Science.gov

Sample records for adenylyl cyclase signaling

  1. HAMP domain-mediated signal transduction probed with a mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase as a reporter.

    PubMed

    Mondéjar, Laura García; Lupas, Andrei; Schultz, Anita; Schultz, Joachim E

    2012-01-01

    HAMP domains, ∼55 amino acid motifs first identified in histidine kinases, adenylyl cyclases, methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, and phosphatases, operate as signal mediators in two-component signal transduction proteins. A bioinformatics study identified a coevolving signal-accepting network of 10 amino acids in membrane-delimited HAMP proteins. To probe the functionality of this network we used a HAMP containing mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase, Rv3645, as a reporter enzyme in which the membrane anchor was substituted by the Escherichia coli chemotaxis receptor for serine (Tsr receptor) and the HAMP domain alternately with that from the protein Af1503 of the archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus or the Tsr receptor. In a construct with the Tsr-HAMP, cyclase activity was inhibited by serine, whereas in a construct with the HAMP domain from A. fulgidus, enzyme activity was not responsive to serine. Amino acids of the signal-accepting network were mutually swapped between both HAMP domains, and serine signaling was examined. The data biochemically tentatively established the functionality of the signal-accepting network. Based on a two-state gearbox model of rotation in HAMP domain-mediated signal propagation, we characterized the interaction between permanent and transient core residues in a coiled coil HAMP structure. The data are compatible with HAMP rotation in signal propagation but do not exclude alternative models for HAMP signaling. Finally, we present data indicating that the connector, which links the α-helices of HAMP domains, plays an important structural role in HAMP function.

  2. Type 3 adenylyl cyclase: a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Liyan; LeBel, Robert P; Storm, Daniel R; Chen, Xuanmao

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are rigid, centriole-derived, microtubule-based organelles present in a majority of vertebrate cells including neurons. They are considered the cellular “antennae” attuned for detecting a range of extracellular signals including photons, odorants, morphogens, hormones and mechanical forces. The ciliary microenvironment is distinct from most actin-based subcellular structures such as microvilli or synapses. In the nervous system, there is no evidence that neuronal cilia process any synaptic structure. Apparently, the structural features of neuronal cilia do not allow them to harbor any synaptic connections. Nevertheless, a large number of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) including odorant receptors, rhodopsin, Smoothened, and type 6 serotonin receptor are found in cilia, suggesting that these tiny processes largely depend on metabotropic receptors and their tuned signals to impact neuronal functions. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3), widely known as a cilia marker, is highly and predominantly expressed in olfactory sensory cilia and primary cilia throughout the brain. We discovered that ablation of AC3 in mice leads to pleiotropic phenotypes including anosmia, failure to detect mechanical stimulation of airflow, cognitive deficit, obesity, and depression-like behaviors. Multiple lines of human genetic evidence also demonstrate that AC3 is associated with obesity, major depressive disorder (MDD), sarcoidosis, and infertility, underscoring its functional importance. Here we review recent progress on AC3, a key enzyme mediating the cAMP signaling in neuronal cilia. PMID:27785336

  3. Adenylyl cyclases in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Gorelick, Fred; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a group of widely distributed enzymes whose functions are very diverse. There are nine known transmembrane AC isoforms activated by Gαs. Each has its own pattern of expression in the digestive system and differential regulation of function by Ca(2+) and other intracellular signals. In addition to the transmembrane isoforms, one AC is soluble and exhibits distinct regulation. In this review, the basic structure, regulation and physiological roles of ACs in the digestive system are discussed.

  4. The role of adenylyl cyclase isoform 6 in β-adrenoceptor signalling in murine airways

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A; Bonvini, Sara J; Wortley, Michael A; Buckley, James; Yew-Booth, Liang; Maher, Sarah A; Dale, Nicole; Dubuis, Eric D; Belvisi, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a key signalling enzyme for many GPCRs and catalyses the conversion of ATP to cAMP which, in turn, is a crucial determinant of many biological responses. β-Adrenoceptor agonists are prescribed as bronchodilators for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and it is commonly assumed that they elicit their actions via AC-dependent production of cAMP. However, empirical evidence in support of this is lacking and the exact mechanism by which these drugs acts remains elusive. This is partly due to the existence of at least 10 different isoforms of AC and the absence of any truly selective pharmacological inhibitors. Here, we have used genetically modified mice and model systems to establish the role of AC isoforms in the airway responses to β-adrenoceptor agonists. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Receptors mediating responses to β-adrenoceptor agonists in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and sensory nerve were identified in isolated tissue systems. Expression of mRNA for the AC isoforms in ASM and neurones was determined by qPCR. Functional responses were assessed in AC isoform KO mice and wild-type controls. KEY RESULTS Airway and vagal tissue expressed mRNA for various isoforms of AC. AC6 was the most prominent isoform. Responses to β-adrenoceptor agonists in tissues from AC6 KO mice were virtually abolished. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS AC6 played a critical role in relaxation of ASM to β1-adrenoceptor agonists and in modulation of sensory nerves by β1-3-adrenoceptor agonists. These results further unravel the signalling pathway of this extensively prescribed class of medicine. PMID:25205328

  5. AKAPs and Adenylyl Cyclase in Cardiovascular Physiology and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic AMP, generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, adenylyl cyclase, protein kinase A and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review we discuss how interaction of AKAPs with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology. PMID:21978991

  6. Studies of the molecular mechanisms of action of relaxin on the adenylyl cyclase signaling system using synthetic peptides derived from the LGR7 relaxin receptor.

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Gur'yanov, I A; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Shpakova, E A; Vlasov, G P; Pertseva, M N

    2007-09-01

    The peptide hormone relaxin produces dose-dependent stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in rat tissues (striatum, cardiac and skeletal muscle) and the muscle tissues of invertebrates, i.e., the bivalve mollusk Anodonta cygnea and the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris, adenylyl cyclase stimulation being more marked in the rat striatum and cardiac muscle. Our studies of the type of relaxin receptor involved in mediating these actions of relaxin involved the first synthesis of peptides 619-629, 619-629-Lys(Palm), and 615-629, which are derivatives of the primary structure of the C-terminal part of the third cytoplasmic loop of the type 1 relaxin receptor (LGR7). Peptides 619-629-Lys(Palm) and 615-629 showed competitive inhibition of adenylyl cyclase stimulation by relaxin in rat striatum and cardiac muscle but had no effect on the action of relaxin in rat skeletal muscle or invertebrate muscle, which is evidence for the tissue and species specificity of their actions. On the one hand, this indicates involvement of the LGR7 receptor in mediating the adenylyl cyclase-stimulating action of relaxin in rat striatum and cardiac muscle and, on the other, demonstrates the existence of other adenylyl cyclase signal mechanisms for the actions of relaxin in rat skeletal muscle and invertebrate muscle, not involving LGR7 receptors. The adenylyl cyclase-stimulating effect of relaxin in the striatum and cardiac muscles was found to be decreased in the presence of C-terminal peptide 385-394 of the alpha(s) subunit of the mammalian G protein and to be blocked by treatment of membranes with cholera toxin. These data provide evidence that in the striatum and cardiac muscle, relaxin stimulates adenylyl cyclase via the LGR7 receptor, this being functionally linked with G(s) protein. It is also demonstrated that linkage of relaxin-activated LGR7 receptor with the G(s) protein is mediated by interaction of the C-terminal half of the third cytoplasmic loop of the receptor with the C

  7. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas; Meili, Dimirela; Salathe, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) was recently identified as a widely expressed intracellular source of cAMP in mammalian cells. sAC is evolutionary, structurally, and biochemically distinct from the G-protein-responsive transmembranous adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). The structure of the catalytic unit of sAC is similar to tmAC, but sAC does not contain transmembranous domains, allowing localizations independent of the membranous compartment. sAC activity is stimulated by HCO3-, Ca2+ and is sensitive to physiologically relevant ATP fluctuations. sAC functions as a physiological sensor for carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, and therefore indirectly for pH. Here we review the physiological role of sAC in different human tissues with a major focus on the lung. PMID:25064591

  8. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  9. Intramolecular signaling in tandem-GAF domains from PDE5 and PDE10 studied with a cyanobacterial adenylyl cyclase reporter.

    PubMed

    Banjac, Ana; Zimmermann, Markus O; Boeckler, Frank M; Kurz, Ursula; Schultz, Anita; Schultz, Joachim E

    2012-03-01

    The dimeric mammalian phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are regulated by N-terminal domains. In PDE5, the GAF-A subdomain of a GAF-tandem (GAF-A and -B) binds the activator cGMP and in PDE10 GAF-B binds cAMP. GAF-tandem chimeras of PDE5 and 10 in which the 36 aa linker helix between GAF-A and -B was swapped lost allosteric regulation of a reporter adenylyl cyclase. In 16 consecutive constructs we substituted the PDE10 linker with that from PDE5. An initial stretch of 10 amino acids coded for isoform specificity. A C240Y substitution uncoupled cyclase activity from regulation, whereas C240F, L or G did not. The C240Y substitution increased basal activity to stimulated levels. Notably, over the next 12 substitutions basal cyclase activity decreased linearly. Further targeted substitutions were based on homology modeling using the PDE2 structure. No combination of substitutions within the initial 10 linker residues caused loss of regulation. The full 10 aa stretch was required. Modeling indicated a potential interaction of the linker with a loop from GAF-A. To interrupt H-bonding a glycine substitution of the loop segment was generated. Despite reduction of basal activity, loss of regulation was maintained. Possibly, the orientation of the linker helix is determined by formation of the dimer at the initial linker segment. Downstream deflections of the linker helix may have caused loss of regulation.

  10. A mechanism of cell death involving an adenylyl cyclase/PKA signaling pathway is induced by the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuebin; Candas, Mehmet; Griko, Natalya B.; Taussig, Ronald; Bulla, Lee A.

    2006-01-01

    Many pathogenic organisms and their toxins target host cell receptors, the consequence of which is altered signaling events that lead to aberrant activity or cell death. A significant body of literature describes various molecular and cellular aspects of toxins associated with bacterial invasion, colonization, and host cell disruption. However, there is little information on the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the insecticidal action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. Recently, we reported that the Cry1Ab toxin produced by Bt kills insect cells by activating a Mg2+-dependent cytotoxic event upon binding of the toxin to its receptor BT-R1. Here we show that binding of Cry toxin to BT-R1 provokes cell death by activating a previously undescribed signaling pathway involving stimulation of G protein (Gαs) and adenylyl cyclase, increased cAMP levels, and activation of protein kinase A. Induction of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway is manifested by sequential cytological changes that include membrane blebbing, appearance of ghost nuclei, cell swelling, and lysis. The discovery of a toxin-induced cell death pathway specifically linked to BT-R1 in insect cells should provide insights into how insects evolve resistance to Bt and into the development of new, safer insecticides. PMID:16788061

  11. A mechanism of cell death involving an adenylyl cyclase/PKA signaling pathway is induced by the Cry1Ab toxin of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuebin; Candas, Mehmet; Griko, Natalya B; Taussig, Ronald; Bulla, Lee A

    2006-06-27

    Many pathogenic organisms and their toxins target host cell receptors, the consequence of which is altered signaling events that lead to aberrant activity or cell death. A significant body of literature describes various molecular and cellular aspects of toxins associated with bacterial invasion, colonization, and host cell disruption. However, there is little information on the molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the insecticidal action of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. Recently, we reported that the Cry1Ab toxin produced by Bt kills insect cells by activating a Mg(2+)-dependent cytotoxic event upon binding of the toxin to its receptor BT-R(1). Here we show that binding of Cry toxin to BT-R(1) provokes cell death by activating a previously undescribed signaling pathway involving stimulation of G protein (G(alphas)) and adenylyl cyclase, increased cAMP levels, and activation of protein kinase A. Induction of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway is manifested by sequential cytological changes that include membrane blebbing, appearance of ghost nuclei, cell swelling, and lysis. The discovery of a toxin-induced cell death pathway specifically linked to BT-R(1) in insect cells should provide insights into how insects evolve resistance to Bt and into the development of new, safer insecticides.

  12. [Reactivity of the adenylyl cyclase system in rat tissues to biogenic amines and peptide hormones under starvation condition].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Pertseva, M N

    2007-04-01

    Under starvation condition, sensitivity of the adenylyl cyclase system to regulatory action of biogenic amines and peptide hormones in rat tissues are changed. In the myocardium and skeletal muscles, after 2 and 4 days of starvation, the regulatory effects of isoproterenol and relaxin acting via G,-proteins on the adenylyl cyclase activity and the G-protein GTP-binding are significantly increased compared with control. At the same time, regulatory effects ofsomatostatin which are realized via Gi-proteins, on adenylyl cyclase system in the myocardium are decreased. Under prolonged starvation consisting of two consecutive 4-days periods, the effects of hormones acting via Gs-proteins on the adenylyl cyclase activity in muscle tissues are decreased to control value levels. The effects of hormones acting via Gi-proteins are largely reduced. In the brain, intensification of adenylyl cyclase stimulating hormonal effects was late and only observed after a 4-day starvation. Unlike muscle tissues, the increase of adenylyl cyclase stimulating effects in the brain is preserved after two-period starvation. The weakening of adenylyl cyclase inhibiting hormonal signals both in the brain and muscles is observed after a 2-day starvation and then the weakening is intensified. Possible role of glucose level and basal adenylyl cyclase activity in determination of the sensitivity of the adenylyl cyclase system to hormones under study is discussed. It is suggested that one of the key causes of physiological changes in animal organism under starvation involves alteration of hormonal signalling systems sensitivity, in particular that of the adenylyl cyclase system, to hormone regulatory action.

  13. Sensing Positive versus Negative Reward Signals through Adenylyl Cyclase-Coupled GPCRs in Direct and Indirect Pathway Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anu G.; Eriksson, Olivia; Vincent, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Transient changes in striatal dopamine (DA) concentration are considered to encode a reward prediction error (RPE) in reinforcement learning tasks. Often, a phasic DA change occurs concomitantly with a dip in striatal acetylcholine (ACh), whereas other neuromodulators, such as adenosine (Adn), change slowly. There are abundant adenylyl cyclase (AC) coupled GPCRs for these neuromodulators in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which play important roles in plasticity. However, little is known about the interaction between these neuromodulators via GPCRs. The interaction between these transient neuromodulator changes and the effect on cAMP/PKA signaling via Golf- and Gi/o-coupled GPCR are studied here using quantitative kinetic modeling. The simulations suggest that, under basal conditions, cAMP/PKA signaling could be significantly inhibited in D1R+ MSNs via ACh/M4R/Gi/o and an ACh dip is required to gate a subset of D1R/Golf-dependent PKA activation. Furthermore, the interaction between ACh dip and DA peak, via D1R and M4R, is synergistic. In a similar fashion, PKA signaling in D2+ MSNs is under basal inhibition via D2R/Gi/o and a DA dip leads to a PKA increase by disinhibiting A2aR/Golf, but D2+ MSNs could also respond to the DA peak via other intracellular pathways. This study highlights the similarity between the two types of MSNs in terms of high basal AC inhibition by Gi/o and the importance of interactions between Gi/o and Golf signaling, but at the same time predicts differences between them with regard to the sign of RPE responsible for PKA activation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine transients are considered to carry reward-related signal in reinforcement learning. An increase in dopamine concentration is associated with an unexpected reward or salient stimuli, whereas a decrease is produced by omission of an expected reward. Often dopamine transients are accompanied by other neuromodulatory signals, such as acetylcholine and adenosine. We highlight the

  14. Angiotensin II enhances adenylyl cyclase signaling via Ca2+/calmodulin. Gq-Gs cross-talk regulates collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Naugle, Jennifer E; Hase, Miki; Gregorian, Caroline; Swaney, James S; Insel, Paul A; Brunton, Laurence L; Meszaros, J Gary

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts regulate formation of extracellular matrix in the heart, playing key roles in cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. In this study, we sought to characterize cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways and its impact on modulating collagen synthesis by cardiac fibroblasts. Angiotensin II (ANG II) activates cell proliferation and collagen synthesis but also potentiates cyclic AMP (cAMP) production stimulated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR). The potentiation of beta-AR-stimulated cAMP production by ANG II is reduced by phospholipase C inhibition and enhanced by overexpression of Gq. Ionomycin and thapsigargin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and potentiated isoproterenol- and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, whereas chelation of Ca2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid/AM inhibited such potentiation. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or Gbetagamma did not alter this cross-talk. Immunoblot analyses showed prominent expression of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), a Ca2+-activated isoform, along with AC2, AC4, AC5, AC6, and AC7. Of those isoforms, only AC3 and AC5/6 proteins were detected in caveolin-rich fractions. Overexpression of AC6 increased betaAR-stimulated cAMP accumulation but did not alter the size of the ANG II potentiation, suggesting that the cross-talk is AC isoform-specific. Isoproterenol-mediated inhibition of serum-stimulated collagen synthesis increased from 31 to 48% in the presence of ANG II, indicating that betaAR-regulated collagen synthesis increased in the presence of ANG II. These data indicate that ANG II potentiates cAMP formation via Ca2+-dependent activation of AC activity, which in turn attenuates collagen synthesis and demonstrates one functional consequence of cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways in cardiac fibroblasts. PMID:12711600

  15. Gi/o-Coupled Receptors Compete for Signaling to Adenylyl Cyclase in SH-SY5Y Cells and Reduce Opioid-Mediated cAMP Overshoot

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Erica S.; Purington, Lauren C.

    2011-01-01

    Organization of G protein-coupled receptors and cognate signaling partners at the plasma membrane has been proposed to occur via multiple mechanisms, including membrane microdomains, receptor oligomerization, and protein scaffolding. Here, we investigate the organization of six types of Gi/o-coupled receptors endogenously expressed in SH-SY5Y cells. The most abundant receptor in these cells was the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), the activation of which occluded acute inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC) by agonists to δ-opioid (DOR), nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOPr), α2-adrenergic (α2AR), cannabinoid 1, and serotonin 1A receptors. We further demonstrate that all receptor pairs share a common pool of AC. The MOR agonist [d-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) also occluded the ability of DOR agonist to stimulate G proteins. However, at lower agonist concentrations and at shorter incubation times when G proteins were not limiting, the relationship between MOR and DOR agonists was additive. The additive relationship was confirmed by isobolographic analysis. Long-term coadministration of MOR and DOR agonists caused cAMP overshoot that was not additive, suggesting that sensitization of AC mediated by these two receptors occurs by a common pathway. Furthermore, heterologous inhibition of AC by agonists to DOR, NOPr, and α2AR reduced the expression of cAMP overshoot in DAMGO-dependent cells. However, this cross-talk did not lead to heterologous tolerance. These results indicate that multiple receptors could be tethered into complexes with cognate signaling proteins and that access to shared AC by multiple receptor types may provide a means to prevent opioid withdrawal. PMID:21098043

  16. Angiotensin II enhances adenylyl cyclase signaling via Ca2+/calmodulin. Gq-Gs cross-talk regulates collagen production in cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Naugle, Jennifer E; Hase, Miki; Gregorian, Caroline; Swaney, James S; Insel, Paul A; Brunton, Laurence L; Meszaros, J Gary

    2003-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts regulate formation of extracellular matrix in the heart, playing key roles in cardiac remodeling and hypertrophy. In this study, we sought to characterize cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways and its impact on modulating collagen synthesis by cardiac fibroblasts. Angiotensin II (ANG II) activates cell proliferation and collagen synthesis but also potentiates cyclic AMP (cAMP) production stimulated by beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR). The potentiation of beta-AR-stimulated cAMP production by ANG II is reduced by phospholipase C inhibition and enhanced by overexpression of Gq. Ionomycin and thapsigargin increased intracellular Ca2+ levels and potentiated isoproterenol- and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, whereas chelation of Ca2+ with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N', N'-tetraacetic acid/AM inhibited such potentiation. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases, protein kinase C, or Gbetagamma did not alter this cross-talk. Immunoblot analyses showed prominent expression of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3), a Ca2+-activated isoform, along with AC2, AC4, AC5, AC6, and AC7. Of those isoforms, only AC3 and AC5/6 proteins were detected in caveolin-rich fractions. Overexpression of AC6 increased betaAR-stimulated cAMP accumulation but did not alter the size of the ANG II potentiation, suggesting that the cross-talk is AC isoform-specific. Isoproterenol-mediated inhibition of serum-stimulated collagen synthesis increased from 31 to 48% in the presence of ANG II, indicating that betaAR-regulated collagen synthesis increased in the presence of ANG II. These data indicate that ANG II potentiates cAMP formation via Ca2+-dependent activation of AC activity, which in turn attenuates collagen synthesis and demonstrates one functional consequence of cross-talk between Gq and Gs signaling pathways in cardiac fibroblasts.

  17. [Structural and functional characteristics of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system regulated by biogenic amines and peptide hormones in the muscle of a worm Lumbricus terrestris].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Shpakova, E A; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Pertseva, M N

    2008-01-01

    It has been shown for the first time that biogenic amines (catecholamines and tryptophane derivatives) stimulate dose-dependently activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and GTP-binding of G-proteins in muscle of the cutaneous-muscle bag of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris. By efficiency of their stimulating action on the AC activity, biogenic amines can be arranged in the following sequence: octopamine > tyramine > tryptamine = serotonin > dopamine > isoproterenol = adrenalin. The sequence of efficiency of their action on GTP-binding is somewhat different: serotonin > tryptamine > octopamine > dopamine = tyramine > adrenaline > isoproterenol. Sensitivity of AC and G-proteins in the worm muscle to biogenic amines is similar with that in smooth muscle of the molluse Anodonta cygnea (invertebrates), but differs markedly by this parameter from the rat myocardium (vertebrates). It has also been revealed that AC in the worm muscle is regulated by peptide hormones relaxin and somatostatin whose action is comparable with that in the mollusk muscle, but much weaker that the action of these hormones on the rat myocardium AC activity. Use of C-terminal peptides of alpha-subunits of G-proteins of the stimulatory (385-394 Galpha(s)) and inhibitory (346-355 Galpha(i2)) types that disrupt selectively the hormonal signal transduction realized via G(s)- and G(i)-proteins, respectively, allowed establishing that the AC-stimulating effects of relaxin, octopamine, tyramine, and dopamine in the worm muscle are realized via the receptors coupled functionally with G(s)-protein; the AC-inhibiting effect of somatostatin is realized via the receptor coupled with G(i)-protein, whereas serotonin and tryptamine activate both types of G-proteins. PMID:18959208

  18. Circadian rhythm of contrast sensitivity is regulated by a dopamine-neuronal PAS-domain protein 2-adenylyl cyclase 1 signaling pathway in retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Christopher K; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Jackson, Chad R; Chan, Guy C-K; Storm, Daniel R; Iuvone, P Michael

    2013-09-18

    Spatial variation in light intensity, called spatial contrast, comprises much of the visual information perceived by mammals, and the relative ability to detect contrast is referred to as contrast sensitivity (Purves et al., 2012). Recently, retinal dopamine D4 receptors (D4Rs) have been implicated in modulating contrast sensitivity (Jackson et al., 2012); however, the cellular and molecular mechanisms have not been elucidated. Our study demonstrates a circadian rhythm of contrast sensitivity that peaks during the daytime, and that its regulation involves interactions of D4Rs, the clock gene Npas2, and the clock-controlled gene adenylyl cyclase 1 (Adcy1) in a subset of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Targeted disruption of the gene encoding D4Rs reduces the amplitude of the contrast sensitivity rhythm by reducing daytime sensitivity and abolishes the rhythmic expression of Npas2 and Adcy1 mRNA in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) of the retina. Npas2(-/-) and Adcy1(-/-) mice show strikingly similar reductions in the contrast sensitivity rhythm to that in mice lacking D4Rs. Moreover, Adcy1 transcript rhythms were abolished in the GCL of Npas2(-/-) mice. Luciferase reporter assays demonstrated that the Adcy1 promoter is selectively activated by neuronal PAS-domain protein 2 (NPAS2)/BMAL1. Our results indicate that the contrast sensitivity rhythm is modulated by D4Rs via a signaling pathway that involves NPAS2-mediated circadian regulation of Adcy1. Hence, we have identified a circadian clock mechanism in a subset of RGCs that modulates an important aspect of retinal physiology and visual processing.

  19. Central role of soluble adenylyl cyclase and cAMP in sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buffone, Mariano G.; Wertheimer, Eva V.; Visconti, Pablo E.; Krapf, Dario

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), the first second messenger to be described, plays a central role in cell signaling in a wide variety of cell types. Over the last decades, a wide body of literature addressed the different roles of cAMP in cell physiology, mainly in response to neurotransmitters and hormones. cAMP is synthesized by a wide variety of adenylyl cylases that can generally be grouped in two types: transmembrane adenylyl cyclase and soluble adenylyl cyclases. In particular, several aspects of sperm physiology are regulated by cAMP produced by a single atypical adenylyl cyclase (Adcy10, aka sAC, SACY). The signature that identifies sAC among other ACs, is their direct stimulation by bicarbonate. The essential nature of cAMP in sperm function has been demonstrated using gain of function as well as loss of function approaches. This review unifies state of the art knowledge of the role of cAMP and those enzymes involved in cAMP signaling pathways required for the acquisition of fertilizing capacity of mammalian sperm. PMID:25066614

  20. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is essential for proper lysosomal acidification.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Nawreen; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier; Milner, Teresa A; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R

    2016-10-01

    Lysosomes, the degradative organelles of the endocytic and autophagic pathways, function at an acidic pH. Lysosomes are acidified by the proton-pumping vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), but the molecular processes that set the organelle's pH are not completely understood. In particular, pH-sensitive signaling enzymes that can regulate lysosomal acidification in steady-state physiological conditions have yet to be identified. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a widely expressed source of cAMP that serves as a physiological pH sensor in cells. For example, in proton-secreting epithelial cells, sAC is responsible for pH-dependent translocation of V-ATPase to the luminal surface. Here we show genetically and pharmacologically that sAC is also essential for lysosomal acidification. In the absence of sAC, V-ATPase does not properly localize to lysosomes, lysosomes fail to fully acidify, lysosomal degradative capacity is diminished, and autophagolysosomes accumulate. PMID:27670898

  1. [Comparative study of molecular mechanisms of natural and synthetic polycationic peptides action on the activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Gur'ianov, I A; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Zakharova, E T; Vlasov, G P; Pertseva, M N

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of action of natural and synthetic polycationic peptides, forming amphiphilic helices, on the heterotrimeric G-proteins and enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC), components of hormone-sensitive AC system, were studied. It is shown that synthetic peptides C-epsilonAhx-WKK(C10)-KKK(C10)-KKKK(C10)-YKK(C10)-KK (peptide I) and (GRGDSGRKKRRQRRRPPQ)2-K-epsilonAhx-C(Acm)(peptide II) in dose-dependent manner stimulate the basal AC activity, inhibit forskolin-stimulated AC activity and decrease both stimulating and inhibiting AC effects of the hormones in the tissues (brain striatum, heart muscle) of rat and in smooth muscles of the mollusc Anodonta cygnea. AC effects of these peptides are decreased after membrane treatment by cholera and pertussis toxins and are inhibited in the presence of the peptides, corresponding to C-terminal regions 385-394 alphas- and 346-355 alphai2-subunits of G-proteins. These data give evidence that the peptides I and II act on the signaling pathways which are realized through Gs- and Gi-proteins. At the same time, natural polycationic peptide mastoparan acts on AC system through Gi-proteins and blocks hormonal signals mediated via Gi-proteins only. Consequently, the action of mastoparan on G-proteins is selective and differs from the action of the synthetic peptides. It is also shown that peptide II, with branched structure, directly interacts not only with G-proteins (less effective in comparison with peptide I with hydrophobic radicals and mastoparan), but also with enzyme AC, the catalytic component of AC system. On the basis of data obtained the following conclusions were made: 1) the formation of amphiphilic helices is not enough for selective activation of G-protein by polycationic peptides, and 2) the primary structure of the peptides, the distribution of positive charged amino acids and hydrophobic radicals in them are very important for selective interaction between polycationic peptides and G-proteins.

  2. Renal Phosphate Wasting in the Absence of Adenylyl Cyclase 6

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Robert A.; Murray, Fiona; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A.; Tang, Tong; Levi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) and fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) enhance phosphate excretion by the proximal tubule of the kidney by retrieval of the sodium-dependent phosphate transporters (Npt2a and Npt2c) from the apical plasma membrane. PTH activates adenylyl cyclase (AC) through PTH 1 receptors and stimulates the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. However, the precise role and isoform(s) of AC in phosphate homeostasis are not known. We report here that mice lacking AC6 (AC6−/−) have increased plasma PTH and FGF-23 levels compared with wild-type (WT) mice but comparable plasma phosphate concentrations. Acute activation of the calcium-sensing receptor or feeding a zero phosphate diet almost completely suppressed plasma PTH levels in both AC6−/− and WT mice, indicating a secondary cause for hyperparathyroidism. Pharmacologic blockade of FGF receptors resulted in a comparable increase in plasma phosphate between genotypes, whereas urinary phosphate remained significantly higher in AC6−/− mice. Compared with WT mice, AC6−/− mice had reduced renal Npt2a and Npt2c protein abundance, with approximately 80% of Npt2a residing in lysosomes. WT mice responded to exogenous PTH with redistribution of Npt2a from proximal tubule microvilli to intracellular compartments and lysosomes alongside a PTH-induced dose–response relationship for fractional phosphate excretion and urinary cAMP excretion. These responses were absent in AC6−/− mice. In conclusion, AC6 in the proximal tubule modulates cAMP formation, Npt2a trafficking, and urinary phosphate excretion, which are highlighted by renal phosphate wasting in AC6−/− mice. PMID:24854272

  3. Crystallization of the class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Natasha; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Prasad T.; Gallagher, D. Travis

    2006-03-01

    The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Y. pestis has been crystallized in an orthorhombic form suitable for structure determination. The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis has been cloned and crystallized in both a triclinic and an orthorhombic form. An amino-terminal His-tagged construct, from which the tag was removed by thrombin, crystallized in a triclinic form diffracting to 1.9 Å, with one dimer per asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 33.5, b = 35.5, c = 71.8 Å, α = 88.7, β = 82.5, γ = 65.5°. Several mutants of this construct crystallized but diffracted poorly. A non-His-tagged native construct (179 amino acids, MW = 20.5 kDa) was purified by conventional chromatography and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. These crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 56.8, b = 118.6, c = 144.5 Å, diffract to 3 Å and probably have two dimers per asymmetric unit and V{sub M} = 3.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Both crystal forms appear to require pH below 5, complicating attempts to incorporate nucleotide ligands into the structure. The native construct has been produced as a selenomethionine derivative and crystallized for phasing and structure determination.

  4. Two members of a widely expressed subfamily of hormone-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed Central

    Premont, R T; Chen, J; Ma, H W; Ponnapalli, M; Iyengar, R

    1992-01-01

    cDNA encoding a hormone- and guanine nucleotide-stimulated adenylyl cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] (type 6) from rat liver and kidney has been cloned and expressed. This enzyme is stimulated by forskolin, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate, and isoproterenol plus GTP but is not stimulated by beta gamma subunits of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. A second form (type 5), which is 75% similar to type 6, has also been cloned. Both types 5 and 6 cDNAs have multiple messages. PCR-based detection of the mRNA for the type 5 and 6 enzymes indicates that both are widely distributed. Homology analyses indicate at least four distinct subfamilies of guanine nucleotide stimulatory protein-regulated adenylyl cyclases. Types 5 and 6 enzymes define one distinct subfamily of mammalian adenylyl cyclases. Diversity of one guanine nucleotide-binding protein-regulated effector may allow different modes of regulation of cell-surface signal transmission. Images PMID:1409703

  5. Adenylyl Cyclase Anchoring by a Kinase Anchor Protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) Is Important for Postsynaptic β-Adrenergic Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingxu; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Stein, Ivar S.; Qian, Hai; Matt, Lucas; Nguyen, Minh; Xiang, Yang K.; Hell, Johannes W.

    2013-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the A kinase anchor protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) interacts not only with PKA but also with various adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms. However, the physiological relevance of AC-AKAP5 binding is largely unexplored. We now show that postsynaptic targeting of AC by AKAP5 is important for phosphorylation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 on Ser-845 by PKA and for synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of GluA1 on Ser-845 is strongly reduced (by 70%) under basal conditions in AKAP5 KO mice but not at all in D36 mice, in which the PKA binding site of AKAP5 (i.e. the C-terminal 36 residues) has been deleted without affecting AC association with GluA1. The increase in Ser-845 phosphorylation upon β-adrenergic stimulation is much more severely impaired in AKAP5 KO than in D36 mice. In parallel, long term potentiation induced by a 5-Hz/180-s tetanus, which mimics the endogenous θ-rhythm and depends on β-adrenergic stimulation, is only modestly affected in acute forebrain slices from D36 mice but completely abrogated in AKAP5 KO mice. Accordingly, anchoring of not only PKA but also AC by AKAP5 is important for regulation of postsynaptic functions and specifically AMPA receptor activity. PMID:23649627

  6. Adenylyl cyclase anchoring by a kinase anchor protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) is important for postsynaptic β-adrenergic signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingxu; Patriarchi, Tommaso; Stein, Ivar S; Qian, Hai; Matt, Lucas; Nguyen, Minh; Xiang, Yang K; Hell, Johannes W

    2013-06-14

    Recent evidence indicates that the A kinase anchor protein AKAP5 (AKAP79/150) interacts not only with PKA but also with various adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms. However, the physiological relevance of AC-AKAP5 binding is largely unexplored. We now show that postsynaptic targeting of AC by AKAP5 is important for phosphorylation of the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 on Ser-845 by PKA and for synaptic plasticity. Phosphorylation of GluA1 on Ser-845 is strongly reduced (by 70%) under basal conditions in AKAP5 KO mice but not at all in D36 mice, in which the PKA binding site of AKAP5 (i.e. the C-terminal 36 residues) has been deleted without affecting AC association with GluA1. The increase in Ser-845 phosphorylation upon β-adrenergic stimulation is much more severely impaired in AKAP5 KO than in D36 mice. In parallel, long term potentiation induced by a 5-Hz/180-s tetanus, which mimics the endogenous θ-rhythm and depends on β-adrenergic stimulation, is only modestly affected in acute forebrain slices from D36 mice but completely abrogated in AKAP5 KO mice. Accordingly, anchoring of not only PKA but also AC by AKAP5 is important for regulation of postsynaptic functions and specifically AMPA receptor activity.

  7. Product identification and adenylyl cyclase activity in chloroplasts of Nicotiana tabacum.

    PubMed

    Witters, Erwin; Quanten, Lieve; Bloemen, Jo; Valcke, Roland; Van Onckelen, Harry

    2004-01-01

    In view of the ongoing debate on plant cyclic nucleotide metabolism, especially the functional presence of adenylyl cyclase, a novel detection method has been worked out to quantify the reaction product. Using uniformly labelled (15)N-ATP as a substrate for adenylyl cyclase, a qualitative and quantitative liquid chromatography/electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS) method was developed to measure de novo formed (15)N-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate. Adenylyl cyclase activity was observed in chloroplasts obtained from Nicotiana tabacum cv. Petit Havana and the kinetic parameters and influence of various metabolic effectors are discussed in their context.

  8. Regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT1A receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Wunsch, Amanda M.; Meng, Fantao; Wu, Qi; Wemmie, John A.; Fisher, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting serotonin (5-HT) bioavailability with selective 5-HT reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) remains the most widely used treatment for mood disorders. However, their limited efficacy, delayed onset of action, and side effects restrict their clinical utility. Endogenous regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins have been implicated as key inhibitors of 5-HT1ARs, whose activation is believed to underlie the beneficial effects of SSRIs, but the identity of the specific RGS proteins involved remains unknown. We identify RGS6 as the critical negative regulator of 5-HT1AR-dependent antidepressant actions. RGS6 is enriched in hippocampal and cortical neurons, 5-HT1AR-expressing cells implicated in mood disorders. RGS6−/− mice exhibit spontaneous anxiolytic and antidepressant behavior rapidly and completely reversibly by 5-HT1AR blockade. Effects of the SSRI fluvoxamine and 5-HT1AR agonist 8-OH-DPAT were also potentiated in RGS6+/− mice. The phenotype of RGS6−/− mice was associated with decreased CREB phosphorylation in the hippocampus and cortex, implicating enhanced Gαi-dependent adenylyl cyclase inhibition as a possible causative factor in the behavior observed in RGS6−/− animals. Our results demonstrate that by inhibiting serotonergic innervation of the cortical-limbic neuronal circuit, RGS6 exerts powerful anxiogenic and prodepressant actions. These findings indicate that RGS6 inhibition may represent a viable means to treat mood disorders or enhance the efficacy of serotonergic agents.—Stewart, A., Maity, B., Wunsch, A. M., Meng, F., Wu, Q., Wemmie, J. A., Fisher, R. A. Regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6) promotes anxiety and depression by attenuating serotonin-mediated activation of the 5-HT1A receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis. PMID:24421401

  9. A kinase-anchoring proteins and adenylyl cyclase in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Efendiev, Riad; Dessauer, Carmen W

    2011-10-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), generated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), serves as a second messenger in signaling pathways regulating many aspects of cardiac physiology, including contraction rate and action potential duration, and in the pathophysiology of hypertrophy and heart failure. A kinase-anchoring proteins localize the effect of cAMP in space and time by organizing receptors, AC, protein kinase A, and other components of the cAMP cascade into multiprotein complexes. In this review, we discuss how the interaction of A kinase-anchoring proteins with distinct AC isoforms affects cardiovascular physiology.

  10. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Adenylyl cyclase 3 haploinsufficiency confers susceptibility to diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tao; Shen, Ying; Lee, Han-Woong; Yu, Rina; Park, Taesun

    2016-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase 3 (Adcy3), a member of the mammalian adenylyl cyclase family responsible for generating the second messenger cAMP, has long been known to play an essential role in olfactory signal transduction. Here, we demonstrated that Adcy3 heterozygous null mice displayed increased visceral adiposity in the absence of hyperphagia and developed abnormal metabolic features characterized by impaired insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, and increased plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines on both chow and high-fat diet (HFD). Of note, HFD decreased the Adcy3 expression in white adipose tissue, liver, and muscle. We also report for the first time that Adcy3 haploinsufficiency resulted in reduced expression of genes involved in thermogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and insulin signaling, with enhanced expression of genes related to adipogenesis in peripheral tissues of mice. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cAMP signals generated by Adcy3 in peripheral tissues may play a pivotal role in modulating obesity and insulin sensitivity. PMID:27678003

  12. Control of outflow resistance by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong Suk; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness in the United States affecting as many as 2.2 million Americans. All current glaucoma treatment strategies aim to reduce intraocular pressure, even in patients with normal tension glaucoma. Typically, this is accomplished by reducing the rate of aqueous flow by limiting aqueous production or enhancing drainage using drugs and surgery. Whereas these strategies are effective in diminishing vision loss, some patients continue to lose vision and many discontinue use of their medications because of undesirable side effects. Drugs known to be effective in altering conventional outflow have for the most part been abandoned from modern clinical practice due to undesirable side effects. Identification of new drugs that could enhance conventional outflow, would offer additional options in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension. To this end, our laboratory has recently uncovered a novel pathway for regulation of conventional outflow by the ciliary body. This pathway is dependent on soluble adenylyl cyclase, an enzyme that catalyzes the generation of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) in response to bicarbonate.

  13. [The influence of two-month treatment with bromocryptine on activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system in the myocardium and testes of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Bondareva, V M; Moyseyuk, I V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are cardiovascular diseases and dysfunctions of the reproductive system, indicating the urgency of developing new approaches to their correction. Last years for the treatment of DM2 began to use bromocryptine (BC), the agonist of type 2 dopamine receptors, which not only restores the energy metabolism, but also prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms and targets of BC action are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BC treatment on functional activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the myocardium and testes of male rats with DM2, which is caused by high-fat diet and treatment with streptozotocin (25 mg/kg). The treatment with BC (60 days, orally at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg once every two days) was started 90 days after the beginning of high-fat diet. Diabetic rats had an increased body weight, elevated triglycerides level, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. The treatment with BC resulted in the restoration of glycometabolic indicators and in the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp), relaxin, and agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β3-AR)--isoproterenol and norepinephrine were decreased in the miocardium of the diabetic rats. The corresponding effects of the β-agonists BRL-37344 and CL-316243 was preserved. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on forskolin-stimulated AC activity was attenuated, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline mediated through α2-AR increased. The treatment with BC resulted in the normalization of the adrenergic signaling in the myocardium and partially restoration of AC effects of relaxin and somatostatin. In the testes of diabetic rats, the basal and stimulated by GppNHp, forskolin, human chorionic gonadotropin and pituitary AC-activating polypeptide AC activity were decreased, and the

  14. Origin of asymmetry in adenylyl cyclases: structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1900c.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sangita C; Wetterer, Martina; Sprang, Stephen R; Schultz, Joachim E; Linder, Jürgen U

    2005-02-23

    Rv1900c, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis adenylyl cyclase, is composed of an N-terminal alpha/beta-hydrolase domain and a C-terminal cyclase homology domain. It has an unusual 7% guanylyl cyclase side-activity. A canonical substrate-defining lysine and a catalytic asparagine indispensable for mammalian adenylyl cyclase activity correspond to N342 and H402 in Rv1900c. Mutagenic analysis indicates that these residues are dispensable for activity of Rv1900c. Structures of the cyclase homology domain, solved to 2.4 A both with and without an ATP analog, form isologous, but asymmetric homodimers. The noncanonical N342 and H402 do not interact with the substrate. Subunits of the unliganded open dimer move substantially upon binding substrate, forming a closed dimer similar to the mammalian cyclase heterodimers, in which one interfacial active site is occupied and the quasi-dyad-related active site is occluded. This asymmetry indicates that both active sites cannot simultaneously be catalytically active. Such a mechanism of half-of-sites-reactivity suggests that mammalian heterodimeric adenylyl cyclases may have evolved from gene duplication of a primitive prokaryote-type cyclase, followed by loss of function in one active site. PMID:15678099

  15. Protein-Protein Docking and Analysis Reveal That Two Homologous Bacterial Adenylyl Cyclase Toxins Interact with Calmodulin Differently*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Jureller, Justin E.; Warren, Julia T.; Solomaha, Elena; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2008-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM), a eukaryotic calcium sensor that regulates diverse biological activities, consists of N- and C-terminal globular domains (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively). CaM serves as the activator of CyaA, a 188-kDa adenylyl cyclase toxin secreted by Bordetella pertussis, which is the etiologic agent for whooping cough. Upon insertion of the N-terminal adenylyl cyclase domain (ACD) of CyaA to its targeted eukaryotic cells, CaM binds to this domain tightly (∼200 pm affinity). This interaction activates the adenylyl cyclase activity of CyaA, leading to a rise in intracellular cAMP levels to disrupt normal cellular signaling. We recently solved the structure of CyaA-ACD in complex with C-CaM to elucidate the mechanism of catalytic activation. However, the structure of the interface between N-CaM and CyaA, the formation of which contributes a 400-fold increase of binding affinity between CyaA and CaM, remains elusive. Here, we used site-directed mutations and molecular dynamic simulations to generate several working models of CaM-bound CyaA-ACD. The validity of these models was evaluated by disulfide bond cross-linking, point mutations, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments. Our study reveals that a β-hairpin region (amino acids 259–273) of CyaA-ACD likely makes contacts with the second calcium binding motif of the extended CaM. This mode of interaction differs from the interaction of N-CaM with anthrax edema factor, which binds N-CaM via its helical domain. Thus, two structurally conserved, bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins have evolved to utilize distinct binding surfaces and modes of activation in their interaction with CaM, a highly conserved eukaryotic signaling protein. PMID:18583346

  16. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  17. Mice Overexpressing Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase Show Enhanced Spatial Memory Flexibility in the Absence of Intact Synaptic Long-Term Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ming; Wang, Hongbing

    2013-01-01

    There is significant interest in understanding the contribution of intracellular signaling and synaptic substrates to memory flexibility, which involves new learning and suppression of obsolete memory. Here, we report that enhancement of Ca[superscript 2+]-stimulated cAMP signaling by overexpressing type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) facilitated…

  18. Identification and characterization of a cDNA encoding mouse CAP: a homolog of the yeast adenylyl cyclase associated protein.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, A B; Cooper, J A

    1993-07-01

    CAP, an adenylyl cyclase associated protein, is present in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In both organisms, CAP is bifunctional: the N-terminal domain binds to adenylyl cyclase, thereby enabling adenylyl cyclase to respond appropriately to upstream regulatory signals, such as RAS in S. cerevisiae; the C-terminal domain is required for cellular morphogenesis. Here, we describe the isolation of a cDNA encoding a CAP homolog from a higher eukaryote. The mouse CAP cDNA contains an open reading frame capable of encoding a 474 amino acid protein. The protein encoded by the mouse CAP cDNA shows extensive homology to the yeast CAP proteins, particularly in the central poly-proline rich region and in the C-terminal domain. By northern analysis, the CAP message appears to be ubiquitous, but not uniform. By indirect immunofluorescence, ectopically expressed mouse CAP protein is found in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and, in migrating cells, at the leading edge. Expression of the mouse CAP cDNA in S. cerevisiae complements defects associated with loss of the yeast CAP carboxy-terminal domain. Hence, the function of the CAP carboxy-terminal domain has been conserved from yeast to mouse.

  19. Hydroxamate based inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Part 1: the effect of acyclic linkers on P-site binding.

    PubMed

    Levy, Daniel; Marlowe, Charles; Kane-Maguire, Kim; Bao, Ming; Cherbavaz, Diana; Tomlinson, James; Sedlock, David; Scarborough, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a family of enzymes that are key elements of signal transduction by virtue of their ability to convert ATP to cAMP. The catalytic mechanism of this transformation proceeds through initial binding of ATP to the purine binding site (P-site) followed by metal mediated cyclization with loss of pyrophosphate. Crystallographic analysis of ACs with known inhibitors reveals the presence of two metals in the active site. Presently, nine isoforms of adenylyl cyclase are known and unique isoform combinations are expressed in a tissue specific manner. The development of isoform specific inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase may prove to be a useful strategy toward the design of novel therapeutic agents. In order to develop novel AC inhibitors, we have chosen a design approach utilizing molecules with the adenine ring system joined to a metal-coordinating hydroxamic acid via flexible acyclic linkers. The designed inhibitors were assayed against type V AC with the size and heteroatom content of the linkers varied to probe the interaction of the nucleotide and metal binding sites within the enzyme. PMID:12372507

  20. Ontogeny of regulatory mechanisms for beta-adrenoceptor control of rat cardiac adenylyl cyclase: targeting of G-proteins and the cyclase catalytic subunit.

    PubMed

    Zeiders, J L; Seidler, F J; Slotkin, T A

    1997-02-01

    Fetal and neonatal tissues are resistant to catecholamine-induced desensitization of essential physiological responses. We examined the mechanisms underlying the ontogeny of desensitization in neonatal rat heart for the beta-adrenergic receptor/adenylyl cyclase signaling cascade. Animals of different ages received isoproterenol daily or 4 days and cardiac membrane preparations were evaluated on the 5th day (6, 15, 25 days old and adults). Measurements were made of basal activity, activity stimulated by two agonists (isoproterenol or glucagon) that operate at different receptors but that share Gs as the transduction intermediate, or by forskolin-Mn' to assess total catalytic capacity of the cyclase subunit; we also assessed inhibition of activity by carbachol which acts via muscarinic cholinergic receptors and G. Adult rats exhibited robust desensitization of the adenylyl cyclase response but the effect was heterologous in that equivalent loss of activity was seen for basal, isoproterenol- and glucagon-stimulated activity forskolin-Mn(2+)-stimulated activity was also decreased. Two factors contributed to desensitization; generalized reduction in membrane protein concentrations caused by cell enlargement (reduced surface-to-volume ratio), and specific interference with the G-protein component that couples receptors to the cyclase. Thus, after adjustment for changes in membrane protein, the desensitization of the forskolin-Mn2, response was no longer evident, but the effects on the other measures were still present. In addition, isoproterenol treatment produced crosstalk with the carbachol/Gi signaling pathway, with significant reductions in the ability of carbachol to inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity. Heterologous desensitization by isoproterenol was also present in 15 and 25 day old rats, but involved only selective components of the effects seen in adults. At 25 days, uncoupling of signals operating through Gs and Gi was obtained without a reduction in forskolin

  1. Regional distribution of somatostatin receptor binding and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease brain.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L; Garlind, A; Nilsson, L; Alafuzoff, I; Fowler, C J; Winblad, B; Cowburn, R F

    1991-10-01

    We have previously reported a reduction in the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the superior temporal cortex of a group of Alzheimer's disease cases, compared to a group of matched controls. In the present study, the levels of high affinity 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding, its modulation by guanine nucleotides and the effects of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity have been measured in preparations of frontal cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus and cerebellum from the same patient and control groups. A significant reduction in 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding was observed in the frontal cortex, but not other regions, of the Alzheimer's disease group, compared with control values. The profiles of inhibition of specific 125I-Tyr11-somatostatin-14 binding by Gpp(NH)p were similar in all regions in both groups. No significant differences in basal, forskolin-stimulated, or somatostatin and neuropeptide Y inhibitions of adenylyl cyclase activity were found between the two groups. The pattern of change of somatostatin binding in the Alzheimer's disease cases observed in the present study differs from the reported pattern of loss of somatostatin neurons and may be secondary to the degeneration of somatostatin receptor-bearing cholinergic afferents arising from the nucleus basalis. The results of this study indicate that impaired somatostatin modulation of adenylyl cyclase is not a global phenomenon in Alzheimer's disease brain and also that there are no major disruptions of somatostatin receptor-G-protein coupling or of adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity in this disorder. PMID:1684616

  2. Type VI adenylyl cyclase negatively regulates GluN2B-mediated LTD and spatial reversal learning

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching-Pang; Lee, Cheng-Ta; Hou, Wen-Hsien; Lin, Meng-Syuan; Lai, Hsing-Lin; Chien, Chen-Li; Chang, Chen; Cheng, Pei-Lin; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Chern, Yijuang

    2016-01-01

    The calcium-sensitive type VI adenylyl cyclase (AC6) is a membrane-bound adenylyl cyclase (AC) that converts ATP to cAMP under stimulation. It is a calcium-inhibited AC and integrates negative inputs from Ca2+ and multiple other signals to regulate the intracellular cAMP level. In the present study, we demonstrate that AC6 functions upstream of CREB and negatively controls neuronal plasticity in the hippocampus. Genetic removal of AC6 leads to cyclase-independent and N-terminus of AC6 (AC6N)-dependent elevation of CREB expression, and enhances the expression of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons. Consequently, GluN2B-dependent calcium signaling and excitatory postsynaptic current, long-term depression, and spatial reversal learning are enhanced in the hippocampus of AC6−/− mice without altering the gross anatomy of the brain. Together, our results suggest that AC6 negatively regulates neuronal plasticity by modulating the levels of CREB and GluN2B in the hippocampus. PMID:26932446

  3. Opposing effects of ethanol on pig ovarian adenylyl cyclase desensitized by human choriogonadotropin or isoproterenol.

    PubMed

    Ekstrom, R C; Hunzicker-Dunn, M

    1990-11-01

    Pig ovarian follicular membranes contain a gonadotropin-responsive adenylyl cyclase, which becomes partially desensitized (approximately 40%) upon a 40-min incubation with a saturating concentration of human (h) CG. This in vitro desensitization is time and hormone dependent and also requires the presence of micromolar concentrations of GTP. In this report we show that 10% ethanol present during the desensitization phase of the incubation increases the extent of hCG-induced desensitization of adenylyl cyclase by 2-fold. Ethanol shortened the time necessary to reach maximal hCG-induced desensitization from 20 to 10 min, but had no effect on the dose dependency for GTP. In addition, ethanol had no effect on the affinity of the LH/hCG receptor for 125I-hCG but did cause an increase in the ED50 of hCG for inducing desensitization from 0.25 to 0.75 nM. Interestingly, ethanol decreased the apparent number of LH/hCG-receptor sites by 55%, yet the control hCG-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity was not reduced. The "hyperdesensitized" state achieved in the presence of ethanol could not be reversed by washing the membranes and incubating them in ethanol-free medium. NaF-sensitive adenylyl cyclase was also not impaired in hCG-desensitized membranes from control or ethanol-treated samples. Thus, hCG-induced desensitization was not due to a defect in the functioning of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G8) or catalytic subunits, but rather was caused by an impairment of the coupling of the lutropin (LH)/hCG receptor with G8, which was exacerbated further by ethanol. In spite of the effect of ethanol on hCG-induced desensitization, this agent had an inhibitory effect on isoproterenol-induced desensitization of isoproterenol-responsive luteal adenylyl cyclase. These results indicate that membrane fluidity is important in modulating the structure and functional interaction of the LH/hCG receptor with G8 because ethanol is a well known lipid

  4. Extracellular Regulation of Sperm Transmembrane Adenylyl Cyclase by a Forward Motility Stimulating Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Souvik; Roy, Debarun; Majumder, Gopal C.; Bhattacharyya, Debdas

    2014-01-01

    Forward motility stimulating factor (FMSF), a glycoprotein isolated from buffalo serum, binds to the surface of the mature sperm cells to promote their progressive motility. This article reports the mode of signal transduction of this extracellular factor in goat sperm. The mechanism was investigated by assaying intracellular second messenger level and forward motility in presence of different pharmacological modulators. Mg++-dependent Forskolin responsive form of transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC) of goat spermatozoa was probed for its involvement in FMSF action. Dideoxyadenosine, a selective inhibitor of tmACs, was used to identify the role of this enzyme in the scheme of FMSF-signaling. Involvement of the α-subunit of G-protein in this regard has been inspected using GTPγS. Participation of protein kinase A (PKA) and tyrosine kinase was checked using IP20 and genistein, respectively. FMSF promotes tmAC activity in a dose-dependent manner through receptor/G-protein activation to enhance intracellular cAMP and forward motility. Motility boosting effects of this glycoprotein are almost lost in presence of dideoxyadenosine. But, FMSF displayed substantial motility promoting activity when movement of spermatozoa was inhibited with KH7, the specific inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase indicating tmAC to be the primary target of FMSF action. Involvement of cAMP in mediating FMSF action was confirmed by the application of dibutyryl cAMP. Observed motility regulatory effects with IP20 and genistein indicate contribution of PKA and tyrosine kinase in FMSF activity; enhanced phosphorylation of a tyrosine containing ≈50 kDa protein was detected in this regard. FMSF initiates a novel signaling cascade to stimulate tmAC activity that augments intracellular cAMP, which through downstream crosstalk of phosphokinases leads to enhanced forward motility in mature spermatozoa. Thus, this article for the first time describes conventional tmAC-dependent profound activation

  5. Overexpression of the Type 1 Adenylyl Cyclase in the Forebrain Leads to Deficits of Behavioral Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S.

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition. PMID:25568126

  6. Overexpression of the type 1 adenylyl cyclase in the forebrain leads to deficits of behavioral inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuanmao; Cao, Hong; Saraf, Amit; Zweifel, Larry S; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1) is an activity-dependent, calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase expressed in the nervous system that is implicated in memory formation. We examined the locomotor activity, and impulsive and social behaviors of AC1+ mice, a transgenic mouse strain overexpressing AC1 in the forebrain. Here we report that AC1+ mice exhibit hyperactive behaviors and demonstrate increased impulsivity and reduced sociability. In contrast, AC1 and AC8 double knock-out mice are hypoactive, and exhibit increased sociability and reduced impulsivity. Interestingly, the hyperactivity of AC1+ mice can be corrected by valproate, a mood-stabilizing drug. These data indicate that increased expression of AC1 in the forebrain leads to deficits in behavioral inhibition.

  7. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors. PMID:11533056

  8. Receptor number and caveolar co-localization determine receptor coupling efficiency to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Xiang, Y; Regan, J W; Insel, P A

    2001-11-01

    Recent evidence suggests that many signaling molecules localize in microdomains of the plasma membrane, particularly caveolae. In this study, overexpression of adenylyl cyclase was used as a functional probe of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) compartmentation. We found that three endogenous receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes couple with different levels of efficiency to the activation of adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6), which localizes to caveolin-rich membrane fractions. Overexpression of AC6 enhanced the maximal cAMP response to beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR)-selective activation 3.7-fold, to beta(2)AR-selective activation only 1.6-fold and to prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) not at all. Therefore, the rank order of efficacy in coupling to AC6 is beta(1)AR > beta(2)AR > prostaglandin E(2) receptor (EP(2)R). beta(2)AR coupling efficiency was greater when we overexpressed the receptor or blocked its desensitization by expressing betaARKct, an inhibitor of G protein-coupled receptor kinase activation, but was not significantly greater when cells were treated with pertussis toxin. Assessment of receptor and AC expression indicated co-localization of AC5/6, beta(1)AR, and beta(2)AR, but not EP(2)R, in caveolin-rich membranes and caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates, likely explaining the observed activation of AC6 by betaAR subtypes but lack thereof by PGE(2). When cardiomyocytes were stimulated with a betaAR agonist, beta(2)AR were no longer found in caveolin-3 immunoprecipitates; an effect that was blocked by expression of betaARKct. Thus, agonist-induced translocation of beta(2)AR out of caveolae causes a sequestration of receptor from effector and likely contributes to the lower efficacy of beta(2)AR coupling to AC6 as compared with beta(1)AR, which do not similarly translocate. Therefore, spatial co-localization is a key determinant of efficiency of coupling by particular extracellular signals to activation of GPCR-linked effectors.

  9. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L.; Barron, Megan E.; Roa, Jinae N.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3−, and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3− sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3−-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H+ absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  10. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  11. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light. PMID:24201148

  12. H2S induces vasoconstriction of rat cerebral arteries via cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Sen; Ping, Na-Na; Cao, Lei; Mi, Yan-Ni; Cao, Yong-Xiao

    2015-12-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), traditionally known for its toxic effects, is now involved in regulating vascular tone. Here we investigated the vasoconstrictive effect of H2S on cerebral artery and the underlying mechanism. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a donor of H2S, concentration-dependently induced vasoconstriction on basilar artery, which was enhanced in the presence of isoprenaline, a β-adrenoceptor agonist or forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator. Administration of NaHS attenuated the vasorelaxant effects of isoprenaline or forskolin. Meanwhile, the NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was diminished in the presence of 8B-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, but was not affected by Bay K-8644, a selective L-type Ca(2+) channel agonist. These results could be explained by the revised effects of NaHS on isoprenaline-induced cAMP elevation and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity. Additionally, NaHS-induced vasoconstriction was enhanced by removing the endothelium or in the presence of L-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase. L-NAME only partially attenuated the effect of NaHS which was given together with forskolin on the pre-contracted artery. In conclusion, H2S induces vasoconstriction of cerebral artery via, at least in part, cAMP/adenylyl cyclase pathway.

  13. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  14. A Chemoattractant-mediated Gi-coupled Pathway Activates Adenylyl Cyclase in Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Mahadeo, Dana C.; Janka-Junttila, Mirkka; Smoot, Rory L.; Roselova, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Neutrophils and Dictyostelium use conserved signal transduction pathways to decipher chemoattractant gradients and migrate directionally. In both cell types, addition of chemoattractants stimulates the production of cAMP, which has been suggested to regulate chemotaxis. We set out to define the mechanism by which chemoattractants increase cAMP levels in human neutrophils. We show that chemoattractants elicit a rapid and transient activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC). This activation is sensitive to pertussis toxin treatment but independent of phosphoinositide-3 kinase activity and an intact cytoskeleton. Remarkably, and in sharp contrast to Gαs-mediated activation, chemoattractant-induced AC activation is lost in cell lysates. Of the nine, differentially regulated transmembrane AC isoforms in the human genome, we find that isoforms III, IV, VII, and IX are expressed in human neutrophils. We conclude that the signal transduction cascade used by chemoattractants to activate AC is conserved in Dictyostelium and human neutrophils and is markedly different from the canonical Gαs-meditated pathway. PMID:17135293

  15. Persistent Electrical Activity in Primary Nociceptors after Spinal Cord Injury Is Maintained by Scaffolded Adenylyl Cyclase and Protein Kinase A and Is Associated with Altered Adenylyl Cyclase Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Bavencoffe, Alexis; Li, Yong; Wu, Zizhen; Yang, Qing; Herrera, Juan; Kennedy, Eileen J.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about intracellular signaling mechanisms that persistently excite neurons in pain pathways. Persistent spontaneous activity (SA) generated in the cell bodies of primary nociceptors within dorsal root ganglia (DRG) has been found to make major contributions to chronic pain in a rat model of spinal cord injury (SCI) (Bedi et al., 2010; Yang et al., 2014). The occurrence of SCI-induced SA in a large fraction of DRG neurons and the persistence of this SA long after dissociation of the neurons provide an opportunity to define intrinsic cell signaling mechanisms that chronically drive SA in pain pathways. The present study demonstrates that SCI-induced SA requires continuing activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), as well as a scaffolded complex containing AC5/6, A-kinase anchoring protein 150 (AKAP150), and PKA. SCI caused a small but significant increase in the expression of AKAP150 but not other AKAPs. DRG membranes isolated from SCI animals revealed a novel alteration in the regulation of AC. AC activity stimulated by Ca2+-calmodulin increased, while the inhibition of AC activity by Gαi showed an unexpected and dramatic decrease after SCI. Localized enhancement of the activity of AC within scaffolded complexes containing PKA is likely to contribute to chronic pathophysiological consequences of SCI, including pain, that are promoted by persistent hyperactivity in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic neuropathic pain is a major clinical problem with poorly understood mechanisms and inadequate treatments. Recent findings indicate that chronic pain in a rat SCI model depends upon hyperactivity in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Although cAMP signaling is involved in many forms of neural plasticity, including hypersensitivity of nociceptors in the presence of inflammatory mediators, our finding that continuing cAMP-PKA signaling is required for persistent SA months after SCI and long after isolation of

  16. [Spatial memory and regulation of brain adenylyl cyclase by serotonin and dopamine in rat with streptozotocin diabetes].

    PubMed

    Sukhov, I B; Chistyakova, O V; Shipilov, V N; Doilnitsyn, A M; Shpakov, A O

    2015-03-01

    The most common complication of diabetes mellitus of the type 1 (DM1) is a cognitive deficiency, which develops as a result of neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The aim of this work was to study the learning and spatial memory in rats with streptozotocin DM1 with different duration (1.5 and 6 months), as well as the activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) sensitive to agonists of the serotonin and the dopamine receptors in the brain of diabetic rats. Our experiments demonstrated that rats with 1.5-months DM1 has no changes in spatial memory which were evaluated in a Morris water maze whereas in rats with 6-months DM1 the spatial memory and learning ability were decreased. The alterations of the regulation of adenylyl cyclase by agonists of types 1 and 6 serotonin receptors and type 2 dopamine receptors were found in both the 1.5- and 6-months DM1 which indicates their importance in the development of cognitive deficiency. Abnormalities in the. brain ACSS can be considered as key factors in the etiology and pathogenesis of cognitive dysfunctions in DM1. Hypothesized that cognitive deficiency occurs only in the later stages of DM1 due to alterations in the serotonin and dopamine signaling systems of the brain.

  17. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F.; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways. PMID:26795422

  18. Photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC) reveals novel mechanisms underlying cAMP-dependent axonal morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhiwen; Tanaka, Kenji F; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Iseki, Mineo; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji; Koyama, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of axonal branching and elongation is essential in the development of refined neural circuits. cAMP is a key regulator of axonal growth; however, whether and how intracellular cAMP regulates axonal branching and elongation remain unclear, mainly because tools to spatiotemporally manipulate intracellular cAMP levels have been lacking. To overcome this issue, we utilized photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (PAC), which produces cAMP in response to blue-light exposure. In primary cultures of dentate granule cells transfected with PAC, short-term elevation of intracellular cAMP levels induced axonal branching but not elongation, whereas long-term cAMP elevation induced both axonal branching and elongation. The temporal dynamics of intracellular cAMP levels regulated axonal branching and elongation through the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), respectively. Thus, using PAC, our study for the first time reveals that temporal cAMP dynamics could regulate axonal branching and elongation via different signaling pathways. PMID:26795422

  19. The adenylyl cyclase Rv2212 modifies the proteome and infectivity of Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Roldán, César; Aceves-Sánchez, Michel de Jesús; Zaveri, Anisha; Charles-Niño, Claudia; Elizondo-Quiroga, Darwin Eduardo; Hernández-Gutiérrez, Rodolfo; Allen, Kirk; Visweswariah, Sandhya S; Flores-Valdez, Mario Alberto

    2015-01-01

    All organisms have the capacity to sense and respond to environmental changes. These signals often involve the use of second messengers such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). This second messenger is widely distributed among organisms and coordinates gene expression related with pathogenesis, virulence, and environmental adaptation. Genomic analysis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has identified 16 adenylyl cyclases (AC) and one phosphodiesterase, which produce and degrade cAMP, respectively. To date, ten AC have been biochemically characterized and only one (Rv0386) has been found to be important during murine infection with M. tuberculosis. Here, we investigated the impact of hsp60-driven Rv2212 gene expression in Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) during growth in vitro, and during macrophage and mice infection. We found that hsp60-driven expression of Rv2212 resulted in an increased capacity of replication in murine macrophages but an attenuated phenotype in lungs and spleen when administered intravenously in mice. Furthermore, this strain displayed an altered proteome mainly affecting proteins associated with stress conditions (bfrB, groEL-2, DnaK) that could contribute to the attenuated phenotype observed in mice.

  20. Adenylyl Cyclase Plays a Regulatory Role in Development, Stress Resistance and Secondary Metabolism in Fusarium fujikuroi

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Jorge; Ádám, Attila L.; Avalos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus Fusarium fujikuroi (Gibberella fujikuroi MP-C) produces secondary metabolites of biotechnological interest, such as gibberellins, bikaverin, and carotenoids. Production of these metabolites is regulated by nitrogen availability and, in a specific manner, by other environmental signals, such as light in the case of the carotenoid pathway. A complex regulatory network controlling these processes is recently emerging from the alterations of metabolite production found through the mutation of different regulatory genes. Here we show the effect of the targeted mutation of the acyA gene of F. fujikuroi, coding for adenylyl cyclase. Mutants lacking the catalytic domain of the AcyA protein showed different phenotypic alterations, including reduced growth, enhanced production of unidentified red pigments, reduced production of gibberellins and partially derepressed carotenoid biosynthesis in the dark. The phenotype differs in some aspects from that of similar mutants of the close relatives F. proliferatum and F. verticillioides: contrary to what was observed in these species, ΔacyA mutants of F. fujikuroi showed enhanced sensitivity to oxidative stress (H2O2), but no change in heavy metal resistance or in the ability to colonize tomato tissue, indicating a high versatility in the regulatory roles played by cAMP in this fungal group. PMID:22291883

  1. Impairment of adenylyl cyclase-mediated glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the periaqueductal grey in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yu-Cheng; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Key points Long-lasting neuropathic pain has been attributed to elevated neuronal plasticity changes in spinal, peripheral and cortical levels. Here, we found that reduced neuronal plasticity in the ventrolateral periaqueductal grey (vlPAG), a midbrain region important for initiating descending pain inhibition, may also contribute to neuropathic pain. Forskolin- and isoproterenol (isoprenaline)-elicited EPSC potentiation was impaired in the vlPAG of a rat model of neuropathic pain induced by spinal nerve injury. Down-regulation of adenylyl cyclase–cAMP– PKA signalling, due to impaired adenylyl cyclase, but not phosphodiesterase, in glutamatergic terminals may contribute to the hypofunction of excitatory synaptic plasticity in the vlPAG of neuropathic rats and the subsequent descending pain inhibition, ultimately leading to long-lasting neuropathic pain. Our results suggest that drugs that activate adenylyl cyclase in the vlPAG have the potential for relieving neuropathic pain. Abstract Neuropathic pain has been attributed to nerve injury-induced elevation of peripheral neuronal discharges and spinal excitatory synaptic plasticity while little is known about the contribution of neuroplasticity changes in the brainstem. Here, we examined synaptic plasticity changes in the ventrolateral (vl) periaqueductal grey (PAG), a crucial midbrain region for initiating descending pain inhibition, in spinal nerve ligation (SNL)-induced neuropathic rats. In vlPAG slices of sham-operated rats, forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase (AC) activator, produced long-lasting enhancement of EPSCs. This is a presynaptic effect since forskolin decreased the paired-pulse ratio and failure rate of EPSCs, and increased the frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature EPSCs. Forskolin-induced EPSC potentiation was mimicked by a β-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol (isoprenaline)), and prevented by an AC inhibitor (SQ 22536) and a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor (H89), but not by a

  2. All five cloned human somatostatin receptors (hSSTR1-5) are functionally coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Greenwood, M T; Warszynska, A; Panetta, R; Srikant, C B

    1994-01-28

    Recent reports have suggested that only some of the cloned somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) are coupled to adenylyl cyclase. These studies have used both stable and transiently transfected cells or cells lacking appropriate Gi alpha and are controversial. To investigate SSTR signalling mechanisms, we have established stably transfected CHO-K1 cells expressing human genes for SSTR1-5. The effect of 0.1-100 nM SST-14 and SST-28 on forskolin (1 microM) stimulated cAMP accumulation was determined and compared to their receptor binding affinities. The 5 expressed hSSTRs bound SST-14 and SST-28 with high affinity (IC50 1.1-2.1 nM for SST-14; IC50 0.25-5.4 nM for SST-28). hSSTR1-4 bound SST-14 > SST-28 whereas hSSTR5 bound SST-28 > SST-14. Radioligand binding to hSSTR1-5 was significantly inhibited by GTP, GTP gamma S and pertussis toxin. Both SST-14 and SST-28 inhibited forskolin-induced cAMP stimulation with ED50 values which paralleled their binding affinities for the individual hSSTR subtypes. These results demonstrate that all 5 human SSTRs are functionally coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in CHO-K1 cells via pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins.

  3. Gene Expression Profiles of Main Olfactory Epithelium in Adenylyl Cyclase 3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenshan; Zhou, Yanfen; Luo, Yingtao; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Yunpeng; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Yongchao; Storm, Daniel R.; Ma, Runlin Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl Cyclase 3 (AC3) plays an important role in the olfactory sensation-signaling pathway in mice. AC3 deficiency leads to defects in olfaction. However, it is still unknown whether AC3 deficiency affects gene expression or olfactory signal transduction pathways within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). In this study, gene microarrays were used to screen differentially expressed genes in MOE from AC3 knockout (AC3−/−) and wild-type (AC3+/+) mice. The differentially expressed genes identified were subjected to bioinformatic analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Gene expression in the MOE from AC3−/− mice was significantly altered, compared to AC3+/+ mice. Of the 41266 gene probes, 3379 had greater than 2-fold fold change in expression levels between AC3−/− and AC3+/+ mice, accounting for 8% of the total gene probes. Of these genes, 1391 were up regulated, and 1988 were down regulated, including 425 olfactory receptor genes, 99 genes that are specifically expressed in the immature olfactory neurons, 305 genes that are specifically expressed in the mature olfactory neurons, and 155 genes that are involved in epigenetic regulation. Quantitative RT-PCR verification of the differentially expressed epigenetic regulation related genes, olfactory receptors, ion transporter related genes, neuron development and differentiation related genes, lipid metabolism and membrane protein transport etc. related genes showed that P75NTR, Hinfp, Gadd45b, and Tet3 were significantly up-regulated, while Olfr370, Olfr1414, Olfr1208, Golf, Faim2, Tsg101, Mapk10, Actl6b, H2BE, ATF5, Kirrrel2, OMP, Drd2 etc. were significantly down-regulated. In summary, AC3 may play a role in proximal olfactory signaling and play a role in the regulation of differentially expressed genes in mouse MOE. PMID:26633363

  4. Calcium influx through L-type channels attenuates skeletal muscle contraction via inhibition of adenylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Menezes-Rodrigues, Francisco Sandro; Pires-Oliveira, Marcelo; Duarte, Thiago; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar Julian; Chiavegatti, Tiago; Godinho, Rosely Oliveira

    2013-11-15

    Skeletal muscle contraction is triggered by acetylcholine induced release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum. Although this signaling pathway is independent of extracellular Ca(2+), L-type voltage-gated calcium channel (Cav) blockers have inotropic effects on frog skeletal muscles which occur by an unknown mechanism. Taking into account that skeletal muscle fiber expresses Ca(+2)-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms and that cAMP is able to increase skeletal muscle contraction force, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) influx on mouse skeletal muscle contraction and the putative crosstalk between extracellular Ca(2+) and intracellular cAMP signaling pathways. The effects of Cav blockers (verapamil and nifedipine) and extracellular Ca(2+) chelator EGTA were evaluated on isometric contractility of mouse diaphragm muscle under direct electrical stimulus (supramaximal voltage, 2 ms, 0.1 Hz). Production of cAMP was evaluated by radiometric assay while Ca(2+) transients were assessed by confocal microscopy using L6 cells loaded with fluo-4/AM. Ca(2+) channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine had positive inotropic effect, which was mimicked by removal of extracellular Ca(+2) with EGTA or Ca(2+)-free Tyrode. While phosphodiesterase inhibitor IBMX potentiates verapamil positive inotropic effect, it was abolished by AC inhibitors SQ22536 and NYK80. Finally, the inotropic effect of verapamil was associated with increased intracellular cAMP content and mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+), indicating that positive inotropic effects of Ca(2+) blockers depend on cAMP formation. Together, our results show that extracellular Ca(2+) modulates skeletal muscle contraction, through inhibition of Ca(2+)-sensitive AC. The cross-talk between extracellular calcium and cAMP-dependent signaling pathways appears to regulate the extent of skeletal muscle contraction responses.

  5. Gene Expression Profiles of Main Olfactory Epithelium in Adenylyl Cyclase 3 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenshan; Zhou, Yanfen; Luo, Yingtao; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Yunpeng; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Yongchao; Storm, Daniel R; Ma, Runlin Z

    2015-11-30

    Adenylyl Cyclase 3 (AC3) plays an important role in the olfactory sensation-signaling pathway in mice. AC3 deficiency leads to defects in olfaction. However, it is still unknown whether AC3 deficiency affects gene expression or olfactory signal transduction pathways within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). In this study, gene microarrays were used to screen differentially expressed genes in MOE from AC3 knockout (AC3(-/-)) and wild-type (AC3(+/+)) mice. The differentially expressed genes identified were subjected to bioinformatic analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Gene expression in the MOE from AC3(-/-) mice was significantly altered, compared to AC3(+/+) mice. Of the 41266 gene probes, 3379 had greater than 2-fold fold change in expression levels between AC3(-/-) and AC3(+/+) mice, accounting for 8% of the total gene probes. Of these genes, 1391 were up regulated, and 1988 were down regulated, including 425 olfactory receptor genes, 99 genes that are specifically expressed in the immature olfactory neurons, 305 genes that are specifically expressed in the mature olfactory neurons, and 155 genes that are involved in epigenetic regulation. Quantitative RT-PCR verification of the differentially expressed epigenetic regulation related genes, olfactory receptors, ion transporter related genes, neuron development and differentiation related genes, lipid metabolism and membrane protein transport etc. related genes showed that P75NTR, Hinfp, Gadd45b, and Tet3 were significantly up-regulated, while Olfr370, Olfr1414, Olfr1208, Golf, Faim2, Tsg101, Mapk10, Actl6b, H2BE, ATF5, Kirrrel2, OMP, Drd2 etc. were significantly down-regulated. In summary, AC3 may play a role in proximal olfactory signaling and play a role in the regulation of differentially expressed genes in mouse MOE.

  6. Intracellular role of adenylyl cyclase in regulation of lateral pseudopod formation during Dictyostelium chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Stepanovic, Vesna; Wessels, Deborah; Daniels, Karla; Loomis, William F; Soll, David R

    2005-04-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) functions as the extracellular chemoattractant in the aggregation phase of Dictyostelium development. There is some question, however, concerning what role, if any, it plays intracellularly in motility and chemotaxis. To test for such a role, the behavior of null mutants of acaA, the adenylyl cyclase gene that encodes the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis during aggregation, was analyzed in buffer and in response to experimentally generated spatial and temporal gradients of extracellular cAMP. acaA- cells were defective in suppressing lateral pseudopods in response to a spatial gradient of cAMP and to an increasing temporal gradient of cAMP. acaA- cells were incapable of chemotaxis in natural waves of cAMP generated by majority control cells in mixed cultures. These results indicate that intracellular cAMP and, hence, adenylyl cyclase play an intracellular role in the chemotactic response. The behavioral defects of acaA- cells were surprisingly similar to those of cells of null mutants of regA, which encodes the intracellular phosphodiesterase that hydrolyzes cAMP and, hence, functions opposite adenylyl cyclase A (ACA). This result is consistent with the hypothesis that ACA and RegA are components of a receptor-regulated intracellular circuit that controls protein kinase A activity. In this model, the suppression of lateral pseudopods in the front of a natural wave depends on a complete circuit. Hence, deletion of any component of the circuit (i.e., RegA or ACA) would result in the same chemotactic defect.

  7. Role of adenylyl cyclase in reduced β-adrenoceptor-mediated vasorelaxation during maturation

    PubMed Central

    López-Canales, O.A.; Castillo-Hernandez, M.C.; Vargas-Robles, H.; Rios, A.; López-Canales, J.S.; Escalante, B.

    2016-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor (βAR)-dependent blood vessel relaxation is impaired in older animals and G protein activation has been suggested as the causative mechanism. Here, we investigated the role of βAR subtypes (β1AR, β2AR, and β3AR) and cAMP in maturation-dependent vasorelaxation impairment. Aortic rings from 15 Sprague-Dawley male rats (3 or 9 weeks old) were harvested and left intact or denuded of the endothelium. Vascular relaxation in aortic rings from younger and older groups was compared in the presence of βAR subtype agonists and antagonists along with cAMP and cGMP antagonists. Isolated aortic rings were used to evaluate relaxation responses, protein expression was evaluated by western blot or real time PCR, and metabolites were measured by ELISA. Expression of βAR subtypes and adenylyl cyclase was assessed, and cAMP activity was measured in vascular tissue from both groups. Isoproterenol- and BRL744-dependent relaxation in aortic rings with and without endothelium from 9-week-old rats was impaired compared with younger rats. The β1AR antagonist CGP20712A (10-7 M) did not affect isoproterenol or BRL744-dependent relaxation in arteries from either group. The β2AR antagonist ICI-118,551 (10-7 M) inhibited isoproterenol-dependent aortic relaxation in both groups. The β3AR antagonist SR59230A (10-7 M) inhibited isoproterenol- and BRL744-dependent aortic ring relaxation in younger but not in older rats. All βAR subtypes were expressed in both groups, although β3AR expression was lower in the older group. Adenylyl cyclase (SQ 22536) or protein kinase A (H89) inhibitors prevented isoproterenol-induced relaxation in younger but not in older rats. Production of cAMP was reduced in the older group. Adenylyl cyclase III and RyR3 protein expression was higher in the younger group. In conclusion, altered expression of β3AR and adenylyl cyclase III may be responsible for reduced cAMP production in the older group. PMID:27383122

  8. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Barott, K. L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K. C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  9. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  10. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  11. Biological Activity of the Alternative Promoters of the Dictyostelium discoideum Adenylyl Cyclase A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Centeno, Javier; Sastre, Leandro

    2016-01-01

    Amoebae of the Dictyostelium discoideum species form multicellular fruiting bodies upon starvation. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is used as intercellular signalling molecule in cell-aggregation, cell differentiation and morphogenesis. This molecule is synthesized by three adenylyl cyclases, one of which, ACA, is required for cell aggregation. The gene coding for ACA (acaA) is transcribed from three different promoters that are active at different developmental stages. Promoter 1 is active during cell-aggregation, promoters 2 and 3 are active in prespore and prestalk tip cells at subsequent developmental stages. The biological relevance of acaA expression from each of the promoters has been studied in this article. The acaA gene was expressed in acaA-mutant cells, that do not aggregate, under control of each of the three acaA promoters. acaA expression under promoter 1 control induced cell aggregation although subsequent development was delayed, very small fruiting bodies were formed and cell differentiation genes were expressed at very low levels. Promoter 2-driven acaA expression induced the formation of small aggregates and small fruiting bodies were formed at the same time as in wild-type strains and differentiation genes were also expressed at lower levels. Expression of acaA from promoter 3 induced aggregates and fruiting bodies formation and their size and the expression of differentiation genes were more similar to that of wild-type cells. Expression of acaA from promoters 1 and 2 in AX4 cells also produced smaller structures. In conclusion, the expression of acaA under control of the aggregation-specific Promoter 1 is able to induce cell aggregation in acaA-mutant strains. Expression from promoters 2 and 3 also recovered aggregation and development although promoter 3 induced a more complete recovery of fruiting body formation. PMID:26840347

  12. Identification of a gamma subunit associated with the adenylyl cyclase regulatory proteins Ns and Ni.

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, J D; Codina, J; Risinger, R; Birnbaumer, L

    1984-02-25

    The subunit composition of the Ns and Ni, the human erythrocyte stimulatory and inhibitory regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase, respectively, were analyzed by a sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing discontinuous urea and polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis system designed for the study of low molecular weight polypeptides. This system disclosed that these proteins, in addition to their known alpha and beta subunits, contain an additional small peptide of apparent molecular weight of 5,000 (5K). This "5K peptide" is also present in preparations of another protein which we termed "40K protein" on the basis of its hydrodynamic behavior and whose primary protein constituent is the Mr 35,000 beta subunit of the above regulatory proteins. Analyzing Ni, the 5K peptide was functionally related to the protein by showing that its apparent Stokes radius changes from 5.9 to 5.1 nm after treatment with guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate and magnesium in parallel with the alpha and beta subunits. These data are interpreted as evidence for the existence of a third subunit associated with the regulatory proteins of adenylyl cyclase. We call this subunit gamma and propose a minimum subunit structure for these proteins of the alpha beta gamma type. PMID:6321456

  13. Bicarbonate-sensitive soluble and transmembrane adenylyl cyclases in peripheral chemoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Ana R; Holmes, Andrew P S; Sample, Vedangi; Kumar, Prem; Cann, Martin J; Monteiro, Emília C; Zhang, Jin; Gauda, Estelle B

    2013-08-15

    Stimulation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors by hypercapnia triggers a reflex ventilatory response via a cascade of cellular events, which includes generation of cAMP. However, it is not known if molecular CO2/HCO3(-) and/or H(+) mediate this effect and how these molecules contribute to cAMP production. We previously reported that the CB highly expresses HCO3(-)-sensitive soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). In the present study we systematically characterize the role of sAC in the CB, comparing the effect of isohydric hypercapnia (IH) in cAMP generation through activation of sAC or transmembrane-adenylyl cyclase (tmAC). Pharmacological deactivation of sAC and tmAC decreased the CB cAMP content in normocapnia and IH with no differences between these two conditions. Changes from normocapnia to IH did not effect the degree of PKA activation and the carotid sinus nerve discharge frequency. sAC and tmAC are functional in CB but intracellular elevations in CO2/HCO3(-) in IH conditions on their own are insufficient to further activate these enzymes, suggesting that the hypercapnic response is dependent on secondary acidosis.

  14. CO2/HCO3(-)- and calcium-regulated soluble adenylyl cyclase as a physiological ATP sensor.

    PubMed

    Zippin, Jonathan H; Chen, Yanqiu; Straub, Susanne G; Hess, Kenneth C; Diaz, Ana; Lee, Dana; Tso, Patrick; Holz, George G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2013-11-15

    The second messenger molecule cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. In mammalian cells, cAMP can be generated from hormone- and G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases or via the widely expressed and structurally and biochemically distinct enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC). sAC activity is uniquely stimulated by bicarbonate ions, and in cells, sAC functions as a physiological carbon dioxide, bicarbonate, and pH sensor. sAC activity is also stimulated by calcium, and its affinity for its substrate ATP suggests that it may be sensitive to physiologically relevant fluctuations in intracellular ATP. We demonstrate here that sAC can function as a cellular ATP sensor. In cells, sAC-generated cAMP reflects alterations in intracellular ATP that do not affect transmembrane AC-generated cAMP. In β cells of the pancreas, glucose metabolism generates ATP, which corresponds to an increase in cAMP, and we show here that sAC is responsible for an ATP-dependent cAMP increase. Glucose metabolism also elicits insulin secretion, and we further show that sAC is necessary for normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Novel type of adenylyl cyclase participates in tabtoxinine-β-lactam-induced cell death and occurrence of wildfire disease in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Ito, Makoto; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Hikichi, Yasufumi; Kiba, Akinori

    2014-01-01

    Tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), a non-specific bacterial toxin, is produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, the causal agent of tobacco wildfire disease. TβL causes the plant cell death by the inhibiting glutamine synthetase, which leads to an abnormal accumulation of ammonium ions. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in TβL-induced cell death and necrotic wildfire lesions, we focused on adenylyl cyclase in Nicotiana benthamiana. We isolated the gene designated as NbAC (Nicotiana benthamiana adenylyl cyclase). Recombinant NbAC protein showed adenylyl cyclase activity in vitro. TβL-induced necrotic lesions were significantly suppressed in NbAC-silenced leaves compared with control plant leaves. However, the amount of ammonium ions was scarcely affected by NbAC-silencing. Furthermore, the silencing of NbAC also suppressed l-methionine sulfoximine-induced cell death without any changes in the amount of ammonium accumulated. When inoculated directly with P. syringae pv tabaci, NbAC-silenced plants showed reduced symptoms. These results suggest that NbAC might play an essential role in intracellular signal transduction during TβL-induced cell death and necrotic wildfire disease development.

  16. Hydroxamate based inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase. Part 2: the effect of cyclic linkers on P-site binding.

    PubMed

    Levy, Daniel; Bao, Ming; Tomlinson, James; Scarborough, Robert

    2002-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a family of enzymes that are key elements of signal transduction by virtue of their ability to convert ATP to cAMP. The catalytic mechanism of this transformation proceeds through initial binding of ATP to the purine binding site (P-site) followed by metal mediated cyclization with loss of pyrophosphate. Previous work in our group identified novel inhibitors which possess an adenine ring joined to a metal-coordinating hydroxamic acid through flexible linkers. Considering the spatial positioning of the metals with respect to the adenine binding site coupled with potentially favorable entropic factors, conformational restriction of the tether through a stereochemistry based SAR employing a rigid cyclic scaffold was explored. PMID:12372508

  17. The catalytic domains of thiamine triphosphatase and CyaB-like adenylyl cyclase define a novel superfamily of domains that bind organic phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Aravind, L

    2002-01-01

    Background The CyaB protein from Aeromonas hydrophila has been shown to possess adenylyl cyclase activity. While orthologs of this enzyme have been found in some bacteria and archaea, it shows no detectable relationship to the classical nucleotide cyclases. Furthermore, the actual biological functions of these proteins are not clearly understood because they are also present in organisms in which there is no evidence for cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results We show that the CyaB like adenylyl cyclase and the mammalian thiamine triphosphatases define a novel superfamily of catalytic domains called the CYTH domain that is present in all three superkingdoms of life. Using multiple alignments and secondary structure predictions, we define the catalytic core of these enzymes to contain a novel α+β scaffold with 6 conserved acidic residues and 4 basic residues. Using contextual information obtained from the analysis of gene neighborhoods and domain fusions, we predict that members of this superfamily may play a central role in the interface between nucleotide and polyphosphate metabolism. Additionally, based on contextual information, we identify a novel domain (called CHAD) that is predicted to functionally interact with the CYTH domain-containing enzymes in bacteria and archaea. The CHAD is predicted to be an alpha helical domain, and contains conserved histidines that may be critical for its function. Conclusions The phyletic distribution of the CYTH domain suggests that it is an ancient enzymatic domain that was present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor and was involved in nucleotide or organic phosphate metabolism. Based on the conservation of catalytic residues, we predict that CYTH domains are likely to chelate two divalent cations, and exhibit a reaction mechanism that is dependent on two metal ions, analogous to nucleotide cyclases, polymerases and certain phosphoesterases. Our analysis also suggests that the experimentally characterized members of this

  18. Purification, characterization, and N-terminal amino acid sequence of the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease from bovine sperm.

    PubMed

    Adeniran, A J; Shoshani, I; Minuth, M; Awad, J A; Elce, J S; Johnson, R A

    1995-03-01

    We previously reported the extraction of a factor from bovine sperm that activated adenylyl cyclases of rat brain and human platelets, and identified it as a trypsin-like protease that was referred to as "ninhibin." This proteolytic activity was purified to near homogeneity from an alkaline extract of washed sperm particles by sequential chromatography on p-aminobenzamidine agarose and CM-Sephadex. Purification was greater than 100-fold with nearly 30% recovery of protease activity exhibiting a major band of approximately 40 kDa. An approximately 45-kDa form of the protease was also evident in crude extracts and was preferentially isolated when the enzyme was prepared in the presence of a mixture of protease inhibitors. The larger form of the protease was substantially less effective in stimulating adenylyl cyclase than was the smaller form; it is likely to be a zymogen form from which the smaller, more active form is derived. Purified forms of acrosin and ninhibin exhibited similar mobilities on PAGE, similar capacities for activating adenylyl cyclase, similar patterns of proteolytic fragmentation, and similar immunoblot patterns obtained with an antibody against purified bovine acrosin. More importantly, the N-terminal amino acid sequence of bovine ninhibin was found to be identical with that of bovine acrosin and caprine acrosin and more than 75% identical with porcine acrosin. The data support the conclusion that the adenylyl cyclase-activating protease previously referred to as ninhibin is, in fact, acrosin. PMID:7756444

  19. pH sensing via bicarbonate-regulated “soluble” adenylyl cyclase (sAC)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Nawreen; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a source of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′ monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is directly regulated by bicarbonate (HCO−3) ions. In living cells, HCO−3 ions are in nearly instantaneous equilibrium with carbon dioxide (CO2) and pH due to the ubiquitous presence of carbonic anhydrases. Numerous biological processes are regulated by CO2, HCO−3, and/or pH, and in a number of these, sAC has been shown to function as a physiological CO2/HCO3/pH sensor. In this review, we detail the known pH sensing functions of sAC, and we discuss two highly-studied, pH-dependent pathways in which sAC might play a role. PMID:24324443

  20. Activation of Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Protects against Secretagogue Stimulated Zymogen Activation in Rat Pancreaic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolodecik, Thomas R.; Shugrue, Christine A.; Thrower, Edwin C.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Gorelick, Fred S.

    2012-01-01

    An early feature of acute pancreatitis is activation of zymogens, such as trypsinogen, within the pancreatic acinar cell. Supraphysiologic concentrations of the hormone cholecystokinin (CCK; 100 nM), or its orthologue cerulein (CER), induce zymogen activation and elevate levels of cAMP in pancreatic acinar cells. The two classes of adenylyl cyclase, trans-membrane (tmAC) and soluble (sAC), are activated by distinct mechanisms, localize to specific subcellular domains, and can produce locally high concentrations of cAMP. We hypothesized that sAC activity might selectively modulate acinar cell zymogen activation. sAC was identified in acinar cells by PCR and immunoblot. It localized to the apical region of the cell under resting conditions and redistributed intracellularly after treatment with supraphysiologic concentrations of cerulein. In cerulein-treated cells, pre-incubation with a trans-membrane adenylyl cyclase inhibitor did not affect zymogen activation or amylase secretion. However, treatment with a sAC inhibitor (KH7), or inhibition of a downstream target of cAMP, protein kinase A (PKA), significantly enhanced secretagogue-stimulated zymogen activation and amylase secretion. Activation of sAC with bicarbonate significantly inhibited secretagogue-stimulated zymogen activation; this response was decreased by inhibition of sAC or PKA. Bicarbonate also enhanced secretagogue-stimulated cAMP accumulation; this effect was inhibited by KH7. Bicarbonate treatment reduced secretagogue-stimulated acinar cell vacuolization, an early marker of pancreatitis. These data suggest that activation of sAC in the pancreatic acinar cell has a protective effect and reduces the pathologic activation of proteases during pancreatitis. PMID:22844459

  1. Human serotonin1B receptor expression in Sf9 cells: phosphorylation, palmitoylation, and adenylyl cyclase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ng, G Y; George, S R; Zastawny, R L; Caron, M; Bouvier, M; Dennis, M; O'Dowd, B F

    1993-11-01

    Analysis of the primary protein structure of the human serotonin1B (5-HT1B) receptor reveals consensus sites for phosphorylation and a putative site for palmitoylation. To investigate these posttranslational modifications, we have expressed a c-myc epitope-tagged 5-HT1B (m5-HT1B) receptor in Sf9 cells. This strategy enabled receptors to be detected by immunoblot analysis and purified by immunoprecipitation using a monoclonal antibody, 9E10, specific for the c-myc epitope. Agonist radioligand [3H]5-HT binding studies showed that the expressed 5-HT1B and m5-HT1B receptors displayed the characteristic pharmacological profile of the neuronal 5-HT1B receptor. The expressed receptors displayed both high- and low-affinity states for [3H]5-HT, suggesting that the receptors were coupled to endogenous G-proteins. Indeed, agonist binding to the high-affinity receptor state was regulated in the presence of GTP gamma S, Gpp(NH)p, and pertussis toxin. [32P]ADP-ribosylation experiments identified a major approximately 41-kDa ADP-ribosylated protein present in Sf9 membranes that comigrated with partially purified bovine brain Gi alpha/G(o) alpha subunits. Measurements of adenylyl cyclase activity in membranes from cells expressing m5-HT1B receptors showed that serotonergic agonists mediated the inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity with a rank order of potency comparable to their affinity constants. Immunoblot analysis of membranes prepared from cells expressing m5-HT1B receptors and photoaffinity labeling of the immunoprecipitated material revealed photolabeled species at approximately 95 and at approximately 42 kDa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Novel metabotropic glutamate receptor negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Toms, Nick J; Roberts, Peter J

    2004-04-01

    Several excitatory amino acid ligands were found potently to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in rat cultured cerebellar astrocytes: L-cysteine sulfinic acid (L-CSA) = L-aspartate > L-glutamate >/= the glutamate uptake inhibitor, L-PDC. This property did not reflect activation of conventional glutamate receptors, since the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists NMDA, AMPA, and kainate, as well as several mGlu receptor agonists [(1S,3R)-ACPD, (S)-DHPG, DCG-IV, L-AP4, L-quisqualate, and L-CCG-I], were without activity. In addition, the mGlu receptor antagonists, L-AP3, (S)-4CPG, Eglu, LY341495, (RS)-CPPG, and (S)-MCPG failed to reverse 30 microM glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. L-PDC-mediated inhibition was abolished by the addition of the enzyme glutamate-pyruvate transaminase. This finding suggests that the effect of L-PDC is indirect and that it is mediated through endogenously released L-glutamate. Interestingly, L-glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses were resistant to pertussis toxin, suggesting that G(i)/G(o) type G proteins were not involved. However, inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC, either via the selective PKC inhibitor GF109203X or chronic PMA treatment) augmented glutamate-mediated inhibitory responses. Although mGlu3 receptors (which are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase) are expressed in astrocyte populations, in our study Western blot analysis indicated that this receptor type was not expressed in cerebellar astrocytes. We therefore suggest that cerebellar astrocytes express a novel mGlu receptor, which is negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and possesses an atypical pharmacological profile. PMID:14999808

  3. Identification of an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor for treating neuropathic and inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hansen; Xu, Hui; Wu, Long-Jun; Kim, Susan S; Chen, Tao; Koga, Kohei; Descalzi, Giannina; Gong, Bo; Vadakkan, Kunjumon I; Zhang, Xuehan; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Zhuo, Min

    2011-01-12

    Neuropathic pain, often caused by nerve injury, is commonly observed among patients with different diseases. Because its basic mechanisms are poorly understood, effective medications are limited. Previous investigations of basic pain mechanisms and drug discovery efforts have focused mainly on early sensory neurons such as dorsal root ganglion and spinal dorsal horn neurons, and few synaptic-level studies or new drugs are designed to target the injury-related cortical plasticity that accompanies neuropathic pain. Our previous work has demonstrated that calcium-stimulated adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) is critical for nerve injury-induced synaptic changes in the anterior cingulate cortex. Through rational drug design and chemical screening, we have identified a lead candidate AC1 inhibitor, NB001, which is relatively selective for AC1 over other adenylate cyclase isoforms. Using a variety of behavioral tests and toxicity studies, we have found that NB001, when administered intraperitoneally or orally, has an analgesic effect in animal models of neuropathic pain, without any apparent side effects. Our study thus shows that AC1 could be a productive therapeutic target for neuropathic pain and describes a new agent for the possible treatment of neuropathic pain.

  4. Inhibitory role of monovalent ions on rat brain cortex adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Nikolic, Ivana; Mitrovic, Marina; Zelen, Ivanka; Zaric, Milan; Kastratovic, Tatjana; Stanojevic, Marijana; Nenadovic, Milutin; Stojanovic, Tomislav

    2013-10-01

    Adenylyl cyclases, comprise of a large family of enzymes that catalyze synthesis of the cyclic AMP from ATP. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of monovalent ions on both basal, stimulated adenylate cyclase EC 4.6.1.1 (AC) activity and C unit of AC and on GTPase active G-protein in the synaptic membranes of rat brain cortex. The effect of ion concentration from 30 to 200 mM (1 mM MgCl2) showed dose-dependent and significant inhibition of the basal AC activity, stimulated and unstimulated C unit activity. Stimulation of AC with 5 μM GTPγS in the presence of 50-200 mM of tested salts showed inhibitory effect on the AC activity. From our results it could be postulated that the investigated monovalent ions exert inhibitory effect on the AC complex activity by affecting the intermolecular interaction of the activated α subunit of G/F protein and the C unit of AC complex an inhibitory influence of tested monovalent ions on these molecular interaction.

  5. Nucleotidyl Cyclase Activity of Particulate Guanylyl Cyclase A: Comparison with Particulate Guanylyl Cyclases E and F, Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Bacterial Adenylyl Cyclases Cyaa and Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Beste, Kerstin Y.; Spangler, Corinna M.; Burhenne, Heike; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs) regulate many physiological processes by catalyzing the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. The GC family consists of seven particulate GCs (pGCs) and a nitric oxide-activated soluble GC (sGC). Rat sGC α1β1 possesses much broader substrate specificity than previously assumed. Moreover, the exotoxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor (EF) from Bacillus anthracis possess nucleotidyl cyclase (NC) activity. pGC-A is a natriuretic peptide-activated homodimer with two catalytic sites that act cooperatively. Here, we studied the NC activity of rat pGC-A in membranes of stably transfected HEK293 cells using a highly sensitive and specific HPLC-MS/MS technique. GTP and ITP were effective, and ATP and XTP were only poor, pGC-A substrates. In contrast to sGC, pGC-A did not use CTP and UTP as substrates. pGC-E and pGC-F expressed in bovine rod outer segment membranes used only GTP as substrate. In intact HEK293 cells, pGC-A generated only cGMP. In contrast to pGCs, EF and CyaA showed very broad substrate-specificity. In conclusion, NCs exhibit different substrate-specificities, arguing against substrate-leakiness of enzymes and pointing to distinct physiological functions of cyclic purine and pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:23922959

  6. Deficits in behavioral sensitization and dopaminergic responses to methamphetamine in adenylyl cyclase 1/8-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Bosse, Kelly E; Charlton, Jennifer L; Susick, Laura L; Newman, Brooke; Eagle, Andrew L; Mathews, Tiffany A; Perrine, Shane A; Conti, Alana C

    2015-12-01

    The cAMP/protein kinase A pathway regulates methamphetamine (METH)-induced neuroplasticity underlying behavioral sensitization. We hypothesize that adenylyl cyclases (AC) 1/8 mediate these neuroplastic events and associated striatal dopamine regulation. Locomotor responses to METH (1 and 5 mg/kg) and striatal dopamine function were evaluated in mice lacking AC 1/8 (DKO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Only 5 mg/kg METH induced an acute locomotor response in DKO mice, which was significantly attenuated versus WT controls. DKO mice showed a marked attenuation in the development and expression of METH-induced behavioral sensitization across doses relative to WT controls. While basal and acute METH (5 mg/kg)-evoked accumbal dialysate dopamine levels were similar between genotypes, saline-treated DKO mice showed elevated tissue content of dopamine and homovanillic acid in the dorsal striatum (DS), reflecting dysregulated dopamine homeostasis and/or metabolism. Significant reductions in DS dopamine levels were observed in METH-sensitized DKO mice compared to saline-treated controls, an effect not observed in WT mice. Notably, saline-treated DKO mice had significantly increased phosphorylated Dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein levels, which were not further augmented following METH sensitization, as observed in WT mice. These data indicate that AC 1/8 are critical to mechanisms subserving drug-induced behavioral sensitization and mediate nigrostriatal pathway METH sensitivity. Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 and 8 were studied for their involvement in the adaptive neurobehavioral responses to methamphetamine. AC 1/8 double knockout (DKO) mice showed heightened basal locomotor activity and dorsal striatal dopamine responsivity. Conversely, methamphetamine-induced locomotor activity was attenuated in DKO mice, accompanied by reductions in dopamine and HVA content and impaired DARPP-32 activation. These findings indicate AC 1/8 signaling

  7. Allosteric activation of Bordetella pertussis adenylyl cyclase by calmodulin: molecular dynamics and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Selwa, Edithe; Davi, Marilyne; Chenal, Alexandre; Sotomayor-Pérez, Ana-Cristina; Ladant, Daniel; Malliavin, Thérèse E

    2014-07-25

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin is an essential toxin that allows Bordetella pertussis to invade eukaryotic cells, where it is activated after binding to calmodulin (CaM). Based on the crystal structure of the AC catalytic domain in complex with the C-terminal half of CaM (C-CaM), our previous molecular dynamics simulations (Selwa, E., Laine, E., and Malliavin, T. (2012) Differential role of calmodulin and calcium ions in the stabilization of the catalytic domain of adenyl cyclase CyaA from Bordetella pertussis. Proteins 80, 1028–1040) suggested that three residues (i.e. Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360)) might be important for stabilizing the AC/CaM interaction. These residues belong to a loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC, which is located at the interface between CaM and the AC catalytic loop. In the present study, we conducted the in silico and in vitro characterization of three AC variants, where one (Asn(347); ACm1A), two (Arg(338) and Asp(360); ACm2A), or three residues (Arg(338), Asn(347), and Asp(360); ACm3A) were substituted with Ala. Biochemical studies showed that the affinities of ACm1A and ACm2A for CaM were not affected significantly, whereas that of ACm3A was reduced dramatically. To understand the effects of these modifications, molecular dynamics simulations were performed based on the modified proteins. The molecular dynamics trajectories recorded for the ACm3AC-CaM complex showed that the calcium-binding loops of C-CaM exhibited large fluctuations, which could be related to the weakened interaction between ACm3A and its activator. Overall, our results suggest that the loop-helix-loop motif at the C-terminal end of AC is crucial during CaM binding for stabilizing the AC catalytic loop in an active configuration.

  8. Laboratory evolution of adenylyl cyclase independent learning in Drosophila and missing heritability.

    PubMed

    Cressy, M; Valente, D; Altick, A; Kockenmeister, E; Honegger, K; Qin, H; Mitra, P P; Dubnau, J

    2014-07-01

    Gene interactions are acknowledged to be a likely source of missing heritability in large-scale genetic studies of complex neurological phenotypes. However, involvement of rare variants, de novo mutations, genetic lesions that are not easily detected with commonly used methods and epigenetic factors also are possible explanations. We used a laboratory evolution study to investigate the modulatory effects of background genetic variation on the phenotypic effect size of a null mutation with known impact on olfactory learning. To accomplish this, we first established a population that contained variation at just 23 loci and used selection to evolve suppression of the learning defect seen with null mutations in the rutabaga adenylyl cyclase. We thus biased the system to favor relatively simplified outcomes by choosing a Mendelian trait and by restricting the genetic variation segregating in the population. This experimental design also assures that the causal effects are among the known 23 segregating loci. We observe a robust response to selection that requires the presence of the 23 variants. Analyses of the underlying genotypes showed that interactions between more than two loci are likely to be involved in explaining the selection response, with implications for the missing heritability problem.

  9. Structure of the Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase Reveals a Novel Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher,D.; Smith, N.; Kim, S.; Heroux, A.; Robinson, H.; Reddy, P.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of the class IV adenylyl cyclase (AC) from Yersinia pestis (Yp) is reported at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The class IV AC fold is distinct from the previously described folds for class II and class III ACs. The dimeric AC-IV folds into an antiparallel eight-stranded barrel whose connectivity has been seen in only three previous structures: yeast RNA triphosphatase and two proteins of unknown function from Pyrococcus furiosus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. Eight highly conserved ionic residues E10, E12, K14, R63, K76, K111, D126, and E136 lie in the barrel core and form the likely binding sites for substrate and divalent cations. A phosphate ion is observed bound to R63, K76, K111, and R113 near the center of the conserved cluster. Unlike the AC-II and AC-III active sites that utilize two-Asp motifs for cation binding, the AC-IV active site is relatively enriched in glutamate and features an ExE motif as its most conserved element. Homologs of Y. pestis AC-IV, including human thiamine triphosphatase, span the three kingdoms of life and delineate an ancient family of phosphonucleotide processing enzymes.

  10. In silico prediction of tyrosinase and adenylyl cyclase inhibitors from natural compounds.

    PubMed

    Fong, Pedro; Tong, Henry H Y; Chao, Chi M

    2014-02-01

    Although many herbal medicines are effective in the treatment of hyperpigmentation, the potency of different constituents remains unknown. In this work, more than 20,000 herbal ingredients from 453 herbs were docked into the crystal structures of adenylyl cyclase and a human homology tyrosinase model using Surflex-Dock. These two enzymes are responsible for melanin production and inhibition of them may attain a skin-whitening effect superior to currently available agents. The essential drug properties for topical formulation of the herbal ingredients, including skin permeability, sensitization, irritation, corrosive and carcinogenic properties were predicted by Dermwin, Skin Sensitization Alerts (SSA), Skin Irritation Corrosion Rules Estimation Tool (SICRET) and Benigni/Bossa rulebase module of Toxtree. Moreover, similarity ensemble and pharmacophore mapping approaches were used to forecast other potential targets for these herbal compounds by the software, SEArch and PharmMapper. Overall, this study predicted seven compounds to have advanced drug-like properties over the well-known effective tyrosinase inhibitors, arbutin and kojic acid. These seven compounds have the highest potential for further in vitro and in vivo investigation with the aim of developing safe and high-efficacy skin-whitening agents.

  11. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  12. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase Is Required for Retinal Ganglion Cell and Photoreceptor Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Fang, Jiahua; Sang, Alan; Wang, Yan; Kapiloff, Michael S.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We have previously demonstrated that soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is necessary for retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and axon growth. Here, we further investigate the role of sAC in neuronal differentiation during retinal development. Methods Chx10 or Math5 promoter-driven Cre-Lox recombination were used to conditionally delete sAC from early and intermediate retinal progenitor cells during retinal development. We examined cell type–specific markers expressed by retinal cells to estimate their relative numbers and characterize retinal laminar morphology by immunofluorescence in adult and newborn mice. Results Retinal ganglion cell and amacrine cell markers were significantly lower in the retinas of adult Math5cre/sACfl/fl and Chx10cre/sACfl/fl mice than in those of wild-type controls. The effect on RGC development was detectable as early as postnatal day 1 and deleting sAC in either Math5- or Chx10-expressing retinal progenitor cells also reduced nerve fiber layer thickness into adulthood. The thickness of the photoreceptor layer was slightly but statistically significantly decreased in both the newborn Chx10cre/sACfl/fl and Math5cre/sACfl/fl mice, but this reduction and abnormal morphology persisted in the adults in only the Chx10cre/sACfl/fl mice. Conclusions sAC plays an important role in the early retinal development of RGCs as well as in the development of amacrine cells and to a lesser degree photoreceptors. PMID:27679853

  13. Effects of abstinence and family history for alcoholism on platelet adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Menninger, J A; Barón, A E; Tabakoff, B

    1998-12-01

    Platelet adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was measured in 32 alcohol-dependent subjects and 27 control subjects who were categorized as either family history-positive (FHP) or family history-negative (FHN) for alcoholism. The interview and blood sample collections were performed shortly after cessation of heavy drinking in the alcoholic group, and repeat blood samples were obtained at the end of the first and second weeks of monitored abstinence. Control subjects received the same interview and provided blood samples at the time of the interview. When subjects were not segregated for FHP or FHN status, there were no statistically significant differences in basal, cesium fluoride (CsF)-, or forskolin-stimulated mean AC activities between the controls and the alcoholics, at study entry or with 1 or 2 weeks of abstinence. On the other hand, over the 2-week course of sobriety from heavy drinking, the CsF-stimulated AC activity of FHP alcohol-dependent subjects decreased significantly (p = 0.03). FHP alcohol-dependent subjects after 2 weeks of sobriety had significantly lower mean CsF-stimulated AC activity than FHN controls (p = 0.04), whereas the FHN alcoholic subjects' CsF-stimulated AC activity did not differ significantly from FHN controls at this point in time. When all subjects were pooled and then categorized as either FHP or FHN, there was a significant difference in mean CsF-stimulated AC activity (p = 0.02) between the FHP and FHN subject groups. Genetic factors and abstinence appear to have roles in determining low platelet AC activity in alcoholic and nonalcoholic subjects. CsF-stimulated platelet AC activity, in particular, appears to act as a trait marker for a genetic vulnerability to developing alcoholism, but recent heavy drinking in male alcoholics is a factor that can mask differences between FHP and FHN subjects.

  14. Analgesic effects of adenylyl cyclase inhibitor NB001 on bone cancer pain in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Wen-bo; Yang, Qi; Guo, Yan-yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Dong-sheng; Cheng, Qiang; Li, Xiao-ming; Tang, Jun; Zhao, Jian-ning; Liu, Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer pain, especially the one caused by metastasis in bones, is a severe type of pain. Pain becomes chronic unless its causes and consequences are resolved. With improvements in cancer detection and survival among patients, pain has been considered as a great challenge because traditional therapies are partially effective in terms of providing relief. Cancer pain mechanisms are more poorly understood than neuropathic and inflammatory pain states. Chronic inflammatory pain and neuropathic pain are influenced by NB001, an adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1)-specific inhibitor with analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effects of NB001 on cancer pain were evaluated. Results Pain was induced by injecting osteolytic murine sarcoma cell NCTC 2472 into the intramedullary cavity of the femur of mice. The mice injected with sarcoma cells for four weeks exhibited significant spontaneous pain behavior and mechanical allodynia. The continuous systemic application of NB001 (30 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, twice daily for three days) markedly decreased the number of spontaneous lifting but increased the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold. NB001 decreased the concentrations of cAMP and the levels of GluN2A, GluN2B, p-GluA1 (831), and p-GluA1 (845) in the anterior cingulate cortex, and inhibited the frequency of presynaptic neurotransmitter release in the anterior cingulate cortex of the mouse models. Conclusions NB001 may serve as a novel analgesic to treat bone cancer pain. Its analgesic effect is at least partially due to the inhibition of AC1 in anterior cingulate cortex. PMID:27612915

  15. Type 3 Adenylyl Cyclase and Somatostatin Receptor 3 Expression Persists in Aged Rat Neocortical and Hippocampal Neuronal Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Guadiana, Sarah M.; Parker, Alexander K.; Filho, Gileno F.; Sequeira, Ashton; Semple-Rowland, Susan; Shaw, Gerry; Mandel, Ronald J.; Foster, Thomas C.; Kumar, Ashok; Sarkisian, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    The primary cilia of forebrain neurons assemble around birth and become enriched with neuromodulatory receptors. Our understanding of the permanence of these structures and their associated signaling pathways in the aging brain is poor, but they are worthy of investigation because disruptions in neuronal cilia signaling have been implicated in changes in learning and memory, depression-like symptoms, and sleep anomalies. Here, we asked whether neurons in aged forebrain retain primary cilia and whether the staining characteristics of aged cilia for type 3 adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), somatostatin receptor 3 (SSTR3), and pericentrin resemble those of cilia in younger forebrain. To test this, we analyzed immunostained sections of forebrain tissues taken from young and aged male Fischer 344 (F344) and F344 × Brown Norway (F344 × BN) rats. Analyses of ACIII and SSTR3 in young and aged cortices of both strains of rats revealed that the staining patterns in the neocortex and hippocampus were comparable. Virtually every NeuN positive cell examined possessed an ACIII positive cilium. The lengths of ACIII positive cilia in neocortex were similar between young and aged for both strains, whereas in F344 × BN hippocampus, the cilia lengths increased with age in CA1 and CA3, but not in dentate gyrus (DG). Additionally, the percentages of ACIII positive cilia that were also SSTR3 positive did not differ between young and aged tissues in either strain. We also found that pericentrin, a protein that localizes to the basal bodies of neuronal cilia and functions in primary cilia assembly, persisted in aged cortical neurons of both rat strains. Collectively, our data show that neurons in aged rat forebrain possess primary cilia and that these cilia, like those present in younger brain, continue to localize ACIII, SSTR3, and pericentrin. Further studies will be required to determine if the function and signaling pathways regulated by cilia are similar in aged compared to young brain

  16. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide: A pivotal modulator of glutamatergic regulation of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Buchanan, Gordon F.; Ding, Jian M.; Hannibal, Jens; Gillette, Martha U.

    1999-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus organizes behavioral rhythms, such as the sleep–wake cycle, on a near 24-h time base and synchronizes them to environmental day and night. Light information is transmitted to the SCN by direct retinal projections via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). Both glutamate (Glu) and pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) are localized within the RHT. Whereas Glu is an established mediator of light entrainment, the role of PACAP is unknown. To understand the functional significance of this colocalization, we assessed the effects of nocturnal Glu and PACAP on phasing of the circadian rhythm of neuronal firing in slices of rat SCN. When coadministered, PACAP blocked the phase advance normally induced by Glu during late night. Surprisingly, blocking PACAP neurotransmission, with either PACAP6–38, a specific PACAP receptor antagonist, or anti-PACAP antibodies, augmented the Glu-induced phase advance. Blocking PACAP in vivo also potentiated the light-induced phase advance of the rhythm of hamster wheel-running activity. Conversely, PACAP enhanced the Glu-induced delay in the early night, whereas PACAP6–38 inhibited it. These results reveal that PACAP is a significant component of the Glu-mediated light-entrainment pathway. When Glu activates the system, PACAP receptor-mediated processes can provide gain control that generates graded phase shifts. The relative strengths of the Glu and PACAP signals together may encode the amplitude of adaptive circadian behavioral responses to the natural range of intensities of nocturnal light. PMID:10557344

  17. DIFERENTIALLY EXPRESSED ADENYLYL CYCLASE ISOFORMS MEDIATE SECRETORY FUNCTIONS IN CHOLANGIOCYTE SUBPOPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, Mario; Fiorotto, Romina; Melero, Saida; Glaser, Shannon; Francis, Heather; Spirlì, Carlo; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2009-01-01

    cAMP is generated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) a group of enzymes with different tissue specificity and regulation. We hypothesized that AC isoforms are heterogeneously expressed along the biliary tree, are associated with specific secretory stimuli and are differentially modulated in cholestasis. Methods: Small (SDC) and large (LDC) cholangiocytes were isolated from controls and from lipopolysaccharide-treated (LPS) or α-naphthylisothiocyanate-treated (ANIT) rats. ACs isoforms expression was assessed by real-time PCR. Secretion and cAMP levels were measured in intrahepatic bile duct units after stimulation with secretin, forskolin, HCO3−/CO2, cholinergic and β-adrenergic agonists, with or without selected inhibitors or after silencing of AC8 or sAC with siRNA. Results: Gene expression of the Ca2+-insensitive isoforms (AC4, AC7) was higher in SDC, while that of the Ca2+-inhibitable (AC5, AC6, AC9), the Ca2+/calmodulin stimulated AC8, and the soluble sAC, was higher in LDC. Ca2+/calmodulin-inhibitors and AC8 gene silencing inhibited choleresis and cAMP production stimulated by secretin and acetylcholine, but not by forskolin. Secretion stimulated by isoproterenol and calcineurin-inibitors was cAMP-dependent and GABA-inhibitable, consistent with activation of AC9. Cholangiocyte secretion stimulated by isohydric changes in [HCO3−]i, was cAMP-dependent and inhibited by sAC-inhibitior and by sAC gene silencing. Treatment with LPS or ANIT increased expression of AC7 and sAC, while decreasing that of the others ACs. Conclusion: These studies demonstrate a previously unrecognized role of AC in biliary pathophysiology. In fact: 1) ACs isoforms are differentially expressed in cholangiocyte subpopulations, 2) AC8, AC9, and sAC mediate cholangiocyte secretion in response to secretin, β-adrenergic agonists, or changes in [HCO3−]i, respectively, 3) ACs gene expression is modulated in experimental cholestasis. PMID:19444869

  18. Differential Interactions of the Catalytic Subunits of Adenylyl Cyclase with Forskolin Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Cibele; Hübner, Melanie; Gille, Andreas; Richter, Mark; Mou, Tung-Chung; Sprang, Stephen R.; Seifert, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The diterpene forskolin (FS) binds to, and activates, mammalian membranous adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms I–VIII. Diterpenes without C1-OH group do not activate ACs. The C1-OH group forms a hydrogen bond with the backbone oxygen of Val506 of the C1 catalytic subunit of AC (isoform V numbering). To better understand the mechanism of AC activation we examined the interactions of FS and eight FS analogs with purified catalytic AC subunits C1 (AC V) and C2 (AC II) by fluorescence spectroscopy, using 2′,3′-O-(N-methylanthraniloyl)-guanosine 5′-triphosphate (MANT-GTP) as fluorescent reporter probe, and by enzymatic activity. FS analogs induced C1/C2 assembly as assessed by fluorescence resonance energy transfer from Trp1020 of C2 to MANT-GTP and by increased direct MANT-GTP fluorescence in the order of efficacy FS ~ 7-deacetyl-FS ~ 6-acetyl-7-deacetyl-FS ~ 9-deoxy-FS > 7-deacetyl-7-(N-methylpiperazino-γ-butyryloxy)-FS > 1-deoxy-FS ~ 1,9-dideoxy-FS ~ 7-deacetyl-1-deoxy-FS ~ 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-FS. In contrast, FS analogs activated catalysis in the order of efficacy FS > 7-deacety-FS ~ 6-acetyl-7-deacetyl-FS ~ 9-deoxy-FS > 7-deacetyl-7-(N-methylpiperazino-γ-butyryloxy)-FS ≫ 1-deoxy-FS, 1,9-dideoxy-FS, 7-deacetyl-1-deoxy-FS and 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-FS (all ineffective). 1-Deoxy-FS analogs inhibited FS-stimulated catalysis by an apparently non-competitive mechanism. Our data suggest a two-step mechanism of AC activation by diterpenes. In the first step, diterpenes, regardless of their substitution pattern, promote C1/C2 assembly. In the second and yet poorly understood step, diterpenes that form a hydrogen bond between C1-OH and Val506 promote a conformational switch that results in activation of catalysis. The apparent non-competitive interaction of FS with 1-deoxy-FS analogs is explained by impaired ligand exchange due to strong hydrophobic interactions with C1/C2. PMID:19447224

  19. A mitochondrial CO2-adenylyl cyclase-cAMP signalosome controls yeast normoxic cytochrome c oxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hess, Kenneth C; Liu, Jingjing; Manfredi, Giovanni; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Barrientos, Antoni

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria, the major source of cellular energy in the form of ATP, respond to changes in substrate availability and bioenergetic demands by employing rapid, short-term, metabolic adaptation mechanisms, such as phosphorylation-dependent protein regulation. In mammalian cells, an intramitochondrial CO2-adenylyl cyclase (AC)-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway regulates aerobic energy production. One target of this pathway involves phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) subunit 4-isoform 1 (COX4i1), which modulates COX allosteric regulation by ATP. However, the role of the CO2-sAC-cAMP-PKA signalosome in regulating COX activity and mitochondrial metabolism and its evolutionary conservation remain to be fully established. We show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, normoxic COX activity measured in the presence of ATP is 55% lower than in the presence of ADP. Moreover, the adenylyl cyclase Cyr1 activity is present in mitochondria, and it contributes to the ATP-mediated regulation of COX through the normoxic subunit Cox5a, homologue of human COX4i1, in a bicarbonate-sensitive manner. Furthermore, we have identified 2 phosphorylation targets in Cox5a (T65 and S43) that modulate its allosteric regulation by ATP. These residues are not conserved in the Cox5b-containing hypoxic enzyme, which is not regulated by ATP. We conclude that across evolution, a CO2-sAC-cAMP-PKA axis regulates normoxic COX activity.

  20. Adenylyl cyclase is required for cAMP production, growth, conidial germination, and virulence in the citrus green mold pathogen Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weili; Wang, Mingshuang; Wang, Jiye; Zhu, Congyi; Chung, Kuang-Ren; Li, Hongye

    2016-11-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the causative agent of green mold decay on citrus fruit. The cAMP-mediated signaling pathway plays an important role in the transduction of extracellular signals and has been shown to regulate a wide range of developmental processes and pathogenicity in fungal pathogens. We cloned and characterized a Pdac1 gene of P. digitatum, which encodes a polypeptide similar to fungal adenylyl cyclases. Using a loss-of-function mutation in the Pdac1 gene we demonstrated a critical requirement for hyphal growth and conidial germination. Deletion of Pdac1 resulted in decreased accumulation of cAMP and down-regulation of genes encoding a G protein α subunit, both catalytic and regulatory subunits of PKA, and two transcriptional regulators StuA and Som1. Fungal mutants lacking Pdac1 produced abundant conidia, which failed to germinate effectively and displayed an elevated sensitivity to heat treatment. Pdac1 mutant failed to utilize carbohydrates effectively and thus displayed severe growth retardation on rich and synthetic media. Slow growth seen in the Pdac1 mutants could be due to a defect in nutrient sensing and acquisition. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Pdac1 was primarily expressed at the early stage of infection. Fungal pathogenicity assayed on citrus fruit revealed that P. digitatum strains impaired for Pdac1 delayed lesion formation. Our results highlight important regulatory roles of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production in P. digitatum and provide insights into the critical role of cAMP in fungal growth, development and virulence.

  1. Adenylyl cyclase is required for cAMP production, growth, conidial germination, and virulence in the citrus green mold pathogen Penicillium digitatum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weili; Wang, Mingshuang; Wang, Jiye; Zhu, Congyi; Chung, Kuang-Ren; Li, Hongye

    2016-11-01

    Penicillium digitatum is the causative agent of green mold decay on citrus fruit. The cAMP-mediated signaling pathway plays an important role in the transduction of extracellular signals and has been shown to regulate a wide range of developmental processes and pathogenicity in fungal pathogens. We cloned and characterized a Pdac1 gene of P. digitatum, which encodes a polypeptide similar to fungal adenylyl cyclases. Using a loss-of-function mutation in the Pdac1 gene we demonstrated a critical requirement for hyphal growth and conidial germination. Deletion of Pdac1 resulted in decreased accumulation of cAMP and down-regulation of genes encoding a G protein α subunit, both catalytic and regulatory subunits of PKA, and two transcriptional regulators StuA and Som1. Fungal mutants lacking Pdac1 produced abundant conidia, which failed to germinate effectively and displayed an elevated sensitivity to heat treatment. Pdac1 mutant failed to utilize carbohydrates effectively and thus displayed severe growth retardation on rich and synthetic media. Slow growth seen in the Pdac1 mutants could be due to a defect in nutrient sensing and acquisition. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that Pdac1 was primarily expressed at the early stage of infection. Fungal pathogenicity assayed on citrus fruit revealed that P. digitatum strains impaired for Pdac1 delayed lesion formation. Our results highlight important regulatory roles of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production in P. digitatum and provide insights into the critical role of cAMP in fungal growth, development and virulence. PMID:27664719

  2. Soluble adenylyl cyclase is not required for axon guidance to netrin-1.

    PubMed

    Moore, Simon W; Lai Wing Sun, Karen; Xie, Fang; Barker, Philip A; Conti, Marco; Kennedy, Timothy E

    2008-04-01

    During development, axons are directed to their targets by extracellular guidance cues. The axonal response to the guidance cue netrin-1 is profoundly influenced by the concentration of cAMP within the growth cone. In some cases, cAMP affects the sensitivity of the growth cone to netrin-1, whereas in others it changes the response to netrin-1 from attraction to repulsion. The effects of cAMP on netrin-1 action are well accepted, but the critical issue of whether cAMP production is activated by a netrin-1 induced signaling cascade remains uncertain. A previous report has suggested that axon guidance in response to netrin-1 requires cAMP production mediated by soluble adenyl cyclase (sAC). We have used genetic, molecular and biochemical strategies to assess this issue. Surprisingly, we found only extremely weak expression of sAC in embryonic neurons and determined that, under conditions where netrin-1 directs axonal pathfinding, exposure to netrin-1 does not alter cAMP levels. Furthermore, although netrin-1-deficient mice exhibit major axon guidance defects, we show that pathfinding is normal in sAC-null mice. Therefore, although cAMP can alter the response of axons to netrin-1, we conclude that netrin-1 does not alter cAMP levels in axons attracted by this cue, and that sAC is not required for axon attraction to netrin-1. PMID:18400890

  3. The Adenylyl Cyclase Plays a Regulatory Role in the Morphogenetic Switch from Vegetative to Pathogenic Lifestyle of Fusarium graminearum on Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Bormann, Jörg; Boenisch, Marike Johanne; Brückner, Elena; Firat, Demet; Schäfer, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide derived from adenosine triphosphate that acts as a second messenger throughout all kingdoms. Intracellular cAMP levels are synthesized by a membrane-bound protein, the adenylyl cyclase. In order to analyze the function of this gene and the importance of cAMP in the life cycle of the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum, the adenylyl cyclase gene (FGSG_01234) was deleted by gene replacement (ΔFgac1). The ΔFgac1 mutant displayed a drastically reduced growth on agar medium which could be rescued by a cAMP analogon. Furthermore, the ΔFgac1 mutant was unable to produce perithecia on detached wheat nodes. However, artificial conditions like carrot agar allowed perithecia development. Pathogenicity towards wheat was drastically reduced in ΔFgac1 compared to the wild type. Point-inoculated spikelets showed only small lesions but no typical head blight disease symptoms. Fluorescence microscopy using dsRed-expressing strains revealed that the ΔFgac1 strain was unable to develop any complex infection structures like lobate appressoria and infection cushions. Instead, hyphal anastomosis occurs frequently. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the lack of fungal penetration. Hence, the formation of compound appressoria seems to be essential for infection of wheat. Hyphae on flower leaves produced huge amounts of new conidia, thereby circumventing the infection cycle. This abundant sporulation on wheat epidermis was not observed in wild type. Intriguingly, the Fgac1 deletion mutant was able to infect maize cobs as wild type, indicating that cAMP signaling is not important for maize infection. The ΔFgac1 mutant was unable to produce the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol both in vitro and during wheat infection. In this study, we show that cAMP signaling controls important cellular processes such as development of infection structures, pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production and sexual reproduction. For the

  4. Block by gabapentin of the facilitation of glutamate release from rat trigeminal nucleus following activation of protein kinase C or adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Maneuf, Yannick P; McKnight, Alexander T

    2001-01-01

    The effect of activation of protein kinase C (PKC) or adenylyl cyclase on release of glutamate has been investigated in a perfused slice preparation from the rat caudal trigeminal nucleus. Stimulation of PKC by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) produced a concentration-dependent increase in K+-evoked release of [2H]-glutamate (maximum increase 45%, EC50 11.8 nM), but in the presence of gabapentin (30 μM) the facilitation of release was blocked. The adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin (FSK) also induced a concentration-dependent increase in K+-evoked release of [3H]-glutamate (maximum increase 36%, EC50 2.4 μM), and again this facilitatory effect was blocked by gabapentin (30 μM). We suggest that these results may be of relevance to the antihyperalgesic properties of gabapentin, in conditions where concomitant release of substance P and CGRP produces activation of PKC and adenylyl cyclase respectively. PMID:11564640

  5. Delivery of Large Heterologous Polypeptides across the Cytoplasmic Membrane of Antigen-Presenting Cells by the Bordetella RTX Hemolysin Moiety Lacking the Adenylyl Cyclase Domain

    PubMed Central

    Holubova, Jana; Jelinek, Jiri; Tomala, Jakub; Masin, Jiri; Kosova, Martina; Stanek, Ondrej; Bumba, Ladislav; Michalek, Jaroslav; Kovar, Marek; Sebo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA; also called ACT or AC-Hly) targets CD11b-expressing phagocytes and translocates into their cytosol an adenylyl cyclase (AC) that hijacks cellular signaling by conversion of ATP to cyclic AMP (cAMP). Intriguingly, insertion of large passenger peptides removes the enzymatic activity but not the cell-invasive capacity of the AC domain. This has repeatedly been exploited for delivery of heterologous antigens into the cytosolic pathway of CD11b-expressing dendritic cells by CyaA/AC− toxoids, thus enabling their processing and presentation on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules to cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs). We produced a set of toxoids with overlapping deletions within the first 371 residues of CyaA and showed that the structure of the AC enzyme does not contain any sequences indispensable for its translocation across target cell membrane. Moreover, replacement of the AC domain (residues 1 to 371) with heterologous polypeptides of 40, 146, or 203 residues yielded CyaAΔAC constructs that delivered passenger CTL epitopes into antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induced strong antigen-specific CD8+ CTL responses in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures. This shows that the RTX (repeats in toxin) hemolysin moiety, consisting of residues 374 to 1706 of CyaA, harbors all structural information involved in translocation of the N-terminal AC domain across target cell membranes. These results decipher the extraordinary capacity of the AC domain of CyaA to transport large heterologous cargo polypeptides into the cytosol of CD11b+ target cells and pave the way for the construction of CyaAΔAC-based polyvalent immunotherapeutic T cell vaccines. PMID:22215742

  6. Pharmacological stimulation of type 5 adenylyl cyclase stabilizes heart rate under both microgravity and hypergravity induced by parabolic flight.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunzhe; Tsunematsu, Takashi; Jiao, Qibin; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Jin, Meihua; Cai, Wenqian; Jin, Hui-Ling; Fujita, Takayuki; Ichikawa, Yasuhiro; Suita, Kenji; Kurotani, Reiko; Yokoyama, Utako; Sato, Motohiko; Iwatsubo, Kousaku; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that type 5 adenylyl cyclase (AC5) functions in autonomic regulation in the heart. Based on that work, we hypothesized that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity could regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate under micro- and hypergravity. To test this hypothesis, we selected the approach of activating AC5 activity in mice with a selective AC5 activator (NKH477) or inhibitor (vidarabine) and examining heart rate variability during parabolic flight. The standard deviation of normal R-R intervals, a marker of total autonomic variability, was significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the vidarabine group, while there were no significant changes in the NKH477 group, suggesting that autonomic regulation was unstable in the vidarabine group. The ratio of low frequency and high frequency (HF) in heart rate variability analysis, a marker of sympathetic activity, became significantly decreased under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group, while there was no such decrease in the vidarabine group. Normalized HF, a marker of parasympathetic activity, became significantly greater under micro- and hypergravity in the NKH477 group. In contrast, there was no such increase in the vidarabine group. This study is the first to indicate that pharmacological modulation of AC5 activity under micro- and hypergravity could be useful to regulate the autonomic control of the heart rate.

  7. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1/CAP1 as a biological target substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9

    SciTech Connect

    Cauwe, Benedicte; Martens, Erik; Van den Steen, Philippe E.; Proost, Paul; Van Aelst, Ilse; Blockmans, Daniel; Opdenakker, Ghislain

    2008-09-10

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically associated with the turnover of secreted structural and functional proteins. Although MMPs have been shown to process also a kaleidoscope of membrane-associated substrates, little is known about the processing of intracellular proteins by MMPs. Physiological and pathological cell apoptosis, necrosis and tumor lysis by chemotherapy, radiotherapy or immunological cytotoxicity, are examples of conditions in which an overload of intracellular proteins becomes accessible to the action of MMPs. We used a model system of dying human myelomonocytic cells to study the processing of intracellular protein substrates by gelatinase B/MMP-9 in vitro. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein-1 or CAP1 was identified as a novel and most efficient substrate of gelatinase B/MMP-9. The presence of CAP1 in the extracellular milieu in vivo was documented by analysis of urine of patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. Whereas no active MMP-9 could be detected in urines of healthy controls, all urine samples of patients with clinical parameters of renal failure contained activated MMP-9 and/or MMP-2. In addition, in some of these patients indications of CAP1 cleavage are observed, implying CAP1 degradation in vivo. The high turnover rate of CAP1 by MMP-9, comparable to that of gelatin as the natural extracellular substrate of this enzyme, may be critical to prevent pathological conditions associated with considerable cytolysis.

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans senses CO2 through the carbonic anhydrase Can2 and the adenylyl cyclase Cac1.

    PubMed

    Mogensen, Estelle Geweiss; Janbon, Guilhem; Chaloupka, James; Steegborn, Clemens; Fu, Man Shun; Moyrand, Frédérique; Klengel, Torsten; Pearson, David S; Geeves, Michael A; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2006-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, a fungal pathogen of humans, causes fatal meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Its virulence is mainly determined by the elaboration of a polysaccharide capsule surrounding its cell wall. During its life, C. neoformans is confronted with and responds to dramatic variations in CO2 concentrations; one important morphological change triggered by the shift from its natural habitat (0.033% CO2) to infected hosts (5% CO2) is the induction of capsule biosynthesis. In cells, CO2 is hydrated to bicarbonate in a spontaneous reaction that is accelerated by carbonic anhydrases. Here we show that C. neoformans contains two beta-class carbonic anhydrases, Can1 and Can2. We further demonstrate that CAN2, but not CAN1, is abundantly expressed and essential for the growth of C. neoformans in its natural environment, where CO2 concentrations are limiting. Structural studies reveal that Can2 forms a homodimer in solution. Our data reveal Can2 to be the main carbonic anhydrase and suggest a physiological role for bicarbonate during C. neoformans growth. Bicarbonate directly activates the C. neoformans Cac1 adenylyl cyclase required for capsule synthesis. We show that this specific activation is optimal at physiological pH. PMID:16400172

  9. Identification of a CAP (adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein) homologous gene in Lentinus edodes and its functional complementation of yeast CAP mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, G L; Miyazaki, Y; Nakagawa, T; Tanaka, K; Shishido, K; Matsuda, H; Kawamukai, M

    1998-04-01

    The adenylyl-cyclase-associated protein, CAP, was originally identified in yeasts as a protein that functions in both signal transduction and cytoskeletal organization. This paper reports the identification of a cDNA and genomic DNA that encodes a CAP homologue from the mushroom Lentinus edodes. The L. edodes cap gene contains eight introns and an ORF encoding a 518 amino acid protein. The L. edodes CAP is 35.5% and 40.9% identical at the amino acid level with Saccharomyces cerevisiae CAP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe CAP, respectively. The C-terminal domain shows greater homology (39-46% identity) with yeast CAPs than does the N-terminal domain (27-35% identity). Southern blotting and Northern blotting results suggest that L. edodes cap is a single-copy gene and uniformly expressed. Expression of the L. edodes CAP in both Schiz. pombe and Sacch. cerevisiae complemented defects associated with the loss of the C-terminal domain function of the endogenous CAP. By using a yeast two-hybrid assay, an interaction was demonstrated between the L. edodes CAP and Schiz. pombe actin. This result and the functional complementation test indicate that CAP from L. edodes has a conserved C-terminal domain function. PMID:9579081

  10. Effect of overexpressed adenylyl cyclase VI on β1- and β2-adrenoceptor responses in adult rat ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Joalice C C; Haydock, Stephen F; Foo, Roger; Brown, Morris J; Harding, Sian E

    2004-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase VI (ACVI) is one of the most abundantly expressed β adrenergic receptor (βAR)-coupled cyclases responsible for cyclic AMP (cAMP) production within the mammalian myocardium. We investigated the role of ACVI in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contractility and whether it is functionally coupled with β1 adrenergic receptor (β1AR). Recombinant adenoviruses were generated for ACVI and for antisense to ACVI (AS). Adult rat ventricular myocytes were transfected with ACVI virus, AS or both (SAS). Adenovirus for green fluorescent protein (GFP) served as control. Myocyte contraction amplitudes (% shortening) and relaxation times (R50) were analysed. ACVI function was determined using cAMP assays. ACVI-transfected cells demonstrated a strong 139 kDa ACVI protein band compared to controls. ACVI myocytes had higher steady-state intracellular cAMP levels than GFP myocytes when unstimulated (GFP vs ACVI=6.60±0.98 vs 14.2±2.1 fmol cAMP/viable cell, n=4, P<0.05) and in the presence of 1 μM isoprenaline or 10 μM forskolin. ACVI myocytes had increased basal contraction (% shortening: GFP vs ACVI: 1.90±1.36 vs 3.91±2.29, P<0.0001) and decreased basal R50 (GFP vs ACVI: 62.6±24.2 ms (n=50) vs 45.0±17.2 ms (n=248), P<0.0001). ACVI myocyte responses were increased for forskolin (Emax: GFP=6.70±1.59 (n=6); ACVI=9.06±0.69 (n=14), P<0.01) but not isoprenaline. ACVI myocyte responses were increased (Emax: GFP vs ACVI=3.16±0.77 vs 5.10±0.60, P<0.0001) to xamoterol (a partial β1AR-selective agonist) under β2AR blockade (+50 nM ICI 118, 551). AS decreased both control and ACVI-stimulated xamoterol responses (Emax: AS=2.59±1.42, SAS=1.38±0.5). ACVI response was not mimicked by IBMX. Conversely, response through β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) was decreased in ACVI myocytes. In conclusion, ACVI overexpression constitutively increases myocyte contraction amplitudes by raising cAMP levels. Native ACVI did not contribute to basal cAMP production or contraction

  11. Effects of 39 Compounds on Calmodulin-Regulated Adenylyl Cyclases AC1 and Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lübker, Carolin; Seifert, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) catalyze the conversion of ATP into the second messenger cAMP. Membranous AC1 (AC1) is involved in processes of memory and learning and in muscle pain. The AC toxin edema factor (EF) of Bacillus anthracis is involved in the development of anthrax. Both ACs are stimulated by the eukaryotic Ca2+-sensor calmodulin (CaM). The CaM-AC interaction could constitute a potential target to enhance or impair the AC activity of AC1 and EF to intervene in above (patho)physiological mechanisms. Thus, we analyzed the impact of 39 compounds including typical CaM-inhibitors, an anticonvulsant, an anticholinergic, antidepressants, antipsychotics and Ca2+-antagonists on CaM-stimulated catalytic activity of AC1 and EF. Compounds were tested at 10 μM, i.e., a concentration that can be reached therapeutically for certain antidepressants and antipsychotics. Calmidazolium chloride decreased CaM-stimulated AC1 activity moderately by about 30%. In contrast, CaM-stimulated EF activity was abrogated by calmidazolium chloride and additionally decreased by chlorpromazine, felodipine, penfluridol and trifluoperazine by about 20–40%. The activity of both ACs was decreased by calmidazolium chloride in the presence and absence of CaM. Thus, CaM-stimulated AC1 activity is more insensitive to inhibition by small molecules than CaM-stimulated EF activity. Inhibition of AC1 and EF by calmidazolium chloride is largely mediated via a CaM-independent allosteric mechanism. PMID:25946093

  12. Clozapine effects on adenylyl cyclase activity and serotonin type 1A receptors in human brain post-mortem.

    PubMed

    Marazziti, Donatella; Baroni, Stefano; Palego, Lionella; Betti, Laura; Giannaccini, Gino; Castagna, Maura; Naccarato, Antonio G; Luccachini, Antonio; Catena-Dell'Osso, Mario; Dell'Osso, Liliana

    2014-04-01

    Although the pharmacological profile of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine has been extensively studied in animal models, little information is available on its effects in the human brain. In particular, much interest is focused on the understanding of clozapine activity on serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission, particularly on 5-HT receptor of type 1A (5-HT(1A)) that seems to play a pivotal role in the control of the 5-HT system. The present work, therefore, aimed at evaluating the effects of clozapine and its major metabolite, norclozapine, on the modulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) velocity via 5-HT(1A) receptors in human post-mortem brain regions, in particular the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and raphe nuclei. Concomitantly, the ability of the two compounds to displace the specific binding of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist [³H]-8-hydroxy-(2-di-N-propylamino) tetralin ([³H]-8-OH-DPAT) was evaluated in the same brain areas. The results showed that both clozapine and norclozapine, although with a 20-fold lower affinity, displaced [³H]8-OH-DPAT binding in all of the brain regions analysed, suggesting their interaction with 5-HT(1A) receptors. At the same time, clozapine and, to a lesser extent, norclozapine were found to inhibit the forskolin (FK)-stimulated AC system, while decreasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations in the hippocampus only. The receptor characterisation of the clozapine effect on AC observed in the hippocampus by the use of antagonists showed a mixed profile, involving not only the 5-HT(1A) receptor but also a muscarinic (M) receptor subtype, most likely the M₄ one. These findings, while considering all the limitations due to the use of post-mortem tissues, are strongly suggestive of a region-dependent pharmacological action of clozapine in the human brain that may explain its peculiar clinical effects and open up research towards novel targets for future antipsychotic drugs.

  13. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase in amygdala blocks the effect of audiogenic seizure kindling in genetically epilepsy-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Tupal, Srinivasan; Faingold, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Genetically epilepsy-prone rats of the severe seizure strain (GEPR-9s) exhibit audiogenic seizures (AGS) beginning with wild running and ending with tonic hind limb extension (TE). AGS kindling in GEPR-9s involves periodic repetition of >/=14 seizures over 7-21 days and results in prolonged seizures and an additional phase of generalized post-tonic clonus (PTC) that follows TE. AGS kindling behavior changes are long-lasting and involve expansion of the requisite seizure neuronal network from the brainstem to include the amygdala, mediated by neuroplasticity in lateral amygdala. Recent evidence indicates that focal activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in lateral amygdala leads to precipitous acquisition of AGS-kindled seizure behaviors, suggesting that activation of AC activity is important in development and maintenance of AGS kindling. The present study further examined the role of AC in AGS-kindled seizures in GEPR-9s by focally inhibiting AC in the amygdala. Bilateral microinjection of an AC inhibitor, SQ22,536 (0.25 and 0.50 nmol/side), in AGS-kindled GEPR-9s selectively blocked PTC during AGS at 1 h after microinjection, but the pre-kindled AGS behaviors remained intact. The incidence of PTC during AGS returned to pre-drug levels 12 h after the lower dose of SQ22,536 (0.25 nmol/side). However, after the higher dose of SQ22,536 (0.5 nmol/side), complete return to AGS with PTC was seen in all GEPR-9s at 120 h. These results indicate that maintenance of AGS kindling-mediated PTC in GEPR-9s may involve activation of AC. These data provide further evidence for the involvement of AC in the epileptogenic mechanisms subserving AGS kindling.

  14. Bis-Halogen-Anthraniloyl-Substituted Nucleoside 5′-Triphosphates as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of Bordetella pertussis Adenylyl Cyclase Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Geduhn, Jens; Dove, Stefan; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; König, Burkhard

    2011-01-01

    Whooping cough is caused by Bordetella pertussis and still constitutes one of the top five causes of death in young children, particularly in developing countries. The calmodulin-activated adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxin CyaA substantially contributes to disease development. Thus, potent and selective CyaA inhibitors would be valuable drugs for the treatment of whooping cough. However, it has been difficult to obtain potent CyaA inhibitors with selectivity relative to mammalian ACs. Selectivity is important for reducing potential toxic effects. In a previous study we serendipitously found that bis-methylanthraniloyl (bis-MANT)-IMP is a more potent CyaA inhibitor than MANT-IMP (Mol Pharmacol 72:526–535, 2007). These data prompted us to study the effects of a series of 32 bulky mono- and bis-anthraniloyl (ANT)-substituted nucleotides on CyaA and mammalian ACs. The novel nucleotides differentially inhibited CyaA and ACs 1, 2, and 5. Bis-ANT nucleotides inhibited CyaA competitively. Most strikingly, bis-Cl-ANT-ATP inhibited CyaA with a potency ≥100-fold higher than ACs 1, 2, and 5. In contrast to MANT-ATP, bis-MANT-ATP exhibited low intrinsic fluorescence, thereby substantially enhancing the signal-to noise ratio for the analysis of nucleotide binding to CyaA. The high sensitivity of the fluorescence assay revealed that bis-MANT-ATP binds to CyaA already in the absence of calmodulin. Molecular modeling showed that the catalytic site of CyaA is sufficiently spacious to accommodate both MANT substituents. Collectively, we have identified the first potent CyaA inhibitor with high selectivity relative to mammalian ACs. The fluorescence properties of bis-ANT nucleotides facilitate development of a high-throughput screening assay. PMID:20962032

  15. Molecular cloning of growth hormone-releasing hormone/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide in the frog Xenopus laevis: brain distribution and regulation after castration.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Lelievre, V; Tam, J; Cheng, J W; Fuenzalida, G; Zhou, X; Waschek, J A

    2000-09-01

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) appears to regulate several neuroendocrine functions in the frog, but its messenger RNA (mRNA) structure and brain distribution are unknown. To understand the potential role of PACAP in the male frog hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, we cloned the frog Xenopus laevis PACAP mRNA and determined its distribution in the brain. We then analyzed the castration-induced alterations of mRNA expression for PACAP and its selective type I receptor (PAC1) in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area, a region known to regulate reproductive function. The PACAP mRNA encodes a peptide precursor predicted to give rise to both GH-releasing hormone and PACAP. The deduced peptide sequence of PACAP-38 was nearly identical to that of human PACAP with one amino acid substitution. Abundant PACAP mRNA was detected in the brain, but not several other tissues, including the testis. In situ hybridization revealed strong expression of the PACAP gene in the dorsal pallium, ventral hypothalamus, and nuclei of cerebellum. PACAP mRNA signals were weak to moderate in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area and were absent in the pituitary. Castration induced an increase in the expression of PACAP and PAC1 receptor mRNAs in the hypothalamic anterior preoptic area after 3 days. Replacement with testosterone prevented the castration-induced changes. These results provide a molecular basis for studying the physiological functions of PACAP in frog brain and suggest that PACAP may be involved in the feedback regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  16. Differential expression of gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptor subunit mRNAs in the developing nervous system and receptor coupling to adenylyl cyclase in embryonic neurons.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stella C; Steiger, Janine L; Gravielle, María Clara; Lyons, Helen R; Russek, Shelley J; Farb, David H

    2004-05-17

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABA(B)Rs) mediate both slow inhibitory synaptic activity in the adult nervous system and motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells. Previous papers have described the expression of GABA(B)Rs in the adult brain, but the expression and functional significance of these gene products in the embryo are largely unknown. Here we examine GABA(B)R expression from rat embryonic day 10 (E10) to E18 compared with adult and ask whether embryonic cortical neurons contain functional GABA(B)R. GABA(B)R1 transcript levels greatly exceed GABA(B)R2 levels in the developing neural tube at E11, and olfactory bulb and striatum at E17 but equalize in most regions of adult nervous tissue, except for the glomerular and granule cell layers of the main olfactory bulb and the striatum. Consistent with expression differences, the binding affinity of GABA for GABA(B)Rs is significantly lower in adult striatum compared with cerebellum. Multiple lines of evidence from in situ hybridization, RNase protection, and real-time PCR demonstrate that GABA(B)R1a, GABA(B)R1b, GABA(B)R1h (a subunit subtype, lacking a sushi domain, that we have identified in embryonic rat brain), GABA(B)R2, and GABA(B)L transcript levels are not coordinately regulated. Despite the functional requirement for a heterodimer of GABA(B)R subunits, the expression of each subunit mRNA is under independent control during embryonic development, and, by E18, GABA(B)Rs are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in neocortical neurons. The presence of embryonic GABA(B)R transcripts and protein and functional receptor coupling indicates potentially important roles for GABA(B)Rs in modulation of synaptic transmission in the developing embryonic nervous system.

  17. Agonist-induced desensitization of dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity is temporally and biochemically separated from D1 receptor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, G Y; Trogadis, J; Stevens, J; Bouvier, M; O'Dowd, B F; George, S R

    1995-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine D1 receptor was investigated by using c-myc epitope-tagged D1 receptors expressed in Sf9 (fall armyworm ovary) cells. Treatment of D1 receptors with 10 microM dopamine for 15 min led to a loss of the dopamine-detected high-affinity state of the receptor accompanying a 40% reduction in the ability of the receptor to mediate maximal dopamine stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. After 60 min of agonist exposure, 45 min after the occurrence of desensitization, 28% of the cell surface receptors were internalized into an intracellular light vesicular membrane fraction as determined by radioligand binding and supported by photoaffinity labeling, immunocytochemical staining, and immunoblot analysis. Pretreatment of cells with concanavalin A or sucrose completely blocked agonist-induced D1 receptor internalization without preventing agonist-induced desensitization, indicating a biochemical separation of these processes. Collectively, these findings indicate that the desensitization of D1 receptor-coupled adenylyl cyclase activity and D1 receptor internalization are temporarily and biochemically distinct mechanisms regulating D1 receptor function following agonist activation. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7479745

  18. Antiviral drug vidarabine possessing cardiac type 5 adenylyl cyclase inhibitory property did not affect cardiohemodynamic or electrophysiological variables in the halothane-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yuji; Cao, Xin; Ohara, Hiroshi; Izumi-Nakaseko, Hiroko; Ando, Kentaro; Nakazato, Yuji; Sugiyama, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Vidarabine has been used for the treatment of patients with local and systemic herpes virus infection; moreover, it was recently reported that it inhibits cardiac type 5 adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, vidarabine has been shown to suppress atrial fibrillation and improve congestive heart failure in experimental models of mice induced by the isoproterenol infusion. Since information that can explain its experimentally demonstrated efficacy against congestive heart failure and atrial fibrillation remains limited, in this study we precisely assessed cardio-electropharmacological effect using the halothane-anesthetized canine model. Vidarabine was intravenously administrated in three escalating doses of 1, 10, 100 mg/kg over 10 min with a pause between the doses (n = 4). Meanwhile, the vehicle dimethyl sulfoxide in volumes of 0.033, 0.033 and 0.33 mL/kg was intravenously administrated in the same manner as was vidarabine (n = 4). No significant difference was detected in any cardiohemodynamic or electrophysiological variables between the vehicle- and vidarabine-treated groups, which indicates that effective doses of vidarabine adequately inhibiting type 5 adenylyl cyclase did not affect the cardiovascular variables in vivo at all, showing its cardiac safety profile under physiological condition. Thus, the clinical utility of vidarabine might be limited to the pathological situation including congestive heart failure with increased adrenergic tone and/or sympathetic nerve-dependent atrial fibrillation. PMID:26763398

  19. Identification of a human cDNA encoding a protein that is structurally and functionally related to the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Matviw, Yu, G.; Young, D. )

    1992-11-01

    The adenylyl cyclases of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe are associated with related proteins named CAP. In S. cerevisiae, CAP is required for cellular responses mediated by the RAS/cyclic AMP pathway. Both yeast CAPs appear to be bifunctional proteins: The N-terminal domains are required for the proper function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains results in morphological and nutritional defects that appear to be unrelated to the cAMP pathways. Expression of either yeast CAP in the heterologous yeast suppresses phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of the endogenous CAP but does not suppress loss of the N-terminal domain. On the basis of the homology between the two yeast CAP proteins, we have designed degenerate oligonucleotides that we used to detect, by the polymerase chain reaction method, a human cDNA fragment encoding a CAP-related peptide. Using the polymerase chain reaction fragment as a probe, we isolated a human cDNA clone encoding a 475-amino-acid protein that is homologous to the yeast CAP proteins. Expressions of the human CAP protein in S. cerevisiae suppresses the phenotypes associated with loss of the C-terminal domain of CAP but does not suppress phenotypes associated with loss of the N-terminal domain. Thus, CAP proteins have been structurally and, to some extent, functionally conserved in evolution between yeasts and mammals. 42 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  1. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Chen, Xuanmao; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs), the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ), however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  2. Dysregulation of TrkB phosphorylation and proBDNF protein in adenylyl cyclase 1 and 8 knockout mice in a model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Hool, Steven M; Conti, Alana C

    2016-03-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediates neuron growth and is regulated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs). Mice lacking AC1/8 (DKO) have a basal reduction in the dendritic complexity of medium spiny neurons in the caudate putamen and demonstrate increased neurotoxicity in the striatum following acute neonatal ethanol exposure compared to wild type (WT) controls, suggesting a compromise in BDNF regulation under varying conditions. Although neonatal ethanol exposure can negatively impact BDNF expression, little is known about the effect on BDNF receptor activation and its downstream signaling, including Akt activation, an established neuroprotective pathway. Therefore, here we determined the effects of AC1/8 deletion and neonatal ethanol administration on BDNF and proBDNF protein expression, and activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCγ. WT and DKO mice were treated with a single dose of 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline at postnatal days 5-7 to model late-gestational alcohol exposure. Striatal and cortical tissues were analyzed using a BDNF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or immunoblotting for proBDNF, phosphorylated and total TrkB, Akt, ERK1/2, and PLCɣ1. Neither postnatal ethanol exposure nor AC1/8 deletion affected total BDNF protein expression at any time point in either region examined. Neonatal ethanol increased the expression of proBDNF protein in the striatum of WT mice 6, 24, and 48 h after exposure, with DKO mice demonstrating a reduction in proBDNF expression 6 h after exposure. Six and 24 h after ethanol administration, phosphorylation of full-length TrkB in the striatum was significantly reduced in WT mice, but was significantly increased in DKO mice only at 24 h. Interestingly, 48 h after ethanol, both WT and DKO mice demonstrated a reduction in phosphorylated full-length TrkB. In addition, Akt and PLCɣ1 phosphorylation was also decreased in ethanol-treated DKO mice 48 h after injection. These data demonstrate

  3. [THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM METFORMIN TREATMENT ON THE ACTIVITY OF ADENYLYL CYCLASE SYSTEM AND NO-SYNTHASES IN THE BRAIN AND THE MYOCARDIUM OF RATS WITH OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Kuznetsova, L A; Sharova, T S; Ignatieva, P A; Bondareva, V M; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    Biguanide metformin, which is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and shows a pronounced cardio- and neuroprotective effects. It is assumed that an important role in these effects of metformin plays its ability to positively influence the activity of NO-synthase catalyzing the synthesis of NO, the most important vasodilator, and the activity of hormone-sensitive adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS. To prove this, we have carried out a study whose purpose was to study the effect of long-term metformin treatment on the metabolic rates in obese rats, as well as on the activity of ACSS and NO-synthase in the myocardium and the brain of these animals. The metformin treatment of Wistar rats with obesity induced by high-fat diet was carried out for 2 months (daily dose of 200 mg/kg). The treatment with metformin led to a decrease in body weight and body fat, reduced glucose and insulin levels as well as reduced insulin resistance index HOMA-IR, improved glucose tolerance, and decreased the level of atherogenic forms of cholesterol. In the myocardium of obese rats, the attenuation of ACSS stimulation induced by the agonists of β1/β2-adrenergic receptors (AR) and the strengthening of β3-AR signaling has been found. At the same time, in the myocardium of animals treated with metformin, the regulation of ACSS by adrenergic agonists was restored, and the ratio of β-AR-signaling pathways returned to normal. In the brain of rats treated with metformin, adenylyl cyclase stimulating effects of serotonin and agonists of type 4 melanocortin receptors, which had been weakenend for obesity, were restored. Metformin treatment completely restored activity of total and endothelial NO-synthase in the myocardium decreased in obesity. It as also shown that metformin treatment induced hyperactivation of NO-synthase in the myocardium and brain of healthy animals. Thus, we conclude that the effects of metformin

  4. [THE EFFECTS OF LONG-TERM METFORMIN TREATMENT ON THE ACTIVITY OF ADENYLYL CYCLASE SYSTEM AND NO-SYNTHASES IN THE BRAIN AND THE MYOCARDIUM OF RATS WITH OBESITY].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Kuznetsova, L A; Sharova, T S; Ignatieva, P A; Bondareva, V M; Shpakov, A O

    2015-01-01

    Biguanide metformin, which is widely used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves carbohydrate and lipid metabolism and shows a pronounced cardio- and neuroprotective effects. It is assumed that an important role in these effects of metformin plays its ability to positively influence the activity of NO-synthase catalyzing the synthesis of NO, the most important vasodilator, and the activity of hormone-sensitive adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS. To prove this, we have carried out a study whose purpose was to study the effect of long-term metformin treatment on the metabolic rates in obese rats, as well as on the activity of ACSS and NO-synthase in the myocardium and the brain of these animals. The metformin treatment of Wistar rats with obesity induced by high-fat diet was carried out for 2 months (daily dose of 200 mg/kg). The treatment with metformin led to a decrease in body weight and body fat, reduced glucose and insulin levels as well as reduced insulin resistance index HOMA-IR, improved glucose tolerance, and decreased the level of atherogenic forms of cholesterol. In the myocardium of obese rats, the attenuation of ACSS stimulation induced by the agonists of β1/β2-adrenergic receptors (AR) and the strengthening of β3-AR signaling has been found. At the same time, in the myocardium of animals treated with metformin, the regulation of ACSS by adrenergic agonists was restored, and the ratio of β-AR-signaling pathways returned to normal. In the brain of rats treated with metformin, adenylyl cyclase stimulating effects of serotonin and agonists of type 4 melanocortin receptors, which had been weakenend for obesity, were restored. Metformin treatment completely restored activity of total and endothelial NO-synthase in the myocardium decreased in obesity. It as also shown that metformin treatment induced hyperactivation of NO-synthase in the myocardium and brain of healthy animals. Thus, we conclude that the effects of metformin

  5. Role of rut adenylyl cyclase in the ensemble regulation of presynaptic terminal excitability: reduced synaptic strength and precision in a Drosophila memory mutant.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2009-01-01

    Although modulation of presynaptic terminal excitability can profoundly affect transmission efficacy, how excitability along axonal terminal branches is regulated requires further investigations. We performed focal patch recording in Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) to monitor the activity of individual synaptic boutons along the presynaptic terminal. Analysis of the learning mutant rutabaga (rut) suggests a tight regulation of presynaptic terminal excitability by rut adenylyl cyclase (AC) that is responsible for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent cAMP synthesis. Focal excitatory junctional currents (ejcs) demonstrated that disrupted cAMP metabolism in rut mutant boutons leads to decreased transmitter release, coupled with temporal dispersion and amplitude fluctuation of ejcs during repetitive activity. Strikingly, rut motor terminals displayed greatly increased variability among corresponding terminal branches of identified NMJs in different preparations. However, boutons throughout single terminal branches were relatively uniform in either WT or rut mutant larvae. The use of electrotonic depolarization to directly evoke transmitter release from axonal terminals revealed that variability in neurotransmission originated from varying degrees of weakened excitability in rut terminals. Pharmacological treatments and axonal action potential recordings raised the possibility that defective rut AC resulted in reduced Ca2+ currents in the nerve terminal. Thus, our data indicate that rut AC not only affects transmitter release machinery, but also plays a previously unsuspected role in local excitability control, both contributing to transmission level and precision along the entire axonal terminal. PMID:19101836

  6. Adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 in metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakurina, G. V.; Kolegova, E. S.; Cheremisina, O. V.; Zavyalov, A. A.; Shishkin, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Choinzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    Progression of tumors and metastasis in particular is one of the main reasons of the high mortality rate among cancer patients. The primary role in developing metastases plays cell locomotion which requires remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Form, dynamics, localization and mechanical properties of the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins, which include the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1). The study is devoted to the investigation of CAP1 level depending on the presence or absence of metastases in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The results show the contribution of CAP1 to SCCHN and NSCLC progression. We detected the connection between the tissue protein CAP1 level and the stage of NSCLC and SCCHN disease. Also the levels of the CAP1 protein in tissues of primary tumors and metastases in lung cancer were different. Our data showed that CAP is important in the development of metastases, which suggests further perspectives in the study of this protein for projecting metastasis of NSCLC and SCCHN.

  7. Adenylyl cyclase A expression is tip-specific in Dictyostelium slugs and directs StatA nuclear translocation and CudA gene expression.

    PubMed

    Verkerke-van Wijk, I; Fukuzawa, M; Devreotes, P N; Schaap, P

    2001-06-01

    cAMP oscillations, generated by adenylyl cyclase A (ACA), coordinate cell aggregation in Dictyostelium and have also been implicated in organizer function during multicellular development. We used a gene fusion of the ACA promoter with a labile lacZ derivative to study the expression pattern of ACA. During aggregation, most cells expressed ACA, but thereafter expression was lost in all cells except those of the anterior tip. Before aggregation, ACA transcription was strongly upregulated by nanomolar cAMP pulses. Postaggregative transcription was sustained by nanomolar cAMP pulses, but downregulated by a continuous micromolar cAMP stimulus and by the stalk-cell-inducing factor DIF. Earlier work showed that the transcription factor StatA displays tip-specific nuclear translocation and directs tip-specific expression of the nuclear protein CudA, which is essential for culmination. Both StatA and CudA were present in nuclei throughout the entire slug in an aca null mutant that expresses ACA from the constitutive actin15 promoter. This suggests that the tip-specific expression of ACA directs tip-specific nuclear translocation of StatA and tip-specific expression of CudA.

  8. High-throughput FACS-based mutant screen identifies a gain-of-function allele of the Fusarium graminearum adenylyl cyclase causing deoxynivalenol over-production.

    PubMed

    Blum, Ailisa; Benfield, Aurélie H; Stiller, Jiri; Kazan, Kemal; Batley, Jacqueline; Gardiner, Donald M

    2016-05-01

    Fusarium head blight and crown rot, caused by the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum, impose a major threat to global wheat production. During the infection, plants are contaminated with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON), which can be toxic for humans and animals. In addition, DON is a major virulence factor during wheat infection. However, it is not fully understood how DON production is regulated in F. graminearum. In order to identify regulators of DON production, a high-throughput mutant screen using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) of a mutagenised TRI5-GFP reporter strain was established and a mutant over-producing DON under repressive conditions identified. A gain-of-function mutation in the F. graminearum adenylyl cyclase (FAC1), which is a known positive regulator of DON production, was identified as the cause of this phenotype through genome sequencing and segregation analysis. Our results show that the high-throughput mutant screening procedure developed here can be applied for identification of fungal proteins involved in diverse processes. PMID:26932301

  9. Cyclic nucleotide–gated channels, calmodulin, adenylyl cyclase, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II are required for late, but not early, long-term memory formation in the honeybee

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee Apis mellifera, olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM) are formed upon multiple-trial conditioning: an early phase (e-LTM) which depends on translation from already available mRNA, and a late phase (l-LTM) which requires de novo transcription and translation. Here we combined olfactory PER conditioning and neuropharmacological inhibition and studied the involvement of the NO–cGMP pathway, and of specific molecules, such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNG), calmodulin (CaM), adenylyl cyclase (AC), and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII), in the formation of olfactory LTM in bees. We show that in addition to NO–cGMP and cAMP–PKA, CNG channels, CaM, AC, and CaMKII also participate in the formation of a l-LTM (72-h post-conditioning) that is specific for the learned odor. Importantly, the same molecules are dispensable for olfactory learning and for the formation of both MTM (in the minute and hour range) and e-LTM (24-h post-conditioning), thus suggesting that the signaling pathways leading to l-LTM or e-LTM involve different molecular actors. PMID:24741108

  10. Acutely administered melatonin decreases somatostatin-binding sites and the inhibitory effect of somatostatin on adenylyl cyclase activity in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo-Claros, Rosa María; Boyano-Adánez Md, María del Carmen; Arilla-Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2004-03-01

    Melatonin is known to increase neuronal activity in the hippocampus, an effect contrary to that of somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting factor, SRIF). Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the somatostatinergic system is implicated in the mechanism of action of melatonin in the rat hippocampus. One group of rats was injected a single dose of melatonin [25 microg/kg subcutaneously (s.c.)] or saline containing ethanol (0.5%, s.c.) and killed 5 hr later. Melatonin significantly decreased the SRIF-like immunoreactivity levels and induced a significant decrease in the density of SRIF receptors as well as in the dissociation constant (Kd). SRIF-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was markedly decreased in hippocampal membranes from melatonin-treated rats. The functional activity of Gi proteins was similar in hippocampal membranes from melatonin-treated and control rats. Western blot analyses revealed that melatonin administration did not alter Gialpha1 or Gialpha2 levels. To determine if the changes observed were related to melatonin-induced activation of central melatonin receptors, a melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole, was administered prior to melatonin injection. Pretreatment with luzindole (10 mg/kg, s.c.) did not alter the melatonin-induced effects on the above-mentioned parameters and luzindole, alone, had no observable effect. The present results demonstrate that melatonin decreases the activity of the SRIF receptor-effector system in the rat hippocampus, an effect which is apparently not mediated by melatonin receptors. As SRIF exerts an opposite effect to that of melatonin on hippocampal neuronal activity, it is possible that the SRIFergic system could be implicated in the mechanism of action of melatonin in the rat.

  11. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen. PMID:22752677

  12. Evidence for physical and functional interactions among two Saccharomyces cerevisiae SH3 domain proteins, an adenylyl cyclase-associated protein and the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Lila, T; Drubin, D G

    1997-01-01

    In a variety of organisms, a number of proteins associated with the cortical actin cytoskeleton contain SH3 domains, suggesting that these domains may provide the physical basis for functional interactions among structural and regulatory proteins in the actin cytoskeleton. We present evidence that SH3 domains mediate at least two independent functions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae actin-binding protein Abp1p in vivo. Abp1p contains a single SH3 domain that has recently been shown to bind in vitro to the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein Srv2p. Immunofluorescence analysis of Srv2p subcellular localization in strains carrying mutations in either ABP1 or SRV2 reveals that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the normal association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. We also show that a site in Abp1p itself is specifically bound by the SH3 domain of the actin-associated protein Rvs167p. Genetic analysis provides evidence that Abp1p and Rvs167p have functions that are closely interrelated. Abp1 null mutations, like rvs167 mutations, result in defects in sporulation and reduced viability under certain suboptimal growth conditions. In addition, mutations in ABP1 and RVS167 yield similar profiles of genetic "synthetic lethal" interactions when combined with mutations in genes encoding other cytoskeletal components. Mutations which specifically disrupt the SH3 domain-mediated interaction between Abp1p and Srv2p, however, show none of the shared phenotypes of abp1 and rvs167 mutations. We conclude that the Abp1p SH3 domain mediates the association of Srv2p with the cortical actin cytoskeleton, and that Abp1p performs a distinct function that is likely to involve binding by the Rvs167p SH3 domain. Overall, work presented here illustrates how SH3 domains can integrate the activities of multiple actin cytoskeleton proteins in response to varying environmental conditions. Images PMID:9190214

  13. Lack of an effect of collecting duct-specific deletion of adenylyl cyclase 3 on renal Na+ and water excretion or arterial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Stuart, Deborah; Van Hoek, Alfred N.; Stockand, James D.; Bugaj, Vladislav; Mironova, Elena; Blount, Mitsi A.

    2014-01-01

    cAMP is a key mediator of connecting tubule and collecting duct (CD) Na+ and water reabsorption. Studies performed in vitro have suggested that CD adenylyl cyclase (AC)3 partly mediates the actions of vasopressin; however, the physiological role of CD AC3 has not been determined. To assess this, mice were developed with CD-specific disruption of AC3 [CD AC3 knockout (KO)]. Inner medullary CDs from these mice exhibited 100% target gene recombination and had reduced ANG II- but not vasopressin-induced cAMP accumulation. However, there were no differences in urine volume, urinary urea excretion, or urine osmolality between KO and control mice during normal water intake or varying degrees of water restriction in the presence or absence of chronic vasopressin administration. There were no differences between CD AC3 KO and control mice in arterial pressure or urinary Na+ or K+ excretion during a normal or high-salt diet, whereas plasma renin and vasopressin concentrations were similar between the two genotypes. Patch-clamp analysis of split-open cortical CDs revealed no difference in epithelial Na+ channel activity in the presence or absence of vasopressin. Compensatory changes in AC6 were not responsible for the lack of a renal phenotype in CD AC3 KO mice since combined CD AC3/AC6 KO mice had similar arterial pressure and renal Na+ and water handling compared with CD AC6 KO mice. In summary, these data do not support a significant role for CD AC3 in the regulation of renal Na+ and water excretion in general or vasopressin regulation of CD function in particular. PMID:24431204

  14. Water absorption and bicarbonate secretion in the intestine of the sea bream are regulated by transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Edison S M; Gregório, Sílvia F; Power, Deborah M; Canário, Adelino V M; Fuentes, Juan

    2012-12-01

    In the marine fish intestine luminal, HCO₃⁻ can remove divalent ions (calcium and magnesium) by precipitation in the form of carbonate aggregates. The process of epithelial HCO₃⁻ secretion is under endocrine control, therefore, in this study we aimed to characterize the involvement of transmembrane (tmACs) and soluble (sACs) adenylyl cyclases on the regulation of bicarbonate secretion (BCS) and water absorption in the intestine of the sea bream (Sparus aurata). We observed that all sections of sea bream intestine are able to secrete bicarbonate as measured by pH-Stat in Ussing chambers. In addition, gut sac preparations reveal net water absorption in all segments of the intestine, with significantly higher absorption rates in the anterior intestine that in the rectum. BCS and water absorption are positively correlated in all regions of the sea bream intestinal tract. Furthermore, stimulation of tmACs (10 μM FK + 500 μM IBMX) causes a significant decrease in BCS, bulk water absorption and short circuit current (Isc) in a region dependent manner. In turn, stimulation of sACs with elevated HCO₃⁻ results in a significant increase in BCS, and bulk water absorption in the anterior intestine, an action completely reversed by the sAC inhibitor KH7 (200 μM). Overall, the results reveal a functional relationship between BCS and water absorption in marine fish intestine and modulation by tmACs and sAC. In light of the present observations, it is hypothesized that the endocrine effects on intestinal BCS and water absorption mediated by tmACs are locally and reciprocally modulated by the action of sACs in the fish enterocyte, thus fine-tuning the process of carbonate aggregate production in the intestinal lumen.

  15. Localization of adenylyl cyclase isoforms and G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells: expression in caveolin-rich and noncaveolin domains.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Head, Brian P; Gregorian, Caroline; Seasholtz, Tammy M; Insel, Paul A

    2002-11-01

    A number of different agonists activate G protein-coupled receptors to stimulate adenylyl cyclase (AC), increase cAMP formation, and promote relaxation in vascular smooth muscle. To more fully understand this stimulation of AC, we assessed the expression, regulation, and compartmentation of AC isoforms in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected expression of AC3, AC5, and AC6 mRNA, whereas immunoblot analysis indicated expression of AC3 and AC5/6 protein primarily in caveolin-rich membrane (cav) fractions relative to noncaveolin (noncav) fractions. Beta(1)-adrenergic receptors (AR), beta(2)AR, and G(s) were detected in both cav and noncav fractions, whereas the prostanoid receptors EP(2)R and EP(4)R were excluded from cav fractions. We used an adenoviral construct to increase AC6 expression. Overexpressed AC6 localized only in noncav fractions. Two-fold overexpression of AC6 caused enhancement of forskolin-, isoproterenol- and prostaglandin E(2)-stimulated cAMP formation but no changes in basal levels of cAMP. At higher levels of AC6 overexpression, basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were increased. Stimulation of cAMP levels by agents that increase Ca(2+) in native cells was consistent with the expression of AC3, but overexpression of AC6, which is inhibited by Ca(2+), blunted the Ca(2+)-stimulable cAMP response. These data indicate that: 1) RASMC express multiple AC isoforms that localize in both caveolin-rich and noncaveolin domains, 2) expression of AC6 in non-caveolin-rich membranes can increase basal levels of cAMP and response to several stimulatory agonists, and 3) Ca(2+)-mediated regulation of cAMP formation depends upon expression of different AC isoforms in RASMC. Compartmentation of GPCRs and AC is different in cardiomyocytes than in RASMC, indicating that targeting of these components to caveolin-rich membranes can be cell-specific. Moreover, our results imply that the

  16. [Peptide 612-627 of thyrotropin receptor and its modified derivatives as the regulators of adenylyl cyclase in the rat thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Shpakova, E A; Tarasenko, I I; Derkach, K V

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of the specific activity of the thyroid gland is carried by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) through TSH receptor (TSHR). This receptor is coupled to different types of G-proteins, including the G(s)-proteins, through which TSH stimulates the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). As the application of TSH in medicine is limited, the development of selective regulators of TSHR with agonistic and antagonistic activity is carried out. One of the approaches to their creation is to develop the peptides corresponding to functionally important regions of TSHR which are located in its intracellular loops (ICL) and are involved in the binding and activation of G-proteins. We have synthesized peptide corresponding to the C-terminal region 612-627 of the third ICL of TSHR and its derivatives modified by palmitic acid residue (at the N- or the C-terminus) or by polylysine dendrimer (at the N-terminus), and studied their effect on the basal and TSH-stimulated AC activity in the membrane fraction isolated from the rat thyroid. The most active was peptide 612-627-K(Pal)A modified by palmitate at the C-terminus, where in TSHR the hydrophobic transmembrane region is located. At the micromolar concentrations the peptide increased AC activity and reduced the AC stimulating effect of TSH. The action of the 612-627-K(Pal)A has been directed onto TSHR homologous to it, as indicated by the following facts: 1) the inhibition of G(s)-protein, the downstream component of AC system, by treating the membranes with cholera toxin led to the blocking of peptide AC effect, 2) this effect was not detected in the tissues where no TSHR, 3) the peptide did not significantly affect the AC stimulating effects of hormones acting via other receptors. The unmodified peptide and the peptide with N-terminal dendrimer are far behind the 612-627-K(Pal)A in their ability to activate AC in the thyroid, while the peptide modified by palmitate at the N-terminus was inactive. At the same time, the peptide

  17. Localization of adenylyl cyclase isoforms and G protein-coupled receptors in vascular smooth muscle cells: expression in caveolin-rich and noncaveolin domains.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Liu, Xiaoqiu; Head, Brian P; Gregorian, Caroline; Seasholtz, Tammy M; Insel, Paul A

    2002-11-01

    A number of different agonists activate G protein-coupled receptors to stimulate adenylyl cyclase (AC), increase cAMP formation, and promote relaxation in vascular smooth muscle. To more fully understand this stimulation of AC, we assessed the expression, regulation, and compartmentation of AC isoforms in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction detected expression of AC3, AC5, and AC6 mRNA, whereas immunoblot analysis indicated expression of AC3 and AC5/6 protein primarily in caveolin-rich membrane (cav) fractions relative to noncaveolin (noncav) fractions. Beta(1)-adrenergic receptors (AR), beta(2)AR, and G(s) were detected in both cav and noncav fractions, whereas the prostanoid receptors EP(2)R and EP(4)R were excluded from cav fractions. We used an adenoviral construct to increase AC6 expression. Overexpressed AC6 localized only in noncav fractions. Two-fold overexpression of AC6 caused enhancement of forskolin-, isoproterenol- and prostaglandin E(2)-stimulated cAMP formation but no changes in basal levels of cAMP. At higher levels of AC6 overexpression, basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were increased. Stimulation of cAMP levels by agents that increase Ca(2+) in native cells was consistent with the expression of AC3, but overexpression of AC6, which is inhibited by Ca(2+), blunted the Ca(2+)-stimulable cAMP response. These data indicate that: 1) RASMC express multiple AC isoforms that localize in both caveolin-rich and noncaveolin domains, 2) expression of AC6 in non-caveolin-rich membranes can increase basal levels of cAMP and response to several stimulatory agonists, and 3) Ca(2+)-mediated regulation of cAMP formation depends upon expression of different AC isoforms in RASMC. Compartmentation of GPCRs and AC is different in cardiomyocytes than in RASMC, indicating that targeting of these components to caveolin-rich membranes can be cell-specific. Moreover, our results imply that the

  18. [Peptide 612-627 of thyrotropin receptor and its modified derivatives as the regulators of adenylyl cyclase in the rat thyroid gland].

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Shpakova, E A; Tarasenko, I I; Derkach, K V

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of the specific activity of the thyroid gland is carried by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) through TSH receptor (TSHR). This receptor is coupled to different types of G-proteins, including the G(s)-proteins, through which TSH stimulates the enzyme adenylyl cyclase (AC). As the application of TSH in medicine is limited, the development of selective regulators of TSHR with agonistic and antagonistic activity is carried out. One of the approaches to their creation is to develop the peptides corresponding to functionally important regions of TSHR which are located in its intracellular loops (ICL) and are involved in the binding and activation of G-proteins. We have synthesized peptide corresponding to the C-terminal region 612-627 of the third ICL of TSHR and its derivatives modified by palmitic acid residue (at the N- or the C-terminus) or by polylysine dendrimer (at the N-terminus), and studied their effect on the basal and TSH-stimulated AC activity in the membrane fraction isolated from the rat thyroid. The most active was peptide 612-627-K(Pal)A modified by palmitate at the C-terminus, where in TSHR the hydrophobic transmembrane region is located. At the micromolar concentrations the peptide increased AC activity and reduced the AC stimulating effect of TSH. The action of the 612-627-K(Pal)A has been directed onto TSHR homologous to it, as indicated by the following facts: 1) the inhibition of G(s)-protein, the downstream component of AC system, by treating the membranes with cholera toxin led to the blocking of peptide AC effect, 2) this effect was not detected in the tissues where no TSHR, 3) the peptide did not significantly affect the AC stimulating effects of hormones acting via other receptors. The unmodified peptide and the peptide with N-terminal dendrimer are far behind the 612-627-K(Pal)A in their ability to activate AC in the thyroid, while the peptide modified by palmitate at the N-terminus was inactive. At the same time, the peptide

  19. Adenylyl cyclase activation underlies intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation, cyclic AMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation evoked by beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes derived from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, P A; Li, Y

    1995-09-18

    We have previously shown that stimulation of cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes with the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO) results in transport of cAMP from astrocytes followed by extracellular hydrolysis to adenosine [Rosenberg et al. J. Neurosci. 14 (1994) 2953-2965]. In this study we found that the endogenous catecholamines epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE), but not dopamine, serotonin, or histamine, all at 10 microM, significantly stimulated intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation in cortical cultures. Detailed dose-response experiments were performed for NE and EPI, as well as ISO. For each catecholamine, the potencies in evoking intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation were similar. These data provide additional evidence that a single common mechanism, namely beta-adrenergic mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase, underlies intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation. It appears that regulation of extracellular adenosine levels via cAMP transport and extracellular hydrolysis to adenosine may be a final common pathway of neuromodulation in cerebral cortex for catecholamines, and, indeed, any substance whose receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

  20. Beneficial Effects of Adenylyl Cyclase Type 6 (AC6) Expression Persist Using a Catalytically Inactive AC6 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tong; Lai, Ngai Chin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Guo, Tracy; Tang, Rouying; Firth, Amy L.; Yuan, Jason X.; Hammond, H. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac-directed expression of AC6 has pronounced favorable effects on cardiac function possibly not linked with cAMP production. To determine rigorously whether cAMP generation is required for the beneficial effects of increased AC6 expression, we generated a catalytically inactive AC6 mutant (AC6mut) that has markedly diminished cAMP generating capacity by replacing aspartic acid with alanine at position 426 in the C1 domain (catalytic region) of AC6. Gene transfer of AC6 or AC6mut (adenovirus-mediated) in adult rat cardiac myocytes resulted in similar expression levels and intracellular distribution, but AC6mut expression was associated with marked reduction in cAMP production. Despite marked reduction in cAMP generation, AC6mut influenced intracellular signaling events similarly to that observed after expression of catalytically intact AC6. For example, both AC6 and AC6mut reduced phenylephrine-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis (p < 0.001), expression of cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (p < 0.01), and phospholamban (p < 0.05). AC6mut expression, similar to its catalytically intact cohort, was associated with increased Ca2+ transients in cardiac myocytes after isoproterenol stimulation. Many of the biological effects of AC6 expression are replicated by a catalytically inactive AC6 mutant, indicating that the mechanisms for these effects do not require increased cAMP generation. PMID:21127130

  1. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory. PMID:27695398

  2. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory.

  3. Ser⁄ Thr residues at α3⁄β5 loop of Gαs are important in morphine-induced adenylyl cyclase sensitization but not mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Seyedabadi, Mohammad; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Albert, Paul R.; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Rahimian, Reza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Ghahremani, Mohammad H.

    2015-01-01

    The signaling switch of β2-adrenergic and μ1-opioid receptors from stimulatory G-protein (Gαs) to inhibitory G-protein (Gαi) (and vice versa) influences adenylyl cyclase (AC) and extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1 ⁄ 2 activation. Post-translational modifications, including dephosphorylation of Gαs, enhance opioid receptor coupling to Gαs. In the present study, we substituted the Ser ⁄ Thr residues of Gαs at the α3 ⁄ β5 and α4 ⁄ β6 loops aiming to study the role of Gαs lacking Ser ⁄ Thr phosphorylation with respect to AC sensitization and mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Isoproterenol increased the cAMP concentration (EC50 = 22.8 ± 3.4 μM) in Gαs-transfected S49 cyc– cells but not in nontransfected cells. However, there was no significant difference between the Gαs-wild-type (wt) and mutants. Morphine (10 μM) inhibited AC activity more efficiently in cyc– compared to Gαs-wt introduced cells (P < 0.05); however, we did not find a notable difference between Gαs-wt and mutants. Interestingly, Gαs-wt transfected cells showed more sensitization with respect to AC after chronic morphine compared to nontransfected cells (101 ± 12% versus 34 ± 6%; P < 0.001); μ1-opioid receptor interacted with Gαs, and both co-immunoprecipitated after chronic morphine exposure. Furthermore, mutation of T270A and S272A (P < 0.01), as well as T270A, S272A and S261A (P < 0.05), in α3 ⁄ β5, resulted in a higher level of AC supersensitization. ERK1⁄ 2 phosphorylation was rapidly induced by isoproterenol (by 9.5 ± 2.4-fold) and morphine (22 ± 2.2-fold) in Gαs-transfected cells; mutations of α3 ⁄ β5 and α4 ⁄ β6 did not affect the pattern or extent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. The findings of the present study show that Gαs interacts with the μ1-opioid receptor, and the Ser ⁄ Thr mutation to Ala at the α3 ⁄ β5 loop of Gαs enhances morphine-induced AC sensitization. In addition, Gαs was required for

  4. The vasorelaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid involves stimulation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP/PKA pathway: Evidences by pharmacological and molecular docking studies.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Luciano A A; Alencar Filho, Edilson B; Coelho, Maisa C; Silva, Bagnólia A

    2015-10-01

    The relaxant effect of 8(17),12E,14-labdatrien-18-oic acid (LBD) was investigated on isolated aortic rings and compared with forskolin (FSK), a standard and potent activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC) with relaxing effect. The presence of potassium channel blockers, such as glibenclamide (ATP-blocker), apamin (SKCa-blocker), charybdotoxin (BKCa-blocker) did not significantly affect either the LBD or FSK concentration-response curves. However, in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (KV-blocker), the relaxant effect for both diterpenes was significantly attenuated, with reduction of its relative potencies. Moreover, the relaxation induced by 8-Br-cAMP, an analog of cAMP, was also significantly attenuated in the same conditions, i.e., in the presence of 4-aminopyridine. The presence of aminophylline, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, caused a significant increasing in the potency for both LBD and FSK. On the other hand, the presence of Rp-cAMPS, a selective PKA-inhibitor, significantly attenuated the relaxant effect of LBD. In this work, in the same experimental conditions, both labdane-type diterpenes presented remarkably similar results; FSK, however, presented a higher potency (100-fold) than LBD. Thus, the hypothesis that LBD could be a novel AC-activator emerged. To assess that hypothesis, computational molecular docking studies were performed. Crystallographic structure of adenylyl cyclase/forskolin complex (1AB8) was obtained from RSCB Protein Data Bank and used to compare the modes of interaction of the native ligand and LBD. The computational data shows many similarities between LBD and FSK concerning the interaction with the regulatory site of AC. Taken together, the results presented here pointed to LBD as a novel AC-activator. PMID:26144373

  5. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention. PMID:27688649

  6. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-09-28

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C's role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention. PMID:27688649

  7. Guanylyl cyclase C signaling axis and colon cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Amanda M; Merlino, Dante J; Blomain, Erik S; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality and morbidity worldwide. While improved treatments have enhanced overall patient outcome, disease burden encompassing quality of life, cost of care, and patient survival has seen little benefit. Consequently, additional advances in CRC treatments remain important, with an emphasis on preventative measures. Guanylyl cyclase C (GUCY2C), a transmembrane receptor expressed on intestinal epithelial cells, plays an important role in orchestrating intestinal homeostatic mechanisms. These effects are mediated by the endogenous hormones guanylin (GUCA2A) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B), which bind and activate GUCY2C to regulate proliferation, metabolism and barrier function in intestine. Recent studies have demonstrated a link between GUCY2C silencing and intestinal dysfunction, including tumorigenesis. Indeed, GUCY2C silencing by the near universal loss of its paracrine hormone ligands increases colon cancer susceptibility in animals and humans. GUCY2C’s role as a tumor suppressor has opened the door to a new paradigm for CRC prevention by hormone replacement therapy using synthetic hormone analogs, such as the FDA-approved oral GUCY2C ligand linaclotide (Linzess™). Here we review the known contributions of the GUCY2C signaling axis to CRC, and relate them to a novel clinical strategy targeting tumor chemoprevention.

  8. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) increases corticosterone in male and female rats

    PubMed Central

    Lezak, K. R.; Roelke, E.; Harris, O.; Choi, I.; Edwards, S.; Gick, N.; Cocchiaro, G.; Missig, G.; Roman, C. W.; Braas, K. M.; Toufexis, D.J.; May, V.; Hammack, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the genes for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the PAC1 receptor have been associated with several psychiatric disorders whose etiology has been associated with stressor exposure and/or dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In rats, exposure to repeated variate stress has been shown to increase PACAP and its cognate PAC1 receptor expression in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), a brain region implicated in anxiety and depression-related behaviors as well as the regulation of HPA axis activity. We have argued that changes in BNST PACAP signaling may mediate the changes in emotional behavior and dysregulation of the HPA axis associated with anxiety and mood disorders. The current set of studies was designed to determine whether BNST PACAP infusion leads to activation of the HPA axis as determined by increases in plasma corticosterone. We observed an increase in plasma corticosterone levels 30 minutes following BNST PACAP38 infusion in male and female rats, which was independent of estradiol (E2) treatment in females, and we found that plasma corticosterone levels were increased at both 30 minutes and 60 minutes, but returned to baseline levels 4 hours following the highest dose. PACAP38 infusion into the lateral ventricles immediately above the BNST did not alter plasma corticosterone level, and the increased plasma corticosterone following BNST PACAP was not blocked by BNST corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) receptor antagonism. These results support others suggesting that BNST PACAP plays a key role in regulating stress responses. PMID:24845172

  9. Alterations in detergent solubility of heterotrimeric G proteins after chronic activation of G(i/o)-coupled receptors: changes in detergent solubility are in correlation with onset of adenylyl cyclase superactivation.

    PubMed

    Bayewitch, M L; Nevo, I; Avidor-Reiss, T; Levy, R; Simonds, W F; Vogel, Z

    2000-04-01

    Prolonged G(i/o) protein-coupled receptor activation has been shown to lead to receptor internalization and receptor desensitization. In addition, it is well established that although acute activation of these receptors leads to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase (AC), long-term activation results in increased AC activity (especially evident on removal of the inhibitory agonist), a phenomenon defined as AC superactivation or sensitization. Herein, we show that chronic exposure to agonists of G(i)-coupled receptors also leads to a decrease in cholate detergent solubility of G protein subunits, and that antagonist treatment after such chronic agonist exposure leads to a time-dependent reversal of the cholate insolubility. With Chinese hamster ovary and COS cells transfected with several G(i/o)-coupled receptors (i.e., mu- and kappa-opioid, and m(4)-muscarinic), we observed that although no overall change occurred in total content of G(alphai)- and beta(1)-subunits, chronic agonist treatment led to a marked reduction in the ability of 1% cholate to solubilize G(betagamma) as well as G(alphai). This solubility shift is exclusively observed with G(alphai), and was not seen with G(alphas). The disappearance and reappearance of G(alphai) and G(betagamma) subunits from and to the detergent-soluble fractions occur with similar time courses as observed for the onset and disappearance of AC superactivation. Lastly, pertussis toxin, which blocks acute and chronic agonist-induced AC inhibition and superactivation, also blocks the shift in detergent solubility. These results suggest a correlation between the solubility shift of the heterotrimeric G(i) protein and the generation of AC superactivation.

  10. Changed sensitivity of adenylate cyclase signaling system to biogenic amines and peptide hormones in tissues of starving rats.

    PubMed

    Shpakov, A O; Kuznetsova, L A; Plesneva, S A; Pertseva, M N

    2007-07-01

    In the myocardium and skeletal muscles of rats deprived of food for 2 days, basal activity of adenylate cyclase decreased, while the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase signaling system to the stimulating effects of non-hormonal agents (guanine nucleotides and NaF) and beta-agonist isoproterinol modulating adenylate cyclase through stimulating G proteins increased. In starving organism, the regulatory effects of hormones realizing their effects through inhibitory G proteins (somatostatin in the myocardium and bromocryptin in the brain) weakened. Their inhibitory effects on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and stimulating effects on binding of guanosine triphosphate decreased. In the brain of starving rats, the differences in the sensitivity of the adenylate cyclase signaling system to hormones and nonhormonal agents were less pronounced than in the muscle tissues, which attested to tissue-specific changes in the functional state of this system under conditions of 2-day starvation.

  11. Ancient conserved domains shared by animal soluble guanylyl cyclases and bacterial signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclases (SGCs) are dimeric enzymes that transduce signals downstream of nitric oxide (NO) in animals. They sense NO by means of a heme moiety that is bound to their N-terminal extensions. Results Using sequence profile searches we show that the N-terminal extensions of the SGCs contain two globular domains. The first of these, the HNOB (Heme NO Binding) domain, is a predominantly α-helical domain and binds heme via a covalent linkage to histidine. Versions lacking this conserved histidine and are likely to interact with heme non-covalently. We detected HNOB domains in several bacterial lineages, where they occur fused to methyl accepting domains of chemotaxis receptors or as standalone proteins. The standalone forms are encoded by predicted operons that also contain genes for two component signaling systems and GGDEF-type nucleotide cyclases. The second domain, the HNOB associated (HNOBA) domain occurs between the HNOB and the cyclase domains in the animal SGCs. The HNOBA domain is also detected in bacteria and is always encoded by a gene, which occurs in the neighborhood of a gene for a HNOB domain. Conclusion The HNOB domain is predicted to function as a heme-dependent sensor for gaseous ligands, and transduce diverse downstream signals, in both bacteria and animals. The HNOBA domain functionally interacts with the HNOB domain, and possibly binds a ligand, either in cooperation, or independently of the latter domain. Phyletic profiles and phylogenetic analysis suggest that the HNOB and HNOBA domains were acquired by the animal lineage via lateral transfer from a bacterial source. PMID:12590654

  12. Contribution of Physical Interactions to Signaling Specificity between a Diguanylate Cyclase and Its Effector

    PubMed Central

    Dahlstrom, Kurt M.; Giglio, Krista M.; Collins, Alan J.; Sondermann, Holger

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is a bacterial second messenger that controls multiple cellular processes. c-di-GMP networks have up to dozens of diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) that synthesize c-di-GMP along with many c-di-GMP-responsive target proteins that can bind and respond to this signal. For such networks to have order, a mechanism(s) likely exists that allow DGCs to specifically signal their targets, and it has been suggested that physical interactions might provide such specificity. Our results show a DGC from Pseudomonas fluorescens physically interacting with its target protein at a conserved interface, and this interface can be predictive of DGC-target protein interactions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that physical interaction is necessary for the DGC to maximally signal its target. If such “local signaling” is a theme for even a fraction of the DGCs used by bacteria, it becomes possible to posit a model whereby physical interaction allows a DGC to directly signal its target protein, which in turn may help curtail undesired cross talk with other members of the network. PMID:26670387

  13. Beta-adrenoceptor mediated signal transduction in congestive heart failure in cardiomyopathic (UM-X7.1) hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kaura, D; Takeda, N; Sethi, R; Wang, X; Nagano, M; Dhalla, N S

    In view of the lack of information regarding the status of beta-adrenoceptor mediated signal transduction mechanisms at severe stages of congestive heart failure, the status of beta-adrenoceptors, G-proteins and adenylyl cyclase activities was examined in 220-275 day old cardiomyopathic hamster hearts. Although no changes in the Kd values for beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors were seen, the number of beta 1-adrenoceptors, unlike that of beta 2-adrenoceptors, was markedly decreased in cardiac membranes from failing hearts. The activation of adenylyl cyclase in the failing hearts by different concentrations of isoproterenol was also attenuated in comparison to the control preparations. The basal adenylyl cyclase activity in cardiac membranes from the failing hearts was not altered; however, the stimulated enzyme activities, when measured in the presence of forskolin, NaF or Gpp(NH)p were depressed significantly. The functional activity of Gs-proteins (measured by cholera toxin stimulation of adenylyl cyclase) was depressed whereas that of Gi-proteins (measured by pertussis toxin stimulation of adenylyl cyclase) was increased in the failing hearts. Not only were the Gs- and Gi-protein contents (measured by immunoblotting) increased, the bioactivities of these proteins as determined by ADP-ribosylations in the presence of cholera toxin and pertussis toxin, respectively, were also higher in failing hearts in comparison to the control values. Northern blot analysis revealed that the signals for Gs- and Gi-protein mRNAs were augmented at this stage of heart failure. These results indicate that the loss of adrenergic support at severe stages of congestive heart failure in cardiomyopathic hamsters may involve a reduction in the number of beta 1-adrenoceptors, and an increase in Gi-protein contents as well as bioactivities in addition to an uncoupling of Gs-proteins from the catalytic site of adenylyl cyclase in cardiac membrane. PMID:8739246

  14. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons. PMID:25135936

  15. High density and ligand affinity confer ultrasensitive signal detection by a guanylyl cyclase chemoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Pichlo, Magdalena; Bungert-Plümke, Stefanie; Weyand, Ingo; Seifert, Reinhard; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Strünker, Timo; Kashikar, Nachiket Dilip; Goodwin, Normann; Müller, Astrid; Pelzer, Patric; Van, Qui; Enderlein, Jörg; Klemm, Clementine; Krause, Eberhard; Trötschel, Christian; Poetsch, Ansgar; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Körschen, Heinz G; Collienne, Ursel

    2014-08-18

    Guanylyl cyclases (GCs), which synthesize the messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, control several sensory functions, such as phototransduction, chemosensation, and thermosensation, in many species from worms to mammals. The GC chemoreceptor in sea urchin sperm can decode chemoattractant concentrations with single-molecule sensitivity. The molecular and cellular underpinnings of such ultrasensitivity are not known for any eukaryotic chemoreceptor. In this paper, we show that an exquisitely high density of 3 × 10(5) GC chemoreceptors and subnanomolar ligand affinity provide a high ligand-capture efficacy and render sperm perfect absorbers. The GC activity is terminated within 150 ms by dephosphorylation steps of the receptor, which provides a means for precise control of the GC lifetime and which reduces "molecule noise." Compared with other ultrasensitive sensory systems, the 10-fold signal amplification by the GC receptor is surprisingly low. The hallmarks of this signaling mechanism provide a blueprint for chemical sensing in small compartments, such as olfactory cilia, insect antennae, or even synaptic boutons.

  16. A wheat allene oxide cyclase gene enhances salinity tolerance via jasmonate signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Naibo; Ai, Xinghui; Wang, Mengcheng; Huang, Zhigang; Xiao, Langtao; Xia, Guangmin

    2014-02-01

    One of the two branches of the α-linolenic acid metabolism pathway is catalyzed by 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase I, and the other is involved in jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis. The former is known to be active in the response to salinity tolerance in wheat (Triticum aestivum), but the participation of the latter in this response has not been established as yet. Here, the salinity-responsive bread wheat gene TaAOC1, which encodes an allene oxide cyclase involved in the α-linolenic acid metabolism pathway, was constitutively expressed in both bread wheat and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In both species, transgenic lines exhibited an enhanced level of tolerance to salinity. The transgenic plants accumulated a higher content of JA and developed shorter roots. Both the shortened roots and the salinity tolerance were abolished in a background lacking a functional AtMYC2, a key component of the JA and abscisic acid signaling pathway, but were still expressed in a background deficient with respect to abscisic acid synthesis. We provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, suggesting that JA is also involved in the plant salinity response and that the α-linolenic acid metabolism pathway has a regulatory role over this response. PMID:24326670

  17. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Gehring, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. PMID:26945740

  18. Identification of guanylate cyclases and related signaling proteins in sperm tail from sea stars by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakachi, Mia; Matsumoto, Midori; Terry, Philip M; Cerny, Ronald L; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    Marine invertebrates employ external fertilization to take the advantages of sexual reproduction as one of excellent survival strategies. To prevent mismatching, successful fertilization can be made only after going though strictly defined steps in the fertilization. In sea stars, the fertilization process starts with the chemotaxis of sperm followed by hyperactivation of sperm upon arriving onto the egg coat, and then sperm penetrate to the egg coat before achieving the fusion. To investigate whether the initiation of chemotaxis and the following signaling has species specificity, we conducted comparative studies in the protein level among sea stars, Asterias amurensis, A. forbesi, and Asterina pectinifera. Since transcription of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) has been suppressed in gamete, the roles of sperm proteins during the fertilization cannot be investigated by examining the mRNA profile. Therefore, proteomics analysis by mass spectrometry was used in this study. In sea stars, upon receiving asteroidal sperm-activating peptide (asterosap), the receptor membrane-bound guanylate cyclases in the sperm tail trigger sperm chemotaxis. We confirmed the presence of membrane-bound guanylate cyclases in the three sea star species, and they all had the same structural domains including the extracellular domain, kinase-like domain, and guanylate cyclase domain. The majority of peptides recovered were from alpha-helices distributed on the solvent side of the protein. More peptides were recovered from the intracellular domains. The transmembrane domain has not been recovered. The functions of the receptors seemed to be conserved among the species. Furthermore, we identified proteins that may be involved in the guanylate cyclase-triggered signaling pathway.

  19. Corruption of homeostatic mechanisms in the guanylyl cyclase C signaling pathway underlying colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Waldman, Scott A

    2010-08-01

    Colon cancer, the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, originates from the malignant transformation of intestinal epithelial cells. The intestinal epithelium undergoes a highly organized process of rapid regeneration along the crypt-villus axis, characterized by proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, whose coordination is essential to maintaining the mucosal barrier. Disruption of these homeostatic processes predisposes cells to mutations in tumor suppressors or oncogenes, whose dysfunction provides transformed cells an evolutionary growth advantage. While sequences of genetic mutations at different stages along the neoplastic continuum have been established, little is known of the events initiating tumorigenesis prior to adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations. Here, we examine a role for the corruption of homeostasis induced by silencing novel tumor suppressors, including the intestine-specific transcription factor CDX2 and its gene target guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), as early events predisposing cells to mutations in APC and other sequential genes that initiate colorectal cancer. CDX2 and GCC maintain homeostatic regeneration in the intestine by restricting cell proliferation, promoting cell maturation and adhesion, regulating cell migration and defending the intestinal barrier and genomic integrity. Elimination of CDX2 or GCC promotes intestinal tumor initiation and growth in aged mice, mice carrying APC mutations or mice exposed to carcinogens. The roles of CDX2 and GCC in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis, universal disruption in their signaling through silencing of hormones driving GCC, and the uniform overexpression of GCC by tumors underscore the potential value of oral replacement with GCC ligands as targeted prevention and therapy for colorectal cancer.

  20. Role of soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling in tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Sharin, Vladislav G.; Martin, Emil; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Sloan, Courtney; Nikonoff, Lubov E.; Kots, Alexander Y; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrate a differential expression of nitric oxide (NO) signaling components in ES cells and our recent study demonstrated an enhanced differentiation of ES cells into myocardial cells with NO donors and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activators. Since NO-cGMP pathway exhibits a diverse role in cancer, we were interested in evaluating the role of the NO receptor sGC and other components of the pathway in regulation of the tumor cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate a differential expression of the sGC subunits, NOS-1 and PKG mRNA and protein levels in various human cancer models. In contrast to sGCα1, robust levels of sGC β1 were observed in OVCAR-3 (ovarian) and MDA-MB-468 (breast) cancer cells which correlated well with the sGC activity and a marked increase in cGMP levels upon exposure to the combination of a NO donor and a sGC activator. NOC-18 (DETA NONOate; NO donor), BAY41-2272 (3-(4-Amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidin-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine); sGC activator), NOC-18+BAY41-2272, IBMX (3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine; phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and 8-bromo-cGMP (cGMP analog) caused growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in growth inhibition, we evaluated the effect of activators/inhibitors on ERK phosphorylation. Our studies indicate that BAY41-2272 or the combination NOC18+BAY41-2272 caused inhibition of the basal ERK1/2 phosphorylation in OVCAR-3 (high sGC activity), SK-OV-3 and SK-Br-3 (low sGC activity) cell lines and in some cases the inhibition was rescued by the sGC inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one). These studies suggest that the effects of activators/inhibitors of NO-sGC-cGMP in tumor cell proliferation is mediated by both cGMP-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:19948239

  1. Crystal Structure of the Signaling Helix Coiled-coil Domain of the b1 Subunit of the Soluble guanylyl Cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Beuve, A; van den Akker, F

    2010-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGC{beta}1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution. The CC structure of sGC{beta}1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  2. Compressive stress induces dephosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain via RhoA phosphorylation by the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kenji; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stress that arises due to deformation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) either stretches or compresses cells. The cellular response to stretching has been actively studied. For example, stretching induces phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) via the RhoA/RhoA-associated protein kinase (ROCK) pathway, resulting in increased cellular tension. In contrast, the effects of compressive stress on cellular functions are not fully resolved. The mechanisms for sensing and differentially responding to stretching and compressive stress are not known. To address these questions, we investigated whether phosphorylation levels of MRLC were affected by compressive stress. Contrary to the response in stretching cells, MRLC was dephosphorylated 5 min after cells were subjected to compressive stress. Compressive loading induced activation of myosin phosphatase mediated via the dephosphorylation of myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853). Because myosin phosphatase targeting subunit 1 (Thr853) is phosphorylated only by ROCK, compressive loading may have induced inactivation of ROCK. However, GTP-bound RhoA (active form) increased in response to compressive stress. The compression-induced activation of RhoA and inactivation of its effector ROCK are contradictory. This inconsistency was due to phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser188) that reduced affinity of RhoA to ROCK. Treatment with the inhibitor of protein kinase A that phosphorylates RhoA (Ser188) induced suppression of compression-stimulated MRLC dephosphorylation. Incidentally, stretching induced phosphorylation of MRLC, but did not affect phosphorylation levels of RhoA (Ser188). Together, our results suggest that RhoA phosphorylation is an important process for MRLC dephosphorylation by compressive loading, and for distinguishing between stretching and compressing cells.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin Y Is a Promiscuous Cyclase That Increases Endothelial Tau Phosphorylation and Permeability*

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Alexeyev, Mikhail; Pastukh, Viktoriya; Balczon, Ron; Stevens, Troy

    2012-01-01

    Exotoxin Y (ExoY) is a type III secretion system effector found in ∼ 90% of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Although it is known that ExoY causes inter-endothelial gaps and vascular leak, the mechanisms by which this occurs are poorly understood. Using both a bacteria-delivered and a codon-optimized conditionally expressed ExoY, we report that this toxin is a dual soluble adenylyl and guanylyl cyclase that results in intracellular cAMP and cGMP accumulation. The enzymatic activity of ExoY caused phosphorylation of endothelial Tau serine 214, accumulation of insoluble Tau, inter-endothelial cell gap formation, and increased macromolecular permeability. To discern whether the cAMP or cGMP signal was responsible for Tau phosphorylation and barrier disruption, pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were engineered for the conditional expression of either wild-type guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cGMP, or a mutated guanylyl cyclase, which synthesizes cAMP. Sodium nitroprusside stimulation of the cGMP-generating cyclase resulted in transient Tau serine 214 phosphorylation and gap formation, whereas stimulation of the cAMP-generating cyclase induced a robust increase in Tau serine 214 phosphorylation, gap formation, and macromolecular permeability. These results indicate that the cAMP signal is the dominant stimulus for Tau phosphorylation. Hence, ExoY is a promiscuous cyclase and edema factor that uses cAMP and, to some extent, cGMP to induce the hyperphosphorylation and insolubility of endothelial Tau. Because hyperphosphorylated and insoluble Tau are hallmarks in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer disease, acute Pseudomonas infections cause a pathophysiological sequela in endothelium previously recognized only in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22637478

  4. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-activating Polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1HOP1 Receptor Activation Coordinates Multiple Neurotrophic Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor; Lutz, Eve; MacKenzie, Christopher; Schutz, Kristin C.; Dozark, Kate; Braas, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    MAPK and Akt pathways are predominant mediators of trophic signaling for many neuronal systems. Among the vasoactive intestinal peptide/secretin/glucagon family of related peptides, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) binding to specific PAC1 receptor isoforms can engage multiple signaling pathways and promote neuroprotection through mechanisms that are not well understood. Using a primary sympathetic neuronal system, the current studies demonstrate that PACAP activation of PAC1HOP1 receptors engages both MAPK and Akt neurotrophic pathways in an integrated program to facilitate neuronal survival after growth factor withdrawal. PACAP not only stimulated prosurvival ERK1/2 and ERK5 activation but also abrogated SAPK/JNK and p38 MAPK signaling in parallel. In contrast to the potent and rapid effects of PACAP in ERK1/2 phosphorylation, PACAP stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a late phase of PAC1HOP1 receptor signaling. From inhibitor and immunoprecipitation analyses, the PACAP/PAC1HOP1 receptor-mediated Akt responses did not represent transactivation mechanisms but appeared to depend on Gαq/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ activity and vesicular internalization pathways. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase γ-selective inhibitors blocked PACAP-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in primary neuronal cultures and in PAC1HOP1-overexpressing cell lines; RNA interference-mediated knockdown of the receptor effectors attenuated PACAP-mediated Akt activation. Similarly, perturbation of endocytic pathways also blocked Akt phosphorylation. Between ERK and Akt pathways, PACAP-stimulated Akt signaling was the primary cascade that attenuated cultured neuron apoptosis after growth factor withdrawal. The partitioning of PACAP-mediated Akt signaling in endosomes may be a key mechanism contributing to the high spatial and temporal specificity in signal transduction necessary for survival pathways. PMID:20093365

  5. Phosphorylation of chemoattractant receptors regulates chemotaxis, actin reorganization and signal relay.

    PubMed

    Brzostowski, Joseph A; Sawai, Satoshi; Rozov, Orr; Liao, Xin-Hua; Imoto, Daisuke; Parent, Carole A; Kimmel, Alan R

    2013-10-15

    Migratory cells, including mammalian leukocytes and Dictyostelium, use G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate MAPK/ERK, PI3K, TORC2/AKT, adenylyl cyclase and actin polymerization, which collectively direct chemotaxis. Upon ligand binding, mammalian GPCRs are phosphorylated at cytoplasmic residues, uncoupling G-protein pathways, but activating other pathways. However, connections between GPCR phosphorylation and chemotaxis are unclear. In developing Dictyostelium, secreted cAMP serves as a chemoattractant, with extracellular cAMP propagated as oscillating waves to ensure directional migratory signals. cAMP oscillations derive from transient excitatory responses of adenylyl cyclase, which then rapidly adapts. We have studied chemotactic signaling in Dictyostelium that express non-phosphorylatable cAMP receptors and show through chemotaxis modeling, single-cell FRET imaging, pure and chimeric population wavelet quantification, biochemical analyses and TIRF microscopy, that receptor phosphorylation is required to regulate adenylyl cyclase adaptation, long-range oscillatory cAMP wave production and cytoskeletal actin response. Phosphorylation defects thus promote hyperactive actin polymerization at the cell periphery, misdirected pseudopodia and the loss of directional chemotaxis. Our data indicate that chemoattractant receptor phosphorylation is required to co-regulate essential pathways for migratory cell polarization and chemotaxis. Our results significantly extend the understanding of the function of GPCR phosphorylation, providing strong evidence that this evolutionarily conserved mechanism is required in a signal attenuation pathway that is necessary to maintain persistent directional movement of Dictyostelium, neutrophils and other migratory cells.

  6. Efficient expression of human soluble guanylate cyclase in Escherichia coli and its signaling-related interaction with nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Fangfang; Wang, Hongyan; Ying, Tianlei; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2010-07-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), as a nitric oxide (NO) sensor, is a critical heme-containing enzyme in NO-signaling pathway of eukaryotes. Human sGC is a heterodimeric hemoprotein, composed of a alpha-subunit (690 AA) and a heme-binding beta-subunit (619 AA). Upon NO binding, sGC catalyzes the conversion of guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) to 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP is a second messenger and initiates the nitric oxide signaling, triggering vasodilatation, smooth muscle relaxation, platelet aggregation, and neuronal transmission etc. The breakthrough of the bottle neck problem for sGC-mediated NO singling was made in this study. The recombinant human sGC beta1 subunit (HsGC beta 619) and its truncated N-terminal fragments (HsGC beta 195 and HsGC beta 384) were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli and purified successfully in quantities. The three proteins in different forms (ferric, ferrous, NO-bound, CO-bound) were characterized by UV-vis and EPR spectroscopy. The homology structure model of the human sGC heme domain was constructed, and the mechanism for NO binding to sGC was proposed. The EPR spectra showed a characteristic of five-coordinated heme-nitrosyl species with triplet hyperfine splitting of NO. The interaction between NO and sGC was investigated and the schematic mechanism was proposed. This study provides new insights into the structure and NO-binding of human sGC. Furthermore, the efficient expression system of E. coli will be beneficial to the further studies on structure and activation mechanism of human sGC. PMID:20063108

  7. Augmented cystine-glutamate exchange by pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide signaling via the VPAC1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Resch, Jon M; Albano, Rebecca; Liu, XiaoQian; Hjelmhaug, Julie; Lobner, Doug; Baker, David A; Choi, SuJean

    2014-07-28

    In the central nervous system, cystine import in exchange for glutamate through system xc(-) is critical for the production of the antioxidant glutathione by astrocytes, as well as the maintenance of extracellular glutamate. Therefore, regulation of system xc(-) activity affects multiple aspects of cellular physiology and may contribute to disease states. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuronally-derived peptide that has already been demonstrated to modulate multiple aspects of glutamate signaling suggesting PACAP may also target activity of cystine-glutamate exchange via system xc(-) . In the current study, 24-hour treatment of primary cortical cultures containing neurons and glia with PACAP concentration-dependently increased system xc(-) function as measured by radiolabeled cystine uptake. Furthermore, the increase in cystine uptake was completely abolished by the system xc(-) inhibitor, (S)-4-carboxyphenylglycine (CPG), attributing increases in cystine uptake specifically to system xc(-) activity. Time course and quantitative PCR results indicate that PACAP signaling may increase cystine-glutamate exchange by increasing expression of xCT, the catalytic subunit of system xc(-) . Furthermore, the potentiation of system xc(-) activity by PACAP occurs via a PKA-dependent pathway that is not mediated by the PAC1R, but rather the shared vasoactive intestinal polypeptide receptor VPAC1R. Finally, assessment of neuronal, astrocytic, and microglial-enriched cultures demonstrated that only astrocyte-enriched cultures exhibit enhanced cystine uptake following both PACAP and VIP treatment. These data introduce a novel mechanism by which both PACAP and VIP regulate system xc(-) activity. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Signalling Exerts Chondrogenesis Promoting and Protecting Effects: Implication of Calcineurin as a Downstream Target

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Matta, Csaba; Katona, Éva; Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Gergely, Pál; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Tóth, Gábor; Reglődi, Dóra; Tamás, Andrea; Zákány, Róza

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2) were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote cartilage regeneration

  9. STC1 interference on calcitonin family of receptors signaling during osteoblastogenesis via adenylate cyclase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Terra, Silvia R; Cardoso, João Carlos R; Félix, Rute C; Martins, Leo Anderson M; Souza, Diogo Onofre G; Guma, Fatima C R; Canário, Adelino Vicente M; Schein, Vanessa

    2015-03-01

    Stanniocalcin 1 (STC1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are involved in bone formation/remodeling. Here we investigate the effects of STC1 on functional heterodimer complex CALCRL/RAMP1, expression and activity during osteoblastogenesis. STC1 did not modify CALCRL and ramp1 gene expression during osteoblastogenesis when compared to controls. However, plasma membrane spatial distribution of CALCRL/RAMP1 was modified in 7-day pre-osteoblasts exposed to either CGRP or STC1, and both peptides induced CALCRL and RAMP1 assembly. CGRP, but not STC1 stimulated cAMP accumulation in 7-day osteoblasts and in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. Furthermore, STC1 inhibited forskolin stimulated cAMP accumulation of HEK293 cells, but not in CALCRL/RAMP1 transfected HEK293 cells. However, STC1 inhibited cAMP accumulation in calcitonin receptor (CTR) HEK293 transfected cells stimulated by calcitonin. In conclusion, STC1 signals through inhibitory G-protein modulates CGRP receptor spatial localization during osteoblastogenesis and may function as a regulatory factor interacting with calcitonin peptide members during bone formation.

  10. Functional classification of cNMP-binding proteins and nucleotide cyclases with implications for novel regulatory pathways in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    McCue, L A; McDonough, K A; Lawrence, C E

    2000-02-01

    We have analyzed the cyclic nucleotide (cNMP)-binding protein and nucleotide cyclase superfamilies using Bayesian computational methods of protein family identification and classification. In addition to the known cNMP-binding proteins (cNMP-dependent kinases, cNMP-gated channels, cAMP-guanine nucleotide exchange factors, and bacterial cAMP-dependent transcription factors), new functional groups of cNMP-binding proteins were identified, including putative ABC-transporter subunits, translocases, and esterases. Classification of the nucleotide cyclases revealed subtle differences in sequence conservation of the active site that distinguish the five classes of cyclases: the multicellular eukaryotic adenylyl cyclases, the eukaryotic receptor-type guanylyl cyclases, the eukaryotic soluble guanylyl cyclases, the unicellular eukaryotic and prokaryotic adenylyl cyclases, and the putative prokaryotic guanylyl cyclases. Phylogenetic distribution of the cNMP-binding proteins and cyclases was analyzed, with particular attention to the 22 complete archaeal and eubacterial genome sequences. Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv and Synechocystis PCC6803 were each found to encode several more putative cNMP-binding proteins than other prokaryotes; many of these proteins are of unknown function. M. tuberculosis also encodes several more putative nucleotide cyclases than other prokaryotic species. PMID:10673278

  11. Controlling fertilization and cAMP signaling in sperm by optogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Vera; Alvarez, Luis; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Hegemann, Peter; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique to control cellular activity by light. The light-gated Channelrhodopsin has been widely used to study and manipulate neuronal activity in vivo, whereas optogenetic control of second messengers in vivo has not been examined in depth. In this study, we present a transgenic mouse model expressing a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (bPAC) in sperm. In transgenic sperm, bPAC mimics the action of the endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase (SACY) that is required for motility and fertilization: light-stimulation rapidly elevates cAMP, accelerates the flagellar beat, and, thereby, changes swimming behavior of sperm. Furthermore, bPAC replaces endogenous adenylyl cyclase activity. In mutant sperm lacking the bicarbonate-stimulated SACY activity, bPAC restored motility after light-stimulation and, thereby, enabled sperm to fertilize oocytes in vitro. We show that optogenetic control of cAMP in vivo allows to non-invasively study cAMP signaling, to control behaviors of single cells, and to restore a fundamental biological process such as fertilization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05161.001 PMID:25601414

  12. Controlling fertilization and cAMP signaling in sperm by optogenetics.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Vera; Alvarez, Luis; Balbach, Melanie; Strünker, Timo; Hegemann, Peter; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Wachten, Dagmar

    2015-01-20

    Optogenetics is a powerful technique to control cellular activity by light. The light-gated Channelrhodopsin has been widely used to study and manipulate neuronal activity in vivo, whereas optogenetic control of second messengers in vivo has not been examined in depth. In this study, we present a transgenic mouse model expressing a photoactivated adenylyl cyclase (bPAC) in sperm. In transgenic sperm, bPAC mimics the action of the endogenous soluble adenylyl cyclase (SACY) that is required for motility and fertilization: light-stimulation rapidly elevates cAMP, accelerates the flagellar beat, and, thereby, changes swimming behavior of sperm. Furthermore, bPAC replaces endogenous adenylyl cyclase activity. In mutant sperm lacking the bicarbonate-stimulated SACY activity, bPAC restored motility after light-stimulation and, thereby, enabled sperm to fertilize oocytes in vitro. We show that optogenetic control of cAMP in vivo allows to non-invasively study cAMP signaling, to control behaviors of single cells, and to restore a fundamental biological process such as fertilization.

  13. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ release, and activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems. PMID:25202235

  14. A Signaling Pathway Involving the Diguanylate Cyclase CelR and the Response Regulator DivK Controls Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, D. Michael; Su, Shengchang

    2014-01-01

    The production of cellulose fibrils is involved in the attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to its plant host. Consistent with previous studies, we reported recently that a putative diguanylate cyclase, celR, is required for synthesis of this polymer in A. tumefaciens. In this study, the effects of celR and other components of the regulatory pathway of cellulose production were explored. Mutational analysis of celR demonstrated that the cyclase requires the catalytic GGEEF motif, as well as the conserved aspartate residue of a CheY-like receiver domain, for stimulating cellulose production. Moreover, a site-directed mutation within the PilZ domain of CelA, the catalytic subunit of the cellulose synthase complex, greatly reduced cellulose production. In addition, deletion of divK, the first gene of the divK-celR operon, also reduced cellulose production. This requirement for divK was alleviated by expression of a constitutively active form of CelR, suggesting that DivK acts upstream of CelR activation. Based on bacterial two-hybrid assays, CelR homodimerizes but does not interact with DivK. The mutation in divK additionally affected cell morphology, and this effect was complementable by a wild-type copy of the gene, but not by the constitutively active allele of celR. These results support the hypothesis that CelR is a bona fide c-di-GMP synthase and that the nucleotide signal produced by this enzyme activates CelA via the PilZ domain. Our studies also suggest that the DivK/CelR signaling pathway in Agrobacterium regulates cellulose production independent of cell cycle checkpoint systems that are controlled by divK. PMID:24443526

  15. Cyclic nucleotide signalling in kidney fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schinner, Elisabeth; Wetzl, Veronika; Schlossmann, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure. PMID:25622251

  16. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Somogyi, Csilla Szűcs; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  17. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Szűcs Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  18. AKAP79, PKC, PKA and PDE4 participate in a Gq-linked muscarinic receptor and adenylate cyclase 2 cAMP signalling complex

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia X.; Cooper, Dermot M. F.

    2014-01-01

    AC2 (adenylate cyclase 2) is stimulated by activation of Gq-coupled muscarinic receptors through PKC (protein kinase C) to generate localized cAMP in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. In the present study, we utilized a sensitive live-cell imaging technique to unravel the proteins that play essential roles in a Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor-mediated cAMP signalling complex. We reveal that, upon agonist binding to the Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor, AKAP79 (A-kinase-anchoring protein 79) recruits PKC to activate AC2 to produce cAMP. The cAMP formed is degraded by PDE4 (phosphodiesterase 4) activated by an AKAP-anchored PKA (protein kinase A). Calcineurin, a phosphatase bound to AKAP79, is not involved in this regulation. Overall, a transient cAMP increase is generated from AC2 by Gq-coupled muscarinic receptor activation, subject to sophisticated regulation through AKAP79, PKC, PDE4 and PKA, which significantly enhances acetylcholine-mediated signalling. PMID:23889134

  19. Parabrachial nucleus (PBn) pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the amygdala: implication for the sensory and behavioral effects of pain

    PubMed Central

    Missig, Galen A.; Roman, Carolyn W.; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Braas, Karen M.; May, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The intricate relationships that associate pain, stress responses and emotional behavior have been well established. Acute stressful situations can decrease nociceptive sensations and conversely, chronic pain can enhance other pain experiences and heighten the emotional and behavioral consequences of stress. Accordingly, chronic pain is comorbid with a number of behavioral disorders including depression, anxiety abnormalities and associated stress-related disorders including post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) represents a convergence of pathways for pain, stress and emotion, and we have identified pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) immunoreactivity in fiber elements in the lateral capsular division of the CeA (CeLC). The PACAP staining patterns colocalized in part with those for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP); anterograde fiber tracing and excitotoxic lesion studies demonstrated that the CeLC PACAP/CGRP immunoreactivities represented sensory fiber projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBn) along the spino-parabrachioamygdaloid tract. The same PBn PACAP/CGRP fiber system also projected to the BNST. As in the BNST, CeA PACAP signaling increased anxiety-like behaviors accompanied by weight loss and decreased feeding. But in addition to heightened anxiety-like responses, CeA PACAP signaling also altered nociception as reflected by decreased latency and threshold responses in thermal and mechanical sensitivity tests, respectively. From PACAP expression in major pain pathways, the current observations are novel and suggest that CeA PACAP nociceptive signaling and resulting neuroplasticity via the spino-parabrachioamygdaloid tract may represent mechanisms that associate chronic pain with sensory hypersensitivity, fear memory consolidation and severe behavioral disorders. PMID:24998751

  20. A Pterin-Dependent Signaling Pathway Regulates a Dual-Function Diguanylate Cyclase-Phosphodiesterase Controlling Surface Attachment in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Feirer, Nathan; Xu, Jing; Allen, Kylie D.; Koestler, Benjamin J.; Bruger, Eric L.; Waters, Christopher M.; White, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The motile-to-sessile transition is an important lifestyle switch in diverse bacteria and is often regulated by the intracellular second messenger cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP). In general, high c-di-GMP concentrations promote attachment to surfaces, whereas cells with low levels of signal remain motile. In the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens, c-di-GMP controls attachment and biofilm formation via regulation of a unipolar polysaccharide (UPP) adhesin. The levels of c-di-GMP in A. tumefaciens are controlled in part by the dual-function diguanylate cyclase-phosphodiesterase (DGC-PDE) protein DcpA. In this study, we report that DcpA possesses both c-di-GMP synthesizing and degrading activities in heterologous and native genetic backgrounds, a binary capability that is unusual among GGDEF-EAL domain-containing proteins. DcpA activity is modulated by a pteridine reductase called PruA, with DcpA acting as a PDE in the presence of PruA and a DGC in its absence. PruA enzymatic activity is required for the control of DcpA and through this control, attachment and biofilm formation. Intracellular pterin analysis demonstrates that PruA is responsible for the production of a novel pterin species. In addition, the control of DcpA activity also requires PruR, a protein encoded directly upstream of DcpA with a predicted molybdopterin-binding domain. PruR is hypothesized to be a potential signaling intermediate between PruA and DcpA through an as-yet-unidentified mechanism. This study provides the first prokaryotic example of a pterin-mediated signaling pathway and a new model for the regulation of dual-function DGC-PDE proteins. PMID:26126849

  1. Role of FQQI motif in the internalization, trafficking, and signaling of guanylyl-cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A in cultured murine mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-01-01

    Binding of the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to transmembrane guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP in target cells. To delineate the critical role of an endocytic signal in intracellular sorting of the receptor, we have identified a FQQI (Phe(790), Gln(791), Gln(792), and Ile(793)) motif in the carboxyl-terminal region of NPRA. Mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were transiently transfected with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) and mutant constructs of eGFP-NPRA. The mutation FQQI/AAAA, in the eGFP-NPRA cDNA sequence, markedly attenuated the internalization of mutant receptors by almost 49% compared with the WT receptor. Interestingly, we show that the μ1B subunit of adaptor protein-1 binds directly to a phenylalanine-based FQQI motif in the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. However, subcellular trafficking indicated that immunofluorescence colocalization of the mutated receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and Rab 11 marker was decreased by 57% in early endosomes, 48% in lysosomes, and 42% in recycling endosomes, respectively, compared with the WT receptor in MMCs. The receptor containing the mutated motif (FQQI/AAAA) also produced a significantly decreased level of intracellular cGMP during subcellular trafficking than the WT receptor. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed a decreased level of colocalization of the mutant receptor with subcellular compartments during endocytic processes. The results suggest that the FQQI motif is essential for the internalization and subcellular trafficking of NPRA during the hormone signaling process in intact MMCs.

  2. The discovery of signal transduction by G proteins. A personal account and an overview of the initial findings and contributions that led to our present understanding

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    The realization that there existed a G-protein coupled signal transduction mechanism developed gradually and was initially the result of an ill fated quest for uncovering the mechanism of action of insulin, followed by a refocused research in many laboratories, including mine, on how GTP acted to increase hormonal stimulation of adenylyl cyclase. Independent research into how light-activated rhodopsin triggers a response in photoreceptor cells of the retina and the attendant biochemical studies joined midway and, without the left hand knowing well what the right hand was doing, preceded classical G protein research in identifying the molecular players responsible for signal transduction by G proteins. PMID:17141178

  3. Adenosine signaling inhibits CIITA-mediated MHC class II transactivation in lung fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Fang, Mingming; Xia, Jun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Kong, Hui; Wang, Hong; Xie, Weiping; Xu, Yong

    2013-08-01

    Efficient antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules represents a critical process in adaptive immunity. Class II transactivator (CIITA) is considered the master regulator of MHC class II (MHC II) transcription. Previously, we have shown that CIITA expression is upregulated in smooth muscle cells deficient in A2b adenosine receptor. Here, we report that treatment with the adenosine receptor agonist adenosine-5'N-ethylcarboxamide (NECA) attenuated MHC II transcription in lung fibro-blast cells as a result of CIITA repression. Further analysis revealed that NECA preferentially abrogated CIITA transcription through promoters III and IV. Blockade with a selective A2b receptor antagonist MRS-1754 restored CIITA-dependent MHC II transactivation. Forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, achieved the same effect as NECA. A2b signaling repressed CIITA transcription by altering histone modifications and recruitment of key factors on the CIITA promoters in a STAT1-dependent manner. MRS-1754 blocked the antagonism of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in CIITA induction by interferon gamma (IFN-γ), alluding to a potential dialogue between TGF-β and adenosine signaling pathways. Finally, A2b signaling attenuated STAT1 phosphorylation and stimulated TGF-β synthesis. In conclusion, we have identified an adenosine-A2b receptor-adenylyl cyclase axis that influences CIITA-mediated MHC II transactivation in lung fibroblast cells and as such have provided invaluable insights into the development of novel immune-modulatory strategies.

  4. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  5. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide induces long-lasting neuroprotection through the induction of activity-dependent signaling via the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcription co-activator 1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S; Martel, Marc-Andre; McMahon, Aoife; Kind, Peter C; Hardingham, Giles E

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neuroprotective peptide which exerts its effects mainly through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, we show that in cortical neurons, PACAP-induced PKA signaling exerts a major part of its neuroprotective effects indirectly, by triggering action potential (AP) firing. Treatment of cortical neurons with PACAP induces a rapid and sustained PKA-dependent increase in AP firing and associated intracellular Ca2+ transients, which are essential for the anti-apoptotic actions of PACAP. Transient exposure to PACAP induces long-lasting neuroprotection in the face of apoptotic insults which is reliant on AP firing and the activation of cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene expression. Although direct, activity-independent PKA signaling is sufficient to trigger phosphorylation on CREB’s activating serine-133 site, this is insufficient for activation of CREB-mediated gene expression. Full activation is dependent on CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1), whose PACAP-induced nuclear import is dependent on firing activity-dependent calcineurin signaling. Over-expression of CRTC1 is sufficient to rescue PACAP-induced CRE-mediated gene expression in the face of activity-blockade, while dominant negative CRTC1 interferes with PACAP-induced, CREB-mediated neuroprotection. Thus, the enhancement of AP firing may play a significant role in the neuroprotective actions of PACAP and other adenylate cyclase-coupled ligands. PMID:21623792

  6. A novel link between Fic (filamentation induced by cAMP)-mediated adenylylation/AMPylation and the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Anwesha; Chen, Andy J; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Lazar, Cheri S; Zbornik, Erica A; Worby, Carolyn A; Koller, Antonius; Mattoo, Seema

    2015-03-27

    The maintenance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis is a critical aspect of determining cell fate and requires a properly functioning unfolded protein response (UPR). We have discovered a previously unknown role of a post-translational modification termed adenylylation/AMPylation in regulating signal transduction events during UPR induction. A family of enzymes, defined by the presence of a Fic (filamentation induced by cAMP) domain, catalyzes this adenylylation reaction. The human genome encodes a single Fic protein, called HYPE (Huntingtin yeast interacting protein E), with adenylyltransferase activity but unknown physiological target(s). Here, we demonstrate that HYPE localizes to the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum via its hydrophobic N terminus and adenylylates the ER molecular chaperone, BiP, at Ser-365 and Thr-366. BiP functions as a sentinel for protein misfolding and maintains ER homeostasis. We found that adenylylation enhances BiP's ATPase activity, which is required for refolding misfolded proteins while coping with ER stress. Accordingly, HYPE expression levels increase upon stress. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of HYPE prevents the induction of an unfolded protein response. Thus, we identify HYPE as a new UPR regulator and provide the first functional data for Fic-mediated adenylylation in mammalian signaling. PMID:25601083

  7. The mechanisms of HAMP-mediated signaling in transmembrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Hedda U; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw; Mondéjar, Laura García; Hulko, Michael; Hantke, Klaus; Martin, Jörg; Schultz, Joachim E; Zeth, Kornelius; Lupas, Andrei N; Coles, Murray

    2011-03-01

    HAMP domains mediate signal transduction in over 7500 enzyme-coupled receptors represented in all kingdoms of life. The HAMP domain of the putative archaeal receptor Af1503 has a parallel, dimeric, four-helical coiled coil structure, but with unusual core packing, related to canonical packing by concerted axial rotation of the helices. This has led to the gearbox model for signal transduction, whereby the alternate packing modes correspond to signaling states. Here we present structures of a series of Af1503 HAMP variants. We show that substitution of a conserved small side chain within the domain core (A291) for larger residues induces a gradual transition in packing mode, involving both changes in helix rotation and bundle shape, which are most prominent at the C-terminal, output end of the domain. These are correlated with activity and ligand response in vitro and in vivo by incorporating Af1503 HAMP into mycobacterial adenylyl cyclase assay systems.

  8. The Gyc76C Receptor Guanylyl Cyclase and the Foraging cGMP-Dependent Kinase Regulate Extracellular Matrix Organization and BMP Signaling in the Developing Wing of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schleede, Justin; Blair, Seth S.

    2015-01-01

    The developing crossveins of the wing of Drosophila melanogaster are specified by long-range BMP signaling and are especially sensitive to loss of extracellular modulators of BMP signaling such as the Chordin homolog Short gastrulation (Sog). However, the role of the extracellular matrix in BMP signaling and Sog activity in the crossveins has been poorly explored. Using a genetic mosaic screen for mutations that disrupt BMP signaling and posterior crossvein development, we identify Gyc76C, a member of the receptor guanylyl cyclase family that includes mammalian natriuretic peptide receptors. We show that Gyc76C and the soluble cGMP-dependent kinase Foraging, likely linked by cGMP, are necessary for normal refinement and maintenance of long-range BMP signaling in the posterior crossvein. This does not occur through cell-autonomous crosstalk between cGMP and BMP signal transduction, but likely through altered extracellular activity of Sog. We identify a novel pathway leading from Gyc76C to the organization of the wing extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases, and show that both the extracellular matrix and BMP signaling effects are largely mediated by changes in the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. We discuss parallels and differences between this pathway and other examples of cGMP activity in both Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian cells and tissues. PMID:26440503

  9. Stimulation of Hippocampal Adenylyl Cyclase Activity Dissociates Memory Consolidation Processes for Response and Place Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martel, Guillaume; Millard, Annabelle; Jaffard, Robert; Guillou, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Procedural and declarative memory systems are postulated to interact in either a synergistic or a competitive manner, and memory consolidation appears to be a highly critical stage for this process. However, the precise cellular mechanisms subserving these interactions remain unknown. To investigate this issue, 24-h retention performances were…

  10. The polyketide MPBD initiates the SDF-1 signaling cascade that coordinates terminal differentiation in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Anjard, Christophe; Su, Yongxuan; Loomis, William F

    2011-07-01

    Dictyostelium uses a wide array of chemical signals to coordinate differentiation as it switches from a unicellular to a multicellular organism. MPBD, the product of the polyketide synthase encoded by stlA, regulates stalk and spore differentiation by rapidly stimulating the release of the phosphopeptide SDF-1. By analyzing specific mutants affected in MPBD or SDF-1 production, we delineated a signal transduction cascade through the membrane receptor CrlA coupled to Gα1, leading to the inhibition of GskA so that the precursor of SDF-1 is released. It is then processed by the extracellular protease of TagB on prestalk cells. SDF-1 apparently acts through the adenylyl cyclase ACG to activate the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and trigger the production of more SDF-1. This signaling cascade shows similarities to the SDF-2 signaling pathway, which acts later to induce rapid spore encapsulation. PMID:21602484

  11. The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase revisited: role of 2-ketoglutarate in the regulation of glutamine synthetase adenylylation state.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Peliska, J A; Ninfa, A J

    1998-09-15

    The regulation of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS) by reversible adenylylation has provided one of the classical paradigms for signal transduction by cyclic cascades. Yet, many mechanistic features of this regulation remain to be elucidated. We examined the regulation of GS adenylylation state in a reconstituted system containing GS, adenylyltransferase (ATase), the PII signal transduction protein that controls ATase, and the uridylyltransferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase/UR), which has a role in regulating PII. In this reconstituted bicyclic cascade system, the adenylylation state of GS was regulated reciprocally by the small molecule effectors 2-ketoglutarate and glutamine at physiological effector concentrations. By examination of the individual regulatory monocycles and comparison to the bicyclic system and existing data, we could deduce that the only sensors of 2-ketoglutarate were PII and PII-UMP. At physiological conditions, we observed that the main role of 2-ketoglutarate in bringing about the deadenylylation of GS was to inhibit GS adenylylation, and this was due to the allosteric regulation of PII activity. Glutamine acted as an allosteric regulator of both ATase and UTase/UR. We also compared the regulation of GS adenylylation state to the regulation of phosphorylation state of the transcription factor NRI (NtrC) in a reconstituted bicyclic system containing NRI, the bifunctional kinase/phosphatase NRII (NtrB), PII, and the UTase/UR. This comparison indicated that, at a fixed 2-ketoglutarate concentration, the regulation of GS adenylylation state by glutamine was sharper and occurred at a higher concentration than did the regulation of NRI phosphorylation. The possible biological implications of this regulatory arrangement are discussed. PMID:9737857

  12. β1-adrenergic receptor antagonists signal via PDE4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Blanchard, Elise; Day, Peter; Conti, Marco

    2013-03-01

    It is generally assumed that antagonists of Gs-coupled receptors do not activate cAMP signalling, because they do not stimulate cAMP production via Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase activation. Here, we report a new signalling pathway whereby antagonists of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) increase cAMP levels locally without stimulating cAMP production directly. Binding of antagonists causes dissociation of a preformed complex between β1ARs and Type-4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s). This reduces the local concentration of cAMP-hydrolytic activity, thereby increasing submembrane cAMP and PKA activity. Our study identifies receptor/PDE4 complex dissociation as a novel mechanism of antagonist action that contributes to the pharmacological properties of β1AR antagonists and might be shared by other receptor subtypes.

  13. New functional activity of aripiprazole revealed: Robust antagonism of D2 dopamine receptor-stimulated Gβγ signaling.

    PubMed

    Brust, Tarsis F; Hayes, Michael P; Roman, David L; Watts, Val J

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is generally considered to be a primary target in the treatment of schizophrenia. First generation antipsychotic drugs (e.g. haloperidol) are antagonists of the DRD2, while second generation antipsychotic drugs (e.g. olanzapine) antagonize DRD2 and 5HT2A receptors. Notably, both these classes of drugs may cause side effects associated with D2 receptor antagonism (e.g. hyperprolactemia and extrapyramidal symptoms). The novel, "third generation" antipsychotic drug, aripiprazole is also used to treat schizophrenia, with the remarkable advantage that its tendency to cause extrapyramidal symptoms is minimal. Aripiprazole is considered a partial agonist of the DRD2, but it also has partial agonist/antagonist activity for other GPCRs. Further, aripiprazole has been reported to have a unique activity profile in functional assays with the DRD2. In the present study the molecular pharmacology of aripiprazole was further examined in HEK cell models stably expressing the DRD2 and specific isoforms of adenylyl cyclase to assess functional responses of Gα and Gβγ subunits. Additional studies examined the activity of aripiprazole in DRD2-mediated heterologous sensitization of adenylyl cyclase and cell-based dynamic mass redistribution (DMR). Aripiprazole displayed a unique functional profile for modulation of G proteins, being a partial agonist for Gαi/o and a robust antagonist for Gβγ signaling. Additionally, aripiprazole was a weak partial agonist for both heterologous sensitization and dynamic mass redistribution.

  14. Early and transient alteration of adenosine A2A receptor signaling in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Tarditi, Alessia; Camurri, Alessandra; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea; Woodman, Ben; Bates, Gillian; Cattaneo, Elena; Abbracchio, Maria P

    2006-07-01

    Huntington Disease (HD) is characterized by choreic involuntary movements and striatal vulnerability. A2A receptors expressed on GABAergic striatal neurons have been suggested to play a pathogenetic role. Previous data demonstrated the presence of an aberrant alteration of A2A receptor-dependent adenylyl cyclase in an in vitro model of the disease (striatal cells expressing mutant huntingtin) and in peripheral circulating cells of HD patients. Here, we investigated whether this dysfunction is present in the R6/2 HD transgenic mouse model, by analyzing striatal A2A receptor-binding and adenylyl cyclase activity at different developmental stages in comparison with age-matched wild type animals. A transient increase in A2A receptor density (Bmax) and A2A receptor-dependent cAMP production at early presymptomatic ages (7-14 postnatal days) was found. Both alterations normalized to control values starting from postnatal day 21. In contrast, A2A receptor mRNA, as detected by real time PCR, dramatically decreased starting from PND21 until late symptomatic stages (12 weeks of age). The discrepancy between A2A receptor expression and density suggests compensatory mechanisms. These data, reproducing ex vivo the previous observations in vitro, support the hypothesis that an alteration of A2A receptor signaling is present in HD and might represent an interesting target for neuroprotective therapies.

  15. Ca2+ signaling by plant Arabidopsis thaliana Pep peptides depends on AtPepR1, a receptor with guanylyl cyclase activity, and cGMP-activated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Verma, Rajeev; Gehring, Chris; Yamaguchi, Yube; Zhao, Yichen; Ryan, Clarence A; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2010-12-01

    A family of peptide signaling molecules (AtPeps) and their plasma membrane receptor AtPepR1 are known to act in pathogen-defense signaling cascades in plants. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms that link these signaling peptides and their receptor, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, to downstream pathogen-defense responses. We identify some cellular activities of these molecules that provide the context for a model for their action in signaling cascades. AtPeps activate plasma membrane inwardly conducting Ca(2+) permeable channels in mesophyll cells, resulting in cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. This activity is dependent on their receptor as well as a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2). We also show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase receptor AtPepR1 has guanylyl cyclase activity, generating cGMP from GTP, and that cGMP can activate CNGC2-dependent cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. AtPep-dependent expression of pathogen-defense genes (PDF1.2, MPK3, and WRKY33) is mediated by the Ca(2+) signaling pathway associated with AtPep peptides and their receptor. The work presented here indicates that extracellular AtPeps, which can act as danger-associated molecular patterns, signal by interaction with their receptor, AtPepR1, a plasma membrane protein that can generate cGMP. Downstream from AtPep and AtPepR1 in a signaling cascade, the cGMP-activated channel CNGC2 is involved in AtPep- and AtPepR1-dependent inward Ca(2+) conductance and resulting cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. The signaling cascade initiated by AtPeps leads to expression of pathogen-defense genes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner.

  16. Engineered G protein coupled receptors reveal independent regulation of internalization, desensitization and acute signaling

    PubMed Central

    Scearce-Levie, Kimberly; Lieberman, Michael D; Elliott, Heather H; Conklin, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    Background The physiological regulation of G protein-coupled receptors, through desensitization and internalization, modulates the length of the receptor signal and may influence the development of tolerance and dependence in response to chronic drug treatment. To explore the importance of receptor regulation, we engineered a series of Gi-coupled receptors that differ in signal length, degree of agonist-induced internalization, and ability to induce adenylyl cyclase superactivation. All of these receptors, based on the kappa opioid receptor, were modified to be receptors activated solely by synthetic ligands (RASSLs). This modification allows us to compare receptors that have the same ligands and effectors, but differ only in desensitization and internalization. Results Removal of phosphorylation sites in the C-terminus of the RASSL resulted in a mutant that was resistant to internalization and less prone to desensitization. Replacement of the C-terminus of the RASSL with the corresponding portion of the mu opioid receptor eliminated the induction of AC superactivation, without disrupting agonist-induced desensitization or internalization. Surprisingly, removal of phosphorylation sites from this chimera resulted in a receptor that is constitutively internalized, even in the absence of agonist. However, the receptor still signals and desensitizes in response to agonist, indicating normal G-protein coupling and partial membrane expression. Conclusions These studies reveal that internalization, desensitization and adenylyl cyclase superactivation, all processes that decrease chronic Gi-receptor signals, are independently regulated. Furthermore, specific mutations can radically alter superactivation or internalization without affecting the efficacy of acute Gi signaling. These mutant RASSLs will be useful for further elucidating the temporal dynamics of the signaling of G protein-coupled receptors in vitro and in vivo. PMID:15707483

  17. Cytidylyl- and Uridylyl Cyclase Activity of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor and Bordetella pertussis CyaA

    PubMed Central

    Göttle, Martin; Dove, Stefan; Kees, Frieder; Schlossmann, Jens; Geduhn, Jens; König, Burkhard; Shen, Yuequan; Tang, Wei-Jen; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine 3′:5′-monophosphate (cGMP) are second messengers for a numerous mammalian cell functions. The natural occurrence and synthesis of a third cyclic nucleotide (cNMP), cyclic cytidine 3′:5′-monophosphate (cCMP) is discussed controversially, and almost nothing is known about cyclic uridine 3′:5′-monophosphate (cUMP). Bacillus anthracis and Bordetella pertussis secrete the adenylyl cyclase (AC) toxins edema factor (EF) and CyaA, respectively, weakening immune responses and facilitating bacterial proliferation. A cell-permeable cCMP analog inhibits human neutrophil superoxide production. Here, we report that EF and CyaA also possess cytidylyl cyclase (CC) and uridylyl cyclase (UC) activity. CC- and UC activity was determined by a radiometric assay, using [α-32P]CTP and [α-32P]UTP as substrates, respectively, and by an HPLC method. The identity of cNMPs was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Based on available crystal structures, we developed a model illustrating conversion of CTP to cCMP by bacterial toxins. In conclusion, we have shown both EF and CyaA have a rather broad substrate-specificity and exhibit cytidylyl- and uridylyl cyclase activity. Both cCMP and cUMP may contribute to toxin actions. PMID:20521845

  18. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology. PMID:9801454

  19. Multiple splice variants of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor detected by RT-PCR in single rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Bresson-Bépoldin, L; Jacquot, M C; Schlegel, W; Rawlings, S R

    1998-10-01

    Alternative splicing of the rat type 1 pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptor (PVR1) produces variants that couple either to both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phospholipase C (PLC) (PVR1 short, PVR1 hop, PVR1 hiphop), or to AC alone (PVR1 hip). We have previously shown that populations of clonal alphaT3-1 gonadotrophs express PVR1 hop and PVR1 short mRNAs, whereas clonal GH4C1 somatotrophs do not. Here we have used the single cell RT-PCR technique to investigate whether normal rat gonadotrophs and somatotrophs express PVR1 mRNA, whether a single cell co-expresses multiple splice variant forms, and whether differential PVR1 mRNA expression correlates with differences in PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ signalling. We found that individual rat gonadotrophs expressed mRNA either for PVR1 hop, for PVR1 short, or co-expressed the two forms. Although we found no differences between the splice variant(s) expressed and the characteristics of PACAP-stimulated Ca2+ responses, the expression of PVR1 mRNA is consistent with the known PACAP stimulation of the PLC system in gonadotrophs. Individual rat somatotrophs also expressed PVR1 hop or PVR1 short (but not PVR1 hip) mRNAs although these forms were never co-expressed. The expression of PVR1 mRNA in somatotrophs can explain in part the activation by PACAP of the AC system in such cells. In conclusion, the single cell RT-PCR technique was used to demonstrate expression of multiple PVR1 splice variants in single identified pituitary cells. These findings open up important questions on the role of alternative splicing in cell biology.

  20. Adenylylation of Tyr77 stabilizes Rab1b GTPase in an active state: A molecular dynamics simulation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luitz, Manuel P.; Bomblies, Rainer; Ramcke, Evelyn; Itzen, Aymelt; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenic pathway of Legionella pneumophila exploits the intercellular vesicle transport system via the posttranslational attachment of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to the Tyr77 sidechain of human Ras like GTPase Rab1b. The modification, termed adenylylation, is performed by the bacterial enzyme DrrA/SidM, however the effect on conformational properties of the molecular switch mechanism of Rab1b remained unresolved. In this study we find that the adenylylation of Tyr77 stabilizes the active Rab1b state by locking the switch in the active signaling conformation independent of bound GTP or GDP and that electrostatic interactions due to the additional negative charge in the switch region make significant contributions. The stacking interaction between adenine and Phe45 however, seems to have only minor influence on this stabilisation. The results may also have implications for the mechanistic understanding of conformational switching in other signaling proteins. PMID:26818796

  1. Inositol triphosphate participates in an oestradiol nongenomic signalling pathway involved in accelerated oviductal transport in cycling rats.

    PubMed

    Orihuela, Pedro A; Parada-Bustamante, Alexis; Zuñiga, Lidia M; Croxatto, Horacio B

    2006-03-01

    Oestradiol (E(2)) accelerates oviductal transport of oocytes in cycling rats through a nongenomic pathway that involves the cAMP-PKA signalling cascade. Here we examined the role of the inositol triphosphate (IP3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascades in this nongenomic pathway. Oestrous rats were injected with E(2) s.c. and intrabursally (i.b) with the selective inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) ET-18-OCH(3) or MAPK PD98059. The number of eggs in the oviduct assessed 24 h later showed that ET-18-OCH(3) blocked E(2)-induced egg transport acceleration, whereas PD98059 had no effect. Other oestrous rats were treated with E(2) s.c. and 1, 3 or 6 h later oviducts were excised and the levels of IP3 and phosphorylated MAPK p44/42 (activated) were determined by radioreceptor assay and western blot, respectively. Oestradiol administration increased IP3 level at 1 and 6 h after treatment, whereas activated MAPK p44/42 level was unchanged. Finally, we explored whether cAMP-PKA and PLC-IP3 signalling cascades are coupled. Inhibition of adenylyl cyclase by i.b. injection of SQ 22536 blocked the increase of IP3 levels induced by E(2), while inhibition of PLC by ET-18-OCH(3) had no effect on E(2)-induced PKA activity. Furthermore, activation of adenylyl cyclase by Forskolin increased oviductal IP3 levels. Thus, activation of PLC-IP3 by E(2) requires previous stimulation of cAMP-PKA. We conclude that the nongenomic pathway utilised by E(2) to accelerate oviductal transport of oocytes in cycling rats involves successive activation of the cAMP-PKA and PLC-IP3 signalling cascades and does not require activation of MAPK. These findings clearly illustrate a non-genomic pathway triggered by E(2) that regulates a complex physiologic process accomplished by an entire organ.

  2. cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: role in pathogenesis and as a drug target

    PubMed Central

    Makin, Laura; Gluenz, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent research linking cAMP signalling to virulence in trypanosomatids and detailed studies of trypanosomatid adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) since their discoveries 40 years ago, downstream components of the pathway and their biological functions have remained remarkably elusive. However, in recent years, significant discoveries have been made: a role for parasite ACs has been proposed in cytokinesis, evasion of the host immune response, and social motility. cAMP phosphodiesterases PDEB1 and PDEB2 were found to be essential for survival and virulence of Trypanosoma brucei and, in Trypanosoma cruzi, PDEC2 was shown to be required for normal osmoregulation. As we discuss here, these breakthroughs have led to an ongoing surge in the development of PDE inhibitors as lead compounds for trypanocidal drugs. PMID:26004537

  3. cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: role in pathogenesis and as a drug target.

    PubMed

    Makin, Laura; Gluenz, Eva

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent research linking cAMP signalling to virulence in trypanosomatids and detailed studies of trypanosomatid adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) since their discoveries 40 years ago, downstream components of the pathway and their biological functions have remained remarkably elusive. However, in recent years, significant discoveries have been made: a role for parasite ACs has been proposed in cytokinesis, evasion of the host immune response, and social motility. cAMP phosphodiesterases PDEB1 and PDEB2 were found to be essential for survival and virulence of Trypanosoma brucei and, in Trypanosoma cruzi, PDEC2 was shown to be required for normal osmoregulation. As we discuss here, these breakthroughs have led to an ongoing surge in the development of PDE inhibitors as lead compounds for trypanocidal drugs. PMID:26004537

  4. Exploring adenylylation and phosphocholination as post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias P; Albers, Michael F; Itzen, Aymelt; Hedberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Editing the translations: Adenylylation and phosphocholination have recently been found as important post-translational modifications used by pathogenic bacteria during the infection process. This review discusses the combined use of chemical handles and specific antibodies for the identification of previously unknown substrates of these post-translational modifications in infected host cells.

  5. Guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum with the topology of mammalian adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, J; Snippe, H; Kleineidam, R G; Van Haastert, P J

    2001-01-01

    The core of adenylate and guanylate cyclases is formed by an intramolecular or intermolecular dimer of two cyclase domains arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Metazoan membrane-bound adenylate cyclases are composed of 12 transmembrane spanning regions, and two cyclase domains which function as a heterodimer and are activated by G-proteins. In contrast, membrane-bound guanylate cyclases have only one transmembrane spanning region and one cyclase domain, and are activated by extracellular ligands to form a homodimer. In the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum, membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity is induced after cAMP stimulation; a G-protein-coupled cAMP receptor and G-proteins are essential for this activation. We have cloned a Dictyostelium gene, DdGCA, encoding a protein with 12 transmembrane spanning regions and two cyclase domains. Sequence alignment demonstrates that the two cyclase domains are transposed, relative to these domains in adenylate cyclases. DdGCA expressed in Dictyostelium exhibits high guanylate cyclase activity and no detectable adenylate cyclase activity. Deletion of the gene indicates that DdGCA is not essential for chemotaxis or osmo-regulation. The knock-out strain still exhibits substantial guanylate cyclase activity, demonstrating that Dictyostelium contains at least one other guanylate cyclase. PMID:11237875

  6. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  7. Nicotinamide Mononucleotide Adenylyl Transferase 2: A Promising Diagnostic and Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Chunhui; Qi, Jia; Deng, Quanwen; Chen, Rihong; Zhai, Duanyang; Yu, Jinlong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers all over the world. It is essential to search for more effective diagnostic and therapeutic methods for CRC. Abnormal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has been considered as a characteristic of cancer cells. In this study, nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferases (NMNATs) as well as p53-mediated cancer signaling pathways were investigated in patients with colorectal cancer. The CRC tissues and adjacent normal tissues were obtained from 95 untreated colorectal cancer patients and were stained for expression of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl transferase 2 (NMNAT2) and p53. The survival rate was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. The multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was conducted as well. Our data demonstrated that expression of NMNAT2 and p53 was significantly higher in CRC tissues, while NMNAT2 expression is in correlation with the invasive depth of tumors and TNM stage. Significant positive correlation was found between the expression of NMNAT2 and the expression of p53. However, NMNAT2 expression was not a statistically significant prognostic factor for overall survival. In conclusion, our results indicated that NMNAT2 might participate in tumorigenesis of CRC in a p53-dependent manner and NMNAT2 expression might be a potential therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27218101

  8. Role of cAMP signalling in winner and loser effects in crayfish agonistic encounters.

    PubMed

    Momohara, Yuto; Minami, Hiroki; Kanai, Akihiro; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2016-07-01

    For territorial animals, establishment of status-dependent dominance order is essential to maintain social stability. In agonistic encounters of the crayfish Procambarus clarkii, a difference of body length of 3-7% is enough for larger animals to become dominant. Despite a physical disadvantage, small winners of the first pairings were more likely to win subsequent conflicts with larger inexperienced animals. In contrast, the losers of the first pairings rarely won subsequent conflicts with smaller naive animals. Such experiences of previous winning or losing affected agonistic outcomes for a long period. The winner effects lasted more than 2 weeks and the loser effect lasted about 10 days. Injection of 5HT1 receptor antagonist into the dominant animals 15-30 min after establishment of dominance order blocked the formation of the winner effects. In contrast, injection of adrenergic-like octopamine receptor antagonist into subordinate animals blocked the formation of the loser. 5HT1 receptors are negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase and adrenergic-like octopamine receptors are positively coupled. Consistent with this, dominant animals failed to show the winner effect when injected with pCPT-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, and subordinate animals failed to show a loser effect when injected with adenylyl cyclase inhibitor SQ 22536. These results suggest that an increase and decrease of cAMP concentration is essential in mediating loser and winner effects, respectively. Furthermore, formation of the loser effect was blocked by injection of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H89, suggesting long-term memory of the loser effect is dependent on the cAMP-PKA signalling pathway. PMID:27086724

  9. Digitonin effects on photoreceptor adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Bitensky, M W; Gorman, R E; Miller, W H

    1972-03-24

    Adenylate cyclase is described in a number of photoreceptor membranes. Vertebrate rod outer segments contain light-regulated cyclase, and light regulation is abolished by digitonin. Disruption of microvilli in cone and rhabdomphotoreceptors is also associated with loss of light regulation and retention of full enzymic activity. The data suggest that inhibitory constraint provides regulation in cyclase systems and that disruption of membrane structure uncouples catalytic and regulatory elements.

  10. Characterization of the pharmacology, signal transduction and internalization of the fluorescent PACAP ligand, fluor-PACAP, on NIH/3T3 cells expressing PAC1.

    PubMed

    Germano, P M; Stalter, J; Le, S V; Wu, M; Yamaguchi, D J; Scott, D; Pisegna, J R

    2001-06-01

    Fluor-PACAP, a fluorescent derivative of PACAP-27, has been confirmed to share a high affinity for PAC1 receptors transfected into NIH/3T3 cells and to have comparable pharmacological characteristics to the unconjugated, native form. Through competitive binding with 125I-PACAP-27, the two ligands exhibited similar dose- dependent inhibition. Additional examination of the efficacy of activating adenylyl cyclase revealed that both ligands analogously stimulated the production of cyclic AMP. Furthermore, PAC1 internalization visualized by our Fluor-PACAP, is compareable to that performed with the radioligand, 125I-PACAP-27, with maximal internalization achieved within thirty minutes. Thus, Fluor-PACAP exhibits intracellular signaling abilities homologous to the native ligand.

  11. Inhibition of Gαs/cAMP Signaling Decreases TCR-Stimulated IL-2 transcription in CD4+ T Helper Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hynes, Thomas R.; Yost, Evan A.; Yost, Stacy M.; Hartle, Cassandra M.; Ott, Braden J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of cAMP in regulating T cell activation and function has been controversial. cAMP is generally known as an immunosuppressant, but it is also required for generating optimal immune responses. As the effect of cAMP is likely to depend on its cellular context, the current study investigated whether the mechanism of activation of Gαs and adenylyl cyclase influences their effect on T cell receptor (TCR)-stimulated interleukin-2 (IL-2) mRNA levels. Methods: The effect of blocking Gs-coupled receptor (GsPCR)-mediated Gs activation on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells was compared with that of knocking down Gαs expression or inhibiting adenylyl cyclase activity. The effect of knocking down Gαs expression on TCR-stimulated cAMP accumulation was compared with that of blocking GsPCR signaling. Results: ZM-241385, an antagonist to the Gs-coupled A2A adenosine receptor (A2AR), enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels in primary human CD4+ T helper cells and in Jurkat T cells. A dominant negative Gαs construct, GαsDN3, also enhanced TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Similar to GsPCR antagonists, GαsDN3 blocked GsPCR-dependent activation of both Gαs and Gβγ. In contrast, Gαs siRNA and 2’,5’-dideoxyadenosine (ddA), an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, decreased TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. Gαs siRNA, but not GαsDN3, decreased TCR-stimulated cAMP synthesis. Potentiation of IL-2 mRNA levels by ZM-241385 required at least two days of TCR stimulation, and addition of ddA after three days of TCR stimulation enhanced IL-2 mRNA levels. Conclusions: GsPCRs play an inhibitory role in the regulation of TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels whereas Gαs and cAMP can play a stimulatory one. Additionally, TCR-dependent activation of Gαs does not appear to involve GsPCRs. These results suggest that the context of Gαs/cAMP activation and the stage of T cell activation and differentiation determine the effect on TCR-stimulated IL-2 mRNA levels. PMID

  12. Time course of the uridylylation and adenylylation states in the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Varón-Castellanos, R; Havsteen, B H; García-Moreno, M; Valero-Ruiz, E; Molina-Alarcón, M; García-Cánovas, F

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic analysis of the glutamine synthetase bicyclic cascade is presented. It includes the dependence on time from the onset of the reaction of both the uridylylation of Shapiro's regulatory protein and the adenylylation of the glutamine synthetase. The transient phase equations obtained allow an estimation of the time elapsed until the states of uridylylation and adenylylation reach their steady-states, and therefore an evaluation of the effective sensitivity of the system. The contribution of the uridylylation cycle to the adenylylation cycle has been studied, and an equation relating the state of adenylylation at any time to the state of uridylylation at the same instant has been derived. PMID:8104399

  13. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl− efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca2+ from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner. PMID:27065801

  14. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl(-) efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca(2+) from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner.

  15. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl(-) efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca(2+) from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner. PMID:27065801

  16. Spatiotemporal control of opioid signaling and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Siuda, Edward R.; Copits, Bryan A.; Schmidt, Martin J.; Baird, Madison A.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Planer, William J.; Funderburk, Samuel C.; McCall, Jordan G.; Gereau, Robert W.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optogenetics is now a widely accepted tool for spatiotemporal manipulation of neuronal activity. However, a majority of optogenetic approaches use binary on/off control schemes. Here we extend the optogenetic toolset by developing a neuromodulatory approach using a rationale-based design to generate a Gi-coupled, optically-sensitive, mu-opioid-like receptor, we term opto-MOR. We demonstrate that opto-MOR engages canonical mu-opioid signaling through inhibition of adenylyl cyclase, activation of MAPK and G protein-gated inward rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, and internalizes with similar kinetics as the mu-opioid receptor. To assess in vivo utility we expressed a Cre-dependent viral opto-MOR in RMTg/VTA GABAergic neurons, which led to a real-time place preference. In contrast, expression of opto-MOR in GABAergic neurons of the ventral pallidum hedonic cold spot, led to real-time place aversion. This tool has generalizable application for spatiotemporal control of opioid signaling and, furthermore, can be used broadly for mimicking endogenous neuronal inhibition pathways. PMID:25937173

  17. Adenylate cyclase 3: a new target for anti-obesity drug development.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Shen, C; Seed Ahmed, M; Östenson, C-G; Gu, H F

    2016-09-01

    Obesity has become epidemic worldwide, and abdominal obesity has a negative impact on health. Current treatment options on obesity, however, still remain limited. It is then of importance to find a new target for anti-obesity drug development based upon recent molecular studies in obesity. Adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) is the third member of adenylyl cyclase family and catalyses the synthesis of cAMP from ATP. Genetic studies with candidate gene and genome-wide association study approaches have demonstrated that ADCY3 genetic polymorphisms are associated with obesity in European and Chinese populations. Epigenetic studies have indicated that increased DNA methylation levels in the ADCY3 gene are involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Furthermore, biological analyses with animal models have implicated that ADCY3 dysfunction resulted in increased body weight and fat mass, while reduction of body weight is partially explained by ADCY3 activation. In this review, we describe genomic and biological features of ADCY3, summarize genetic and epigenetic association studies of the ADCY3 gene with obesity and discuss dysfunction and activation of ADCY3. Based upon all data, we suggest that ADCY3 is a new target for anti-obesity drug development. Further investigation on the effectiveness of ADCY3 activator and its delivery approach to treat abdominal obesity has been taken into our consideration. PMID:27256589

  18. Modelling intracellular competition for calcium: kinetic and thermodynamic control of different molecular modes of signal decoding

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Roque, Antonio C.; Simoes de Souza, Fabio M.

    2016-01-01

    Frequently, a common chemical entity triggers opposite cellular processes, which implies that the components of signalling networks must detect signals not only through their chemical natures, but also through their dynamic properties. To gain insights on the mechanisms of discrimination of the dynamic properties of cellular signals, we developed a computational stochastic model and investigated how three calcium ion (Ca2+)-dependent enzymes (adenylyl cyclase (AC), phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1), and calcineurin (CaN)) differentially detect Ca2+ transients in a hippocampal dendritic spine. The balance among AC, PDE1 and CaN might determine the occurrence of opposite Ca2+-induced forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). CaN is essential for LTD. AC and PDE1 regulate, indirectly, protein kinase A, which counteracts CaN during LTP. Stimulations of AC, PDE1 and CaN with artificial and physiological Ca2+ signals demonstrated that AC and CaN have Ca2+ requirements modulated dynamically by different properties of the signals used to stimulate them, because their interactions with Ca2+ often occur under kinetic control. Contrarily, PDE1 responds to the immediate amplitude of different Ca2+ transients and usually with the same Ca2+ requirements observed under steady state. Therefore, AC, PDE1 and CaN decode different dynamic properties of Ca2+ signals. PMID:27033299

  19. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  20. Assembly of a β2-adrenergic receptor—GluR1 signalling complex for localized cAMP signalling

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Mei-ling A; Lisé, Marie-France; Yuen, Eunice Y; Kam, Angel Y F; Zhang, Mingxu; Hall, Duane D; Malik, Zulfiqar A; Qian, Hai; Chen, Yucui; Ulrich, Jason D; Burette, Alain C; Weinberg, Richard J; Law, Ping-Yee; El-Husseini, Alaa; Yan, Zhen; Hell, Johannes W

    2010-01-01

    Central noradrenergic signalling mediates arousal and facilitates learning through unknown molecular mechanisms. Here, we show that the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the trimeric Gs protein, adenylyl cyclase, and PKA form a signalling complex with the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluR1, which is linked to the β2AR through stargazin and PSD-95 and their homologues. Only GluR1 associated with the β2AR is phosphorylated by PKA on β2AR stimulation. Peptides that interfere with the β2AR–GluR1 association prevent this phosphorylation of GluR1. This phosphorylation increases GluR1 surface expression at postsynaptic sites and amplitudes of EPSCs and mEPSCs in prefrontal cortex slices. Assembly of all proteins involved in the classic β2AR–cAMP cascade into a supramolecular signalling complex and thus allows highly localized and selective regulation of one of its major target proteins. PMID:19942860

  1. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record.

  2. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record. PMID:17686016

  3. Structural insights into biased G protein-coupled receptor signaling revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rahmeh, Rita; Damian, Marjorie; Cottet, Martin; Orcel, Hélène; Mendre, Christiane; Durroux, Thierry; Sharma, K. Shivaji; Durand, Grégory; Pucci, Bernard; Trinquet, Eric; Zwier, Jurriaan M.; Deupi, Xavier; Bron, Patrick; Banères, Jean-Louis; Mouillac, Bernard; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven-transmembrane proteins that mediate most cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, representing the largest group of therapeutic targets. Recent studies show that some GPCRs signal through both G protein and arrestin pathways in a ligand-specific manner. Ligands that direct signaling through a specific pathway are known as biased ligands. The arginine-vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R), a prototypical peptide-activated GPCR, is an ideal model system to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling. Although the native hormone arginine-vasopressin leads to activation of both the stimulatory G protein (Gs) for the adenylyl cyclase and arrestin pathways, synthetic ligands exhibit highly biased signaling through either Gs alone or arrestin alone. We used purified V2R stabilized in neutral amphipols and developed fluorescence-based assays to investigate the structural basis of biased signaling for the V2R. Our studies demonstrate that the Gs-biased agonist stabilizes a conformation that is distinct from that stabilized by the arrestin-biased agonists. This study provides unique insights into the structural mechanisms of GPCR activation by biased ligands that may be relevant to the design of pathway-biased drugs. PMID:22493271

  4. Functional importance of two conserved residues in intracellular loop 1 and transmembrane region 2 of Family A GPCRs: insights from ligand binding and signal transduction responses of D1 and D5 dopaminergic receptor mutants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Boyang; Yang, Xiaodi; Tiberi, Mario

    2015-10-01

    For many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the role of the first intracellular loop (IL1) and its connections with adjacent transmembrane (TM) regions have not been investigated. Notably, these regions harbor several polar residues such as Ser and Thr. To begin uncovering how these polar residues may contribute to the structural basis for GPCR functionality, we have designed human D1-class receptor mutants (hD1-ST1 and hD5-ST1) whereby all Ser and Thr of IL1 and IL1/TM2 juncture have been replaced by Ala and Val, respectively. Both ST1 mutants exhibited a loss of dopamine affinity but similar binding properties for inverse agonists compared to their parent receptors. As well, these mutations diminished receptor activation for both subtypes, as indicated by an ablated constitutive activity and a pronounced decrease in dopamine potency. Interestingly, both mutants exhibited enhanced dopamine-mediated maximal stimulation (Emax) of adenylyl cyclase that was at least two-fold higher than wild-type. Point mutations for hD1R revealed that the loss in dopamine affinity and potency was attributed to Thr59, while the enhanced Emax of adenylyl cyclase was directly influenced by Ser65. These two residues are conserved among many Family A GPCRs and have recurring molecular interactions among crystallized structures. As such, their functional roles for IL1 and its transition into TM2 reported herein may also be applicable to other GPCRs. Our work thus potentially highlights a structural role of Thr59 and Ser65 in the formation of critical intramolecular interactions for ligand binding and signal transduction of D1-class dopaminergic receptors.

  5. Alterations in adipocyte adenylate cyclase activity in morbidly obese and formerly morbidly obese humans.

    PubMed

    Martin, L F; Klim, C M; Vannucci, S J; Dixon, L B; Landis, J R; LaNoue, K F

    1990-08-01

    Studies examining animal models of genetic obesity have identified defects in adipocyte hormone-stimulated lipolysis that involve the adenylate cyclase transmembrane signaling system, specifically those components that decrease adenylate cyclase activity. To determine whether obese people demonstrate alterations in adenylate cyclase activity that could contribute to the maintenance of obesity by inhibiting lipolysis, we examined human adipocytes from patients who were lean, obese, or formerly obese. Fat samples were obtained from the lower abdomen of 14 women who were morbidly obese (obese group), from 10 women who were formerly morbidly obese and had lost weight after gastric stapling (postobese group), and from 10 similarly aged women of normal weight (controls). Adipocyte adenylate cyclase activity was determined under ligand-free (no stimulatory or inhibitory influences present), hormone-stimulated (isoproterenol, 10(-6) mmol/L), and maximal (cells stimulated with 10 mumol/L forskolin) conditions by measuring cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels by radioimmunoassay. The activity of adenylate cyclase was significantly different (p less than 0.01) in the three groups. Adipocytes from obese women had lower levels of cyclase activity under both ligand-free (5% vs 16% of maximal) and hormone-stimulated conditions (76% vs 100% of maximal) than adipocytes from normal women. Postobese women had levels of hormone-stimulated cAMP identical to those of normal women but still had abnormal ligand-free levels (under 5%). These results suggest the presence of an alteration in adipocyte adenylate cyclase regulation in morbidly obese women that is not entirely corrected when weight is lost after food intake is reduced by gastric stapling. This alteration in ligand-free cAMP activity may contribute to the development and maintenance of obesity. PMID:2166354

  6. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by serotonin signaling.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anna A; Thathiah, Amantha; De Strooper, Bart; Tesseur, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the β- and γ-secretases releases the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which deposits in senile plaques and contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The α-secretase cleaves APP in the Aβ peptide sequence to generate soluble APPα (sAPPα). Upregulation of α-secretase activity through the 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT4) receptor has been shown to reduce Aβ production, amyloid plaque load and to improve cognitive impairment in transgenic mouse models of AD. Consequently, activation of 5-HT4 receptors following agonist stimulation is considered to be a therapeutic strategy for AD treatment; however, the signaling cascade involved in 5-HT4 receptor-stimulated proteolysis of APP remains to be determined. Here we used chemical and siRNA inhibition to identify the proteins which mediate 5-HT4d receptor-stimulated α-secretase activity in the SH-SY5Y human neuronal cell line. We show that G protein and Src dependent activation of phospholipase C are required for α-secretase activity, while, unexpectedly, adenylyl cyclase and cAMP are not involved. Further elucidation of the signaling pathway indicates that inositol triphosphate phosphorylation and casein kinase 2 activation is also a prerequisite for α-secretase activity. Our findings provide a novel route to explore the treatment of AD through 5-HT4 receptor-induced α-secretase activation.

  7. Regulation of amyloid precursor protein processing by serotonin signaling.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anna A; Thathiah, Amantha; De Strooper, Bart; Tesseur, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the β- and γ-secretases releases the amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which deposits in senile plaques and contributes to the etiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The α-secretase cleaves APP in the Aβ peptide sequence to generate soluble APPα (sAPPα). Upregulation of α-secretase activity through the 5-hydroxytryptamine 4 (5-HT4) receptor has been shown to reduce Aβ production, amyloid plaque load and to improve cognitive impairment in transgenic mouse models of AD. Consequently, activation of 5-HT4 receptors following agonist stimulation is considered to be a therapeutic strategy for AD treatment; however, the signaling cascade involved in 5-HT4 receptor-stimulated proteolysis of APP remains to be determined. Here we used chemical and siRNA inhibition to identify the proteins which mediate 5-HT4d receptor-stimulated α-secretase activity in the SH-SY5Y human neuronal cell line. We show that G protein and Src dependent activation of phospholipase C are required for α-secretase activity, while, unexpectedly, adenylyl cyclase and cAMP are not involved. Further elucidation of the signaling pathway indicates that inositol triphosphate phosphorylation and casein kinase 2 activation is also a prerequisite for α-secretase activity. Our findings provide a novel route to explore the treatment of AD through 5-HT4 receptor-induced α-secretase activation. PMID:24466315

  8. Striatal microRNA controls cocaine intake through CREB signalling.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Jonathan A; Im, Heh-In; Amelio, Antonio L; Kocerha, Jannet; Bali, Purva; Lu, Qun; Willoughby, David; Wahlestedt, Claes; Conkright, Michael D; Kenny, Paul J

    2010-07-01

    Cocaine addiction is characterized by a gradual loss of control over drug use, but the molecular mechanisms regulating vulnerability to this process remain unclear. Here we report that microRNA-212 (miR-212) is upregulated in the dorsal striatum of rats with a history of extended access to cocaine. Striatal miR-212 decreases responsiveness to the motivational properties of cocaine by markedly amplifying the stimulatory effects of the drug on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) signalling. This action occurs through miR-212-enhanced Raf1 activity, resulting in adenylyl cyclase sensitization and increased expression of the essential CREB co-activator TORC (transducer of regulated CREB; also known as CRTC). Our findings indicate that striatal miR-212 signalling has a key role in determining vulnerability to cocaine addiction, reveal new molecular regulators that control the complex actions of cocaine in brain reward circuitries and provide an entirely new direction for the development of anti-addiction therapeutics based on the modulation of noncoding RNAs.

  9. G protein-coupled receptors: signalling and regulation by lipid agonists for improved glucose homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moran, Brian M; Flatt, Peter R; McKillop, Aine M

    2016-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a pivotal role in cell signalling, controlling many processes such as immunity, growth, cellular differentiation, neurological pathways and hormone secretions. Fatty acid agonists are increasingly recognised as having a key role in the regulation of glucose homoeostasis via stimulation of islet and gastrointestinal GPCRs. Downstream cell signalling results in modulation of the biosynthesis, secretion, proliferation and anti-apoptotic pathways of islet and enteroendocrine cells. GPR40 and GPR120 are activated by long-chain fatty acids (>C12) with both receptors coupling to the Gαq subunit that activates the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. GPR41 and GPR43 are stimulated by short-chain fatty acids (C2-C5), and activation results in binding to Gαi that inhibits the adenylyl cyclase pathway attenuating cAMP production. In addition, GPR43 also couples to the Gαq subunit augmenting intracellular Ca(2+) and activating phospholipase C. GPR55 is specific for cannabinoid endogenous agonists (endocannabinoids) and non-cannabinoid fatty acids, which couples to Gα12/13 and Gαq proteins, leading to enhancing intracellular Ca(2+), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and Rho kinase. GPR119 is activated by fatty acid ethanolamides and binds to Gαs utilising the adenylate cyclase pathway, which is dependent upon protein kinase A. Current research indicates that GPCR therapies may be approved for clinical use in the near future. This review focuses on the recent advances in preclinical diabetes research in the signalling and regulation of GPCRs on islet and enteroendocrine cells involved in glucose homoeostasis.

  10. Crystal structure of the Alpha subunit PAS domain from soluble guanylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Rahul; Weichsel, Andrzej; Montfort, William R

    2013-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric heme protein of ∼150 kDa and the primary nitric oxide receptor. Binding of NO stimulates cyclase activity, leading to regulation of cardiovascular physiology and providing attractive opportunities for drug discovery. How sGC is stimulated and where candidate drugs bind remains unknown. The α and β sGC chains are each composed of Heme-Nitric Oxide Oxygen (H-NOX), Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS), coiled-coil and cyclase domains. Here, we present the crystal structure of the α1 PAS domain to 1.8 Å resolution. The structure reveals the binding surfaces of importance to heterodimer function, particularly with respect to regulating NO binding to heme in the β1 H-NOX domain. It also reveals a small internal cavity that may serve to bind ligands or participate in signal transduction. PMID:23934793

  11. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. PMID:26567315

  12. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency.

  13. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  14. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field. PMID:27030537

  15. Bifunctional Homodimeric Triokinase/FMN Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; Couto, Ana; Cabezas, Alicia; Pinto, Rosa María; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Canales, José; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian triokinase, which phosphorylates exogenous dihydroxyacetone and fructose-derived glyceraldehyde, is neither molecularly identified nor firmly associated to an encoding gene. Human FMN cyclase, which splits FAD and other ribonucleoside diphosphate-X compounds to ribonucleoside monophosphate and cyclic X-phosphodiester, is identical to a DAK-encoded dihydroxyacetone kinase. This bifunctional protein was identified as triokinase. It was modeled as a homodimer of two-domain (K and L) subunits. Active centers lie between K1 and L2 or K2 and L1: dihydroxyacetone binds K and ATP binds L in different subunits too distant (≈14 Å) for phosphoryl transfer. FAD docked to the ATP site with ribityl 4′-OH in a possible near-attack conformation for cyclase activity. Reciprocal inhibition between kinase and cyclase reactants confirmed substrate site locations. The differential roles of protein domains were supported by their individual expression: K was inactive, and L displayed cyclase but not kinase activity. The importance of domain mobility for the kinase activity of dimeric triokinase was highlighted by molecular dynamics simulations: ATP approached dihydroxyacetone at distances below 5 Å in near-attack conformation. Based upon structure, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, relevant residues were mutated to alanine, and kcat and Km were assayed whenever kinase and/or cyclase activity was conserved. The results supported the roles of Thr112 (hydrogen bonding of ATP adenine to K in the closed active center), His221 (covalent anchoring of dihydroxyacetone to K), Asp401 and Asp403 (metal coordination to L), and Asp556 (hydrogen bonding of ATP or FAD ribose to L domain). Interestingly, the His221 point mutant acted specifically as a cyclase without kinase activity. PMID:24569995

  16. Thyrostimulin-TSHR signaling promotes the proliferation of NIH:OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells via trans-regulation of the EGFR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Lin, Ting-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Wen; Wu, Fang-Ju; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin signaling plays an indispensable role in ovarian cancer progression. We previously have demonstrated that thyrostimulin and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), the most ancient glycoprotein hormone and receptor pair that evolved much earlier than the gonadotropin systems, co-exist in the ovary. However, whether thyrostimulin-driven TSHR activation contributes to ovarian cancer progression in a similar way to gonadotropin receptors has never been explored. In this study, we first found that TSHR is expressed in both rat normal ovarian surface epithelium and human epithelial ovarian cancers (EOCs). Using human NIH:OVCAR-3 as a cell model, we demonstrated that thyrostimulin promotes EOC cell proliferation as strongly as gonadotropins. Thyrostimulin treatment not only activated adenylyl cyclase and the subsequent PKA, MEK-ERK1/2 and PI3K-AKT signal cascades, but also trans-activated EGFR signaling. Signaling dissection using diverse inhibitors indicated that EOC cell proliferation driven by thyrostimulin-TSHR signaling is PKA independent, but does require the involvement of the MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT signal cascades, which are activated mainly via the trans-activation of EGFR. Thus, not only have we proved that this ancient glycoprotein hormone system is involved in NIH:OVCAR-3 cell proliferation for the first time, but also that it may possibly become a novel oncotarget when studying ovarian cancer. PMID:27273257

  17. β-Adrenergic activation of electrogenic K+ and Cl− secretion in guinea pig distal colonic epithelium proceeds via separate cAMP signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Halm, Susan T.; Zhang, Jin

    2010-01-01

    Adrenergic stimulation of isolated guinea pig distal colonic mucosa produced transient Cl− and sustained K+ secretion. Transient short-circuit current (Isc) depended on β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AdrR), and sustained Isc relies on a β1-AdrR/β2-AdrR complex. Epinephrine (epi) increased cAMP content with a biphasic time course similar to changes in epi-activated Isc (epiIsc). Inhibition of transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs) reduced peak epiIsc and cAMP to near zero without decreasing sustained epiIsc, consistent with cAMP from tmAC signaling for only Cl− secretion. Inhibition of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) reduced sustained epiIsc and cAMP to near zero without decreasing peak epiIsc or cAMP, consistent with cAMP from sAC signaling for K+ secretion. Sensitivity to phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and peptide YY (PYY) stimulation further supported separate signaling for the two components. PDE3 or PDE4 inhibitors enhanced peak epiIsc but not sustained epiIsc, consistent with these PDEs as part of the β2-AdrR signaling domain. PYY suppressed peak epiIsc in a pertussis toxin (PTx)-sensitive manner, supporting Gαi-dependent inhibition of tmACs producing cAMP for Cl− secretion. Since PYY or PTx did not alter sustained epiIsc, signaling for K+ secretion occurred via a Gαi-independent mechanism. Presence of multiple sAC variants in colonic epithelial cells was supported by domain-specific antibodies. Responses to specific activators and inhibitors suggested that protein kinase A was not involved in activating peak or sustained components of epiIsc, but the cAMP-dependent guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Epac, may contribute. Thus β-adrenergic activation of electrogenic Cl− and K+ secretion, respectively, required tmAC- and sAC-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:20413718

  18. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits cell cycle activity of embryonic cardiac progenitor cells via its NPRA receptor signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam; Feridooni, Tiam; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; McNeil, Kathleen; Chinni, Sarita; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-04-01

    The biological effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs), which can either activate guanylyl cyclase (NPRA and NPRB) or inhibit adenylyl cyclase (NPRC) to modulate intracellular cGMP or cAMP, respectively. During cardiac development, ANP serves as an early maker of differentiating atrial and ventricular chamber myocardium. As development proceeds, expression of ANP persists in the atria but declines in the ventricles. Currently, it is not known whether ANP is secreted or the ANP-NPR signaling system plays any active role in the developing ventricles. Thus the primary aims of this study were to 1) examine biological activity of ANP signaling systems in embryonic ventricular myocardium, and 2) determine whether ANP signaling modulates proliferation/differentiation of undifferentiated cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and/or cardiomyocytes. Here, we provide evidence that ANP synthesized in embryonic day (E)11.5 ventricular myocytes is actively secreted and processed to its biologically active form. Notably, NPRA and NPRC were detected in E11.5 ventricles and exogenous ANP stimulated production of cGMP in ventricular cell cultures. Furthermore, we showed that exogenous ANP significantly decreased cell number and DNA synthesis of CPCs but not cardiomyocytes and this effect could be reversed by pretreatment with the NPRA receptor-specific inhibitor A71915. ANP treatment also led to a robust increase in nuclear p27 levels in CPCs compared with cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data provide evidence that in the developing mammalian ventricles ANP plays a local paracrine role in regulating the balance between CPC proliferation and differentiation via NPRA/cGMP-mediated signaling pathways.

  19. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  20. Cyclic AMP signalling pathways in the regulation of uterine relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; López Bernal, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Studying the mechanism(s) of uterine relaxation is important and will be helpful in the prevention of obstetric difficulties such as preterm labour, which remains a major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Multiple signalling pathways regulate the balance between maintaining relative uterine quiescence during gestation, and the transition to the contractile state at the onset of parturition. Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP promotes myometrial relaxation, and thus quiescence, via effects on multiple intracellular targets including calcium channels, potassium channels and myosin light chain kinase. A complete understanding of cAMP regulatory pathways (synthesis and hydrolysis) would assist in the development of better tocolytics to delay or inhibit preterm labour. Here we review the enzymes involved in cAMP homoeostasis (adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases) and possible myometrial substrates for the cAMP dependent protein kinase. We must emphasise the need to identify novel pharmacological targets in human pregnant myometrium to achieve safe and selective uterine relaxation when this is indicated in preterm labour or other obstetric complications. PMID:17570154

  1. Glutamine Synthetase Regulation, Adenylylation State, and Strain Specificity Analyzed by Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Robert A.; Streicher, Stanley L.

    1979-01-01

    We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to examine the regulation and adenylylation states of glutamine synthetases (GSs) from Escherichia coli (GSE) and Klebsiella aerogenes (GSK). In gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), we found that GSK had a mobility which differed significantly from that of GSE. In addition, for both GSK and GSE, adenylylated subunits (GSK-adenosine 5′-monophosphate [AMP] and GSE-AMP) had lesser mobilities in SDS gels than did the corresponding non-adenylylated subunits. The order of mobilities was GSK-AMP < GSK < GSE-AMP < GSE. We were able to detect these mobility differences with purified and partially purified preparations of GS, crude cell extracts, and whole cell lysates. SDS gel electrophoresis thus provided a means of estimating the adenylylation state and the quantity of GS present independent of enzymatic activity measurements and of determining the strain origin. Using SDS gels, we showed that: (i) the constitutively produced GS in strains carrying the glnA4 allele was mostly adenylylated, (ii) the GS-like polypeptide produced by strains carrying the glnA51 allele was indistinguishable from wild-type GSK, and (iii) strains carrying the glnA10 allele contained no polypeptide having the mobility of GSK or GSK-AMP. Using native polyacrylamide gels, we detected the increased amount of dodecameric GS present in cells grown under nitrogen limitation compared with cells grown under conditions of nitrogen excess. In native gels there was neither a significant difference in the mobilities of adenylylated and non-adenylylated GSs nor a GS-like protein in cells carrying the glnA10 allele. Images PMID:33958

  2. The adhesion GPCR latrophilin - a novel signaling cascade in oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Jana; Prömel, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Although several signaling pathways in oriented cell division have been well characterized such as delta/notch inductions or wnt/frizzled-based anterior-posterior polarity, there is strong evidence for additional signal pathways controlling early anterior-posterior polarity decisions. The homolog of the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor latrophilin, LAT-1 has been identified as a receptor essential for oriented cell division in an anterior-posterior direction of specific blastomeres in the early C. elegans embryo. We recently conducted a study aiming at clarifying the signals involved in LAT-1 function. We identified a Gs protein/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP pathway in vitro and demonstrated its physiological relevance in oriented cell division. By interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates cAMP levels. These data indicate that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. This commentary will discuss our findings in the context of the current knowledge of mechanisms controlling oriented cell division and anterior-posterior polarity. Further, we identify open questions which need to be addressed in the future.

  3. Adrenergic signaling and oxidative stress: a role for sirtuins?

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Conti, Valeria; Russomanno, Giusy; Longobardi, Giancarlo; Furgi, Giuseppe; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The adrenergic system plays a central role in stress signaling and stress is often associated with increased production of ROS. However, ROS overproduction generates oxidative stress, that occurs in response to several stressors. β-adrenergic signaling is markedly attenuated in conditions such as heart failure, with downregulation and desensitization of the receptors and their uncoupling from adenylyl cyclase. Transgenic activation of β2-adrenoceptor leads to elevation of NADPH oxidase activity, with greater ROS production and p38MAPK phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase or ROS significantly reduced the p38MAPK signaling cascade. Chronic β2-adrenoceptor activation is associated with greater cardiac dilatation and dysfunction, augmented pro-inflammatory and profibrotic signaling, while antioxidant treatment protected hearts against these abnormalities, indicating ROS production to be central to the detrimental signaling of β2-adrenoceptors. It has been demonstrated that sirtuins are involved in modulating the cellular stress response directly by deacetylation of some factors. Sirt1 increases cellular stress resistance, by an increased insulin sensitivity, a decreased circulating free fatty acids and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), an increased activity of AMPK, increased activity of PGC-1a, and increased mitochondrial number. Sirt1 acts by involving signaling molecules such P-I-3-kinase-Akt, MAPK and p38-MAPK-β. βAR stimulation antagonizes the protective effect of the AKT pathway through inhibiting induction of Hif-1α and Sirt1 genes, key elements in cell survival. More studies are needed to better clarify the involvement of sirtuins in the β-adrenergic response and, overall, to better define the mechanisms by which tools such as exercise training are able to counteract the oxidative stress, by both activation of sirtuins and inhibition of GRK2 in many cardiovascular conditions and can be used to prevent or treat diseases such as heart failure

  4. Adenylate cyclase in Arthrospira platensis responds to light through transcription.

    PubMed

    Kashith, M; Keerthana, B; Sriram, S; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-08-19

    Cyclic 3',5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, but its role in higher plants was in doubt due to its very low concentration. In this study we wanted to look at the flux of cAMP in response to light in algae, considered to be the more primitive form of photosynthetic organisms. While it did not fluctuate very much in the tested green algae, in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis its level was closely linked to exposure to light. The expression from cyaC, the major isoform of adenylate cyclase was strongly influenced by exposure of the cells to light. There was about 300 fold enhancement of cyaC transcripts in cells exposed to light compared to the transcripts in cells in the dark. Although post-translational regulation of adenylate cyclase activity has been widely known, our studies suggest that transcriptional control could also be an important aspect of its regulation in A. platensis. PMID:27311855

  5. Delineation of the Roles Played by RasG and RasC in cAMP-dependent Signal Transduction during the Early Development of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Bolourani, Parvin; Spiegelman, George B.

    2006-01-01

    On starvation, the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum initiates a program of development leading to formation of multicellular structures. The initial cell aggregation requires chemotaxis to cyclic AMP (cAMP) and relay of the cAMP signal by the activation of adenylyl cyclase (ACA), and it has been shown previously that the Ras protein RasC is involved in both processes. Insertional inactivation of the rasG gene resulted in delayed aggregation and a partial inhibition of early gene expression, suggesting that RasG also has a role in early development. Both chemotaxis and ACA activation were reduced in the rasG− cells, but the effect on chemotaxis was more pronounced. When the responses of rasG− cells to cAMP were compared with the responses of rasC− and rasC−rasG− strains, generated in otherwise isogenic backgrounds, these studies revealed that signal transduction through RasG is more important in chemotaxis and early gene expression, but that signal transduction through RasC is more important in ACA activation. Because the loss of either of the two Ras proteins alone did not result in a total loss of signal output down either of the branches of the cAMP signal-response pathway, there appears to be some overlap of function. PMID:16885420

  6. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1

    PubMed Central

    Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels. PMID:26505631

  7. Developmental exposure to terbutaline alters cell signaling in mature rat brain regions and augments the effects of subsequent neonatal exposure to the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Armando; Seidler, Frederic J.; Aldridge, Justin E.; Slotkin, Theodore A. . E-mail: t.slotkin@duke.edu

    2005-03-01

    Exposure to apparently unrelated neurotoxicants can nevertheless converge on common neurodevelopmental events. We examined the long-term effects of developmental exposure of rats to terbutaline, a {beta}-adrenoceptor agonist used to arrest preterm labor, and the organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) separately and together. Treatments mimicked the appropriate neurodevelopmental stages for human exposures: terbutaline on postnatal days (PN) 2-5 and CPF on PN11-14, with assessments conducted on PN45. Although neither treatment affected growth or viability, each elicited alterations in CNS cell signaling mediated by adenylyl cyclase (AC), a transduction pathway shared by numerous neuronal and hormonal signals. Terbutaline altered signaling in the brainstem and cerebellum, with gender differences particularly notable in the cerebellum (enhanced AC in males, suppressed in females). By itself, CPF exposure elicited deficits in AC signaling in the midbrain, brainstem, and striatum. However, sequential exposure to terbutaline followed by CPF produced larger alterations and involved a wider spectrum of brain regions than were obtained with either agent alone. In the cerebral cortex, adverse effects of the combined treatment intensified between PN45 and PN60, suggesting that exposures alter the long-term program for development of synaptic communication, leading to alterations in AC signaling that emerge even after adolescence. These findings indicate that terbutaline, like CPF, is a developmental neurotoxicant, and reinforce the idea that its use in preterm labor may create a subpopulation that is sensitized to long-term CNS effects of organophosphorus insecticides.

  8. Oriented Cell Division in the C. elegans Embryo Is Coordinated by G-Protein Signaling Dependent on the Adhesion GPCR LAT-1.

    PubMed

    Müller, Antje; Winkler, Jana; Fiedler, Franziska; Sastradihardja, Tania; Binder, Claudia; Schnabel, Ralf; Kungel, Jana; Rothemund, Sven; Hennig, Christian; Schöneberg, Torsten; Prömel, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Orientation of spindles and cell division planes during development of many species ensures that correct cell-cell contacts are established, which is vital for proper tissue formation. This is a tightly regulated process involving a complex interplay of various signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying several of these pathways are still incompletely understood. Here, we identify the signaling cascade of the C. elegans latrophilin homolog LAT-1, an essential player in the coordination of anterior-posterior spindle orientation during the fourth round of embryonic cell division. We show that the receptor mediates a G protein-signaling pathway revealing that G-protein signaling in oriented cell division is not solely GPCR-independent. Genetic analyses showed that through the interaction with a Gs protein LAT-1 elevates intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the C. elegans embryo. Stimulation of this G-protein cascade in lat-1 null mutant nematodes is sufficient to orient spindles and cell division planes in the embryo in the correct direction. Finally, we demonstrate that LAT-1 is activated by an intramolecular agonist to trigger this cascade. Our data support a model in which a novel, GPCR-dependent G protein-signaling cascade mediated by LAT-1 controls alignment of cell division planes in an anterior-posterior direction via a metabotropic Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase pathway by regulating intracellular cAMP levels.

  9. Stable G protein-effector complexes in striatal neurons: mechanism of assembly and role in neurotransmitter signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Keqiang; Masuho, Ikuo; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Cao, Yan; Sasaki, Keita; Lai, Chun Wan J; Han, Pyung-Lim; Ueda, Hiroshi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Xu, Baoji; Willardson, Barry M; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling via G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors is essential for motor control. Critical to this process is the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5) that produces second messenger cAMP upon receptor-mediated activation by G protein Golf. However, the molecular organization of the Golf-AC5 signaling axis is not well understood. In this study, we report that in the striatum AC5 exists in a stable pre-coupled complex with subunits of Golf heterotrimer. We use genetic mouse models with disruption in individual components of the complex to reveal hierarchical order of interactions required for AC5-Golf stability. We further identify that the assembly of AC5-Golf complex is mediated by PhLP1 chaperone that plays central role in neurotransmitter receptor coupling to cAMP production motor learning. These findings provide evidence for the existence of stable G protein-effector signaling complexes and identify a new component essential for their assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10451.001 PMID:26613416

  10. Stable G protein-effector complexes in striatal neurons: mechanism of assembly and role in neurotransmitter signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Keqiang; Masuho, Ikuo; Shih, Chien-Cheng; Cao, Yan; Sasaki, Keita; Lai, Chun Wan J; Han, Pyung-Lim; Ueda, Hiroshi; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Xu, Baoji; Willardson, Barry M; Martemyanov, Kirill A

    2015-01-01

    In the striatum, signaling via G protein-coupled neurotransmitter receptors is essential for motor control. Critical to this process is the effector enzyme adenylyl cyclase type 5 (AC5) that produces second messenger cAMP upon receptor-mediated activation by G protein Golf. However, the molecular organization of the Golf-AC5 signaling axis is not well understood. In this study, we report that in the striatum AC5 exists in a stable pre-coupled complex with subunits of Golf heterotrimer. We use genetic mouse models with disruption in individual components of the complex to reveal hierarchical order of interactions required for AC5-Golf stability. We further identify that the assembly of AC5-Golf complex is mediated by PhLP1 chaperone that plays central role in neurotransmitter receptor coupling to cAMP production motor learning. These findings provide evidence for the existence of stable G protein-effector signaling complexes and identify a new component essential for their assembly. PMID:26613416

  11. Diterpene Cyclases and the Nature of the Isoprene Fold

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Rong; Zhang, Yonghui; Mann, Francis M.; Huang, Cancan; Mukkamala, Dushyant; Hudock, Michael P.; Mead, Matthew; Prisic, Sladjana; Wang, Ke; Lin, Fu-Yang; Chang, Ting-Kai; Peters, Reuben; Oldfield, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The structures and mechanism of action of many terpene cyclases are known, but there are no structures of diterpene cyclases. Here, we propose structural models based on bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, domain swapping, enzyme inhibition and spectroscopy that help explain the nature of diterpene cyclase structure, function, and evolution. Bacterial diterpene cyclases contain ∼20 α-helices and the same conserved “QW” and DxDD motifs as in triterpene cyclases, indicating the presence of a βγ barrel structure. Plant diterpene cyclases have a similar catalytic motif and βγ-domain structure together with a third, α-domain, forming an αβγ structure, and in H+-initiated cyclases, there is an EDxxD-like Mg2+/diphosphate binding motif located in the γ-domain. The results support a new view of terpene cyclase structure and function and suggest evolution from ancient (βγ) bacterial triterpene cyclases to (βγ) bacterial and thence to (αβγ) plant diterpene cyclases. PMID:20602361

  12. Soluble guanylyl cyclase is involved in PDT-induced injury of crayfish glial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaleva, V. D.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2016-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential tool for selective destruction of malignant brain tumors. However, not only malignant but also healthy neurons and glial cells may be damaged during PDT. Nitric oxide is an important modulator of cell viability and intercellular neuroglial communications. NO have been already shown to participate in PDT-induced injury of neurons and glial cells. As soluble guanylyl cyclase is the only known receptor for NO, we have studied the possible role of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the regulation of survival and death of neurons and surrounding glial cells under photo-oxidative stress induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT). The crayfish stretch receptor consisting of a single identified sensory neuron enveloped by glial cells is a simple but informative model object. It was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine photosens (10 nM) and irradiated with a laser diode (670 nm, 0.4 W/cm2). Using inhibitory analysis we have shown that during PDT soluble guanylyl cyclase, probably, has proapoptotic and antinecrotic effect on the glial cells of the isolated crayfish stretch receptor. Proapoptotic effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase could be mediated by protein kinase G (PKG). Thus, the involvement of NO/sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway in PDT-induced apoptosis of glial cells was indirectly demonstrated.

  13. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  14. Dimethyl fumarate activates the prostaglandin EP2 receptor and stimulates cAMP signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Tsang, Vivian; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2016-06-17

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of relapsing remitting MS. The pathology of MS is a result of both immune dysregulation and oxidative stress induced damage, and DMF is believed to have therapeutic effects on both of these processes. However, the mechanisms of action of DMF are not fully understood. To determine if DMF is able to activate signaling cascades that affect immune dysregulation, we treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with DMF. We discovered that DMF stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production after 1 min treatment in vitro. cAMP is a small molecule second messenger that has been shown to modulate immune response. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that adenylyl cyclase mediates DMF induced cAMP production; DMF activated the prostaglandin EP2 receptor to produce cAMP. This response was not due to increased endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but was enhanced by addition of exogenous PGE2. Furthermore, we determined that the bioactive metabolite of DMF, monomethyl fumarate (MMF), also stimulates cAMP production. These novel findings suggest that DMF may provide protection against MS by inhibiting immune cell function via the cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:27157139

  15. Soluble guanylate cyclase as a novel treatment target for osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Joshua, Jisha; Schwaerzer, Gerburg K; Kalyanaraman, Hema; Cory, Esther; Sah, Robert L; Li, Mofei; Vaida, Florin; Boss, Gerry R; Pilz, Renate B

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major health problem leading to fractures that cause substantial morbidity and mortality. Current osteoporosis therapies have significant drawbacks, creating a need for novel bone-anabolic agents. We previously showed that the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP (cGMP)/protein kinase G pathway mediates some of the anabolic effects of estrogens and mechanical stimulation in osteoblasts and osteocytes, leading us to hypothesize that cGMP-elevating agents may have bone-protective effects. We tested cinaciguat, a prototype of a novel class of soluble guanylate cyclase activators, in a mouse model of estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis. Compared with sham-operated mice, ovariectomized mice had lower serum cGMP concentrations, which were largely restored to normal by treatment with cinaciguat or low-dose 17β-estradiol. Microcomputed tomography of tibiae showed that cinaciguat significantly improved trabecular bone microarchitecture in ovariectomized animals, with effect sizes similar to those obtained with estrogen replacement therapy. Cinaciguat reversed ovariectomy-induced osteocyte apoptosis as efficiently as estradiol and enhanced bone formation parameters in vivo, consistent with in vitro effects on osteoblast proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Compared with 17β-estradiol, which completely reversed the ovariectomy-induced increase in osteoclast number, cinaciguat had little effect on osteoclasts. Direct guanylate cyclase stimulators have been extremely well tolerated in clinical trials of cardiovascular diseases, and our findings provide proof-of-concept for this new class of drugs as a novel, anabolic treatment strategy for postmenopausal osteoporosis, confirming an important role of nitric oxide/cGMP/protein kinase G signaling in bone. PMID:25188528

  16. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  17. Regulation of protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4 signaling in human platelets by compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide actions.

    PubMed

    Bilodeau, Matthew L; Hamm, Heidi E

    2007-08-01

    Thrombin potently regulates human platelets by the G protein-coupled receptors protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1 and PAR4. Platelet activation by thrombin and other agonists is broadly inhibited by prostacyclin and nitric oxide acting through adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases to elevate cAMP and cGMP levels, respectively. Using forskolin and YC-1 [3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole] to selectively activate the adenylyl and guanylyl cyclases, respectively, and the membrane-permeable analogs N(6),2'-O-dibutyryladenosine-3'-5'-cAMP (dibutyryl-cAMP) and 8-(4-parachlorophenylthoi)-cGMP (8-pCPT-cGMP), we sought to identify key antiplatelet steps for cyclic nucleotide actions in blocking platelet activation by PAR1 versus PAR4. Platelet aggregation by PAR1 or PAR4 was inhibited with similar EC(50) of 1.2 to 2.1 microM forskolin, 31 to 33 microM YC-1, 57 to 150 microM dibutyryl-cAMP, and 220 to 410 microM 8-pCPT-cGMP. There was a marked left shift in the inhibitory potencies of forskolin and YC-1 for alpha-granule release and glycoprotein IIbIIIa/integrin alphaIIbbeta3 activation (i.e., EC(50) of 1-60 and 40-1300 nM, respectively) that was not observed for dibutyryl-cAMP and 8-pCPT-cGMP (i.e., EC(50) of 200-600 and 40-140 microM, respectively). This inhibition was essentially instantaneous, and measurements of cyclic nucleotide levels and kinase activities support a model of compartmentation involving the cyclic nucleotide effectors and regulators and the key molecular targets for this platelet inhibition. The different sensitivities of PAR1 and PAR4 to inhibition of calcium mobilization and dense granule release identify key antiplatelet steps for cyclic nucleotide actions and are consistent with the signaling models for these receptors. Specifically, PAR4 inhibition depends on the regulation of both calcium mobilization and dense granule release, and PAR1 inhibition depends predominantly on the regulation of dense granule release. PMID:17525299

  18. Adaptations in adenosine signaling in drug dependence: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Hack, Stephen P; Christie, Macdonald J

    2003-01-01

    Adenosine is an important endogenous purine neuromodulator in the central nervous system that modulates many important cellular processes in neurons. The physiological effects of adenosine are transduced through four pharmacologically classified receptor types i.e., A1, A2A, A2B and A3. All adenosine receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) of the type 1 variety. Adaptations in adenosine signaling have been implicated in a wide range of pathophysiological processes, such as epilepsies, sleep disorders, pain, and drug addictions. Knowledge relating to the etiology of addictive processes is far from complete, and as a result the therapeutic options to deal with drug dependence issues are limited. Drugs of abuse mediate their effects through many distinct cellular effectors, such as neurotransmitter transporters, ion channels, and receptor proteins. However, a unifying feature of the major drugs of abuse-i.e., opiates, cocaine, and alcohol-is that they all directly or indirectly modulate adenosine signaling in neurons. Agents targeting adenosine receptors may therefore offer novel avenues for the development of therapies to manage or treat addictions. A consistent cellular adaptation to long-term drug use is the up- or down-regulation of signaling pathways driven by adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP (cAMP) in several brain regions linked to addiction. Withdrawal from mu-opioids or cocaine following their chronic administration leads to an upregulation of adenylyl cyclase-mediated signaling, resulting in high levels of cAMP. Cyclic AMP produced in this way acts as a substrate for the endogenous production of adenosine. Increased levels of endogenous adenosine interact with presynaptic A1 receptors to inhibit the excessive neuronal excitation often seen during morphine/cocaine withdrawal. These pre-clinical findings fit well with other data indicating that drugs which boost endogenous adenosine levels or directly interact with inhibitory A1 receptors can alleviate

  19. Signaling governed by G proteins and cAMP is crucial for growth, secondary metabolism and sexual development in Fusarium fujikuroi.

    PubMed

    Studt, Lena; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Tudzynski, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    The plant-pathogenic fungus Fusarium fujikuroi is a notorious rice pathogen causing hyper-elongation of infected plants due to the production of gibberellic acids (GAs). In addition to GAs, F. fujikuroi produces a wide range of other secondary metabolites, such as fusarins, fusaric acid or the red polyketides bikaverins and fusarubins. The recent availability of the fungal genome sequence for this species has revealed the potential of many more putative secondary metabolite gene clusters whose products remain to be identified. However, the complex regulation of secondary metabolism is far from being understood. Here we studied the impact of the heterotrimeric G protein and the cAMP-mediated signaling network, including the regulatory subunits of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), to study their effect on colony morphology, sexual development and regulation of bikaverins, fusarubins and GAs. We demonstrated that fusarubin biosynthesis is negatively regulated by at least two Gα subunits, FfG1 and FfG3, which both function as stimulators of the adenylyl cyclase FfAC. Surprisingly, the primary downstream target of the adenylyl cyclase, the PKA, is not involved in the regulation of fusarubins, suggesting that additional, yet unidentified, cAMP-binding protein(s) exist. In contrast, bikaverin biosynthesis is significantly reduced in ffg1 and ffg3 deletion mutants and positively regulated by FfAC and FfPKA1, while GA biosynthesis depends on the active FfAC and FfPKA2 in an FfG1- and FfG3-independent manner. In addition, we provide evidence that G Protein-mediated/cAMP signaling is important for growth in F. fujikuroi because deletion of ffg3, ffac and ffpka1 resulted in impaired growth on minimal and rich media. Finally, sexual crosses of ffg1 mutants showed the importance of a functional FfG1 protein for development of perithecia in the mating strain that carries the MAT1-1 idiomorph. PMID:23469152

  20. AT1a receptor signaling is required for basal and water deprivation-induced urine concentration in AT1a receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao C.; Shao, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    It is well recognized that ANG II interacts with arginine vasopressin (AVP) to regulate water reabsorption and urine concentration in the kidney. The present study used ANG II type 1a (AT1a) receptor-deficient (Agtr1a−/−) mice to test the hypothesis that AT1a receptor signaling is required for basal and water deprivation-induced urine concentration in the renal medulla. Eight groups of wild-type (WT) and Agtr1a−/− mice were treated with or without 24-h water deprivation and 1-desamino-8-d-AVP (DDAVP; 100 ng/h ip) for 2 wk or with losartan (10 mg/kg ip) during water deprivation. Under basal conditions, Agtr1a−/− mice had lower systolic blood pressure (P < 0.01), greater than threefold higher 24-h urine excretion (WT mice: 1.3 ± 0.1 ml vs. Agtr1a−/− mice: 5.9 ± 0.7 ml, P < 0.01), and markedly decreased urine osmolality (WT mice: 1,834 ± 86 mosM/kg vs. Agtr1a−/− mice: 843 ± 170 mosM/kg, P < 0.01), without significant changes in 24-h urinary Na+ excretion. These responses in Agtr1a−/− mice were associated with lower basal plasma AVP (WT mice: 105 ± 8 pg/ml vs. Agtr1a−/− mice: 67 ± 6 pg/ml, P < 0.01) and decreases in total lysate and membrane aquaporin-2 (AQP2; 48.6 ± 7% of WT mice, P < 0.001) and adenylyl cyclase isoform III (55.6 ± 8% of WT mice, P < 0.01) proteins. Although 24-h water deprivation increased plasma AVP to the same levels in both strains, 24-h urine excretion was still higher, whereas urine osmolality remained lower, in Agtr1a−/− mice (P < 0.01). Water deprivation increased total lysate AQP2 proteins in the inner medulla but had no effect on adenylyl cyclase III, phosphorylated MAPK ERK1/2, and membrane AQP2 proteins in Agtr1a−/− mice. Furthermore, infusion of DDAVP for 2 wk was unable to correct the urine-concentrating defects in Agtr1a−/− mice. These results demonstrate that AT1a receptor-mediated ANG II signaling is required to maintain tonic AVP release and regulate V2 receptor-mediated responses to

  1. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  2. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  3. The triterpene cyclase protein family: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Racolta, Silvia; Juhl, P Benjamin; Sirim, Demet; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Triterpene cyclases catalyze a broad range of cyclization reactions to form polycyclic triterpenes. Triterpene cyclases that convert squalene to hopene are named squalene-hopene cyclases (SHC) and triterpene cyclases that convert oxidosqualene are named oxidosqualene cyclases (OSC). Many sequences have been published, but there is only one structure available for each of SHCs and OSCs. Although they catalyze a similar reaction, the sequence similarity between SHCs and OSCs is low. A family classification based on phylogenetic analysis revealed 20 homologous families which are grouped into two superfamilies, SHCs and OSCs. Based on this family assignment, the Triterpene Cyclase Engineering Database (TTCED) was established. It integrates available information on sequence and structure of 639 triterpene cyclases as well as on structurally and functionally relevant amino acids. Family specific multiple sequence alignments were generated to identify the functionally relevant residues. Based on sequence alignments, conserved residues in SHCs and OSCs were analyzed and compared to experimentally confirmed mutational data. Functional schematic models of the central cavities of OSCs and SHCs were derived from structure comparison and sequence conservation analysis. These models demonstrate the high similarity of the substrate binding cavity of SHCs and OSCs and the equivalences of the respective residues. The TTCED is a novel source for comprehensive information on the triterpene cyclase family, including a compilation of previously described mutational data. The schematic models present the conservation analysis in a readily available fashion and facilitate the correlation of residues to a specific function or substrate interaction.

  4. Polymorphism in purified guanylate cyclase from vertebrate rod photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, F; Yamazaki, A

    1991-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase from rod photoreceptors of amphibian (toad, Bufo marinus, and frog, Rana catesbeiana) and bovine retinas was solubilized and purified by a single chromatography step on a GTP-agarose column. Silver staining of purified amphibian enzymes in SDS/polyacrylamide gels disclosed a doublet band (110 and 115 kDa), while the bovine enzyme appeared as a singlet band (110 kDa). The identification of these guanylate cyclases was confirmed using three chromatography systems with the purified enzymes. Specific binding to Con A-Sepharose suggested that rod guanylate cyclase is a glycoprotein. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of purified toad, frog, and bovine enzymes resolved two, three, and five variants, respectively, that differed in isoelectric point. Two variants of toad guanylate cyclase showed differences in various characterizations. These data suggest multiple mechanisms for regulation of guanylate cyclase activity in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. Images PMID:1675787

  5. Cyanobacteriochrome SesA Is a Diguanylate Cyclase That Induces Cell Aggregation in Thermosynechococcus*♦

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Gen; Nomura, Ryouhei; Shimada, Takashi; Ni-Ni-Win; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have unique photoreceptors, cyanobacteriochromes, that show diverse spectral properties to sense near-UV/visible lights. Certain cyanobacteriochromes have been shown to regulate cellular phototaxis or chromatic acclimation of photosynthetic pigments. Some cyanobacteriochromes have output domains involved in bacterial signaling using a second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), but its role in cyanobacteria remains elusive. Here, we characterize the recombinant Tlr0924 from a thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, which was expressed in a cyanobacterial system. The protein reversibly photoconverts between blue- and green-absorbing forms, which is consistent with the protein prepared from Escherichia coli, and has diguanylate cyclase activity, which is enhanced 38-fold by blue light compared with green light. Therefore, Tlr0924 is a blue light-activated diguanylate cyclase. The protein's relatively low affinity (10.5 mm) for Mg2+, which is essential for diguanylate cyclase activity, suggests that Mg2+ might also regulate c-di-GMP signaling. Finally, we show that blue light irradiation under low temperature is responsible for Thermosynechococcus vulcanus cell aggregation, which is abolished when tlr0924 is disrupted, suggesting that Tlr0924 mediates blue light-induced cell aggregation by producing c-di-GMP. Given our results, we propose the name “sesA (sessility-A)” for tlr0924. This is the first report for cyanobacteriochrome-dependent regulation of a sessile/planktonic lifestyle in cyanobacteria via c-di-GMP. PMID:25059661

  6. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signaling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

    PubMed Central

    Tagoe, Daniel N. A.; Kalejaiye, Titilola D.; de Koning, Harry P.

    2015-01-01

    Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi), sleeping sickness (Trypanosoma brucei spp.), and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp). Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signaling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled receptors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D), which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well conserved genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of protein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signaling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs) whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signaling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signaling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics. PMID:26441645

  7. Dynamic mass redistribution as a means to measure and differentiate signaling via opioid and cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Codd, Ellen E; Mabus, John R; Murray, Brian S; Zhang, Sui-Po; Flores, Christopher M

    2011-08-01

    Classically, G protein-coupled receptor activation by a ligand has been viewed as producing a defined response such as activation of a G protein, activation or inhibition of adenylyl cyclase, or stimulation of phospholipase C and/or alteration in calcium flux. Newer concepts of ligand-directed signaling recognize that different ligands, ostensibly acting at the same receptors, may induce different downstream effects, complicating the selection of a screening assay. Dynamic mass redistribution (DMR), a label-free technology that uses light to measure ligand-induced changes in the mass of cells proximate to the biosensor, provides an integrated cellular response comprising multiple pathways and cellular events. Using DMR, signals induced by opioid or cannabinoid agonists in cells transfected with these receptors were blocked by pharmacologically appropriate receptor antagonists as well as by pertussis toxin. Differences among compounds in relative potencies at DMR versus ligand-stimulated GTPγS or receptor binding endpoints, suggesting functional selectivity, were observed. Preliminary evidence indicates that inhibitors of intermediate steps in the cell signaling cascade, such as receptor recycling inhibitors, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, or cytoskeletal disruptors, altered or attenuated the cannabinoid-induced response. Notable is the finding that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitors attenuated signaling induced by the cannabinoid type 2 receptor inverse agonist AM630 but not that stimulated by the agonist CP 55,940. Thus, DMR has the potential to not only identify ligands that activate a given G protein-coupled receptor, but also ascertain the signaling pathways engaged by a specific ligand, making DMR a useful tool in the identification of biased ligands, which may ultimately exhibit improved therapeutic profiles. PMID:21323580

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 expression via a PLC/PKC-dependent signaling pathway in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Hui; Xu, Yongjun; Chen, Yanming; Zhang, Yanmin; Ni, Xin

    2012-10-15

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) has been shown to modulate dendritic development in hippocampus. Mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1) plays key roles in dendritic differentiation. In the present study, we examined the effects of CRH on MKLP1 expression in cultured hippocampal neurons and determine subsequent signaling pathways involved. CRH dose-dependently increased MKLP1 mRNA and protein expression. This effect can be reversed by CRHR1 antagonist but not by CRHR2 antagonist. CRHR1 knockdown impaired this effect of CRH. CRH stimulated GTP-bound Gαs protein and phosphorylated phospholipase C (PLC)-β3 expression, which were blocked by CRHR1 antagonist. Transfection of GP antagonist-2A, an inhibitory peptide of Gαq protein, blocked CRH-induced phosphorylated PLC-β3 expression. PLC and PKC inhibitors completely blocked whereas adenylyl cyclase (AC) and PKA inhibitors did not affect CRH-induced MKLP1 expression. Our results indicate that CRH act on CRHR1 to induce MKLP1 expression via PLC/PKC signaling pathway. CRH may regulate MKLP1 expression, thereby modulating dendritic development.

  9. Phospholipase C Signaling via the Parathyroid Hormone (PTH)/PTH-Related Peptide Receptor Is Essential for Normal Bone Responses to PTH

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun; Liu, Minlin; Yang, Dehong; Bouxsein, Mary L.; Thomas, Clare C.; Schipani, Ernestina; Bringhurst, F. Richard; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that differentiation of hypertrophic chondrocytes is delayed in mice expressing a mutated PTH/PTHrP receptor (PTHR) (called DSEL here) that stimulates adenylyl cyclase normally but fails to activate phospholipase C (PLC). To better understand the role of PLC signaling via the PTHR in skeletal and mineral homeostasis, we examined these mice fed a normal or calcium-deficient diet. On a standard diet, DSEL mice displayed a modest decrease in bone mass. Remarkably, when fed a low-calcium diet or infused with PTH, DSEL mice exhibited strikingly curtailed peritrabecular stromal cell responses and attenuated new bone formation when compared with Wt mice. Attenuated in vitro colony formation was also observed in bone marrow cells derived from DSEL mice fed a low-calcium diet. Furthermore, PTH stimulated proliferation and increased mRNAs encoding cyclin D1 in primary osteoblasts derived from Wt but not from DSEL mice. Our data indicate that PLC signaling through the PTHR is required for skeletal homeostasis. PMID:20501677

  10. Non-photic signalling in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hastings, M H; Duffield, G E; Ebling, F J; Kidd, A; Maywood, E S; Schurov, I

    1997-11-01

    Scheduled arousal by handling and sub-cutaneous saline injection entrains the free-running clock of the adult Syrian hamster and outbred (ID(ICR)) but not inbred (C57B16) mice. Syrian hamsters bearing lesions of the intergeniculate leaflet of the thalamus remain able to entrain and phase-shift to light, but the lesions block completely entrainment by serial arousal, even though lesioned animals continue to respond acutely to the arousing cue. This suggests that the innervation from the IGL to the SCN is a necessary component of the pathways which signal an aroused state to the clock. Siberian hamsters do not entrain to serial arousal but they do entrain to serial injections of melatonin, whereas in adult Syrian hamster, systemic treatment with melatonin has no effect above that of arousal. In contrast to the adult, the foetal and neonatal Syrian hamster can be entrained by melatonin. These variations in sensitivity correlate with inter-specific and developmental differences in the pattern and level of expression of melatonin receptors in the SCN. The perinatal hamster can also be entrained by dopaminergic agonists. SCN tissue from neonatal Syrian hamsters was used to characterise the biochemical actions of dopamine and melatonin. In primary culture and tissue explants, forskolin, dopamine and glutamatergic agonists all stimulated the phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB. This probably occurred via convergent actions through Ca2+ (glutamate) and cyclic AMP-dependent (forskolin, dopamine) signalling pathways. Dopamine induced phospho-CREB-ir exclusively in GABA-ir neurons and melatonin reversed this effect of dopamine, indicative of an inhibitory Gi protein linking via the Mel1a receptor to adenylyl cyclase. The regulation of phospho-CREB by multiple entraining cues in the SCN highlights its position as a point of convergence for regulators of the clock, and indicates a possible role in entrainment.

  11. Murine Guanylate Cyclase C Regulates Colonic Injury and Inflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Harmel-Laws, Eleana; Garin-Laflam, Monica P.; Mann, Elizabeth A.; Bezerra, Lucas D.; Hogan, Simon P.; Cohen, Mitchell B.

    2011-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C or GC-C) and its ligands, guanylin (GUCA2A or Gn) and uroguanylin (GUCA2B or Ugn), are expressed in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and regulate ion secretion, intestinal barrier function, and epithelial monolayer homeostasis via cGMP-dependent signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to determine if GC-C and its ligands direct the course of intestinal inflammation. Here, we show that DSS-induced clinical disease and histological damage to the colonic mucosa were significantly less severe in GC-C−/− mice and moderately reduced in Gn−/− animals. Relative to wildtype controls, GC-C−/− and Gn−/− mice had reduced apoptosis and increased proliferation of IECs during DSS colitis. Basal and DSS-induced production of resistin-like molecule β (RELMβ) was substantially diminished in GC-C−/− mice. RELMβ is thought to stimulate cytokine production in macrophages in this disease model and, consistent with this, TNFα and IFNγ production was minimal in GC-C−/− animals. RELMβ and cytokine levels were similar to wildtype in Gn−/− mice, however. Colonic instillation of recombinant RELMβ by enema into GC-C−/− mice restores sensitivity to DSS-mediated mucosal injury. These findings demonstrate a novel role for GC-C signaling in facilitating mucosal wounding and inflammation and further suggest that this may be mediated, in part, through control of RELMβ production. PMID:21555532

  12. Voluntary running depreciates the requirement of Ca2+-stimulated cAMP signaling in synaptic potentiation and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-08-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation in mice lacking type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1), a neurospecific synaptic enzyme that contributes to Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP production. Following 1 mo of voluntary running-wheel exercise, the impaired LTP and object recognition memory in AC1 knockout (KO) mice were significantly attenuated. Running up-regulated exon II mRNA level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), though it failed to increase exon I and IV mRNAs in the hippocampus of AC1 KO mice. Intrahippocampal infusion of recombinant BDNF was sufficient to rescue LTP and object recognition memory defects in AC1 KO mice. Therefore, voluntary running and exogenous BDNF application overcome the defective Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling. Our results also demonstrate that alteration in Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP can affect the molecular outcome of physical exercise.

  13. Voluntary running depreciates the requirement of Ca2+-stimulated cAMP signaling in synaptic potentiation and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Zhang, Ming; Ding, Qi; Sethna, Ferzin; Yan, Lily; Moon, Changjong; Yang, Miyoung; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-08-01

    Mental health and cognitive functions are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although having active lifestyle with physical exercise improves learning and memory, how it interacts with the specific key molecular regulators of synaptic plasticity is largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of voluntary running on long-term potentiation (LTP) and memory formation in mice lacking type 1 adenylyl cyclase (AC1), a neurospecific synaptic enzyme that contributes to Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP production. Following 1 mo of voluntary running-wheel exercise, the impaired LTP and object recognition memory in AC1 knockout (KO) mice were significantly attenuated. Running up-regulated exon II mRNA level of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), though it failed to increase exon I and IV mRNAs in the hippocampus of AC1 KO mice. Intrahippocampal infusion of recombinant BDNF was sufficient to rescue LTP and object recognition memory defects in AC1 KO mice. Therefore, voluntary running and exogenous BDNF application overcome the defective Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP signaling. Our results also demonstrate that alteration in Ca(2+)-stimulated cAMP can affect the molecular outcome of physical exercise. PMID:27421897

  14. Soluble variants of human recombinant glutaminyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23977104

  15. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    PubMed

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed.

  16. Soluble Variants of Human Recombinant Glutaminyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of 1H-15N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23977104

  17. Diuretics and the renal adenylate cyclase system

    PubMed Central

    Dawborn, J.K.; Macneil, S.; Martin, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    1 The relationship between the diuretic effectiveness and the effect on the renal adenylate cyclase of three diuretics, acetazolamide, frusemide and ethacrynic acid, was examined. The hypothesis that acetazolamide and parathyroid hormone (PTH), inhibit renal carbonic anhydrase by a cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP)-dependent mechanism was also tested. 2 In vitro, acetazolamide, frusemide and ethacrynic acid at high concentrations (10-3M) all produced some inhibition of basal and stimulated rat kidney plasma membrane adenylate cyclase. The effect of acetazolamide was much less than that of frusemide and ethacrynic acid. These plasma membrane effects were reproduced in studies of cyclic AMP formation in isolated kidney tubules of rats. 3 Intravenous injections of acetazolamide did not change the total cyclic AMP content of the kidneys of rats killed by microwave irradiation. 4 Acetazolamide produced a diuresis in the rat and a slight inhibition of the antidiuretic effect of Pitressin. Frusemide produced a diuresis and greatly reduced the antidiuretic response to Pitressin. Ethacrynic acid was ineffective as a diuretic in the rat and actually enhanced the antidiuretic response to Pitressin. 5 In investigating the possible influence of diuretics and PTH on the activity and state of phosphorylation of carbonic anhydrase it was found that: there was no correlation between the ability of diuretics to inhibit carbonic anhydrase activity and to inhibit carbonic anhydrase phosphorylation; neither PTH nor cyclic AMP (in the presence of adenosine triphosphate, Mg2+, K+ and incubation at 37°C) inhibited rat cortex homogenate carbonic anhydrase activity. 6 It seems unlikely that any of the tested diuretics exerts its pharmacological effect by means of changes in kidney cyclic AMP metabolism. PMID:202362

  18. Dcsbis (PA2771) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly active diguanylate cyclase with unique activity regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying; Liu, Shiheng; Liu, Cuilan; Huang, Yan; Chi, Kaikai; Su, Tiantian; Zhu, Deyu; Peng, Jin; Xia, Zhijie; He, Jing; Xu, Sujuan; Hu, Wei; Gu, Lichuan

    2016-01-01

    C-di-GMP (3’,5’ -Cyclic diguanylic acid) is an important second messenger in bacteria that influences virulence, motility, biofilm formation, and cell division. The level of c-di-GMP in cells is controlled by diguanyl cyclases (DGCs) and phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Here, we report the biochemical functions and crystal structure of the potential diguanylase Dcsbis (PA2771, a diguanylate cyclase with a self-blocked I-site) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. The full-length Dcsbis protein contains an N-terminal GAF domain and a C-terminal GGDEF domain. We showed that Dcsbis tightly coordinates cell motility without markedly affecting biofilm formation and is a diguanylate cyclase with a catalytic activity much higher than those of many other DGCs. Unexpectedly, we found that a peptide loop (protecting loop) extending from the GAF domain occupies the conserved inhibition site, thereby largely relieving the product-inhibition effect. A large hydrophobic pocket was observed in the GAF domain, thus suggesting that an unknown upstream signaling molecule may bind to the GAF domain, moving the protecting loop from the I-site and thereby turning off the enzymatic activity. PMID:27388857

  19. Control of the Diadenylate Cyclase CdaS in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Mehne, Felix M. P.; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Eijlander, Robyn T.; Herzberg, Christina; Hewitt, Lorraine; Kaever, Volkhard; Lewis, Richard J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis encodes three diadenylate cyclases that synthesize the essential signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP. The activities of the vegetative enzymes DisA and CdaA are controlled by protein-protein interactions with their conserved partner proteins. Here, we have analyzed the regulation of the unique sporulation-specific diadenylate cyclase CdaS. Very low expression of CdaS as the single diadenylate cyclase resulted in the appearance of spontaneous suppressor mutations. Several of these mutations in the cdaS gene affected the N-terminal domain of CdaS. The corresponding CdaS mutant proteins exhibited a significantly increased enzymatic activity. The N-terminal domain of CdaS consists of two α-helices and is attached to the C-terminal catalytically active diadenylate cyclase (DAC) domain. Deletion of the first or both helices resulted also in strongly increased activity indicating that the N-terminal domain serves to limit the enzyme activity of the DAC domain. The structure of YojJ, a protein highly similar to CdaS, indicates that the protein forms hexamers that are incompatible with enzymatic activity of the DAC domains. In contrast, the mutations and the deletions of the N-terminal domain result in conformational changes that lead to highly increased enzymatic activity. Although the full-length CdaS protein was found to form hexamers, a truncated version with a deletion of the first N-terminal helix formed dimers with high enzyme activity. To assess the role of CdaS in sporulation, we assayed the germination of wild type and cdaS mutant spores. The results indicate that cyclic di-AMP formed by CdaS is required for efficient germination. PMID:24939848

  20. Ontogeny of fetal adenylate cyclase; mechanisms for regulation of beta-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Maier, J A; Roberts, J M; Jacobs, M M

    1989-11-01

    Transmembrane second messenger signalling systems regulate differentiation, growth and homeostatic responses during fetal development. The beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase system is the best studied of these and has been used as a model to investigate the control of developmental processes. In tissues such as lung, heart and parotid, beta-adrenergic responsiveness of adenylate cyclase increases during development. In the developing fetal lung beta-receptor concentration increases during gestation or after glucocorticoid treatment, but cannot fully explain enhanced adrenergic responsiveness. To probe developmental and hormonal effects on beta-receptor function, we asked if advancing gestation or glucocorticoid treatment alters beta-receptor-Gs interactions in fetal rabbit lung membrane particulates. Before 25 days gestation, 1-isoproterenol competes for 3H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA), a radiolabelled beta-antagonist, with a single low affinity, later in gestation, high and low affinities of isoproterenol for the beta-receptor are present which can be shifted to the lower affinity by addition of guanyl nucleotide. High affinity binding is precociously induced in 25 days--fetal lung particulates as early as 3 h after maternal betamethasone treatment, but beta-adrenoreceptor concentration in treated fetuses was increased over controls only after 24 h of treatment. Cholera toxin catalyzed ADP ribosylation of membrane particulates showed cholera toxin substrate (Gs) was not altered by glucocorticoid treatment. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity with isoproterenol (100mM) and GTP (100mM) resulted in no incremental increase over that produced by GTP (100mM) alone in glucocorticoid treated or control particulates, either early or late in gestation. These data demonstrate that beta-receptor-Gs interactions are not sufficient to produce full agonist responses. Although both beta-adrenergic receptors and Gs are present in fetal rabbit lung early in gestation, interaction

  1. Farnesyloxycoumarins, a new class of squalene-hopene cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cravotto, Giancarlo; Balliano, Gianni; Robaldo, Bruna; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Chimichi, Stefano; Boccalini, Marco

    2004-04-19

    A few naturally occurring prenyl- and prenyloxycoumarins and several new related synthetic derivatives were evaluated as inhibitors of squalene-hopene cyclase (SHC), a useful model enzyme, to predict their interactions with oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC). Umbelliprenin-10',11'-monoepoxide (IC(50) 2.5 microM) and the corresponding 6',7'-10',11' diepoxide (IC(50) 1.5 microM) were the most active enzyme inhibitors.

  2. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  3. Butyrate activates the cAMP-protein kinase A-cAMP response element-binding protein signaling pathway in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aihua; Si, Hongwei; Liu, Dongmin; Jiang, Honglin

    2012-01-01

    Butyrate is a major SCFA produced by microbial fermentation of dietary fiber in the gastrointestinal tract. Butyrate is widely thought to mediate the benefits of fiber and resistant starch consumption to colon health in humans. Besides serving as a substrate for energy production, butyrate has many regulatory effects in animals. Little is known about the signaling mechanisms underlying the regulatory effects of butyrate and other SCFA. In this study, we determined whether butyrate can activate cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA)- cAMP response element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) signaling in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelial cells. Butyrate promoted luciferase expression from a CRE-reporter construct, induced phosphorylation of CREB, increased the activity of PKA, and elevated the levels of cAMP in Caco-2 cells. These data suggest that butyrate activates cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling in Caco-2 cells. Butyrate, however, had no effect on the activities of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE), two enzymes that determine the production and degradation of intracellular cAMP, respectively. Because the activities of AC and PDE are primarily regulated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPR)-mediated intracellular signaling, lack of an effect of butyrate on these two enzymes suggests that butyrate does not activate cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling through GPR. Butyrate-treated Caco-2 cells had greater concentrations of ATP than untreated cells. Because ATP is the substrate for cAMP production, this difference suggests that butyrate may activate cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling in Caco-2 cells through increased ATP production. Overall, this study raises the possibility that some of the regulatory effects of butyrate in animals, including those on the colonocytes, may be mediated by the cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway at the cellular level.

  4. Reduced basal and stimulated (isoprenaline, Gpp(NH)p, forskolin) adenylate cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease correlated with histopathological changes.

    PubMed

    Ohm, T G; Bohl, J; Lemmer, B

    1991-02-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is an adenylate cyclase borne second messenger involved in basic metabolic events. The beta-adrenoceptor sensitive adenylate cyclase was studied in post-mortem hippocampi of controls and Alzheimer patients. Virtually identical subsets of each hippocampus homogenate were stimulated by 100 mumol isoprenaline, Gpp(NH)p and forskolin, respectively, in presence of an ATP-regenerating system. The determination of cAMP formed was carried out by means of a radioassay. The observed significant 50% reduction in basal as well as in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in Alzheimer's disease is negatively correlated with semiquantitative evaluations of amyloid plaques (P less than 0.05) but not with neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles or neuropil threads. This reduction in enzyme activity is obviously not due to simple cell loss alone. It is likely that the crucial point of the observed functional disturbance is at the level of the catalytic unit of the adenylate cyclase, since the same degree of reduction is maintained at all steps of the signal cascade. PMID:2054615

  5. Expansion of signal transduction by G proteins The second 15 years or so: From 3 to 16 α subunits plus βγ dimers

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaumer, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    The first 15 years, or so, brought the realization that there existed a G protein coupled signal transduction mechanism by which hormone receptors regulate adenylyl cyclases and the light receptor rhodopsin activates visual phosphodiesterase. Three G proteins, Gs, Gi and transducin (T) had been characterized as αβγ heterotrimers, and Gsα-GTP and Tα-GTP had been identified as the sigaling arms of Gs and T. These discoveries were made using classical biochemical approaches, and culminated in the purification of these G proteins. The second 15 years, or so, are the subject of the present review. This time coincided with the advent of powerful recombinant DNA techniques. Combined with the classical approaches, the field expanded the repertoire of G proteins from 3 to 16, discovered the superfamily of seven transmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) – which is not addressed in this article – and uncovered an amazing repertoire of effector functions regulated not only by αGTP complexes but also by βγ dimers. Emphasis is placed in presenting how the field developed with the hope of conveying why many of the new findings were made. PMID:17258171

  6. Further evidence supporting a role for gs signal transduction in severe malaria pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Auburn, Sarah; Fry, Andrew E; Clark, Taane G; Campino, Susana; Diakite, Mahamadou; Green, Angela; Richardson, Anna; Jallow, Muminatou; Sisay-Joof, Fatou; Pinder, Margaret; Molyneux, Malcolm E; Taylor, Terrie E; Haldar, Kasturi; Rockett, Kirk A; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P

    2010-04-01

    With the functional demonstration of a role in erythrocyte invasion by Plasmodium falciparum parasites, implications in the aetiology of common conditions that prevail in individuals of African origin, and a wealth of pharmacological knowledge, the stimulatory G protein (Gs) signal transduction pathway presents an exciting target for anti-malarial drug intervention. Having previously demonstrated a role for the G-alpha-s gene, GNAS, in severe malaria disease, we sought to identify other important components of the Gs pathway. Using meta-analysis across case-control and family trio (affected child and parental controls) studies of severe malaria from The Gambia and Malawi, we sought evidence of association in six Gs pathway candidate genes: adenosine receptor 2A (ADORA2A) and 2B (ADORA2B), beta-adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (ADRBK1), adenylyl cyclase 9 (ADCY9), G protein beta subunit 3 (GNB3), and regulator of G protein signalling 2 (RGS2). Our study amassed a total of 2278 cases and 2364 controls. Allele-based models of association were investigated in all genes, and genotype and haplotype-based models were investigated where significant allelic associations were identified. Although no significant associations were observed in the other genes, several were identified in ADORA2A. The most significant association was observed at the rs9624472 locus, where the G allele (approximately 20% frequency) appeared to confer enhanced risk to severe malaria [OR = 1.22 (1.09-1.37); P = 0.001]. Further investigation of the ADORA2A gene region is required to validate the associations identified here, and to identify and functionally characterize the responsible causal variant(s). Our results provide further evidence supporting a role of the Gs signal transduction pathway in the regulation of severe malaria, and request further exploration of this pathway in future studies.

  7. Multiple Transduction Pathways Mediate Thyrotropin Receptor Signaling in Preosteoblast-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boutin, Alisa; Neumann, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that the TSH receptor (TSHR) couples to a number of different signaling pathways, although the Gs-cAMP pathway has been considered primary. Here, we measured the effects of TSH on bone marker mRNA and protein expression in preosteoblast-like U2OS cells stably expressing TSHRs. We determined which signaling cascades are involved in the regulation of IL-11, osteopontin (OPN), and alkaline phosphatase (ALPL). We demonstrated that TSH-induced up-regulation of IL-11 is primarily mediated via the Gs pathway as IL-11 was up-regulated by forskolin (FSK), an adenylyl cyclase activator, and inhibited by protein kinase A inhibitor H-89 and by silencing of Gαs by small interfering RNA. OPN levels were not affected by FSK, but its up-regulation was inhibited by TSHR/Gi-uncoupling by pertussis toxin. Pertussis toxin decreased p38 MAPK kinase phosphorylation, and a p38 inhibitor and small interfering RNA knockdown of p38α inhibited OPN induction by TSH. Up-regulation of ALPL expression required high doses of TSH (EC50 = 395nM), whereas low doses (EC50 = 19nM) were inhibitory. FSK-stimulated cAMP production decreased basal ALPL expression, whereas protein kinase A inhibition by H-89 and silencing of Gαs increased basal levels of ALPL. Knockdown of Gαq/11 and a protein kinase C inhibitor decreased TSH-stimulated up-regulation of ALPL, whereas a protein kinase C activator increased ALPL levels. A MAPK inhibitor and silencing of ERK1/2 inhibited TSH-stimulated ALPL expression. We conclude that TSH regulates expression of different bone markers via distinct signaling pathways. PMID:26950201

  8. Bacillus bombysepticus α-Toxin Binding to G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 Regulates cAMP/PKA Signaling Pathway to Induce Host Death

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Ma, Sanyuan; Gao, Junping; Jin, Shengkai; Jiang, Liang; Xia, Qingyou

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens and their toxins target host receptors, leading to aberrant behavior or host death by changing signaling events through subversion of host intracellular cAMP level. This is an efficient and widespread mechanism of microbial pathogenesis. Previous studies describe toxins that increase cAMP in host cells, resulting in death through G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathways by influencing adenylyl cyclase or G protein activity. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) has a central role in regulation of GPCR desensitization. However, little information is available about the pathogenic mechanisms of toxins associated with GRK2. Here, we reported a new bacterial toxin-Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb) α-toxin that was lethal to host. We showed that Bb α-toxin interacted with BmGRK2. The data demonstrated that Bb α-toxin directly bound to BmGRK2 to promote death by affecting GPCR signaling pathways. This mechanism involved stimulation of Gαs, increase level of cAMP and activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Activated cAMP/PKA signal transduction altered downstream effectors that affected homeostasis and fundamental biological processes, disturbing the structural and functional integrity of cells, resulting in death. Preventing cAMP/PKA signaling transduction by inhibitions (NF449 or H-89) substantially reduced the pathogenicity of Bb α-toxin. The discovery of a toxin-induced host death specifically linked to GRK2 mediated signaling pathway suggested a new model for bacterial toxin action. Characterization of host genes whose expression and function are regulated by Bb α-toxin and GRK2 will offer a deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases caused by pathogens that elevate cAMP. PMID:27022742

  9. A Diguanylate Cyclase Acts as a Cell Division Inhibitor in a Two-Step Response to Reductive and Envelope Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell division arrest is a universal checkpoint in response to environmental assaults that generate cellular stress. In bacteria, the cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) signaling network is one of several signal transduction systems that regulate key processes in response to extra-/intracellular stimuli. Here, we find that the diguanylate cyclase YfiN acts as a bifunctional protein that produces c-di-GMP in response to reductive stress and then dynamically relocates to the division site to arrest cell division in response to envelope stress in Escherichia coli. YfiN localizes to the Z ring by interacting with early division proteins and stalls cell division by preventing the initiation of septal peptidoglycan synthesis. These studies reveal a new role for a diguanylate cyclase in responding to environmental change, as well as a novel mechanism for arresting cell division. PMID:27507823

  10. Role of Adenylate Cyclase 1 in Retinofugal Map Development

    PubMed Central

    Dhande, Onkar S.; Bhatt, Shivani; Anishchenko, Anastacia; Elstrott, Justin; Iwasato, Takuji; Swindell, Eric C.; Xu, Hong-Ping; Jamrich, Milan; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Feller, Marla B.; Crair, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    The development of topographic maps of the sensory periphery is sensitive to the disruption of adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1) signaling. AC1 catalyzes the production of cAMP in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner, and AC1 mutant mice (AC1−/−) have disordered visual and somatotopic maps. However, the broad expression of AC1 in the brain and the promiscuous nature of cAMP signaling have frustrated attempts to determine the underlying mechanism of AC1-dependent map development. In the mammalian visual system, the initial coarse targeting of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) projections to the superior colliculus (SC) and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) is guided by molecular cues, and the subsequent refinement of these crude projections occurs via an activity-dependent process that depends on spontaneous retinal waves. Here, we show that AC1−/− mice have normal retinal waves but disrupted map refinement. We demonstrate that AC1 is required for the emergence of dense and focused termination zones and elimination of inaccurately targeted collaterals at the level of individual retinofugal arbors. Conditional deletion of AC1 in the retina recapitulates map defects, indicating that the locus of map disruptions in the SC and dorsal LGN of AC1−/− mice is presynaptic. Finally, map defects in mice without AC1 and disrupted retinal waves (AC1−/−;β2−/− double KO mice) are no worse than those in mice lacking only β2−/−, but loss of AC1 occludes map recovery in β2−/− mice during the second postnatal week. These results suggest that AC1 in RGC axons mediates the development of retinotopy and eye-specific segregation in the SC and dorsal LGN. PMID:22102330

  11. Multiple Facets of cAMP Signalling and Physiological Impact: cAMP Compartmentalization in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburger, Anouk; Maarsingh, Harm; Schmidt, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Therapies involving elevation of the endogenous suppressor cyclic AMP (cAMP) are currently used in the treatment of several chronic inflammatory disorders, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Characteristics of COPD are airway obstruction, airway inflammation and airway remodelling, processes encompassed by increased airway smooth muscle mass, epithelial changes, goblet cell and submucosal gland hyperplasia. In addition to inflammatory cells, airway smooth muscle cells and (myo)fibroblasts, epithelial cells underpin a variety of key responses in the airways such as inflammatory cytokine release, airway remodelling, mucus hypersecretion and airway barrier function. Cigarette smoke, being next to environmental pollution the main cause of COPD, is believed to cause epithelial hyperpermeability by disrupting the barrier function. Here we will focus on the most recent progress on compartmentalized signalling by cAMP. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, adenylyl cyclases, cAMP-specific phospho-diesterases (PDEs) maintain compartmentalized cAMP signalling. Intriguingly, spatially discrete cAMP-sensing signalling complexes seem also to involve distinct members of the A-kinase anchoring (AKAP) superfamily and IQ motif containing GTPase activating protein (IQGAPs). In this review, we will highlight the interaction between cAMP and the epithelial barrier to retain proper lung function and to alleviate COPD symptoms and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms involved in this process. Future studies should include the development of cAMP-sensing multiprotein complex specific disruptors and/or stabilizers to orchestrate cellular functions. Compartmentalized cAMP signalling regulates important cellular processes in the lung and may serve as a therapeutic target. PMID:24281338

  12. The calcium-sensor guanylate cyclase activating protein type 2 specific site in rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase type 1.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Fik-Rymarkiewicz, Ewa; Venkataraman, Venkateswar; Krishnan, Ramalingam; Koch, Karl-Wilhelm; Sharma, Rameshwar K

    2005-05-17

    The rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase type 1 (ROS-GC1), originally identified in the photoreceptor outer segments, is a member of the subfamily of Ca(2+)-modulated membrane guanylate cyclases. In phototransduction, its activity is tightly regulated by its two Ca(2+)-sensor protein parts, GCAP1 and GCAP2. This study maps the GCAP2-modulatory site in ROS-GC1 through the use of multiple techniques involving surface plasmon resonance binding studies with soluble ROS-GC1 constructs, coimmunoprecipitation, functional reconstitution experiments with deletion mutants, and peptide competition assays. The findings show that the sequence motif of the core GCAP2-modulatory site is Y965-N981 of ROS-GC1. The site is distinct from the GCAP1-modulatory site. It, however, partially overlaps with the S100B-regulatory site. This indicates that the Y965-N981 motif tightly controls the Ca(2+)-dependent specificity of ROS-GC1. Identification of the site demonstrates an intriguing topographical feature of ROS-GC1. This is that the GCAP2 module transmits the Ca(2+) signals to the catalytic domain from its C-terminal side and the GCAP1 module from the distant N-terminal side.

  13. SUMOylation regulates ciliary localization of olfactory signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Joiner, Ariell M.; Zhang, Lian; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge; Martens, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cilia are evolutionarily conserved organelles found on many mammalian cell types, including neuronal populations. Although neuronal cilia, including those on olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), are often delineated by localization of adenylyl cyclase 3 (AC3, also known as ADCY3), the mechanisms responsible for targeting integral membrane proteins are largely unknown. Post-translational modification by small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins plays an important role in protein localization processes such as nuclear–cytosolic transport. Here, we identified through bioinformatic analysis that adenylyl cyclases harbor conserved SUMOylation motifs, and show that AC3 is a substrate for SUMO modification. Functionally, overexpression of the SUMO protease SENP2 prevented ciliary localization of AC3, without affecting ciliation or cilia maintenance. Furthermore, AC3-SUMO mutants did not localize to cilia. To test whether SUMOylation is sufficient for cilia entry, we compared localization of ANO2, which possesses a SUMO motif, and ANO1, which lacks SUMOylation sites and does not localize to cilia. Introduction of SUMOylation sites into ANO1 was not sufficient for ciliary entry. These data suggest that SUMOylation is necessary but not sufficient for ciliary trafficking of select constituents, further establishing the link between ciliary and nuclear import. PMID:25908845

  14. Insect Stage-Specific Adenylate Cyclases Regulate Social Motility in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Saada, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed “social motility,” based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  15. Insect stage-specific adenylate cyclases regulate social motility in African trypanosomes.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Miguel A; Saada, Edwin A; Hill, Kent L

    2015-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed "social motility," based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  16. Role of LRP1 and ERK and cAMP Signaling Pathways in Lactoferrin-Induced Lipolysis in Mature Rat Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ikoma-Seki, Keiko; Nakamura, Kanae; Morishita, Satoru; Ono, Tomoji; Sugiyama, Keikichi; Nishino, Hoyoku; Hirano, Hisashi; Murakoshi, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a multifunctional glycoprotein present in milk. A clinical study showed that enteric-coated bovine LF tablets decrease visceral fat accumulation. Furthermore, animal studies revealed that ingested LF is partially delivered to mesenteric fat, and in vitro studies showed that LF promotes lipolysis in mature adipocytes. The aim of the present study was to determine the mechanism underlying the induction of lipolysis in mature adipocytes that is induced by LF. To address this question, we used proteomics techniques to analyze protein expression profiles. Mature adipocytes from primary cultures of rat mesenteric fat were collected at various times after exposure to LF. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression levels of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), which catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis, were upregulated and that HSL was activated by protein kinase A within 15 min after the cells were treated with LF. We previously reported that LF increases the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), suggesting that LF activates the cAMP signaling pathway. In this study, we show that the expression level and the activity of the components of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway were upregulated. Moreover, LF increased the activity of the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), which acts downstream in the cAMP and ERK signaling pathways and regulates the expression levels of adenylyl cyclase and HSL. Moreover, silencing of the putative LF receptor low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) attenuated lipolysis in LF-treated adipocytes. These results suggest that LF promoted lipolysis in mature adipocytes by regulating the expression levels of proteins involved in lipolysis through controlling the activity of cAMP/ERK signaling pathways via LRP1. PMID:26506094

  17. Sck1 negatively regulates Gpa2-mediated glucose signaling in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Mudge, Dayna K; Yang, Fan; Currie, Brian M; Kim, James M; Yeda, Kelly; Bashyakarla, Varoon K; Ivey, F Douglas; Hoffman, Charles S

    2014-02-01

    Schizosaccharomyces pombe detects extracellular glucose via a G protein-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP)-signaling pathway activating protein kinase A (PKA) and regulating transcription of genes involved in metabolism and sexual development. In this pathway, Gpa2 Gα binds to and activates adenylyl cyclase in response to glucose detection by the Git3 G protein-coupled receptor. Using a two-hybrid screen to identify extrinsic regulators of Gpa2, we isolated a clone that expresses codons 471 to 696 of the Sck1 kinase, which appears to display a higher affinity for Gpa2(K270E)-activated Gα relative to Gpa2(+) Gα. Deletion of sck1(+) or mutational inactivation of the Sck1 kinase produces phenotypes reflecting increased PKA activity in strains expressing Gpa2(+) or Gpa2(K270E), suggesting that Sck1 negatively regulates PKA activation through Gpa2. In contrast to the Gpa2(K270E) GDP-GTP exchange rate mutant, GTPase-defective Gpa2(R176H) weakly binds Sck1 in the two-hybrid screen and a deletion of sck1(+) in a Gpa2(R176H) strain confers phenotypes consistent with a slight reduction in PKA activity. Finally, deleting sck1(+) in a gpa2Δ strain results in phenotypes consistent with a second role for Sck1 acting in parallel with PKA. In addition to this parallel role with PKA, our data suggest that Sck1 negatively regulates Gpa2, possibly targeting the nucleotide-free form of the protein that may expose the one and only AKT/PKB consensus site in Gpa2 for Sck1 to bind. This dual role for Sck1 may allow S. pombe to produce distinct biological responses to glucose and nitrogen starvation signals that both activate the Wis1-Spc1/StyI stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway.

  18. Dynamics of β-adrenergic/cAMP signaling and morphological changes in cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Vardjan, Nina; Kreft, Marko; Zorec, Robert

    2014-04-01

    The morphology of astrocytes, likely regulated by cAMP, determines the structural association between astrocytes and the synapse, consequently modulating synaptic function. β-Adrenergic receptors (β-AR), which increase cytosolic cAMP concentration ([cAMP]i ), may affect cell morphology. However, the real-time dynamics of β-AR-mediated cAMP signaling in single live astrocytes and its effect on cell morphology have not been studied. We used the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensor Epac1-camps to study time-dependent changes in [cAMP]i ; morphological changes in primary rat astrocytes were monitored by real-time confocal microscopy. Stimulation of β-AR by adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline, a specific agonist of β-AR, rapidly increased [cAMP]i (∼15 s). The FRET signal response, mediated via β-AR, was faster than in the presence of forskolin (twofold) and dibutyryl-cAMP (>35-fold), which directly activate adenylyl cyclase and Epac1-camps, respectively, likely due to slow entry of these agents into the cytosol. Oscillations in [cAMP]i have not been recorded, indicating that cAMP-dependent processes operate in a slow time domain. Most Epac1-camps expressing astrocytes revealed a morphological change upon β-AR activation and attained a stellate morphology within 1 h. The morphological changes exhibited a bell-shaped dependency on [cAMP]i . The 5-10% decrease in cell cross-sectional area and the 30-50% increase in cell perimeter are likely due to withdrawal of the cytoplasm to the perinuclear region and the appearance of protrusions on the surface of astrocytes. Because astrocyte processes ensheath neurons, β-AR/cAMP-mediated morphological changes can modify the geometry of the extracellular space, affecting synaptic, neuronal, and astrocyte functions in health and disease. PMID:24464905

  19. Chronic Galphas signaling in the striatum increases anxiety-related behaviors independent of developmental effects.

    PubMed

    Favilla, Christopher; Abel, Ted; Kelly, Michele P

    2008-12-17

    Current research in the field of anxiety disorders is largely receptor-centric, leaving intracellular pathways largely unexplored. Galphas, the G-protein which stimulates adenylyl cyclase and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels, may be one intracellular molecule regulating anxiety-related behaviors as increased efficacy of Galphas signaling has been noted in patient populations that suffer from anxiety. We report here anxiety-related behaviors in two lines of transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active isoform of Galphas (or Galphas*). The first line expressed Galphas* throughout postnatal forebrain neurons, while the second line of mice conditionally expressed Galphas* selectively in the striatum (Galphas*(str) mice). In the open field, both lines of mice showed a significant preference for the periphery suggesting that expression of Galphas* in the striatum alone was sufficient to produce an anxiogenic phenotype. In the light/dark box, Galphas*(str) mice exhibited longer latencies to enter the light and spent significantly less time in the lit compartment. Similarly, Galphas*(str) mice showed longer latencies to enter the open quadrants and spent less time in the open quadrants of the elevated zero maze. Interestingly, these anxiety-related phenotypes were largely unrelated to developmental effects as mice expressing the Galphas*(str) transgene during development, but not at testing, were normal on most measures. These observations show that chronic Galphas signaling in the striatum is sufficient to trigger anxiety-related behaviors largely independent of developmental effects and suggest the cAMP pathway or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels may be viable targets for future pharmacological intervention in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  20. A novel adenylylation process in liver plasma membrane-bound proteins

    SciTech Connect

    San Jose, E.; Benguria, A.; Villalobo, A. )

    1990-11-25

    Rat liver plasma membrane contains five distinct polypeptides of apparent molecular mass of 130, 120, 110, 100, and 86 kDa which are labeled upon incubation with (alpha-32P)ATP as well as with (gamma-32P)ATP. Covalently bound adenosine 5'-monophosphate to some of the polypeptides was identified using nonhydrolyzable analogues of ATP. Chase experiments of alpha-32P-nucleotide-labeled polypeptides with different nonradiolabeled phosphocompounds and sensitivity to different inhibitors demonstrate that the 86-kDa polypeptide is a phosphoesterase, forming a catalytic intermediate. On the other hand, the comparative slow rate of turnover of the polypeptides of higher molecular mass (130, 120, 110, and 100 kDa) suggests that the bound AMP could play a regulatory rather than a catalytic role. Using the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue (alpha, beta-methylene)ATP and dilution experiments with Triton X-100-solubilized membranes, it has been possible to identify the 130-kDa adenylylated polypeptide as a possible target of an adenylylating system. These polypeptides, except the 86-kDa phosphoesterase, are affected in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence of beta-mercaptoethanol. An intercatenary disulfide bond(s) appear(s) to link the polypeptide(s) of 120 kDa and/or 110 kDa in a dimeric structure of apparent molecular mass of 240 kDa. All five polypeptides labeled with (alpha-32P)ATP are glycoproteins bound to the cell plasma membrane.

  1. Biochemistry and physiology of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Johanne; Desjardins, Richard; Hum, David; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Hamet, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GC) exist as soluble and particulate, membrane-associated enzymes which catalyse the conversion of GTP to cGMP, an intracellular signalling molecule. Several membrane forms of the enzyme have been identified up to now. Some of them serve as receptors for the natriuretic peptides, a family of peptides which includes atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), three peptides known to play important roles in renal and cardiovascular physiology. These are transmembrane proteins composed of a single transmembrane domain, a variable extracellular natriuretic peptide-binding domain, and a more conserved intracellular kinase homology domain (KHD) and catalytic domain. GC-A, the receptor for ANP and BNP, also named natriuretic peptide receptor-A or -1 (NPR-A or NPR- 1), has been studied widely. Its mode of activation by peptide ligands and mechanisms of regulation serve as prototypes for understanding the function of other particulate GC. Activation of this enzyme by its ligand is a complex process requiring oligomerization, ligand binding, KHD phosphorylation and ATP binding. Gene knockout and genetic segregation studies have provided strong evidence for the importance of GC-A in the regulation of blood pressure and heart and renal functions. GC-B is the main receptor for CNP, the latter having a more paracrine role at the vascular and venous levels. The structure and regulation of GC-B is similar to that of GC-A. This chapter reviews the structure and roles of GC-A and GC-B in blood pressure regulation and cardiac and renal pathophysiology. PMID:11952095

  2. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  3. Functional analysis of allene oxide cyclase, MpAOC, in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ohshika, Jun; Takahashi, Tomohiro; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Matusuura, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-08-01

    12-Oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) is an intermediate in jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis. OPDA exerts JA-dependent and JA-independent biological effects; therefore, it is considered a signaling molecule in flowering plants. OPDA is induced by bacterial infection and wounding and inhibits growth in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The functions of OPDA and allene oxide cyclase (AOC) in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha were explored, which represents the most basal lineage of extant land plants. The analysis of OPDA showed that it is present in M. polymorpha and is increased by wounding. OPDA has been suggested to be involved in the response to environmental stresses. Moreover, OPDA showed growth inhibitory activity in M. polymorpha. Nonetheless JA in M. polymorpha was not found in this study. AOC synthesizes OPDA from an unstable allene oxide. A database search of the M. polymorpha genome identified only a putative gene encoding allene oxide cyclase (MpAOC). Recombinant MpAOC showed AOC activity similar to that in flowering plants. MpAOC was localized to chloroplasts, as in flowering plants. Expression of MpAOC was induced by wounding and OPDA treatment, and positive feedback regulation of OPDA was demonstrated in M. polymorpha. Overexpression of MpAOC increased the endogenous OPDA level and suppressed growth in M. polymorpha. These results indicate the role of OPDA as a signaling molecule regulating growth and the response to wounding in the liverwort M. polymorpha. PMID:25892411

  4. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Rosely O; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S A

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response.

  5. New perspectives in signaling mediated by receptors coupled to stimulatory G protein: the emerging significance of cAMP efflux and extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Rosely O.; Duarte, Thiago; Pacini, Enio S. A.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) linked to stimulatory G (Gs) proteins (GsPCRs) mediate increases in intracellular cyclic AMP as consequence of activation of nine adenylyl cyclases , which differ considerably in their cellular distribution and activation mechanisms. Once produced, cyclic AMP may act via distinct intracellular signaling effectors such as protein kinase A and the exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epacs). More recently, attention has been focused on the efflux of cAMP through a specific transport system named multidrug resistance proteins that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily. Outside the cell, cAMP is metabolized into adenosine, which is able to activate four distinct subtypes of adenosine receptors, members of the GPCR family: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Taking into account that this phenomenon occurs in numerous cell types, as consequence of GsPCR activation and increment in intracellular cAMP levels, in this review, we will discuss the impact of cAMP efflux and the extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway on the regulation of GsPCR-induced cell response. PMID:25859216

  6. TSH Receptor Signaling Abrogation by a Novel Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Latif, Rauf; Realubit, Ronald B.; Karan, Charles; Mezei, Mihaly; Davies, Terry F.

    2016-01-01

    Pathological activation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) is caused by thyroid-stimulating antibodies in patients with Graves’ disease (GD) or by somatic and rare genomic mutations that enhance constitutive activation of the receptor influencing both G protein and non-G protein signaling. Potential selective small molecule antagonists represent novel therapeutic compounds for abrogation of such abnormal TSHR signaling. In this study, we describe the identification and in vitro characterization of a novel small molecule antagonist by high-throughput screening (HTS). The identification of the TSHR antagonist was performed using a transcription-based TSH-inhibition bioassay. TSHR-expressing CHO cells, which also expressed a luciferase-tagged CRE response element, were optimized using bovine TSH as the activator, in a 384 well plate format, which had a Z score of 0.3–0.6. Using this HTS assay, we screened a diverse library of ~80,000 compounds at a final concentration of 16.7 μM. The selection criteria for a positive hit were based on a mean signal threshold of ≥50% inhibition of control TSH stimulation. The screening resulted in 450 positive hits giving a hit ratio of 0.56%. A secondