To elucidate the specific role of IIAGlc phosphorylation in the regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, both the phosphorylatable histidine (H90) and the interactive histidine (H75) of IIAGlc were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to glutamine and glutamate. Wild-type IIAGlc and the H75Q mutant, in which the histidine in position 75 has been replaced by glutamine, were phosphorylated by the phosphohistidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr∼P) and were equally potent activators of adenylyl cyclase. Neither the H90Q nor the H90E mutant of IIAGlc was phosphorylated by HPr∼P, and both failed to activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, replacement of H75 by glutamate inhibited the appearance of a steady-state level of phosphorylation of H90 of this mutant protein by HPr∼P, yet the H75E mutant of IIAGlc was a partial activator of adenylyl cyclase. The H75E H90A double mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated, did not activate adenylyl cyclase. This suggests that the H75E mutant was transiently phosphorylated by HPr∼P but the steady-state level of the phosphorylated form of the mutant protein was decreased due to the repulsive forces of the negatively charged glutamate at position 75 in the catalytic pocket. These results are discussed in the context of the proximity of H75 and H90 in the IIAGlc structure and the disposition of the negative charge in the modeled glutamate mutants. PMID:9457881

  15. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Ksiazek, Dorota; Brandstetter, Hans; Israel, Lars; Bourenkov, Gleb P; Katchalova, Galina; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Bartunik, Hans D; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2003-09-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are widely distributed and highly conserved proteins that regulate actin remodeling in response to cellular signals. The N termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C termini bind to G-actin and thereby alter the dynamic rearrangements of the microfilament system. We report here the X-ray structure of the core of the N-terminal domain of the CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum, which comprises residues 51-226, determined by a combination of single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS). The overall structure of this fragment is an alpha helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices. Results from gel filtration and crosslinking experiments for CAP(1-226), CAP(255-464), and the full-length protein, together with the CAP N-terminal domain structure and the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, provide evidence that the functional structure of CAP is multimeric.

  16. NMR structural characterization of the N-terminal domain of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Mavoungou, Chrystelle; Israel, Lars; Rehm, Till; Ksiazek, Dorota; Krajewski, Marcin; Popowicz, Grzegorz; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Holak, Tad A

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved, ubiquitous actin binding proteins that are involved in microfilament reorganization. The N-termini of CAPs play a role in Ras signaling and bind adenylyl cyclase; the C-termini bind to G-actin. We report here the NMR characterization of the amino-terminal domain of CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum (CAP(1-226)). NMR data, including the steady state (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOE experiments, indicate that the first 50 N-terminal residues are unstructured and that this highly flexible serine-rich fragment is followed by a stable, folded core starting at Ser 51. The NMR structure of the folded core is an alpha-helix bundle composed of six antiparallel helices, in a stark contrast to the recently determined CAP C-terminal domain structure, which is solely built by beta-strands.

  17. Modulation of mitochondrial protein phosphorylation by soluble adenylyl cyclase ameliorates cytochrome oxidase defects

    PubMed Central

    Acin-Perez, Rebeca; Salazar, Eric; Brosel, Sonja; Yang, Hua; Schon, Eric A; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of respiratory chain components has emerged as a mode of regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism, but its mechanisms are still largely unexplored. A recently discovered intramitochondrial signalling pathway links CO2 generated by the Krebs cycle with the respiratory chain, through the action of a mitochondrial soluble adenylyl cyclase (mt-sAC). Cytochrome oxidase (COX), whose deficiency causes a number of fatal metabolic disorders, is a key mitochondrial enzyme activated by mt-sAC. We have now discovered that the mt-sAC pathway modulates mitochondrial biogenesis in a reactive oxygen species dependent manner, in cultured cells and in animals with COX deficiency. We show that upregulation of mt-sAC normalizes reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial biogenesis, thereby restoring mitochondrial function. This is the first example of manipulation of a mitochondrial signalling pathway to achieve a direct positive modulation of COX, with clear implications for the development of novel approaches to treat mitochondrial diseases. PMID:20049744

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of a rat homolog of CAP, the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zelicof, A; Gatica, J; Gerst, J E

    1993-06-25

    We have isolated a rat cDNA whose expression suppresses the physiological consequences of the chromosomal disruption of CAP, the gene encoding the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast CAP is a bifunctional protein: the NH2 terminus is necessary and sufficient for cellular responsiveness to activated RAS proteins, while the COOH terminus is required for normal cellular morphology and growth control. The rat MCH1 cDNA encodes a protein of 474 amino acids that is 36% identical to S. cerevisiae CAP and is capable of suppressing the loss of the COOH-terminal functions of CAP when expressed in yeast. The MCH1 protein therefore appears to be a structural and functional homolog of the yeast cyclase-associated proteins. Northern analysis of MCH1 gene expression shows it to be constitutively expressed in all cell and tissue types examined. The cloning of a rat homolog of CAP, in addition to the cloning of a human CAP homolog by Matviw et al. (Matviw, H., Yu, G., and Young, D. (1992) Mol. Cell. Biol. 12, 5033-5040), demonstrates that both cyclase-associated proteins and their functions may have evolved with mammalian cells.

  19. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Aca1 regulates virulence and differentiation of Cryptococcus neoformans via the cyclic AMP-protein kinase A cascade.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Hicks, Julie K; Giles, Steven S; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    The evolutionarily conserved cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway controls cell functions in response to environmental cues in organisms as diverse as yeast and mammals. In the basidiomycetous human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, the cAMP pathway governs virulence and morphological differentiation. Here we identified and characterized adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, Aca1, which functions in parallel with the Galpha subunit Gpa1 to control the adenylyl cyclase (Cac1). Aca1 interacted with the C terminus of Cac1 in the yeast two-hybrid system. By molecular and genetic approaches, Aca1 was shown to play a critical role in mating by regulating cell fusion and filamentous growth in a cAMP-dependent manner. Aca1 also regulates melanin and capsule production via the Cac1-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway. Genetic epistasis studies support models in which Aca1 and Gpa1 are necessary and sufficient components that cooperate to activate adenylyl cyclase. Taken together, these studies further define the cAMP signaling cascade controlling virulence of this ubiquitous human fungal pathogen.

  20. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1/CAP1 as a biological target substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9

    SciTech Connect

    Cauwe, Benedicte; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Proost, Paul; Van Aelst, Ilse; Blockmans, Daniel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2008-09-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically associated with the turnover of secreted structural and functional proteins. Although MMPs have been shown to process also a kaleidoscope of membrane-associated substrates, little is known about the processing of intracellular proteins by MMPs. Physiological and pathological cell apoptosis, necrosis and tumor lysis by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or immunological cytotoxicity, are examples of conditions in which an overload of intracellular proteins becomes accessible to the action of MMPs. We used a model system of dying human myelomonocytic cells to study the processing of intracellular protein substrates by gelatinase B/MMP-9 in vitro. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1 or CAP1 was identified as a novel and most efficient substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9. The presence of CAP1 in the extracellular milieu in vivo was documented by analysis of urine of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Whereas no active MMP-9 could be detected in urines of healthy controls, all urine samples of patients with clinical parameters of renal failure contained activated MMP-9 and/or MMP-2. In addition, in some of these patients indications of CAP1 cleavage are observed, implying CAP1 degradation in vivo. The high turnover rate of CAP1 by MMP-9, comparable to that of gelatin as the natural extracellular substrate of this enzyme, may be critical to prevent pathological conditions associated with considerable cytolysis.

  1. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1/CAP1 as a biological target substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9.

    PubMed

    Cauwe, Bénédicte; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E; Proost, Paul; Van Aelst, Ilse; Blockmans, Daniel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2008-09-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically associated with the turnover of secreted structural and functional proteins. Although MMPs have been shown to process also a kaleidoscope of membrane-associated substrates, little is known about the processing of intracellular proteins by MMPs. Physiological and pathological cell apoptosis, necrosis and tumor lysis by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or immunological cytotoxicity, are examples of conditions in which an overload of intracellular proteins becomes accessible to the action of MMPs. We used a model system of dying human myelomonocytic cells to study the processing of intracellular protein substrates by gelatinase B/MMP-9 in vitro. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1 or CAP1 was identified as a novel and most efficient substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9. The presence of CAP1 in the extracellular milieu in vivo was documented by analysis of urine of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Whereas no active MMP-9 could be detected in urines of healthy controls, all urine samples of patients with clinical parameters of renal failure contained activated MMP-9 and/or MMP-2. In addition, in some of these patients indications of CAP1 cleavage are observed, implying CAP1 degradation in vivo. The high turnover rate of CAP1 by MMP-9, comparable to that of gelatin as the natural extracellular substrate of this enzyme, may be critical to prevent pathological conditions associated with considerable cytolysis.

  2. Adenylyl cyclase G, an osmosensor controlling germination of Dictyostelium spores.

    PubMed

    van Es, S; Virdy, K J; Pitt, G S; Meima, M; Sands, T W; Devreotes, P N; Cotter, D A; Schaap, P

    1996-09-27

    Dictyostelium cells express a G-protein-coupled adenylyl cyclase, ACA, during aggregation and an atypical adenylyl cyclase, ACG, in mature spores. The ACG gene was disrupted by homologous recombination. acg- cells developed into normal fruiting bodies with viable spores, but spore germination was no longer inhibited by high osmolarity, a fairly universal constraint for spore and seed germination. ACG activity, measured in aca-/ACG cells, was strongly stimulated by high osmolarity with optimal stimulation occurring at 200 milliosmolar. RdeC mutants, which display unrestrained protein kinase A (PKA) activity and a cell line, which overexpresses PKA under a prespore specific promoter, germinate very poorly, both at high and low osmolarity. These data indicate that ACG is an osmosensor controlling spore germination through activation of protein kinase A.

  3. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  4. Mammalian adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) regulates cofilin function, the actin cytoskeleton, and cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Ghai, Pooja; Wu, Huhehasi; Wang, Changhui; Field, Jeffrey; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2013-07-19

    CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) was first identified in yeast as a protein that regulates both the actin cytoskeleton and the Ras/cAMP pathway. Although the role in Ras signaling does not extend beyond yeast, evidence supports that CAP regulates the actin cytoskeleton in all eukaryotes including mammals. In vitro actin polymerization assays show that both mammalian and yeast CAP homologues facilitate cofilin-driven actin filament turnover. We generated HeLa cells with stable CAP1 knockdown using RNA interference. Depletion of CAP1 led to larger cell size and remarkably developed lamellipodia as well as accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin). Moreover, we found that CAP1 depletion also led to changes in cofilin phosphorylation and localization as well as activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and enhanced cell spreading. CAP1 forms complexes with the adhesion molecules FAK and Talin, which likely underlie the cell adhesion phenotypes through inside-out activation of integrin signaling. CAP1-depleted HeLa cells also had substantially elevated cell motility as well as invasion through Matrigel. In summary, in addition to generating in vitro and in vivo evidence further establishing the role of mammalian CAP1 in actin dynamics, we identified a novel cellular function for CAP1 in regulating cell adhesion.

  5. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 is a receptor for human resistin and mediates inflammatory actions of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sahmin; Lee, Hyun-Chae; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Sang Eun; Cho, Youngjin; Kim, Joonoh; Lee, Soobeom; Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Jaewon; Yang, Han-Mo; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Nam, Ky-Youb; Chung, Junho; Lazar, Mitchell A; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2014-03-04

    Human resistin is a cytokine that induces low-grade inflammation by stimulating monocytes. Resistin-mediated chronic inflammation can lead to obesity, atherosclerosis, and other cardiometabolic diseases. Nevertheless, the receptor for human resistin has not been clarified. Here, we identified adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) as a functional receptor for human resistin and clarified its intracellular signaling pathway to modulate inflammatory action of monocytes. We found that human resistin directly binds to CAP1 in monocytes and upregulates cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and NF-κB-related transcription of inflammatory cytokines. Overexpression of CAP1 in monocytes enhanced the resistin-induced increased activity of the cAMP-dependent signaling. Moreover, CAP1-overexpressed monocytes aggravated adipose tissue inflammation in transgenic mice that express human resistin from their monocytes. In contrast, suppression of CAP1 expression abrogated the resistin-mediated inflammatory activity both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, CAP1 is the bona fide receptor for resistin leading to inflammation in humans.

  6. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  7. Endogenous regulators of G protein signaling differentially modulate full and partial mu-opioid agonists at adenylyl cyclase as predicted by a collision coupling model.

    PubMed

    Clark, M J; Linderman, J J; Traynor, J R

    2008-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins accelerate the endogenous GTPase activity of Galpha(i/o) proteins to increase the rate of deactivation of active Galpha-GTP and Gbetagamma signaling molecules. Previous studies have suggested that RGS proteins are more effective on less efficiently coupled systems such as with partial agonist responses. To determine the role of endogenous RGS proteins in functional responses to mu-opioid agonists of different intrinsic efficacy, Galpha(i/o) subunits with a mutation at the pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive cysteine (C351I) and with or without a mutation at the RGS binding site (G184S) were stably expressed in C6 glioma cells expressing a mu-opioid receptor. Cells were treated overnight with PTX to inactivate endogenous G proteins. Maximal inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase by the low-efficacy partial agonists buprenorphine and nalbuphine was increased in cells expressing RGS-insensitive Galpha(o)(CIGS), Galpha(i2)(CIGS), or Galpha(i3)(CIGS) compared with their Galpha(CI) counterparts, but the RGS-insensitive mutation had little or no effect on the maximal inhibition by the higher efficacy agonists DAMGO and morphine. The potency of all the agonists to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase was increased in cells expressing RGS-insensitive Galpha(o)(CIGS), Galpha(i2)(CIGS), or Galpha(i3)(CIGS), regardless of efficacy. These data are comparable with predictions based on a collision coupling model. In this model, the rate of G protein inactivation, which is modulated by RGS proteins, and the rate of G protein activation, which is affected by agonist intrinsic efficacy, determine the maximal agonist response and potency at adenylyl cyclase under steady state conditions.

  8. Protein kinase C and epidermal growth factor stimulation of Raf1 potentiates adenylyl cyclase type 6 activation in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Beazely, Michael A; Alan, Jamie K; Watts, Val J

    2005-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) activity is inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro; however, in intact cells, PKC activation does not inhibit the activity of transiently expressed AC6. To investigate the effects of PKC activation on AC6 activity in intact cells, we constructed human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express wild-type AC6 (AC6-WT) or an AC6 mutant lacking a PKC and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylation site, Ser674 (AC6-S674A). In contrast to in vitro observations, we observed a PKC-mediated enhancement of forskolin- and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in HEK-AC6 cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also potentiated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing endogenous AC6, including Chinese hamster ovary cells and differentiated Cath.a differentiated cells. In HEK-AC6-S674A cells, the potentiation of AC6 stimulation was significantly greater than in cells expressing AC6-WT. The positive effect of PKC activation on AC6 activity seemed to involve Raf1 kinase because the Raf1 inhibitor 3-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene-5-iodo-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one (GW5074) inhibited the PKC potentiation of AC6 activity. Furthermore, the forskolin-stimulated activity of a recombinant AC6 in which the putative Raf1 regulatory sites have been eliminated was not potentiated by activation of PKC. The ability of Raf1 to regulate AC6 may involve a direct interaction because AC6 and a constitutively active Raf1 construct were coimmunoprecipitated. In addition, we report that epidermal growth factor receptor activation also enhances AC6 signaling in a Raf1-dependent manner. These data suggest that Raf1 potentiates drug-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing AC6 after activation of multiple signaling pathways.

  9. Choreographing the adenylyl cyclase signalosome: sorting out the partners and the steps.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bogard, Amy S; Gros, Robert; Feldman, Ross D

    2012-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a ubiquitous family of enzymes and are critical regulators of metabolic and cardiovascular function. Multiple isoforms of the enzyme are expressed in a range of tissues. However, for many processes, the adenylyl cyclase isoforms have been thought of as essentially interchangeable, with their impact more dependent on their common actions to increase intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate content regardless of the isoform involved. It has long been appreciated that each subfamily of isoforms demonstrate a specific pattern of "upstream" regulation, i.e., specific patterns of ion dependence (e.g., calcium-dependence) and specific patterns of regulation by kinases (protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), raf). However, more recent studies have suggested that adenylyl cyclase isoform-selective patterns of signaling are a wide-spread phenomenon. The determinants of these selective signaling patterns relate to a number of factors, including: (1) selective coupling of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific G protein-coupled receptors, (2) localization of specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in defined structural domains (AKAP complexes, caveolin/lipid rafts), and (3) selective coupling of adenylyl cyclase isoforms with specific downstream signaling cascades important in regulation of cell growth and contractility. The importance of isoform-specific regulation has now been demonstrated both in mouse models as well as in humans. Adenylyl cyclase has not been viewed as a useful target for therapeutic regulation, given the ubiquitous expression of the enzyme and the perceived high risk of off-target effects. Understanding which isoforms of adenylyl cyclase mediate distinct cellular effects would bring new significance to the development of isoform-specific ligands to regulate discrete cellular actions.

  10. Identification of a mutation in the gene encoding the alpha subunit of the stimulatory G protein of adenylyl cyclase in McCune-Albright syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Schwindinger, W F; Francomano, C A; Levine, M A

    1992-01-01

    McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) is characterized by polyostotic fibrous dysplasia, café-au-lait lesions, and a variety of endocrine disorders, including precocious puberty, hyperthyroidism, hypercortisolism, growth hormone excess, and hyperprolactinemia. The diverse metabolic abnormalities seen in MAS share the involvement of cells that respond to extracellular signals through activation of the hormone-sensitive adenylyl cyclase system (EC 4.6.1.1). Mutations that lead to constitutive activation of Gs alpha, the guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity, have been identified in a subset of human growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumors and human thyroid tumors. We report here the identification of a mutation in the gene encoding Gs alpha in a patient with MAS. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze amplified DNA fragments including exon 8 or exon 9 of the Gs alpha gene. In one subject with MAS a G-to-A transition was found in exon 8 of one of the two alleles encoding Gs alpha. This single-base substitution results in the replacement of arginine by histidine at position 201 of the mature Gs alpha protein. Semiquantitative analysis of amplified DNA indicated that the mutant allele was less prevalent than the wild-type allele in peripheral leukocytes and was present in very low levels in skin. These findings support the previous contention that the segmental distribution and variable expression of the cutaneous, skeletal, and endocrine manifestations of MAS reflect an underlying somatic mosaicism. Further, these results suggest that the molecular basis of MAS is a postzygotic mutation in Gs alpha that causes constitutive activation of adenylyl cyclase. Images PMID:1594625

  11. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Differences in type II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoform expression between rat preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Serazin-Leroy, V; Morot, M; de Mazancourt, P; Giudicelli, Y

    2001-11-26

    Adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity is low in preadipocyte membranes when compared to adipocytes. Under conditions promoting inhibition of adipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity by Gpp(NH)p, a stable GTP analog, a paradoxical increase in preadipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity was obtained. In order to explain this contradiction, expression of types II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoforms was compared in adipocytes and undifferentiated preadipocytes both by western blots and by a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Type II, IV, V and VI mRNAs and proteins were present in both adipocytes and preadipocytes. However, in undifferentiated preadipocytes, expression of type II mRNA and protein were significantly higher whereas expression of type IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase mRNAs and proteins were significantly weaker than in adipocytes. In late differentiated preadipocytes, the adenylyl cyclase subtype mRNA expression pattern was intermediary between the undifferentiated and the full differentiation states except for type IV which remained weakly expressed. Moreover, one of the representative regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS protein), RGS4, was less expressed in undifferentiated preadipocyte membranes and cytosol extracts, which contrasts with adipocytes where RGS4 is clearly expressed. Thus, the preferential expression of type II adenylyl cyclase (G(betagamma) subunit-stimulated) in preadipocytes might explain why Gpp(NH)p elicits stimulation of adenylyl cyclase under conditions designed to promote inhibition. Conversely, the preferential expression of type V and VI adenylyl cyclases and the slightly higher expression of type IV adenylyl cyclase in adipocytes could contribute to explain the elevated total catalytic activity observed in mature fat cells compared to their precursor cells.

  13. Association of elongation factor 1 alpha and ribosomal protein L3 with the proline-rich region of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein CAP.

    PubMed

    Yanagihara, C; Shinkai, M; Kariya, K; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Hu, C D; Masuda, T; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-17

    CAP is a multifunctional protein; the N-terminal region binds adenylyl cyclase and controls its response to Ras while the C-terminal region is involved in cytoskeletal regulation. In between the two regions, CAP possesses two proline-rich segments, P1 and P2, resembling a consensus sequence for binding SH3 domains. We have identified two yeast proteins with molecular sizes of 48 and 46 kDa associated specifically with P2. Determination of partial protein sequences demonstrated that the 48-kDa and 46-kDa proteins correspond to EF1 alpha and rL3, respectively, neither of which contains any SH3-domain-like sequence. Deletion of P2 from CAP resulted in loss of the activity to bind the two proteins either in vivo or in vitro. Yeast cells whose chromosomal CAP was replaced by the P2-deletion mutant displayed an abnormal phenotype represented by dissociated localizations of CAP and F-actin, which were colocalized in wild-type cells. These results suggest that these associations may have functional significance.

  14. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP. sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems which are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells. PMID:21490586

  15. Identification of a 14-3-3 protein from Lentinus edodes that interacts with CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein), and conservation of this interaction in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Yamamoto, T; Ozoe, F; Yano, D; Tanaka, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    2000-01-01

    We previously identified a gene encoding a CAP (adenylyl cyclase-associated protein) homologue from the edible Basidiomycete Lentinus edodes. To further discover the cellular functions of the CAP protein, we searched for CAP-interacting proteins using a yeast two-hybrid system. Among the candidates thus obtained, many clones encoded the C-terminal half of an L. edodes 14-3-3 homologue (designated cip3). Southern blot analysis indicated that L. edodes contains only one 14-3-3 gene. Overexpression of the L. edodes 14-3-3 protein in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe rad24 null cells complemented the loss of endogenous 14-3-3 protein functions in cell morphology and UV sensitivity, suggesting functional conservation of 14-3-3 proteins between L. edodes and S. pombe. The interaction between L. edodes CAP and 14-3-3 protein was restricted to the N-terminal domain of CAP and was confirmed by in vitro co-precipitation. Results from both the two-hybrid system and in vivo co-precipitation experiments showed the conservation of this interaction in S. pombe. The observation that a 14-3-3 protein interacts with the N-terminal portion of CAP but not with full-length CAP in L. edodes and S. pombe suggests that the C-terminal region of CAP may have a negative effect on the interaction between CAP and 14-3-3 proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins may play a role in regulation of CAP function.

  16. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-01-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions. Images PMID:9190214

  17. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-02-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions.

  18. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 in metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakurina, G. V.; Kolegova, E. S.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Zavyalov, A. A.; Shishkin, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    Progression of tumors and metastasis in particular is one of the main reasons of the high mortality rate among cancer patients. The primary role in developing metastases plays cell locomotion which requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Form, dynamics, localization and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins, which include the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). The study is devoted to the investigation of CAP1 level depending on the presence or absence of metastases in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results show the contribution of CAP1 to SCCHN and NSCLC progression. We detected the connection between the tissue protein CAP1 level and the stage of NSCLC and SCCHN disease. Also the levels of the CAP1 protein in tissues of primary tumors and metastases in lung cancer were different. Our data showed that CAP is important in the development of metastases, which suggests further perspectives in the study of this protein for projecting metastasis of NSCLC and SCCHN.

  19. Photoactivation mechanism of a bacterial light-regulated adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Winkler, Andreas; Frey, Daniel; Reinstein, Jochen; Meinhart, Anton; Schlichting, Ilme

    2017-03-20

    Light-regulated enzymes enable organisms to quickly respond to changing light conditions. We characterize a photoactivatable adenylyl cyclase from Beggiatoa sp. (bPAC) that translates a blue light signal into production of the second messenger cyclic AMP. bPAC contains a BLUF photoreceptor domain that senses blue light using a flavin chromophore, linked to an adenylyl cyclase (AC) domain. We present a dark state crystal structure of bPAC that closely resembles the recently published structure of the homologous OaPAC from Oscillatoria acuminata. To elucidate the structural mechanism of light-dependent AC activation by the BLUF domain, we determined crystal structures of illuminated bPAC and of a pseudo-lit state variant. We use hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements of secondary structure dynamics and hypothesis-driven point mutations to trace the activation pathway from the chromophore in the BLUF domain to the active site of the cyclase. The structural changes are relayed from the residues interacting with the excited chromophore through a conserved kink of the BLUF β-sheet to a tongue-like extrusion of the AC domain that regulates active site opening and repositions catalytic residues. Our findings not only show the specific molecular pathway of photoactivation in BLUF-regulated ACs, but they also have implications for the general understanding of signaling in BLUF domains and of the activation of adenylyl cyclases.

  20. Identification of a CAP (adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein) homologous gene in Lentinus edodes and its functional complementation of yeast CAP mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, K; Shishido, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1998-04-01

    The adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was originally identified in yeasts as a protein that functions in both signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization. This paper reports the identification of a cDNA and genomic DNA that encodes a CAP homologue from the mushroom Lentinus edodes. The L. edodes cap gene contains eight introns and an ORF encoding a 518 amino acid protein. The L. edodes CAP is 35.5% and 40.9% identical at the amino acid level with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe CAP, respectively. The C-terminal domain shows greater homology (39-46% identity) with yeast CAPs than does the N-terminal domain (27-35% identity). Southern blotting and Northern blotting results suggest that L. edodes cap is a single-copy gene and uniformly expressed. Expression of the L. edodes CAP in both Schiz. pombe and Sacch. cerevisiae complemented defects associated with the loss of the C-terminal domain function of the endogenous CAP. By using a yeast two-hybrid assay, an interaction was demonstrated between the L. edodes CAP and Schiz. pombe actin. This result and the functional complementation test indicate that CAP from L. edodes has a conserved C-terminal domain function.

  1. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  2. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  3. [Adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of the insulin superfamily peptide action and their impairment in myometrium of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Plesneva, S a; Kuznetsova, L A; Shpakov, A O; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N

    2008-10-01

    For the first time we found in myometrium of the women and pregnant women that adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of relaxin, insulin and insulin growth factor 1 are realized via six-component AC signaling mechanisms involving the following signaling chain: receptor-tyrosine kinase ==> Gi protein (beta gamma dimmer) ==> phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase ==> protein kinase C (zeta) ==> Gs protein ==> adenylyl cyclase (AC), which are similar to the discovered adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of insulin and relaxin action in vertebrates (rat) and invertebrates (mollusk). The effect of relaxin is more pronounced as compared with other peptides (relaxin > insulin > insulin-like growth factor-1) in myometrium of pregnant women. It is connected with the specific role ofrelaxin as main regulator of reproductive functions. For the first time we revealed the functional defects in distal parts of adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of the insulin superfamily peptides action in the condition type-2 diabetes (the increase of the basal adenylyl cyclase activity and decrease of the peptide-stimulated AX activity in presence of guanilylimidodiphosphate). The defects are localized on the level of Gs protein, adenylyl cyclase and their functional coupling. The data obtained confirm our conception about molecular defects in hormoneregulated adenylyl cyclase system as a key reason of type-2 diabetes.

  4. A cyanobacterial light activated adenylyl cyclase partially restores development of a Dictyostelium discoideum, adenylyl cyclase a null mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Raffelberg, Sarah; Losi, Aba; Schaap, Pauline; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    A light-regulated adenylyl cyclase, mPAC, was previously identified from the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC7420. MPAC consists of a flavin-based blue light-sensing LOV domain and a catalytic domain. In this work, we expressed mPAC in an adenylate cyclase A null mutant (aca-) of the eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and tested to what extent light activation of mPAC could restore the cAMP-dependent developmental programme of this organism. Amoebas of Dictyostelium, a well-established model organism, generate and respond to cAMP pulses, which cause them to aggregate and construct fruiting bodies. mPAC was expressed under control of a constitutive actin-15 promoter in D. discoideum and displayed low basal adenylyl cyclase activity in darkness that was about five-fold stimulated by blue light. mPAC expression in aca- cells marginally restored aggregation and fruiting body formation in darkness. However, more and larger fruiting bodies were formed when mPAC expressing cells were incubated in light. Extending former applications of light-regulated AC, these results demonstrate that mPAC can be used to manipulate multicellular development in eukaryotes in a light dependent manner.

  5. Relaxin adenylyl cyclase system of pregnant women with diabetes: functional defects in insulin and relaxin adenylyl cyclase signaling systems in myometrium of pregnant women with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Ludmila; Plesneva, Svetlana; Shpakov, Alexander; Pertseva, Marianna

    2005-05-01

    The study was conducted to reveal the functional disturbances in two novel insulin and relaxin adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms (ACSMs). It was shown for the first time that in myometrium of pregnant women with insulin insufficiency the functional defects of Gs-protein-AC coupling in insulin- and relaxin H2-regulated AC systems were developed. As a result, the sensitivity of the signaling systems to both hormones and potentiation of their AC effects by guanine nucleotides were markedly decreased compared with that in control group. These functional defects in ACSM may lead to violation of the process of insulin and relaxin signal transduction.

  6. Activation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele; Papa, Dan; Hübner, Melanie; Mou, Tung-Chung; Lushington, Gerald H; Seifert, Roland

    2008-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 to 9 are differentially expressed in tissues and constitute an interesting drug target. ACs 1 to 8 are activated by the diterpene, forskolin (FS). It is unfortunate that there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective activators. To develop such compounds, an understanding of the structure/activity relationships of diterpenes is necessary. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and nine FS analogs on ACs 1, 2, and 5 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Diterpenes showed the highest potencies at AC1 and the lowest potencies at AC2. We identified full agonists, partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists, i.e., diterpenes that reduced basal AC activity. Each AC isoform exhibited a distinct pharmacological profile. AC2 showed the highest basal activity of all AC isoforms and highest sensitivity to inverse agonistic effects of 1-deoxy-forskolin, 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-forskolin, and, particularly, BODIPY-forskolin. In contrast, BODIPY-forskolin acted as partial agonist at the other ACs. 1-Deoxy-forskolin analogs were devoid of agonistic activity at ACs but antagonized the effects of FS in a mixed competitive/noncompetitive manner. At purified catalytic AC subunits, BODIPY-forskolin acted as weak partial agonist/strong partial antagonist. Molecular modeling revealed that the BODIPY group rotates promiscuously outside of the FS-binding site. Collectively, ACs are not uniformly activated and inhibited by FS and FS analogs, demonstrating the feasibility to design isoform-selective FS analogs. The two- and multiple-state models, originally developed to conceptualize ligand effects at G-protein-coupled receptors, can be applied to ACs to explain certain experimental data.

  7. Glucose and GLP-1 Stimulate cAMP Production via Distinct Adenylyl Cyclases in INS-1E Insulinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Zippin, Jonathan Hale; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    In β cells, both glucose and hormones, such as GLP-1, stimulate production of the second messenger cAMP, but glucose and GLP-1 elicit distinct cellular responses. We now show in INS-1E insulinoma cells that glucose and GLP-1 produce cAMP with distinct kinetics via different adenylyl cyclases. GLP-1 induces a rapid cAMP signal mediated by G protein–responsive transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). In contrast, glucose elicits a delayed cAMP rise mediated by bicarbonate, calcium, and ATP-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). This glucose-induced, sAC-dependent cAMP rise is dependent upon calcium influx and is responsible for the glucose-induced activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK1/2) pathway. These results demonstrate that sAC-generated and tmAC-generated cAMP define distinct signaling cascades. PMID:18695009

  8. The PI3K-mediated activation of CRAC independently regulates adenylyl cyclase activation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Comer, Frank I; Lippincott, Christopher K; Masbad, Joseph J; Parent, Carole A

    2005-01-26

    The ability of a cell to detect an external chemical signal and initiate a program of directed migration along a gradient comprises the fundamental process called chemotaxis. Investigations in Dictyostelium discoideum and neutrophils have established that pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins that bind to the PI3K products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3, such as CRAC (cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase) and Akt/PKB, translocate specifically to the leading edge of chemotaxing cells. CRAC is essential for the chemoattractant-mediated activation of the adenylyl cyclase ACA, which converts ATP into cAMP, the primary chemoattractant for D. discoideum. The mechanisms by which CRAC activates ACA remain to be determined. We now show that in addition to its essential role in the activation of ACA, CRAC is involved in regulating chemotaxis. Through mutagenesis, we show that these two functions are independently regulated downstream of PI3K. A CRAC mutant that has lost the capacity to bind PI3K products does not support chemotaxis and shows minimal ACA activation. Finally, overexpression of CRAC and various CRAC mutants show strong effects on ACA activation with little effect on chemotaxis. These findings establish that chemoattractant-mediated activation of PI3K is important for the CRAC-dependent regulation of both chemotaxis and adenylyl cyclase activation.

  9. Dysregulation of TrkB phosphorylation and proBDNF protein in adenylyl cyclase 1 and 8 knockout mice in a model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Hool, Steven M; Conti, Alana C

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates neuron growth and is regulated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs). Mice lacking AC1/8 (DKO) have a basal reduction in the dendritic complexity of medium spiny neurons in the caudate putamen and demonstrate increased neurotoxicity in the striatum following acute neonatal ethanol exposure compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting a compromise in BDNF regulation under varying conditions. Although neonatal ethanol exposure can negatively impact BDNF expression, little is known about the effect on BDNF receptor activation and its downstream signaling, including Akt activation, an established neuroprotective pathway. Therefore, here we determined the effects of AC1/8 deletion and neonatal ethanol administration on BDNF and proBDNF protein expression, and activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCγ. WT and DKO mice were treated with a single dose of 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline at postnatal days 5-7 to model late-gestational alcohol exposure. Striatal and cortical tissues were analyzed using a BDNF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblotting for proBDNF, phosphorylated and total TrkB, Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCɣ1. Neither postnatal ethanol exposure nor AC1/8 deletion affected total BDNF protein expression at any time point in either region examined. Neonatal ethanol increased the expression of proBDNF protein in the striatum of WT mice 6, 24, and 48 h after exposure, with DKO mice demonstrating a reduction in proBDNF expression 6 h after exposure. Six and 24 h after ethanol administration, phosphorylation of full-length TrkB in the striatum was significantly reduced in WT mice, but was significantly increased in DKO mice only at 24 h. Interestingly, 48 h after ethanol, both WT and DKO mice demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated full-length TrkB. In addition, Akt and PLCɣ1 phosphorylation was also decreased in ethanol-treated DKO mice 48 h after injection. These data demonstrate

  10. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase: Potential Role in Mineral Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Weidong; Moe, Orson W.

    2007-04-01

    The conversion of a signal of inorganic ion concentration to a second messenger is of fundamental biologic significance. The soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) serves such a purpose by transducing divalent cation concentrations and bicarbonate concentrations into intracellular cyclic AMP levels. sAC is widely expressed and may represent a generic bicarbonate sensor providing the afferent pathway to bicarbonate-regulated biologic processes. The best described action of sAC to date is in the mediation of bicarbonate-induced changes in sperm motility. Since a number of processes in mineral metabolism—such as bone formation, bone resorption, intestinal calcium absorption, and renal calcium transport in the distal convoluted tubule—are regulated by bicarbonate, sAC may play a role at multiple levels in mineral metabolism.

  11. Forskolin photoaffinity labels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, D.I.; Robbins, J.D.; Ruoho, A.E.; Sutkowski, E.M.; Seamon, K.B. )

    1991-07-15

    Two photolabels, N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)-propionamide)-6- aminoethylcarbamylforskolin(125I-6-AIPP-Fsk) and N-(3-(4-azido-3-125I-phenyl)propionamide)-7-aminoethylcarbamyl-7- desacetylforskolin (125I-7-AIPP-Fsk) were synthesized with specific activities of 2200 Ci/mmol and used to label adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter. The affinities of the photolabels for adenylyl cyclase were determined by their inhibition of (3H)forskolin binding to bovine brain membranes. 6-AIPP-Fsk and 7-AIPP-Fsk inhibited (3H)forskolin binding with IC50 values of 15 nM and 200 nM, respectively. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeled a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated bovine brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin or cytochalasin B. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk labeling of partially purified adenylyl cyclase was inhibited by forskolin but not by 1,9-dideoxyforskolin. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk specifically labeled a 45-kDa protein and not a 115-kDa protein in control and GTP {gamma} S-preactivated brain membranes. This labeling was inhibited by forskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose. Human erythrocyte membranes were photolyzed with 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk. 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk, but not 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk, strongly labeled a broad 45-70-kDa band. Forskolin, 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, cytochalasin B, and D-glucose, but not cytochalasin E or L-glucose, inhibited 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk labeling of the 45-70-kDa band. 125I-6-AIPP-Fsk and 125I-7-AIPP-Fsk are high affinity photolabels with specificity for adenylyl cyclase and the glucose transporter, respectively.

  12. Control of Outflow Resistance by Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Suk

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the United States affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure, even in patients with normal tension glaucoma. Typically, this is accomplished by reducing the rate of aqueous flow by limiting aqueous production or enhancing drainage using drugs and surgery. Whereas these strategies are effective in diminishing vision loss, some patients continue to lose vision and many discontinue use of their medications because of undesirable side effects. Drugs known to be effective in altering conventional outflow have for the most part been abandoned from modern clinical practice due to undesirable side effects. Identification of new drugs that could enhance conventional outflow, would offer additional options in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. To this end, our laboratory has recently uncovered a novel pathway for regulation of conventional outflow by the ciliary body. This pathway is dependent on soluble adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme that catalyzes the generation of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′ monophosphate (cAMP) in response to bicarbonate. PMID:24320087

  13. Structure-based development of novel adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, Christine; Rauch, Annika; Hess, Ken C; Kachholz, Barbara; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Steegborn, Clemens

    2008-08-14

    In mammals, the second messenger cAMP is synthesized by a family of transmembrane isoforms (tmACs) and one known cytoplasmic enzyme, "soluble" adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Understanding the individual contributions of these families to cAMP signaling requires tools which can distinguish them. Here, we describe the structure-based development of isoform discriminating AC inhibitors. Docking calculations using a library of small molecules with the crystal structure of a sAC homologue complexed with the noncompetitive inhibitor catechol estrogen identified two novel inhibitors, 3,20-dioxopregn-4-en-21-yl4-bromobenzenesulfonate (2) and 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,13,13,14,14-dodecachloro-1,4,4a,4b,5,8,8a,12b-octahydro-11-sulfo-1,4:5,8-dimethanotriphenylene-10-carboxylic acid (3). In vitro testing revealed that 3 defines a novel AC inhibitor scaffold with high affinity for human sAC and less inhibitory effect on mammalian tmACs. 2 also discriminates between sAC and tmACs, and it appears to simultaneously block the original binding pocket and a neighboring interaction site. Our results show that compounds exploiting the catechol estrogen binding site can produce potent, isoform discriminating AC inhibitors.

  14. Cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript expression in the rat nucleus accumbens is regulated by adenylyl cyclase and the cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate/protein kinase a second messenger system.

    PubMed

    Jones, Douglas C; Kuhar, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    Cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), a neuropeptide involved in the brain's reward/reinforcement circuit, modulates the effects of psychostimulants, including cocaine. The CART gene has been characterized, and binding sites for multiple transcription factors have been identified within the promoter region, including the cAMP-response element, which serves as a binding site for cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). CART expression appears to be regulated via cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)/CREB-mediated signaling in cell culture. Therefore, the goal of these studies was to examine the involvement of cAMP/PKA/CREB-mediated signaling in CART mRNA and peptide expression in vivo in the rat nucleus accumbens. Intra-accumbal injections of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, stimulated the phosphorylation of CREB and increased both CART mRNA and peptide levels, an effect attenuated by inhibition of PKA with H89 [N-(2-[p-bromocinnamylamino]ethyl)-5-isoquinoline-sulfonamide hydrochloride] and adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In addition, Rp-cAMPS alone decreased CART mRNA compared with saline-injected controls, suggesting that CART expression may be tonically regulated by PKA. Under certain conditions, cocaine increases CART mRNA levels; thus, we examined the effects of cocaine on forskolin-induced CART mRNA expression in the rat nucleus accumbens. Cocaine plus forskolin significantly increased CART mRNA over either of the drugs administered independently, suggesting that under conditions of heightened cAMP signaling, cocaine may impact CART gene expression. These results suggest that CART expression in vivo in the rat nucleus accumbens is regulated by adenylyl cyclase and cAMP/PKA-mediating signaling and, likely, through the activation of CREB.

  15. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  16. Long-term administration of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol desensitizes CB1-, adenosine A1-, and GABAB-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Selley, Dana E; Cassidy, Michael P; Martin, Billy R; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2004-11-01

    Cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the cerebellum mediate the inhibitory effects of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on motor coordination. Intracellular effects of CB(1) receptors include inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via activation of G(i/o) proteins. There is evidence for the convergence of other neuronal receptors, such as adenosine A(1) and GABA(B), with the cannabinoid system on this signaling pathway to influence motor function. Previous studies have shown that brain CB(1) receptors are desensitized and down-regulated by long-term THC treatment, but few studies have examined the effects of long-term THC treatment on downstream effector activity in brain. Therefore, these studies examined the relationship between CB(1), adenosine A(1), and GABA(B) receptors in cerebella of mice undergoing prolonged treatment with vehicle or THC at the level of G protein activation and adenylyl cyclase inhibition. In control cerebella, CB(1) receptors produced less than additive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase with GABA(B) and A(1) receptors, indicating that these receptors are localized on overlapping populations of cells. Long-term THC treatment produced CB(1) receptor down-regulation and desensitization of both cannabinoid agonist-stimulated G protein activation and inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase. However, G protein activation by GABA(B) or A(1) receptors was unaffected. It is noteworthy that heterologous attenuation of GABA(B) and A(1) receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase was observed, even though absolute levels of basal and forskolin- or G(s)-stimulated activity were unchanged. These results indicate that long-term THC administration produces a disruption of inhibitory receptor control of cerebellar adenylyl cyclase and suggest a potential mechanism of cross-tolerance to the motor incoordinating effects of cannabinoid, GABA(B), and A(1) agonists.

  17. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Richard L.; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.; Winger, Ryan C.; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM. PMID:26101266

  18. Endothelial CD99 signals through soluble adenylyl cyclase and PKA to regulate leukocyte transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard L; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Winger, Ryan C; Wang, Jing; Arase, Hisashi; Muller, William A

    2015-06-29

    CD99 is a critical regulator of leukocyte transendothelial migration (TEM). How CD99 signals during this process remains unknown. We show that during TEM, endothelial cell (EC) CD99 activates protein kinase A (PKA) via a signaling complex formed with the lysine-rich juxtamembrane cytoplasmic tail of CD99, the A-kinase anchoring protein ezrin, and soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). PKA then stimulates membrane trafficking from the lateral border recycling compartment to sites of TEM, facilitating the passage of leukocytes across the endothelium. Pharmacologic or genetic inhibition of EC sAC or PKA, like CD99 blockade, arrests neutrophils and monocytes partway through EC junctions, in vitro and in vivo, without affecting leukocyte adhesion or the expression of relevant cellular adhesion molecules. This is the first description of the CD99 signaling pathway in TEM as well as the first demonstration of a role for sAC in leukocyte TEM.

  19. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    SciTech Connect

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  20. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  1. Structural Basis for Inhibition of Mammalian Adenylyl Cyclase by Calcium

    SciTech Connect

    Mou, Tung-Chung; Masada, Nanako; Cooper, Dermot M.F.; Sprang, Stephen R.

    2009-09-11

    Type V and VI mammalian adenylyl cyclases (AC5, AC6) are inhibited by Ca{sup 2+} at both sub- and supramicromolar concentration. This inhibition may provide feedback in situations where cAMP promotes opening of Ca{sup 2+} channels, allowing fine control of cardiac contraction and rhythmicity in cardiac tissue where AC5 and AC6 predominate. Ca{sup 2+} inhibits the soluble AC core composed of the C1 domain of AC5 (VC1) and the C2 domain of AC2 (IIC2). As observed for holo-AC5, inhibition is biphasic, showing 'high-affinity' (K{sub i} = {approx}0.4 {mu}M) and 'low-affinity' (K{sub i} = {approx}100 {mu}M) modes of inhibition. At micromolar concentration, Ca{sup 2+} inhibition is nonexclusive with respect to pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}), a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to ATP, but at >100 {mu}M Ca{sup 2+}, inhibition appears to be exclusive with respect to PP{sub i}. The 3.0 {angstrom} resolution structure of G{alpha}s{center_dot}GTP{gamma}S/forskolin-activated VC1:IIC2 crystals soaked in the presence of ATP{alpha}S and 8 {mu}M free Ca{sup 2+} contains a single, loosely coordinated metal ion. ATP soaked into VC1:IIC2 crystals in the presence of 1.5 mM Ca{sup 2+} is not cyclized, and two calcium ions are observed in the 2.9 {angstrom} resolution structure of the complex. In both of the latter complexes VC1:IIC2 adopts the 'open', catalytically inactive conformation characteristic of the apoenzyme, in contrast to the 'closed', active conformation seen in the presence of ATP analogues and Mg{sup 2+} or Mn{sup 2+}. Structures of the pyrophosphate (PP{sub i}) complex with 10 mM Mg{sup 2+} (2.8 {angstrom}) or 2 mM Ca{sup 2+} (2.7 {angstrom}) also adopt the open conformation, indicating that the closed to open transition occurs after cAMP release. In the latter complexes, Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} bind only to the high-affinity 'B' metal site associated with substrate/product stabilization. Ca{sup 2+} thus stabilizes the inactive conformation in both ATP- and PP{sub i

  2. Isoform-specific regulation of adenylyl cyclase: a potential target in future pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a target enzyme of multiple G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In the past decade, the cloning, structure and biochemical properties of nine AC isoforms were reported, and each isoform of AC shows distinct patterns of tissue distribution and biochemical/pharmacological properties. In addition to the conventional regulators of this enzyme, such as calmodulin (CaM) or PKC, novel regulators, for example, caveolin, have been identified. Most importantly, these regulators work on AC in an isoform dependent manner. Recent studies have demonstrated that certain classic AC inhibitors, i.e., P-site inhibitors, show an isoform-dependent inhibition of AC. The side chain modifications of forskolin, a diterpene extract from Coleus forskolii, markedly enhance its isoform selectivity. When taken together, these findings suggest that it is feasible to develop new pharmacotherapeutic agents that target AC isoforms to regulate various neurohormonal signals in a highly tissue-/organ-specific manner.

  3. Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-04-16

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO-cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO-cGMP and cAMP-PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors.

  4. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  5. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 attenuates adenylyl cyclase activity in rat thyroid cells: reduction of thyrotropin receptor number and increase in guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gi-2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Berg, J P; Sandvik, J A; Ree, A H; Sørnes, G; Bjøro, T; Torjesen, P A; Gordeladze, J O; Haug, E

    1994-08-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] is the most potent of the naturally occurring vitamin D metabolites. In rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells, 1,25-(OH)2D3 attenuated the increase in TSH-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity obtained by removing TSH from the culture medium. When cells were incubated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 (10 nmol/liter; 4 days), the binding capacity for specific [125I]TSH binding decreased from 20.1 +/- 1.8 to 8.8 +/- 1.6 fmol/10(6) cells (mean +/- SEM; n = 4; P < 0.01) compared to that in control cells. The Kd did not change (mean +/- SEM, 0.46 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.07 nmol/liter; n = 4; P = NS). Western blotting revealed no change in the membrane content of the adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) alpha-subunit (Gs alpha) during 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment. Similarly, levels of the AC inhibitory G-protein Gi-3 alpha- and G-protein beta-subunits were not altered by 1,25-(OH)2D3. However, Western blotting with antibodies recognizing both Gi-1 alpha and Gi-2 alpha was augmented 4-fold, presumably representing an increase in Gi-2 alpha only, as Gi-1 alpha messenger RNA (mRNA) was not detected in FRTL-5 cells. 1,25-(OH)2D3 (10 nmol/liter; 4 days) reduced cholera toxin (10 nmol/liter)-stimulated AC activity to 85% of the control value (P < 0.05), whereas forskolin (100 mumol/liter)-stimulated direct activation of AC was inhibited by 39%. The TSH receptor mRNA level correlated to the beta-actin mRNA was 2-fold higher in control cells compared to that in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells 12 h after TSH removal. Only minor alterations in the Gs alpha mRNA/beta-actin mRNA and Gi-3 alpha mRNA/beta-actin mRNA ratios were observed during 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment, whereas Gi-2 alpha mRNA increased 3-fold compared to that in control cells. No change in the resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be detected after 4 days of 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment. Our studies show that 1,25-(OH)2D3 attenuates AC activity by reducing the TSH receptor

  6. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Adenylyl cyclase 2 selectively couples to E prostanoid type 2 receptors, whereas adenylyl cyclase 3 is not receptor-regulated in airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Adris, Piyatilake; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2012-08-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) agonists stimulate AC activity and cAMP production. We have previously shown in a number of cell types that AC6 selectively couples to βAR and these proteins are coexpressed in lipid rafts. We overexpressed AC2, AC3, and AC6 in mouse bronchial smooth muscle cells (mBSMCs) and human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells by using recombinant adenoviruses and assessed their localization and regulation by various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). AC3 and AC6 were expressed primarily in caveolin-rich fractions, whereas AC2 expression was excluded from these domains. AC6 expression enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol but did not increase responses to butaprost, reflecting the colocalization of AC6 with β(2)AR but not E prostanoid type 2 receptor (EP(2)R) in lipid raft fractions. AC2 expression enhanced butaprost-stimulated cAMP production but had no effect on the β(2)AR-mediated response. AC3 did not couple to any GPCR tested. Forskolin-induced arborization of mBSMCs was assessed as a functional readout of cAMP signaling. Arborization was enhanced by overexpression of AC6 and AC3, but AC2 had no effect. GPCR-stimulated arborization mirrored the selective coupling observed for cAMP production. With the addition of the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor rolipram AC2 accelerated forskolin-stimulated arborization. Thus, AC2 selectively couples to EP(2)R, but signals from this complex are limited by PDE4 activity. AC3 does not seem to couple to GPCR in either mBSMCs or HEK-293 cells, so it probably exists in a distinct signaling domain in these cells.

  8. Structure-based inhibitor discovery against adenylyl cyclase toxins from pathogenic bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Wei, Binqing Q; Bergson, Pamela; Lee, Young-Sam; Shen, Yuequan; Mrksich, Milan; Shoichet, Brian K; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2003-07-11

    Edema factor (EF) and CyaA are adenylyl cyclase toxins secreted by pathogenic bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using the structure of the catalytic site of EF, we screened a data base of commercially available, small molecular weight chemicals for those that could specifically inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity of EF. From 24 compounds tested, we have identified one quinazoline compound, ethyl 5-aminopyrazolo[1,5-a]quinazoline-3-carboxylate, that specifically inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity of EF and CyaA with approximately 20 microm Ki. This compound neither affects the activity of host resident adenylyl cyclases type I, II, and V nor exhibits promiscuous inhibition. The compound is a competitive inhibitor, consistent with the prediction that it binds to the adenine portion of the ATP binding site on EF. EF is activated by the host calcium sensor, calmodulin. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopic analysis shows that this compound does not affect the binding of calmodulin to EF. This compound is dissimilar from a previously described, non-nucleoside inhibitor of host adenylyl cyclase. It may serve as a lead to design antitoxins to address the role of adenylyl cyclase toxins in bacterial pathogenesis and to fight against anthrax and whooping cough.

  9. Drug Target Exploitable Structural Features of Adenylyl Cyclase Activity in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Andreas N.; Kamga, Henri L.; Awofolu, Omotayo R.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2012-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni), a cause of schistosomiasis, encodes a predicted guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding protein tagged Smp_059340.1. Smp_059340.1 is predicted to be a member of the G protein alpha-s subunit responsible for regulating adenylyl cyclase activity in S. mansoni and a possible drug target against the parasite. Our structural bioinformatics analyses identified key amino acid residues (Ser53, Thr188, Asp207 and Gly210) in the two molecular switches responsible for cycling the protein between active (GTP bound) and inactive (GDP bound) states. Residue Thr188 is located on Switch I region while Gly210 is located on Switch II region with Switch II longer than Switch I. The Asp207 is located on the G3 box motif and Ser53 is the binding residue for magnesium ion. These findings offer new insights into the dynamic and functional determinants of the Smp_059340.1 protein in regulating the S. mansoni life cycle. The binding interfaces and their residues could be used as starting points for selective modulations of interactions within the pathway using small molecules, peptides or mutagenesis. PMID:23133313

  10. Adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide reduces phosphorylation and toxicity of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor in spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Maria Josè; Parodi, Sara; Piol, Diana; Stack, Conor; Chivet, Mathilde; Contestabile, Andrea; Miranda, Helen C; Lievens, Patricia M-J; Espinoza, Stefano; Jochum, Tobias; Rocchi, Anna; Grunseich, Christopher; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Cato, Andrew C B; Lieberman, Andrew P; La Spada, Albert R; Sambataro, Fabio; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Gozes, Illana; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-12-21

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA belongs to the family of polyQ diseases, which are fatal neurodegenerative disorders mainly caused by protein-mediated toxic gain-of-function mechanisms and characterized by deposition of misfolded proteins in the form of aggregates. The neurotoxicity of the polyQ proteins can be modified by phosphorylation at specific sites, thereby providing the rationale for the development of disease-specific treatments. We sought to identify signaling pathways that modulate polyQ-AR phosphorylation for therapy development. We report that cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) phosphorylates polyQ-AR specifically at Ser(96) Phosphorylation of polyQ-AR by CDK2 increased protein stabilization and toxicity and is negatively regulated by the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. To translate these findings into therapy, we developed an analog of pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), a potent activator of the AC/PKA pathway. Chronic intranasal administration of the PACAP analog to knock-in SBMA mice reduced Ser(96) phosphorylation, promoted polyQ-AR degradation, and ameliorated disease outcome. These results provide proof of principle that noninvasive therapy based on the use of PACAP analogs is a therapeutic option for SBMA.

  11. Effects of dopamine on adenylyl cyclase activity and amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hatta, S; Amemiya, N; Takemura, H; Ohshika, H

    1995-06-01

    Several previous studies have shown that dopamine causes amylase secretion from rat parotid tissue. However, the mechanism of this dopamine action is still unclear. The present study was designed to characterize dopamine action in rat parotid gland tissue by examining the effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release. Dopamine significantly enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP in parotid slices and stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in parotid membrane preparations. It also significantly stimulated amylase release from parotid slices. The stimulatory effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release were effectively blocked with propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, but not by either SCH 23390, a preferential D1 antagonist, or butaclamol, a preferential D2 antagonist. No substantial specific binding sites for D1 receptors were detectable by [3H]SCH 23390 binding in parotid membranes. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue is not mediated through specific D1 dopamine receptors but rather through beta-adrenergic receptors.

  12. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L.; Barron, Megan E.; Roa, Jinae N.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3−, and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3− sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3−-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H+ absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  13. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved.

  14. Short- and long-term regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by delta-opioid receptor are mediated by Galphai2 in neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tetrault, Joan; Wang, Wei; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2006-06-01

    Activation of the opioid receptor results in short-term inhibition of intracellular cAMP levels followed by receptor desensitization and subsequent increase of cAMP above the control level (adenylyl cyclase superactivation). Using adenovirus to deliver pertussis toxin-insensitive mutants of the alpha-subunits of G(i/o) that are expressed in neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells (Galpha(i2), Galpha(i3), and Galpha(o)), we examined the identities of the G proteins involved in the short- and long-term action of the delta-opioid receptor (DOR). Pertussis toxin pretreatment completely abolished the ability of [d-Pen(2), d-Pen(5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE) to inhibit forskolin-stimulated intracellular cAMP production. Expression of the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2), and not the C351L mutants of Galpha(i3) or Galpha(o), rescued the short-term effect of DPDPE after pertussis toxin treatment. The ability of Galpha(i2) in mediating DOR inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity was also reflected in the ability of Galpha(i2), not Galpha(i3) or Galpha(o), to coimmunoprecipitate with DOR. Coincidently, after long-term DPDPE treatment, pertussis toxin treatment eliminated the antagonist naloxone-induced superactivation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Again, only the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2) restored the adenylyl cyclase superactivation after pertussis toxin treatment. More importantly, the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2) remained associated with DOR after long-term agonist and pertussis toxin treatment whereas the wild-type Galpha(i2) did not. These data suggest that Galpha(i2) serves as the signaling molecule in both DOR-mediated short- and long-term regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity.

  15. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-22

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways.

  16. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F.; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways. PMID:26795422

  17. An adenylyl cyclase with a phosphodiesterase domain in basal plants with a motile sperm system

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Urano, Yuki; Yamamoto, Chiaki; Ohmori, Mikiya; Takada, Yuki; Okuda, Shujiro; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Sakayama, Hidetoshi; Kohchi, Takayuki; Takahashi, Fumio

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC), which produces the signalling molecule cAMP, has numerous important cellular functions in diverse organisms from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Here we report the identification and characterization of an AC gene from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The encoded protein has both a C-terminal AC catalytic domain similar to those of class III ACs and an N-terminal cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain that degrades cyclic nucleotides, thus we designated the gene MpCAPE (COMBINED AC with PDE). Biochemical analyses of recombinant proteins showed that MpCAPE has both AC and PDE activities. In MpCAPE-promoter-GUS lines, GUS activity was specifically detected in the male sexual organ, the antheridium, suggesting MpCAPE and thus cAMP signalling may be involved in the male reproductive process. CAPE orthologues are distributed only in basal land plants and charophytes that use motile sperm as the male gamete. CAPE is a subclass of class III AC and may be important in male organ and cell development in basal plants. PMID:27982074

  18. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is present in the cell cytoplasm and nucleus of multiple shark tissues.

    PubMed

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is directly stimulated by bicarbonate (HCO3(-)) to produce the signaling molecule cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Because sAC and sAC-related enzymes are found throughout phyla from cyanobacteria to mammals and they regulate cell physiology in response to internal and external changes in pH, CO2, and HCO3(-), sAC is deemed an evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor. Previously, sAC has been reported in dogfish shark and round ray gill cells, where they sense and counteract blood alkalosis by regulating the activity of V-type H(+)- ATPase. Here, we report the presence of sAC protein in gill, rectal gland, cornea, intestine, white muscle, and heart of leopard shark Triakis semifasciata Co-expression of sAC with transmembrane adenylyl cyclases supports the presence of cAMP signaling microdomains. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry on tissue sections, and western blots and cAMP-activity assays on nucleus-enriched fractions demonstrate the presence of sAC protein in and around nuclei. These results suggest that sAC modulates multiple physiological processes in shark cells, including nuclear functions.

  19. Type 3 adenylyl cyclase: a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liyan; LeBel, Robert P; Storm, Daniel R; Chen, Xuanmao

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are rigid, centriole-derived, microtubule-based organelles present in a majority of vertebrate cells including neurons. They are considered the cellular “antennae” attuned for detecting a range of extracellular signals including photons, odorants, morphogens, hormones and mechanical forces. The ciliary microenvironment is distinct from most actin-based subcellular structures such as microvilli or synapses. In the nervous system, there is no evidence that neuronal cilia process any synaptic structure. Apparently, the structural features of neuronal cilia do not allow them to harbor any synaptic connections. Nevertheless, a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including odorant receptors, rhodopsin, Smoothened, and type 6 serotonin receptor are found in cilia, suggesting that these tiny processes largely depend on metabotropic receptors and their tuned signals to impact neuronal functions. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3), widely known as a cilia marker, is highly and predominantly expressed in olfactory sensory cilia and primary cilia throughout the brain. We discovered that ablation of AC3 in mice leads to pleiotropic phenotypes including anosmia, failure to detect mechanical stimulation of airflow, cognitive deficit, obesity, and depression-like behaviors. Multiple lines of human genetic evidence also demonstrate that AC3 is associated with obesity, major depressive disorder (MDD), sarcoidosis, and infertility, underscoring its functional importance. Here we review recent progress on AC3, a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia. PMID:27785336

  20. The adenylyl cyclase Rv2212 modifies the proteome and infectivity of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Zaveri, Anisha; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin Eduardo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Allen, Kirk; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    All organisms have the capacity to sense and respond to environmental changes. These signals often involve the use of second messengers such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). This second messenger is widely distributed among organisms and coordinates gene expression related with pathogenesis, virulence, and environmental adaptation. Genomic analysis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has identified 16 adenylyl cyclases (AC) and one phosphodiesterase, which produce and degrade cAMP, respectively. To date, ten AC have been biochemically characterized and only one (Rv0386) has been found to be important during murine infection with M. tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the impact of hsp60-driven Rv2212 gene expression in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) during growth in vitro, and during macrophage and mice infection. We found that hsp60-driven expression of Rv2212 resulted in an increased capacity of replication in murine macrophages but an attenuated phenotype in lungs and spleen when administered intravenously in mice. Furthermore, this strain displayed an altered proteome mainly affecting proteins associated with stress conditions (bfrB, groEL-2, DnaK) that could contribute to the attenuated phenotype observed in mice.

  1. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Key points Long-lasting neuropathic pain has been attributed to elevated neuronal plasticity changes in spinal, peripheral and cortical levels. Here, we found that reduced neuronal plasticity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), a midbrain region important for initiating descending pain inhibition, may also contribute to neuropathic pain. Forskolin- and isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-elicited EPSC potentiation was impaired in the vlPAG of a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Down-regulation of adenylyl cyclase–cAMP– PKA signalling, due to impaired adenylyl cyclase, but not phosphodiesterase, in glutamatergic terminals may contribute to the hypofunction of excitatory synaptic plasticity in the vlPAG of neuropathic rats and the subsequent descending pain inhibition, ultimately leading to long-lasting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that drugs that activate adenylyl cyclase in the vlPAG have the potential for relieving neuropathic pain. Abstract Neuropathic pain has been attributed to nerve injury-induced elevation of peripheral neuronal discharges and spinal excitatory synaptic plasticity while little is known about the contribution of neuroplasticity changes in the brainstem. Here, we examined synaptic plasticity changes in the ventrolateral (vl) periaqueductal grey (PAG), a crucial midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition, in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic rats. In vlPAG slices of sham-operated rats, forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator, produced long-lasting enhancement of EPSCs. This is a presynaptic effect since forskolin decreased the paired-pulse ratio and failure rate of EPSCs, and increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature EPSCs. Forskolin-induced EPSC potentiation was mimicked by a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol (isoprenaline)), and prevented by an AC inhibitor (SQ 22536) and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (H89), but not by a

  2. Multiple developmental roles for CRAC, a cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Shaulsky, G; Kuspa, A

    1999-04-01

    Receptor-mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase (ACA) in Dictyostelium requires CRAC protein. Upon translocation to the membrane, this pleckstrin homology (PH) domain protein stimulates ACA and thereby mediates developmental aggregation. CRAC may also have roles later in development since CRAC-null cells can respond to chemotactic signals and participate in developmental aggregation when admixed with wild-type cells, but they do not complete development within such chimeras. To test whether the role of CRAC in postaggregative development is related to the activation of ACA, chemotactic aggregation was bypassed in CRAC-null cells by activating the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). While such strains formed mounds, they did not complete fruiting body morphogenesis or form spores. Expression of CRAC in the prespore cells of these strains rescued sporulation and fruiting body formation. This later function of CRAC does not appear to require its PH domain since the C-terminal portion of the protein (CRAC-DeltaPH) can substitute for full-length CRAC in promoting spore cell formation and morphogenesis. No detectable ACA activation was observed in any of the CRAC-null strains rescued by PKA activation and expression of CRAC-DeltaPH. Finally, we found that the development of CRAC-null ACA-null double mutants could be rescued by the activation of PKA together with the expression of CRAC-DeltaPH. Thus, there appears to be a required function for CRAC in postaggregative development that is independent of its previously described function in the ACA activation pathway.

  3. New insights concerning the molecular basis for defective glucoregulation in soluble adenylyl cyclase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Holz, George G; Leech, Colin A; Chepurny, Oleg G

    2014-12-01

    Recently published findings indicate that a knockout (KO) of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, also known as AC-10) gene expression in mice leads to defective glucoregulation that is characterized by reduced pancreatic insulin secretion and reduced intraperitoneal glucose tolerance. Summarized here are current concepts regarding the molecular basis for this phenotype, with special emphasis on the potential role of sAC as a determinant of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Highlighted is new evidence that in pancreatic beta cells, oxidative glucose metabolism stimulates mitochondrial CO₂production that in turn generates bicarbonate ion (HCO(3)(-)). Since HCO(3)(-) binds to and directly stimulates the activity of sAC, we propose that glucose-stimulated cAMP production in beta cells is mediated not simply by transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (TMACs), but also by sAC. Based on evidence that sAC is expressed in mitochondria, there exists the possibility that beta-cell glucose metabolism is linked to mitochondrial cAMP production with consequent facilitation of oxidative phosphorylation. Since sAC is also expressed in the cytoplasm, sAC catalyzed cAMP production may activate cAMP sensors such as PKA and Epac2 to control ion channel function, intracellular Ca²⁺ handling, and Ca²⁺-dependent exocytosis. Thus, we propose that the existence of sAC in beta cells provides a new and unexpected explanation for previously reported actions of glucose metabolism to stimulate cAMP production. It seems possible that alterations of sAC activity might be of importance when evaluating new strategies for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), or when evaluating why glucose metabolism fails to stimulate insulin secretion in patients diagnosed with T2DM. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in health and disease.

  4. Thalamic adenylyl cyclase 1 is required for barrel formation in the somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Lee, L-J; Hayashi, Y; Muglia, L; Itohara, S; Erzurumlu, R S; Iwasato, T

    2015-04-02

    Cyclic AMP signaling is critical for activity-dependent refinement of neuronal circuits. Global disruption of adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1), the major calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase in the brain, impairs formation of whisker-related discrete neural modules (the barrels) in cortical layer 4 in mice. Since AC1 is expressed both in the thalamus and the neocortex, the question of whether pre- or postsynaptic (or both) AC1 plays a role in barrel formation has emerged. Previously, we generated cortex-specific AC1 knockout (Cx-AC1KO) mice and found that these animals develop histologically normal barrels, suggesting a potentially more prominent role for thalamic AC1 in barrel formation. To determine this, we generated three new lines of mice: one in which AC1 is disrupted in nearly half of the thalamic ventrobasal nucleus cells in addition to the cortical excitatory neurons (Cx/pTh-AC1KO mouse), and another in which AC1 is disrupted in the thalamus but not in the cortex or brainstem nuclei of the somatosensory system (Th-AC1KO mouse). Cx/pTh-AC1KO mice show severe deficits in barrel formation. Th-AC1KO mice show even more severe disruption in barrel patterning. In these two lines, single thalamocortical (TC) axon labeling revealed a larger lateral extent of TC axons in layer 4 compared to controls. In the third line, all calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclases (both AC1 and AC8) are deleted in cortical excitatory neurons. These mice have normal barrels. Taken together, these results indicate that thalamic AC1 plays a major role in patterning and refinement of the mouse TC circuitry.

  5. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for novel object learning and extinction of contextual memory: role of cAMP signaling in primary cilia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenshan; Phan, Trongha; Storm, Daniel R

    2011-04-13

    Although primary cilia are found on neurons throughout the brain, their physiological function remains elusive. Human ciliopathies are associated with cognition defects, and transgenic mice lacking proteins expressed in primary cilia exhibit defects in learning and memory. Recently, it was reported that mice lacking the G-protein-coupling receptor somatostatin receptor-3 (SSTR3), a protein expressed predominately in the primary cilia of neurons, have defective memory for novel object recognition and lower cAMP levels in the brain. Since SSTR3 is coupled to regulation of adenylyl cyclase, this suggests that adenylyl cyclase activity in primary cilia of CNS neurons may be critical for some forms of learning and memory. Because the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is expressed in primary cilia of hippocampal neurons, we examined AC3(-/-) mice for several forms of learning and memory. Here, we report that AC3(-/-) mice show no short-term memory for novel objects and fail to exhibit extinction of contextual fear conditioning. They also show impaired learning and memory for temporally dissociative passive avoidance. Since AC3 is exclusively expressed in primary cilia, we conclude that cAMP signals generated within primary cilia contribute to some forms of learning and memory, including extinction of contextual fear conditioning.

  6. Compressive Stress Induces Dephosphorylation of the Myosin Regulatory Light Chain via RhoA Phosphorylation by the Adenylyl Cyclase/Protein Kinase A Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Kenji; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress that arises due to deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) either stretches or compresses cells. The cellular response to stretching has been actively studied. For example, stretching induces phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) via the RhoA/RhoA-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway, resulting in increased cellular tension. In contrast, the effects of compressive stress on cellular functions are not fully resolved. The mechanisms for sensing and differentially responding to stretching and compressive stress are not known. To address these questions, we investigated whether phosphorylation levels of MRLC were affected by compressive stress. Contrary to the response in stretching cells, MRLC was dephosphorylated 5 min after cells were subjected to compressive stress. Compressive loading induced activation of myosin phosphatase mediated via the dephosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853). Because myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853) is phosphorylated only by ROCK, compressive loading may have induced inactivation of ROCK. However, GTP-bound RhoA (active form) increased in response to compressive stress. The compression-induced activation of RhoA and inactivation of its effector ROCK are contradictory. This inconsistency was due to phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser188) that reduced affinity of RhoA to ROCK. Treatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A that phosphorylates RhoA (Ser188) induced suppression of compression-stimulated MRLC dephosphorylation. Incidentally, stretching induced phosphorylation of MRLC, but did not affect phosphorylation levels of RhoA (Ser188). Together, our results suggest that RhoA phosphorylation is an important process for MRLC dephosphorylation by compressive loading, and for distinguishing between stretching and compressing cells. PMID:25734240

  7. Gene Expression Profiles of Main Olfactory Epithelium in Adenylyl Cyclase 3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenshan; Zhou, Yanfen; Luo, Yingtao; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Yunpeng; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Yongchao; Storm, Daniel R.; Ma, Runlin Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl Cyclase 3 (AC3) plays an important role in the olfactory sensation-signaling pathway in mice. AC3 deficiency leads to defects in olfaction. However, it is still unknown whether AC3 deficiency affects gene expression or olfactory signal transduction pathways within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). In this study, gene microarrays were used to screen differentially expressed genes in MOE from AC3 knockout (AC3−/−) and wild-type (AC3+/+) mice. The differentially expressed genes identified were subjected to bioinformatic analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Gene expression in the MOE from AC3−/− mice was significantly altered, compared to AC3+/+ mice. Of the 41266 gene probes, 3379 had greater than 2-fold fold change in expression levels between AC3−/− and AC3+/+ mice, accounting for 8% of the total gene probes. Of these genes, 1391 were up regulated, and 1988 were down regulated, including 425 olfactory receptor genes, 99 genes that are specifically expressed in the immature olfactory neurons, 305 genes that are specifically expressed in the mature olfactory neurons, and 155 genes that are involved in epigenetic regulation. Quantitative RT-PCR verification of the differentially expressed epigenetic regulation related genes, olfactory receptors, ion transporter related genes, neuron development and differentiation related genes, lipid metabolism and membrane protein transport etc. related genes showed that P75NTR, Hinfp, Gadd45b, and Tet3 were significantly up-regulated, while Olfr370, Olfr1414, Olfr1208, Golf, Faim2, Tsg101, Mapk10, Actl6b, H2BE, ATF5, Kirrrel2, OMP, Drd2 etc. were significantly down-regulated. In summary, AC3 may play a role in proximal olfactory signaling and play a role in the regulation of differentially expressed genes in mouse MOE. PMID:26633363

  8. Inhibition of melanogenesis by 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) via blocking adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Rho, Seong-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Choen; Park, Hyun Ho; Kim, Dongjin

    2011-07-22

    Due to its multiple biological activities, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) in propolis has gained attention as potentially useful therapeutics for various diseases. However, the efficacy of chrysin for the use of dermatological health has not been fully explored. To clarify the action mechanism of the skin protecting property of chrysin, we firstly investigated the molecular docking property of chrysin on the mammalian adenylyl cyclase, which is the key enzyme of cAMP-induced melanogenesis. We also examined the involvement of chrysin in alpha-MSH and forskolin-induced cAMP signaling within a cell based assay. In addition, we inquired into the inhibitory effect of chrysin on melanogenesis and found that the pretreatment with chrysin inhibited the forskolin-induced melanin contents significantly without annihilating the cell viability. These results strongly suggest that chrysin directly inhibits the activity of adenylyl cyclase, downregulates forskolin-induced cAMP-production pathway, consequently inhibiting melanogenesis. Thus, chrysin may also be used as an effective inhibitor of hyperpigmentation.

  9. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  10. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is an essential sensor for acid/base homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K.; Salazar, Eric; Levin, Lonny R.; Goss, Greg G.; Buck, Jochen

    2009-01-01

    pH homeostasis is essential for life, yet it remains unclear how animals sense their systemic acid/base (A/B) status. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionary conserved signaling enzyme that produces the second messenger cAMP in response to bicarbonate ions (HCO3−). We cloned the sAC ortholog from the dogfish, a shark that regulates blood A/B by absorbing and secreting protons (H+) and HCO3− at its gills. Similar to mammalian sAC, dogfish soluble adenylyl cyclase (dfsAC) is activated by HCO3− and can be inhibited by two structurally and mechanistically distinct small molecule inhibitors. dfsAC is expressed in the gill epithelium, where the subset of base-secreting cells resides. Injection of inhibitors into animals under alkaline stress confirmed that dfsAC is essential for maintaining systemic pH and HCO3− levels in the whole organism. One of the downstream effects of dfsAC is to promote the insertion of vacuolar proton pumps into the basolateral membrane to absorb H+ into the blood. sAC orthologs are present throughout metazoans, and mammalian sAC is expressed in A/B regulatory organs, suggesting that systemic A/B sensing via sAC is widespread in the animal kingdom. PMID:20018667

  11. Bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase is an essential sensor for acid/base homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Salazar, Eric; Levin, Lonny R; Goss, Greg G; Buck, Jochen

    2010-01-05

    pH homeostasis is essential for life, yet it remains unclear how animals sense their systemic acid/base (A/B) status. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionary conserved signaling enzyme that produces the second messenger cAMP in response to bicarbonate ions (HCO(3)(-)). We cloned the sAC ortholog from the dogfish, a shark that regulates blood A/B by absorbing and secreting protons (H(+)) and HCO(3)(-) at its gills. Similar to mammalian sAC, dogfish soluble adenylyl cyclase (dfsAC) is activated by HCO(3)(-) and can be inhibited by two structurally and mechanistically distinct small molecule inhibitors. dfsAC is expressed in the gill epithelium, where the subset of base-secreting cells resides. Injection of inhibitors into animals under alkaline stress confirmed that dfsAC is essential for maintaining systemic pH and HCO(3)(-) levels in the whole organism. One of the downstream effects of dfsAC is to promote the insertion of vacuolar proton pumps into the basolateral membrane to absorb H(+) into the blood. sAC orthologs are present throughout metazoans, and mammalian sAC is expressed in A/B regulatory organs, suggesting that systemic A/B sensing via sAC is widespread in the animal kingdom.

  12. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is an acid-base sensor in epithelial base-secreting cells.

    PubMed

    Roa, Jinae N; Tresguerres, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Blood acid-base regulation by specialized epithelia, such as gills and kidney, requires the ability to sense blood acid-base status. Here, we developed primary cultures of ray (Urolophus halleri) gill cells to study mechanisms for acid-base sensing without the interference of whole animal hormonal regulation. Ray gills have abundant base-secreting cells, identified by their noticeable expression of vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (VHA), and also express the evolutionarily conserved acid-base sensor soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). Exposure of cultured cells to extracellular alkalosis (pH 8.0, 40 mM HCO3 (-)) triggered VHA translocation to the cell membrane, similar to previous reports in live animals experiencing blood alkalosis. VHA translocation was dependent on sAC, as it was blocked by the sAC-specific inhibitor KH7. Ray gill base-secreting cells also express transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); however, tmAC inhibition by 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine did not prevent alkalosis-dependent VHA translocation, and tmAC activation by forskolin reduced the abundance of VHA at the cell membrane. This study demonstrates that sAC is a necessary and sufficient sensor of extracellular alkalosis in ray gill base-secreting cells. In addition, this study indicates that different sources of cAMP differentially modulate cell biology.

  13. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Ana R.; Holmes, Andrew P.S.; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J.; Monteiro, Emília C.; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B.

    2014-01-01

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3− and/or H+ mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3−-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3− in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis. PMID:23727159

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel adenylyl cyclase gene, HpAC1, involved in stress signaling in Hippeastrum x hybridum.

    PubMed

    Swieżawska, Brygida; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Pawełek, Agnieszka; Grzegorzewska, Weronika; Szewczuk, Piotr; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2014-07-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are enzymes that generate cyclic AMP, which is involved in different physiological and developmental processes in a number of organisms. Here, we report the cloning and characterization of a new plant adenylyl cyclases (AC) gene, designated HpAC1, from Hippeastrum x hybridum. This gene encodes a protein of 206 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 23 kD and an isoelectric point of 5.07. The predicted amino acid sequence contains all the typical features of and shows high identity with putative plant ACs. The purified, recombinant HpAC1 is able to convert ATP to cAMP. The complementation test that was performed to analyze the ability of HpAC1 to compensate for the AC deficiency in the Escherichia coli SP850 strain revealed that HpAC1 functions as an adenylyl cyclase and produces cyclic AMP. Moreover, it was shown that the transcript level of HpAC1 and cyclic AMP concentration changed during certain stress conditions. Both mechanical damage and Phoma narcissi infection lead to two sharp increases in HpAC1 mRNA levels during a 72-h test cycle. Changes in intracellular cAMP level were also observed. These results may indicate the participation of a cAMP-dependent pathway both in rapid and systemic reactions induced after disruption of symplast and apoplast continuity.

  15. Inhibition of adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase isoforms by the antiviral drug foscarnet.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, O; Mitterauer, T; Nanoff, C; Hohenegger, M; Tang, W J; Freissmuth, M; Kleuss, C

    2001-02-02

    The pyrophosphate (PP(i)) analog foscarnet inhibits viral DNA-polymerases and is used to treat cytomegalovirus and human immunodeficiency vius infections. Nucleotide cyclases and DNA-polymerases catalyze analogous reactions, i.e. a phosphodiester bond formation, and have similar topologies in their active sites. Inhibition by foscarnet of adenylyl cyclase isoforms was therefore tested with (i) purified catalytic domains C1 and C2 of types I and VII (IC1 and VIIC1) and of type II (IIC2) and (ii) membrane-bound holoenzymes (from mammalian tissues and types I, II, and V heterologously expressed in Sf9 cell membranes). Foscarnet was more potent than PP(i) in suppressing forskolin-stimulated catalysis by both, IC1/IIC2 and VIIC1/IIC2. Stimulation of VIIC1/IIC2 by Galpha(s) relieved the inhibition by foscarnet but not that by PP(i). The IC(50) of foscarnet on membrane-bound adenylyl cyclases also depended on their mode of regulation. These findings predict that receptor-dependent cAMP formation is sensitive to inhibition by foscarnet in some, but not all, cells. This was verified with two cell lines; foscarnet blocked cAMP accumulation after A(2A)-adenosine receptor stimulation in PC12 but not in HEK-A(2A) cells. Foscarnet also inhibited soluble and, to a lesser extent, particulate guanylyl cylase. Thus, foscarnet interferes with the generation of cyclic nucleotides, an effect which may give rise to clinical side effects. The extent of inhibition varies with the enzyme isoform and with the regulatory input.

  16. Hippocampal somatostatin receptors and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in histamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Puebla, L; Rodríguez-Martín, E; Arilla, E

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of histamine (0.1, 1.0 or 10.0 micrograms) on the hippocampal somatostatin (SS) receptor/effector system in Wistar rats were investigated. In view of the rapid onset of histamine action, the effects of histamine on the somatostatinergic system were studied 2 h after its administration. Hippocampal SS-like immunoreactivity (SSLI) levels were not modified by any of the histamine doses studied. SS-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin (FK)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was markedly increased in hippocampal membranes from rats treated with 10 micrograms of histamine (23% +/- 1% vs. 17% +/- 1% and 37% +/- 2% vs. 23% +/- 1%, respectively). In contrast, neither the basal nor the FK-stimulated enzyme activities were affected by histamine administration. The functional activity of the hippocampal guanine-nucleotide binding inhibitory protein (Gi protein), as assessed by the capacity of the stable GTP analogue 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) to inhibit FK-stimulated AC activity, was not modified by histamine administration. These data suggest that the increased response of the enzyme to SS was not related to an increased functional activity of Gi proteins. In fact, the increased AC response to SS in hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats was associated with quantitative changes in the SS receptors. Equilibrium binding data obtained with [125I]Tyr11-SS indicate an increase in the number with specific SS receptors (541 +/- 24 vs. 365 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein, P < 0.001) together with a decrease in their apparent affinity (0.57 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.41 +/- 0.03 nM, P < 0.05) in rat hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats as compared to control animals. With the aim of determining if these changes were related to histamine binding to its specific receptor sites, the histaminergic H1 and H2 receptor antagonists mepyramine and cimetidine

  17. pH sensing via bicarbonate-regulated “soluble” adenylyl cyclase (sAC)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nawreen; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a source of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′ monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is directly regulated by bicarbonate (HCO−3) ions. In living cells, HCO−3 ions are in nearly instantaneous equilibrium with carbon dioxide (CO2) and pH due to the ubiquitous presence of carbonic anhydrases. Numerous biological processes are regulated by CO2, HCO−3, and/or pH, and in a number of these, sAC has been shown to function as a physiological CO2/HCO3/pH sensor. In this review, we detail the known pH sensing functions of sAC, and we discuss two highly-studied, pH-dependent pathways in which sAC might play a role. PMID:24324443

  18. Disruption of type 3 adenylyl cyclase expression in the hypothalamus leads to obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Chen, Xuanmao; Yang, Yimei; Storm, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Evidence from human studies and transgenic mice lacking the type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) indicates that AC3 plays a role in the regulation of body weight. It is unknown in which brain region AC3 exerts such an effect. We examined the role of AC3 in the hypothalamus for body weight control using a floxed AC3 mouse strain. Here, we report that AC3 flox/flox mice became obese after the administration of AAV-CRE-GFP into the hypothalamus. Both male and female AC3 floxed mice showed heavier body weight than AAV-GFP injected control mice. Furthermore, mice with selective ablation of AC3 expression in the ventromedial hypothalamus also showed increased body weight and food consumption. Our results indicated that AC3 in the hypothalamus regulates energy balance. PMID:27942392

  19. Stimulation of renin secretion by catecholamines is dependent on adenylyl cyclases 5 and 6.

    PubMed

    Aldehni, Fadi; Tang, Tong; Madsen, Kirsten; Plattner, Michael; Schreiber, Andrea; Friis, Ulla G; Hammond, H Kirk; Han, Pyung Lim; Schweda, Frank

    2011-03-01

    The sympathetic nervous system stimulates renin release from juxtaglomerular cells via the β-adrenoreceptor-cAMP pathway. Recent in vitro studies have suggested that the calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclases (ACs) 5 and 6 possess key roles in the control of renin exocytosis. To investigate the relative contribution of AC5 and AC6 to the regulation of renin release in vivo we performed experiments using AC5 and AC6 knockout mice. Male AC5(-/-) mice exhibited normal plasma renin concentrations, renal renin synthesis (mRNA and renin content), urinary volume, and systolic blood pressure. In male AC6(-/-) mice, plasma renin concentration (AC6(-/-): 732 ± 119; AC6 (+/+): 436 ± 78 ng of angiotensin I per hour*mL(-1); P<0.05), and renin synthesis were stimulated associated with an increased excretion of dilute urine (1.55-fold; P<0.05) and reduced blood pressure (-10.6 mm Hg; P<0.001). Stimulation of plasma renin concentration by a single injection of the β-adrenoreceptor agonist isoproterenol (10 mg/kg IP) was significantly attenuated in AC5(-/-) (male: -20%; female: -33%) compared with wild-type mice in vivo. The mitigation of the plasma renin concentration response to isoproterenol was even more pronounced in AC6(-/-) (male: -63%; female: -50% versus AC6(+/+)). Similarly, the effects of isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide on renin release from isolated perfused kidneys were attenuated to a higher extent in AC6(-/-) (-51% to -98% versus AC6(+/+)) than in AC5(-/-) (-31% to 46% versus AC5(+/+)). In conclusion, both AC5 and AC6 are involved in the stimulation of renin secretion in vivo, and AC6 is the dominant isoforms in this process.

  20. Fluorogenic Green-Inside Red-Outside (GIRO) Labeling Approach Reveals Adenylyl Cyclase-Dependent Control of BKα Surface Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of surface levels of protein is critical for proper cell function and influences properties including cell adhesion, ion channel contributions to current flux, and the sensitivity of surface receptors to ligands. Here we demonstrate a two-color labeling system in live cells using a single fluorogen activating peptide (FAP) based fusion tag, which enables the rapid and simultaneous quantification of surface and internal proteins. In the nervous system, BK channels can regulate neural excitability and neurotransmitter release, and the surface trafficking of BK channels can be modulated by signaling cascades and assembly with accessory proteins. Using this labeling approach, we examine the dynamics of BK channel surface expression in HEK293 cells. Surface pools of the pore-forming BKα subunit were stable, exhibiting a plasma membrane half-life of >10 h. Long-term activation of adenylyl cyclase by forskolin reduced BKα surface levels by 30%, an effect that could not be attributed to increased bulk endocytosis of plasma membrane proteins. This labeling approach is compatible with microscopic imaging and flow cytometry, providing a solid platform for examining protein trafficking in living cells. PMID:26301573

  1. Soluble adenylyl cyclase accounts for high basal cCMP and cUMP concentrations in HEK293 and B103 cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alan; Danker, Kerstin Y; Wolter, Sabine; Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2014-05-30

    Intact HEK293 cells and B103 neuroblastoma cells possess high basal concentrations of the established second messengers cAMP and cGMP and of the emerging second messengers cCMP and cUMP. We asked the question which nucleotidyl cyclase accounts for the high basal cNMP concentrations. Activators and inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase had no major effects on cNMPs, and the activator of membranous adenylyl cyclase forskolin increased only cAMP. Addition of bicarbonate to medium increased, whereas removal of bicarbonate decreased levels of all four cNMPs. The inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase, 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthio)-N'-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) propanehydrazide (KH7), reduced bicarbonate-stimulated cNMPs. In conclusion, bicarbonate-stimulated soluble adenylyl cyclase plays an important role in the regulation of basal cellular cNMP levels, most notably cCMP and cUMP.

  2. Deficits in behavioral sensitization and dopaminergic responses to methamphetamine in adenylyl cyclase 1/8-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Charlton, Jennifer L; Susick, Laura L; Newman, Brooke; Eagle, Andrew L; Mathews, Tiffany A; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2015-12-01

    The cAMP/protein kinase A pathway regulates methamphetamine (METH)-induced neuroplasticity underlying behavioral sensitization. We hypothesize that adenylyl cyclases (AC) 1/8 mediate these neuroplastic events and associated striatal dopamine regulation. Locomotor responses to METH (1 and 5 mg/kg) and striatal dopamine function were evaluated in mice lacking AC 1/8 (DKO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Only 5 mg/kg METH induced an acute locomotor response in DKO mice, which was significantly attenuated versus WT controls. DKO mice showed a marked attenuation in the development and expression of METH-induced behavioral sensitization across doses relative to WT controls. While basal and acute METH (5 mg/kg)-evoked accumbal dialysate dopamine levels were similar between genotypes, saline-treated DKO mice showed elevated tissue content of dopamine and homovanillic acid in the dorsal striatum (DS), reflecting dysregulated dopamine homeostasis and/or metabolism. Significant reductions in DS dopamine levels were observed in METH-sensitized DKO mice compared to saline-treated controls, an effect not observed in WT mice. Notably, saline-treated DKO mice had significantly increased phosphorylated Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein levels, which were not further augmented following METH sensitization, as observed in WT mice. These data indicate that AC 1/8 are critical to mechanisms subserving drug-induced behavioral sensitization and mediate nigrostriatal pathway METH sensitivity. Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 and 8 were studied for their involvement in the adaptive neurobehavioral responses to methamphetamine. AC 1/8 double knockout (DKO) mice showed heightened basal locomotor activity and dorsal striatal dopamine responsivity. Conversely, methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity was attenuated in DKO mice, accompanied by reductions in dopamine and HVA content and impaired DARPP-32 activation. These findings indicate AC 1/8 signaling

  3. International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology. CI. Structures and Small Molecule Modulators of Mammalian Adenylyl Cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dessauer, Carmen W; Watts, Val J; Ostrom, Rennolds S; Conti, Marco; Dove, Stefan; Seifert, Roland

    2017-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) generate the second messenger cAMP from ATP. Mammalian cells express nine transmembrane AC (mAC) isoforms (AC1-9) and a soluble AC (sAC, also referred to as AC10). This review will largely focus on mACs. mACs are activated by the G-protein Gαs and regulated by multiple mechanisms. mACs are differentially expressed in tissues and regulate numerous and diverse cell functions. mACs localize in distinct membrane compartments and form signaling complexes. sAC is activated by bicarbonate with physiologic roles first described in testis. Crystal structures of the catalytic core of a hybrid mAC and sAC are available. These structures provide detailed insights into the catalytic mechanism and constitute the basis for the development of isoform-selective activators and inhibitors. Although potent competitive and noncompetitive mAC inhibitors are available, it is challenging to obtain compounds with high isoform selectivity due to the conservation of the catalytic core. Accordingly, caution must be exerted with the interpretation of intact-cell studies. The development of isoform-selective activators, the plant diterpene forskolin being the starting compound, has been equally challenging. There is no known endogenous ligand for the forskolin binding site. Recently, development of selective sAC inhibitors was reported. An emerging field is the association of AC gene polymorphisms with human diseases. For example, mutations in the AC5 gene (ADCY5) cause hyperkinetic extrapyramidal motor disorders. Overall, in contrast to the guanylyl cyclase field, our understanding of the (patho)physiology of AC isoforms and the development of clinically useful drugs targeting ACs is still in its infancy.

  4. Inhibition of Adenylyl Cyclase Type 5 Increases Longevity and Healthful Aging through Oxidative Stress Protection

    PubMed Central

    Vatner, Stephen F.; Pachon, Ronald E.; Vatner, Dorothy E.

    2015-01-01

    Mice with disruption of adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5 knockout, KO) live a third longer than littermates. The mechanism, in part, involves the MEK/ERK pathway, which in turn is related to protection against oxidative stress. The AC5 KO model also protects against diabetes, obesity, and the cardiomyopathy induced by aging, diabetes, and cardiac stress and also demonstrates improved exercise capacity. All of these salutary features are also mediated, in part, by oxidative stress protection. For example, chronic beta adrenergic receptor stimulation induced cardiomyopathy was rescued by AC5 KO. Conversely, in AC5 transgenic (Tg) mice, where AC5 is overexpressed in the heart, the cardiomyopathy was exacerbated and was rescued by enhancing oxidative stress resistance. Thus, the AC5 KO model, which resists oxidative stress, is uniquely designed for clinical translation, since it not only increases longevity and exercise, but also protects against diabetes, obesity, and cardiomyopathy. Importantly, inhibition of AC5's action to prolong longevity and enhance healthful aging, as well as its mechanism through resistance to oxidative stress, is unique among all of the nine AC isoforms. PMID:25945149

  5. Adenylyl cyclase localization to the uropod of aggregating Dictyostelium cells requires RacC

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C.; Jung, D.; Cao, Z.; Chung, C. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The localization of adenylyl cyclase A (ACA) to uropod of cells is required for the stream formation during Dictyostelium development. RacC is a Dictyostelium orthologue of Cdc42. We identified a streaming defect of racC− cells as they are clearly less polarized and form smaller and fragmented streams. ACA-YFP is mainly associated with intracellular vesicular structures, but not with the plasma membrane in racC− cells. racC− cells have a slightly higher number of vesicles than Ax3 cells, suggesting that the defect of ACA trafficking is not simply due to the lack of vesicle formation. While the ACA-YFP vesicles traveled with an average velocity of 9.1 µm/min in Ax3 cells, a slow and diffusional movement without direction with an average velocity of 4 µm/min was maintained in racC− cells. Images acquired by using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis revealed that a significantly decreased number of ACA-YFP vesicles appeared near the cell membrane, indicating a defect in ACA-YFP vesicle trafficking. These results suggest an important role of RacC in the rapid and directional movements of ACA vesicles on microtubules to the plasma membrane, especially to the back of polarized cell. PMID:26315268

  6. Physiological calcium concentrations regulate calmodulin binding and catalysis of adenylyl cyclase exotoxins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuequan; Lee, Young-Sam; Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Bergson, Pamela; Lu, Dan; Chen, Alice; Beckingham, Kathy; Grabarek, Zenon; Mrksich, Milan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2002-12-16

    Edema factor (EF) and CyaA are calmodulin (CaM)-activated adenylyl cyclase exotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using spectroscopic, enzyme kinetic and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy analyses, we show that low Ca(2+) concentrations increase the affinity of CaM for EF and CyaA causing their activation, but higher Ca(2+) concentrations directly inhibit catalysis. Both events occur in a physiologically relevant range of Ca(2+) concentrations. Despite the similarity in Ca(2+) sensitivity, EF and CyaA have substantial differences in CaM binding and activation. CyaA has 100-fold higher affinity for CaM than EF. CaM has N- and C-terminal globular domains, each binding two Ca(2+) ions. CyaA can be fully activated by CaM mutants with one defective C-terminal Ca(2+)-binding site or by either terminal domain of CaM while EF cannot. EF consists of a catalytic core and a helical domain, and both are required for CaM activation of EF. Mutations that decrease the interaction of the helical domain with the catalytic core create an enzyme with higher sensitivity to Ca(2+)-CaM activation. However, CyaA is fully activated by CaM without the domain corresponding to the helical domain of EF.

  7. Adenylyl cyclase localization to the uropod of aggregating Dictyostelium cells requires RacC.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Jung, D; Cao, Z; Chung, C Y

    2015-09-25

    The localization of adenylyl cyclase A (ACA) to uropod of cells is required for the stream formation during Dictyostelium development. RacC is a Dictyostelium orthologue of Cdc42. We identified a streaming defect of racC(-) cells as they are clearly less polarized and form smaller and fragmented streams. ACA-YFP is mainly associated with intracellular vesicular structures, but not with the plasma membrane in racC(-) cells. racC(-) cells have a slightly higher number of vesicles than Ax3 cells, suggesting that the defect of ACA trafficking is not simply due to the lack of vesicle formation. While the ACA-YFP vesicles traveled with an average velocity of 9.1 μm/min in Ax3 cells, a slow and diffusional movement without direction with an average velocity of 4 μm/min was maintained in racC(-) cells. Images acquired by using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis revealed that a significantly decreased number of ACA-YFP vesicles appeared near the cell membrane, indicating a defect in ACA-YFP vesicle trafficking. These results suggest an important role of RacC in the rapid and directional movements of ACA vesicles on microtubules to the plasma membrane, especially to the back of polarized cell.

  8. Bidirectional synaptic plasticity and spatial memory flexibility require Ca2+-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Storm, Daniel R; Wang, Hongbing

    2011-07-13

    When certain memory becomes obsolete, effective suppression of the previously established memory is essential for animals to adapt to the changing environment. At the cellular level, reversal of synaptic potentiation may be important for neurons to acquire new information and to prevent synaptic saturation. Here, we investigated the function of Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling in the regulation of bidirectional synaptic plasticity and spatial memory formation in double knock-out mice (DKO) lacking both type 1 and 8 adenylyl cyclases (ACs). In anesthetized animals, the DKO mutants showed defective long-term potentiation (LTP) after a single high-frequency stimulation (HFS) or two spaced HFSs at 100 Hz. However, DKO mice showed normal LTP after a single HFS at 200 Hz or two compressed HFSs at 100 Hz. Interestingly, reversal of synaptic potentiation as well as de novo synaptic depression was impaired in DKO mice. In the Morris water maze, DKO mice showed defective acquisition and memory retention, although the deficits could be attenuated by overtraining or compressed trainings with a shorter intertrial interval. In the reversal platform test, DKO animals were impaired in both relearning and old memory suppression. Furthermore, the extinction of the old spatial memory was not efficient in DKO mice. These data demonstrate that Ca(2+)-stimulated AC activity is important not only for LTP and spatial memory formation but also for the suppression of both previously established synaptic potentiation and old spatial memory.

  9. Metabolic Communication between Astrocytes and Neurons via Bicarbonate-Responsive Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun B.; Gordon, Grant R.J.; Zhou, Ning; Tai, Chao; Rungta, Ravi L.; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A.; Ryu, Jae K.; McLarnon, James G.; Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; MacVicar, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Astrocytes are proposed to participate in brain energy metabolism by supplying substrates to neurons from their glycogen stores and from glycolysis. However, the molecules involved in metabolic sensing and the molecular pathways responsible for metabolic coupling between different cell types in the brain are not fully understood. Here we show that a recently cloned bicarbonate (HCO3−) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), is highly expressed in astrocytes and becomes activated in response to HCO3− entry via the electrogenic NaHCO3 cotransporter (NBC). Activated sAC increases intracellular cAMP levels, causing glycogen breakdown, enhanced glycolysis, and the release of lactate into the extracellular space, which is subsequently taken up by neurons for use as an energy substrate. This process is recruited over a broad physiological range of [K+]ext and also during aglycemic episodes, helping to maintain synaptic function. These data reveal a molecular pathway in astrocytes that is responsible for brain metabolic coupling to neurons. PMID:22998876

  10. Metabolic communication between astrocytes and neurons via bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyun B; Gordon, Grant R J; Zhou, Ning; Tai, Chao; Rungta, Ravi L; Martinez, Jennifer; Milner, Teresa A; Ryu, Jae K; McLarnon, James G; Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; MacVicar, Brian A

    2012-09-20

    Astrocytes are proposed to participate in brain energy metabolism by supplying substrates to neurons from their glycogen stores and from glycolysis. However, the molecules involved in metabolic sensing and the molecular pathways responsible for metabolic coupling between different cell types in the brain are not fully understood. Here we show that a recently cloned bicarbonate (HCO₃⁻) sensor, soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC), is highly expressed in astrocytes and becomes activated in response to HCO₃⁻ entry via the electrogenic NaHCO₃ cotransporter (NBC). Activated sAC increases intracellular cAMP levels, causing glycogen breakdown, enhanced glycolysis, and the release of lactate into the extracellular space, which is subsequently taken up by neurons for use as an energy substrate. This process is recruited over a broad physiological range of [K⁺](ext) and also during aglycemic episodes, helping to maintain synaptic function. These data reveal a molecular pathway in astrocytes that is responsible for brain metabolic coupling to neurons.

  11. Functional transplant of photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) into Aplysia sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Tatsumi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Iseki, Mineo

    2007-09-01

    In neural mechanisms of animal learning, intracellular cAMP has been known to play an important role. In the present experiments we attempted functional transplant of a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) isolated from Euglena into Aplysia neurons, and explored whether PAC can produce cAMP in the neurons by light stimulation. Serotonergic modulation of mechanoafferent sensory neurons in Aplysia pleural ganglia has been reported to increase intracellular cAMP level and promotes synaptic transmission to motor neurons by increasing spike width of sensory neurons. When cAMP was directly injected into the sensory neurons, spike amplitude temporarily decreased while spike width temporarily increased. This effect was not substituted by injection of 5'AMP, and maintained longer in a bath solution containing IBMX, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor. We, therefore, explored these changes as indicators of appearance of the PAC function. PAC or the PAC expression vector (pNEX-PAC) was injected into cell bodies of sensory neurons. Spike amplitude decreased in both cases and spike width increased in the PAC injection when the neurons were stimulated with light, suggesting that the transplanted PAC works well in Aplysia neurons. These results indicate that we can control cAMP production in specific neurons with light by the functional transplant of PAC.

  12. Absorption and emission spectroscopic characterization of photo-dynamics of photoactivated adenylyl cyclase mutant bPAC-Y7F of Beggiatoa sp.

    PubMed

    Penzkofer, Alfons; Stierl, Manuela; Mathes, Tilo; Hegemann, Peter

    2014-11-01

    The photoactivated cyclase bPAC of the microbial mats bacterium Beggiatoa sp. consists of a BLUF domain and an adenylyl cyclase domain. It has strong activity of photo-induced cyclic adenylyl monophosphate (cAMP) formation and is therefore an important optogenetic tool in neuroscience applications. The SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant where Tyr-7 is replaced by Phe-7 in the BLUF domain has lost the typical BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics. Instead, the investigated SUMO-bPAC-Y7F mutant consisted of three protein conformations with different triplet based photo-dynamics: (i) reversible flavin quinone (Fl) cofactor reduction to flavin semiquinone (FlH), (ii) reversible violet/near ultraviolet absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlA) formation, and (iii) irreversible red absorbing flavin photoproduct (FlC) formation. Absorption and emission spectroscopic measurements on SUMO-bPAC-Y7F were carried out before, during and after light exposure. Flavin photo-dynamics schemes are developed for the SUMO-bPAC-Y7F fractions performing photo-induced FlH, FlA, and FlC formation. Quantitative parameters of the flavin cofactor excitation, relaxation and recovery dynamics in SUMO-bPAC-Y7F are determined.

  13. Somatic ‘Soluble’ Adenylyl Cyclase Isoforms Are Unaffected in Sacytm1Lex/Sacytm1Lex ‘Knockout’ Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Kamenetsky, Margarita; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Background Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy) represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacytm1Lex/Sacytm1Lex knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. Principal Findings We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which ‘escapes’ the design of the Sacytm1Lex knockout allele. Conclusions/Significance These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells. PMID:18806876

  14. Gbeta subunit interacts with a peptide encoding region 956-982 of adenylyl cyclase 2. Cross-linking of the peptide to free Gbetagamma but not the heterotrimer.

    PubMed

    Weng, G; Li, J; Dingus, J; Hildebrandt, J D; Weinstein, H; Iyengar, R

    1996-10-25

    The region encoded by amino acids 956-982 of adenylyl cyclase 2 is important for Gbetagamma stimulation. Interactions of a peptide encoding the 956-982 region of adenylyl cyclase 2 (QEHAQEPERQYMHIGTMVEFAYALVGK (QEHA peptide)) with Gbetagamma subunits were studied. QEHA peptide was covalently attached to beta subunit of free Gbetagamma by the cross-linker N-succinimidyl(4-iodoacetyl)aminobenzoate. Cross-linking was proportional to the amount of QEHA peptide added; other control peptides cross-linked minimally. When Go was used, very little cross-linking was observed with GDP and EDTA, but upon activation by guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate and Mg2+, specific cross-linking of the QEHA peptide to Gbeta was observed. We conclude that beta subunits of G proteins contain effector interaction domains that are occluded by Galpha subunits in the heterotrimer. Molecular modeling studies used to dock the QEHA peptide on to Gbeta indicate that amino acids 75-165 of Gbeta may be involved in effector interactions.

  15. Bacterial effector binds host cell adenylyl cyclase to potentiate Gαs-dependent cAMP production.

    PubMed

    Pulliainen, Arto T; Pieles, Kathrin; Brand, Cameron S; Hauert, Barbara; Böhm, Alex; Quebatte, Maxime; Wepf, Alexander; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-06-12

    Subversion of host organism cAMP signaling is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Bartonella effector protein A (BepA) of vasculotumorigenic Bartonella henselae protects the infected human endothelial cells against apoptotic stimuli by elevation of cellular cAMP levels by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, adenylyl cyclase (AC) and the α-subunit of the AC-stimulating G protein (Gαs) were identified as potential cellular target proteins for BepA by gel-free proteomics. Results of the proteomics screen were evaluated for physical and functional interaction by: (i) a heterologous in vivo coexpression system, where human AC activity was reconstituted under the regulation of Gαs and BepA in Escherichia coli; (ii) in vitro AC assays with membrane-anchored full-length human AC and recombinant BepA and Gαs; (iii) surface plasmon resonance experiments; and (iv) an in vivo fluorescence bimolecular complementation-analysis. The data demonstrate that BepA directly binds host cell AC to potentiate the Gαs-dependent cAMP production. As opposed to the known microbial mechanisms, such as ADP ribosylation of G protein α-subunits by cholera and pertussis toxins, the fundamentally different BepA-mediated elevation of host cell cAMP concentration appears subtle and is dependent on the stimulus of a G protein-coupled receptor-released Gαs. We propose that this mechanism contributes to the persistence of Bartonella henselae in the chronically infected vascular endothelium.

  16. Bacterial effector binds host cell adenylyl cyclase to potentiate Gαs-dependent cAMP production

    PubMed Central

    Pulliainen, Arto T.; Pieles, Kathrin; Brand, Cameron S.; Hauert, Barbara; Böhm, Alex; Quebatte, Maxime; Wepf, Alexander; Gstaiger, Matthias; Aebersold, Ruedi; Dessauer, Carmen W.; Dehio, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Subversion of host organism cAMP signaling is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Bartonella effector protein A (BepA) of vasculotumorigenic Bartonella henselae protects the infected human endothelial cells against apoptotic stimuli by elevation of cellular cAMP levels by an as yet unknown mechanism. Here, adenylyl cyclase (AC) and the α-subunit of the AC-stimulating G protein (Gαs) were identified as potential cellular target proteins for BepA by gel-free proteomics. Results of the proteomics screen were evaluated for physical and functional interaction by: (i) a heterologous in vivo coexpression system, where human AC activity was reconstituted under the regulation of Gαs and BepA in Escherichia coli; (ii) in vitro AC assays with membrane-anchored full-length human AC and recombinant BepA and Gαs; (iii) surface plasmon resonance experiments; and (iv) an in vivo fluorescence bimolecular complementation-analysis. The data demonstrate that BepA directly binds host cell AC to potentiate the Gαs-dependent cAMP production. As opposed to the known microbial mechanisms, such as ADP ribosylation of G protein α-subunits by cholera and pertussis toxins, the fundamentally different BepA-mediated elevation of host cell cAMP concentration appears subtle and is dependent on the stimulus of a G protein-coupled receptor-released Gαs. We propose that this mechanism contributes to the persistence of Bartonella henselae in the chronically infected vascular endothelium. PMID:22635269

  17. Type VI adenylyl cyclase negatively regulates GluN2B-mediated LTD and spatial reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Pang; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Hou, Wen-Hsien; Lin, Meng-Syuan; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Chien, Chen-Li; Chang, Chen; Cheng, Pei-Lin; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Chern, Yijuang

    2016-03-02

    The calcium-sensitive type VI adenylyl cyclase (AC6) is a membrane-bound adenylyl cyclase (AC) that converts ATP to cAMP under stimulation. It is a calcium-inhibited AC and integrates negative inputs from Ca(2+) and multiple other signals to regulate the intracellular cAMP level. In the present study, we demonstrate that AC6 functions upstream of CREB and negatively controls neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus. Genetic removal of AC6 leads to cyclase-independent and N-terminus of AC6 (AC6N)-dependent elevation of CREB expression, and enhances the expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons. Consequently, GluN2B-dependent calcium signaling and excitatory postsynaptic current, long-term depression, and spatial reversal learning are enhanced in the hippocampus of AC6(-/-) mice without altering the gross anatomy of the brain. Together, our results suggest that AC6 negatively regulates neuronal plasticity by modulating the levels of CREB and GluN2B in the hippocampus.

  18. Type VI adenylyl cyclase negatively regulates GluN2B-mediated LTD and spatial reversal learning

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Pang; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Hou, Wen-Hsien; Lin, Meng-Syuan; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Chien, Chen-Li; Chang, Chen; Cheng, Pei-Lin; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Chern, Yijuang

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensitive type VI adenylyl cyclase (AC6) is a membrane-bound adenylyl cyclase (AC) that converts ATP to cAMP under stimulation. It is a calcium-inhibited AC and integrates negative inputs from Ca2+ and multiple other signals to regulate the intracellular cAMP level. In the present study, we demonstrate that AC6 functions upstream of CREB and negatively controls neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus. Genetic removal of AC6 leads to cyclase-independent and N-terminus of AC6 (AC6N)-dependent elevation of CREB expression, and enhances the expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons. Consequently, GluN2B-dependent calcium signaling and excitatory postsynaptic current, long-term depression, and spatial reversal learning are enhanced in the hippocampus of AC6−/− mice without altering the gross anatomy of the brain. Together, our results suggest that AC6 negatively regulates neuronal plasticity by modulating the levels of CREB and GluN2B in the hippocampus. PMID:26932446

  19. Regulation of Anterior Chamber Drainage by Bicarbonate-sensitive Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in the Ciliary Body*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong S.; Tresguerres, Martin; Hess, Kenneth; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Marmorstein, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP results from the resistance to drainage of aqueous humor (AH) produced by the ciliary body in a process requiring bicarbonate. Once secreted into the anterior chamber, AH drains from the eye via two pathways: uveoscleral and pressure-dependent or conventional outflow (Ct). Modulation of “inflow” and “outflow” pathways is thought to occur via distinct, local mechanisms. Mice deficient in the bicarbonate channel bestrophin-2 (Best2), however, exhibit a lower IOP despite an increase in AH production. Best2 is expressed uniquely in nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells providing evidence for a bicarbonate-dependent communicative pathway linking inflow and outflow. Here, we show that bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is highly expressed in the ciliary body in NPE cells, but appears to be absent from drainage tissues. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC in mice causes a significant increase in IOP due to a decrease in Ct with no effect on inflow. In mice deficient in sAC IOP is elevated, and Ct is decreased relative to wild-type mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC did not alter IOP or Ct in sAC-deficient mice. Based on these data we propose that the ciliary body can regulate Ct and that sAC serves as a critical sensor of bicarbonate in the ciliary body regulating the secretion of substances into the AH that govern outflow facility independent of pressure. PMID:21994938

  20. Regulation of anterior chamber drainage by bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase in the ciliary body.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong S; Tresguerres, Martin; Hess, Kenneth; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2011-12-02

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure (IOP). IOP results from the resistance to drainage of aqueous humor (AH) produced by the ciliary body in a process requiring bicarbonate. Once secreted into the anterior chamber, AH drains from the eye via two pathways: uveoscleral and pressure-dependent or conventional outflow (C(t)). Modulation of "inflow" and "outflow" pathways is thought to occur via distinct, local mechanisms. Mice deficient in the bicarbonate channel bestrophin-2 (Best2), however, exhibit a lower IOP despite an increase in AH production. Best2 is expressed uniquely in nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (NPE) cells providing evidence for a bicarbonate-dependent communicative pathway linking inflow and outflow. Here, we show that bicarbonate-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is highly expressed in the ciliary body in NPE cells, but appears to be absent from drainage tissues. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC in mice causes a significant increase in IOP due to a decrease in C(t) with no effect on inflow. In mice deficient in sAC IOP is elevated, and C(t) is decreased relative to wild-type mice. Pharmacologic inhibition of sAC did not alter IOP or C(t) in sAC-deficient mice. Based on these data we propose that the ciliary body can regulate C(t) and that sAC serves as a critical sensor of bicarbonate in the ciliary body regulating the secretion of substances into the AH that govern outflow facility independent of pressure.

  1. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  2. Adolescent nicotine administration alters serotonin receptors and cell signaling mediated through adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Seidler, F J; Cousins, M M; Slikker, W; Slotkin, T A

    2002-10-04

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that targets synaptic function during critical developmental stages and recent studies indicate that CNS vulnerability extends into adolescence, the age at which smoking typically commences. We administered nicotine to adolescent rats via continuous minipump infusions from PN30 to PN47.5, using 6 mg/kg/day, a dose rate that replicates the plasma nicotine levels found in smokers, and examined 5HT receptors and related cell signaling during nicotine administration (PN45) and in the post-treatment period (PN50, 60, 75). Adolescent nicotine decreased 5HT(2) receptor binding in brain regions containing 5HT projections (hippocampus and cerebral cortex), with selectivity for females in the cerebral cortex; regions containing 5HT cell bodies showed either an increase (midbrain in males) or no change (brainstem). In contrast, there were no significant changes in 5HT(1A) receptors; however, the ability of the receptors to signal through adenylyl cyclase (AC) showed a switch from stimulatory to inhibitory effects in females during the post-treatment period. There were also transient alterations in AC responses to beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation, as well as pronounced induction of the AC response to the non-receptor-mediated stimulant, forskolin. Our results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure alters the concentrations and functions of postsynaptic 5HT receptors in a manner commensurate with impaired 5HT synaptic function. The direction of change, emergence of defects after the cessation of nicotine administration, and sex-preference for effects in females, all support a relationship of impaired 5HT function to the higher incidence of depression seen in adolescent smokers.

  3. Role of adenylyl cyclase 6 in the development of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Kristensen, Tina Bøgelund; Brooks, Heddwen L; Kohan, Donald E; Rieg, Timo; Fenton, Robert A

    2017-04-06

    Psychiatric patients treated with lithium (Li(+)) may develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Although the etiology of Li(+)-induced NDI (Li-NDI) is poorly understood, it occurs partially due to reduced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression in the kidney collecting ducts. A mechanism postulated for this is that Li(+) inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, leading to decreased cAMP, reduced AQP2 abundance, and less membrane targeting. We hypothesized that Li-NDI would not develop in mice lacking AC6. Whole-body AC6 knockout (AC6(-/-)) mice and potentially novel connecting tubule/principal cell-specific AC6 knockout (AC6(loxloxCre)) mice had approximately 50% lower urine osmolality and doubled water intake under baseline conditions compared with controls. Dietary Li(+) administration increased water intake and reduced urine osmolality in control, AC6(-/-), and AC6(loxloxCre) mice. Consistent with AC6(-/-) mice, medullary AQP2 and pS256-AQP2 abundances were lower in AC6(loxloxCre) mice compared with controls under standard conditions, and levels were further reduced after Li(+) administration. AC6(loxloxCre) and control mice had a similar increase in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells in response to Li(+). However, AC6(loxloxCre) mice had a higher number of H(+)-ATPase B1 subunit-positive cells under standard conditions and after Li(+) administration. Collectively, AC6 has a minor role in Li-NDI development but may be important for determining the intercalated cell-to-principal cell ratio.

  4. Stimulation of hippocampal adenylyl cyclase activity dissociates memory consolidation processes for response and place learning.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Millard, Annabelle; Jaffard, Robert; Guillou, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Procedural and declarative memory systems are postulated to interact in either a synergistic or a competitive manner, and memory consolidation appears to be a highly critical stage for this process. However, the precise cellular mechanisms subserving these interactions remain unknown. To investigate this issue, 24-h retention performances were examined in mice given post-training intrahippocampal injections of forskolin (FK) aiming at stimulating hippocampal adenylyl cyclases (ACs). The injection was given at different time points over a period of 9 h following acquisition in either an appetitive bar-pressing task or water-maze tasks challenging respectively "response memory" and "place memory." Retention testing (24 h) showed that FK injection altered memory formation only when given within a 3- to 6-h time window after acquisition but yielded opposite memory effects as a function of task demands. Retention of the spatial task was impaired, whereas retention of both the cued-response in the water maze and the rewarded bar-press response were improved. Intrahippocampal injections of FK produced an increase in pCREB immunoreactivity, which was strictly limited to the hippocampus and lasted less than 2 h, suggesting that early effects (0-2 h) of FK-induced cAMP/CREB activation can be distinguished from late effects (3-6 h). These results delineate a consolidation period during which specific cAMP levels in the hippocampus play a crucial role in enhancing memory processes mediated by other brain regions (e.g., dorsal or ventral striatum) while eliminating interference by the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory.

  5. Analgesic effects of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor NB001 on bone cancer pain in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-bo; Yang, Qi; Guo, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cheng, Qiang; Li, Xiao-ming; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Jian-ning; Liu, Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain, especially the one caused by metastasis in bones, is a severe type of pain. Pain becomes chronic unless its causes and consequences are resolved. With improvements in cancer detection and survival among patients, pain has been considered as a great challenge because traditional therapies are partially effective in terms of providing relief. Cancer pain mechanisms are more poorly understood than neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. Chronic inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are influenced by NB001, an adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1)-specific inhibitor with analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effects of NB001 on cancer pain were evaluated. Results Pain was induced by injecting osteolytic murine sarcoma cell NCTC 2472 into the intramedullary cavity of the femur of mice. The mice injected with sarcoma cells for four weeks exhibited significant spontaneous pain behavior and mechanical allodynia. The continuous systemic application of NB001 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily for three days) markedly decreased the number of spontaneous lifting but increased the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold. NB001 decreased the concentrations of cAMP and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, p-GluA1 (831), and p-GluA1 (845) in the anterior cingulate cortex, and inhibited the frequency of presynaptic neurotransmitter release in the anterior cingulate cortex of the mouse models. Conclusions NB001 may serve as a novel analgesic to treat bone cancer pain. Its analgesic effect is at least partially due to the inhibition of AC1 in anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27612915

  6. Role of adenylyl cyclase 6 in the development of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Søren Brandt; Kristensen, Tina Bøgelund; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Kohan, Donald E.; Rieg, Timo

    2017-01-01

    Psychiatric patients treated with lithium (Li+) may develop nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). Although the etiology of Li+-induced NDI (Li-NDI) is poorly understood, it occurs partially due to reduced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression in the kidney collecting ducts. A mechanism postulated for this is that Li+ inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity, leading to decreased cAMP, reduced AQP2 abundance, and less membrane targeting. We hypothesized that Li-NDI would not develop in mice lacking AC6. Whole-body AC6 knockout (AC6–/–) mice and potentially novel connecting tubule/principal cell–specific AC6 knockout (AC6loxloxCre) mice had approximately 50% lower urine osmolality and doubled water intake under baseline conditions compared with controls. Dietary Li+ administration increased water intake and reduced urine osmolality in control, AC6–/–, and AC6loxloxCre mice. Consistent with AC6–/– mice, medullary AQP2 and pS256-AQP2 abundances were lower in AC6loxloxCre mice compared with controls under standard conditions, and levels were further reduced after Li+ administration. AC6loxloxCre and control mice had a similar increase in the numbers of proliferating cell nuclear antigen–positive cells in response to Li+. However, AC6loxloxCre mice had a higher number of H+-ATPase B1 subunit–positive cells under standard conditions and after Li+ administration. Collectively, AC6 has a minor role in Li-NDI development but may be important for determining the intercalated cell–to–principal cell ratio.

  7. Impact of divalent metal ions on regulation of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Erdorf, Miriam; Mou, Tung-Chung; Seifert, Roland

    2011-12-01

    Mammalian membranous adenylyl cyclases (mACs) play an important role in transmembrane signalling events in almost every cell and represent an interesting drug target. Forskolin (FS) is an invaluable research tool, activating AC isoforms 1-8. However, there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective FS analogs. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and six FS derivatives on recombinant ACs 1, 2 and 5, representing members of different mAC families. Correlations of the pharmacological properties of the different AC isoforms revealed pronounced differences between ACs 1, 2 and 5. Additionally, potencies and efficacies of FS derivatives changed for any given AC isoform, depending on the metal ion, Mg(2+) or Mn(2+). The most striking effects of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+) on the diterpene profile were observed for AC2 where the large inhibitory effect of BODIPY-FS in the presence of Mg(2+) was considerably reduced in the presence of Mn(2+). Sequence alignment and docking experiments confirmed an exceptional position of AC2 compared to ACs 1 and 5 with respect to the structural environment of the catalytic core and cation-dependent diterpene effects. In conclusion, mAC isoforms 1, 2 and 5 exhibit a distinct pharmacological diterpene profile, depending on the divalent cation present. mAC crystal structures and modelling/docking studies provided an explanation for the pharmacological differences between the AC isoforms. Our study constitutes an important step towards the development of isoform-specific diterpenes exhibiting stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

  8. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  9. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  10. Modulation of NaCl absorption by [HCO(3)(-)] in the marine teleost intestine is mediated by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Grosell, Martin

    2010-07-01

    Intestinal HCO(3)(-) secretion and NaCl absorption are essential for counteracting dehydration in marine teleost fish. We investigated how these two processes are coordinated in toadfish. HCO(3)(-) stimulated a luminal positive short-circuit current (I(sc)) in intestine mounted in Ussing chamber, bathed with the same saline solution on the external and internal sides of the epithelium. The I(sc) increased proportionally to the [HCO(3)(-)] in the bath up to 80 mM NaHCO(3), and it did not occur when NaHCO(3) was replaced with Na(+)-gluconate or with NaHCO(3) in Cl(-)-free saline. HCO(3)(-) (20 mM) induced a approximately 2.5-fold stimulation of I(sc), and this [HCO(3)(-)] was used in all subsequent experiments. The HCO(3)(-)-stimulated I(sc) was prevented or abolished by apical application of 10 muM bumetanide (a specific inhibitor of NKCC) and by 30 microM 4-catechol estrogen [CE; an inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC)]. The inhibitory effects of bumetanide and CE were not additive. The HCO(3)(-)-stimulated I(sc) was prevented by apical bafilomycin (1 microM) and etoxolamide (1 mM), indicating involvement of V-H(+)-ATPase and carbonic anhydrases, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of an NKCC2-like protein in the apical membrane and subapical area of epithelial intestinal cells, of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase in basolateral membranes, and of an sAC-like protein in the cytoplasm. We propose that sAC regulates NKCC activity in response to luminal HCO(3)(-), and that V-H(+)-ATPase and intracellular carbonic anhydrase are essential for transducing luminal HCO(3)(-) into the cell by CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) hydration/dehydration. This mechanism putatively coordinates HCO(3)(-) secretion with NaCl and water absorption in toadfish intestine.

  11. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase type 5 prevents L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Yeon; Kang, Young-Mi; Kang, Young; Park, Tae-Shin; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Hwang, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Chung, Bong-Hyun; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Kim, Mee-Ree; Lee, Chul-Ho; Han, Pyung-Lim; Kim, Kyoung-Shim

    2014-08-27

    The dopamine precursor L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) is widely used as a therapeutic choice for the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease. However, the long-term use of L-DOPA leads to the development of debilitating involuntary movements, called L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). The cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling in the striatum is known to play a role in LID. However, from among the nine known adenylyl cyclases (ACs) present in the striatum, the AC that mediates LID remains unknown. To address this issue, we prepared an animal model with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in the substantia nigra in wild-type and AC5-knock-out (KO) mice, and examined behavioral responses to short-term or long-term treatment with L-DOPA. Compared with the behavioral responses of wild-type mice, LID was profoundly reduced in AC5-KO mice. The behavioral protection of long-term treatment with L-DOPA in AC5-KO mice was preceded by a decrease in the phosphorylation levels of PKA substrates ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) 1/2, MSK1 (mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1), and histone H3, levels of which were all increased in the lesioned striatum of wild-type mice. Consistently, FosB/ΔFosB expression, which was induced by long-term L-DOPA treatment in the lesioned striatum, was also decreased in AC5-KO mice. Moreover, suppression of AC5 in the dorsal striatum with lentivirus-shRNA-AC5 was sufficient to attenuate LID, suggesting that the AC5-regulated signaling cascade in the striatum mediates LID. These results identify the AC5/cAMP system in the dorsal striatum as a therapeutic target for the treatment of LID in patients with Parkinson's disease.

  12. Human bronchial smooth muscle cells express adenylyl cyclase isoforms 2, 4, and 6 in distinct membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Xu, Congfeng; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2011-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (AC) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists stimulate AC activity and increase airway diameter. We assessed expression of AC isoforms in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses detected expression of AC2, AC4, and AC6. Forskolin-stimulated AC activity in membranes from hBSMC displayed Ca(2+)-inhibited and G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity, consistent with expression of AC6, AC2, and AC4. Isoproterenol-stimulated AC activity was inhibited by Ca(2+) but unaltered by G(βγ), whereas butaprost-stimulated AC activity was stimulated by G(βγ) but unaffected by Ca(2+) addition. Using sucrose density centrifugation to isolate lipid raft fractions, we found that only AC6 localized in lipid raft fractions, whereas AC2 and AC4 localized in nonraft fractions. Immunoisolation of caveolae using caveolin-1 antibodies yielded Ca(2+)-inhibited AC activity (consistent with AC6 expression), whereas the nonprecipitated material displayed G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity (consistent with expression of AC2 and/or AC4). Overexpression of AC6 enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol and beraprost but did not increase responses to prostaglandin E(2) or butaprost. β(2)AR, but not prostanoid EP(2) or EP(4) receptors, colocalized with AC5/6 in lipid raft fractions. Thus, particular G protein-coupled receptors couple to discreet AC isoforms based, in part, on their colocalization in membrane microdomains. These different cAMP signaling compartments in airway smooth muscle cells are responsive to different hormones and neurotransmitters and can be regulated by different coincident signals such as Ca(2+) and G(βγ).

  13. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  14. DIFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED ADENYLYL CYCLASE ISOFORMS MEDIATE SECRETORY FUNCTIONS IN CHOLANGIOCYTE SUBPOPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, Mario; Fiorotto, Romina; Melero, Saida; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Spirlì, Carlo; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    cAMP is generated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) a group of enzymes with different tissue specificity and regulation. We hypothesized that AC isoforms are heterogeneously expressed along the biliary tree, are associated with specific secretory stimuli and are differentially modulated in cholestasis. Methods: Small (SDC) and large (LDC) cholangiocytes were isolated from controls and from lipopolysaccharide-treated (LPS) or α-naphthylisothiocyanate-treated (ANIT) rats. ACs isoforms expression was assessed by real-time PCR. Secretion and cAMP levels were measured in intrahepatic bile duct units after stimulation with secretin, forskolin, HCO3−/CO2, cholinergic and β-adrenergic agonists, with or without selected inhibitors or after silencing of AC8 or sAC with siRNA. Results: Gene expression of the Ca2+-insensitive isoforms (AC4, AC7) was higher in SDC, while that of the Ca2+-inhibitable (AC5, AC6, AC9), the Ca2+/calmodulin stimulated AC8, and the soluble sAC, was higher in LDC. Ca2+/calmodulin-inhibitors and AC8 gene silencing inhibited choleresis and cAMP production stimulated by secretin and acetylcholine, but not by forskolin. Secretion stimulated by isoproterenol and calcineurin-inibitors was cAMP-dependent and GABA-inhibitable, consistent with activation of AC9. Cholangiocyte secretion stimulated by isohydric changes in [HCO3−]i, was cAMP-dependent and inhibited by sAC-inhibitior and by sAC gene silencing. Treatment with LPS or ANIT increased expression of AC7 and sAC, while decreasing that of the others ACs. Conclusion: These studies demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of AC in biliary pathophysiology. In fact: 1) ACs isoforms are differentially expressed in cholangiocyte subpopulations, 2) AC8, AC9, and sAC mediate cholangiocyte secretion in response to secretin, β-adrenergic agonists, or changes in [HCO3−]i, respectively, 3) ACs gene expression is modulated in experimental cholestasis. PMID:19444869

  15. Acetylcholine inhibits Ca2+ current by acting exclusively at a site proximal to adenylyl cyclase in frog cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Jurevicius, J; Fischmeister, R

    1996-03-15

    1. The effects of acetylcholine (ACh) on the L-type Ca2+ current (ICa) stimulated by isoprenaline (Iso) or forskolin (Fsk) were examined in frog ventricular myocytes using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique and a double capillary for extracellular microperfusion. 2. The exposure of one half of the cell to 1 microM Iso produced a half-maximal increase in ICa since a subsequent application of Iso to the other half induced an additional effect of nearly the same amplitude. Similarly, addition of 1 microM ACh to only one half of a cell exposed to Iso on both halves reduced the effect of Iso by only approximately 50%. 3. When 10 microM Iso or 30 microM Fsk were applied to a Ca(2+)-free solution on one half of the cell, ICa was increased in the remote part of the cell where adenylyl cyclase activity was not stimulated. However, addition of ACh (3-10 microM) to the remote part had no effect on ICa, while addition of ACh to the part of the cell exposed to Iso or Fsk strongly antagonized the stimulatory effects of these drugs. 4. Our data demonstrate that ACh regulates ICa by acting at a site proximal to adenylyl cyclase in frog ventricular cells. We conclude that the muscarinic regulation of ICa does not involve any additional cAMP-independent mechanisms occurring downstream from cAMP generation.

  16. Lactam formation increases receptor binding, adenylyl cyclase stimulation and bone growth stimulation by human parathyroid hormone (hPTH)(1-28)NH2.

    PubMed

    Whitfield, J F; Morley, P; Willick, G E; Isaacs, R J; MacLean, S; Ross, V; Barbier, J R; Divieti, P; Bringhurst, F R

    2000-05-01

    Human parathyroid hormone (1-28)NH2 [hPTH(1-28)NH2] is the smallest of the PTH fragments that can fully stimulate adenylyl cyclase in ROS 17/2 rat osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells. This fragment has an IC50 of 110 nM for displacing 125I-[Nle8,18,Tyr34]bovine PTH(1-34)NH2 from HKRK B7 porcine kidney cells, which stably express 950,000 human type 1 PTH/PTH-related protein (PTHrP) receptors (PTH1Rs) per cell. It also has an EC50 of 23.9 nM for stimulating adenylyl cyclase in ROS 17/2 cells. Increasing the amphiphilicity of the alpha-helix in the residue 17-28 region by replacing Lys27 with Leu and stabilizing the helix by forming a lactam between Glu22 and Lys26 to produce the [Leu27]cyclo(Glu22-Lys26)hPTH(1-28)NH2 analog dramatically reduced the IC50 for displacing 125I-[Nle8,18,Tyr34]bPTH(1-34)NH2 from hPTH1Rs from 110 to 6 nM and dropped the EC50 for adenylyl cyclase stimulation in ROS 17/2 cells from 23.9 to 9.6 nM. These modifications also increased the osteogenic potency of hPTH(1-28)NH2. Thus, hPTH(1-28)NH2 did not significantly stimulate either femoral or vertebral trabecular bone growth in rats when injected daily at a dose of 5 nmol/100 g body weight for 6 weeks, beginning 2 weeks after ovariectomy (OVX), but it strongly stimulated the growth of trabeculae in the cancellous bone of the distal femurs and L5 vertebrae when injected at 25 nmol/100 g body weight. By contrast [Leu27]cyclo(Glu22-Lys26)hPTH(1-28)NH2 significantly stimulated trabecular bone growth when injected at 5 nmol/100 g of body weight. Thus, these modifications have brought the bone anabolic potency of hPTH(1-28)NH2 considerably closer to the potencies of the larger PTH peptides and analogs.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase type 6 overexpression selectively enhances beta-adrenergic and prostacyclin receptor-mediated inhibition of cardiac fibroblast function because of colocalization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqiu; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Mahautmr, Penden; Stitham, Jeremiah; Hwa, John; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2008-06-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts produce and degrade extracellular matrix and are critical in regulating cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. Fibroblasts are activated by factors such as transforming growth factor beta and inhibited by agents that elevate 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. cAMP signal generation and response is known to be compartmentalized in many cell types in part through the colocalization of receptors and specific adenylyl cyclase isoforms in lipid rafts and caveolae. The present study sought to define the localization of key G protein-coupled receptors with adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) in lipid rafts of rat cardiac fibroblasts and to determine if this colocalization was functionally relevant. We found that cardiac fibroblasts produce cAMP in response to agonists for beta-adrenergic (isoproterenol), prostaglandin EP2 (butaprost), adenosine (adenosine-5'-N-ethylcarboxamide, NECA), and prostacyclin (beraprost) receptors. Overexpression of AC6 increased cAMP production stimulated by isoproterenol and beraprost but not by butaprost or NECA. A key function of fibroblasts is the production of collagen. Isoproterenol- and beraprostmediated inhibition of collagen synthesis was also enhanced by AC6 overexpression, while inhibition by butaprost and NECA were unaltered. Lipid raft fractions from cardiac fibroblasts contain the preponderance of beta-adrenergic receptors and AC6 but exclude EP2 receptors. While we could not determine the localization of native prostacyclin receptors, we were able to determine that epitope-tagged prostanoid IP receptors (IPR) expressed in COS7 cells did localize, in part, in lipid raft fractions. These findings indicate that IP receptors are expressed in lipid rafts and can activate raft-localized AC isoforms. AC6 is completely compartmentized in lipid raft domains where it is activated solely by coresident G protein-coupled receptors to regulate cardiac fibroblast function.

  18. Distinct pools of cAMP centre on different isoforms of adenylyl cyclase in pituitary-derived GH3B6 cells.

    PubMed

    Wachten, Sebastian; Masada, Nanako; Ayling, Laura-Jo; Ciruela, Antonio; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J; Cooper, Dermot M F

    2010-01-01

    Microdomains have been proposed to explain specificity in the myriad of possible cellular targets of cAMP. Local differences in cAMP levels can be generated by phosphodiesterases, which control the diffusion of cAMP. Here, we address the possibility that adenylyl cyclases, the source of cAMP, can be primary architects of such microdomains. Distinctly regulated adenylyl cyclases often contribute to total cAMP levels in endogenous cellular settings, making it virtually impossible to determine the contribution of a specific isoform. To investigate cAMP dynamics with high precision at the single-isoform level, we developed a targeted version of Epac2-camps, a cAMP sensor, in which the sensor was tagged to a catalytically inactive version of the Ca(2+)-stimulable adenylyl cyclase 8 (AC8). This sensor, and less stringently targeted versions of Epac2-camps, revealed opposite regulation of cAMP synthesis in response to Ca(2+) in GH(3)B(6) pituitary cells. Ca(2+) release triggered by thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulated the minor endogenous AC8 species. cAMP levels were decreased by inhibition of AC5 and AC6, and simultaneous activation of phosphodiesterases, in different compartments of the same cell. These findings demonstrate the existence of distinct adenylyl-cyclase-centered cAMP microdomains in live cells and open the door to their molecular micro-dissection.

  19. Mice Overexpressing Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase Show Enhanced Spatial Memory Flexibility in the Absence of Intact Synaptic Long-Term Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    There is significant interest in understanding the contribution of intracellular signaling and synaptic substrates to memory flexibility, which involves new learning and suppression of obsolete memory. Here, we report that enhancement of Ca[superscript 2+]-stimulated cAMP signaling by overexpressing type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) facilitated…

  20. The C1 and C2 domains target human type 6 adenylyl cyclase to lipid rafts and caveolae.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Muthusamy; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Sun, Shu Qiang; Kaminsky, Joseph; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2009-02-01

    Previous data has shown that adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) is expressed principally in lipid rafts or caveolae of cardiac myocytes and other cell types while certain other isoforms of AC are excluded from these microdomains. The mechanism by which AC6 is localized to lipid rafts or caveolae is unknown. In this study, we show AC6 is localized in lipid rafts of COS-7 cells (expressing caveolin-1) and in HEK-293 cells or cardiac fibroblasts isolated from caveolin-1 knock-out mice (both of which lack prototypical caveolins). To determine the region of AC6 that confers raft localization, we independently expressed each of the major intracellular domains, the N-terminus, C1 and C2 domains, and examined their localization with various approaches. The N-terminus did not associate with lipid rafts or caveolae of either COS-7 or HEK-293 cells nor did it immunoprecipitate with caveolin-1 when expressed in COS-7 cells. By contrast, the C1 and C2 domains each associated with lipid rafts to varying degrees and were present in caveolin-1 immunoprecipitates. There were no differences in the pattern of localization of either the C1 or C2 domains between COS-7 and HEK-293 cells. Further dissection of the C1 domain into four individual proteins indicated that the N-terminal half of this domain is responsible for its raft localization. To probe for a role of a putative palmitoylation motif in the C-terminal portion of the C2 domain, we expressed various truncated forms of AC6 lacking most or all of the C-terminal 41 amino acids. These truncated AC6 proteins were not altered in terms of their localization in lipid rafts or their catalytic activity, implying that this C-terminal region is not required for lipid raft targeting of AC6. We conclude that while the C1 domain may be most important, both the C1 and C2 domains of AC6 play a role in targeting AC6 to lipid rafts.

  1. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.

  2. Glucagon receptor of human liver. Studies of its molecular weight and binding properties, and its ability to activate hepatic adenylyl cyclase of non-obese and obese subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, J N; Einarsson, K; Backman, L; Ewerth, S; Arner, P

    1985-01-01

    The glucagon receptor and the adenylyl cyclase system of human liver membranes were studied in six non-obese and six obese subjects who had elevated insulin and plasma glucagon levels. Analysis of specific glucagon binding by the method of Scatchard demonstrated a linear (monocomponent) plot with a dissociation constant of 2-3 nM, and the binding at low hormone concentrations was sensitive to guanosine triphosphate (GTP). The molecular weight of the glucagon receptor was 63,000 D as determined by an affinity labeling procedure and sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Affinity labeling of this structure was specific for glucagon and inhibited by GTP. Glucagon stimulated the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by human membranes with half-maximal activation elicited by 6 nM hormone. The human cyclase system required GTP to facilitate an optimal glucagon response. NaF (10 mM) also activated the cyclase system and produced the same magnitude of response as maximum glucagon activation. A comparison of the liver adenylyl cyclase system of non-obese and obese subjects was made using glucagon (5 nM and 1 microM) and NaF (10 mM). No significant differences in cAMP production were noted between the two groups, regardless of the agent used to activate the enzyme. These findings agree with the glucagon binding studies that showed similar amounts of binding activity in the membranes from the two groups. Also, there was no influence of either age or sex of the subjects on the adenylyl cyclase response. In conclusion, human liver membranes contain a glucagon receptor and an adenylyl cyclase system that correspond closely to the well-studied system in animal liver. This system in human obesity is not altered by the approximately twofold elevation in plasma glucagon that occurs in this metabolic disorder. Images PMID:2982913

  3. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    PubMed

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels.

  4. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Barott, K. L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K. C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  5. Nitric oxide inhibition of adenylyl cyclase type 6 activity is dependent upon lipid rafts and caveolin signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bundey, Richard A; Insel, Paul A

    2004-05-07

    Several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and vascular endothelial cells, produce nitric oxide (NO) via both constitutive and inducible isoforms of NO synthase. NO attenuates cardiac contractility and contributes to contractile dysfunction in heart failure, although the precise molecular mechanisms for these effects are poorly defined. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms type 5 and 6, which are preferentially expressed in cardiac myocytes, may be inhibited via a direct nitrosylation by NO. Because endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and NOS3), beta-adrenergic (betaAR) receptors, and AC6 all can localize in lipid raft/caveolin-rich microdomains, we sought to understand the role of lipid rafts in organizing components of betaAR-G(s)-AC signal transduction together with eNOS. Using neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, we found that disruption of lipid rafts with beta-cyclodextrin inhibited forskolin-stimulated AC activity and cAMP production, eliminated caveolin-3-eNOS interaction, and increased NO production. betaAR- and G(s)-mediated activation of AC activity were inhibited by beta-cyclodextrin treatment, but prostanoid receptor-stimulated AC activity, which appears to occur outside caveolin-rich microdomains, was unaffected unless eNOS was overexpressed and lipid rafts were disrupted. An NO donor, SNAP, inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in both native cardiac myocytes and cardiac myocytes and pulmonary artery endothelial cells engineered to overexpress AC6. These effects of SNAP were independent of guanylyl cyclase activity and were mimicked by overexpression of eNOS. The juxtaposition of eNOS with betaAR and AC types 5 and 6 results in selective regulation of betaAR by eNOS activity in lipid raft domains over other G(s)-coupled receptors localized in nonraft domains. Thus co-localization of multiple signaling components in lipid rafts provides key spatial regulation of AC activity.

  6. Prunetin signals via G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30(GPER1): Stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP-mediated activation of MAPK signaling induces Runx2 expression in osteoblasts to promote bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kainat; Pal, Subhashis; Yadav, Manisha; Maurya, Rakesh; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Sanyal, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya

    2015-12-01

    Prunetin is found in red clover and fruit of Prunus avium (red cherry). The effect of prunetin on osteoblast function, its mode of action and bone regeneration in vivo were investigated. Cultures of primary osteoblasts, osteoblastic cell line and HEK293T cells were used for various in vitro studies. Adult female rats received drill-hole injury at the femur diaphysis to assess the bone regenerative effect of prunetin. Prunetin at 10nM significantly (a) increased proliferation and differentiation of primary cultures of osteoblasts harvested from rats and (b) promoted formation of mineralized nodules by bone marrow stromal/osteoprogenitor cells. At this concentration, prunetin did not activate any of the two nuclear estrogen receptors (α and β). However, prunetin triggered signaling via a G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR30/GPER1, and enhanced cAMP levels in osteoblasts. G15, a selective GPR30 antagonist, abolished prunetin-induced increases in osteoblast proliferation, differentiation and intracellular cAMP. In osteoblasts, prunetin up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) protein through cAMP-dependent Erk/MAP kinase activation that ultimately resulted in the up-regulation of GPR30. Administration of prunetin at 0.25mg/kg given to rats stimulated bone regeneration at the site of drill hole and up-regulated Runx2 expression in the fractured callus and the effect was comparable to human parathyroid hormone, the only clinically used osteogenic therapy. We conclude that prunetin promotes osteoinduction in vivo and the mechanism is defined by signaling through GPR30 resulting in the up-regulation of the key osteogenic gene Runx2 that in turn up-regulates GPR30.

  7. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin. PMID:8552082

  8. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  9. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Oude-Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10) was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine-tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic anhydrase (CA), sAC constitutes an HCO−3/CO−2/pH sensor. In both alpha-intercalated cells of the collecting duct and the clear cells of the epididymis, sAC is expressed at significant level and involved in pH homeostasis via apical recruitment of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA) in a PKA-dependent manner. In addition to maintenance of pH homeostasis, sAC is also involved in metabolic regulation such as coupling of Krebs cycle to oxidative phosphorylation via bicarbonate/CO2 sensing. Additionally, sAC also regulates CFTR channel and plays an important role in regulation of barrier function and apoptosis. These observations suggest that sAC, via bicarbonate-sensing, plays an important role in maintaining homeostatic status of cells against fluctuations in their microenvironment. PMID:24575049

  10. Association of adenylyl cyclase 6 rs3730070 polymorphism and hemolytic level in patients with sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Cita, Kizzy-Clara; Ferdinand, Séverine; Connes, Philippe; Brudey, Laura; Tressières, Benoit; Etienne-Julan, Maryse; Lemonne, Nathalie; Tarer, Vanessa; Elion, Jacques; Romana, Marc

    2016-05-01

    A recent study suggested that adenosine signaling pathway could promote hemolysis in patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA). This signaling pathway involves several gene coding enzymes for which variants have been described. In this study, we analyzed the genotype-phenotype relationships between functional polymorphisms or polymorphisms associated with altered expression of adenosine pathway genes, namely adenosine deaminase (ada; rs73598374), adenosine A2b receptor (adora2b; rs7208480), adenylyl cyclase6 (adcy6; rs3730071, rs3730070, rs7300155), and hemolytic rate in SCA patients. One hundred and fifty SCA patients were genotyped for adcy6, ada, and adora2b variants as well as alpha-globin gene, a genetic factor known to modulate hemolytic rate. Hematological and biochemical data were obtained at steady-state. Lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, reticulocytes and total bilirubin were used to calculate a hemolytic index. Genotype-phenotype relationships were investigated using parametric tests and multivariate analysis. SCA patients carrying at least one allele of adcy6 rs3730070-G exhibited lower hemolytic rate than non-carriers in univariate analysis (p=0.006). The presence of adcy6 rs3730070-G variant was associated with a decreased hemolytic rate in adjusted model for age and alpha-thalassemia (p=0.032). Our results support a protective effect of adcy6 rs3730070-G variant on hemolysis in SCA patients.

  11. Deletion of Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase Perturbs the Postnatal Maturation of Olfactory Sensory Neurons and Olfactory Cilium Ultrastructure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Mengdi; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Yanfen; Storm, Daniel R.; Wang, Zhenshan

    2017-01-01

    Type 3 adenylyl cyclase (Adcy3) is localized to the cilia of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) and is an essential component of the olfactory cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway. Although the role of this enzyme in odor detection and axonal projection in OSNs was previously characterized, researchers will still have to determine its function in the maturation of postnatal OSNs and olfactory cilium ultrastructure. Previous studies on newborns showed that the anatomic structure of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of Adcy3 knockout mice (Adcy3-/-) is indistinguishable from that of their wild-type littermates (Adcy3+/+), whereas the architecture and associated composition of MOE are relatively underdeveloped at this early age. The full effects of sensory deprivation on OSNs may not also be exhibited in such age. In the present study, following a comparison of postnatal OSNs in seven-, 30-, and 90-day-old Adcy3-/- mice and wild-type controls (Adcy3+/+), we observed that the absence of Adcy3 leads to cumulative defects in the maturation of OSNs. Upon aging, Adcy3-/- OSNs exhibited increase in immature cells and reduction in mature cells along with elevated apoptosis levels. The density and ultrastructure of Adcy3-/- cilia were also disrupted in mice upon aging. Collectively, our results reveal an indispensable role of Adcy3 in postnatal maturation of OSNs and maintenance of olfactory cilium ultrastructure in mice through adulthood. PMID:28154525

  12. Cyclase-associated proteins: CAPacity for linking signal transduction and actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Hubberstey, Andrew V; Mottillo, Emilio P

    2002-04-01

    Many extracellular signals elicit changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which are mediated through an array of signaling proteins and pathways. One family of proteins that plays a role in regulating actin remodeling in response to cellular signals are the cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs). CAPs are highly conserved monomeric actin binding proteins present in a wide range of organisms including yeast, fly, plants, and mammals. The original CAP was isolated as a component of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex that serves as an effector of Ras during nutritional signaling. CAPs are multifunctional molecules that contain domains involved in actin binding, adenylyl cyclase association in yeast, SH3 binding, and oligomerization. Genetic studies in yeast have implicated CAPs in vesicle trafficking and endocytosis. CAPs play a developmental role in multicellular organisms, and studies of Drosophila have illuminated the importance of the actin cytoskeleton during eye development and in establishing oocyte polarity. This review will highlight the critical structural and functional domains of CAPs, describe recent studies that have implied important roles for these proteins in linking cell signaling with actin polymerization, and highlight their roles in vesicle trafficking and development.

  13. High-throughput FACS-based mutant screen identifies a gain-of-function allele of the Fusarium graminearum adenylyl cyclase causing deoxynivalenol over-production.

    PubMed

    Blum, Ailisa; Benfield, Aurélie H; Stiller, Jiri; Kazan, Kemal; Batley, Jacqueline; Gardiner, Donald M

    2016-05-01

    Fusarium head blight and crown rot, caused by the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum, impose a major threat to global wheat production. During the infection, plants are contaminated with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON), which can be toxic for humans and animals. In addition, DON is a major virulence factor during wheat infection. However, it is not fully understood how DON production is regulated in F. graminearum. In order to identify regulators of DON production, a high-throughput mutant screen using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) of a mutagenised TRI5-GFP reporter strain was established and a mutant over-producing DON under repressive conditions identified. A gain-of-function mutation in the F. graminearum adenylyl cyclase (FAC1), which is a known positive regulator of DON production, was identified as the cause of this phenotype through genome sequencing and segregation analysis. Our results show that the high-throughput mutant screening procedure developed here can be applied for identification of fungal proteins involved in diverse processes.

  14. Genetic evidence for adenylyl cyclase 1 as a target for preventing neuronal excitotoxicity mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Gong, Bo; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Toyoda, Hiroki; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Zhuo, Min

    2007-01-12

    The excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors by glutamate results in neuronal excitotoxicity. cAMP is a key second messenger and contributes to NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity. Adenylyl cyclases 1 (AC1) and 8 (AC8) are the two major calcium-stimulated ACs in the central nervous system. Previous studies demonstrate AC1 and AC8 play important roles in synaptic plasticity, memory, and persistent pain. However, little is known about the possible roles of these two ACs in glutamate-induced neuronal excitotoxicity. Here, we report that genetic deletion of AC1 significantly attenuated neuronal death induced by glutamate in primary cultures of cortical neurons, whereas AC8 deletion did not produce a significant effect. AC1, but not AC8, contributes to intracellular cAMP production following NMDA receptor activation by glutamate in cultured cortical neurons. AC1 is involved in the dynamic modulation of cAMP-response element-binding protein activity in neuronal excitotoxicity. To explore the possible roles of AC1 in cell death in vivo, we studied neuronal excitotoxicity induced by an intracortical injection of NMDA. Cortical lesions induced by NMDA were significantly reduced in AC1 but not in AC8 knock-out mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that AC1 plays an important role in neuronal excitotoxicity and may serve as a therapeutic target for preventing excitotoxicity in stroke and neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Adenylyl cyclase A expression is tip-specific in Dictyostelium slugs and directs StatA nuclear translocation and CudA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Verkerke-van Wijk, I; Fukuzawa, M; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    2001-06-01

    cAMP oscillations, generated by adenylyl cyclase A (ACA), coordinate cell aggregation in Dictyostelium and have also been implicated in organizer function during multicellular development. We used a gene fusion of the ACA promoter with a labile lacZ derivative to study the expression pattern of ACA. During aggregation, most cells expressed ACA, but thereafter expression was lost in all cells except those of the anterior tip. Before aggregation, ACA transcription was strongly upregulated by nanomolar cAMP pulses. Postaggregative transcription was sustained by nanomolar cAMP pulses, but downregulated by a continuous micromolar cAMP stimulus and by the stalk-cell-inducing factor DIF. Earlier work showed that the transcription factor StatA displays tip-specific nuclear translocation and directs tip-specific expression of the nuclear protein CudA, which is essential for culmination. Both StatA and CudA were present in nuclei throughout the entire slug in an aca null mutant that expresses ACA from the constitutive actin15 promoter. This suggests that the tip-specific expression of ACA directs tip-specific nuclear translocation of StatA and tip-specific expression of CudA.

  16. miR-181b promotes cell proliferation and reduces apoptosis by repressing the expression of adenylyl cyclase 9 (AC9) in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Yan-Li; Liu, Shang; Zhang, Pei-Pei; Chen, Zheng; Liu, Min; Tang, Hua

    2014-01-03

    MicroRNAs are a class of small, endogenous, non-coding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators. In this study, we found that miR-181b promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. And we validated a new miR-181b target gene, adenylyl cyclase 9 (AC9). miR-181b restricted cAMP production by post-transcriptionally downregulating AC9 expression. Phenotypic experiments indicated that miR-181b and AC9 exerted opposite effects on cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase subtype 1 is essential for late-phase long term potentiation and spatial propagation of synaptic responses in the anterior cingulate cortex of adult mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tao; O'Den, Gerile; Song, Qian; Koga, Kohei; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Zhuo, Min

    2014-10-10

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a key cellular mechanism for pathological pain in the central nervous system. LTP contains at least two different phases: early-phase LTP (E-LTP) and late-phase LTP (L-LTP). Among several major cortical areas, the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) is a critical brain region for pain perception and its related emotional changes. Periphery tissue or nerve injuries cause LTP of excitatory synaptic transmission in the ACC. Our previous studies have demonstrated that genetic deletion of calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) or pharmacological application of a selective AC1 inhibitor NB001 blocked E-LTP in the ACC. However, the effect of AC1 on L-LTP, which requires new protein synthesis and is important for the process of chronic pain, has not been investigated. Here we tested the effects of NB001 on the ACC L-LTP and found that bath application of NB001 (0.1 μM) totally blocked the induction of L-LTP and recruitment of cortical circuitry without affecting basal excitatory transmission. In contrast, gabapentin, a widely used analgesic drug for neuropathic pain, did not block the induction of L-LTP and circuitry recruitment even at a high concentration (100 μM). Gabapentin non-selectively decreased basal synaptic transmission. Our results provide strong evidence that the selective AC1 inhibitor NB001 can be used to inhibit pain-related cortical L-LTP without affecting basal synaptic transmission. It also provides basic mechanisms for possible side effects of gabapentin in the central nervous system and its ineffectiveness in some patients with neuropathic pain.

  18. Neonatal parathion exposure and interactions with a high-fat diet in adulthood: Adenylyl cyclase-mediated cell signaling in heart, liver and cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Abayomi A; Wrench, Nicola; Levin, Edward D; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2010-04-05

    Organophosphates are developmental neurotoxicants but recent evidence points to additional adverse effects on metabolism and cardiovascular function. One common mechanism is disrupted cell signaling mediated through cyclic AMP, targeting neurohumoral receptors, G-proteins and adenylyl cyclase (AC) itself. Earlier, we showed that neonatal parathion evokes later upregulation of the hepatic AC pathway in adolescence but that the effect wanes by young adulthood; nevertheless metabolic changes resembling prediabetes persist. Here, we administered parathion to neonatal rats (postnatal days 1-4, 0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/day), straddling the threshold for cholinesterase inhibition, but we extended the studies to much later, 5 months of age. In addition, we investigated whether metabolic challenge imposed by consuming a high-fat diet for 7 weeks would exacerbate neonatal parathion's effects. Parathion alone increased the expression or function of G(i), thus reducing AC responses to fluoride. Receptors controlling AC activity were also affected: beta-adrenergic receptors (betaARs) in skeletal muscle were increased, whereas those in the heart were decreased, and the latter also showed an elevation of m(2)-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which inhibit AC. The high-fat diet also induced changes in AC signaling, enhancing the hepatic AC response to glucagon while impairing the cardiac response to fluoride or forskolin, and suppressing betaARs and m(2)-muscarinic receptors; the only change in the cerebellum was a decrease in betaARs. Although there were no significant interactions between neonatal parathion exposure and a high-fat diet, their convergent effects on the same signaling cascade indicate that early OP exposure, separately or combination with dietary factors, may contribute to the worldwide increase in the incidence of obesity and diabetes.

  19. Neonatal Parathion Exposure and Interactions with a High-Fat Diet in Adulthood: Adenylyl Cyclase-Mediated Cell Signaling in Heart, Liver and Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Adigun, Abayomi A.; Wrench, Nicola; Levin, Edward D.; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphates are developmental neurotoxicants but recent evidence points to additional adverse effects on metabolism and cardiovascular function. One common mechanism is disrupted cell signaling mediated through cyclic AMP, targeting neurohumoral receptors, G-proteins and adenylyl cyclase (AC) itself. Earlier, we showed that neonatal parathion evokes later upregulation of the hepatic AC pathway in adolescence but that the effect wanes by young adulthood; nevertheless metabolic changes resembling prediabetes persist. Here, we administered parathion to neonatal rats (postnatal days 1-4, 0.1 or 0.2 mg/kg/day), straddling the threshold for cholinesterase inhibition, but we extended the studies to much later, 5 months of age. In addition, we investigated whether metabolic challenge imposed by consuming a high-fat diet for 7 weeks would exacerbate neonatal parathion’s effects. Parathion alone increased the expression or function of Gi, thus reducing AC responses to fluoride. Receptors controlling AC activity were also affected: β-adrenergic receptors (βARs) in skeletal muscle were increased, whereas those in the heart were decreased, and the latter also showed an elevation of m2-muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, which inhibit AC. The high-fat diet also induced changes in AC signaling, enhancing the hepatic AC response to glucagon while impairing the cardiac response to fluoride or forskolin, and suppressing βARs and m2-muscarinic receptors; the only change in the cerebellum was a decrease in βARs. Although there were no significant interactions between neonatal parathion exposure and a high-fat diet, their convergent effects on the same signaling cascade indicate that early OP exposure, separately or combination with dietary factors, may contribute to the worldwide increase in the incidence of obesity and diabetes. PMID:20074626

  20. A cytoskeletal localizing domain in the cyclase-associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates access to a distant SH3-binding site.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Wang, C; Palmieri, S J; Haarer, B K; Field, J

    1999-07-09

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase consists of a 200-kDa catalytic subunit (CYR1) and a 70-kDa subunit (CAP/SRV2). CAP/Srv2p assists the small G protein Ras to activate adenylyl cyclase. CAP also regulates the cytoskeleton through an actin sequestering activity and is directed to cortical actin patches by a proline-rich SH3-binding site (P2). In this report we analyze the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Ras/cAMP signaling. Two alleles of CAP, L16P(Srv2) and R19T (SupC), first isolated in genetic screens for mutants that attenuate cAMP levels, reduced adenylyl cyclase binding, and cortical actin patch localization. A third mutation, L27F, also failed to localize but showed no loss of either cAMP signaling or adenylyl cyclase binding. However, all three N-terminal mutations reduced CAP-CAP multimer formation and SH3 domain binding, although the SH3-binding site is about 350 amino acids away. Finally, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A did not affect the cAMP phenotypes of the hyperactive Ras2(Val19) allele. These data identify a novel region of CAP that controls access to the SH3-binding site and demonstrate that cytoskeletal localization of CAP or an intact cytoskeleton per se is not necessary for cAMP signaling.

  1. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: I. Novel role of CaMKs and interactions between calcium- and adenylyl cyclase-dependent pathways.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Theca and granulosa cells for in vitro primary culture were obtained by enzymatic digestion of mature ovarian tissue from Atlantic croaker (Micropogonias undulatus) and separation from the other cell types by Percoll density-gradient centrifugation. Histochemical staining and treatment with pregnenolone confirmed the presence in the cultured cells of enzymes involved in synthesizing the major sex steroids in croaker ovaries: testosterone, estradiol, and 17alpha,20beta,21-trihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one (20beta-S). Croaker theca and granulosa cells maintained their steroidogenic response to gonadotropin when cultured with serum-supplemented media and produced high levels of testosterone for up to 5 days, although estradiol production was low. Multiple signal transduction pathways mediating gonadotropin stimulation of androgen production were identified in Atlantic croaker ovarian theca and granulosa cells in primary co-culture. Inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels (VSCCs) and calmodulin decreased the steroidogenic response to gonadotropin, whereas activators of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A (PKA) increased testosterone production, indicating that both calcium and PKA-dependent signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of follicular steroid production. In addition, the first evidence in vertebrates for an involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs) in gonadal steroidogenesis was obtained, since the stimulatory effects of gonadotropin on testosterone media accumulation were attenuated by specific inhibitors of CaMKs. Some interactions among the signaling pathways were observed as demonstrated by the positive effect of elevated intracellular calcium on adenylyl cyclase activity and the reduction of forskolin- and dbcAMP-induced testosterone production by inhibitors of VSCCs, calmodulin, and CaMKs.

  2. Structural evidence for variable oligomerization of the N-terminal domain of cyclase-associated protein (CAP).

    PubMed

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Hu, Nien-Jen; Wlodawer, Alexander; Hofmann, Andreas

    2005-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved and widely distributed protein that links the nutritional response signaling to cytoskeleton remodeling. In yeast, CAP is a component of the adenylyl cyclase complex and helps to activate the Ras-mediated catalytic cycle of the cyclase. While the N-terminal domain of CAP (N-CAP) provides a binding site for adenylyl cyclase, the C-terminal domain (C-CAP) possesses actin binding activity. Our attempts to crystallize full-length recombinant CAP from Dictyostelium discoideum resulted in growth of orthorhombic crystals containing only the N-terminal domain (residues 42-227) due to auto-proteolytic cleavage. The structure was solved by molecular replacement with data at 2.2 A resolution. The present crystal structure allows the characterization of a head-to-tail N-CAP dimer in the asymmetric unit and a crystallographic side-to-side dimer. Comparison with previously published structures of N-CAP reveals variable modes of dimerization of this domain, but the presence of a common interface for the side-to-side dimer.

  3. The vasorelaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid involves stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP/PKA pathway: Evidences by pharmacological and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luciano A A; Alencar Filho, Edilson B; Coelho, Maisa C; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-10-05

    The relaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid (LBD) was investigated on isolated aortic rings and compared with forskolin (FSK), a standard and potent activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC) with relaxing effect. The presence of potassium channel blockers, such as glibenclamide (ATP-blocker), apamin (SKCa-blocker), charybdotoxin (BKCa-blocker) did not significantly affect either the LBD or FSK concentration-response curves. However, in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (KV-blocker), the relaxant effect for both diterpenes was significantly attenuated, with reduction of its relative potencies. Moreover, the relaxation induced by 8-Br-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, was also significantly attenuated in the same conditions, i.e., in the presence of 4-aminopyridine. The presence of aminophylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, caused a significant increasing in the potency for both LBD and FSK. On the other hand, the presence of Rp-cAMPS, a selective PKA-inhibitor, significantly attenuated the relaxant effect of LBD. In this work, in the same experimental conditions, both labdane-type diterpenes presented remarkably similar results; FSK, however, presented a higher potency (100-fold) than LBD. Thus, the hypothesis that LBD could be a novel AC-activator emerged. To assess that hypothesis, computational molecular docking studies were performed. Crystallographic structure of adenylyl cyclase/forskolin complex (1AB8) was obtained from RSCB Protein Data Bank and used to compare the modes of interaction of the native ligand and LBD. The computational data shows many similarities between LBD and FSK concerning the interaction with the regulatory site of AC. Taken together, the results presented here pointed to LBD as a novel AC-activator.

  4. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide and nerve growth factor use the proteasome to rescue nerve growth factor-deprived sympathetic neurons cultured from chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Przywara, D A; Kulkarni, J S; Wakade, T D; Leontiev, D V; Wakade, A R

    1998-11-01

    Removal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic neurons initiates a neuronal death program and apoptosis. We show that pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) prevents apoptosis in NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons. PACAP (100 nM) added to culture medium at the time of plating failed to support neuronal survival. However, in neurons grown for 2 days with NGF and then deprived of NGF, PACAP prevented cell death for the next 24-48 h. Uptake of [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) was used as an index of survival and decreased >50% in NGF-deprived cultures within 24 h. PACAP (1-100 nM) restored [3H]NE uptake to 92 +/- 8% of that of NGF-supported controls. Depolarization-induced [3H]NE release in neurons rescued by PACAP was the same as that in NGF-supported neurons. PACAP rescue was not mimicked by forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and was not blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate. Mobilization of phosphatidylinositol by muscarine failed to support NGF-deprived neurons. Thus, PACAP may use novel signaling to promote survival of sympathetic neurons. The apoptosis-associated caspase CPP32 activity increased approximately fourfold during 6 h of NGF withdrawal (145 +/- 40 versus 38 +/- 17 nmol of substrate cleaved/min/mg of protein) and returned to even below the control level in NGF-deprived, PACAP-rescued cultures (14 +/- 7 nmol/min/mg of protein). Readdition of NGF or PACAP to NGF-deprived cultures reversed CPP32 activation, and this was blocked by lactacystin, a potent and specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that NGF and PACAP target CPP32 for destruction by the proteasome. As PACAP is a preganglionic neurotransmitter in autonomic ganglia, we propose a novel function for this transmitter as an apoptotic rescuer of sympathetic neurons when the supply of NGF is compromised.

  5. Modulation of NaCl absorption by [HCO3−] in the marine teleost intestine is mediated by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Grosell, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal HCO3− secretion and NaCl absorption are essential for counteracting dehydration in marine teleost fish. We investigated how these two processes are coordinated in toadfish. HCO3− stimulated a luminal positive short-circuit current (Isc) in intestine mounted in Ussing chamber, bathed with the same saline solution on the external and internal sides of the epithelium. The Isc increased proportionally to the [HCO3−] in the bath up to 80 mM NaHCO3, and it did not occur when NaHCO3 was replaced with Na+-gluconate or with NaHCO3 in Cl−-free saline. HCO3− (20 mM) induced a ∼2.5-fold stimulation of Isc, and this [HCO3−] was used in all subsequent experiments. The HCO3−-stimulated Isc was prevented or abolished by apical application of 10 μM bumetanide (a specific inhibitor of NKCC) and by 30 μM 4-catechol estrogen [CE; an inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC)]. The inhibitory effects of bumetanide and CE were not additive. The HCO3−-stimulated Isc was prevented by apical bafilomycin (1 μM) and etoxolamide (1 mM), indicating involvement of V-H+-ATPase and carbonic anhydrases, respectively. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of an NKCC2-like protein in the apical membrane and subapical area of epithelial intestinal cells, of Na+/K+-ATPase in basolateral membranes, and of an sAC-like protein in the cytoplasm. We propose that sAC regulates NKCC activity in response to luminal HCO3−, and that V-H+-ATPase and intracellular carbonic anhydrase are essential for transducing luminal HCO3− into the cell by CO2/HCO3− hydration/dehydration. This mechanism putatively coordinates HCO3− secretion with NaCl and water absorption in toadfish intestine. PMID:20410468

  6. Ocean acidification stimulates alkali signal pathway: A bicarbonate sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase from oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates physiological changes induced by CO2 exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiudan; Wang, Mengqiang; Jia, Zhihao; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Shuai; Chen, Hao; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-12-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) has been demonstrated to have severe effects on marine organisms, especially marine calcifiers. However, the impacts of OA on the physiology of marine calcifiers and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an acid-base sensor in response to [HCO3(-)] and an intracellular source of cyclic AMP (cAMP). In the present study, an ortholog of sAC was identified from pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (designated as CgsAC) and the catalytic region of CgsAC was cloned and expressed. Similar to the native CgsAC from gill tissues, the recombinant CgsAC protein (rCgsAC) exhibited [HCO3(-)] mediated cAMP-forming activity, which could be inhibited by a small molecule KH7. After 16days of CO2 exposure (pH=7.50), the mRNA transcripts of CgsAC increased in muscle, mantle, hepatopancreas, gill, male gonad and haemocytes, and two truncated CgsAC forms of 45kD and 20kD were produced. Cytosolic CgsAC could be translocated from the cytoplasm and nuclei to the membrane in response to CO2 exposure. Besides, CO2 exposure could increase the production of cAMP and intracellular pH of haemocytes, which was regulated by CgsAC (p<0.05), suggesting the existence of a [HCO3(-)]/CgsAC/cAMP signal pathway in oyster. The elevated CO2 could induce an increase of ROS level (p<0.05) and a decrease of phagocytic rate of haemocytes (p<0.05), which could be inhibited by KH7. The results collectively suggest that CgsAC is an important acid-base sensor in oyster and the [HCO3(-)]/CgsAC/cAMP signal pathway might be responsible for intracellular alkalization effects on oxidative phosphorylation and innate immunity under CO2 exposure. The changes of intracellular pH, ROS, and phagocytosis mediated by CgsAC might help us to further understand the effects of ocean acidification on marine calcifiers.

  7. Sensing Positive versus Negative Reward Signals through Adenylyl Cyclase-Coupled GPCRs in Direct and Indirect Pathway Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anu G.; Eriksson, Olivia; Vincent, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in striatal dopamine (DA) concentration are considered to encode a reward prediction error (RPE) in reinforcement learning tasks. Often, a phasic DA change occurs concomitantly with a dip in striatal acetylcholine (ACh), whereas other neuromodulators, such as adenosine (Adn), change slowly. There are abundant adenylyl cyclase (AC) coupled GPCRs for these neuromodulators in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which play important roles in plasticity. However, little is known about the interaction between these neuromodulators via GPCRs. The interaction between these transient neuromodulator changes and the effect on cAMP/PKA signaling via Golf- and Gi/o-coupled GPCR are studied here using quantitative kinetic modeling. The simulations suggest that, under basal conditions, cAMP/PKA signaling could be significantly inhibited in D1R+ MSNs via ACh/M4R/Gi/o and an ACh dip is required to gate a subset of D1R/Golf-dependent PKA activation. Furthermore, the interaction between ACh dip and DA peak, via D1R and M4R, is synergistic. In a similar fashion, PKA signaling in D2+ MSNs is under basal inhibition via D2R/Gi/o and a DA dip leads to a PKA increase by disinhibiting A2aR/Golf, but D2+ MSNs could also respond to the DA peak via other intracellular pathways. This study highlights the similarity between the two types of MSNs in terms of high basal AC inhibition by Gi/o and the importance of interactions between Gi/o and Golf signaling, but at the same time predicts differences between them with regard to the sign of RPE responsible for PKA activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine transients are considered to carry reward-related signal in reinforcement learning. An increase in dopamine concentration is associated with an unexpected reward or salient stimuli, whereas a decrease is produced by omission of an expected reward. Often dopamine transients are accompanied by other neuromodulatory signals, such as acetylcholine and adenosine. We highlight the

  8. Non-raft adenylyl cyclase 2 defines a cAMP signaling compartment that selectively regulates IL-6 expression in airway smooth muscle cells: differential regulation of gene expression by AC isoforms.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Birg, Anna V; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2014-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms differ in their tissue distribution, cellular localization, regulation, and protein interactions. Most cell types express multiple AC isoforms. We hypothesized that cAMP produced by different AC isoforms regulates unique cellular responses in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (BSMC). Overexpression of AC2, AC3, or AC6 had distinct effects on forskolin (Fsk)-induced expression of a number of known cAMP-responsive genes. These data show that different AC isoforms can differentially regulate gene expression. Most notable, overexpression and activation of AC2 enhanced interleukin 6 (IL-6) expression, but overexpression of AC3 or AC6 had no effect. IL-6 production by BSMC was induced by Fsk and select G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, though IL-6 levels did not directly correlate with global cAMP levels. Treatment with PKA selective 6-Bnz-cAMP or Epac selective 8-CPT-2Me-cAMP cAMP analogs revealed a predominant role for PKA in cAMP-mediated induction of IL-6. IL-6 promoter mutations demonstrated that AP-1 and CRE transcription sites were required for Fsk to stimulate IL-6 expression. Our present study defines an AC2 cAMP signaling compartment that specifically regulates IL-6 expression in BSMC via Epac and PKA and demonstrates that other AC isoforms are excluded from this pool.

  9. Distinct PKC isoforms mediate the activation of cPLA2 and adenylyl cyclase by phorbol ester in RAW264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-W; Chen, Bin C

    1998-01-01

    The modulatory effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and adenylyl cyclase (AC) have recently been described. Since the signalling cascades associated with these events play critical roles in various functions of macrophages, we set out to investigate the crosstalk between PKC and the cPLA2 and AC pathways in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and to determine the involvement of individual PKC isoforms. The cPLA2 and AC pathways were studied by measuring the potentiation by the phorbol ester PMA of ionomycin-induced arachidonic acid (AA) release and prostagladin E1 (PGE1)-stimulated cyclic AMP production, respectively.PMA at 1 μM caused a significant increase in AA release both in the presence (371%) and absence (67%) of ionomycin induction, while exposure of RAW 264.7 cells to PMA increased PGE1 stimulation of cyclic AMP levels by 208%.Treatment of cells with staurosporine and Ro 31-8220 inhibited the PMA-induced potentiation of both AA release and cyclic AMP accumulation, while Go 6976 (an inhibitor of classical PKC isoforms) and LY 379196 (a specific inhibitor of PKCβ) inhibited the AA response but failed to affect the enhancement of the cyclic AMP response by PMA.Long term pretreatment of cells with PMA abolished the subsequent effect of PMA in potentiating AA release, but only inhibited the cyclic AMP response by 42%.Neither PD 98059, an inhibitor of MEK, nor genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, had any effect on the ability of PMA to potentiate AA or cyclic AMP production.The potentiation of AA release, but not of cyclic AMP formation, by PMA was sensitive to inhibition by wortmannin. This effect was unrelated to the inhibition of PKC activation as deduced from the translocation of PKC activity to the cell membrane.Western blot analysis revealed the presence of eight PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, δ, ε, μ λ and ξ) in RAW 264.7 cells and PMA was shown to induce the translocation of the α, βI, βII,

  10. Prostaglandin EP3 receptor superactivates adenylyl cyclase via the Gq/PLC/Ca2+ pathway in a lipid raft-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Kumiko; Yano, Akiko; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Morimoto, Kazushi; Inazumi, Tomoaki; Hatae, Noriyuki; Tabata, Hiroyuki; Segi-Nishida, Eri; Tanaka, Satoshi; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Yukihiko

    2009-11-27

    We previously demonstrated that prostaglandin EP3 receptor augments EP2-elicited cAMP formation in COS-7 cells in a G(i/o)-insensitive manner. The purpose of our current study was to identify the signaling pathways involved in EP3-induced augmentation of receptor-stimulated cAMP formation. The enhancing effect of EP3 receptor was irrespective of the C-terminal structure of the EP3 isoform. This EP3 action was abolished by treatment with inhibitors for phospholipase C and intracellular Ca(2+)-related signaling molecules such as U73122, staurosporine, 2-APB and SK&F 96365. Indeed, an EP3 agonist stimulated IP(3) formation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which was blocked by U73122, but not by pertussis toxin. The enhancing effect by EP3 on cAMP formation was mimicked by both a Ca(2+) ionophore and the activation of a typical G(q)-coupled receptor. Moreover, EP3 was exclusively localized to the raft fraction in COS-7 cells and EP3-elicited augmentation of cAMP formation was abolished by cholesterol depletion and introduction of a dominant negative caveolin-1 mutant. These results suggest that EP3 elicits adenylyl cyclase superactivation via G(q)/phospholipase C activation and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in a lipid raft microdomain-dependent manner.

  11. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  12. Disruption of type 5 adenylyl cyclase prevents β-adrenergic receptor cardiomyopathy: a novel approach to β-adrenergic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Vatner, Stephen F; Vatner, Dorothy E

    2014-11-15

    β-Adrenergic receptor (β-AR) blockade is widely used to treat heart failure, since the adverse effects of chronic β-AR stimulation are central to the pathogenesis of this disease state. Transgenic (Tg) mice, where β-AR signaling is chronically enhanced by overexpression of cardiac β₂-ARs, is a surrogate for this mechanism, since these mice develop cardiomyopathy as reflected by reduced left ventricular (LV) function, increased fibrosis, apoptosis, and myocyte hypertrophy. We hypothesized that disruption of type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5), which is in the β-AR signaling pathway in the heart, but exerts only a minor β-AR blocking effect, could prevent the cardiomyopathy in β₂-AR Tg mice without the negative effects of full β-AR blockade. Accordingly, we mated β₂-AR Tg mice with AC5 knockout (KO) mice. The β₂-AR Tg × AC5 KO bigenic mice prevented the cardiomyopathy as reflected by improved LV ejection fraction, reduced apoptosis, fibrosis, and myocyte size and preserved exercise capacity. The rescue was not simply due to a β-blocking effect of AC5 KO, since neither baseline LV function nor the response to isoproterenol was diminished substantially compared with the negative inotropic effects of β-blockade. However, AC5 disruption in β₂-AR Tg activates the antioxidant, manganese superoxide dismutase, an important mechanism protecting the heart from cardiomyopathy. These results indicate that disruption of AC5 prevents the cardiomyopathy induced by chronically enhanced β-AR signaling in mice with overexpressed β₂-AR, potentially by enhancing resistance to oxidative stress and apoptosis, suggesting a novel, alternative approach to β-AR blockade.

  13. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen.

  14. Bis-Halogen-Anthraniloyl-Substituted Nucleoside 5′-Triphosphates as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Bordetella pertussis Adenylyl Cyclase Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Geduhn, Jens; Dove, Stefan; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; König, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Whooping cough is caused by Bordetella pertussis and still constitutes one of the top five causes of death in young children, particularly in developing countries. The calmodulin-activated adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin CyaA substantially contributes to disease development. Thus, potent and selective CyaA inhibitors would be valuable drugs for the treatment of whooping cough. However, it has been difficult to obtain potent CyaA inhibitors with selectivity relative to mammalian ACs. Selectivity is important for reducing potential toxic effects. In a previous study we serendipitously found that bis-methylanthraniloyl (bis-MANT)-IMP is a more potent CyaA inhibitor than MANT-IMP (Mol Pharmacol 72:526–535, 2007). These data prompted us to study the effects of a series of 32 bulky mono- and bis-anthraniloyl (ANT)-substituted nucleotides on CyaA and mammalian ACs. The novel nucleotides differentially inhibited CyaA and ACs 1, 2, and 5. Bis-ANT nucleotides inhibited CyaA competitively. Most strikingly, bis-Cl-ANT-ATP inhibited CyaA with a potency ≥100-fold higher than ACs 1, 2, and 5. In contrast to MANT-ATP, bis-MANT-ATP exhibited low intrinsic fluorescence, thereby substantially enhancing the signal-to noise ratio for the analysis of nucleotide binding to CyaA. The high sensitivity of the fluorescence assay revealed that bis-MANT-ATP binds to CyaA already in the absence of calmodulin. Molecular modeling showed that the catalytic site of CyaA is sufficiently spacious to accommodate both MANT substituents. Collectively, we have identified the first potent CyaA inhibitor with high selectivity relative to mammalian ACs. The fluorescence properties of bis-ANT nucleotides facilitate development of a high-throughput screening assay. PMID:20962032

  15. Long-term enhancement of REM sleep by the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the pontine reticular formation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; Basille, M; Gonzalez, B; Vaudry, H; Hamon, M; Adrien, J; Bourgin, P

    1999-11-01

    In rats, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep can be elicited by microinjection of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) into the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO). In the present study, we investigated whether this area could also be a REM-promoting target for a peptide closely related to VIP: the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). When administered into the posterior part of the PnO, but not in nearby areas, of freely moving chronically implanted rats, PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 (0.3 and 3 pmol) induced a marked enhancement (60-85% over baseline) of REM sleep for 8 h that could be prevented by prior infusion of the antagonist PACAP-(6-27) (3 pmol) into the same site. Moreover, injections of PACAP into the centre of the posterior PnO resulted in REM sleep enhancement which could last for up to 11 consecutive days. Quantitative autoradiography using [125I]PACAP-27 revealed the presence in the PnO of specific binding sites with high affinity for PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 (IC50 = 2.4 and 3.2 nM, respectively), but very low affinity for VIP (IC50 > 1 microM). These data suggest that PACAP within the PnO may play a key role in REM sleep regulation, and provide evidence for long-term (several days) mechanisms involved in such a control. PAC1 receptors which have a much higher affinity for PACAP than for VIP might mediate this long-term action of PACAP on REM sleep.

  16. Lack of an effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of adenylyl cyclase 3 on renal Na+ and water excretion or arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Stuart, Deborah; Van Hoek, Alfred N; Stockand, James D; Bugaj, Vladislav; Mironova, Elena; Blount, Mitsi A; Kohan, Donald E

    2014-03-15

    cAMP is a key mediator of connecting tubule and collecting duct (CD) Na(+) and water reabsorption. Studies performed in vitro have suggested that CD adenylyl cyclase (AC)3 partly mediates the actions of vasopressin; however, the physiological role of CD AC3 has not been determined. To assess this, mice were developed with CD-specific disruption of AC3 [CD AC3 knockout (KO)]. Inner medullary CDs from these mice exhibited 100% target gene recombination and had reduced ANG II- but not vasopressin-induced cAMP accumulation. However, there were no differences in urine volume, urinary urea excretion, or urine osmolality between KO and control mice during normal water intake or varying degrees of water restriction in the presence or absence of chronic vasopressin administration. There were no differences between CD AC3 KO and control mice in arterial pressure or urinary Na(+) or K(+) excretion during a normal or high-salt diet, whereas plasma renin and vasopressin concentrations were similar between the two genotypes. Patch-clamp analysis of split-open cortical CDs revealed no difference in epithelial Na(+) channel activity in the presence or absence of vasopressin. Compensatory changes in AC6 were not responsible for the lack of a renal phenotype in CD AC3 KO mice since combined CD AC3/AC6 KO mice had similar arterial pressure and renal Na(+) and water handling compared with CD AC6 KO mice. In summary, these data do not support a significant role for CD AC3 in the regulation of renal Na(+) and water excretion in general or vasopressin regulation of CD function in particular.

  17. Chronic treatment with escitalopram but not R-citalopram translocates Galpha(s) from lipid raft domains and potentiates adenylyl cyclase: a 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter-independent action of this antidepressant compound.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiu; Rasenick, Mark M

    2010-03-01

    Chronic antidepressant treatment has been shown to increase adenylyl cyclase activity, in part, due to translocation of Galpha(s) from lipid rafts to a nonraft fraction of the plasma membrane where they engage in a more facile stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. This effect holds for multiple classes of antidepressants, and for serotonin uptake inhibitors, it occurs in the absence of the serotonin transporter. In the present study, we examined the change in the amount of Galpha(s) in lipid raft and whole cell lysate after exposing C6 cells to escitalopram. The results showed that chronic (but not acute) escitalopram decreased the content of Galpha(s) in lipid rafts, whereas there was no change in overall Galpha(s) content. These effects were drug dose- and exposure time-dependent. Although R-citalopram has been reported to antagonize some effects of escitalopram, this compound was without effect on Galpha(s) localization in lipid rafts, and R-citalopram did not inhibit these actions of escitalopram. Escitalopram treatment increased cAMP accumulation, and this seemed due to increased coupling between Galpha(s) and adenylyl cyclase. Thus, escitalopram is potent, rapid and efficacious in translocating Galpha(s) from lipid rafts, and this effect seems to occur independently of 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters. Our results suggest that, although antidepressants display distinct affinities for well identified targets (e.g., monoamine transporters), several presynaptic and postsynaptic molecules are probably modified during chronic antidepressant treatment, and these additional targets may be required for clinical efficacy of these drugs.

  18. Identification of a cyclase-associated protein (CAP) homologue in Dictyostelium discoideum and characterization of its interaction with actin.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, U; Brokamp, R; Karakesisoglou, I; Schleicher, M; Noegel, A A

    1996-02-01

    In search for novel actin binding proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum we have isolated a cDNA clone coding for a protein of approximately 50 kDa that is highly homologous to the class of adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins (CAP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the amino-terminal part of CAP is involved in the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase whereas the loss of the carboxyl-terminal domain results in morphological and nutritional defects. To study the interaction of Dictyostelium CAP with actin, the complete protein and its amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains were expressed in Escherichia coli and used in actin binding assays. CAP sequestered actin in a Ca2+ independent way. This activity was localized to the carboxyl-terminal domain. CAP and its carboxyl-terminal domain led to a fluorescence enhancement of pyrene-labeled G-actin up to 50% indicating a direct interaction, whereas the amino-terminal domain did not enhance. In polymerization as well as in viscometric assays the ability of the carboxyl-terminal domain to sequester actin and to prevent F-actin formation was approximately two times higher than that of intact CAP. The sequestering activity of full length CAP could be inhibited by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), whereas the activity of the carboxyl-terminal domain alone was not influenced, suggesting that the amino-terminal half of the protein is required for the PIP2 modulation of the CAP function. In profilin-minus cells the CAP concentration is increased by approximately 73%, indicating that CAP may compensate some profilin functions in vivo. In migrating D. discoideum cells CAP was enriched at anterior and posterior plasma membrane regions. Only a weak staining of the cytoplasm was observed. In chemotactically stimulated cells the protein was very prominent in leading fronts. The data suggest an involvement of D. discoideum CAP in microfilament reorganization near the plasma membrane in a PIP2-regulated manner.

  19. Two separate functions are encoded by the carboxyl-terminal domains of the yeast cyclase-associated protein and its mammalian homologs. Dimerization and actin binding.

    PubMed

    Zelicof, A; Protopopov, V; David, D; Lin, X Y; Lustgarten, V; Gerst, J E

    1996-07-26

    The yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was identified as a component of the RAS-activated cyclase complex. CAP consists of two functional domains separated by a proline-rich region. One domain, which localizes to the amino terminus, mediates RAS signaling through adenylyl cyclase, while a domain at the carboxyl terminus is involved in the regulation of cell growth and morphogenesis. Recently, the carboxyl terminus of yeast CAP was shown to sequester actin, but whether this function has been conserved, and is the sole function of this domain, is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carboxyl-terminal domains of CAP and CAP homologs have two separate functions. We show that carboxyl-terminals of both yeast CAP and a mammalian CAP homolog, MCH1, bind to actin. We also show that this domain contains a signal for dimerization, allowing both CAP and MCH1 to form homodimers and heterodimers. The properties of actin binding and dimerization are mediated by separate regions on the carboxyl terminus; the last 27 amino acids of CAP being critical for actin binding. Finally, we present evidence that links a segment of the proline-rich region of CAP to its localization in yeast. Together, these results suggest that all three domains of CAP proteins are functional.

  20. Mammalian homolog of the yeast cyclase associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates actin filament assembly.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Field, J

    2000-02-01

    Control of cell shape and motility requires rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton. One cytoskeletal protein that may regulate actin dynamics is CAP (cyclase associated protein; CAP/Srv2p; ASP-56). CAP was first isolated from yeast as an adenylyl cyclase associated protein required for RAS regulation of cAMP signaling. In addition, CAP also regulates the actin cytoskeleton primarily through an actin monomer binding activity. CAP homologs are found in many eukaryotes, including mammals where they also bind actin, but little is known about their biological function. We, therefore, designed experiments to address CAP1 regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. CAP1 localized to membrane ruffles and actin stress fibers in fixed cells of various types. To address localization in living cells, we constructed GFP-CAP1 fusion proteins and found that fusion proteins lacking the actin-binding region localized like the wild type protein. We also performed microinjection studies with affinity-purified anti-CAP1 antibodies in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts and found that the antibodies attenuated serum stimulation of stress fibers. Finally, CAP1 purified from platelets through a monoclonal antibody affinity purification step stimulated the formation of stress fiber-like filaments when it was microinjected into serum-starved Swiss 3T3 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that CAP1 promotes assembly of the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. A Drosophila homolog of cyclase-associated proteins collaborates with the Abl tyrosine kinase to control midline axon pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Wills, Zachary; Emerson, Mark; Rusch, Jannette; Bikoff, Jay; Baum, Buzz; Perrimon, Norbert; Van Vactor, David

    2002-11-14

    We demonstrate that Drosophila capulet (capt), a homolog of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein that binds and regulates actin in yeast, associates with Abl in Drosophila cells, suggesting a functional relationship in vivo. We find a robust and specific genetic interaction between capt and Abl at the midline choice point where the growth cone repellent Slit functions to restrict axon crossing. Genetic interactions between capt and slit support a model where Capt and Abl collaborate as part of the repellent response. Further support for this model is provided by genetic interactions that both capt and Abl display with multiple members of the Roundabout receptor family. These studies identify Capulet as part of an emerging pathway linking guidance signals to regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics and suggest that the Abl pathway mediates signals downstream of multiple Roundabout receptors.

  2. An actin monomer binding activity localizes to the carboxyl-terminal half of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Chen, Z; Horenstein, J; Weber, A; Field, J

    1995-03-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex contains at least two subunits, a 200-kDa catalytic subunit and a 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein, CAP (also called Srv2p). Genetic studies suggested two roles for CAP, one as a positive regulator of cAMP levels in yeast and a second role as a cytoskeletal regulator. We present evidence showing that CAP sequesters monomeric actin (Kd in the range of 0.5-5 microM), decreasing actin incorporation into actin filaments. Anti-CAP monoclonal antibodies co-immunoprecipitate a protein with a molecular size of about 46 kDa. When CAP was purified from yeast using an anti-CAP monoclonal antibody column, the 46-kDa protein co-purified with a stoichiometry of about 1:1 with CAP. Western blots identified the 46-kDa protein as yeast actin. CAP also bound to muscle actin in vitro in immunoprecipitation assays and falling ball viscometry assays. Experiments with pyrene-labeled actin demonstrated that CAP sequesters actin monomers. The actin monomer binding activity is localized to the carboxyl-terminal half of CAP. Together, these data suggest that yeast CAP regulates the yeast cytoskeleton by sequestering actin monomers.

  3. Identification of a cyclase-associated protein (CAP) homologue in Dictyostelium discoideum and characterization of its interaction with actin.

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, U; Brokamp, R; Karakesisoglou, I; Schleicher, M; Noegel, A A

    1996-01-01

    In search for novel actin binding proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum we have isolated a cDNA clone coding for a protein of approximately 50 kDa that is highly homologous to the class of adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins (CAP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the amino-terminal part of CAP is involved in the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase whereas the loss of the carboxyl-terminal domain results in morphological and nutritional defects. To study the interaction of Dictyostelium CAP with actin, the complete protein and its amino-terminal and carboxyl-terminal domains were expressed in Escherichia coli and used in actin binding assays. CAP sequestered actin in a Ca2+ independent way. This activity was localized to the carboxyl-terminal domain. CAP and its carboxyl-terminal domain led to a fluorescence enhancement of pyrene-labeled G-actin up to 50% indicating a direct interaction, whereas the amino-terminal domain did not enhance. In polymerization as well as in viscometric assays the ability of the carboxyl-terminal domain to sequester actin and to prevent F-actin formation was approximately two times higher than that of intact CAP. The sequestering activity of full length CAP could be inhibited by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), whereas the activity of the carboxyl-terminal domain alone was not influenced, suggesting that the amino-terminal half of the protein is required for the PIP2 modulation of the CAP function. In profilin-minus cells the CAP concentration is increased by approximately 73%, indicating that CAP may compensate some profilin functions in vivo. In migrating D. discoideum cells CAP was enriched at anterior and posterior plasma membrane regions. Only a weak staining of the cytoplasm was observed. In chemotactically stimulated cells the protein was very prominent in leading fronts. The data suggest an involvement of D. discoideum CAP in microfilament reorganization near the plasma membrane in a PIP2-regulated manner. Images PMID

  4. [The influence of two-month treatment with bromocryptine on activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system in the myocardium and testes of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Bondareva, V M; Moyseyuk, I V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are cardiovascular diseases and dysfunctions of the reproductive system, indicating the urgency of developing new approaches to their correction. Last years for the treatment of DM2 began to use bromocryptine (BC), the agonist of type 2 dopamine receptors, which not only restores the energy metabolism, but also prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms and targets of BC action are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BC treatment on functional activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the myocardium and testes of male rats with DM2, which is caused by high-fat diet and treatment with streptozotocin (25 mg/kg). The treatment with BC (60 days, orally at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg once every two days) was started 90 days after the beginning of high-fat diet. Diabetic rats had an increased body weight, elevated triglycerides level, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. The treatment with BC resulted in the restoration of glycometabolic indicators and in the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp), relaxin, and agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β3-AR)--isoproterenol and norepinephrine were decreased in the miocardium of the diabetic rats. The corresponding effects of the β-agonists BRL-37344 and CL-316243 was preserved. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on forskolin-stimulated AC activity was attenuated, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline mediated through α2-AR increased. The treatment with BC resulted in the normalization of the adrenergic signaling in the myocardium and partially restoration of AC effects of relaxin and somatostatin. In the testes of diabetic rats, the basal and stimulated by GppNHp, forskolin, human chorionic gonadotropin and pituitary AC-activating polypeptide AC activity were decreased, and the

  5. [BETA-ADRENERGIC REGULATION OF THE ADENYLYL CYCLASE SIGNALING SYSTEM IN MYOCARDIUM AND BRAIN OF RATS WITH OBESITY AND TYPES 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND THE EFFECT OF LONG-TERM INTRANASAL INSULIN TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, L A; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    The stimulating effect of norepinephrine, isoproterenol and selective β-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists BRL 37344 and CL 316.243 on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the brain and myocardium of young and mature rats (disease induction at 2 and 4 months, respectively) with experimental obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), and the influence of long-term treatment of animals with intranasal insulin (I-I) were studied. The AC stimulatory effects of β-agonist isoproterenol in animals with obesity and DM2 was shown to be practically unchanged. The respective effects of norepinephrine on the AC activity were attenuated in the brain of young and mature rats and in the myocardium if mature rats, and the I-I treatment led to their partial recovery. In the brain and myocardium of mature rats with obesity and DM2, the enhancement of the AC stimulatory effects of β3-AR agonists was observed, white in young rats the influence of the same pathological conditions was lacking. The I-I treatment decreased the AC stimulatory effects of β3-agonists to their levels in the control. Since functional disruption of the adrenergic agonist-sensitive ACSS can lead to metabolic syndrome and DM2, the recovery of this system by the I-I treatment offers one of the ways to correct these diseases and their complications in the nervous and cardiovascular systems.

  6. Functional role of Calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 8 in adaptations to psychological stressors in the mouse: implications for mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Razzoli, M; Andreoli, M; Maraia, G; Di Francesco, C; Arban, R

    2010-10-13

    The Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulated adenylyl cylcase 8 (AC8) is a pure Ca(2+) sensor, catalyzing the conversion of ATP to cAMP, with a critical role in neuronal plasticity. A role for AC8 in modulating complex behavioral outcomes has been demonstrated in AC8 knock out (KO) mouse models in which anxiety-like responses were differentially modulated following repeated stress experiences, suggesting an involvement of AC8 in stress adaptation and mood disorders. To further investigate the role of this enzyme in phenotypes relevant for psychiatric conditions, AC8 KO mice were assessed for baseline behavioral and hormonal parameters, responses to repeated restraint stress experience, and long-term effects of chronic social defeat stress. The lack of AC8 conferred a hyperactive-phenotype both in home-cage behaviors and the forced swim test response as well as lower leptin plasma levels and adrenal hypertrophy. AC8 KO mice showed baseline "anxiety" levels similar to wild type littermates in a variety of procedures, but displayed decreased anxiety-like responses following repeated restraint stress. This increased stress resilience was not seen during the chronic social defeat procedure. AC8 KO did not differ from wild type mice in response to social stress; similar alterations in body weight, food intake and increased social avoidance were found in all defeated subjects. Altogether these results support a complex role of cAMP signaling pathways confirming the involvement of AC8 in the modulation of stress responses. Furthermore, the hyperactivity and the increased risk taking behavior observed in AC8 KO mice could be related to a manic-like behavioral phenotype that warrants further investigation.

  7. Studies of the Mu-Opioid Receptor/G-protein Complex Affinity Co-Purified and Membrane Preparations from 7315c Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-09

    population of mu-opioid receptors. Morphine, an opioid agonist, inhibits prolactin secretion, in part, by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity via...interaction with multiple G-proteins in the 7315c cell membrane is that mu-opioid agonists inhibit prolactin secretion from this cell via the generation of...secretion. The receptor mediated activation of either Gil or Gi2 and subsequent inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity would inhibit prolactin secretion

  8. The Notch pathway attenuates interleukin 1β (IL1β)-mediated induction of adenylyl cyclase 8 (AC8) expression during vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) trans-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Keuylian, Zela; de Baaij, Jeroen H F; Gueguen, Marie; Glorian, Martine; Rouxel, Clotilde; Merlet, Elise; Lipskaia, Larissa; Blaise, Régis; Mateo, Véronique; Limon, Isabelle

    2012-07-20

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) trans-differentiation, or their switch from a contractile/quiescent to a secretory/inflammatory/migratory state, is known to play an important role in pathological vascular remodeling including atherosclerosis and postangioplasty restenosis. Several reports have established the Notch pathway as tightly regulating VSMC response to various stress factors through growth, migration, apoptosis, and de-differentiation. More recently, we showed that alterations of the Notch pathway also govern VSMC acquisition of the inflammatory state, one of the major events accelerating atherosclerosis. We also evidenced that the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis triggers a de novo expression of adenylyl cyclase isoform 8 (AC8), associated with the properties developed by trans-differentiated VSMCs. As an initial approach to understanding the regulation of AC8 expression, we examined the role of the Notch pathway. Here we show that inhibiting the Notch pathway enhances the effect of IL1β on AC8 expression, amplifies its deleterious effects on the VSMC trans-differentiated phenotype, and decreases Notch target genes Hrt1 and Hrt3. Conversely, Notch activation resulted in blocking AC8 expression and up-regulated Hrt1 and Hrt3 expression. Furthermore, overexpressing Hrt1 and Hrt3 significantly decreased IL1β-induced AC8 expression. In agreement with these in vitro findings, the in vivo rat carotid balloon-injury model of restenosis evidenced that AC8 de novo expression coincided with down-regulation of the Notch3 pathway. These results, demonstrating that the Notch pathway attenuates IL1β-mediated AC8 up-regulation in trans-differentiated VSMCs, suggest that AC8 expression, besides being induced by the proinflammatory cytokine IL1β, is also dependent on down-regulation of the Notch pathway occurring in an inflammatory context.

  9. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  10. A Survey of Nucleotide Cyclases in Actinobacteria: Unique Domain Organization and Expansion of the Class III Cyclase Family in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, K.; Krupa, A.; Srinivasan, N.

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides are well-known second messengers involved in the regulation of important metabolic pathways or virulence factors. There are six different classes of nucleotide cyclases that can accomplish the task of generating cAMP, and four of these are restricted to the prokaryotes. The role of cAMP has been implicated in the virulence and regulation of secondary metabolites in the phylum Actinobacteria, which contains important pathogens, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. leprae, M. bovis and Corynebacterium, and industrial organisms from the genus Streptomyces. We have analysed the actinobacterial genome sequences found in current databases for the presence of different classes of nucleotide cyclases, and find that only class III cyclases are present in these organisms. Importantly, prominent members such as M. tuberculosis and M. leprae have 17 and 4 class III cyclases, respectively, encoded in their genomes, some of which display interesting domain fusions seen for the first time. In addition, a pseudogene corresponding to a cyclase from M. avium has been identified as the only cyclase pseudogene in M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. The Corynebacterium and Streptomyces genomes encode only a single adenylyl cyclase each, both of which have corresponding orthologues in M. tuberculosis. A clustering of the cyclase domains in Actinobacteria reveals the presence of typical eukaryote-like, fungi-like and other bacteria-like class III cyclase sequences within this phylum, suggesting that these proteins may have significant roles to play in this important group of organisms. PMID:18629044

  11. Cytokine-induced iNOS and ERK1/2 inhibit adenylyl cyclase type 5/6 activity and stimulate phosphodiesterase 4D5 activity in intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Hu, Wenhui; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-08-15

    This study identified a distinctive pattern of expression and activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms in mouse colonic longitudinal smooth muscle cells and determined the changes in their expression and/or activity in response to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) in vitro and 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colonic inflammation in vivo. AC5/6 and PDE4D5, expressed in circular muscle cells, were also expressed in longitudinal smooth muscle. cAMP formation was tightly regulated via feedback phosphorylation of AC5/6 and PDE4D5 by PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by myristoylated PKI blocked phosphorylation of AC5/6 and PDE4D5 and enhanced cAMP formation. TNBS treatment in vivo and IL-1β and TNF-α in vitro induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, stimulated ERK1/2 activity, caused iNOS-mediated S-nitrosylation and inhibition of AC5/6, and induced phosphorylation of PDE4D5 and stimulated its activity. The resultant decrease in AC5/6 activity and increase in PDE4D5 activity decreased cAMP formation and smooth muscle relaxation. S-nitrosylation and inhibition of AC5/6 activity were reversed by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W, whereas phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D5 were reversed by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. The effects of IL-1β or TNF-α on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and smooth muscle relaxation reflected inhibition of AC5/6 activity and activation of PDE4D5 and were partly reversed by 1400W or PD98059 and completely reversed by a combination of the two inhibitors. The changes in the cAMP/PKA signaling and smooth muscle relaxation contribute to colonic dysmotility during inflammation.

  12. A Short History of cGMP, Guanylyl Cyclases, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules. PMID:19089322

  13. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  14. Cannabinoid CB1 receptors fail to cause relaxation, but couple via Gi/Go to the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in carotid artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Michael; Challiss, R A John; Standen, Nicholas B; Boyle, John P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to characterize which cannabinoid receptors, if any, are present on rat carotid artery smooth muscle. Additionally, the effects of cannabinoids on carotid artery tone, on cyclic AMP accumulation and on forskolin-induced relaxation were examined in the same tissue.Stimulation of carotid arteries with forskolin (10 μM) significantly increased cyclic AMP accumulation, an effect that was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by the cannabinoid receptor agonist, methanandamide.Similar inhibition was seen with the CB1 agonist HU-210 but this inhibition was not mimicked by the CB2 agonist, WIN 55,2212-2.The inhibitory effect of methanandamide on cyclic AMP accumulation was prevented by incubation of the arteries with pertussis toxin and was significantly reduced by LY320135, a selective CB1 antagonist, but not by SR 144528, a CB2-selective antagonist.Methanandamide failed to relax carotid arteries pre-contracted with phenylephrine, but inhibited forskolin-induced relaxation of these arteries. This functional inhibition of relaxation by methanandamide was inhibited by CB1-selective (LY320135 and SR 141716A), but not a CB2-selective antagonist (SR 144528).These data demonstrate the presence of functional G protein-linked cannabinoid receptors of the CB1 subtype in the rat carotid artery, but show that these receptors inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation rather than cause relaxation. PMID:10516638

  15. Identification of Arabidopsis cyclase-associated protein 1 as the first nucleotide exchange factor for plant actin.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Guérin, Christophe; von Witsch, Matthias; Blanchoin, Laurent; Staiger, Christopher J

    2007-08-01

    The actin cytoskeleton powers organelle movements, orchestrates responses to abiotic stresses, and generates an amazing array of cell shapes. Underpinning these diverse functions of the actin cytoskeleton are several dozen accessory proteins that coordinate actin filament dynamics and construct higher-order assemblies. Many actin-binding proteins from the plant kingdom have been characterized and their function is often surprisingly distinct from mammalian and fungal counterparts. The adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) has recently been shown to be an important regulator of actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. The disruption of actin organization in cap mutant plants indicates defects in actin dynamics or the regulated assembly and disassembly of actin subunits into filaments. Current models for actin dynamics maintain that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin removes ADP-actin subunits from filament ends and that profilin recharges these monomers with ATP by enhancing nucleotide exchange and delivery of subunits onto filament barbed ends. Plant profilins, however, lack the essential ability to stimulate nucleotide exchange on actin, suggesting that there might be a missing link yet to be discovered from plants. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana CAP1 (AtCAP1) is an abundant cytoplasmic protein; it is present at a 1:3 M ratio with total actin in suspension cells. AtCAP1 has equivalent affinities for ADP- and ATP-monomeric actin (Kd approximately 1.3 microM). Binding of AtCAP1 to ATP-actin monomers inhibits polymerization, consistent with AtCAP1 being an actin sequestering protein. However, we demonstrate that AtCAP1 is the first plant protein to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. Even in the presence of ADF/cofilin, AtCAP1 can recharge actin monomers and presumably provide a polymerizable pool of subunits to profilin for addition onto filament ends. In turnover assays, plant profilin, ADF, and CAP act cooperatively to promote flux

  16. Regulation of intestinal guanylate cyclase by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) and protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, J K; Wehner, M S; Bolen, E J; Sando, J J; Linden, J; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1992-01-01

    The heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) stimulates membrane-bound guanylate cyclase in intestinal epithelium and induces fluid and ion secretion. Using the T84 human colon carcinoma cell line as a model, we observed that phorbol esters markedly enhanced STa-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in T84 cells (C. S. Weikel, C. L. Spann, C. P. Chambers, J. K. Crane, J. Linden, and E. L. Hewlett, Infect. Immun. 58:1402-1407, 1990). In this study we document that the phorbol ester treatment increases 125I-STa-binding sites as well as membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity in T84 cells and provide evidence that both effects are mediated by phosphorylation. Guanylate cyclase activity was increased approximately 50% in membranes prepared from intact T84 cells treated with phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (beta-PDB) and after treatment of homogenates with beta-PDB in a manner dependent on ATP, MgCl2, and cytosol. Similarly, treatment of membranes with purified bovine brain protein kinase C in the presence of appropriate cofactors and beta-PDB resulted in an increase in STa-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity of about 70%. Likewise, the number of 125I-STa-binding sites was increased by about 25 to 40% in membranes prepared from intact cells or homogenates treated with beta-PDB; no effect on binding affinity (Kd = 0.15 nM) was noted. These experiments suggest that protein kinase C may phosphorylate the STa receptor-guanylate cyclase or a closely related protein and increase guanylate cyclase activity. The stimulatory effects of protein kinase C on STa-sensitive guanylate cyclase are opposite in direction to the profound inhibitory effects of the kinase on atrial natriuretic peptide-stimulated guanylate cyclase, demonstrating differential regulation by protein kinases within the guanylate cyclase-receptor family. PMID:1360449

  17. Leucine-rich repeats and carboxyl terminus are required for interaction of yeast adenylate cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Choe, H R; Nishida, Y; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Ohnishi, S; Tamaoki, T; Kataoka, T

    1990-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding adenylate cyclase has been analyzed by deletion and insertion mutagenesis to localize regions required for activation by the Sa. cerevisiae RAS2 protein. The NH2-terminal 657 amino acids were found to be dispensable for the activation. However, almost all 2-amino acid insertions in the middle 600 residues comprising leucine-rich repeats and deletions in the COOH-terminal 66 residues completely abolished activation by the RAS2 protein, whereas insertion mutations in the other regions generally had no effect. Chimeric adenylate cyclases were constructed by swapping the upstream and downstream portions surrounding the catalytic domains between the Sa. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylate cyclases and examined for activation by the RAS2 protein. We found that the fusion containing both the NH2-terminal 1600 residues and the COOH-terminal 66 residues of the Sa. cerevisiae cyclase rendered the catalytic domain of the Sc. pombe cyclase, which otherwise did not respond to RAS proteins, activatable by the RAS2 protein. Thus the leucine-rich repeats and the COOH terminus of the Sa. cerevisiae adenylate cyclase appear to be required for interaction with RAS proteins. Images PMID:2247439

  18. A lycopene β-cyclase/lycopene ε-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce α-carotene and β-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as α-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ε-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of α-carotene and β-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the α-carotene-to-β-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids α-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi.

  19. p19 detected in the rat retina and pineal gland is a guanylyl cyclase-activating protein (GCAP).

    PubMed

    Dejda, Agnieszka; Matczak, Izabela; Gorczyca, Wojciech A

    2002-01-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activation of retina-specific guanylyl cyclase (retGC) is mediated by guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). Here we report for the first time detection of a 19 kDa protein (p19) with GCAP properties in extracts of rat retina and pineal gland. Both extracts stimulate synthesis of cGMP in rod outer segment (ROS) membranes at low (30 nM) but not at high (1 microM) concentrations of Ca(2+). At low Ca(2+), immunoaffinity purified p19 activates guanylyl cyclase(s) in bovine ROS and rat retinal membranes. Moreover, p19 is recognized by antibodies against bovine GCAP1 and, similarly to other GCAPs, exhibits a Ca(2+)-dependent electrophoretic mobility shift.

  20. CAP2, cyclase-associated protein 2, is a dual compartment protein.

    PubMed

    Peche, V; Shekar, S; Leichter, M; Korte, H; Schröder, R; Schleicher, M; Holak, T A; Clemen, C S; Ramanath-Y, B; Pfitzer, G; Karakesisoglou, I; Noegel, A A

    2007-10-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are evolutionarily conserved proteins with roles in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and in signal transduction. Mammals have two CAP genes encoding the related CAP1 and CAP2. We studied the distribution and subcellular localization of CAP1 and CAP2 using specific antibodies. CAP1 shows a broad tissue distribution, whereas CAP2 is significantly expressed only in brain, heart and skeletal muscle, and skin. CAP2 is found in the nucleus in undifferentiated myoblasts and at the M-line of differentiated myotubes. In PAM212, a mouse keratinocyte cell line, CAP2 is enriched in the nucleus, and sparse in the cytosol. By contrast, CAP1 localizes to the cytoplasm in PAM212 cells. In human skin, CAP2 is present in all living layers of the epidermis localizing to the nuclei and the cell periphery. In in vitro studies, a C-terminal fragment of CAP2 interacts with actin, indicating that CAP2 has the capacity to bind to actin.

  1. Role of protein kinase C on the acute desensitization of renal cortical adenylate cyclase to parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, E; López, C; Díaz, K; Pernalete, N; López, M; Starosta, R

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of adenylate cyclase desensitization to parathyroid hormone are still unclear. Current evidence suggest that the signal generated after PTH binding to receptors results in activation of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase C with subsequent activation of protein kinase C. Recent studies have suggested a role of protein kinase C on the regulation of the PTH-dependent receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cultured cells. Therefore, the present studies were conducted to examine the role of protein kinase C on the desensitization of canine renal cortical adenylate cyclase after an acute exposure in vivo to PTH. A group of normal dogs were treated with a single intravenous injection of 1 microgram/k of syn bPTH (1-34) or Nle bPTH (3-34). Ten minutes later, animals were subjected to bilateral nephrectomy and the kidney cortex processed for preparations of basolateral membranes for determinations of adenylate cyclase activity, as well as membrane and cytosolic fractions for analysis of protein kinase C activity. Animals not treated with PTH were used as controls. PTH administration in vivo resulted in a 46.9 +/- 9.3% decrease in maximal adenylate cyclase activity in vitro in response to syn bPTH (1-34) (P < 0.001). Likewise, PTH binding as measured with 125I-Nle8,18,Tyr34-bPTH (1-34)NH2 showed a 40 +/- 3% decrease. This alterations were associated with a marked translocation of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the membrane. Thus, protein kinase C activity in membrane fractions increased from 160.6 +/- 44.8 pmol Pi/min in controls to 500.4 +/- 123 in PTH treated dogs (P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Mechanism of oligomerisation of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum in solution.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Adlina Mohd; Jaenicke, Elmar; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Hofmann, Andreas

    2006-10-06

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a highly conserved modular protein implicated in the regulation of actin filament dynamics and a variety of developmental and morphological processes. The protein exists as a high molecular weight complex in cell extracts and purified protein possesses a high tendency to aggregate, a major obstacle for crystallisation. Using a mutagenesis approach, we show that two structural features underlie the mechanism of oligomerisation in Dictyostelium discoideum CAP. Positively charged clusters on the surface of the N-terminal helix-barrel domain are involved in inter-molecular interactions with the N or C-terminal domains. Abolishing these interactions mainly renders dimers due to a domain swap feature in the extreme C-terminal region of the protein that was previously described. Based on earlier studies with yeast CAP, we also generated constructs with mutations in the extreme N-terminal region of Dictyostelium CAP that did not show significantly altered oligomerisation behaviour. Constructs with mutations in the earlier identified protein-protein interaction interface on the N-terminal domain of CAP could not be expressed as soluble protein. Assessment of the soluble proteins indicates that the mutations did not affect their overall fold. Further studies point to the correlation between stability of full-length CAP with its multimerisation behaviour, where oligomer formation leads to a more stable protein.

  3. Role of guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) in setting the flash sensitivity of rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ana; Burns, Marie E.; Sokal, Izabela; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Baylor, Denis A.; Chen, Jeannie

    2001-01-01

    The retina's photoreceptor cells adjust their sensitivity to allow photons to be transduced over a wide range of light intensities. One mechanism thought to participate in sensitivity adjustments is Ca2+ regulation of guanylate cyclase (GC) by guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). We evaluated the contribution of GCAPs to sensitivity regulation in rods by disrupting their expression in transgenic mice. The GC activity from GCAPs−/− retinas showed no Ca2+ dependence, indicating that Ca2+ regulation of GCs had indeed been abolished. Flash responses from dark-adapted GCAPs−/− rods were larger and slower than responses from wild-type rods. In addition, the incremental flash sensitivity of GCAPs−/− rods failed to be maintained at wild-type levels in bright steady light. GCAP2 expressed in GCAPs−/− rods restored maximal light-induced GC activity but did not restore normal flash response kinetics. We conclude that GCAPs strongly regulate GC activity in mouse rods, decreasing the flash sensitivity in darkness and increasing the incremental flash sensitivity in bright steady light, thereby extending the rod's operating range. PMID:11493703

  4. Crystal structure of the actin binding domain of the cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Dodatko, Tetyana; Fedorov, Alexander A; Grynberg, Marcin; Patskovsky, Yury; Rozwarski, Denise A; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah; Kondraskina, Elena; Irving, Tom; Godzik, Adam; Almo, Steven C

    2004-08-24

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is a modular actin monomer binding protein that directly regulates filament dynamics and has been implicated in a number of complex developmental and morphological processes, including mRNA localization and the establishment of cell polarity. The crystal structure of the C-terminal dimerization and actin monomer binding domain (C-CAP) reveals a highly unusual dimer, composed of monomers possessing six coils of right-handed beta-helix flanked by antiparallel beta-strands. Domain swapping, involving the last two strands of each monomer, results in the formation of an extended dimer with an extensive interface. This structural and biochemical characterization provides new insights into the organization and potential mechanistic properties of the multiprotein assemblies that integrate dynamic actin processes into the overall physiology of the cell. An unanticipated finding is that the unique tertiary structure of the C-CAP monomer provides a structural model for a wide range of molecules, including RP2 and cofactor C, proteins involved in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and tubulin maturation, respectively, as well as several uncharacterized proteins that exhibit very diverse domain organizations. Thus, the unusual right-handed beta-helical fold present in C-CAP appears to support a wide range of biological functions.

  5. An actin-binding protein, CAP, is expressed in a subset of rat taste bud cells.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Y; Yasuoka, A; Asano-Miyoshi, M; Abe, K; Emori, Y

    2001-02-12

    Single cell cDNA libraries were constructed from taste bud cells of rat circumvallate papillae. Using three steps of screening, including differential hybridization, sequence analyses and in situ hybridization, a clone encoding a rat homolog of yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) was identified to be highly expressed in a subset of taste bud cells.

  6. Receptor guanylyl cyclase-G is a novel thermosensory protein activated by cool temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ying-Chi; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yuh-Charn; Breer, Heinz; Fleischer, Joerg; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2015-02-03

    Transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), with activity regulated by peptide ligands and/or calcium-binding proteins, are essential for various physiological and sensory processes. The mode of activation of the GC subtype GC-G, which is expressed in neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion that respond to cool temperatures, has been elusive. In searching for appropriate stimuli to activate GC-G, we found that its enzymatic activity is directly stimulated by cool temperatures. In this context, it was observed that dimerization/oligomerization of GC-G, a process generally considered as critical for enzymatic activity of GCs, is strongly enhanced by coolness. Moreover, heterologous expression of GC-G in cultured cells rendered these cells responsive to coolness; thus, the protein might be a sensor for cool temperatures. This concept is supported by the observation of substantially reduced coolness-induced response of Grueneberg ganglion neurons and coolness-evoked ultrasonic vocalization in GC-G-deficient mouse pups. GC-G may be a novel thermosensory protein with functional implications for the Grueneberg ganglion, a sensory organ responding to cool temperatures.

  7. Nitric oxide regulation of gene transcription via soluble guanylate cyclase and type I cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Idriss, S D; Gudi, T; Casteel, D E; Kharitonov, V G; Pilz, R B; Boss, G R

    1999-04-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) regulates the expression of multiple genes but in most cases its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We used baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells, which have very low soluble guanylate cyclase and cGMP-dependent protein kinase (G-kinase) activity, and CS-54 arterial smooth muscle cells, which express these two enzymes, to study NO regulation of the human fos promoter. The NO-releasing agent Deta-NONOate (ethanamine-2,2'-(hydroxynitrosohydrazone)bis-) had no effect on a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene under control of the fos promoter in BHK cells transfected with an empty vector or in cells transfected with a G-kinase Ibeta expression vector. In BHK cells transfected with expression vectors for guanylate cyclase, Deta-NONOate markedly increased the intracellular cGMP concentration and caused a small (2-fold) increase in CAT activity; the increased CAT activity appeared to be from cGMP activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In BHK cells co-transfected with guanylate cyclase and G-kinase expression vectors, CAT activity was increased 5-fold in the absence of Deta-NONOate and 7-fold in the presence of Deta-NONOate. Stimulation of CAT activity in the absence of Deta-NONOate appeared to be largely from endogenous NO since we found that: (i) BHK cells produced high amounts of NO; (ii) CAT activity was partially inhibited by a NO synthase inhibitor; and (iii) the inhibition by the NO synthase inhibitor was reversed by exogenous NO. In CS-54 cells, we found that NO increased fos promoter activity and that the increase was prevented by a guanylate cyclase inhibitor. In summary, we found that NO activates the fos promoter by a guanylate cyclase- and G-kinase-dependent mechanism.

  8. Ablation of cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) leads to cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Peche, Vivek S; Holak, Tad A; Burgute, Bhagyashri D; Kosmas, Kosmas; Kale, Sushant P; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Elhamine, Fatiha; Stehle, Robert; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Nohroudi, Klaus; Addicks, Klaus; Stöckigt, Florian; Schrickel, Jan W; Gallinger, Julia; Schleicher, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A

    2013-02-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins are highly conserved proteins that have a role in the regulation of actin dynamics. Higher eukaryotes have two isoforms, CAP1 and CAP2. To study the in vivo function of CAP2, we generated mice in which the CAP2 gene was inactivated by a gene-trap approach. Mutant mice showed a decrease in body weight and had a decreased survival rate. Further, they developed a severe cardiac defect marked by dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associated with drastic reduction in basal heart rate and prolongations in atrial and ventricular conduction times. Moreover, CAP2-deficient myofibrils exhibited reduced cooperativity of calcium-regulated force development. At the microscopic level, we observed disarrayed sarcomeres with development of fibrosis. We analyzed CAP2's role in actin assembly and found that it sequesters G-actin and efficiently fragments filaments. This activity resides completely in its WASP homology domain. Thus CAP2 is an essential component of the myocardial sarcomere and is essential for physiological functioning of the cardiac system, and a deficiency leads to DCM and various cardiac defects.

  9. Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 overexpressed in pancreatic cancers is involved in cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Ken; Takamura, Masaaki; Masugi, Yohei; Mori, Taisuke; Du, Wenlin; Hibi, Taizo; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Ohta, Tsutomu; Ohki, Misao; Hirohashi, Setsuo; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis among cancers due to the difficulty of early diagnosis and its aggressive behavior. To characterize the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancers on gene expression, pancreatic cancer xenografts transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice served as a panel for gene-expression profiling. As a result of profiling, the adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) gene was shown to be overexpressed in all of the xenografts. The expression of CAP1 protein in all 73 cases of pancreatic cancer was recognized by immunohistochemical analyses. The ratio of CAP1-positive tumor cells in clinical specimens was correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and neural invasion, and also with the poor prognosis of patients. Immunocytochemical analyses in pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated that CAP1 colocalized to the leading edge of lamellipodia with actin. Knockdown of CAP1 by RNA interference resulted in the reduction of lamellipodium formation, motility, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report demonstrating the overexpression of CAP1 in pancreatic cancers and suggesting the involvement of CAP1 in the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase and soluble guanylyl cyclase disappear in elicited rat neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ciuman, Małgorzata; Siednienko, Jakub; Czyzyk, Rafał; Witwicka, Hanna; Kołosionek, Ewa; Kobiałka, Marcin; Gorczyca, Wojciech A

    2006-11-01

    The nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (NO/sGC/PKG) cascade has been shown to affect important functions of circulating neutrophils. We demonstrate that neutrophils isolated from rats treated intraperitoneally with peptone protease cannot use this signaling pathway. Although PKG was detected at both the mRNA and protein levels in peripheral blood neutrophils (PBNs) of control rats, it was expressed neither in PBNs nor in peritoneal exudate neutrophils (PENs) of provoked rats. Also, mRNA of the alpha and beta chains of heterodimeric sGC was present in PBNs, but absent in PENs. Consistently, PBNs responded to activators of sGC with cGMP synthesis, while PENs did not. These results showed that neutrophils recruited by a provoking agent lost PKG and, in the case of PENs, also sGC and thus the capacity to respond to NO with cGMP signaling. We speculate that such downregulation of the sGC/PKG pathway is likely a result of the high activity of inducible NO synthase observed in inflammatory neutrophils.

  11. Regional myocardial downregulation of the inhibitory guanosine triphosphate-binding protein (Gi alpha 2) and beta-adrenergic receptors in a porcine model of chronic episodic myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, H K; Roth, D A; McKirnan, M D; Ping, P

    1993-01-01

    Regional myocardial ischemia is associated with increased levels of adenosine and norepinephrine, factors that may alter activation of the beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR)-G protein-adenylyl cyclase pathway in the heart. We have used the ameroid constrictor model to determine whether alterations in myocardial signal transduction through the beta AR-G protein-adenylyl cyclase pathway occur in the setting of chronic episodes of reversible ischemia. Pigs were instrumented with ameroid occluders placed around the left circumflex coronary artery. 5 wk later, after ameroid closure, flow and function were normal in the ischemic bed, but flow (P = 0.001) and function (P < 0.03) were abnormal when metabolic demands were increased. The ischemic bed showed a reduction in myocardial beta AR number (P < 0.005). Despite regional downregulation of myocardial beta AR number, adenylyl cyclase activity was similar in the ischemic and control beds. Quantitative immunoblotting showed that the cardiac inhibitory GTP-binding protein, Gi alpha 2, was decreased in the ischemic bed (P = 0.02). In contrast, the cardiac stimulatory GTP-binding protein, Gs alpha, was increased in endocardial sections from the ischemic bed (P = < 0.05). Decreased Gi alpha 2 content was associated with decreased inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. Reduced Gi alpha 2 content, in conjunction with increased Gs alpha content in the endocardium, may provide a means by which adrenergic activation is maintained in the setting of chronic episodic myocardial ischemia. Images PMID:8254020

  12. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 2 is a novel prognostic marker in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Masugi, Yohei; Tanese, Keiji; Emoto, Katsura; Yamazaki, Ken; Effendi, Kathryn; Funakoshi, Takeru; Mori, Mariko; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2015-12-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the lethal malignant tumors worldwide. Previously we reported that adenylate cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2), which is a well-conserved actin regulator, was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma; however, CAP2 expression in other clinical cancers remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to clarify the clinicopathological significance of CAP2 overexpression in malignant melanoma. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that many melanoma cells exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic expression of CAP2, whereas no normal melanocytes showed detectable immunostaining for CAP2. A high level of CAP2 expression was seen in 14 of 50 melanomas and was significantly correlated with greater tumor thickness and nodular melanoma subtypes. In addition, a high level of CAP2 expression was associated with poor overall survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. For 13 patients, samples of primary and metastatic melanoma tissue were available: four patients exhibited higher levels of CAP2 expression in metastatic tumor compared to the primary site, whereas no patient showed lower levels of CAP2 expression in metastatic melanomas. Our findings show that CAP2 overexpression is a novel prognostic marker in malignant melanoma and that CAP2 expression seems to increase stepwise during tumor progression, suggesting the involvement of CAP2 in the aggressive behavior of malignant melanoma.

  13. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 is associated with metastasis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min; Song, Xiaolian; Zhang, Guoliang; Peng, Aimei; Li, Xuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Yang; Wang, Changhui

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer ranks first in both prevalence and mortality rates among all types of cancer. Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure. Biomarkers are critical to early diagnosis and prediction and monitoring of progressive lesions. Several biomarkers have been identified for lung cancer but none have been routinely used clinically. The present study assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) for lung cancer. CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis and/or immunostaining in biopsy specimens (24 neoplastic and 6 non-neoplastic) freshly collected at surgical lung resection, in 82 pathologically banked lung cancer specimens and in cultured non-invasive (95-C) and invasive (95-D) lung cancer cells. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate immunoreactive CAP1 signal with cancer type and stage. In vitro cell migration was performed to determine the effect of RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing on invasiveness of 95-D cells. These analyses collectively demonstrated that: i) both CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were significantly higher in neoplastic compared to non-neoplastic specimens and in metastatic compared to non-metastatic specimens but not different between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma; ii) immunoreactive CAP1 signal was significantly stronger in metastatic specimens and 95-D cells compared to non-metastatic specimens and 95-C cells; and iii) RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing adequately attenuated the invasive capacity of 95-D cells in vitro. These findings suggest that overexpression of CAP1 in lung cancer cells, particularly at the metastatic stage, may have significant clinical implications as a diagnostic/prognostic factor for lung cancer.

  14. Identification of bacterial guanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Youn, Hwan; Kang, In-Hye; Gomelsky, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The ability of bacteria to use cGMP as a second messenger has been controversial for decades. Recently, nucleotide cyclases from Rhodospirillum centenum, GcyA, and Xanthomonas campestris, GuaX, have been shown to possess guanylate cyclase activities. Enzymatic activities of these guanylate cyclases measured in vitro were low, which makes interpretation of the assays ambiguous. Protein sequence analysis at present is insufficient to distinguish between bacterial adenylate and guanylate cyclases, both of which belong to nucleotide cyclases of type III. We developed a simple method for discriminating between guanylate and adenylate cyclase activities in a physiologically relevant bacterial system. The method relies on the use of a mutant cAMP receptor protein, CRPG , constructed here. While wild-type CRP is activated exclusively by cAMP, CRPG can be activated by either cAMP or cGMP. Using CRP- and CRPG -dependent lacZ expression in two E. coli strains, we verified that R. centenum GcyA and X. campestris GuaX have primarily guanylate cyclase activities. Among two other bacterial nucleotide cyclases tested, one, GuaA from Azospillrillum sp. B510, proved to have guanylate cyclase activity, while the other one, Bradyrhizobium japonicum CyaA, turned out to function as an adenylate cyclase. The results obtained with this reporter system were in excellent agreement with direct measurements of cyclic nucleotides secreted by E. coli expressing nucleotide cyclase genes. The simple genetic screen developed here is expected to facilitate identification of bacterial guanylate cyclases and engineering of guanylate cyclases with desired properties.

  15. CAS-1, a C. elegans cyclase-associated protein, is required for sarcomeric actin assembly in striated muscle.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Kanako; Ono, Shoichiro

    2012-09-01

    Assembly of contractile apparatuses in striated muscle requires precisely regulated reorganization of the actin cytoskeletal proteins into sarcomeric organization. Regulation of actin filament dynamics is one of the essential processes of myofibril assembly, but the mechanism of actin regulation in striated muscle is not clearly understood. Actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin is a key enhancer of actin filament dynamics in striated muscle in both vertebrates and nematodes. Here, we report that CAS-1, a cyclase-associated protein in Caenorhabditis elegans, promotes ADF/cofilin-dependent actin filament turnover in vitro and is required for sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle. CAS-1 is predominantly expressed in striated muscle from embryos to adults. In vitro, CAS-1 binds to actin monomers and enhances exchange of actin-bound ATP/ADP even in the presence of UNC-60B, a muscle-specific ADF/cofilin that inhibits the nucleotide exchange. As a result, CAS-1 and UNC-60B cooperatively enhance actin filament turnover. The two proteins also cooperate to shorten actin filaments. A cas-1 mutation is homozygous lethal with defects in sarcomeric actin organization. cas-1-mutant embryos and worms have aggregates of actin in muscle cells, and UNC-60B is mislocalized to the aggregates. These results provide genetic and biochemical evidence that cyclase-associated protein is a critical regulator of sarcomeric actin organization in striated muscle.

  16. Deficiency of cyclase-associated protein 2 promotes arrhythmias associated with connexin43 maldistribution and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Peche, Vivek Shahaji; Linhart, Markus; Nickenig, Georg; Noegel, Angelika Anna; Schrickel, Jan Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) plays a major role in regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Since inactivation of CAP2 in a mouse model by a gene trap approach (Cap2gt/gt) results in cardiomyopathy and increased mortality, we hypothesized that CAP2 has a major impact on arrhythmias and electrophysiological parameters. Material and methods We performed long-term-ECG recordings in transgenic CAP2 deficient mice (C57BL/6) to detect spontaneous arrhythmias. In vivo electrophysiological studies by right heart catheterization and ex vivo epicardial mapping were used to analyze electrophysiological parameters, the inducibility of arrhythmias, and conduction velocities. Expression and distribution of cardiac connexins and the amount of cardiac fibrosis were evaluated. Results Spontaneous ventricular arrhythmias could be detected in Cap2gt/gt during the long-term-ECG recording. Cap2gt/gt showed marked conduction delays at atrial and ventricular levels, including a reduced heart rate (421.0 ±40.6 bpm vs. 450.8 ±27.9 bpm; p < 0.01), and prolongations of PQ (46.3 ±4.1 ms vs. 38.6 ±6.5 ms; p < 0.01), QRS (16.2 ±2.6 ms vs. 12.6 ±1.4 ms; p < 0.01), and QTc interval (55.8 ±6.0 ms vs. 45.2 ±3.3 ms; p = 0.02) in comparison to wild type mice. The PQ prolongation was due to an infra-Hisian conduction delay (HV: 9.7 ±2.1 ms vs. 6.5 ±3.1 ms; p = 0.02). The inducibility of ventricular tachycardias during the electrophysiological studies was significantly elevated in the mutant mice (inducible animals: 88% vs. 33%; p = 0.04). Cap2gt/gt showed more abnormal distribution of connexin43 compared to WT (23.0 ±4.7% vs. 2.9 ±0.8%; p < 0.01). Myocardial fibrosis was elevated in Cap2gt/gt hearts (9.1 ±6.7% vs. 5.5 ±3.3%; p < 0.01). Conclusions Loss of CAP2 results in marked electrophysiological disturbances including impaired sinus node function, conduction delays, and susceptibility to malignant arrhythmias. Structural changes in Cap2gt/gt are associated with

  17. Involvement of hepatocellular carcinoma biomarker, cyclase-associated protein 2 in zebrafish body development and cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Effendi, Kathryn; Yamazaki, Ken; Mori, Taisuke; Masugi, Yohei; Makino, Shinji; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2013-01-01

    Cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2) is a conserved protein that is found up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). By using zebrafish, combined with HCC cell lines, we further investigated the role of CAP2. The zebrafish CAP2 sequence was 60% identical to human CAP2 with 77% homology in the C-terminal actin-binding domain, and 58% in the N-terminal cyclase-binding domain. CAP2 expression was observed during zebrafish development and was preferentially expressed in the skeletal muscle and heart. Knockdown using two different morpholinos against CAP2 resulted in a short-body morphant zebrafish phenotype with pericardial edema. CAP2 was observed co-localized with actin in zebrafish skeletal muscle, and in the leading edge of lamellipodium in HCC cell lines. CAP2 silencing resulted in a defect in lamellipodium formation and decreased cell motility in HCC cell lines. Strongly positive expression of CAP2 was observed in 10 of 16 (63%) poorly, 30 of 68 (44%) moderately, and 2 of 21 (10%) well differentiated HCC. CAP2 expression was significantly associated with tumor size, poor differentiation, portal vein invasion, and intrahepatic metastasis. Our results indicate that an important conserved function of CAP2 in higher vertebrates may be associated with the process of skeletal muscle development. CAP2 also played an important role in enhancing cell motility, which may promote a more invasive behavior in the progression of HCC. These findings highlight the link between development and cancer.

  18. High expression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 accelerates the proliferation, migration and invasion of neural glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaojun; Wang, Donglin; Ban, Na; Fan, Shaochen; Chen, Wenjuan; Sun, Jie; Xing, Weikang; Wang, Yunfeng; Cui, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), a conserved member of cyclase-associated proteins was reported to be associated with the proliferation, migration or invasion of the tumors of pancreas, breast and liver, and was involved in astrocyte proliferation after acute Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). In this study, we sought to investigate the character of CAP1 in the pathological process of human glioma by detecting human glioma specimens and cell lines. 43 of 100 specimens showed high expression of CAP1 via immunohistochemistry. With statistics analysis, we found out the expression level of CAP1 was correlated with the WHO grades of human glioma and was great positively related to Ki-67 (p<0.01). In vitro, silencing CAP1 in U251 and U87MG, the glioma cell lines with the relatively higher expression of CAP1, induced the proliferation of the cells significantly retarded, migration and invasion as well. Obviously, our results indicated that CAP1 participated in the molecular pathological process of glioma indeed, and in a certain sense, CAP1 might be a potential and promising molecular target for glioma diagnosis and therapies in the future.

  19. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  20. Time course of the uridylylation and adenylylation states in the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Varón-Castellanos, R; Havsteen, B H; García-Moreno, M; Valero-Ruiz, E; Molina-Alarcón, M; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade is presented. It includes the dependence on time from the onset of the reaction of both the uridylylation of Shapiro's regulatory protein and the adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase. The transient phase equations obtained allow an estimation of the time elapsed until the states of uridylylation and adenylylation reach their steady-states, and therefore an evaluation of the effective sensitivity of the system. The contribution of the uridylylation cycle to the adenylylation cycle has been studied, and an equation relating the state of adenylylation at any time to the state of uridylylation at the same instant has been derived. PMID:8104399

  1. Knocking down the expression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 inhibits the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia-Fei; Ni, Qi-Chao; Chen, Jin-Peng; Xu, Jun-Fei; Jiang, Ying; Yang, Shu-Yun; Ma, Jing; Gu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) is a conserved protein that was found to be up-regulated in breast cancer and related to the migration of breast cancer. We verified its roles in breast cancer specimens and cell lines. In our results, 71 of 100 specimens of breast cancer showed high levels of CAP1 by immunohistochemistry. Associated with statistical analysis, we saw that CAP1 was related to the grade of breast cancer. In MDA-MB-231, the expression of CAP1 was the highest and by knocking down the expression of CAP1 in MDA-MB-231, its ability for proliferating and migrating apparently decreased and induced changes in morphology, which were related to the arrangement of F-actin. Therefore, CAP1 might be a potential molecular targeted therapy for surgery and immune treatment.

  2. The Cyclase-associated protein Cap1 is important for proper regulation of infection-related morphogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Guotian; Shaw, Brian; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2012-09-01

    Surface recognition and penetration are critical steps in the infection cycle of many plant pathogenic fungi. In Magnaporthe oryzae, cAMP signaling is involved in surface recognition and pathogenesis. Deletion of the MAC1 adenylate cyclase gene affected appressorium formation and plant infection. In this study, we used the affinity purification approach to identify proteins that are associated with Mac1 in vivo. One of the Mac1-interacting proteins is the adenylate cyclase-associated protein named Cap1. CAP genes are well-conserved in phytopathogenic fungi but none of them have been functionally characterized. Deletion of CAP1 blocked the effects of a dominant RAS2 allele and resulted in defects in invasive growth and a reduced intracellular cAMP level. The Δcap1 mutant was defective in germ tube growth, appressorium formation, and formation of typical blast lesions. Cap1-GFP had an actin-like localization pattern, localizing to the apical regions in vegetative hyphae, at the periphery of developing appressoria, and in circular structures at the base of mature appressoria. Interestingly, Cap1, similar to LifeAct, did not localize to the apical regions in invasive hyphae, suggesting that the apical actin cytoskeleton differs between vegetative and invasive hyphae. Domain deletion analysis indicated that the proline-rich region P2 but not the actin-binding domain (AB) of Cap1 was responsible for its subcellular localization. Nevertheless, the AB domain of Cap1 must be important for its function because CAP1(ΔAB) only partially rescued the Δcap1 mutant. Furthermore, exogenous cAMP induced the formation of appressorium-like structures in non-germinated conidia in CAP1(ΔAB) transformants. This novel observation suggested that AB domain deletion may result in overstimulation of appressorium formation by cAMP treatment. Overall, our results indicated that CAP1 is important for the activation of adenylate cyclase, appressorium morphogenesis, and plant infection in M

  3. ASP-56, a new actin sequestering protein from pig platelets with homology to CAP, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein from yeast.

    PubMed

    Gieselmann, R; Mann, K

    1992-02-24

    A new 56 kDa actin-binding protein (ASP-56) was isolated from pig platelet lysate. In falling ball viscosimetry it caused a reduction in viscosity that could be attributed to a decrease in the concentration of polymeric actin. Fluorescence measurements with NBD-labelled actin showed reduction of polymeric actin, too. These results could be explained by sequestering of actin in a non-polymerizable 1:1 ASP-56/actin complex. Sequencing of about 20 tryptic peptides of ASP-56 and comparison with known sequences revealed about 60% homology to the adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from yeast.

  4. Kinetics of nitric oxide dissociation from five- and six-coordinate nitrosyl hemes and heme proteins, including soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kharitonov, V G; Sharma, V S; Magde, D; Koesling, D

    1997-06-03

    Kinetics of NO dissociation were characterized for three five-coordinate systems, heme-NO, HSA-heme-NO (human serum albumin), GC-NO (soluble guanylate cyclase), and for the six-coordinate system, Im-heme-NO. Nitrosyl myoglobin was redetermined for comparison. Previously known, six-coordinate R and T state nitrosyl hemoglobins are also included in the comparison. The data indicate that NO dissociates more than 1000 times faster from five-coordinate model heme than it does from the six-coordinate analog. Such a negative trans-effect between NO and a proximal base is in sharp contrast to carboxy heme derivatives, in which ligand dissociation rates are greatly slowed in when a trans base is present. As a result of opposite trans-effects, six-coordinate carboxy and nitrosyl derivatives have comparable dissociation rates, even though the five-coordinate species are very different. In proteins, five- and six-coordinate forms do not show a large difference in dissociation rates. Part of the reason may be due to different probabilities for geminate recombination in the different proteins, but this cannot explain all the facts. There must also be influences of the protein structure on bond-breaking rate constants themselves. With the exception of hemoglobin in the T state, nitrosyl guanylate cyclase shows the highest NO dissociation rate constant, k(obs) = 6 x 10(-4) s(-1). This would yield a half-life of about 2 min at 37 degrees C for dissociation of NO from GC-NO, a number that has implications for the mechanism of regulation of the activity of this key heme enzyme.

  5. Bifunctional homodimeric triokinase/FMN cyclase: contribution of protein domains to the activities of the human enzyme and molecular dynamics simulation of domain movements.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; Couto, Ana; Cabezas, Alicia; Pinto, Rosa María; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Canales, José; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2014-04-11

    Mammalian triokinase, which phosphorylates exogenous dihydroxyacetone and fructose-derived glyceraldehyde, is neither molecularly identified nor firmly associated to an encoding gene. Human FMN cyclase, which splits FAD and other ribonucleoside diphosphate-X compounds to ribonucleoside monophosphate and cyclic X-phosphodiester, is identical to a DAK-encoded dihydroxyacetone kinase. This bifunctional protein was identified as triokinase. It was modeled as a homodimer of two-domain (K and L) subunits. Active centers lie between K1 and L2 or K2 and L1: dihydroxyacetone binds K and ATP binds L in different subunits too distant (≈ 14 Å) for phosphoryl transfer. FAD docked to the ATP site with ribityl 4'-OH in a possible near-attack conformation for cyclase activity. Reciprocal inhibition between kinase and cyclase reactants confirmed substrate site locations. The differential roles of protein domains were supported by their individual expression: K was inactive, and L displayed cyclase but not kinase activity. The importance of domain mobility for the kinase activity of dimeric triokinase was highlighted by molecular dynamics simulations: ATP approached dihydroxyacetone at distances below 5 Å in near-attack conformation. Based upon structure, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, relevant residues were mutated to alanine, and kcat and Km were assayed whenever kinase and/or cyclase activity was conserved. The results supported the roles of Thr(112) (hydrogen bonding of ATP adenine to K in the closed active center), His(221) (covalent anchoring of dihydroxyacetone to K), Asp(401) and Asp(403) (metal coordination to L), and Asp(556) (hydrogen bonding of ATP or FAD ribose to L domain). Interestingly, the His(221) point mutant acted specifically as a cyclase without kinase activity.

  6. Roles of Protein Kinase A and Adenylate Cyclase in Light-Modulated Cellulase Regulation in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, André; Tisch, Doris; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway represents a central signaling cascade with crucial functions in all organisms. Previous studies of Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) suggested a function of cAMP signaling in regulation of cellulase gene expression. We were therefore interested in how the crucial components of this pathway, adenylate cyclase (ACY1) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), would affect cellulase gene expression. We found that both ACY1 and PKA catalytic subunit 1 (PKAC1) are involved in regulation of vegetative growth but are not essential for sexual development. Interestingly, our results showed considerably increased transcript abundance of cellulase genes in darkness compared to light (light responsiveness) upon growth on lactose. This effect is strongly enhanced in mutant strains lacking PKAC1 or ACY1. Comparison to the wild type showed that ACY1 has a consistently positive effect on cellulase gene expression in light and darkness, while PKAC1 influences transcript levels of cellulase genes positively in light but negatively in darkness. A function of PKAC1 in light-modulated cellulase gene regulation is also reflected by altered complex formation within the cel6a/cbh2 promoter in light and darkness and in the absence of pkac1. Analysis of transcript levels of cellulase regulator genes indicates that the regulatory output of the cAMP pathway may be established via adjustment of XYR1 abundance. Consequently, both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A are involved in light-modulated cellulase gene expression in T. reesei and have a dampening effect on the light responsiveness of this process. PMID:22286997

  7. The role of cyclase-associated protein in regulating actin filament dynamics - more than a monomer-sequestration factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-08-01

    Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is fundamental to a number of cell biological events. A variety of actin-regulatory proteins modulate polymerization and depolymerization of actin and contribute to actin cytoskeletal reorganization. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-monomer-binding protein that has been studied for over 20 years. Early studies have shown that CAP sequesters actin monomers; recent studies, however, have revealed more active roles of CAP in actin filament dynamics. CAP enhances the recharging of actin monomers with ATP antagonistically to ADF/cofilin, and also promotes the severing of actin filaments in cooperation with ADF/cofilin. Self-oligomerization and binding to other proteins regulate activities and localization of CAP. CAP has crucial roles in cell signaling, development, vesicle trafficking, cell migration and muscle sarcomere assembly. This Commentary discusses the recent advances in our understanding of the functions of CAP and its implications as an important regulator of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, which are involved in various cellular activities.

  8. Cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) promotes cofilin-induced actin dynamics in mammalian nonmuscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bertling, Enni; Hotulainen, Pirta; Mattila, Pieta K; Matilainen, Tanja; Salminen, Marjo; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2004-05-01

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are highly conserved actin monomer binding proteins present in all eukaryotes. However, the mechanism by which CAPs contribute to actin dynamics has been elusive. In mammals, the situation is further complicated by the presence of two CAP isoforms whose differences have not been characterized. Here, we show that CAP1 is widely expressed in mouse nonmuscle cells, whereas CAP2 is the predominant isoform in developing striated muscles. In cultured NIH3T3 and B16F1 cells, CAP1 is a highly abundant protein that colocalizes with cofilin-1 to dynamic regions of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of CAP1 knockdown cells demonstrated that this protein promotes rapid actin filament depolymerization and is important for cell morphology, migration, and endocytosis. Interestingly, depletion of CAP1 leads to an accumulation of cofilin-1 into abnormal cytoplasmic aggregates and to similar cytoskeletal defects to those seen in cofilin-1 knockdown cells, demonstrating that CAP1 is required for proper subcellular localization and function of ADF/cofilin. Together, these data provide the first direct in vivo evidence that CAP promotes rapid actin dynamics in conjunction with ADF/cofilin and is required for several central cellular processes in mammals.

  9. Regulation of follitropin-sensitive adenylate cyclase by stimulatory and inhibitory forms of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in immature rat Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been designed to examine the role of guanine nucleotides in mediating FSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in Sertoli cell plasma membranes. Analysis of ({sup 3}H)GDP binding to plasma membranes suggested a single high affinity site with a K{sub d} = 0.24 uM. Competition studies indicated that GTP{sub {gamma}}S was 7-fold more potent than GDP{sub {beta}}S. Bound GDP could be released by FSH in the presence of GTP{sub {gamma}}S, but not by FSH alone. Adenylate cyclase activity was enhanced 5-fold by FSH in the presence of GTP. Addition of GDP{sub {beta}}S to the activated enzyme (FSH plus GTP) resulted in a time-dependent decay to basal activity within 20 sec. GDP{sub {beta}}S competitively inhibited GTP{sub {gamma}}S-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a K{sub i} = 0.18 uM. Adenylate cyclase activity was also demonstrated to be sensitive to the nucleotide bound state. In the presence of FSH, only the GTP{sub {gamma}}S-bound form persisted even if GDP{sub {beta}}S previously occupied all available binding sites. Two membrane proteins, M{sub r} = 43,000 and 48,000, were ADP{centered dot}ribosylated using cholera toxin and labeling was enhanced 2 to 4-fold by GTP{sub {gamma}}S but not by GDP{sub {beta}}S. The M{sub r} = 43,000 and 48,000 proteins represented variant forms of G{sub S}. A single protein of M{sub r} = 40,000 (G{sub i}) was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin in vitro. GTP inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with an IC{sub 50} = 0.1 uM. The adenosine analog, N{sup 6}{centered dot}phenylisopropyl adenosine enhanced GTP inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by an additional 15%. GTP-dependent inhibition of forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity was abolished in membranes prepared from Sertoli cells treated in culture with pertussis toxin.

  10. Mammalian CAP (Cyclase-associated protein) in the world of cell migration: Roles in actin filament dynamics and beyond.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is essential for a variety of fundamental biological processes such as embryonic development, wound healing, and immune response. Aberrant cell migration also underlies pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis, in which morphological transformation promotes spreading of cancer to new sites. Cell migration is driven by actin dynamics, which is the repeated cycling of monomeric actin (G-actin) into and out of filamentous actin (F-actin). CAP (Cyclase-associated protein, also called Srv2) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein, which is implicated in cell motility and the invasiveness of human cancers. It cooperates with another actin regulatory protein, cofilin, to accelerate actin dynamics. Hence, knockdown of CAP1 slows down actin filament turnover, which in most cells leads to reduced cell motility. However, depletion of CAP1 in HeLa cells, while causing reduction in dynamics, actually led to increased cell motility. The increases in motility are likely through activation of cell adhesion signals through an inside-out signaling. The potential to activate adhesion signaling competes with the negative effect of CAP1 depletion on actin dynamics, which would reduce cell migration. In this commentary, we provide a brief overview of the roles of mammalian CAP1 in cell migration, and highlight a likely mechanism underlying the activation of cell adhesion signaling and elevated motility caused by depletion of CAP1.

  11. Srv2/cyclase-associated protein forms hexameric shurikens that directly catalyze actin filament severing by cofilin.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Little, Kristin; Sharov, Grigory; Sokolova, Olga; Goode, Bruce L

    2013-01-01

    Actin filament severing is critical for the dynamic turnover of cellular actin networks. Cofilin severs filaments, but additional factors may be required to increase severing efficiency in vivo. Srv2/cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a widely expressed protein with a role in binding and recycling actin monomers ascribed to domains in its C-terminus (C-Srv2). In this paper, we report a new biochemical and cellular function for Srv2/CAP in directly catalyzing cofilin-mediated severing of filaments. This function is mediated by its N-terminal half (N-Srv2), and is physically and genetically separable from C-Srv2 activities. Using dual-color total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we determined that N-Srv2 stimulates filament disassembly by increasing the frequency of cofilin-mediated severing without affecting cofilin binding to filaments. Structural analysis shows that N-Srv2 forms novel hexameric star-shaped structures, and disrupting oligomerization impairs N-Srv2 activities and in vivo function. Further, genetic analysis shows that the combined activities of N-Srv2 and Aip1 are essential in vivo. These observations define a novel mechanism by which the combined activities of cofilin and Srv2/CAP lead to enhanced filament severing and support an emerging view that actin disassembly is controlled not by cofilin alone, but by a more complex set of factors working in concert.

  12. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 may predict brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuan-Shuan; Tan, Min; Lin, Hai-Yan; Xu, Lei; Shen, Chang-Xing; Yuan, Qing; Song, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Chang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting brain metastasis (BM) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The model comprises 120 cases of NSCLC that were treated and followed up for 4 years. The patients were divided into the BM (n=50) and non-BM (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence) (n=70) groups. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses were performed in metastatic tissues of NSCLC. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate the immunoreactive cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) signal with BM. Survival analyses were performed by using the Kaplan-Meier method. CAP1 protein content and immunoreactivity were significantly increased in BM specimens compared to other-metastatic specimens. The survival analysis revealed that CAP1 overexpression was significantly associated with survival (P<0.05). The ROC test suggested that the area under the curve was 73.33% (P<0.001; 95% CI, 63.5-83.2%). When P=0.466, the sensitivity and specificity reached 79.5 and 67.1%, respectively. These findings suggested that CAP1 is involved in the BM of NSCLC, and that elevated levels of CAP1 expression may indicate a poor prognosis for patients with BM. The CAP1 molecular model may be useful in the prediction of the risk of BM in NSCLC.

  13. Adenylate cyclase, cyclic AMP and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 in airway smooth muscle: modulation by protein kinase C and growth serum.

    PubMed Central

    Moughal, N; Stevens, P A; Kong, D; Pyne, S; Pyne, N J

    1995-01-01

    Bradykinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulate adenylate cyclase activity in serum-depleted cultured airway smooth muscle via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. The probable target is the type II adenylate cyclase, which can integrate coincident signals from both PKC and Gs. Therefore, activation of Gs (by cholera-toxin pre-treatment) amplified the bradykinin-stimulated cyclic AMP signal and concurrently attenuated the partial activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2) by bradykinin. We have previously demonstrated that, in order to induce full activation of ERK-2 with bradykinin, it is necessary to obliterate PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP formation. We concluded that the cyclic AMP signal limits the magnitude of ERK-2 activation [Pyne, Moughal, Stevens, Tolan and Pyne (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 611-616]. The present study indicates that the bradykinin-stimulated ERK-2 pathway is entirely cyclic AMP-sensitive, and suggests that coincident signal detection by adenylate cyclase may be an important physiological route for the modulation of early mitogenic signalling. Furthermore, the direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity enables bradykinin to induce DNA synthesis, indicating that the PKC-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase limits entry of cells into the cell cycle. These studies suggest that the mitogenicity of an agonist may be governed, in part, by its ability to stimulate an inhibitory cyclic AMP signal pathway in the cell. The activation of adenylate cyclase by PKC appears to be downstream of phospholipase D. However, in cells that were maintained in growth serum (i.e. were not growth-arrested), bradykinin was unable to elicit a PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP response. The lesion in the signal-response coupling was not at the level of either the receptor or phospholipase D, which remain functionally operative and suggests modification occurs at either PKC or adenylate cyclase itself. These studies are discussed with

  14. The C-terminal dimerization motif of cyclase-associated protein is essential for actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-12-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein that functions together with actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin to enhance actin filament dynamics. CAP has multiple functional domains, and the function to regulate actin monomers is carried out by its C-terminal half containing a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain, a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 (CARP) domain, and a dimerization motif. WH2 and CARP are implicated in binding to actin monomers and important for enhancing filament turnover. However, the role of the dimerization motif is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of the dimerization motif of CAS-2, a CAP isoform in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in actin monomer regulation. CAS-2 promotes ATP-dependent recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers for polymerization by enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. The C-terminal half of CAS-2 (CAS-2C) has nearly as strong activity as full-length CAS-2. Maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CAS-2C is a dimer. However, MBP-CAS-2C with a truncation of either one or two C-terminal β-strands is monomeric. Truncations of the dimerization motif in MBP-CAS-2C nearly completely abolish its activity to sequester actin monomers from polymerization and enhance nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. As a result, these CAS-2C variants, also in the context of full-length CAS-2, fail to compete with ADF/cofilin to release actin monomers for polymerization. CAS-2C variants lacking the dimerization motif exhibit enhanced binding to actin filaments, which is mediated by WH2. Taken together, these results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved dimerization motif of CAP is essential for its C-terminal region to exert the actin monomer-specific regulatory function.

  15. Novel Gbeta Mimic Kelch Proteins (Gpb1 and Gpb2 Connect G-Protein Signaling to Ras via Yeast Neurofibromin Homologs Ira1 and Ira2: A Model for Human NF1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    the level of pigmentation produced following 2 or 4 days incubation compared to the isogenic wild type strains and mutants with defects in the enzyme...coupling, Gpb1/2 serve as potent molecular brakes to constrain signaling via the PKA signaling pathway during both vegetative growth and dimorphic...In ad- dition to regulating Ras activity, neurofibromin also gov- erns G protein-mediated adenylyl cyclase activity in the fruit fly Drosophila

  16. Microscopical localization on adenylate cyclase: a historical review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Richards, P A; Richards, P D

    1998-03-15

    The histochemistry technique for localizing adenylate cyclase has been developed over the past two decades. Early efforts were directed at overcoming the criticism of the lead capture technique, the inhibition of the enzyme by fixation, and problems associated with the substrate. The introduction of alternative metal ions, strontium and cerium, offered solutions to the criticism of the lead capture technique. The inhibition of the enzyme by the various fixation methods used has been rarely overcome satisfactorily and the use of non-fixed material during incubation is one of the alternatives that has been suggested. The introduction of adenylate (beta-gamma-methylene) diphosphate as an alternative substrate offers a solution to the problems associated with commercially available adenylyl imidodiphosphate. Although no standard medium or method has been accepted by all researchers, the histochemical technique still has a place in the arsenal of the modern cell biologist. The technique localizes the active enzyme, as opposed to the protein, active and nonactive, by immunocytochemistry and the precursors of the protein by in situ hybridization methods.

  17. Mammalian and malaria parasite cyclase-associated proteins catalyze nucleotide exchange on G-actin through a conserved mechanism.

    PubMed

    Makkonen, Maarit; Bertling, Enni; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Baum, Jake; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-01-11

    Cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) are among the most highly conserved regulators of actin dynamics, being present in organisms from mammals to apicomplexan parasites. Yeast, plant, and mammalian CAPs are large multidomain proteins, which catalyze nucleotide exchange on actin monomers from ADP to ATP and recycle actin monomers from actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin for new rounds of filament assembly. However, the mechanism by which CAPs promote nucleotide exchange is not known. Furthermore, how apicomplexan CAPs, which lack many domains present in yeast and mammalian CAPs, contribute to actin dynamics is not understood. We show that, like yeast Srv2/CAP, mouse CAP1 interacts with ADF/cofilin and ADP-G-actin through its N-terminal α-helical and C-terminal β-strand domains, respectively. However, in the variation to yeast Srv2/CAP, mouse CAP1 has two adjacent profilin-binding sites, and it interacts with ATP-actin monomers with high affinity through its WH2 domain. Importantly, we revealed that the C-terminal β-sheet domain of mouse CAP1 is essential and sufficient for catalyzing nucleotide exchange on actin monomers, although the adjacent WH2 domain is not required for this function. Supporting these data, we show that the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum CAP, which is entirely composed of the β-sheet domain, efficiently promotes nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. Collectively, this study provides evidence that catalyzing nucleotide exchange on actin monomers via the β-sheet domain is the most highly conserved function of CAPs from mammals to apicomplexan parasites. Other functions, including interactions with profilin and ADF/cofilin, evolved in more complex organisms to adjust the specific role of CAPs in actin dynamics.

  18. Heat Shock Protein 90 Associates with the Per-Arnt-Sim Domain of Heme-free Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Dai, Yue; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Seeger, Franziska; Ghosh, Arnab; Garcin, Elsa D.; Montfort, William R.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) drives heme insertion into the β1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) β1, which enables it to associate with a partner sGCα1 subunit and mature into a nitric oxide (NO)-responsive active form. We utilized fluorescence polarization measurements and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to define molecular interactions between the specific human isoforms hsp90β and apo-sGCβ1. hsp90β and its isolated M domain, but not its isolated N and C domains, bind with low micromolar affinity to a heme-free, truncated version of sGCβ1 (sGCβ1(1–359)-H105F). Surprisingly, hsp90β and its M domain bound to the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of apo-sGC-β1(1–359), which lies adjacent to its heme-binding (H-NOX) domain. The interaction specifically involved solvent-exposed regions in the hsp90β M domain that are largely distinct from sites utilized by other hsp90 clients. The interaction strongly protected two regions of the sGCβ1 PAS domain and caused local structural relaxation in other regions, including a PAS dimerization interface and a segment in the H-NOX domain. Our results suggest a means by which the hsp90β interaction could prevent apo-sGCβ1 from associating with its partner sGCα1 subunit while enabling structural changes to assist heme insertion into the H-NOX domain. This mechanism would parallel that in other clients like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and HIF1α, which also interact with hsp90 through their PAS domains to control protein partner and small ligand binding interactions. PMID:26134567

  19. ATP-dependent regulation of actin monomer-filament equilibrium by cyclase-associated protein and ADF/cofilin.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazumi; Ono, Shoichiro

    2013-07-15

    CAP (cyclase-associated protein) is a conserved regulator of actin filament dynamics. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, CAS-1 is an isoform of CAP that is expressed in striated muscle and regulates sarcomeric actin assembly. In the present study, we report that CAS-2, a second CAP isoform in C. elegans, attenuates the actin-monomer-sequestering effect of ADF (actin depolymerizing factor)/cofilin to increase the steady-state levels of actin filaments in an ATP-dependent manner. CAS-2 binds to actin monomers without a strong preference for either ATP- or ADP-actin. CAS-2 strongly enhances the exchange of actin-bound nucleotides even in the presence of UNC-60A, a C. elegans ADF/cofilin that inhibits nucleotide exchange. UNC-60A induces the depolymerization of actin filaments and sequesters actin monomers, whereas CAS-2 reverses the monomer-sequestering effect of UNC-60A in the presence of ATP, but not in the presence of only ADP or the absence of ATP or ADP. A 1:100 molar ratio of CAS-2 to UNC-60A is sufficient to increase actin filaments. CAS-2 has two independent actin-binding sites in its N- and C-terminal halves, and the C-terminal half is necessary and sufficient for the observed activities of the full-length CAS-2. These results suggest that CAS-2 (CAP) and UNC-60A (ADF/cofilin) are important in the ATP-dependent regulation of the actin monomer-filament equilibrium.

  20. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-06-25

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca/sup 2 +/ gating.

  1. Guanylyl cyclase structure, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide, bicarbonate, natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), guanylins, uroguanylins and guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) activate a family of enzymes variously called guanyl, guanylyl or guanylate cyclases that catalyze the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and pyrophosphate. Intracellular cyclic GMP is a second messenger that modulates: platelet aggregation, neurotransmission, sexual arousal, gut peristalsis, blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, lipolysis, phototransduction, cardiac hypertrophy and oocyte maturation. This review briefly discusses the discovery of cGMP and guanylyl cyclases, then nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylyl cyclase are described in slightly greater detail. Finally, the structure, function, and regulation of the individual mammalian single membrane-spanning guanylyl cyclases GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-D, GC-E, GC-F and GC-G are described in greatest detail as determined by biochemical, cell biological and gene-deletion studies.

  2. Structure and mechanism of mouse cyclase-associated protein (CAP1) in regulating actin dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Silvia; Collins, Agnieszka; Golden, Leslie; Sokolova, Olga; Goode, Bruce L

    2014-10-31

    Srv2/CAP is a conserved actin-binding protein with important roles in driving cellular actin dynamics in diverse animal, fungal, and plant species. However, there have been conflicting reports about whether the activities of Srv2/CAP are conserved, particularly between yeast and mammalian homologs. Yeast Srv2 has two distinct functions in actin turnover: its hexameric N-terminal-half enhances cofilin-mediated severing of filaments, while its C-terminal-half catalyzes dissociation of cofilin from ADP-actin monomers and stimulates nucleotide exchange. Here, we dissected the structure and function of mouse CAP1 to better understand its mechanistic relationship to yeast Srv2. Although CAP1 has a shorter N-terminal oligomerization sequence compared with Srv2, we find that the N-terminal-half of CAP1 (N-CAP1) forms hexameric structures with six protrusions, similar to N-Srv2. Further, N-CAP1 autonomously binds to F-actin and decorates the sides and ends of filaments, altering F-actin structure and enhancing cofilin-mediated severing. These activities depend on conserved surface residues on the helical-folded domain. Moreover, N-CAP1 enhances yeast cofilin-mediated severing, and conversely, yeast N-Srv2 enhances human cofilin-mediated severing, highlighting the mechanistic conservation between yeast and mammals. Further, we demonstrate that the C-terminal actin-binding β-sheet domain of CAP1 is sufficient to catalyze nucleotide-exchange of ADP-actin monomers, while in the presence of cofilin this activity additionally requires the WH2 domain. Thus, the structures, activities, and mechanisms of mouse and yeast Srv2/CAP homologs are remarkably well conserved, suggesting that the same activities and mechanisms underlie many of the diverse actin-based functions ascribed to Srv2/CAP homologs in different organisms.

  3. Cyclase-associated protein is essential for the functioning of the endo-lysosomal system and provides a link to the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Hameeda; Rivero, Francisco; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Schwager, Stephan; Balbo, Alessandra; Bozzaro, Salvatore; Schleicher, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A

    2005-10-01

    Data from mutant analysis in yeast and Dictyostelium indicate a role for the cyclase-associated protein (CAP) in endocytosis and vesicle transport. We have used genetic and biochemical approaches to identify novel interacting partners of Dictyostelium CAP to help explain its molecular interactions in these processes. Cyclase-associated protein associates and interacts with subunits of the highly conserved vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) and co-localizes to some extent with the V-ATPase. Furthermore, CAP is essential for maintaining the structural organization, integrity and functioning of the endo-lysosomal system, as distribution and morphology of V-ATPase- and Nramp1-decorated membranes were disturbed in a CAP mutant (CAP bsr) accompanied by an increased endosomal pH. Moreover, concanamycin A (CMA), a specific inhibitor of the V-ATPase, had a more severe effect on CAP bsr than on wild-type cells, and the mutant did not show adaptation to the drug. Also, the distribution of green fluorescent protein-CAP was affected upon CMA treatment in the wildtype and recovered after adaptation. Distribution of the V-ATPase in CAP bsr was drastically altered upon hypo-osmotic shock, and growth was slower and reached lower saturation densities in the mutant under hyper-osmotic conditions. Taken together, our data unravel a link of CAP with the actin cytoskeleton and endocytosis and suggest that CAP is an essential component of the endo-lysosomal system in Dictyostelium.

  4. Suppression of the humoral immune response by cannabinoids is partially mediated through inhibition of adenylate cyclase by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein coupled mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, N E; Koh, W S; Yang, K H; Lee, M; Kessler, F K

    1994-11-16

    Cannabinoid compounds, including the major psychoactive component of marihuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), have been widely established as being inhibitory on a broad array of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The presence of cannabinoid receptors has been identified recently on mouse spleen cells, which possess structural and functional characteristics similar to those of the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor originally identified in rat brain. These findings, together with those demonstrating that delta 9-THC inhibits adenylate cyclase in splenocytes, strongly suggest that certain aspects of immune inhibition by cannabinoids may be mediated through a cannabinoid receptor-associated mechanism. The objective of the present studies was to determine whether inhibition of adenylate cyclase is relevant to mouse spleen cell immune function and, if so, whether this inhibition is mediated through a Gi-protein coupled mechanism as previously described in neuronal tissue. Spleen cell activation by the phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), plus the calcium ionophore ionomycin, produced a rapid but transient increase in cytosolic cAMP, which was inhibited completely by immunosuppressive concentrations of delta 9-THC (22 microM) and the synthetic bicyclic cannabinoid CP-55940 (5.2 microM), which produced no effect on cell viability. Inhibition by cannabinoids of lymphocyte proliferative responses to PMA plus ionomycin and sheep erythrocyte (sRBC) IgM antibody-forming cell (AFC) response, was abrogated completely by low concentrations of dibutyryl-cAMP (10-100 microM). Inhibition of the sRBC AFC response by both delta 9-THC (22 microM) and CP-55940 (5.2 microM) was also abrogated by preincubation of splenocytes for 24 hr with pertussis toxin (0.1-100 ng/mL). Pertussis toxin pretreatment of spleen cells was also found to directly abrogate cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase, as measured by forskolin-stimulated accumulation

  5. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  6. Identification of a prostacyclin receptor coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Negishi, M.; Ichikawa, A. )

    1990-11-01

    A stable analogue of prostacyclin, iloprost, specifically bound to 30,000 x g pellet (the membrane fraction) prepared from mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells. The binding was dependent on time, temperature and pH, and absolutely required a divalent cation. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the maximal concentration of the binding site as determined by Scatchard plot analysis were 10.4 nM and 1.12 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Hill coefficient was 1.0, indicating a single entity of binding site and no cooperativity. The binding site was highly specific for iloprost among PGs tested (iloprost much greater than PGE1 greater than carbacyclin greater than PGE2). In contrast, the membrane fraction had the binding site specific for PGE2 and PGE1, which was distinct from the prostacyclin receptor. The dissociation of bound (3H)iloprost from the membrane fraction was specifically enhanced by guanine nucleotides. Furthermore, iloprost dose-dependently enhanced the activity of adenylate cyclase in a GTP-dependent manner. These results indicate that a specific prostacyclin receptor is coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mastocytoma cells.

  7. Differential protein levels and post-translational modifications in spinal cord injury of the rat.

    PubMed

    Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Brejnikow, Mika; Kang, Sung Ung; Vishwanath, Vinay; Walder, Nadja; Herkner, Kurt; Redl, Heinz; Lubec, Gert

    2010-03-05

    Although changes in protein expression in spinal cord injury (SCI) would be of pivotal interest, information so far is limited. It was therefore the aim of the study to determine protein levels and post-translational modifications in the early phase following SCI in the rat. SCI was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats and sham operated rats served as controls. A gel-based proteomic approach using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by quantification with specific software and subsequent identification of differentially expressed proteins by nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS was applied. Proteins of several pathways and cascades were dysregulated in SCI: 14-3-3 epsilon protein, dynein light chain 1, and tubulin beta-5 chain showed higher levels in SCI, whereas adenylyl cyclase associated protein 1, dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2, F-actin capping protein subunit beta, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and transthyretin showed lower levels in the injured tissue. Post-translational modifications indicated free oxygen radical attack on proteins in SCI. The occurrence of stress is indicated by deranged stress-induced phosphoprotein 1 and signaling abnormalities are reflected by adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and 14-3-3 epsilon protein. The findings propose the involvement of the corresponding cascades and challenge further work into aberrant signaling and oxidative stress in SCI, which may form the basis for experimental intervention for spinal cord trauma.

  8. CAP1, an Adenylate Cyclase-Associated Protein Gene, Regulates Bud-Hypha Transitions, Filamentous Growth, and Cyclic AMP Levels and Is Required for Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Sundstrom, Paula

    2001-01-01

    In response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans exits the budding cycle, producing germ tubes and hyphae concomitant with expression of virulence genes, such as that encoding hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1). Biochemical studies implicate cyclic AMP (cAMP) increases in promoting bud-hypha transitions, but genetic evidence relating genes that control cAMP levels to bud-hypha transitions has not been reported. Adenylate cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) of nonpathogenic fungi interact with Ras and adenylate cyclase to increase cAMP levels under specific environmental conditions. To initiate studies on the relationship between cAMP signaling and bud-hypha transitions in C. albicans, we identified, cloned, characterized, and disrupted the C. albicans CAP1 gene. C. albicans strains with inactivated CAP1 budded in conditions that led to germ tube formation in isogenic strains with CAP1. The addition of 10 mM cAMP and dibutyryl cAMP promoted bud-hypha transitions and filamentous growth in the cap1/cap1 mutant in liquid and solid media, respectively, showing clearly that cAMP promotes hypha formation in C. albicans. Increases in cytoplasmic cAMP preceding germ tube emergence in strains having CAP1 were markedly diminished in the budding cap1/cap1 mutant. C. albicans strains with deletions of both alleles of CAP1 were avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. The avirulence of a germ tube-deficient cap1/cap1 mutant coupled with the role of Cap1 in regulating cAMP levels shows that the Cap1-mediated cAMP signaling pathway is required for bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and the pathogenesis of candidiasis. PMID:11325951

  9. CAP1, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein gene, regulates bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and cyclic AMP levels and is required for virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Y S; Sundstrom, P

    2001-05-01

    In response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans exits the budding cycle, producing germ tubes and hyphae concomitant with expression of virulence genes, such as that encoding hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1). Biochemical studies implicate cyclic AMP (cAMP) increases in promoting bud-hypha transitions, but genetic evidence relating genes that control cAMP levels to bud-hypha transitions has not been reported. Adenylate cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) of nonpathogenic fungi interact with Ras and adenylate cyclase to increase cAMP levels under specific environmental conditions. To initiate studies on the relationship between cAMP signaling and bud-hypha transitions in C. albicans, we identified, cloned, characterized, and disrupted the C. albicans CAP1 gene. C. albicans strains with inactivated CAP1 budded in conditions that led to germ tube formation in isogenic strains with CAP1. The addition of 10 mM cAMP and dibutyryl cAMP promoted bud-hypha transitions and filamentous growth in the cap1/cap1 mutant in liquid and solid media, respectively, showing clearly that cAMP promotes hypha formation in C. albicans. Increases in cytoplasmic cAMP preceding germ tube emergence in strains having CAP1 were markedly diminished in the budding cap1/cap1 mutant. C. albicans strains with deletions of both alleles of CAP1 were avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. The avirulence of a germ tube-deficient cap1/cap1 mutant coupled with the role of Cap1 in regulating cAMP levels shows that the Cap1-mediated cAMP signaling pathway is required for bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and the pathogenesis of candidiasis.

  10. Glutamine Synthetase Regulation, Adenylylation State, and Strain Specificity Analyzed by Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Robert A.; Streicher, Stanley L.

    1979-01-01

    We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to examine the regulation and adenylylation states of glutamine synthetases (GSs) from Escherichia coli (GSE) and Klebsiella aerogenes (GSK). In gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), we found that GSK had a mobility which differed significantly from that of GSE. In addition, for both GSK and GSE, adenylylated subunits (GSK-adenosine 5′-monophosphate [AMP] and GSE-AMP) had lesser mobilities in SDS gels than did the corresponding non-adenylylated subunits. The order of mobilities was GSK-AMP < GSK < GSE-AMP < GSE. We were able to detect these mobility differences with purified and partially purified preparations of GS, crude cell extracts, and whole cell lysates. SDS gel electrophoresis thus provided a means of estimating the adenylylation state and the quantity of GS present independent of enzymatic activity measurements and of determining the strain origin. Using SDS gels, we showed that: (i) the constitutively produced GS in strains carrying the glnA4 allele was mostly adenylylated, (ii) the GS-like polypeptide produced by strains carrying the glnA51 allele was indistinguishable from wild-type GSK, and (iii) strains carrying the glnA10 allele contained no polypeptide having the mobility of GSK or GSK-AMP. Using native polyacrylamide gels, we detected the increased amount of dodecameric GS present in cells grown under nitrogen limitation compared with cells grown under conditions of nitrogen excess. In native gels there was neither a significant difference in the mobilities of adenylylated and non-adenylylated GSs nor a GS-like protein in cells carrying the glnA10 allele. Images PMID:33958

  11. The guanylyl cyclase-A receptor transduces an atrial natriuretic peptide/ATP activation signal in the absence of other proteins.

    PubMed

    Wong, S K; Ma, C P; Foster, D C; Chen, A Y; Garbers, D L

    1995-12-22

    Attempts to activate partially purified preparations of the guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have previously failed, leading to speculation that essential cofactors are lost during purification procedures. The receptor was modified to contain the FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK), expressed in Sf9 cells, and purified to apparent homogeneity (4.3 mumol cyclic GMP formed/min/mg protein; 5.8 mmol 125I-ANP binding site/mg protein) by a combination of immunoaffinity, Q-Sepharose FF, and wheat germ agglutinin batch chromatography. High initial protein/detergent ratios, the presence of glycerol (40%), and the inclusion of protein phosphatase inhibitors in all buffers resulted in the purification of a receptor that continued to transduce the ANP/ATP activation signal. Both native and purified GC-A contained a single class of high affinity ANP binding sites (Kd = 60 pM) and an equivalent EC50 for ATP (0.3 mM). Positive cooperativity as a function of MnGTP was retained during purification. Thus, GC-A is capable of transducing a ligand binding signal in the absence of other proteins.

  12. The cyclase-associated protein FgCap1 has both protein kinase A-dependent and -independent functions during deoxynivalenol production and plant infection in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong; Jiang, Cong

    2017-01-31

    Fusarium graminearum is a causal agent of wheat scab and a producer of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). The expression of trichothecene biosynthesis (TRI) genes and DON production are mainly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway and two pathway-specific transcription factors (TRI6 and TRI10). Interestingly, deletion mutants of TRI6 show reduced expression of several components of cAMP signalling, including the FgCAP1 adenylate-binding protein gene that has not been functionally characterized in F. graminearum. In this study, we show that FgCap1 interacts with Fac1 adenylate cyclase and that deletion of FgCAP1 reduces the intracellular cAMP level and PKA activity. The Fgcap1 deletion mutant is defective in vegetative growth, conidiogenesis and plant infection. It also shows significantly reduced DON production and TRI gene expression, which can be suppressed by exogenous cAMP, indicating a PKA-dependent regulation of DON biosynthesis by FgCap1. The wild-type, but not tri6 mutant, shows increased levels of intracellular cAMP and FgCAP1 expression under DON-producing conditions. Furthermore, the promoter of FgCAP1 contains one putative Tri6-binding site that is important for its function during DON biosynthesis, but is dispensable for hyphal growth, conidiogenesis and pathogenesis. In addition, FgCap1 shows an actin-like localization to the cortical patches at the apical region of hyphal tips. Phosphorylation of FgCap1 at S353 was identified by phosphoproteomics analysis. The S353A mutation in FgCAP1 has no effect on its functions during vegetative growth, conidiation and DON production. However, expression of the FgCAP1(S353A) allele fails to complement the defects of the Fgcap1 mutant in plant infection, indicating the importance of the phosphorylation of FgCap1 at S353 during pathogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that FgCAP1 is involved in the regulation of DON production via cAMP signalling

  13. Role of Nitric Oxide, Nitric Oxide Synthase, Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase, and cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Mouse Stem Cell Cardiac Development

    PubMed Central

    Spinelli, Valentina; Vona, Alessia; Corti, Francesca; Diolaiuti, Lorenzo; Zanardelli, Matteo; Sartiani, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and Aim. Nitric oxide (NO) can trigger cardiac differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), indicating a cardiogenic function of the NO synthetizing enzyme(s) (NOS). However, the involvement of the NO/NOS downstream effectors soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cGMP activated protein kinase I (PKG-I) is less defined. Therefore, we assess the involvement of the entire NO/NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway during cardiac differentiation process. Methods. Mouse ESCs were differentiated toward cardiac lineages by hanging drop methodology for 21 days. NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway was studied quantifying genes, proteins, enzymatic activities, and effects of inhibition during differentiation. Percentages of beating embryoid bodies (mEBs) were evaluated as an index of cardiogenesis. Results and Discussion. Genes and protein expression of enzymes were increased during differentiation with distinctive kinetics and proteins possessed their enzymatic functions. Exogenous administered NO accelerated whereas the blockade of PKG-I strongly slowed cardiogenesis. sGC inhibition was effective only at early stages and NOS blockade ineffective. Of NOS/sGC/PKG-I pathway, PKG-I seems to play the prominent role in cardiac maturation. Conclusion. We concluded that exogenous administered NO and other pharmacological strategies able to increase the activity of PKG-I provide new tools to investigate and promote differentiation of cardiogenic precursors. PMID:27840646

  14. A Novel zf-MYND Protein, CHB-3, Mediates Guanylyl Cyclase Localization to Sensory Cilia and Controls Body Size of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Manabi; Teramoto, Takayuki; Ishihara, Takeshi; Ohshima, Yasumi; McIntire, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are important sensory organelles, which are thought to be essential regulators of numerous signaling pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, defects in sensory cilium formation result in a small-body phenotype, suggesting the role of sensory cilia in body size determination. Previous analyses suggest that lack of normal cilia causes the small-body phenotype through the activation of a signaling pathway which consists of the EGL-4 cGMP-dependent protein kinase and the GCY-12 receptor-type guanylyl cyclase. By genetic suppressor screening of the small-body phenotype of a cilium defective mutant, we identified a chb-3 gene. Genetic analyses placed chb-3 in the same pathway as egl-4 and gcy-12 and upstream of egl-4. chb-3 encodes a novel protein, with a zf-MYND motif and ankyrin repeats, that is highly conserved from worm to human. In chb-3 mutants, GCY-12 guanylyl cyclase visualized by tagged GFP (GCY-12::GFP) fails to localize to sensory cilia properly and accumulates in cell bodies. Our analyses suggest that decreased GCY-12 levels in the cilia of chb-3 mutants may cause the suppression of the small-body phenotype of a cilium defective mutant. By observing the transport of GCY-12::GFP particles along the dendrites to the cilia in sensory neurons, we found that the velocities and the frequencies of the particle movement are decreased in chb-3 mutant animals. How membrane proteins are trafficked to cilia has been the focus of extensive studies in vertebrates and invertebrates, although only a few of the relevant proteins have been identified. Our study defines a new regulator, CHB-3, in the trafficking process and also shows the importance of ciliary targeting of the signaling molecule, GCY-12, in sensory-dependent body size regulation in C. elegans. Given that CHB-3 is highly conserved in mammal, a similar system may be used in the trafficking of signaling proteins to the cilia of other species. PMID:21124861

  15. The discovery of signal transduction by G proteins. A personal account and an overview of the initial findings and contributions that led to our present understanding

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    The realization that there existed a G-protein coupled signal transduction mechanism developed gradually and was initially the result of an ill fated quest for uncovering the mechanism of action of insulin, followed by a refocused research in many laboratories, including mine, on how GTP acted to increase hormonal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Independent research into how light-activated rhodopsin triggers a response in photoreceptor cells of the retina and the attendant biochemical studies joined midway and, without the left hand knowing well what the right hand was doing, preceded classical G protein research in identifying the molecular players responsible for signal transduction by G proteins. PMID:17141178

  16. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: entry of bacterial adenylate cyclase into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Confer, D L; Slungaard, A S; Graf, E; Panter, S S; Eaton, J W

    1984-01-01

    We have identified an adenylate cyclase toxin in urea extracts and culture supernatant fluids of Bordetella pertussis (2). The ability of this toxin and the lack of a strong correlation between its activity and adenylate cyclase activity found in urea extracts suggest that it is an oligomer of readily dissociable subunits. The mechanism by which Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin interacts with target cells is unknown, but polyvalent cations are necessary. Neutrophils exposed to the toxin acquire a 39,000 Mr protein that can also be photoaffinity labeled with 32P-ATP. We anticipate that this protein will prove to be a catalytic component of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin. Susceptible cells exposed to Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin are functionally aberrant. In phagocytes, decreased bactericidal capacity may be important in the pathogenesis of human whooping cough and other Bordetella infections occurring in domestic animals. The effects of the toxin on neoplastic cells may offer new insights into the factors controlling their growth and differentiation. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique bacterial product. Further purification and characterization of this toxin will add to our understanding of cell-protein interactions and pathogen-host relationships.

  17. Oligomeric state affects oxygen dissociation and diguanylate cyclase activity of globin coupled sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Deer, D Douglas; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is regulated by enzymes, such as diguanylate cyclases, that respond to environmental signals and alter c-di-GMP levels. Diguanylate cyclase activity of two globin coupled sensors is shown to be regulated by gaseous ligands, with cyclase activity and O2 dissociation affected by protein oligomeric state.

  18. Detection of Nitric Oxide Induced by Angiotensin II Receptor Type 1 Using Soluble Guanylate Cyclase beta1 Subunit Fused to a Yellow Fluorescent Protein, Venus.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yuichi; Ozawa, Kentaro; Komatsubara, Akira T; Zhao, Jing; Nishi, Mayumi; Yoshizumi, Masanori

    2017-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important gaseous molecule involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes, including the regulation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Here, we report the development of a high-affinity method to detect NO using soluble guanylate cyclase beta1 subunit fused to Venus, a variant of yellow fluorescent protein (sGC-Venus). We measured the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus with and without an NO donor using purified probes. At 560 nm emission, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was increased by approximately 2.5-fold by the NO donor, but the fluorescence intensities of sGC-Venus excited by other wavelengths showed much less of an increase or no significant increase. To measure NO in living cells, the fluorescence intensity of sGC-Venus at 405 nm excitation was normalized to that at 488 nm excitation because it showed no significant difference with or without the NO donor. In HEK293 cells overexpressing the angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AT1 receptor), the production of NO induced by activation of the AT1 receptor was detected using sGC-Venus. These data indicate that sGC-Venus will be a useful tool for visualizing intracellular NO in living cells and that NO might be a common tool to regulate GPCRs.

  19. A high-affinity interaction with ADP-actin monomers underlies the mechanism and in vivo function of Srv2/cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Pieta K; Quintero-Monzon, Omar; Kugler, Jamie; Moseley, James B; Almo, Steven C; Lappalainen, Pekka; Goode, Bruce L

    2004-11-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP), also called Srv2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a conserved actin monomer-binding protein that promotes cofilin-dependent actin turnover in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about the mechanism underlying this function. Here, we show that S. cerevisiae CAP binds with strong preference to ADP-G-actin (Kd 0.02 microM) compared with ATP-G-actin (Kd 1.9 microM) and competes directly with cofilin for binding ADP-G-actin. Further, CAP blocks actin monomer addition specifically to barbed ends of filaments, in contrast to profilin, which blocks monomer addition to pointed ends of filaments. The actin-binding domain of CAP is more extensive than previously suggested and includes a recently solved beta-sheet structure in the C-terminus of CAP and adjacent sequences. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we define evolutionarily conserved residues that mediate binding to ADP-G-actin and demonstrate that these activities are required for CAP function in vivo in directing actin organization and polarized cell growth. Together, our data suggest that in vivo CAP competes with cofilin for binding ADP-actin monomers, allows rapid nucleotide exchange to occur on actin, and then because of its 100-fold weaker binding affinity for ATP-actin compared with ADP-actin, allows other cellular factors such as profilin to take the handoff of ATP-actin and facilitate barbed end assembly.

  20. Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Calmodulin, Adenylyl Cyclase, and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Are Required for Late, but Not Early, Long-Term Memory Formation in the Honeybee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee "Apis mellifera," olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM)…

  1. Structural analysis of the diadenylate cyclase reaction of DNA-integrity scanning protein A (DisA) and its inhibition by 3'-dATP.

    PubMed

    Müller, Martina; Deimling, Tobias; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Witte, Gregor

    2015-08-01

    The identification of the essential bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) synthesized by the DNA-integrity scanning protein A (DisA) has opened up a new and emerging field in bacterial signalling. To further analyse the diadenylate cyclase (DAC) reaction catalysed by the DAC domains of DisA, we crystallized Thermotoga maritima DisA in the presence of different ATP analogues and metal ions to identify the metal-binding site and trap the enzyme in pre- and post-reaction states. Through structural and biochemical assays we identified important residues essential for the reaction in the active site of the DAC domains. Our structures resolve the metal-binding site and thus explain the activation of ATP for the DAC reaction. Moreover, we were able to identify a potent inhibitor of the DAC domain. Based on the available structures and homology to annotated DAC domains we propose a common mechanism for c-di-AMP synthesis by DAC domains in c-di-AMP-producing species and a possible approach for its effective inhibition.

  2. Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) acts directly on F-actin to accelerate cofilin-mediated actin severing across the range of physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Normoyle, Kieran P M; Brieher, William M

    2012-10-12

    Fast actin depolymerization is necessary for cells to rapidly reorganize actin filament networks. Utilizing a Listeria fluorescent actin comet tail assay to monitor actin disassembly rates, we observed that although a mixture of actin disassembly factors (cofilin, coronin, and actin-interacting protein 1 is sufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological G-actin concentrations this mixture was insufficient to disassemble actin comet tails in the presence of physiological F-actin concentrations. Using biochemical complementation, we purified cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from thymus extracts as a factor that protects against the inhibition of excess F-actin. CAP has been shown to participate in actin dynamics but has been thought to act by liberating cofilin from ADP·G-actin monomers to restore cofilin activity. However, we found that CAP augments cofilin-mediated disassembly by accelerating the rate of cofilin-mediated severing. We also demonstrated that CAP acts directly on F-actin and severs actin filaments at acidic, but not neutral, pH. At the neutral pH characteristic of cytosol in most mammalian cells, we demonstrated that neither CAP nor cofilin are capable of severing actin filaments. However, the combination of CAP and cofilin rapidly severed actin at all pH values across the physiological range. Therefore, our results reveal a new function for CAP in accelerating cofilin-mediated actin filament severing and provide a mechanism through which cells can maintain high actin turnover rates without having to alkalinize cytosol, which would affect many biochemical reactions beyond actin depolymerization.

  3. Microarray phenotyping places cyclase associated protein CAP at the crossroad of signaling pathways reorganizing the actin cytoskeleton in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Hameeda; Neelakanta, Girish; Eichinger, Ludwig; Rivero, Francisco; Noegel, Angelika A

    2009-01-15

    Large-scale gene expression analysis has been applied recently to uncover groups of genes that are co-regulated in particular processes. Here we undertake such an analysis on CAP, a protein that participates in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium. microarray analysis revealed that loss of CAP altered the expression of many cytoskeletal components. One of these, the Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor RhoGDI1, was analyzed further. RhoGDI1 null cells expressed lower amounts of CAP, which failed to accumulate predominantly at the cell cortex. To further position CAP in the corresponding signal transduction pathways we studied CAP localization and cellular functioning in mutants that have defects in several signaling components. CAP showed correct localization and dynamics in all analyzed strains except in mutants with deficient cAMP dependent protein kinase A activity, where CAP preferentially accumulated in crown shaped structures. Ectopic expression of CAP improved the efficiency of phagocytosis in Gbeta-deficient cells and restored the pinocytosis, morphology and actin distribution defects in a PI3 kinase double mutant (pi3k1/2 null). Our results show that CAP acts at multiple crossroads and links signaling pathways to the actin cytoskeleton either by physical interaction with cytoskeletal components or through regulation of their gene expression.

  4. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  5. Identification and characterization of Csh3 as an SH3 protein that interacts with fission yeast Cap1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Takaharu; Kobayashi-Ooka, Yasuyo; Zhou, Guo-Lei; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cap1 has been identified as the (adenylyl) cyclase-associated protein. Cap1 was able to bind Cap1 itself and actin. Cap1 localized at the growing tip, and this localization was dependent on the Cap1 P2 region. In a two-hybrid screening using cap1 as bait, we isolated csh3, which encodes a protein of 296 amino acids with an SH3 domain and a proline/glutamine-rich region. The binding of Csh3 and Cap1 was confirmed by in vivo pull down assays. Cooperative functions of Csh3 and Cap1 were observed. Deletion of both csh3 and cap1 resulted in heightened sensitivity to CaCl2, while disruption of either gene alone did not have any effect in this regard. In addition, over-expression of csh3 or cap1 alone did not affect cell growth, while over-expression of both genes resulted in growth retardation. Finally, while Csh3-GFP localized to the cytoplasm in wild-type cells, its localization was altered in cap1Δ cells, suggesting that the interaction between Csh3 and Cap1 controls the cellular localization of Csh3. These results demonstrate that Cap1 in Schizo. pombe is a multifunctional protein that functions through interaction with Cap1 itself and other proteins including adenylyl cyclase, actin and Csh3.

  6. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  7. Properties of adenyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S

    1976-01-01

    Several spontaneous cya and crp mutants of Escherichia coli have been selected as clones simultaneously resistant to phage lambda and nalidixic acid and characterized. Both cya and crp mutants have been found to grow as cocci with increased doubling times. They have increased resistance to some mutagens (methylmethanesulfonate, ultraviolet light, gamma rays), antibiotics (nalidixic acid, ampicillin), phages (lambda, T6), sublethal heat and hypotonic shock, and decreased resistance to neutral detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate), a protein synthesis inhibitor (streptomycin), and a respiratory inhibitor (sodium azide). The nature of changes in cell parameters indicate fundamental alterations in the envelope structure of the cya and crp mutant cells. The new cya and crp mutants have been found to be multiply carbohydrate negative and nonmotile in conformity with similar previously isolated mutants. Studies of revertants and phi80 cya+ and phi80 cya transductants indicated that the pleiotropic phenotype is related to a single mutational event at the cya or the crp locus in the mutants. Images PMID:173710

  8. Structure of the adenylylation domain of E. coli glutamine synthetase adenylyl transferase: evidence for gene duplication and evolution of a new active site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yibin; Carr, Paul D; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Ollis, David L

    2010-02-26

    The X-ray structure of the C-terminal fragment, containing residues 449-946, of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase adenylyl transferase (ATase) has been determined. ATase is part of the cascade that regulates the enzymatic activity of E. coli glutamine synthetase, a key component of the cell's machinery for the uptake of ammonia. It has two enzymatic activities, adenylyl removase (AR) and adenylyl transferase (AT), which are located in distinct catalytic domains that are separated by a regulatory (R) domain. We previously reported the three-dimensional structure of the AR domain (residues 1-440). The present structure contains both the R and AT domains. AR and AT share 24% sequence identity and also contain the beta-polymerase motif that is characteristic of many nucleotidylyl transferase enzymes. The structures overlap with an rmsd of 2.4 A when the superhelical R domain is omitted. A model for the complete ATase molecule is proposed, along with some refinements of domain boundaries. A rather more speculative model for the complex of ATase with glutamine synthetase and the nitrogen signal transduction protein PII is also presented.

  9. Stimulation of Hippocampal Adenylyl Cyclase Activity Dissociates Memory Consolidation Processes for Response and Place Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Guillaume; Millard, Annabelle; Jaffard, Robert; Guillou, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Procedural and declarative memory systems are postulated to interact in either a synergistic or a competitive manner, and memory consolidation appears to be a highly critical stage for this process. However, the precise cellular mechanisms subserving these interactions remain unknown. To investigate this issue, 24-h retention performances were…

  10. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10(-5) M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10(-4) M and 9 × 10(-6) M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol.

  11. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E.; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10−5 M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10−4 M and 9 × 10−6 M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol. PMID:28167903

  12. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  13. [Adenylate cyclase. A possible factor in the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Michankin, B N; Chevchenko, L A; Asseeva, L E

    1992-01-01

    Biological effect of homogenous preparation of Y. pestis adenylate cyclase on eucaryotic cells was studied. Adenylate cyclase, added (7.5 x 10(8) g/ml) to guinea pig macrophages lowers the level of chemiluminescence to 50-70%, has an appreciable cytotoxic effect on peritoneal macrophages and suppresses phosphorylation processes of leucocyte proteins from white mice. The experimental results obtained allow to suggest Y. pestis adenylate cyclase to be a pathogenic factor, contributing to the development of plague infection.

  14. Contribution of de novo synthesis of Gαs-proteins to 1-methyladenine production in starfish ovarian follicle cells stimulated by relaxin-like gonad-stimulating substance.

    PubMed

    Mita, Masatoshi; Haraguchi, Shogo; Uzawa, Haruka; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2013-11-01

    In starfish, the peptide hormone gonad-stimulating substance (GSS) secreted from nervous tissue stimulates oocyte maturation to induce 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde) production by ovarian follicle cells. The hormonal action of GSS on follicle cells involves its receptor, G-proteins and adenylyl cyclase. However, GSS failed to induce 1-MeAde and cAMP production in follicle cells of ovaries during oogenesis. At the maturation stage, follicle cells acquired the potential to respond to GSS by producing 1-MeAde and cAMP. Adenylyl cyclase activity in follicle cells of fully grown stage ovaries was also stimulated by GSS in the presence of GTP. These activations depended on the size of oocytes in ovaries. The α subunit of Gs-proteins was not detected immunologically in follicle cells of oogenesis stage ovaries, although Gαi and Gαq were detectable. Using specific primers for Gαs and Gαi, expression levels of Gαs in follicle cells were found to increase significantly as the size of oocytes in ovaries increased, whereas the mRNA levels of Gαi were almost constant regardless of oocyte size. These findings strongly suggest the potential of follicle cells to respond to GSS by producing 1-MeAde and cAMP is brought by de novo synthesis of Gαs-proteins.

  15. Immunohistochemical Localization of Guanylate Cyclase within Neurons of Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariano, Marjorie A.; Lewicki, John A.; Brandwein, Harvey J.; Murad, Ferid

    1982-02-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.2] has been examined in rat neocortex, caudate-putamen, and cerebellum by using specific monoclonal antibodies. Immunofluorescence could be seen within somata and proximal dendrites of neurons in these regions. A nuclear immunofluorescence reaction to guanylate cyclase was characteristically absent. The staining pattern for guanylate cyclase was coincident with previously described localizations of cyclic GMP immunofluorescence within medium spiny neurons of the caudate-putamen and pyramidal cells of the neocortex. Cerebellar guanylate cyclase immunoreactivity was primarily confined to Purkinje cells and their primary dendrites, similar to the pattern reported for cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase localization. Guanylate cyclase immunofluorescence was abolished when the monoclonal antibodies were exposed to purified enzyme prior to incubation of the tissue slices or when control antibody was substituted for the primary antibody. Immunohistochemical localization of cyclic AMP in these same tissues was readily distinguished from that of guanylate cyclase or cyclic GMP, showing uniform fluorescence throughout the cell bodies of neurons and glial elements.

  16. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein-coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Inda, Carolina; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Bonfiglio, Juan J; Senin, Sergio A; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-07-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP.

  17. Actin activates Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoY nucleotidyl cyclase toxin and ExoY-like effector domains from MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Raoux-Barbot, Dorothée; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Ogryzko, Vasily; Worpenberg, Lina; David, Violaine; Henriot, Veronique; Fellous, Souad; Merrifield, Christien; Assayag, Elodie; Ladant, Daniel; Renault, Louis; Mechold, Undine

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotidyl cyclase toxin ExoY is one of the virulence factors injected by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system into host cells. Inside cells, it is activated by an unknown eukaryotic cofactor to synthesize various cyclic nucleotide monophosphates. ExoY-like adenylate cyclases are also found in Multifunctional-Autoprocessing Repeats-in-ToXin (MARTX) toxins produced by various Gram-negative pathogens. Here we demonstrate that filamentous actin (F-actin) is the hitherto unknown cofactor of ExoY. Association with F-actin stimulates ExoY activity more than 10,000 fold in vitro and results in stabilization of actin filaments. ExoY is recruited to actin filaments in transfected cells and alters F-actin turnover. Actin also activates an ExoY-like adenylate cyclase MARTX effector domain from Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Finally, using a yeast genetic screen, we identify actin mutants that no longer activate ExoY. Our results thus reveal a new sub-group within the class II adenylyl cyclase family, namely actin-activated nucleotidyl cyclase (AA-NC) toxins. PMID:27917880

  18. Site-specific N-linked glycosylation of receptor guanylyl cyclase C regulates ligand binding, ligand-mediated activation and interaction with vesicular integral membrane protein 36, VIP36.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Najla; Ballal, Suhas; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2013-02-08

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) is a multidomain, membrane-associated receptor guanylyl cyclase. GC-C is primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, where it mediates fluid-ion homeostasis, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner, following activation by its ligands guanylin, uroguanylin, or the heat-stable enterotoxin peptide (ST). GC-C is also expressed in neurons, where it plays a role in satiation and attention deficiency/hyperactive behavior. GC-C is glycosylated in the extracellular domain, and differentially glycosylated forms that are resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (130 kDa) and the plasma membrane (145 kDa) bind the ST peptide with equal affinity. When glycosylation of human GC-C was prevented, either by pharmacological intervention or by mutation of all of the 10 predicted glycosylation sites, ST binding and surface localization was abolished. Systematic mutagenesis of each of the 10 sites of glycosylation in GC-C, either singly or in combination, identified two sites that were critical for ligand binding and two that regulated ST-mediated activation. We also show that GC-C is the first identified receptor client of the lectin chaperone vesicular integral membrane protein, VIP36. Interaction with VIP36 is dependent on glycosylation at the same sites that allow GC-C to fold and bind ligand. Because glycosylation of proteins is altered in many diseases and in a tissue-dependent manner, the activity and/or glycan-mediated interactions of GC-C may have a crucial role to play in its functions in different cell types.

  19. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  20. Restoration of adenylate cyclase responsiveness in murine myeloid leukemia permits inhibition of proliferation by hormone. Butyrate augments catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, L; Fleming, J W; Klingberg, D; Gabig, T G; Boswell, H S

    1988-04-01

    Mechanisms of leukemic cell clonal dominance may include aberrations of transmembrane signaling. In particular, neoplastic transformation has been associated with reduced capacity for hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, prostaglandin E, a hormonal activator of adenylate cyclase that has antiproliferative activity in myeloid cells, and cholera toxin, an adenylate cyclase agonist that functions at a postreceptor site by activating the adenylate cyclase stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs), were studied for antiproliferative activity in two murine myeloid cell lines. FDC-P1, an interleukin 3 (IL 3)-dependent myeloid cell line and a tumorigenic IL 3-independent subline, FI, were resistant to these antiproliferative agents. The in vitro ability of the "differentiation" agent, sodium butyrate, to reverse their resistance to adenylate cyclase agonists was studied. The antiproliferative action of butyrate involved augmentation of transmembrane adenylate cyclase activity. Increased adenylate cyclase catalyst activity was the primary alteration of this transmembrane signaling group leading to the functional inhibitory effects on leukemia cells, although alterations in regulatory G-proteins appear to play a secondary role.

  1. Role of GTP-binding proteins in the regulation of mammalian cardiac chloride conductance

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Beta-Adrenoceptor agonists activate a time- and voltage-independent Cl- conductance in mammalian cardiac myocytes. To characterize the cellular signaling pathways underlying its regulation, wide-tipped pipettes fitted with a pipette perfusion device were used to record whole-cell current and to introduce nucleotides to the interior of guinea pig ventricular myocytes. Replacement of pipette GTP with GDP beta S prevented activation of the Cl- conductance by Iso, suggesting a requirement for G protein turnover. With GTP in the pipette, the effect of Iso could be abolished by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol, and mimicked by histamine or forskolin. These actions of Iso and forskolin are mediated exclusively via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), because (a) maximal activation of the Cl- conductance by forskolin or pipette cAMP occluded the effect of Iso, and (b) switching to pipette solution containing a synthetic peptide inhibitor (PKI) of PKA completely abolished the Cl- conductance activated by Iso and prevented the action of forskolin, but had no further effect. These results argue against basal activation of the Cl- conductance, and make it extremely unlikely that the stimulatory G protein, Gs, has any direct, phosphorylation-independent influence. The muscarinic receptor agonists acetylcholine (ACh) and carbachol diminished, in a reversible manner, Cl- conductance activated by Iso or forskolin, but not that elicited by cAMP. The muscarinic inhibition was abolished by replacing pipette GTP with GDP beta S, or by preincubating cells with pertussis toxin (PTX), and was therefore mediated by an inhibitory G protein, presumably Gi, influencing adenylyl cyclase activity. Nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues (GTP gamma S or GppNHp) applied via the pipette did not themselves activate Cl- conductance, but rendered Cl- current activation by brief exposures to Iso or histamine, but not to forskolin, irreversible. The Cl- conductance persistently activated by Iso was

  2. Regulation of Sertoli cell tight junction dynamics in the rat testis via the nitric oxide synthase/soluble guanylate cyclase/3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate/protein kinase G signaling pathway: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nikki P Y; Cheng, C Yan

    2003-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) catalyzes the oxidation of L-arginine to NO. NO plays a crucial role in regulating various physiological functions, possibly including junction dynamics via its effects on cAMP and cGMP, which are known modulators of tight junction (TJ) dynamics. Although inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS) are found in the testis and have been implicated in the regulation of spermatogenesis, their role(s) in TJ dynamics, if any, is not known. When Sertoli cells were cultured at 0.5-1.2 x 10(6) cells/cm(2) on Matrigel-coated dishes or bicameral units, functional TJ barrier was formed when the barrier function was assessed by quantifying transepithelial electrical resistance across the cell epithelium. The assembly of the TJ barrier was shown to associate with a significant plummeting in the levels of iNOS and eNOS, seemingly suggesting that their presence by producing NO might perturb TJ assembly. To further confirm the role of NOS on the TJ barrier function in vitro, zinc (II) protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP), an NOS inhibitor and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, was added to the Sertoli cell cultures during TJ assembly. Indeed, ZnPP was found to facilitate the assembly and maintenance of the Sertoli cell TJ barrier, possibly by inducing the production of TJ-associated proteins, such as occludin. Subsequent studies by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting have shown that iNOS and eNOS are structurally linked to TJ-integral membrane proteins, such as occludin, and cytoskeletal proteins, such as actin, vimentin, and alpha-tubulin. When the cAMP and cGMP levels in these ZnPP-treated samples were quantified, a ZnPP-induced reduction of intracellular cGMP, but not cAMP, was indeed detected. Furthermore, 8-bromo-cGMP, a cell membrane-permeable analog of cGMP, could also perturb the TJ barrier dose dependently similar to the effects of 8-bromo-cAMP. KT-5823, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G, was shown to facilitate the Sertoli cell TJ

  3. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  4. Dual role of cAMP and involvement of both G-proteins and ras in regulation of ERK2 in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Knetsch, M L; Epskamp, S J; Schenk, P W; Wang, Y; Segall, J E; Snaar-Jagalska, B E

    1996-07-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum expresses two Extracellular signal Regulated Kinases, ERK1 and ERK2, which are involved in growth, multicellular development and regulation of adenylyl cyclase. Binding of extracellular cAMP to cAMP receptor 1, a G-protein coupled cell surface receptor, transiently stimulates phosphorylation, activation and nuclear translocation of ERK2. Activation of ERK2 by cAMP is dependent on heterotrimeric G-proteins, since activation of ERK2 is absent in cells lacking the Galpha4 subunit. The small G-protein rasD also activates ERK2. In cells overexpressing a mutated, constitutively active rasD, ERK2 activity is elevated prior to cAMP stimulation. Intracellular cAMP and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are essential for adaptation of the ERK2 response. This report shows that multiple signalling pathways are involved in regulation of ERK2 activity in D.discoideum.

  5. Examination of calcium-binding protein expression in the inner ear of wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-knockout mice in kanamycin-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, A; Szabadfi, K; Fulop, B; Reglodi, D; Kiss, P; Farkas, J; Szalontai, B; Gabriel, R; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with diverse biological effects. It also occurs and exerts protective effects in sensory organs; however, little is known about its effects in the auditory system. Recently, we have shown that PACAP protects cochlear cells against oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis and homozygous PACAP-deficient animals show stronger expression of Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the hair cells of the inner ear, but there are no data about the consequences of the lack of endogenous PACAP in different ototoxic insults such as aminoglycoside-induced toxicity. In this study, we examined the effect of kanamycin treatment on Ca(2+)-binding protein expression in hair cells of wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous PACAP-deficient mice. We treated 5-day-old mice with kanamycin, and 2 days later, we examined the Ca(2+)-binding protein expression of the hair cells with immunohistochemistry. We found stronger expression of Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the hair cells of control heterozygous and homozygous PACAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type animals. Kanamycin induced a significant increase in Ca(2+)-binding protein expression in wild-type and heterozygous PACAP-deficient mice, but the baseline higher expression in homozygous PACAP-deficient mice did not show further changes after the treatment. Elevated endolymphatic Ca(2+) is deleterious for the cochlear function, against which the high concentration of Ca(2+)-buffers in hair cells may protect. Meanwhile, the increased immunoreactivity of Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the absence of PACAP provide further evidence for the important protective role of PACAP in ototoxicity, but further investigations are necessary to examine the exact role of endogenous PACAP in ototoxic insults.

  6. The involvement of a protein kinase in phototaxis and gravitaxis of Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Daiker, Viktor; Häder, Donat-P; Richter, Peter R; Lebert, Michael

    2011-05-01

    The unicellular flagellate Euglena gracilis shows positive phototaxis at low-light intensities (<10 W/m(2)) and a negative one at higher irradiances (>10 W/m(2)). Phototaxis is based on blue light-activated adenylyl cyclases, which produce cAMP upon irradiation. In the absence of light the cells swim upward in the water column (negative gravitaxis). The results of sounding rocket campaigns and of a large number of ground experiments led to the following model of signal perception and transduction in gravitaxis of E. gracilis: The body of the cell is heavier than the surrounding medium, sediments and thereby exerts a force onto the lower membrane. Upon deviation from a vertical swimming path mechano-sensitive ion channels are activated. Calcium is gated inwards which leads to an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration and causes a change of the membrane potential. After influx, calcium activates one of several calmodulins found in Euglena, which in turn activates an adenylyl cyclase (different from the one involved in phototaxis) to produce cAMP from ATP. One further element in the sensory transduction chain of both phototaxis and gravitaxis is a specific protein kinase A. We found five different protein kinases A in E. gracilis. The blockage of only one of these (PK.4, accession No. EU935859) by means of RNAi inhibited both phototaxis and gravitaxis, while inhibition of the other four affected neither phototaxis nor gravitaxis. It is assumed that cAMP directly activates this protein kinase A which may in turn phosphorylate a protein involved in the flagellar beating mechanism.

  7. Induction of RAGE Shedding by Activation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Metz, Verena V.; Kojro, Elzbieta; Rat, Dorothea; Postina, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The multiligand Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is involved in various pathophysiological processes, including diabetic inflammatory conditions and Alzheimes disease. Full-length RAGE, a cell surface-located type I membrane protein, can proteolytically be converted by metalloproteinases ADAM10 and MMP9 into a soluble RAGE form. Moreover, administration of recombinant soluble RAGE suppresses activation of cell surface-located RAGE by trapping RAGE ligands. Therefore stimulation of RAGE shedding might have a therapeutic value regarding inflammatory diseases. We aimed to investigate whether RAGE shedding is inducible via ligand-induced activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We chose three different GPCRs coupled to distinct signaling cascades: the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) activating adenylyl cyclase, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) linked to phospholipase Cβ, and the PACAP receptor (subtype PAC1) coupled to adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase Cβ, calcium signaling and MAP kinases. We generated HEK cell lines stably coexpressing an individual GPCR and full-length RAGE and then investigated GPCR ligand-induced activation of RAGE shedding. We found metalloproteinase-mediated RAGE shedding on the cell surface to be inducible via ligand-specific activation of all analyzed GPCRs. By using specific inhibitors we have identified Ca2+ signaling, PKCα/PKCβI, CaMKII, PI3 kinases and MAP kinases to be involved in PAC1 receptor-induced RAGE shedding. We detected an induction of calcium signaling in all our cell lines coexpressing RAGE and different GPCRs after agonist treatment. However, we did not disclose a contribution of adenylyl cyclase in RAGE shedding induction. Furthermore, by using a selective metalloproteinase inhibitor and siRNA-mediated knock-down approaches, we show that ADAM10 and/or MMP9 are playing important roles in constitutive and PACAP-induced RAGE shedding. We also found that treatment of mice with PACAP increases the amount of

  8. Induction of RAGE shedding by activation of G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Metz, Verena V; Kojro, Elzbieta; Rat, Dorothea; Postina, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    The multiligand Receptor for Advanced Glycation End products (RAGE) is involved in various pathophysiological processes, including diabetic inflammatory conditions and Alzheimers disease. Full-length RAGE, a cell surface-located type I membrane protein, can proteolytically be converted by metalloproteinases ADAM10 and MMP9 into a soluble RAGE form. Moreover, administration of recombinant soluble RAGE suppresses activation of cell surface-located RAGE by trapping RAGE ligands. Therefore stimulation of RAGE shedding might have a therapeutic value regarding inflammatory diseases. We aimed to investigate whether RAGE shedding is inducible via ligand-induced activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We chose three different GPCRs coupled to distinct signaling cascades: the V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) activating adenylyl cyclase, the oxytocin receptor (OTR) linked to phospholipase Cβ, and the PACAP receptor (subtype PAC1) coupled to adenylyl cyclase, phospholipase Cβ, calcium signaling and MAP kinases. We generated HEK cell lines stably coexpressing an individual GPCR and full-length RAGE and then investigated GPCR ligand-induced activation of RAGE shedding. We found metalloproteinase-mediated RAGE shedding on the cell surface to be inducible via ligand-specific activation of all analyzed GPCRs. By using specific inhibitors we have identified Ca(2+) signaling, PKCα/PKCβI, CaMKII, PI3 kinases and MAP kinases to be involved in PAC1 receptor-induced RAGE shedding. We detected an induction of calcium signaling in all our cell lines coexpressing RAGE and different GPCRs after agonist treatment. However, we did not disclose a contribution of adenylyl cyclase in RAGE shedding induction. Furthermore, by using a selective metalloproteinase inhibitor and siRNA-mediated knock-down approaches, we show that ADAM10 and/or MMP9 are playing important roles in constitutive and PACAP-induced RAGE shedding. We also found that treatment of mice with PACAP increases the amount

  9. Cloning, expression, and sequencing of squalene-hopene cyclase, a key enzyme in triterpenoid metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, D; Kaletta, C; Entian, K D; Beck-Sickinger, A; Poralla, K

    1992-01-01

    The pentacyclic hopanoids, a class of eubacterial lipids, are synthesized by squalene-hopene cyclase and side chain-elongating enzymes. With the aid of DNA probes based on the amino-terminal sequence of purified squalene-hopene cyclase from Bacillus acidocaldarius, clones of Escherichia coli that express this enzyme in the cytoplasmic membrane were isolated. According to the DNA sequence, the cyclase contained 627 amino acids with a molecular mass of 69,473 Da. A high percentage of the amino acids were basic. No significant similarity to existing sequenced proteins was found. Images PMID:1729216

  10. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. CyaA targets myeloid phagocytes expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, known as αMβ2 integrin CD11b/CD18 or Mac-1) and translocates by a poorly understood mechanism directly across the cytoplasmic membrane into cell cytosol of phagocytes an adenylyl cyclase(AC) enzyme. This binds intracellular calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cytosolic ATP into cAMP. Among other effects, this yields activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, BimEL accumulation and phagocyte apoptosis induction. In parallel, CyaA acts as a cytolysin that forms cation-selective pores in target membranes. Direct penetration of CyaA into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells allows the use of an enzymatically inactive CyaA toxoid as a tool for delivery of passenger antigens into the cytosolic pathway of processing and MHC class I-restricted presentation, which can be exploited for induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses.

  11. The HD-GYP domain of RpfG mediates a direct linkage between the Rpf quorum-sensing pathway and a subset of diguanylate cyclase proteins in the phytopathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Maxuel O; Alegria, Marcos Castanheira; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Docena, Cassia; Rosa, Maria Claudia Pareda; Ramos, Carlos H I; Farah, Chuck S

    2006-10-01

    Bacteria use extracellular levels of small diffusible autoinducers to estimate local cell-density (quorum-sensing) and to regulate complex physiological processes. The quorum-sensing signal transduction pathway of Xanthomonas spp. phytopathogens has special features that distinguish it from that of other pathogens. This pathway consists of RpfF, necessary for the production of the unique autoinducer 'diffusible signalling factor' (DSF), and RpfC and RpfG, a two-component system necessary for the DSF-dependent production of extracellular pathogenicity factors and cellular dispersion. Yeast two-hybrid and direct in vitro assays were used to identify interactions involving the Rpf group of proteins. We show that RpfC, a protein consisting of N-terminal transmembrane, histidine kinase, response-regulator and C-terminal histidine phosphotransfer domains interacts with both RpfG, a protein consisting of an N-terminal response regulator domain and a C-terminal HD-GYP domain, and with RpfF. We also show that RpfC interacts with the only known homologue of 'conditioned medium factor', which is involved in quorum-sensing in Dictyostelium discoideum under conditions of nutritional stress. Furthermore, RpfCG is shown to interact with a second two-component system made up of NtrB and NtrC homologues. Finally we show that the recently characterized HD-GYP phosphodiesterase domain of RpfG interacts directly with diguanylate cyclase GGDEF domain-containing proteins coded by the Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri genome, which in other bacteria produce cyclic diGMP, an important second messenger involved in the regulation of complex bacterial processes including biofilm production, virulence and motility. These results demonstrate a direct physical linkage between quorum-sensing and cyclic diGMP signalling pathways in bacteria.

  12. Interaction of 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin with adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Laurenza, A.; Morris, D.I.; Seamon, K.B.

    1986-05-01

    7-Bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin (BrAcFk) and the 12-tritio derivative (/sup 3/H-BrAckFk) were synthesized as alkylating analogs of forskolin. BrAcFk stimulated adenylate cyclase in human platelet and bovine brain membranes with an EC50 of 50..mu..M and inhibited /sup 3/H-forskolin binding to these membranes with a K/sub i/ of 300 nM. /sup 3/H-forskolin binding was decreased in membranes pretreated for 20 min with 10 ..mu..M BrAcFk. The i,9-dideoxy derivative of BrAcFk did not activate adenylate cyclase or inhibit /sup 3/H-forskolin binding. Proteins labelled by BrAcFk in solubilized preparations from bovine brain and human platelets were identified by fluorography of SDS gels. The two predominant bands labelled in the low and high molecular weight regions had molecular weights of 50,000 and 135,000 daltons respectively. The 135,000 dalton band identified by fluorography coeluted with adenylate cyclase activity on a Dupont GF450 column and has a molecular weight identical to that of the catalytic subunit determined by silver staining of SDS gels. These results suggest that BrAcFk can react covalently with the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase.

  13. [Biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in plant cells - new insight into guanylate cyclases].

    PubMed

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Marciniak, Katarzyna; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is involved in many physiological processes in plants. Concentration of this second messenger in plant cell is determined by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) responsible for cGMP synthesis and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in cGMP inactivation. First discovered plant GCs were localized in cytosol, but few years ago a new family of plasma membrane proteins with guanylyl cyclase activity was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. These proteins belong to the family of a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLK) with extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain, a transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. A novel class of guanylyl cyclases contain the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain. These molecules are different to animal GCs in that the GC catalytic center is nested within the kinase domain. In presented paper we summarized the most recent data concerning plant guanylyl cyclases.

  14. Regulated unfolding: a basic principle of intraprotein signaling in modular proteins.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Joachim E; Natarajan, Janani

    2013-11-01

    Modular proteins possess N-terminal sensor domains connected with different C-terminal output domains. Different output domains, for example, phosphodiesterases adenylyl cyclases, are regulated by identical N-terminal domains. Therefore, the mechanisms of intraprotein signaling share properties suitable to regulation of disparate output enzymes, which see the same signal but react differently. The common denominator is a reversible switch of folding/unfolding that connects sensor and output domains. In the inhibited state, output domains are restrained, whereas in the activated state domains are released to assemble according to intrinsic domain properties. We review recent work investigating the mechanism of intraprotein signaling and discuss how this signaling mechanism may have contributed to the evolutionary diversity of specific small molecule-binding domains without loss of regulatory properties.

  15. G-protein-linked serotonin receptors in mouse kidney exhibit identical properties to 5-HT1b receptors in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ciaranello, R.D.; Tan, G.L.; Dean, R. )

    1990-03-01

    The serotonin 1b (5-HT1b) receptor is thought to mediate both pre- and postsynaptic actions of serotonin. Until recently 5-HT1b sites were thought to be present only in rodent brain. We now report the presence of high-affinity (125I)iodocyanopindolol ((125I) ICYP) binding sites in the mouse renal medulla with properties identical to those of brain 5-HT1b receptors. In vitro receptor autoradiography demonstrates that (125I)ICYP binding is highly localized to the outer stripe of the renal medulla. Association and dissociation kinetics, saturation analysis and competition displacement analyses indicate that renal medullary (125I)ICYP binding sites exhibit identical properties with brain 5-HT1b receptors. Incubation of renal medullary or brain membranes with guanylimidodiphosphate results in a decreased affinity of 5-HT1b sites for 5-HT and (125I)ICYP; this can be reversed by the addition of a purified mixture of G proteins (Gi/Go). Treatment of brain or kidney membranes with N-ethylmaleimide results in a decrease in 5-HT1b binding which can also be restored by reconstitution with purified G proteins. Adenylyl cyclase from renal medullary homogenates or minces can be stimulated more than 3-fold by forskolin and attenuated by 5-HT. These results indicate that mouse kidney contains high-affinity 5-HT1b receptors with identical properties to those found in brain. These are localized in the outer stripe of the renal medulla and are functionally coupled to adenylyl cyclase inhibitor (Gi) G-proteins.

  16. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  17. Discovery and Characterization of a New Family of Diterpene Cyclases in Bacteria and Fungi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Long; Zhang, Shasha; Ma, Ke; Xu, Yuxing; Tao, Qiaoqiao; Chen, Yihua; Chen, Juan; Guo, Shunxing; Ren, Jinwei; Wang, Wenzhao; Tao, Yong; Yin, Wen-Bing; Liu, Hongwei

    2017-04-18

    Diterpene cyclases from bacteria and basidiomycete fungi are seldom studied. Here, we presented the identification and verification of EriG, a member of the UbiA superfamily, as the enzyme responsible for the cyclization of the cyathane skeleton in the mushroom Hericium erinaceum. Genome mining using the EriG protein sequence as a probe led to the discovery of a new family of ubiquitous UbiA-related diterpene cyclases in bacteria and fungi. We successfully characterized seven new diterpene cyclases from bacteria or basidiomycete fungi with the help of an engineered Escherichia coli strain and determined the structures of their corresponding products. A new diterpene with an unusual skeleton was generated during this process. The discovery of this new family of diterpene cyclases provides new insight into the UbiA superfamily.

  18. Gonadotropin regulation of testosterone production by primary cultured theca and granulosa cells of Atlantic croaker: II. Involvement of a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Benninghoff, Abby D; Thomas, Peter

    2006-07-01

    Previous investigations in Atlantic croaker ovaries and primary co-cultured theca and granulosa cells have identified multiple signal transduction pathways involved in the control of gonadotropin-induced steroidogenesis, including adenylyl cyclase- and calcium-dependent signaling pathways. In the present study, evidence was obtained for an involvement of a third signal transduction pathway, a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) signaling cascade, in the regulation of gonadal steroidogenesis in this lower vertebrate teleost model. Gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone synthesis was markedly attenuated by two antagonists of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases 1/2 (MEK1/2, also known as Map2k1/Map2k2). Moreover, treatment with gonadotropin-induced MEK1/2-dependent phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2, also known as Mapk3/Mapk1) in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in co-cultured croaker theca and granulosa cells. Active MEK1/2 was required for a complete steroidogenic response to activators of the adenylyl cyclase pathway, including forskolin and dbcAMP, suggesting that the target(s) of MAP kinase signaling are distal to cAMP generation and activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Interestingly, dbcAMP caused a similar increase of ERK1/2 phosphorylation as was observed with gonadotropin treatment, although an inhibitor of PKA did not attenuate this response. Finally, there was no evidence of cross-talk between calcium-dependent signaling pathways and this MAP kinase cascade. While drugs that block calcium-dependent signal transduction, including inhibitors of voltage-sensitive calcium channels, calmodulin, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases, significantly reduced gonadotropin-induced testosterone accumulation, these drugs had no apparent effect on hCG-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation.

  19. Leucine periodicity of U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) A' protein is implicated in snRNP assembly via protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, L D; Harper, D S; Keene, J D

    1991-01-01

    Recombinant A' protein could be reconstituted into U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) upon addition to HeLa cell extracts as determined by coimmunoprecipitation and particle density; however, direct binding to U2 RNA could not be demonstrated except in the presence of the U2 snRNP B" protein. Mutational analysis indicated that a central core region of A' was required for particle reconstitution. This region consists of five tandem repeats of approximately 24 amino acids each that exhibit a periodicity of leucine and asparagine residues that is distinct from the leucine zipper. Similar leucine-rich (Leu-Leu motif) repeats are characteristic of a diverse array of soluble and membrane-associated proteins from yeasts to humans but have not been reported previously to reside in nuclear proteins. Several of these proteins, including Toll, chaoptin, RNase/angiogenin inhibitors, lutropin-choriogonadotropin receptor, carboxypeptidase N, adenylyl cyclase, CD14, and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev, may be involved in protein-protein interactions. Our findings suggest that in cell extracts the Leu-Leu motif of A' is required for reconstitution with U2 snRNPs and perhaps with other components involved in splicing through protein-protein interactions. Images PMID:1825347

  20. Regulator of G protein signaling proteins differentially modulate signaling of μ and δ opioid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhihua; Li, Zhisong; Guo, Lei; Ye, Caiying; Li, Juan; Yu, Xiaoli; Yang, Huifen; Wang, Yulin; Chen, Chongguang; Zhang, Dechang; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Effects of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins on μ and δ opioid receptors were investigated in HEK293 cells. Co-expression of RGS1, RGS2, RGS4, RGS9, RGS10 or RGS19 (Gα-interacting protein (GAIP)) significantly reduced [Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-N-methyl-Phe-Gly-ol]-Enkephalin (DAMGO)-induced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC) mediated by μ opioid receptor, but only RGS9 decreased the effects of [Tyr-D-Pen-Gly-p-Chloro-Phe-D-Pen]-Enkephalin (DPDPE) mediated by δ opioid receptor. When C-tails of the receptors were exchanged (μ/δC and δ/μC chimeras), RGS proteins decreased δ/μC-mediated AC inhibition, but none had significant effects on that via μ/δC receptor. Thus, the C-terminal domains of the receptors are critical for the differential effects of RGS proteins, which may be due to differences in receptor - G protein - RGS protein interactions in signaling complexes. PMID:17433292

  1. Involvement of rhodopsin and ATP in the activation of membranous guanylate cyclase in retinal photoreceptor outer segments (ROS-GC) by GC-activating proteins (GCAPs): a new model for ROS-GC activation and its link to retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Yamazaki, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Membranous guanylate cyclase in retinal photoreceptor outer segments (ROS-GC), a key enzyme for the recovery of photoreceptors to the dark state, has a topology identical to and cytoplasmic domains homologous to those of peptide-regulated GCs. However, under the prevailing concept, its activation mechanism is significantly different from those of peptide-regulated GCs: GC-activating proteins (GCAPs) function as the sole activator of ROS-GC in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner, and neither reception of an outside signal by the extracellular domain (ECD) nor ATP binding to the kinase homology domain (KHD) is required for its activation. We have recently shown that ATP pre-binding to the KHD in ROS-GC drastically enhances its GCAP-stimulated activity, and that rhodopsin illumination, as the outside signal, is required for the ATP pre-binding. These results indicate that illuminated rhodopsin is involved in ROS-GC activation in two ways: to initiate ATP binding to ROS-GC for preparation of its activation and to reduce [Ca(2+)] through activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase. These two signal pathways are activated in a parallel and proportional manner and finally converge for strong activation of ROS-GC by Ca(2+)-free GCAPs. These results also suggest that the ECD receives the signal for ATP binding from illuminated rhodopsin. The ECD is projected into the intradiscal space, i.e., an intradiscal domain(s) of rhodopsin is also involved in the signal transfer. Many retinal disease-linked mutations are found in these intradiscal domains; however, their consequences are often unclear. This model will also provide novel insights into causal relationship between these mutations and certain retinal diseases.

  2. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and their Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Allyn C.; Blume, Lawrence C.; Dalton, George D.

    2011-01-01

    CB1 receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) abundant in neurons, in which they modulate neurotransmission. The CB1 receptor influence on memory and learning is well recognized, and disease states associated with CB1 receptors are observed in addiction disorders, motor dysfunction, schizophrenia, and in bipolar, depression, and anxiety disorders. Beyond the brain, CB1 receptors also function in liver and adipose tissues, vascular as well as cardiac tissue, reproductive tissues and bone. Signal transduction by CB1 receptors occurs through interaction with Gi/o proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, activate K+ currents (Kir), and influence Nitric Oxide (NO) signaling. CB1 receptors are observed in internal organelles as well as plasma membrane. β-Arrestins, adaptor protein AP-3, and G-protein receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP1) modulate cellular trafficking. Cannabinoid Receptor Interacting Protein 1a (CRIP1a) is an accessory protein whose function has not been delineated. Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase (FAN) regulates ceramide signaling. Such diversity in cellular signaling and modulation by interacting proteins suggests that agonists and allosteric modulators could be developed to specifically regulate unique, cell type-specific responses. PMID:20166926

  3. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  4. Structural Analysis of Guanylyl Cyclase-Activating Protein-2 (GCAP-2) Homodimer by Stable Isotope-Labeling, Chemical Cross-Linking, and Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettelkau, Jens; Thondorf, Iris; Theisgen, Stephan; Lilie, Hauke; Schröder, Thomas; Arlt, Christian; Ihling, Christian H.; Sinz, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    The topology of the GCAP-2 homodimer was investigated by chemical cross-linking and high resolution mass spectrometry. Complementary conducted size-exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicated that GCAP-2 forms a homodimer both in the absence and in the presence of Ca2+. In-depth MS and MS/MS analysis of the cross-linked products was aided by 15 N-labeled GCAP-2. The use of isotope-labeled protein delivered reliable structural information on the GCAP-2 homodimer, enabling an unambiguous discrimination between cross-links within one monomer (intramolecular) or between two subunits (intermolecular). The limited number of cross-links obtained in the Ca2+-bound state allowed us to deduce a defined homodimeric GCAP-2 structure by a docking and molecular dynamics approach. In the Ca2+-free state, GCAP-2 is more flexible as indicated by the higher number of cross-links. We consider stable isotope-labeling to be indispensable for deriving reliable structural information from chemical cross-linking data of multi-subunit protein assemblies.

  5. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  6. Guanine nucleotide binding regulatory proteins and adenylate cyclase in livers of streptozotocin- and BB/Wor-diabetic rats. Immunodetection of Gs and Gi with antisera prepared against synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C J; Blackmore, P F; Johnson, E H; Wange, R L; Krone, P K; Exton, J H

    1989-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase in liver plasma membranes from streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or BB/Wor spontaneously diabetic rats showed increased responsiveness to GTP, glucagon, fluoroaluminate, and cholera toxin. Basal or forskolin-stimulated activity was unchanged in STZ rats, but increased in BB/Wor rats. No change in the alpha-subunit of Gi (alpha i) was observed in STZ or BB/Wor rats using pertussis toxin-stimulated [32P]ADP-ribosylation. Immunodetection using antibodies against the COOH-terminal decapeptides of alpha T and alpha i-3 showed no change in alpha i in STZ rats and a slight decrease in BB/Wor rats. Angiotensin II inhibition of hepatic adenylate cyclase was not altered in either diabetic rat. In both models of diabetes, Gs alpha-subunits were increased as measured by cholera toxin-stimulated [32P]-ADP-ribosylation of 43-47.5-kD peptides, reconstitution with membranes from S49 cyc- cells or immunoreactivity using antibodies against the COOH-terminal decapeptide of alpha s. These data indicate that STZ-diabetes increases hepatic Gs but does not change Gi or adenylate cyclase catalytic activity. In contrast, BB/Wor rats show increased hepatic Gs and adenylate cyclase. These changes could explain the increase in hepatic cAMP and related dysfunctions observed in diabetes. Images PMID:2498395

  7. CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) Exerts Distinct Functions in the Proliferation and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by ERK

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The actin-regulating protein CAP1 is implicated in the invasiveness of human cancers. However, the exact role remains elusive and controversial given lines of conflicting evidence. Moreover, a potential role in the proliferative transformation has largely been overlooked. Further establishing the role and dissecting underlying mechanisms are imperative before targeting CAP1 can become a possibility for cancer treatment. Here we report our findings that CAP1 exerts cell type-dependent functions in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Depletion of CAP1 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cancer cells stimulated the metastatic potential while it actually inhibited it in the non-metastatic MCF-7 cancer cells or in normal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate functions for CAP1 in cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, again in a cell context-dependent manner. Importantly, we identify pivotal roles for the ERK-centered signaling in mediating both CAP1 functions. Phosphor mutants of CAP1 at the S307/S309 regulatory site had compromised rescue effects for both the invasiveness and proliferation in CAP1-knockdown cells, suggesting that CAP1 likely mediates upstream cell signals to control both functions. These novel mechanistic insights may ultimately open up avenues for strategies targeting CAP1 in the treatment of breast cancer, tailored for specific types of the highly diverse disease. PMID:27173014

  8. CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) Exerts Distinct Functions in the Proliferation and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by ERK.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2016-05-13

    The actin-regulating protein CAP1 is implicated in the invasiveness of human cancers. However, the exact role remains elusive and controversial given lines of conflicting evidence. Moreover, a potential role in the proliferative transformation has largely been overlooked. Further establishing the role and dissecting underlying mechanisms are imperative before targeting CAP1 can become a possibility for cancer treatment. Here we report our findings that CAP1 exerts cell type-dependent functions in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Depletion of CAP1 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cancer cells stimulated the metastatic potential while it actually inhibited it in the non-metastatic MCF-7 cancer cells or in normal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate functions for CAP1 in cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, again in a cell context-dependent manner. Importantly, we identify pivotal roles for the ERK-centered signaling in mediating both CAP1 functions. Phosphor mutants of CAP1 at the S307/S309 regulatory site had compromised rescue effects for both the invasiveness and proliferation in CAP1-knockdown cells, suggesting that CAP1 likely mediates upstream cell signals to control both functions. These novel mechanistic insights may ultimately open up avenues for strategies targeting CAP1 in the treatment of breast cancer, tailored for specific types of the highly diverse disease.

  9. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  10. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Kang, In-Hye; Nelson, Mathew D; Jensen, Tricia M; Lyuksyutova, Anna I; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Raizen, David M; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties make bacteriophytochromes particularly attractive for optogenetic applications. However, the lack of understanding of how light-induced conformational changes control output activities has hindered engineering of bacteriophytochrome-based optogenetic tools. Many bacteriophytochromes function as homodimeric enzymes, in which light-induced conformational changes are transferred via α-helical linkers to the rigid output domains. We hypothesized that heterologous output domains requiring homodimerization can be fused to the photosensory modules of bacteriophytochromes to generate light-activated fusions. Here, we tested this hypothesis by engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by light in the near-infrared spectral window using the photosensory module of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteriophytochrome BphG1 and the adenylate cyclase domain from Nostoc sp. CyaB1. We engineered several light-activated fusion proteins that differed from each other by approximately one or two α-helical turns, suggesting that positioning of the output domains in the same phase of the helix is important for light-dependent activity. Extensive mutagenesis of one of these fusions resulted in an adenylate cyclase with a sixfold photodynamic range. Additional mutagenesis produced an enzyme with a more stable photoactivated state. When expressed in cholinergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, the engineered adenylate cyclase affected worm behavior in a light-dependent manner. The insights derived from this study can be applied to the engineering of other homodimeric bacteriophytochromes, which will further expand the optogenetic toolset.

  11. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Patrick; Schmitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases. PMID:27829890

  12. Pancreatic Beta Cell G-Protein Coupled Receptors and Second Messenger Interactions: A Systems Biology Computational Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretory in pancreatic beta-cells responses to nutrient stimuli and hormonal modulators include multiple messengers and signaling pathways with complex interdependencies. Here we present a computational model that incorporates recent data on glucose metabolism, plasma membrane potential, G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCR), cytoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum calcium dynamics, cAMP and phospholipase C pathways that regulate interactions between second messengers in pancreatic beta-cells. The values of key model parameters were inferred from published experimental data. The model gives a reasonable fit to important aspects of experimentally measured metabolic and second messenger concentrations and provides a framework for analyzing the role of metabolic, hormones and neurotransmitters changes on insulin secretion. Our analysis of the dynamic data provides support for the hypothesis that activation of Ca2+-dependent adenylyl cyclases play a critical role in modulating the effects of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and catecholamines. The regulatory properties of adenylyl cyclase isoforms determine fluctuations in cytoplasmic cAMP concentration and reveal a synergistic action of glucose, GLP-1 and GIP on insulin secretion. On the other hand, the regulatory properties of phospholipase C isoforms determine the interaction of glucose, acetylcholine and free fatty acids (FFA) (that act through the FFA receptors) on insulin secretion. We found that a combination of GPCR agonists activating different messenger pathways can stimulate insulin secretion more effectively than a combination of GPCR agonists for a single pathway. This analysis also suggests that the activators of GLP-1, GIP and FFA receptors may have a relatively low risk of hypoglycemia in fasting conditions whereas an activator of muscarinic receptors can increase this risk. This computational analysis demonstrates that study of second messenger

  13. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J.; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function. PMID:26033914

  14. Quantitative proteomics reveals differential regulation of protein expression in recipient myocardium after trilineage cardiovascular cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hua; Ye, Lei; Cai, Wenxuan; Lee, Yoonkyu; Guner, Huseyin; Lee, Youngsook; Kamp, Timothy J; Zhang, Jianyi; Ge, Ying

    2015-08-01

    Intramyocardial transplantation of cardiomyocytes (CMs), endothelial cells (ECs), and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) has beneficial effects on the post-infarction heart. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional improvements remain undefined. We employed large-scale label-free quantitative proteomics to identify proteins that were differentially regulated following cellular transplantation in a swine model of myocardial infarction (MI). We identified 22 proteins that were significantly up-regulated after trilineage cell transplantation compared to both MI and Sham groups. Among them, 12 proteins, including adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 and tropomodulin-1, are associated with positive regulation of muscular contraction whereas 11 proteins, such as desmoplakin and zyxin, are involved in embryonic and muscular development and regeneration. Moreover, we identified 21 proteins up-regulated and another 21 down-regulated in MI, but reversed after trilineage cell transplantation. Proteins up-regulated after MI but reversed by transplantation are related to fibrosis and apoptosis. Conversely, proteins down-regulated in MI but restored after cell therapy are regulators of protein nitrosylation. Our results show that the functionally beneficial effects of trilineage cell therapy are accompanied by differential regulation of protein expression in the recipient myocardium, which may contribute to the improved cardiac function.

  15. Receptor Guanylyl Cyclases in Sensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2017-01-01

    Invertebrate models have generated many new insights into transmembrane signaling by cell-surface receptors. This review focuses on receptor guanylyl cyclases (rGCs) and describes recent advances in understanding their roles in sensory processing in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. A complete analysis of the C. elegans genome elucidated 27 rGCs, an unusually large number compared with mammalian genomes, which encode 7 rGCs. Most C. elegans rGCs are expressed in sensory neurons and play roles in sensory processing, including gustation, thermosensation, olfaction, and phototransduction, among others. Recent studies have found that by producing a second messenger, guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate, some rGCs act as direct sensor molecules for ions and temperatures, while others relay signals from G protein-coupled receptors. Interestingly, genetic and biochemical analyses of rGCs provide the first example of an obligate heterodimeric rGC. Based on recent structural studies of rGCs in mammals and other organisms, molecular mechanisms underlying activation of rGCs are also discussed in this review. PMID:28123378

  16. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  17. Differential involvement of cyclase- versus non-cyclase-coupled D1-like dopamine receptors in orofacial movement topography in mice: studies with SKF 83822.

    PubMed

    Makihara, Yasuyuki; Okuda, Yaeko; Kawada, Chieko; Matsumoto, Mitsuhiko; Waddington, John L; Koshikawa, Noriaki; Tomiyama, Katsunori

    2007-03-19

    Though orofacial movements are fundamental motor patterns that are known to be regulated critically by D1-like dopamine receptors, these processes remain poorly understood. This uncertainty is heightened by evidence for putative D1-like receptors that are linked not only to adenylyl cyclase (AC) but also to phospholipase C (PLC). Using a new method, we have characterised four topographies of orofacial movement in the mouse using the novel D1-like agonist SKF 83822, which stimulates AC but not PLC. These were compared with responses to SKF 83959, which stimulates PLC but not AC. Also, effects were characterised using the D1-like antagonist SCH 23390 and the D2-like antagonist YM 09151-2. SKF 83822 induced vertical jaw movements with incisor chattering but inhibited horizontal jaw movements; there was little effect on tongue protrusions. Vertical jaw movements induced by SKF 83822 were inhibited by SCH 23390 but uninfluenced by YM 09151-2, while YM 09151-2 released horizontal jaw movements; thus, D1-like agonist-induced, AC-mediated vertical jaw movements constitute a 'pure' D1-like-dependent process that does not involve D1-like:D2-like interactions, while horizontal jaw movements involve oppositional interactions. Orofacial movements in mice appear to consist of at least four phenomenologically dissociable topographies that are mechanistically distinct. They are regulated differentially by AC- and/or PLC-dependent processes and these processes involve distinct D1-like:D2-like interactions.

  18. WR-2721 inhibits parathyroid adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.E.; Morrissey, J.; McConkey, C. Jr.; Goldfarb, S.; Slatopolsky, E.; Martin, K.J.

    1987-02-01

    WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid) is a chemoprotective and radioprotective agent that has been shown to lower serum calcium in dogs and in humans. This is secondary both to impaired release of CaS from bone and diminished secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) from parathyroid glands. Because cAMP plays a role in the regulation of PTH secretion and WR-2721 has been shown to lower cAMP levels in radiated mouse spleen, the authors investigated the effects of WR-2721 on cAMP production in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Additional, they studied the adenylate cyclase in plasma membranes from normal bovine parathyroid glands after exposure to WR-2721. With parathyroid cells incubated at 0.5 mM CaS , addition of Wr-2721 in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 2.0 mM resulted in a progressive decrease in intracellular cAMP measured by radioimmunoassay. In plasma membranes of bovine parathyroid cells a dose-dependent decrease in adenylate cyclase activity was noted. Inhibition of the cyclase was seen over a wide range of MgS concentrations. WR-2721 inhibited both basal and NaF, Gpp(NH)(, forskolin, and pertussin toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. These data suggest that WR-2721 inhibits the activity of parathyroid adenylate cyclase.

  19. Protein expression profile in the striatum of rats with methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Takeshi; McGregor, Iain S; Matsumoto, Izuru

    2007-04-01

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (MAP) results in an increased behavioral response to the drug during subsequent exposure. This phenomenon is called behavioral sensitization. Sensitization is an enduring phenomenon, and suggests chronic alterations in neuronal plasticity. MAP-induced sensitization has been proposed and widely investigated as an animal model of MAP psychosis and schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying MAP-induced sensitization. 2-DE-based proteomics allows us to examine global changes in protein expression in complex biological systems and to propose hypotheses concerning the mechanisms underlying various pathological conditions. In the present study, we examined protein expression profiles in the striatum of MAP-sensitized rats using 2-DE-based proteomics. Repeated administration of MAP (4.0 mg/kg, once a day, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) for 10 days significantly augmented the locomotor response to an MAP challenge injection (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) on day 11. This enhanced activity was maintained even after a week of drug abstinence. 2-DE analysis revealed 42 protein spots were differentially regulated in the striatum of MAP-sensitized rats compared to control. Thirty-one protein spots were identified using MALDI-TOF, including synapsin II, synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 2 (DRP2). These proteins can be related to underlying mechanisms of MAP-induced behavioral sensitization, indicating cytoskeletal modification, and altered synaptic function.

  20. Structural analysis of an oxygen-regulated diguanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Barends, Thomas R M; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger that is involved in switching between motile and sessile lifestyles. Given the medical importance of biofilm formation, there has been increasing interest in understanding the synthesis and degradation of cyclic di-GMPs and their regulation in various bacterial pathogens. Environmental cues are detected by sensing domains coupled to GGDEF and EAL or HD-GYP domains that have diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively, producing and degrading cyclic di-GMP. The Escherichia coli protein DosC (also known as YddV) consists of an oxygen-sensing domain belonging to the class of globin sensors that is coupled to a C-terminal GGDEF domain via a previously uncharacterized middle domain. DosC is one of the most strongly expressed GGDEF proteins in E. coli, but to date structural information on this and related proteins is scarce. Here, the high-resolution structural characterization of the oxygen-sensing globin domain, the middle domain and the catalytic GGDEF domain in apo and substrate-bound forms is described. The structural changes between the iron(III) and iron(II) forms of the sensor globin domain suggest a mechanism for oxygen-dependent regulation. The structural information on the individual domains is combined into a model of the dimeric DosC holoprotein. These findings have direct implications for the oxygen-dependent regulation of the activity of the cyclase domain.

  1. Adenylate cyclase of human articular chondrocytes. Responsiveness to prostaglandins and other hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, J P; McGuire, M K; Meats, J E; Ebsworth, N M; Russell, R G; Crawford, A; Mac Neil, S

    1982-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] was shown to be present in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Optimal conditions of incubation time, protein and substrate concentrations and pH were determined in whole cell lysates. Maximal activity occurred at pH 8.5 with no decrease in activity up to pH 10.0. Adenylate cyclase activity of particulate membrane preparations was enhanced by the addition of crude cytosol preparations. The prostaglandins E1, E2, F1 alpha, F2 alpha, D2, B1, B2, A1 and A2, as well as adrenaline and isoprenaline, stimulated adenylate cyclase derived from either adult or foetal chondrocytes. No significant stimulation was observed in the presence of human calcitonin or glucagon. Bovine parathyroid hormone always significantly stimulated the adenylate cyclase derived from foetal chondrocytes, but not from adult chondrocytes. Preincubation of the chondrocytes in culture with indomethacin and with or without supernatant medium from cultured mononuclear cells increased the responsiveness of the adenylate cyclase to prostaglandin E1. PMID:7159397

  2. [The aspects of adenylate cyclase activity regulation in myocardium cell membranes during hypokinesia].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, K Ia; Komar, E S; Lobanok, L M

    1999-01-01

    Nonstimulated and isoproterenol, GTF, GITF, NaF stimulated activities of the adenylate cyclase in sarcolemma in white rats' myocardium was studied after two weeks of hypokinesia. As was established, in restrained animals the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to the specified agents was increased and transition to the bimodal GTF regulation took place. It is hypothesised that involvement of membrane-bound Gi-proteins in the adrenergic effects on cardiomyocytes is one of mechanisms of the cardiotropic effects of restraint and heart distresses.

  3. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field.

  4. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency.

  5. Aquaporin inhibition changes protein phosphorylation pattern following sperm motility activation in fish.

    PubMed

    Zilli, Loredana; Beirão, José; Schiavone, Roberta; Herraez, Maria Paz; Cabrita, Elsa; Storelli, Carlo; Vilella, Sebastiano

    2011-09-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that osmolality is the key signal in sperm motility activation in Sparus aurata spermatozoa. In particular, we have proposed that the hyper-osmotic shock triggers water efflux from spermatozoa via aquaporins. This water efflux determines the cell volume reduction and, in turn, the rise in the intracellular concentration of ions. This increase could lead to the activation of adenylyl cyclase and of the cAMP-signaling pathway, causing the phosphorylation of sperm proteins and then the initiation of sperm motility. This study confirms the important role of sea bream AQPs (Aqp1a and Aqp10b) in the beginning of sperm motility. In fact, when these proteins are inhibited by HgCl(2), the phosphorylation of some proteins (174 kDa protein of head; 147, 97 and 33 kDa proteins of flagella), following the hyper-osmotic shock, was inhibited (totally or partially). However, our results also suggest that more than one transduction pathways could be activated when sea bream spermatozoa were ejaculated in seawater, since numerous proteins showed an HgCl(2)(AQPs)-independent phosphorylation state after motility activation. The role played by each different signal transduction pathways need to be clarified.

  6. Reversible adenylylation of glutamine synthetase is dynamically counterbalanced during steady-state growth of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hiroyuki; Hwa, Terence; Lenz, Peter; Yan, Dalai

    2010-12-03

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) is the central enzyme for nitrogen assimilation in Escherichia coli and is subject to reversible adenylylation (inactivation) by a bifunctional GS adenylyltransferase/adenylyl-removing enzyme (ATase). In vitro, both of the opposing activities of ATase are regulated by small effectors, most notably glutamine and 2-oxoglutarate. In vivo, adenylyltransferase (AT) activity is critical for growth adaptation when cells are shifted from nitrogen-limiting to nitrogen-excess conditions and a rapid decrease of GS activity by adenylylation is needed. Here, we show that the adenylyl-removing (AR) activity of ATase is required to counterbalance its AT activity during steady-state growth under both nitrogen-excess and nitrogen-limiting conditions. This conclusion was established by studying AR(-)/AT(+) mutants, which surprisingly displayed steady-state growth defects in nitrogen-excess conditions due to excessive GS adenylylation. Moreover, GS was abnormally adenylylated in the AR(-) mutants even under nitrogen-limiting conditions, whereas there was little GS adenylylation in wild-type strains. Despite the importance of AR activity, we establish that AT activity is significantly regulated in vivo, mainly by the cellular glutamine concentration. There is good general agreement between quantitative estimates of AT regulation in vivo and results derived from previous in vitro studies except at very low AT activities. We propose additional mechanisms for the low AT activities in vivo. The results suggest that dynamic counterbalance by reversible covalent modification may be a general strategy for controlling the activity of enzymes such as GS, whose physiological output allows adaptation to environmental fluctuations.

  7. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  8. Topographic separation of adenylate cyclase and hormone receptors in the plasma membrane of toad erythrocyte ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hollenberg, M. D.; Bennett, V.; Cuatrecasas, P.

    1977-01-01

    Brief sonication of whole erythrocyte plasma membranes (ghosts) from toads at 4° does not inactivate adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.1] or destroy the receptor binding properties of hydroxybenzylpindolol or insulin. The hormonal (but not the fluoride-induced) stimulation of this enzyme is, however, lost. Fractionation of the small, resealed membrane fragments (vesicles) on discontinuous sucrose gradients results in the separation of vesicle populations differing grossly in size and protein composition. In addition, the distribution of the β-adrenergic receptor, an insulin binding site, and adenylate cyclase among these vesicles fractions differs. The pattern of distribution of these functional structures can be altered differentially by manipulations of the ghosts before sonication. For example, brief preincubation with isoproterenol leads to a change in the relative distribution of β-receptor (but not adenylate cyclase) among the various vesicle fractions; this effect is not obtained with β-receptor antagonists, which block the isoproterenol effect. Exposure of the ghosts to different temperatures, changes in the divalent cation composition of the medium, or the addition of ATP also leads to changes in the distribution of surface markers of the subsequently formed vesicles. The results indicate gross asymmetries in the distribution of protein components within the plane of the membrane and raise important questions regarding the manner whereby functionally related and coupled components, such as hormone receptors and adenylate cyclase, interact. Images PMID:197522

  9. Effect of Enzymatic Adenylylation on Dihydrostreptomycin Accumulation in Escherichia coli Carrying an R-Factor: Model Explaining Aminoglycoside Resistance by Inactivating Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dickie, P.; Bryan, L. E.; Pickard, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    the accumulation of DHS. Unlike DHS, adenylylated DHS does not interact with ribosomes, and, consequently, there is a failure to initiate ribosomally dependent sequelae such as the second energy-dependent phase of accumulation, inhibition of protein synthesis, and/or misreading of mRNA. PMID:82422

  10. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  11. Domain-Opening and Dynamic Coupling in the α-Subunit of Heterotrimeric G Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Grant, Barry J.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are conformational switches that turn on intracellular signaling cascades in response to the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors. Receptor activation by extracellular stimuli promotes a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis on the G protein α-subunit (Gα). Important conformational transitions occurring during this cycle have been characterized from extensive crystallographic studies of Gα. However, the link between the observed conformations and the mechanisms involved in G-protein activation and effector interaction remain unclear. Here we describe a comprehensive principal component analysis of available Gα crystallographic structures supplemented with extensive unbiased conventional and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations that together characterize the response of Gα to GTP binding and hydrolysis. Our studies reveal details of activating conformational changes as well as the intrinsic flexibility of the α-helical domain that includes a large-scale 60° domain opening under nucleotide-free conditions. This result is consistent with the recently reported open crystal structure of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, in complex with the α2 adrenergic receptor. Sets of unique interactions potentially important for the conformational transition are also identified. Moreover simulations reveal nucleotide-dependent dynamical couplings of distal regions and residues potentially important for the allosteric link between functional sites. PMID:23870276

  12. Photoreceptor IFT complexes containing chaperones, guanylyl cyclase 1 and rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Reshma; Li, Mei; Sun, Jun; Baker, Sheila A; Insinna, Christine; Besharse, Joseph C

    2009-06-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) provides a mechanism for the transport of cilium-specific proteins, but the mechanisms for linkage of cargo and IFT proteins have not been identified. Using the sensory outer segments (OS) of photoreceptors, which are derived from sensory cilia, we have identified IFT-cargo complexes containing IFT proteins, kinesin 2 family proteins, two photoreceptor-specific membrane proteins, guanylyl cyclase 1 (GC1, Gucy2e) and rhodopsin (RHO), and the chaperones, mammalian relative of DNAJ, DnajB6 (MRJ), and HSC70 (Hspa8). Analysis of these complexes leads to a model in which MRJ through its binding to IFT88 and GC1 plays a critical role in formation or stabilization of the IFT-cargo complexes. Consistent with the function of MRJ in the activation of HSC70 ATPase activity, Mg-ATP enhances the co-IP of GC1, RHO, and MRJ with IFT proteins. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of MRJ in IMCD3 cells expressing GC1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) reduces cilium membrane targeting of GC1-GFP without apparent effect on cilium elongation.

  13. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  14. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  15. Identification of a Hippeastrum hybridum guanylyl cyclase responsive to wounding and pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Jaworski, Krzysztof; Szewczuk, Piotr; Pawełek, Agnieszka; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-09-15

    Guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) is a critical component of many (patho)physiological processes in plants whilst guanylyl cyclases (GCs) which catalyse the formation of cGMP from GTP have remained somewhat elusive. Consequently, the two major aims are the discovery of novel guanylyl cyclases and the identification of GC/cGMP mediated processes. To identify a novel GC from Hippeastrum hybridum plant and facilitate the preparation of guanylyl cyclase in an amount sufficient for further crystallographic studies, we have constructed an overproduction system for this enzyme. This gene encodes a protein of 256 amino acids, with a calculated molecular mass of 28kD. The predicted amino acid sequence contains all the typical features and shows a high identity to other plant GCs. The GST-HpGC1 was catalytically active in Escherichia coli cells and the purified, recombinant HpGC1 was able to convert GTP to cGMP in the presence of divalent cations. The used overexpression system yields a guanylyl cyclase as 6% of the bacterial cytosolic protein. Besides the identification of HpGC1 as a guanylyl cyclase, the study has shown that the level of HpCG1 mRNA changed during stress conditions. Both mechanical damage and a Peyronellaea curtisii (=Phoma narcissi) fungi infection led to an initial decrease in the HpGC1 transcript level, followed by a substantial increase during the remainder of the 48-h test cycle. Moreover, significant changes in cyclic GMP level were observed, taking the form of oscillations. In conclusion, our data unequivocally identified the product of the HpGC1 gene as a guanylyl cyclase and demonstrates that such an overproduction system can be successfully used in enzyme synthesis. Furthermore, they indicate a link between the causing stimulus (wounding, infection) and guanylyl cyclase expression and the increase in cGMP amplitude. Therefore, it is concluded that appearance of cyclic GMP as a mediator in defense and wound-healing mechanisms provides a

  16. [Role of protein kinases of human red cell membrane in deformability and aggregation changes].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A V; Maĭmistova, A A; Tikhomirova, I A; Bulaeva, S V; Mikhaĭlov, P V; Murav'ev, A A

    2012-01-01

    The proteomic analysis has showed that red cell membrane contains several kinases and phosphatases. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the role of protein kinases of human red cell membrane in deformability and aggregation changes. Exposure of red blood cells (RBCs) to some chemical compounds led to change in the RBC microrheological properties. When forskolin (10 microM), an adenylyl cyclase (AC) and a protein kinase A (PKA) stimulator was added to RBC suspension, the RBC deformability (RBCD) was increased by 20% (p < 0.05). Somewhat more significant deformability rise appeared after RBC incubation with dB-AMP (by 26%; p < 0.01). Red cell aggregation (RBCA) was significantly decreased under these conditions (p < 0.01). Markedly less changes of deformability was found after RBC incubation with protein kinase stimulator C (PKC)--phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). This drug reduced red cell aggregation only slightly. It was inhibited red cell tyrosine phosphotase activity by N-vanadat and was obtained a significant RBCD rise and RBCA lowering. The similar effect was found when cells were incubated with cisplatin as a tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activator. It is important to note that a selective TPK inhibitor--lavendustin eliminated the above mention effects. On the whole the total data clearly show that the red cell aggregation and deformation changes were connected with an activation of the different intracellular signaling pathways.

  17. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  18. Differential expression of functional guanylyl cyclases in melanocytes: absence of nitric-oxide-sensitive isoform in metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Das, P K; van den Wijngaard, R M; Lenz, W; Klockenbring, T; Malcharzyk, V; Drummer, C; Gerzer, R

    2001-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive endogenous molecule with multiple functions and its cellular signaling activity is mainly mediated by activation of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, a heterodimeric (alpha/beta) hemeprotein. The expression of the NO-sensitive soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase was studied in various cultured melanocytic cells by measuring the accumulation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the presence and absence of NO donors. Here we report that 3-morpholino-sydnonimine, a donor of NO redox species, and (Z)-1-[2- (2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, a direct NO donor, induced a 20-fold increase in intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in nonmetastatic melanoma cells and normal melanocytes in culture that could be related to cellular melanin content in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was due to stimulation of the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase as such increase was completely abolished by using a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. The involvement of functional soluble guanylyl cyclase was further confirmed by the presence of alpha1 and beta1 subunits in these cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, none of the NO donors induced guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in metastatic melanoma cells, which could be attributed to the absence of the beta1 subunit that is essential for catalytic activity of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase. Metastatic melanoma cells produced higher levels of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in response to natriuretic peptides than other cell types, however, due to upregulation of membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase activities, but they are less pigmented or unpigmented. The present finding suggests that NO signaling in association with melanogenesis is dependent on the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, whereas absence of soluble guanylyl

  19. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory. PMID:27695398

  20. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  1. Relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase inhibition in the rabbit myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.

    1985-11-01

    The muscarinic receptor-binding properties of a series of muscarinic drugs were compared with their effects on adenylate cyclase in membranes of the rabbit myocardium. When measured by competitive inhibition of (TH)-N-methylscopolamine binding, the competition curves of the various agonists were adequately described by the ternary complex model. This model assumes that the receptor can bind reversibly with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the membrane and that the affinity of the agonist for the receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein complex is higher than that for the free receptor. A satisfactory fit of the ternary complex model to the data could only be achieved assuming that very little receptor is precoupled with the guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the absence of agonist. There was good agreement between the efficacy of each agonist as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the estimate of the positive cooperativity between the binding of the agonist receptor complex and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (0.1 mM) had no significant effect on the binding of (TH)N-methylscopolamine but caused an increase in the concentration of the various agonists required for half-maximal receptor occupancy. There was good correlation between efficacy as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the influence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate on binding properties.

  2. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels. PMID:26505631

  3. Identification of a mammalian glutaminyl cyclase converting glutaminyl into pyroglutamyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, W H; Spiess, J

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from bovine pituitary were found to contain an activity catalyzing the conversion of glutaminyl peptides such as [Gln1]gonadotropin-releasing hormone, [Gln1, Gly4]thyrotropin-releasing hormone (H-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-OH), and H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH to the respective pyroglutamyl peptides. The TRH precursor fragment H-Lys-Arg-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-Lys-Arg-OH and the D-glutaminyl stereoisomer of H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH did not react under the same conditions. The conversion products were identified by Edman degradation, amino acid analysis, and reversed-phase HPLC. That this activity was exhibited by an enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, was concluded from the protein character of the activity (revealed by its abolition with trypsin and heat), the Michaelis-Menten relationship between substrate concentration and conversion rate, and the substrate specificity. It was determined that glutaminyl cyclase had a molecular weight of 43,000-50,000, a pH optimum at pH 8, and Km and Vmax values in the range of 60-130 microM and 390-690 pmol/microgram per hr, respectively. Glutaminyl cyclase was not observed to require ATP and could be inhibited with 1.0 M ammonium chloride, which increased the Km and decreased the Vmax value. The subcellular distribution of glutaminyl cyclase corresponded to the one of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase believed to catalyze C-terminal amidations during posttranslational precursor processing. It was also observed that the formation of pyroglutamyl from glutaminyl peptides occurred nonenzymatically; however, the enzymatic reaction carried out with crude extract was found to be approximately 70 times faster than the nonenzymatic reaction enhanced by phosphate. It is speculated that glutaminyl cyclase may participate in the posttranslational processing of hormonal precursors to pyroglutamyl peptides. PMID:3473473

  4. Label-free quantification of calcium-sensor targeting to photoreceptor guanylate cyclase and rhodopsin kinase by backscattering interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Sulmann, Stefan; Kussrow, Amanda; Bornhop, Darryl J.; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    Quantification of protein binding to membrane proteins is challenging and a limited set of methods is available to study such systems. Here we employed backscattering interferometry (BSI), a free-solution label-free method with high sensitivity, to quantify the interaction of neuronal Ca2+-Sensor proteins with their targets operating in phototransduction. We tested direct binding of guanylate cyclase–activating proteins (GCAP1 and GCAP2) to their membrane target guanylate cyclase 1. The regulatory mechanism of GCAPs including their binding interface in the target is unresolved. Here we used a label-free, free-solution assay method based on BSI to determine binding constants of GCAP1 and GCAP2 to the full-length membrane-bound guanylate cyclase type 1. GCAP1 and GCAP2 bound to different regions on the target guanylate cyclase with submicromolar affinity (apparent KD-values of 663 ± 121 nM and 231 ± 63 nM for Ca2+-free GCAP1 and GCAP2, respectively). A guanylate cyclase construct containing the juxta-membrane and kinase homology domain harbored an exclusive binding site for GCAP1 with similar affinities as the full-length protein, whereas GCAP2 did not bind to this region. We provide a model in which GCAP1 and GCAP2 do not share a single binding site to the target, thus cannot exchange upon fluctuating Ca2+ levels. PMID:28361875

  5. Effect of mitomycin C on the activation of adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1986-09-01

    Isoproterenol (IPN)-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure of AH130 cells to mitomycin C (MMC). The enhancement was also observed in prostaglandin E1-, guanine nucleotide analog-, NaF-, cholera toxin- and forskolin-stimulated activities of the enzyme but not in manganese-stimulated activity. In addition, even when the cells pretreated with islet-activating protein were exposed to MMC, IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced. Anaerobic exposure of AH130 cells to MMC somewhat inhibited IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase in contrast with aerobic exposure. Exposure of cells to adriamycin also caused enhancement of IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase but exposure to nitrogen mustard inhibited the enzyme stimulation by IPN. The enhancing effect of MMC was lost by the combined treatment with alpha-tocopherol. From these results, it was shown that MMC modulated the activity of adenylate cyclase, probably through alterations in membrane structure.

  6. Berberine ameliorates renal injury by regulating G proteins-AC- cAMP signaling in diabetic rats with nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Li Qin; Wang, Feng Ling; Zhu, Ling Na; Lv, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Zhang, Shan Tang

    2013-06-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a progressive kidney disease that is caused by injury to glomerulus and glomerular mesangial cells (MCs) proliferation play a critical role in the pathogenesis of DN. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the protective effects and the possible molecular mechanism of berberine on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN rats. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to normal control and DN groups of comparable age. Three DN groups received 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg of berberine for 8 weeks via daily intragastrically, respectively. The G proteins-adenylyl cyclase (AC)-cAMP signaling pathway and glomerular MCs proliferation were examined in STZ-induced diabetic rat kidney. Enhanced MCs proliferation and remarkable renal injury were concomitant with activation of Gαi and inhibition of Gαs and cAMP in DN model group. Berberine treatment for 8 weeks abolished the above changes by upregulating the expression of Gαs protein and downregulating the expression of Gαi protein, increasing cAMP level, and inhibiting MCs proliferation compared with model group. Taken together, for the first time, these results demonstrated that berberine can relieve renal injury in DN rats through mediating G proteins-AC-cAMP signaling pathway and inhibiting the abnormal proliferation of MCs by increasing cAMP level, suggesting that berberine could be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of DN.

  7. The Orphan G Protein-coupled Receptor Gpr175 (Tpra40) Enhances Hedgehog Signaling by Modulating cAMP Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaskirat; Wen, Xiaohui; Scales, Suzie J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an essential role in vertebrate embryonic tissue patterning of many developing organs. Signaling occurs predominantly in primary cilia and is initiated by the entry of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein Smoothened into cilia and culminates in gene transcription via the Gli family of transcription factors upon their nuclear entry. Here we identify an orphan GPCR, Gpr175 (also known as Tpra1 or Tpra40: transmembrane protein, adipocyte associated 1 or of 40 kDa), which also localizes to primary cilia upon Hh stimulation and positively regulates Hh signaling. Interaction experiments place Gpr175 at the level of PKA and upstream of the Gαi component of heterotrimeric G proteins, which itself localizes to cilia and can modulate Hh signaling. Gpr175 or Gαi1 depletion leads to increases in cellular cAMP levels and in Gli3 processing into its repressor form. Thus we propose that Gpr175 coupled to Gαi1 normally functions to inhibit the production of cAMP by adenylyl cyclase upon Hh stimulation, thus maximizing signaling by turning off PKA activity and hence Gli3 repressor formation. Taken together our data suggest that Gpr175 is a novel positive regulator of the Hh signaling pathway. PMID:26451044

  8. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  9. A source of ultrasensitivity in the glutamine response of the bicyclic cascade system controlling glutamine synthetase adenylylation state and activity in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Ninfa, Alexander J

    2011-12-20

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in Escherichia coli is regulated by reversible adenylylation, brought about by a bicyclic system comprised of uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), its substrate, PII, adenylyltransferase (ATase), and its substrate, GS. The modified and unmodified forms of PII produced by the upstream UTase/UR-PII cycle regulate the downstream ATase-GS cycle. A reconstituted UTase/UR-PII-ATase-GS bicyclic system has been shown to produce a highly ultrasensitive response of GS adenylylation state to the glutamine concentration, but its composite UTase/UR-PII and ATase-GS cycles displayed moderate glutamine sensitivities when examined separately. Glutamine sensitivity of the bicyclic system was significantly reduced when the trimeric PII protein was replaced by a heterotrimeric form of PII that was functionally monomeric, and coupling between the two cycles was different in systems containing wild-type or heterotrimeric PII. Thus, the trimeric nature of PII played a role in the glutamine response of the bicyclic system. We therefore examined regulation of the individual AT (adenylylation) and AR (deadenylylation) activities of ATase by PII preparations with various levels of uridylylation. AR activity was affected in a linear fashion by PII uridylylation, but partially modified wild-type PII activated the AT much less than expected based on the extent of PII modification. Partially modified wild-type PII also bound to ATase less than expected based upon the fraction of modified subunits. Our results suggest that the AT activity is only bound and activated by completely unmodified PII and that this design is largely responsible for ultrasensitivity of the bicyclic system.

  10. Expansion of signal transduction by G proteins. The second 15 years or so: from 3 to 16 alpha subunits plus betagamma dimers.

    PubMed

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2007-04-01

    The first 15 years, or so, brought the realization that there existed a G protein coupled signal transduction mechanism by which hormone receptors regulate adenylyl cyclases and the light receptor rhodopsin activates visual phosphodiesterase. Three G proteins, Gs, Gi and transducin (T) had been characterized as alphabetagamma heterotrimers, and Gsalpha-GTP and Talpha-GTP had been identified as the sigaling arms of Gs and T. These discoveries were made using classical biochemical approaches, and culminated in the purification of these G proteins. The second 15 years, or so, are the subject of the present review. This time coincided with the advent of powerful recombinant DNA techniques. Combined with the classical approaches, the field expanded the repertoire of G proteins from 3 to 16, discovered the superfamily of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) -- which is not addressed in this article -- and uncovered an amazing repertoire of effector functions regulated not only by alphaGTP complexes but also by betagamma dimers. Emphasis is placed in presenting how the field developed with the hope of conveying why many of the new findings were made.

  11. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  12. Multiple effects of phorbol esters on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    In S49 lymphoma cells, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances adenylate cyclase activity and doubles cAMP accumulation in response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation at 37/sup 0/C, putatively via the action of protein kinase C. at 27/sup 0/C, TPA has the opposite effect, inhibiting cAMP production in response to isoproterenol by approx. 25%. TPA also inhibits the response to prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/), another stimulant of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in these cells, by 30% at 37/sup 0/C and almost 50% at 27/sup 0/C. In contrast, TPA enhances responses to forskolin and cholera toxin at both 27 and 37/sup 0/C. In membranes from cells treated with TPA, PGE/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is inhibited by 50%, whereas the catalytic activity stimulated by NaF or forskolin is enhanced. TPA reduces the potency of both PGE/sub 1/ and isoproterenol for cAMP generation by 50%. TPA causes a similar decrease in ..beta..-adrenergic agonist affinity with no reduction in the density of either antagonist of agonist binding sites in wild type cells and in cells lacking the ..cap alpha..-subunit of the stimulatory transducer protein (G/sub s/) (cyc/sup -/) or lacking functional receptor G/sub s/ coupling (UNC). Therefore, TPA has at least three functionally distinct effects on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in S49 cells. The authors conclude that multiple and opposing effects of TPA on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase occur simultaneously within the same cell, affecting the responses to several agonists differently. In addition, the data offer a mechanism by which a cell can achieve heterogeneous efficacies to hormones that activate adenylate cyclase.

  13. Identification of Actin-Binding Proteins from Maize Pollen

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, C.J.

    2004-01-13

    Specific Aims--The goal of this project was to gain an understanding of how actin filament organization and dynamics are controlled in flowering plants. Specifically, we proposed to identify unique proteins with novel functions by investigating biochemical strategies for the isolation and characterization of actin-binding proteins (ABPs). In particular, our hunt was designed to identify capping proteins and nucleation factors. The specific aims included: (1) to use F-actin affinity chromatography (FAAC) as a general strategy to isolate pollen ABPs (2) to produce polyclonal antisera and perform subcellular localization in pollen tubes (3) to isolate cDNA clones for the most promising ABPs (4) to further purify and characterize ABP interactions with actin in vitro. Summary of Progress By employing affinity chromatography on F-actin or DNase I columns, we have identified at least two novel ABPs from pollen, PrABP80 (gelsolin-like) and ZmABP30, We have also cloned and expressed recombinant protein, as well as generated polyclonal antisera, for 6 interesting ABPs from Arabidopsis (fimbrin AtFIM1, capping protein a/b (AtCP), adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (AtCAP), AtCapG & AtVLN1). We performed quantitative analyses of the biochemical properties for two of these previously uncharacterized ABPs (fimbrin and capping protein). Our studies provide the first evidence for fimbrin activity in plants, demonstrate the existence of barbed-end capping factors and a gelsolin-like severing activity, and provide the quantitative data necessary to establish and test models of F-actin organization and dynamics in plant cells.

  14. Antineoplastic effects of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Confer, D L; Jacob, H S; Eaton, J W

    1983-01-01

    Urea extracts of B. pertussis, but not B. bronchiseptica, cause large and sustained intracellular cAMP elevation in several neoplastic cell lines. These cAMP elevations are associated with growth inhibition (HL-60, Friend erythroleukemia) and a phenotypic change/differentiation (HL-60, L1210). B. pertussis extract injections prolong survival of L1210 tumor-bearing mice. Pretreatment of L1210 cells with B. pertussis extract both delays mortality and induces growth of solid tumors instead of ascites in subsequently inoculated mice. We conclude that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase is capable of invading a variety of neoplastic cells to catalyze the intracellular formation of large amounts of cAMP. These cAMP elevations are durable and promote growth arrest, differentiation, or phenotypic alterations reflected in altered biologic behavior. B. pertussis adenylate cyclase should prove to be a useful tool for manipulating cAMP levels in neoplastic cells to elucidate the role of cAMP in malignant transformation.

  15. The oxytocin-induced inward current in vagal neurons of the rat is mediated by G protein activation but not by an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration.

    PubMed

    Alberi, S; Dreifuss, J J; Raggenbass, M

    1997-12-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin can depolarize parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve of the rat by generating a sustained inward current, which is sodium-dependent and tetrodotoxin-insensitive. The second messenger activated by oxytocin receptor binding is, however, not yet known. In the present study, we attempted to characterize it by using the whole-cell recording technique and brainstem slices. When loaded with GTP-gamma-S, a non-hydrolysable analogue of GTP, vagal neurons generated a persistent inward current in the absence of agonist and the oxytocin effect was suppressed, suggesting that the peptide-evoked current was mediated by G-protein activation. Loading vagal neurons with the calcium chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N',-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) suppressed a calcium-dependent, slowly decaying potassium aftercurrent but did not affect the oxytocin response, suggesting that the latter was not mediated by an agonist-induced increase in the intracellular calcium concentration. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation was probably not involved, since the peptide-evoked current was not modified by loading neurons with the PKC inhibitor H7. Thus, the oxytocin-evoked current in vagal neurons was probably not mediated by phospholipase C-beta (PLC-beta) activation. Loading neurons with 8-Br-cAMP or with an adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin) reduced the oxytocin-evoked current by about half. SQ 22536, an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, reduced this current by a similar amount. However, the peptide-evoked current was unaffected by Rp-cAMPS and Sp-cAMPS, an inhibitor and an activator, respectively, of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). We suggest that oxytocin activates two distinct signalling pathways in vagal neurons: one which is cAMP-dependent, but PKA-independent, and one, unidentified, which is PLC-beta-and cAMP-independent. Each pathway accounts for about half of the peptide effect and both appear to involve G-protein

  16. Binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to solubilized preparations of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Seamon, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to proteins solubilized from bovine brain membranes was studied by precipitating proteins with polyethylene glycol and separating (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to protein from free (/sup 3/H)forskolin by rapid filtration. The K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to solubilized proteins was 14 nM which was similar to that for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites in membranes from rat brain and human platelets. Forskolin analogs competed for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites with the same rank potency in both brain membranes and in proteins solubilized from brain membranes. (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to proteins solubilized from membranes with a Bmax of 38 fmolmg protein which increased to 94 fmolmg protein when GppNHp was included in the binding assay. In contrast, GppNHp had no effect on (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to proteins solubilized from membranes preactivated with GppNHp. Solubilized adenylate cyclase from non-preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 130 pmolmgmin which was increased 7-fold by GppNHp. In contrast, adenylate cyclase from preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 850 pmolmgmin which was not stimulated by GppNHp or forskolin

  17. Stable G protein-effector complexes in striatal neurons: mechanism of assembly and role in neurotransmitter signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Keqiang; Masuho, Ikuo; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Cao, Yan; Sasaki, Keita; Lai, Chun Wan J; Han, Pyung-Lim; Ueda, Hiroshi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Xu, Baoji; Willardson, Barry M; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling via G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors is essential for motor control. Critical to this process is the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5) that produces second messenger cAMP upon receptor-mediated activation by G protein Golf. However, the molecular organization of the Golf-AC5 signaling axis is not well understood. In this study, we report that in the striatum AC5 exists in a stable pre-coupled complex with subunits of Golf heterotrimer. We use genetic mouse models with disruption in individual components of the complex to reveal hierarchical order of interactions required for AC5-Golf stability. We further identify that the assembly of AC5-Golf complex is mediated by PhLP1 chaperone that plays central role in neurotransmitter receptor coupling to cAMP production motor learning. These findings provide evidence for the existence of stable G protein-effector signaling complexes and identify a new component essential for their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10451.001 PMID:26613416

  18. Temperature-sensitive Gbeta mutants discriminate between G protein-dependent and -independent signaling mediated by serpentine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Jin, T; Soede, R D; Liu, J; Kimmel, A R; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    1998-01-01

    Deletion of the single gene for the Dictyostelium G protein beta-subunit blocks development at an early stage. We have now isolated temperature-sensitive alleles of Gbeta to investigate its role in later development. We show that Gbeta is directly required for adenylyl cyclase A activation and for morphogenetic signaling during the entire developmental program. Gbeta was also essential for induction of aggregative gene expression by cAMP pulses, a process that is mediated by serpentine cAMP receptors (cARs). However, Gbeta was not required for cAR-mediated induction of prespore genes and repression of stalk genes, and neither was Gbeta needed for induction of prestalk genes by the differentiation inducing factor (DIF). cAMP induction of prespore genes and repression of stalk genes is mediated by the protein kinase GSK-3. GSK-3 also determines cell-type specification in insects and vertebrates and is regulated by the wingless/wnt morphogens that are detected by serpentine fz receptors. The G protein-dependent and -independent modes of cAR-mediated signaling reported here may also exist for the wingless/wnt signaling pathways in higher organisms. PMID:9724643

  19. G-Protein α-Subunit Gsα Is Required for Craniofacial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yanxia; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; Hong, Yang; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-01-01

    The heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gsα couples receptors to activate adenylyl cyclase and is required for the intracellular cAMP response and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. Gsα is ubiquitously expressed in many cell types; however, the role of Gsα in neural crest cells (NCCs) remains unclear. Here we report that NCCs-specific Gsα knockout mice die within hours after birth and exhibit dramatic craniofacial malformations, including hypoplastic maxilla and mandible, cleft palate and craniofacial skeleton defects. Histological and anatomical analysis reveal that the cleft palate in Gsα knockout mice is a secondary defect resulting from craniofacial skeleton deficiencies. In Gsα knockout mice, the morphologies of NCCs-derived cranial nerves are normal, but the development of dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia are impaired. Furthermore, loss of Gsα in NCCs does not affect cranial NCCs migration or cell proliferation, but significantly accelerate osteochondrogenic differentiation. Taken together, our study suggests that Gsα is required for neural crest cells-derived craniofacial development. PMID:26859889

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 expression via a PLC/PKC-dependent signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hui; Xu, Yongjun; Chen, Yanming; Zhang, Yanmin; Ni, Xin

    2012-10-15

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been shown to modulate dendritic development in hippocampus. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1) plays key roles in dendritic differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of CRH on MKLP1 expression in cultured hippocampal neurons and determine subsequent signaling pathways involved. CRH dose-dependently increased MKLP1 mRNA and protein expression. This effect can be reversed by CRHR1 antagonist but not by CRHR2 antagonist. CRHR1 knockdown impaired this effect of CRH. CRH stimulated GTP-bound Gαs protein and phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-β3 expression, which were blocked by CRHR1 antagonist. Transfection of GP antagonist-2A, an inhibitory peptide of Gαq protein, blocked CRH-induced phosphorylated PLC-β3 expression. PLC and PKC inhibitors completely blocked whereas adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA inhibitors did not affect CRH-induced MKLP1 expression. Our results indicate that CRH act on CRHR1 to induce MKLP1 expression via PLC/PKC signaling pathway. CRH may regulate MKLP1 expression, thereby modulating dendritic development.

  1. Heavy isotope labeling study of the turnover of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in BC/sup 3/H1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, R.; Bockaert, J.; Mermet-Bouvier, R.; Guillon, G.; Homburger, V.

    1987-06-25

    We have used the method of heavy isotope labeling to study the metabolic turnover of adenylate cyclase in a nonfusing muscle cell line, the BC/sup 3/H1 cells. These cells contains an adenylate cyclase coupled to beta-adrenergic receptors and highly stimulated by forskolin, a potent activator of the enzyme. After transfer of the cells from normal medium to heavy medium (a medium containing heavy labeled amino acids, /sup 3/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N), heavy isotope-labeled adenylate cyclase molecules progressively replace pre-existing light molecules. In sucrose gradient differential sedimentation, after a 5-day switch in heavy medium, the enzyme exhibited a higher mass (s = 8.40 +/- 0.03 S, n = 13) compared to the control enzyme. Indeed, the increase in the sedimentation coefficient of the heavy molecules was due to the synthesis of new molecules of adenylate cyclase labeled with heavy isotope amino acids since in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, no change in the sedimentation pattern of the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase occurred. After incorporation of heavy isotope amino acids in the adenylate cyclase molecules, the kinetics parameters of the enzyme did not change. However, adenylate cyclase from cells incubated with heavy medium exhibits an activity about 2-fold lower than control. After switching the cells to the heavy medium, the decrease of the activity of the enzyme occurred during the first 24 h and thereafter remained at a steady state for at least 4 days. In contrast, 24 h after the switch, the sedimentation coefficient of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively shifted to a higher value.

  2. Cellular interactions uncouple beta-adrenergic receptors from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; de Vellis, J

    1978-11-17

    C6 glioma cells and B104 neuroblastoma cells both possess adenylate cyclase activity, but only C6 cells have beta-adrenergic receptors. However, when cocultured with B104 cells, C6 cells show a marked decrease in their ability to accumulate adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate upon stimulation with beta receptor agonists. Since both beta receptors and cholera toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities are present in C6/B104 cocultures, we conclude that the beta receptor/adenylate cyclase transduction mechanism in cocultured C6 cells is uncoupled.

  3. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  4. A new role for AMP-activated protein kinase in the circadian regulation of L-type voltage-gated calcium channels in late-stage embryonic retinal photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cathy C Y; Shi, Liheng; Lin, Chia-Hung; Kim, Andy Jeesu; Ko, Michael L; Ko, Gladys Y-P

    2015-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated when the intracellular ATP production decreases. The activities of AMPK display circadian rhythms in various organs and tissues, indicating that AMPK is involved in the circadian regulation of cellular metabolism. In vertebrate retina, the circadian clocks regulate many aspects of retinal function and physiology, including light/dark adaption, but whether and how AMPK was involved in the retinal circadian rhythm was not known. We hypothesized that the activation of AMPK (measured as phosphorylated AMPK) in the retina was under circadian control, and AMPK might interact with other intracellular signaling molecules to regulate photoreceptor physiology. We combined ATP assays, western blots, immunostaining, patch-clamp recordings, and pharmacological treatments to decipher the role of AMPK in the circadian regulation of photoreceptor physiology. We found that the overall retinal ATP content displayed a diurnal rhythm that peaked at early night, which was nearly anti-phase to the diurnal and circadian rhythms of AMPK phosphorylation. AMPK was also involved in the circadian phase-dependent regulation of photoreceptor L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCCs), the ion channel essential for sustained neurotransmitter release. The activation of AMPK dampened the L-VGCC currents at night with a corresponding decrease in protein expression of the L-VGCCα1 pore-forming subunit, while inhibition of AMPK increased the L-VGCC current during the day. AMPK appeared to be upstream of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase and mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) but downstream of adenylyl cyclase in regulating the circadian rhythm of L-VGCCs. Hence, as a cellular energy sensor, AMPK integrates into the cell signaling network to regulate the circadian rhythm of photoreceptor physiology. We found that in chicken embryonic retina, the activation of AMP-activated protein

  5. Heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gγ13 is critical to olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Ponissery-Saidu, Samsudeen; Yee, Karen; Wang, Hong; Chen, Meng-Ling; Iguchi, Naoko; Zhang, Genhua; Jiang, Ping; Reisert, Johannes; Huang, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    The activation of G-protein-coupled olfactory receptors on the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) triggers a signaling cascade, which is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein consisting of α, β and γ subunits. Although its α subunit, Gαolf, has been identified and well characterized, the identities of its β and γ subunits and their function in olfactory signal transduction, however, have not been well established yet. We and others have found the expression of Gγ13 in the olfactory epithelium, particularly in the cilia of the OSNs. In this study, we generated a conditional gene knockout mouse line to specifically nullify Gγ13 expression in the olfactory marker protein-expressing OSNs. Immunohistochemical and Western blot results showed that Gγ13 subunit was indeed eliminated in the mutant mice’s olfactory epithelium. Intriguingly, Gαolf, β1 subunits, Ric-8B and CEP290 proteins were also absent in the epithelium whereas the presence of the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase III remained largely unaltered. Electro-olfactogram studies showed that the mutant animals had greatly reduced responses to a battery of odorants including three presumable pheromones. Behavioral tests indicated that the mutant mice had a remarkably reduced ability to perform an odor-guided search task although their motivation and agility seemed normal. Our results indicate that Gαolf exclusively forms a functional heterotrimeric G protein with Gβ1 and Gγ13 in OSNs, mediating olfactory signal transduction. The identification of the olfactory G protein’s βγ moiety has provided a novel approach to understanding the feedback regulation of olfactory signal transduction pathways as well as the control of subcellular structures of OSNs. PMID:23637188

  6. The isoenzyme of glutaminyl cyclase is an important regulator of monocyte infiltration under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Cynis, Holger; Hoffmann, Torsten; Friedrich, Daniel; Kehlen, Astrid; Gans, Kathrin; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Wolf, Raik; Wermann, Michael; Stephan, Anett; Haegele, Monique; Sedlmeier, Reinhard; Graubner, Sigrid; Jagla, Wolfgang; Müller, Anke; Eichentopf, Rico; Heiser, Ulrich; Seifert, Franziska; Quax, Paul H A; de Vries, Margreet R; Hesse, Isabel; Trautwein, Daniela; Wollert, Ulrich; Berg, Sabine; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-09-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory disorders are characterized by detrimental cytokine and chemokine expression. Frequently, the chemotactic activity of cytokines depends on a modified N-terminus of the polypeptide. Among those, the N-terminus of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2 and MCP-1) is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE-) residue protecting against degradation in vivo. Here, we show that the N-terminal pE-formation depends on glutaminyl cyclase activity. The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases and improves receptor activation and signal transduction in vitro. Genetic ablation of the glutaminyl cyclase iso-enzymes QC (QPCT) or isoQC (QPCTL) revealed a major role of isoQC for pE(1) -CCL2 formation and monocyte infiltration. Consistently, administration of QC-inhibitors in inflammatory models, such as thioglycollate-induced peritonitis reduced monocyte infiltration. The pharmacologic efficacy of QC/isoQC-inhibition was assessed in accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE3*Leiden mice, showing attenuated atherosclerotic pathology following chronic oral treatment. Current strategies targeting CCL2 are mainly based on antibodies or spiegelmers. The application of small, orally available inhibitors of glutaminyl cyclases represents an alternative therapeutic strategy to treat CCL2-driven disorders such as atherosclerosis/restenosis and fibrosis.

  7. The isoenzyme of glutaminyl cyclase is an important regulator of monocyte infiltration under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cynis, Holger; Hoffmann, Torsten; Friedrich, Daniel; Kehlen, Astrid; Gans, Kathrin; Kleinschmidt, Martin; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Wolf, Raik; Wermann, Michael; Stephan, Anett; Haegele, Monique; Sedlmeier, Reinhard; Graubner, Sigrid; Jagla, Wolfgang; Müller, Anke; Eichentopf, Rico; Heiser, Ulrich; Seifert, Franziska; Quax, Paul H A; de Vries, Margreet R; Hesse, Isabel; Trautwein, Daniela; Wollert, Ulrich; Berg, Sabine; Freyse, Ernst-Joachim; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammatory disorders are characterized by detrimental cytokine and chemokine expression. Frequently, the chemotactic activity of cytokines depends on a modified N-terminus of the polypeptide. Among those, the N-terminus of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2 and MCP-1) is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE-) residue protecting against degradation in vivo. Here, we show that the N-terminal pE-formation depends on glutaminyl cyclase activity. The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases and improves receptor activation and signal transduction in vitro. Genetic ablation of the glutaminyl cyclase iso-enzymes QC (QPCT) or isoQC (QPCTL) revealed a major role of isoQC for pE1-CCL2 formation and monocyte infiltration. Consistently, administration of QC-inhibitors in inflammatory models, such as thioglycollate-induced peritonitis reduced monocyte infiltration. The pharmacologic efficacy of QC/isoQC-inhibition was assessed in accelerated atherosclerosis in ApoE3*Leiden mice, showing attenuated atherosclerotic pathology following chronic oral treatment. Current strategies targeting CCL2 are mainly based on antibodies or spiegelmers. The application of small, orally available inhibitors of glutaminyl cyclases represents an alternative therapeutic strategy to treat CCL2-driven disorders such as atherosclerosis/restenosis and fibrosis. PMID:21774078

  8. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  9. Determinants for the activation and autoinhibition of the diguanylate cyclase response regulator WspR.

    PubMed

    De, Nabanita; Navarro, Marcos V A S; Raghavan, Rahul V; Sondermann, Holger

    2009-10-30

    The bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls secretion, cell adhesion, and motility, leading to biofilm formation and increased cytotoxicity. Diguanylate cyclases containing GGDEF and phosphodiesterases containing EAL or HD-GYP domains have been identified as the enzymes controlling cellular c-di-GMP levels, yet less is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing regulation and signaling specificity. We recently determined a product-inhibition pathway for the diguanylate cyclase response regulator WspR from Pseudomonas, a potent molecular switch that controls biofilm formation. In WspR, catalytic activity is modulated by a helical stalk motif that connects its phospho-receiver and GGDEF domains. The stalks facilitate the formation of distinct oligomeric states that contribute to both activation and autoinhibition. Here, we provide novel insights into the regulation of diguanylate cyclase activity in WspR based on the crystal structures of full-length WspR, the isolated GGDEF domain, and an artificially dimerized catalytic domain. The structures highlight that inhibition is achieved by restricting the mobility of rigid GGDEF domains, mediated by c-di-GMP binding to an inhibitory site at the GGDEF domain. Kinetic measurements and biochemical characterization corroborate a model in which the activation of WspR requires the formation of a tetrameric species. Tetramerization occurs spontaneously at high protein concentration or upon addition of the phosphomimetic compound beryllium fluoride. Our analyses elucidate common and WspR-specific mechanisms for the fine-tuning of diguanylate cyclase activity.

  10. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  11. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate metabolism in synaptic growth, strength, and precision: neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc phosphodiesterase and rut adenylyl cyclase mutations.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-03-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrates that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29-30°C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and wild-type (WT). Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss factors that could contribute to the effectiveness of counterbalancing interactions between dnc and rut mutations for phenotypic rescue.

  12. A novel calmodulin-binding protein, belonging to the WD-repeat family, is localized in dendrites of a subset of CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    A rat brain synaptosomal protein of 110,000 M(r) present in a fraction highly enriched in adenylyl cyclase activity was microsequenced (Castets, F., G. Baillat, S. Mirzoeva, K. Mabrouk, J. Garin, J. d'Alayer, and A. Monneron. 1994. Biochemistry. 33:5063-5069). Peptide sequences were used to clone a cDNA encoding a novel, 780-amino acid protein named striatin. Striatin is a member of the WD-repeat family (Neer, E.J., C.J. Schmidt, R. Nambudripad, and T.F. Smith. 1994. Nature (Lond.). 371:297-300), the first one known to bind calmodulin (CaM) in the presence of Ca++. Subcellular fractionation shows that striatin is a membrane-associated, Lubrol-soluble protein. As analyzed by Northern blots, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry, striatin is localized in the central nervous system, where it is confined to a subset of neurons, many of which are associated with the motor system. In particular, striatin is conspicuous in the dorsal part of the striatum, as well as in motoneurons. Furthermore, striatin is essentially found in dendrites, but not in axons, and is most abundant in dendritic spines. We propose that striatin interacts, through its WD- repeat domain and in a CaM/Ca(++)-dependent manner, with one or several members of a surrounding cluster of molecules engaged in a Ca(++)- signaling pathway specific to excitatory synapses. PMID:8769426

  13. Severe impairment of growth and differentiation in a Neurospora crassa mutant lacking all heterotrimeric G alpha proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kays, Ann M; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2004-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G alpha proteins play a critical role in regulating growth and differentiation in filamentous fungi. No systematic analysis of functional relationships between subunits has been investigated. This study explores the relative contributions of Neurospora crassa G alpha subunits, gna-1, gna-2, and gna-3, in directing development by analyzing strains deleted for various combinations of these genes. Although viable, mutants lacking all G alpha subunits or gna-1 and gna-3 are severely restricted in apical growth, forming small colonies. These strains form little aerial hyphae during asexual development on solid medium and exhibit inappropriate sporulation in submerged cultures. Similar to all strains carrying the Delta gna-1 mutation, these mutants are female sterile. Defects attributed to gna-2 are observed only in conjunction with the loss of gna-1 or gna-3, suggesting a minor role for this G alpha in N. crassa biology. Results from analysis of adenylyl cyclase and epistatic studies with the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit (mcb) indicate separate functions for GNA-1 and GNA-3 in cAMP metabolism and additional cAMP-independent roles for GNA-1. These studies indicate that although G alpha subunits are not essential for viability in filamentous fungi, their loss results in an organism that cannot effectively forage for nutrients or undergo asexual or sexual reproduction. PMID:15082543

  14. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase activity by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S

    2004-11-01

    The levels of the cGMP in smooth muscle of the gut reflect continued synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Soluble GC is a haem-containing, heterodimeric protein consisting alpha- and beta-subunits: each subunit has N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The haem moiety acts as an intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and determines the ability of NO to activate the enzyme and generate cGMP. In the present study the mechanism by which protein kinases regulate soluble GC in gastric smooth muscle was examined. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) acting as a NO donor stimulated soluble GC activity and increased cGMP levels. SNP induced soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation was abolished by the selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors, Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. In contrast, SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP levels were significantly enhanced by Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. Phosphorylation and inhibition of soluble GC were PKG specific, as selective activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Sp-5, 6-DCl-cBiMPS had no effect on SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation and activity. The ability of PKG to stimulate soluble GC phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro by back phosphorylation technique. Addition of purified phosphatase 1 inhibited soluble GC phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibition was reversed by a high concentration (10 microM) of okadaic acid. In gastric smooth muscle cells, inhibition of phosphatase activity by okadaic acid increased soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The increase in soluble GC phosphorylation inhibited SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP formation. The results implied the feedback inhibition of soluble GC activity by PKG-dependent phosphorylation impeded further formation of cGMP.

  15. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  16. Guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins in retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Meisheng; Tran, V.T.; Fong, H.K.W. ); Pandey, S. )

    1991-05-01

    The expression of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was analyzed by RNA blot hybridization and cDNA amplification. Both adult and fetal human RPE cells contain mRNA for multiple G protein {alpha} subunits (G{alpha}) including G{sub s}{alpha}, G{sub i-1}{alpha}, G{sub i-2}{alpha}, G{sub i-3}{alpha}, and G{sub z}{alpha} (or G{sub x}{alpha}), where G{sub s} and G{sub i} are proteins that stimulate or inhibit adenylyl cyclase, respectively, and G{sub z} is a protein that may mediate pertussis toxin-insensitive events. Other G{alpha}-related mRNA transcripts were detected in fetal RPE cells by low-stringency hybridization to G{sub i-2}{alpha} and G{sub s}{alpha} protein-coding cDNA probes. The diversity of G proteins in RPE cells was further studied by cDNA amplification with reverse transcriptase and the polymerase chain reaction. This approach revealed that, besides the above mentioned members of the G{alpha} gene family, at least two other G{alpha} subunits are expressed in RPE cells. Human retinal cDNA clones that encode one of the additional G{alpha} subunits were isolated and characterized. The results indicate that this G{alpha} subunit belongs to a separate subfamily of G proteins that may be insensitive to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

  17. Brain region specific alterations in the protein and mRNA levels of protein kinase A subunits in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Mondal, Amal C; Shukla, Pradeep K; Conley, Robert R

    2005-08-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA), a critical component of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system, phosphorylates crucial proteins and has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. The objective of the study was to examine if changes in PKA activity or in the protein and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of any of its subunits are related to the pathophysiology of teenage suicide. We determined PKA activity and the protein and mRNA expression of different subunits of PKA in cytosol and membrane fractions obtained from the prefrontal cortex, (PFC) hippocampus, and nucleus accumbens (NA) of post-mortem brain from 17 teenage suicide victims and 17 nonpsychiatric control subjects. PKA activity was significantly decreased in the PFC but not the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims as compared with controls. However, the protein and mRNA expression of only two PKA subunits, that is, PKA RIalpha and PKA RIbeta, but not any other subunits were significantly decreased in both membrane and cytosol fractions of the PFC and protein expression of RIalpha and RIbeta in the NA of teenage suicide victims as compared to controls. A decrease in protein and mRNA expression of two specific PKA subunits may be associated with the pathogenesis of teenage suicide, and this decrease may be brain region specific, which may be related to the specific behavioral functions associated with these brain areas. Whether these changes in PKA subunits are related to suicidal behavior or are a result of suicide or are specific to suicide is not clear at this point.

  18. Fic domain-catalyzed adenylylation: Insight provided by the structural analysis of the type IV secretion system effector BepA

    PubMed Central

    Palanivelu, Dinesh V; Goepfert, Arnaud; Meury, Marcel; Guye, Patrick; Dehio, Christoph; Schirmer, Tilman

    2011-01-01

    Numerous bacterial pathogens subvert cellular functions of eukaryotic host cells by the injection of effector proteins via dedicated secretion systems. The type IV secretion system (T4SS) effector protein BepA from Bartonella henselae is composed of an N-terminal Fic domain and a C-terminal Bartonella intracellular delivery domain, the latter being responsible for T4SS-mediated translocation into host cells. A proteolysis resistant fragment (residues 10–302) that includes the Fic domain shows autoadenylylation activity and adenylyl transfer onto Hela cell extract proteins as demonstrated by autoradiography on incubation with α-[32P]-ATP. Its crystal structure, determined to 2.9-Å resolution by the SeMet-SAD method, exhibits the canonical Fic fold including the HPFxxGNGRxxR signature motif with several elaborations in loop regions and an additional β-rich domain at the C-terminus. On crystal soaking with ATP/Mg2+, additional electron density indicated the presence of a PPi/Mg2+ moiety, the side product of the adenylylation reaction, in the anion binding nest of the signature motif. On the basis of this information and that of the recent structure of IbpA(Fic2) in complex with the eukaryotic target protein Cdc42, we present a detailed model for the ternary complex of Fic with the two substrates, ATP/Mg2+ and target tyrosine. The model is consistent with an in-line nucleophilic attack of the deprotonated side-chain hydroxyl group onto the α-phosphorus of the nucleotide to accomplish AMP transfer. Furthermore, a general, sequence-independent mechanism of target positioning through antiparallel β-strand interactions between enzyme and target is suggested. PMID:21213248

  19. Ultraviolet radiation augments epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, H.; Kajita, S.; Ohkawara, A.

    1985-05-01

    Pig skin was irradiated in vivo with fluorescent sunlamp tubes (peak emission at 305 nm). A significant increase in epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was observed as early as 12 h following 1-2 minimum erythema doses (MEDs) UVB exposure, which lasted at least 48 h. The augmentation of adenylate cyclase response was relatively specific to the beta-adrenergic system and there was no significant difference in either adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response of epidermis. The increased beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was less marked at higher doses of UVB exposure (5 MEDs); in the latter condition, a significant reduction in adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response was observed. There was no significant difference in either low- or high-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-treated skin at 1-2 MEDs. These data indicate that the epidermal adenylate cyclase responses are affected in vivo by UVB irradiation, which might be a significant regulatory mechanism of epidermal cyclic AMP systems.

  20. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K; Makino, Clint L

    2015-04-24

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca(2+)]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mM for ROS-GC1 and 39 mM for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca(2+) nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca(2+)]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity.

  1. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Makino, Clint L.

    2015-01-01

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca2+]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mm for ROS-GC1 and 39 mm for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca2+ nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca2+]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity. PMID:25767116

  2. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  3. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: Expression, purification, and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2000-01-01

    The α1- and β1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein. PMID:10995472

  4. Guanylate cyclase 1 relies on rhodopsin for intracellular stability and ciliary trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pearring, Jillian N; Spencer, William J; Lieu, Eric C; Arshavsky, Vadim Y

    2015-01-01

    Sensory cilia are populated by a select group of signaling proteins that detect environmental stimuli. How these molecules are delivered to the sensory cilium and whether they rely on one another for specific transport remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether the visual pigment, rhodopsin, is critical for delivering other signaling proteins to the sensory cilium of photoreceptor cells, the outer segment. Rhodopsin is the most abundant outer segment protein and its proper transport is essential for formation of this organelle, suggesting that such a dependency might exist. Indeed, we demonstrated that guanylate cyclase-1, producing the cGMP second messenger in photoreceptors, requires rhodopsin for intracellular stability and outer segment delivery. We elucidated this dependency by showing that guanylate cyclase-1 is a novel rhodopsin-binding protein. These findings expand rhodopsin’s role in vision from being a visual pigment and major outer segment building block to directing trafficking of another key signaling protein. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12058.001 PMID:26590321

  5. Identification of Glutaminyl Cyclase Genes Involved in Pyroglutamate Modification of Fungal Lignocellulolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Vincent W.; Dana, Craig M.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The breakdown of plant biomass to simple sugars is essential for the production of second-generation biofuels and high-value bioproducts. Currently, enzymes produced from filamentous fungi are used for deconstructing plant cell wall polysaccharides into fermentable sugars for biorefinery applications. A post-translational N-terminal pyroglutamate modification observed in some of these enzymes occurs when N-terminal glutamine or glutamate is cyclized to form a five-membered ring. This modification has been shown to confer resistance to thermal denaturation for CBH-1 and EG-1 cellulases. In mammalian cells, the formation of pyroglutamate is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases. Using the model filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, we identified two genes (qc-1 and qc-2) that encode proteins homologous to mammalian glutaminyl cyclases. We show that qc-1 and qc-2 are essential for catalyzing the formation of an N-terminal pyroglutamate on CBH-1 and GH5-1. CBH-1 and GH5-1 produced in a Δqc-1 Δqc-2 mutant, and thus lacking the N-terminal pyroglutamate modification, showed greater sensitivity to thermal denaturation, and for GH5-1, susceptibility to proteolytic cleavage. QC-1 and QC-2 are endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized proteins. The pyroglutamate modification is predicted to occur in a number of additional fungal proteins that have diverse functions. The identification of glutaminyl cyclases in fungi may have implications for production of lignocellulolytic enzymes, heterologous expression, and biotechnological applications revolving around protein stability. PMID:28096492

  6. Isolation of an Arabidopsis mutant lacking vitamin E and identification of a cyclase essential for all tocopherol biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Porfirova, Svetlana; Bergmuller, Eveline; Tropf, Susanne; Lemke, Rainer; Dormann, Peter

    2002-09-17

    Tocopherol (vitamin E) is a plant chloroplast lipid presumed to be involved in the response to oxidative stress. A tocopherol-deficient mutant (vte1) was isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana by using a TLC-based screening approach. Mutant plants lacked all four tocopherol forms and were deficient in tocopherol cyclase activity. Genetic mapping of vte1 and a genomics-based approach led to the identification of the ORF At4g32770 as a candidate gene for tocopherol cyclase. In vte1, At4g32770 contains a splicing site mutation and the corresponding mRNA expression is reduced. Expression of VTE1 in Escherichia coli resulted in the production of a protein with high tocopherol cyclase and tocotrienol cyclase activity. The VTE1 sequence shows no similarities to genes with known function, but is similar to that of SXD1, a gene that was recently isolated based on the availability of the sucrose export defective1 maize mutant (sxd1). Growth of the vte1 mutant, chlorophyll content, and photosynthetic quantum yield were similar to wild type under optimal growth conditions. Therefore, absence of tocopherol has no large impact on photosynthesis or plant viability, suggesting that other antioxidants can compensate for the loss of tocopherol. During photo-oxidative stress, chlorophyll content and photosynthetic quantum yield were slightly reduced in vte1 as compared with wild type indicating a potential role for tocopherol in maintaining an optimal photosynthesis rate under high-light stress.

  7. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  8. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    PubMed Central

    Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Hyder, Salman M.; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the α1 and β1 subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC α1 10% and sGC β1 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression. PMID:11209068

  9. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record.

  10. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase-dependent elevation in adiponectin in the rostral ventrolateral medulla underlies g protein-coupled receptor 18-mediated hypotension in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Penumarti, Anusha; Abdel-Rahman, Abdel A

    2014-10-01

    Direct activation of the endocannabinoid receptor G protein-coupled receptor 18 (GPR18) in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of conscious rats by abnormal cannabidiol (Abn CBD; trans-4-[3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]-5-pentyl-1,3-benzenediol) elevates local nitric oxide (NO) and adiponectin (ADN) levels and reduces oxidative stress and blood pressure (BP). However, the molecular mechanisms for GPR18-mediated neurochemical responses, including the nitric oxide synthase isoform that generates NO, and their potential causal link to the BP reduction are not known. We hypothesized that GPR18-mediated enhancement of Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation, triggered by a reduction in cAMP, accounts for the NO/ADN-dependent reductions in RVLM oxidative stress and BP. Intra-RVLM GPR18 activation (Abn CBD; 0.4 μg) enhanced RVLM Akt, ERK1/2, and nNOS phosphorylation as well as ADN levels during the hypotensive response. Prior GPR18 blockade with O-1918 (1,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-2-[(1R,6R)-3-methyl-6-(1-methylethenyl)-2-cyclohexen-1-yl]benzene) produced the opposite effects and abrogated Abn CBD-evoked neurochemical and BP responses. Pharmacological inhibition of RVLM phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt (wortmannin), ERK1/2 (PD98059 [2-​(2-​amino-​3-​methoxyphenyl)-​4H-​1-​benzopyran-​4-​one]), or nNOS (N(ω)-propyl-l-arginine), or activation of adenylyl cyclase (forskolin) virtually abolished intra-RVLM Abn CBD-evoked hypotension and the increases in Akt, ERK1/2, and nNOS phosphorylation and in ADN levels in the RVLM. Our pharmacological and neurochemical findings support a pivotal role for PI3K, Akt, ERK1/2, nNOS, and adenylyl cyclase, via modulation of NO, ADN, and cAMP levels, in GPR18 regulation of the RVLM redox state and BP in conscious rats.

  11. The human thyrotropin receptor: a heptahelical receptor capable of stimulating members of all four G protein families.

    PubMed Central

    Laugwitz, K L; Allgeier, A; Offermanns, S; Spicher, K; Van Sande, J; Dumont, J E; Schultz, G

    1996-01-01

    Thyrotropin is the primary hormone that, via one heptahelical receptor, regulates thyroid cell functions such as secretion, specific gene expression, and growth. In human thyroid, thyrotropin receptor activation leads to stimulation of the adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C cascades. However, the G proteins involved in thyrotropin receptor action have been only partially defined. In membranes of human thyroid gland, we immunologically identified alpha subunits of the G proteins Gs short, Gs long, Gi1, Gi2, Gi3, G(o) (Go2 and another form of Go, presumably Go1), Gq, G11, G12, and G13. Activation of the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor by bovine TSH led to increased incorporation of the photoreactive GTP analogue [alpha-32P]GTP azidoanilide into immunoprecipitated alpha subunits of all G proteins detected in thyroid membranes. This effect was receptor-dependent and not due to direct G protein stimulation because it was mimicked by TSH receptor-stimulating antibodies of patients suffering from Grave disease and was abolished by a receptor-blocking antiserum from a patient with autoimmune hypothyroidism. The TSH-induced activation of individual G proteins occurred with EC50 values of 5-50 milliunits/ml, indicating that the activated TSH receptor coupled with similar potency to different G proteins. When human thyroid slices were pretreated with pertussis toxin, the TSH receptor-mediated accumulation of cAMP increased by approximately 35% with TSH at 1 milliunits/ml, indicating that the TSH receptor coupled to Gs and G(i). Taken together, these findings show that, at least in human thyroid membranes, in which the protein is expressed at its physiological levels, the TSH receptor resembles a naturally occurring example of a general G protein-activating receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8552586

  12. A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-22

    2003) Designing repeat proteins: Well-expressed, soluble and stable proteins from combinatorial libraries of consensus ankyrin repeat proteins. J. Mol...A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase...changes exhibited by intrinsically disordered proteins is necessary as we continue to unravel their myriad biological functions. In repeats in toxin

  13. A Diguanylate Cyclase Acts as a Cell Division Inhibitor in a Two-Step Response to Reductive and Envelope Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell division arrest is a universal checkpoint in response to environmental assaults that generate cellular stress. In bacteria, the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling network is one of several signal transduction systems that regulate key processes in response to extra-/intracellular stimuli. Here, we find that the diguanylate cyclase YfiN acts as a bifunctional protein that produces c-di-GMP in response to reductive stress and then dynamically relocates to the division site to arrest cell division in response to envelope stress in Escherichia coli. YfiN localizes to the Z ring by interacting with early division proteins and stalls cell division by preventing the initiation of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. These studies reveal a new role for a diguanylate cyclase in responding to environmental change, as well as a novel mechanism for arresting cell division. PMID:27507823

  14. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivation and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction are enhanced in IVF media: an effect that is not associated with an increase in protein kinase A activation.

    PubMed

    Moseley, F L C; Jha, K N; Björndahl, Lars; Brewis, I A; Publicover, S J; Barratt, C L R; Lefièvre, L

    2005-07-01

    Sperm capacitation is a prerequisite for successful in vitro fertilization (IVF) and therefore a focus of sperm preparation in IVF laboratories. The technology of IVF is, therefore, potentially valuable in advancing our understanding of the molecular processes that occur during sperm capacitation. We have investigated sperm capacitation induced by a commercial IVF medium compared to that occurring in standard capacitating medium (CM) typically used in a nonclinical setting. Percoll-washed spermatozoa were resuspended in Cook Sydney IVF medium, Cook Sydney IVF sperm buffer, Earle's balanced salt medium (capacitating medium) or a modified Earle's balanced salt medium [non-capacitating medium (NCM)] for up to 120 min at 37 degrees C and, if applicable, in the presence of 5% CO2 in air. Sperm protein kinase A (PKA) activity, PKA-dependent serine/threonine phosphorylation, tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivation and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were evaluated. IVF medium was shown to accelerate sperm capacitation (compared with capacitating medium) as determined by tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm hyperactivation and progesterone-induced acrosome reaction. This effect was not associated with enhanced activation of PKA or increased levels of serine/threonine phosphorylation. In contrast, IVF sperm buffer (used for sperm preparation) did not stimulate sperm capacitation when incubated for up to 90 min. We have shown that different capacitating media vary strikingly in their efficacy and that this difference reflects activation of a pathway other than the well-characterized activation of soluble adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/PKA.

  15. Oxygen and Bis(3',5')-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate Binding Control Oligomerization State Equilibria of Diguanylate Cyclase-Containing Globin Coupled Sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Rivera, Shannon; Deer, D Douglas; Joynt, Shawnna C; Dvorak, David; Weinert, Emily E

    2016-12-06

    Bacteria sense their environment to alter phenotypes, including biofilm formation, to survive changing conditions. Heme proteins play important roles in sensing the bacterial gaseous environment and controlling the switch between motile and sessile (biofilm) states. Globin coupled sensors (GCS), a family of heme proteins consisting of a globin domain linked by a central domain to an output domain, are often found with diguanylate cyclase output domains that synthesize c-di-GMP, a major regulator of biofilm formation. Characterization of diguanylate cyclase-containing GCS proteins from Bordetella pertussis and Pectobacterium carotovorum demonstrated that cyclase activity is controlled by ligand binding to the heme within the globin domain. Both O2 binding to the heme within the globin domain and c-di-GMP binding to a product-binding inhibitory site (I-site) within the cyclase domain control oligomerization states of the enzymes. Changes in oligomerization state caused by c-di-GMP binding to the I-site also affect O2 kinetics within the globin domain, suggesting that shifting the oligomer equilibrium leads to broad rearrangements throughout the protein. In addition, mutations within the I-site that eliminate product inhibition result in changes to the accessible oligomerization states and decreased catalytic activity. These studies provide insight into the mechanism by which ligand binding to the heme and I-site controls activity of GCS proteins and suggests a role for oligomerization-dependent activity in vivo.

  16. Functional analysis of the two interacting cyclase domains in ent-kaurene synthase from the fungus Phaeosphaeria sp. L487 and a comparison with cyclases from higher plants.

    PubMed

    Kawaide, H; Sassa, T; Kamiya, Y

    2000-01-28

    We report here kinetic analysis and identification of the two cyclase domains in a bifunctional diterpene cyclase, Phaeosphaeria ent-kaurene synthase (FCPS/KS). Kinetics of a recombinant FCPS/KS protein indicated that the affinity for copalyl diphosphate is higher than that for geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGDP). ent-Kaurene production from GGDP by FCPS/KS was enhanced by the addition of a plant ent-kaurene synthase (KS) but not by plant CDP synthase (CPS), suggesting that the rate of ent-kaurene production of FCPS/KS may be limited by the KS activity. Site-directed mutagenesis of aspartate-rich motifs in FCPS/KS indicated that the (318)DVDD motif near the N terminus and the (656)DEFFE motif near the C terminus may be part of the active site for the CPS and KS reactions, respectively. The other aspartate-rich (132)DDVLD motif near the N terminus is thought to be involved in both reactions. Functional analysis of the N- and C-terminal truncated mutants revealed that a N-terminal 59-kDa polypeptide catalyzed the CPS reaction and a C-terminal 66-kDa polypeptide showed KS activity. A 101-kDa polypeptide lacking the first 43 amino acids of the N terminus reduced KS activity severely without CPS activity. These results indicate that there are two separate interacting domains in the 106-kDa polypeptide of FCPS/KS.

  17. Role of glutaminyl cyclases in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kehlen, Astrid; Haegele, Monique; Menge, Katja; Gans, Kathrin; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    CCL2 is a chemokine known to recruit monocytes/macrophages to sites of inflammation. CCL2 is also associated with tumor progression in several cancer types. Recently, we showed that the N-terminus of CCL2 is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE)-residue by both glutaminyl cyclases (QC (QPCT)) and its isoenzyme (isoQC (QPCTL)). The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases. Here, we report an upregulation of QPCT expression in tissues of patients with thyroid carcinomas compared with goiter tissues, whereas QPCTL was not regulated. In thyroid carcinoma cell lines, QPCT gene expression correlates with the mRNA levels of its substrate CCL2. Both QPCT and CCL2 are regulated in a NF-κB-dependent pathway shown by stimulation with TNFa and IL1b as well as by inhibition with the IKK2 inhibitor and RNAi of p50. In the culture supernatant of thyroid carcinoma cells, equal amounts of pECCL2 and total CCL2 were detected by two ELISAs discriminating between total CCL2 and pECCL2, concluding that all CCL2 is secreted as pECCL2. Activation of the CCL2/CCR2 pathway by recombinant CCL2 increased tumor cell migration of FTC238 cells in scratch assays as well as thyroid carcinoma cell-derived CCL2-induced migration of monocytic THP1 cells. Suppression of CCL2 signaling by CCR2 antagonist, IKK2 inhibitor, and QPCT RNAi reduced FTC238 cell growth measured by WST8 proliferation assays. Our results reveal new evidence for a novel role of QC in thyroid carcinomas and provide an intriguing rationale for the use of QC inhibitors as a means of blocking pECCL2 formation and preventing thyroid cancer metastasis.

  18. Investigation of the G protein subunit Gαolf gene (GNAL) in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Laurin, Nancy; Ickowicz, Abel; Pathare, Tejaswee; Malone, Molly; Tannock, Rosemary; Schachar, Russell; Kennedy, James L.; Barr, Cathy L.

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine system plays an important role in the regulation of attention and motor behavior, subsequently, several dopamine-related genes have been associated with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Among them are the dopamine receptors D1 and D5 that mediate adenylyl cyclase activation through coupling with Gs-like proteins. We thus hypothesized that the Gs-like subunit Gαolf, expressed in D1-rich areas of the brain, contributes to the genetic susceptibility of ADHD. To evaluate the involvement of the Gαolf gene, GNAL, in ADHD, we examined the inheritance pattern of 12 GNAL polymorphisms in 258 nuclear families ascertained through a proband with ADHD (311 affected children) using the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT). Categorical analysis of individual marker alleles demonstrated biased transmission of one polymorphism in GNAL intron 3 (rs2161961; P = 0.011). We also observed significant relationships between rs2161961 and dimensional symptoms of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity (P = 0.003 and P = 0.008). In addition, because of recent evidence of imprinting at the GNAL locus, secondary analyses were split into maternal and paternal transmissions to assess a contribution of parental effects. We found evidence of strong maternal effect, with preferential transmission of maternal alleles for rs2161961A (P = 0.005) and rs8098539A (P = 0.035). These preliminary findings suggest a possible contribution of GNAL in the susceptibility to ADHD, with possible involvement of parent-of-origin effects. PMID:17166517

  19. Arthropod D2 receptors positively couple with cAMP through the Gi/o protein family.

    PubMed

    Clark, Merry C; Baro, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    The pyloric network is an important model system for understanding neuromodulation of rhythmic motor behaviors like breathing or walking. Dopamine (DA) differentially modulates neurons within the pyloric network. However, while the electrophysiological actions of DA have been well characterized, nothing is known about the signaling events that mediate its effects. We have begun a molecular characterization of DA receptors (DARs) in this invertebrate system. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of the lobster D(2) receptor, D(2 alpha Pan). We found that when expressed in HEK cells, the D(2 alpha Pan) receptor is activated by DA, but not other monoamines endogenous to the lobster nervous system. This receptor positively couples with cAMP through multiple Gi/o proteins via two discrete pathways: 1) a G alpha mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC), leading to a decrease in cAMP and 2) a G beta gamma-mediated activation of phospholipase C beta (PLC beta), leading to an increase in cAMP. Alternate splicing alters the potency and efficacy of the receptor, but does not affect monoamine specificity. Finally, we show that arthropod D(2) receptor coupling with cAMP varies with the cellular milieu.

  20. The alpha(2D/A)-adrenergic receptor-linked membrane guanylate cyclase: a new signal transduction system in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, V; Duda, T; Sharma, R K

    1998-05-01

    In the pineal gland, the membrane guanylate cyclase activity was specifically stimulated by alpha(2D/A)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(2D/A)-AR) agonists. The agonists, however, did not stimulate the cyclase activity in the cell-free membranes. It was possible to stimulate the cyclase in cell-free membranes by the addition of the pineal soluble fraction, but this stimulation was Ca2+-dependent and alpha(2D/A)-agonist-independent. It was also possible to achieve Ca2+-dependent stimulation of the cyclase by the direct addition of CD-GCAP to the isolated pineal membranes. CD-GCAP is a Ca2+-binding protein and is a specific activator of one of the two members of the ROS-GC subfamily of membrane guanylate cyclases, ROS-GC1. The soluble fraction of the pineal gland stimulated recombinant ROS-GC1 in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. The direct presence of both ROS-GC1 and CD-GCAP in the pineal was established by molecular cloning/PCR studies. The findings demonstrate the existence of a novel signal transduction mechanism--the linkage of the alpha(2D/A)-AR signaling system with ROS-GC1 transduction system, occurring through intracellular Ca2+ via CD-GCAP.

  1. Newly synthesized cAMP is integrated at a membrane protein complex signalosome to ensure receptor response specificity.

    PubMed

    Guinzberg, Raquel; Díaz-Cruz, Antonio; Acosta-Trujillo, Carlos; Vilchis-Landeros, María Magdalena; Vázquez-Meza, Héctor; Lozano-Flores, Carlos; Chiquete-Felix, Natalia; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Piña, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP within the cell is required to achieve receptor-specific responses. The mechanism through which the cell selects a specific response to newly synthesized cAMP is not fully understood. In hepatocyte plasma membranes, we identified two functional and independent cAMP-responsive signaling protein macrocomplexes that produce, use, degrade, and regulate their own nondiffusible (sequestered) cAMP pool to achieve their specific responses. Each complex responds to the stimulation of an adenosine G protein-coupled receptor (Ado-GPCR), bound to either A2A or A2B , but not simultaneously to both. Each isoprotein involved in each signaling cascade was identified by measuring changes in cAMP levels after receptor activation, and its participation was confirmed by antibody-mediated inactivation. A2A -Ado-GPCR selective stimulation activates adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), which is bound to AKAP79/150, to synthesize cAMP which is used by two other AKAP79/150-tethered proteins: protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphodiesterase 3A (PDE3A). In contrast, A2B -Ado-GPCR stimulation activates D-AKAP2-attached AC5 to generate cAMP, which is channeled to two other D-AKAP2-tethered proteins: guanine-nucleotide exchange factor 2 (Epac2) and PDE3B. In both cases, prior activation of PKA or Epac2 with selective cAMP analogs prevents de novo cAMP synthesis. In addition, we show that cAMP does not diffuse between these protein macrocomplexes or 'signalosomes'. Evidence of coimmunoprecipitation and colocalization of some proteins belonging to each signalosome is presented. Each signalosome constitutes a minimal functional signaling unit with its own machinery to synthesize and regulate a sequestered cAMP pool. Thus, each signalosome is devoted to ensure the transmission of a unique and unequivocal message through the cell.

  2. Mu and Delta opioid receptors activate the same G proteins in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells

    PubMed Central

    Alt, A; Clark, M J; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2002-01-01

    There is evidence for interactions between mu and delta opioid systems both in vitro and in vivo. This work examines the hypothesis that interaction between these two receptors can occur intracellularly at the level of G protein in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.The [35S]GTPγS binding assay was used to measure G protein activation following agonist occupation of opioid receptors. The agonists DAMGO (EC50, 45 nM) and SNC80 (EC50, 32 nM) were found to be completely selective for stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding through mu and delta opioid receptors respectively. Maximal stimulation of [35S]-GTPγS binding produced by SNC80 was 57% of that seen with DAMGO. When combined with a maximally effective concentration of DAMGO, SNC80 caused no additional [35S]-GTPγS binding. This effect was also seen when measured at the level of adenylyl cyclase.Receptor activation increased the dissociation of pre-bound [35S]-GTPγS. In addition, the delta agonist SNC80 promoted the dissociation of [35S]-GTPγS from G proteins initially labelled using the mu agonist DAMGO. Conversely, DAMGO promoted the dissociation of [35S]-GTPγS from G proteins initially labelled using SNC80.Tolerance to DAMGO and SNC80 in membranes from cells exposed to agonist for 18 h was homologous and there was no evidence for alteration in G protein activity.The findings support the hypothesis that mu- and delta-opioid receptors share a common G protein pool, possibly through a close organization of the two receptors and G protein at the plasma membrane. PMID:11786497

  3. Molecular dissection of G protein preference using Gsalpha chimeras reveals novel ligand signaling of GPCRs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Han; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2007-10-01

    Although only 16 genes have been identified in mammals, several Galpha subunits can be simultaneously activated by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to modulate their complicated functions. Current GPCR assays are limited in the evaluation of selective Galpha activation, thus not allowing a comprehensive pathway screening. Because adenylyl cyclases are directly activated by G(s)alpha and the carboxyl termini of the various Galpha proteins determine their receptor coupling specificity, we proposed a set of chimeric G(s)alpha where the COOH-terminal five amino acids are replaced by those of other Galpha proteins and used these to dissect the potential Galpha linked to a given GPCR. Unlike G(q)alpha, G(12)alpha, and G(i)alpha outputs, compounding the signals from several Galpha members, the chimeric G(s)alpha proteins provide a superior molecular approach that reflects the previously uncharacterized pathways of GPCRs under the same cAMP platform. This is, to our knowledge, the first time allowing verification of the whole spectrum of Galpha coupling preference of adenosine A1 receptor, reported to couple to multiple G proteins and modulate many physiological processes. Furthermore, we were able to distinguish the uncharacterized pathways between the two neuromedin U receptors (NMURs), which distribute differently but are stimulated by a common agonist. In contrast to the G(q) signals mainly conducted by NMUR1, NMUR2 routed preferentially to the G(i) pathways. Dissecting the potential Galpha coupling to these GPCRs will promote an understanding of their physiological roles and benefit the pharmaceutical development of agonists/antagonists by exploiting the selective affinity toward a certain Galpha subclass.

  4. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  5. GSK3β Mediates Renal Response to Vasopressin by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satish; Hao, ChuanMing; Woodgett, James; Harris, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a key target of drug discovery in several diseases, including diabetes and Alzheimer disease. Because lithium, a potent inhibitor of GSK3β, causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, GSK3β may play a crucial role in regulating water homeostasis. We developed renal collecting duct-specific GSK3β knockout mice to determine whether deletion of GSK3β affects arginine vasopressin-dependent renal water reabsorption. Although only mildly polyuric under normal conditions, knockout mice exhibited an impaired urinary concentrating ability in response to water deprivation or treatment with a vasopressin analogue. The knockout mice had reduced levels of mRNA, protein, and membrane localization of the vasopressin-responsive water channel aquaporin 2 compared with wild-type mice. The knockout mice also expressed lower levels of pS256-AQP2, a phosphorylated form crucial for membrane trafficking. Levels of cAMP, a major regulator of aquaporin 2 expression and trafficking, were also lower in the knockout mice. Both GSK3β gene deletion and pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3β reduced adenylate cyclase activity. In summary, GSK3β inactivation or deletion reduces aquaporin 2 expression by modulating adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP generation, thereby impairing responses to vasopressin in the renal collecting duct. PMID:20056751

  6. Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: characterization and differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Donato, Gina M; Hsia, Hung-Lun J; Green, Candace S; Hewlett, Erik L

    2005-11-01

    Bordetella hinzii is a commensal respiratory microorganism in poultry but is increasingly being recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. Although associated with a variety of disease states, practically nothing is known about the mechanisms employed by this bacterium. In this study, we show by DNA sequencing and reverse transcription-PCR that both commensal and clinical strains of B. hinzii possess and transcriptionally express cyaA, the gene encoding adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) in other pathogenic Bordetella species. By Western blotting, we also found that B. hinzii produces full-length ACT protein in quantities that are comparable to those made by B. pertussis. In contrast to B. pertussis ACT, however, ACT from B. hinzii is less extractable from whole bacteria, nonhemolytic, has a 50-fold reduction in adenylate cyclase activity, and is unable to elevate cyclic AMP levels in host macrophages (nontoxic). The decrease in enzymatic activity is attributable, at least in part, to a decreased binding affinity of B. hinzii ACT for calmodulin, the eukaryotic activator of B. pertussis ACT. In addition, we demonstrate that the lack of intoxication by B. hinzii ACT may be due to the absence of expression of cyaC, the gene encoding the accessory protein required for the acylation of B. pertussis ACT. These results demonstrate the expression of ACT by B. hinzii and represent the first characterization of a potential virulence factor of this organism.

  7. E. coli heat-stable enterotoxin and guanylyl cyclase C: new functions and unsuspected actions.

    PubMed Central

    Giannella, Ralph A.; Mann, Elizabeth A.

    2003-01-01

    Some E. coli cause diarrhea by elaborating heat-labile and heat-stable (ST) enterotoxins which stimulate intestinal secretion. E. coli ST's are small peptides which bind to intestinal luminal epithelial cell receptors. The ST receptor, one of a family of receptor-cyclases called guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C), is a membrane spanning protein containing an extracellular binding domain and intracellular protein kinase and catalytic domains. The intestine synthesizes and secretes homologous peptides, guanylin and uroguanylin. The kidney also synthesizes uroguanylin. ST, guanylin or uroguanylin binding to GC-C results in increased cGMP, phosphorylation of the CFTR Cl- channel and secretion. Proguanylin and prouroguanylin circulate in blood and bind to receptors in intestine, kidney, liver, brain etc. In the kidney, they stimulate the excretion of Na+ and K+. Study of GC-C "knock-out" mice reveal that GC-C is important to intestinal salt and water secretion, duodenal bicarbonate secretion, recovery from CCl4-induced liver injury, and to intestinal polyp formation in Min mice lacking GC-C. PMID:12813912

  8. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the “Beta type” promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  9. Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyl Transferase 2: A Promising Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chunhui; Qi, Jia; Deng, Quanwen; Chen, Rihong; Zhai, Duanyang; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers all over the world. It is essential to search for more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods for CRC. Abnormal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has been considered as a characteristic of cancer cells. In this study, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) as well as p53-mediated cancer signaling pathways were investigated in patients with colorectal cancer. The CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from 95 untreated colorectal cancer patients and were stained for expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2) and p53. The survival rate was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted as well. Our data demonstrated that expression of NMNAT2 and p53 was significantly higher in CRC tissues, while NMNAT2 expression is in correlation with the invasive depth of tumors and TNM stage. Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of NMNAT2 and the expression of p53. However, NMNAT2 expression was not a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, our results indicated that NMNAT2 might participate in tumorigenesis of CRC in a p53-dependent manner and NMNAT2 expression might be a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27218101

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  11. Regulation and therapeutic targeting of peptide-activated receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-04-01

    Cyclic GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates a wide array of physiologic processes such as blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, phototransduction and lipolysis. Soluble and single-membrane-spanning enzymes called guanylyl cyclases (GC) synthesize cGMP. In humans, the latter group consists of GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-E and GC-F, which are also known as NPR-A, NPR-B, StaR, Ret1-GC and Ret2-GC, respectively. Membrane GCs are activated by peptide ligands such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), guanylin, uroguanylin, heat stable enterotoxin and GC-activating proteins. Nesiritide and carperitide are clinically approved peptide-based drugs that activate GC-A. CD-NP is an experimental heart failure drug that primarily activates GC-B but also activates GC-A at high concentrations and is resistant to degradation. Inactivating mutations in GC-B cause acromesomelic dysplasia type Maroteaux dwarfism and chromosomal mutations that increase CNP concentrations are associated with Marfanoid-like skeletal overgrowth. Pump-based CNP infusions increase skeletal growth in a mouse model of the most common type of human dwarfism, which supports CNP/GC-B-based therapies for short stature diseases. Linaclotide is a peptide activator of GC-C that stimulates intestinal motility and is in late-stage clinical trials for the treatment of chronic constipation. This review discusses the discovery of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, the general characteristics and therapeutic applications of GC-A, GC-B and GC-C, and emphasizes the regulation of transmembrane guanylyl cyclases by phosphorylation and ATP.

  12. Hypertonicity-induced transmitter release at Drosophila neuromuscular junctions is partly mediated by integrins and cAMP/protein kinase A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Grinnell, Alan D.; Kidokoro, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of quantal transmitter release increases upon application of hypertonic solutions. This effect bypasses the Ca(2+) triggering step, but requires the presence of key molecules involved in vesicle fusion, and hence could be a useful tool for dissecting the molecular process of vesicle fusion. We have examined the hypertonicity response at neuromuscular junctions of Drosophila embryos in Ca(2+)-free saline. Relative to wild-type, the response induced by puff application of hypertonic solution was enhanced in a mutant, dunce, in which the cAMP level is elevated, or in wild-type embryos treated with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, while protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors decreased it. The response was also smaller in a mutant, DC0, which lacks the major subunit of PKA. Thus the cAMP/PKA cascade is involved in the hypertonicity response. Peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), which inhibit binding of integrins to natural ligands, reduced the response, whereas a peptide containing the non-binding sequence Arg-Gly-Glu (RGE) did not. A reduced response persisted in a mutant, myospheroid, which expresses no integrins, and the response in DC0 was unaffected by RGD peptides. These data indicate that there are at lease two components in the hypertonicity response: one that is integrin mediated and involves the cAMP/PKA cascade, and another that is not integrin mediated and does not involve the cAMP/PKA cascade.

  13. Mechanism of sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction: role of protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ickowicz, Debby; Finkelstein, Maya; Breitbart, Haim

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian sperm must undergo a series of biochemical and physiological modifications, collectively called capacitation, in the female reproductive tract prior to the acrosome reaction (AR). The mechanisms of these modifications are not well characterized though protein kinases were shown to be involved in the regulation of intracellular Ca2+ during both capacitation and the AR. In the present review, we summarize some of the signaling events that are involved in capacitation. During the capacitation process, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (PI3K) is phosphorylated/activated via a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent cascade, and downregulated by protein kinase C α (PKCα). PKCα is active at the beginning of capacitation, resulting in PI3K inactivation. During capacitation, PKCα as well as PP1γ2 is degraded by a PKA-dependent mechanism, allowing the activation of PI3K. The activation of PKA during capacitation depends mainly on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) produced by the bicarbonate-dependent soluble adenylyl cyclase. This activation of PKA leads to an increase in actin polymerization, an essential process for the development of hyperactivated motility, which is necessary for successful fertilization. Actin polymerization is mediated by PIP2 in two ways: first, PIP2 acts as a cofactor for phospholipase D (PLD) activation, and second, as a molecule that binds and inhibits actin-severing proteins such as gelsolin. Tyrosine phosphorylation of gelsolin during capacitation by Src family kinase (SFK) is also important for its inactivation. Prior to the AR, gelsolin is released from PIP2 and undergoes dephosphorylation/activation, resulting in fast F-actin depolymerization, leading to the AR. PMID:23001443

  14. Synthetic FXR agonist GW4064 is a modulator of multiple G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Yadav, Manisha; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Kumar, Harish; Dwivedi, Shailendra Kumar Dhar; Mishra, Jay Sharan; Gurjar, Anagha; Manhas, Amit; Chandra, Sharat; Yadav, Prem Narayan; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Trivedi, Arun Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Sanyal, Sabyasachi

    2014-05-01

    The synthetic nuclear bile acid receptor (farnesoid X receptor [FXR]) agonist GW4064 is extensively used as a specific pharmacological tool to illustrate FXR functions. We noticed that GW4064 activated empty luciferase reporters in FXR-deficient HEK-293T cells. We postulated that this activity of GW4064 might be routed through as yet unknown cellular targets and undertook an unbiased exploratory approach to identify these targets. Investigations revealed that GW4064 activated cAMP and nuclear factor for activated T-cell response elements (CRE and NFAT-RE, respectively) present on these empty reporters. Whereas GW4064-induced NFAT-RE activation involved rapid intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and NFAT nuclear translocation, CRE activation involved soluble adenylyl cyclase-dependent cAMP accumulation and Ca(2+)-calcineurin-dependent nuclear translocation of transducers of regulated CRE-binding protein 2. Use of dominant negative heterotrimeric G-protein minigenes revealed that GW4064 caused activation of Gαi/o and Gq/11 G proteins. Sequential pharmacological inhibitor-based screening and radioligand-binding studies revealed that GW4064 interacted with multiple G protein-coupled receptors. Functional studies demonstrated that GW4064 robustly activated H1 and H4 and inhibited H2 histamine receptor signaling events. We also found that MCF-7 breast cancer cells, reported to undergo GW4064-induced apoptosis in an FXR-dependent manner, did not express FXR, and the GW4064-mediated apoptosis, also apparent in HEK-293T cells, could be blocked by selective histamine receptor regulators. Taken together, our results demonstrate identification of histamine receptors as alternate targets for GW4064, which not only necessitates cautious interpretation of the biological functions attributed to FXR using GW4064 as a pharmacological tool but also provides a basis for the rational designing of new pharmacophores for histamine receptor modulation.

  15. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  16. Regulation of cGMP levels by guanylate cyclase in truncated frog rod outer segments

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Cyclic GMP is the second messenger in phototransduction and regulates the photoreceptor current. In the present work, we tried to understand the regulation mechanism of cytoplasmic cGMP levels in frog photoreceptors by measuring the photoreceptor current using a truncated rod outer segment (tROS) preparation. Since exogenously applied substance diffuses into tROS from the truncated end, we could examine the biochemical reactions relating to the cGMP metabolism by manipulating the cytoplasmic chemical condition. In tROS, exogenously applied GTP produced a dark current whose amplitude was half-maximal at approximately 0.4 mM GTP. The conductance for this current was suppressed by light in a fashion similar to when it is activated by cGMP. In addition, no current was produced in the absence of Mg2+, which is known to be necessary for the guanylate cyclase activity. These results indicate that guanylate cyclase was present in tROS and synthesized cGMP from exogenously applied GTP. The enzyme activity was distributed throughout the rod outer segment. The amount of synthesized cGMP increased as the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of tROS decreased, which indicated the activation of guanylate cyclase at low Ca2+ concentrations. Half-maximal effect of Ca2+ was observed at approximately 100 nM. tROS contained the proteins involved in the phototransduction mechanism and therefore, we could examine the regulation of the light response waveform by Ca2+. At low Ca2+ concentrations, the time course of the light response was speeded up probably because cGMP recovery was facilitated by activation of the cyclase. Then, if the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of a photoreceptor decreases during light stimulation, the Ca2+ decrease may explain the acceleration of the light response during light adaptation. In tROS, however, we did observe an acceleration during repetitive light flashes when the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration increased during the stimulation. This result suggests the

  17. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  18. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Susick, Laura L.; Lowing, Jennifer L.; Bosse, Kelly E.; Hildebrandt, Clara C.; Chrumka, Alexandria C.; Conti, Alana C.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  19. The tcmVI region of the tetracenomycin C biosynthetic gene cluster of Streptomyces glaucescens encodes the tetracenomycin F1 monooxygenase, tetracenomycin F2 cyclase, and, most likely, a second cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Summers, R G; Wendt-Pienkowski, E; Motamedi, H; Hutchinson, C R

    1993-01-01

    Certain mutations in the tcmVI region of the Streptomyces glaucescens chromosome affect formation of the D ring of the polyketide antibiotic tetracenomycin C (TCM C). This region lies immediately upstream from the TCM C polyketide synthase genes (tcmKLM), and the nucleotide sequence reveals the presence of three small genes, tcmH, tcmI, and tcmJ. On the basis of the phenotypes of mutants and the effects of these genes, when coupled on a plasmid with the tcmKLMN177 genes (tcmN177 is a 3'-truncated version of tcmN), on the production of TCM intermediates in a TCM- mutant, the tcmH gene encodes the C-5 monooxygenase that converts TCM F1 to TCM D3, the tcmI gene encodes the D-ring cyclase that converts TCM F2 to TCM F1 (mutations in this gene are responsible for the type VI phenotype), and the tcmJ gene most likely encodes the B-ring cyclase that acts in the biosynthesis of TCM F2. Furthermore, it appears that the N-terminal domain of the tcmN gene product (encoded by the tcmN177 gene) acts later in the biosynthesis of TCM F2 than the product of tcmJ, suggesting that the N-terminal domain of the TcmN protein is the C-ring cyclase. Images PMID:8244926

  20. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - past and present.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Chris

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins.

  1. Increase in the amount of adenylate cyclase in rat gastrocnemius muscle after denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchida, S.; Yoshida, H.

    1989-01-01

    After section of the sciatic nerve, the basal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in rat gastrocnemius muscle increased 6-7 times per membrane protein and about 2 times per whole muscle in the following 30 or 40 days. The AC activity in the muscle 30 days after denervation was increased about 4 times by folskolin. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) also increased the adenylate cyclase activity in the denervated muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin to cells isolated from gastrocnemius muscle was examined to determine the amount of AC molecules. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding by increasing amounts of unlabeled forskolin gave a sigmoid curve with a IC/sub 50/ value of 3/times/10/sup /minus/7/M. Results showed that the number of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites per cell was higher on the denervated side than on the control side, like the basal AC activity. The IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition by unlabeled forskolin of binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin were similar to muscles on the control and denervated sides. These results suggest that an increase in the AC activity induced by denervation was due to an increase in the numbers of AC molecules in the muscle.

  2. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of photo-activated adenylate cyclase nano-clusters from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.; Kateriya, S.

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopic characteristics of BLUF (BLUF = sensor of blue light using flavin) domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC = Naegleria photo-activated cyclase) samples from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain is studied at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic development in the dark was investigated over two weeks. Attenuation coefficient spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence excitation distributions were measured. Thawing of frozen nPAC samples gave solutions with varying protein nano-cluster size and varying flavin, tyrosine, tryptophan, and protein color-center emission. Protein color-center emission was observed in the wavelength range of 360-900 nm with narrow emission bands of small Stokes shift and broad emission bands of large Stokes shift. The emission spectra evolved in time with protein nano-cluster aging.

  3. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims: specific decrease in the prefrontal cortex but not the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Conley, Robert R

    2007-10-01

    Abnormalities in both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphoinositide (PI) signalling systems have been observed in the post-mortem brain of suicide victims. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor that is activated by phosphorylating enzymes such as protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), which suggests that both AC and PI signalling systems converge at the level of CREB. CREB is involved in the transcription of many neuronally expressed genes that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. Since we observed abnormalities of both PKA and PKC in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims, we examined if these abnormalities are also associated with abnormalities of CREB, which is activated by these phosphorylating enzymes. We determined CRE-DNA binding using the gel shift assay, as well as protein expression of CREB using the Western blot technique, and the mRNA expression of CREB using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus obtained from 17 teenage suicide victims and 17 matched normal control subjects. We observed that the CRE-DNA binding and the protein expression of CREB were significantly decreased in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with controls. There was also a significant decrease in mRNA expression of CREB in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with control subjects. However, there were no significant differences in CRE-DNA binding or the protein and mRNA expression of CREB in the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared with control subjects. These results suggest that the abnormalities of PKA, and of PKC, observed in teenage suicide victims are also associated with abnormalities of the transcription factor CREB, and that this may also cause alterations of important neuronally expressed genes, and provide further support of the signal transduction of abnormalities

  4. Development of a novel photoreactive calmodulin derivative: Cross-linking of purified adenylate cyclase from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Lawton, R.G.; Gnegy, M.E. )

    1989-07-11

    A novel photoreactive calmodulin (CaM) derivative was developed and used to label the purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex. {sup 125}I-CaM was conjugated with the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent p-nitrophenyl 3-diazopyruvate (DAPpNP). Spectral data indicated that diazopyruvoyl (DAP) groups were incorporated into the CaM molecule. Iodo-CaM-DAPs behaved like native CaM with respect to (1) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (2) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP photochemically cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a manner that was both Ca{sup 2+} dependent and CaM specific. Photolysis of forskolin-agarose-purified adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex with {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP produced a single cross-linked product which migrates on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000.

  5. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  6. Adenylate cyclase A acting on PKA mediates induction of stalk formation by cyclic diguanylate at the Dictyostelium organizer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Singh, Reema; Cole, Christian; Lawal, Hajara Mohammed; Schilde, Christina; Febrer, Melanie; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Schaap, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Coordination of cell movement with cell differentiation is a major feat of embryonic development. The Dictyostelium stalk always forms at the organizing tip, by a mechanism that is not understood. We previously reported that cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), synthesized by diguanylate cyclase A (DgcA), induces stalk formation. Here we used transcriptional profiling of dgca− structures to identify target genes for c-di-GMP, and used these genes to investigate the c-di-GMP signal transduction pathway. We found that knockdown of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in prestalk cells reduced stalk gene induction by c-di-GMP, whereas PKA activation bypassed the c-di-GMP requirement for stalk gene expression. c-di-GMP caused a persistent increase in cAMP, which still occurred in mutants lacking the adenylate cyclases ACG or ACR, or the cAMP phosphodiesterase RegA. However, both inhibition of adenylate cyclase A (ACA) with SQ22536 and incubation of a temperature-sensitive ACA mutant at the restrictive temperature prevented c-di-GMP–induced cAMP synthesis as well as c-di-GMP–induced stalk gene transcription. ACA produces the cAMP pulses that coordinate Dictyostelium morphogenetic cell movement and is highly expressed at the organizing tip. The stalk-less dgca− mutant regained its stalk by expression of a light-activated adenylate cyclase from the ACA promoter and exposure to light, indicating that cAMP is also the intermediate for c-di-GMP in vivo. Our data show that the more widely expressed DgcA activates tip-expressed ACA, which then acts on PKA to induce stalk genes. These results explain why stalk formation in Dictyostelia always initiates at the site of the morphogenetic organizer. PMID:28057864

  7. cap alpha. /sub i/-3 cDNA encodes the. cap alpha. subunit of G/sub k/, the stimulatory G protein of receptor-regulated K/sup +/ channels

    SciTech Connect

    Codina, J.; Olate, J.; Abramowitz, J.; Mattera, R.; Cook, R.G.; Birnbaumer, L.

    1988-05-15

    cDNA cloning has identified the presence in the human genome of three genes encoding ..cap alpha.. subunits of pertussis toxin substrates, generically called G/sub i/. They are named ..cap alpha../sub i/-1, ..cap alpha../sub i/-2 and ..cap alpha../sub i/-3. However, none of these genes has been functionally identified with any of the ..cap alpha.. subunits of several possible G proteins, including pertussis toxin-sensitive G/sub p/'s, stimulatory to phospholipase C or A/sub 2/, G/sub i/, inhibitory to adenylyl cyclase, or G/sub k/, stimulatory to a type of K/sup +/ channels. The authors now report the nucleotide sequence and the complete predicted amino acid sequence of human liver ..cap alpha../sub i/-3 and the partial amino acid sequence of proteolytic fragments of the ..cap alpha.. subunit of human erythrocyte G/sub k/. The amino acid sequence of the proteolytic fragment is uniquely encoded by the cDNA of ..cap alpha../sub i/-3, thus identifying it as ..cap alpha../sub k/. The probable identity of ..cap alpha../sub i/-1 with ..cap alpha../sub p/ and possible roles for ..cap alpha../sub i/-2, as well as additional roles for ..cap alpha../sub i/-1 and ..cap alpha../sub i/-3 (..cap alpha../sub k/) are discussed.

  8. Potent Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activities of Oxidosqualene Cyclase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Griffin, John H.; Wilson, Aaron J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2001-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan agent that causes Chagas' disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Better drugs are needed to treat infected individuals. The sterol biosynthesis pathway is a potentially excellent target for drug therapy against T. cruzi. In this study, we investigated the antitrypanosomal activities of a series of compounds designed to inhibit a key enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, oxidosqualene cyclase. This enzyme converts 2,3-oxidosqualene to the tetracyclic product, lanosterol. The lead compound, N-(4E,8E)-5,9, 13-trimethyl-4,8, 12-tetradecatrien-1-ylpyridinium, is an electron-poor aromatic mimic of a monocyclized transition state or high-energy intermediate formed from oxidosqualene. This compound and 27 related compounds were tested against mammalian-stage T. cruzi, and 12 inhibited growth by 50% at concentrations below 25 nM. The lead compound was shown to cause an accumulation of oxidosqualene and decreased production of lanosterol and ergosterol, consistent with specific inhibition of the oxidosqualene cyclase. The data demonstrate potent anti-T. cruzi activity associated with inhibition of oxidosqualene cyclase. PMID:11257036

  9. Porcine CD38 exhibits prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Ting, Kai Yiu; Leung, Christina F P; Graeff, Richard M; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan; Kotaka, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates Ca(2+) influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. It is one of the products produced from the catalysis of NAD(+) by the multifunctional CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase superfamily. After elimination of the nicotinamide ring by the enzyme, the reaction intermediate of NAD(+) can either be hydrolyzed to form linear ADPR or cyclized to form cADPR. We have previously shown that human CD38 exhibits a higher preference towards the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to form linear ADPR while Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase prefers cyclizing NAD(+) to form cADPR. In this study, we characterized the enzymatic properties of porcine CD38 and revealed that it has a prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity producing cADPR. We also determined the X-ray crystallographic structures of porcine CD38 and were able to observe conformational flexibility at the base of the active site of the enzyme which allow the NAD(+) reaction intermediate to adopt conformations resulting in both hydrolysis and cyclization forming linear ADPR and cADPR respectively.

  10. Protein Crystal Engineering of YpAC-IV Using a Strategy of Excess Charge Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.; Smith, N; Kim, S; Robinson, H; Reddy, P

    2009-01-01

    The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis has been engineered by site-specific mutagenesis to facilitate crystallization at neutral pH. The wild-type enzyme crystallized only below pH 5, consistent with the observation of a carboxyl-carboxylate H bond in a crystal contact in the refined structure 2FJT. On the basis of that unliganded structure at 1.9 A resolution, two different approaches were tested with the goal of producing a higher-pH crystal needed for inhibitor complexation and mechanistic studies. In one approach, Asp 19, which forms the growth-limiting dicarboxyl contact in wild-type triclinic crystals, was modified to Ala and Asn in hopes of relieving the acid-dependence of that crystal form. In the other approach, wild-type residues Met 18, Glu 25, and Asp 55 were (individually) changed to lysine to reduce the protein's excess negative charge in hopes of enabling growth of new, higher-pH forms. These three sites were selected based on their high solvent exposure and lack of intraprotein interactions. The D19A and D19N mutants had reduced solubility and did not crystallize. The other three mutants all crystallized, producing several new forms at neutral pH. One of these forms, with the D55K mutant, enabled a product complex at 0.16 nm resolution, structure 3GHX. This structure shows why the new crystal form required the mutation in order to grow at neutral pH. This approach could be useful in other cases where excess negative charge inhibits the crystallization of low-pI proteins.

  11. Effects of protein kinase inhibitors on canine Purkinje fibre pacemaker depolarization and the pacemaker current i(f).

    PubMed

    Chang, F; Cohen, I S; DiFrancesco, D; Rosen, M R; Tromba, C

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of the protein kinase inhibitors H-7 and H-8 were investigated on diastolic depolarization of the action potential with microelectrodes and on the pacemaker current if with the two-microelectrode voltage clamp in canine cardiac Purkinje fibres. 2. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect on the slope of diastolic depolarization but eliminated the actions of isoprenaline (1 microM). 3. We examined the actions of H-7 and H-8 on if in the presence and absence of isoprenaline. H-7 (200 microM) shifted the pacemaker current if in the negative direction on the voltage axis, whereas 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect by itself. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 can reverse or prevent the actions of isoprenaline (1-5 microM) on if. 4. We applied activators of the cyclic AMP cascade down-stream to the beta-receptor, to further evaluate where H-7 and H-8 might be exerting their effects. When exposing Purkinje fibres to an adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin, 10-50 microM), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX, 100 microM) and a permeable cyclic AMP analogue (8-chlorophenylthio-cyclic AMP, 200 microM-1 mM), the amplitude of if was increased. H-7 and H-8 at 100-200 microM eliminated each of these actions. 5. These results suggest that a phosphorylation process is involved in the modulation of the pacemaker current, if, in Purkinje fibres. The different actions of H-7 and H-8 on basal if suggest the hypothesis that other protein kinases, possibly protein kinase C, might also be involved in regulating basal phosphorylation of if in Purkinje fibres.

  12. Effects of protein kinase inhibitors on canine Purkinje fibre pacemaker depolarization and the pacemaker current i(f).

    PubMed Central

    Chang, F; Cohen, I S; DiFrancesco, D; Rosen, M R; Tromba, C

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of the protein kinase inhibitors H-7 and H-8 were investigated on diastolic depolarization of the action potential with microelectrodes and on the pacemaker current if with the two-microelectrode voltage clamp in canine cardiac Purkinje fibres. 2. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect on the slope of diastolic depolarization but eliminated the actions of isoprenaline (1 microM). 3. We examined the actions of H-7 and H-8 on if in the presence and absence of isoprenaline. H-7 (200 microM) shifted the pacemaker current if in the negative direction on the voltage axis, whereas 100 microM-H-8 had no significant effect by itself. Both 200 microM-H-7 and 100 microM-H-8 can reverse or prevent the actions of isoprenaline (1-5 microM) on if. 4. We applied activators of the cyclic AMP cascade down-stream to the beta-receptor, to further evaluate where H-7 and H-8 might be exerting their effects. When exposing Purkinje fibres to an adenylyl cyclase activator (forskolin, 10-50 microM), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (IBMX, 100 microM) and a permeable cyclic AMP analogue (8-chlorophenylthio-cyclic AMP, 200 microM-1 mM), the amplitude of if was increased. H-7 and H-8 at 100-200 microM eliminated each of these actions. 5. These results suggest that a phosphorylation process is involved in the modulation of the pacemaker current, if, in Purkinje fibres. The different actions of H-7 and H-8 on basal if suggest the hypothesis that other protein kinases, possibly protein kinase C, might also be involved in regulating basal phosphorylation of if in Purkinje fibres. PMID:1804968

  13. Oxygen promotes biofilm formation of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 through a diguanylate cyclase and an adhesin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Hao; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Xuan; Zhao, Li-Ping; Tian, Li-Jiao; Han, Jun-Cheng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Although oxygen has been reported to regulate biofilm formation by several Shewanella species, the exact regulatory mechanism mostly remains unclear. Here, we identify a direct oxygen-sensing diguanylate cyclase (DosD) and reveal its regulatory role in biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 under aerobic conditions. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the activity of DosD culminates to synthesis of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) in the presence of oxygen. DosD regulates the transcription of bpfA operon which encodes seven proteins including a large repetitive adhesin BpfA and its cognate type I secretion system (TISS). Regulation of DosD in aerobic biofilms is heavily dependent on an adhesin BpfA and the TISS. This study offers an insight into the molecular mechanism of oxygen-stimulated biofilm formation by S. putrefaciens CN32. PMID:23736081

  14. Role for the membrane receptor guanylyl cyclase-C in attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior.

    PubMed

    Gong, Rong; Ding, Cheng; Hu, Ji; Lu, Yao; Liu, Fei; Mann, Elizabeth; Xu, Fuqiang; Cohen, Mitchell B; Luo, Minmin

    2011-09-16

    Midbrain dopamine neurons regulate many important behavioral processes, and their dysfunctions are associated with several human neuropsychiatric disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and schizophrenia. Here, we report that these neurons in mice selectively express guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C), a membrane receptor previously thought to be expressed mainly in the intestine. GC-C activation potentiates the excitatory responses mediated by glutamate and acetylcholine receptors via the activity of guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Mice in which GC-C has been knocked out exhibit hyperactivity and attention deficits. Moreover, their behavioral phenotypes are reversed by ADHD therapeutics and a PKG activator. These results indicate important behavioral and physiological functions for the GC-C/PKG signaling pathway within the brain and suggest new therapeutic targets for neuropsychiatric disorders related to the malfunctions of midbrain dopamine neurons.

  15. Reconstitution of a fungal meroterpenoid biosynthesis reveals the involvement of a novel family of terpene cyclases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Takayuki; Tokunaga, Kinya; Matsuda, Yudai; Fujii, Isao; Abe, Ikuro; Ebizuka, Yutaka; Kushiro, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meroterpenoids are hybrid natural products of both terpenoid and polyketide origin. We identified a biosynthetic gene cluster that is responsible for the production of the meroterpenoid pyripyropene in the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus through reconstituted biosynthesis of up to five steps in a heterologous fungal expression system. The cluster revealed a previously unknown terpene cyclase with an unusual sequence and protein primary structure. The wide occurrence of this sequence in other meroterpenoid and indole-diterpene biosynthetic gene clusters indicates the involvement of these enzymes in the biosynthesis of various terpenoid-bearing metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria. In addition, a novel polyketide synthase that incorporated nicotinyl-CoA as the starter unit and a prenyltransferase, similar to that in ubiquinone biosynthesis, was found to be involved in the pyripyropene biosynthesis. The successful production of a pyripyropene analogue illustrates the catalytic versatility of these enzymes for the production of novel analogues with useful biological activities.

  16. Engineering of Bacillus subtilis Strains To Allow Rapid Characterization of Heterologous Diguanylate Cyclases and Phosphodiesterases

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaohui; Dong, Xiao; Subramanian, Sundharraman; Matthews, Paige M.; Cooper, Caleb A.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial processes, including biofilm formation, motility, and virulence, are often regulated by changes in the available concentration of cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Generally, high c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with decreased motility and increased biofilm formation and low c-di-GMP concentrations are correlated with an increase in motility and activation of virulence pathways. The study of c-di-GMP is complicated, however, by the fact that organisms often encode dozens of redundant enzymes that synthesize and hydrolyze c-di-GMP, diguanylate cyclases (DGCs), and c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs); thus, determining the contribution of any one particular enzyme is challenging. In an effort to develop a facile system to study c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes, we have engineered a suite of Bacillus subtilis strains to assess the effect of individual heterologously expressed proteins on c-di-GMP levels. As a proof of principle, we characterized all 37 known genes encoding predicted DGCs and PDEs in Clostridium difficile using parallel readouts of swarming motility and fluorescence from green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed under the control of a c-di-GMP-controlled riboswitch. We found that 27 of the 37 putative C. difficile 630 c-di-GMP metabolic enzymes had either active cyclase or phosphodiesterase activity, with agreement between our motility phenotypes and fluorescence-based c-di-GMP reporter. Finally, we show that there appears to be a threshold level of c-di-GMP needed to inhibit motility in Bacillus subtilis. PMID:25085482

  17. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate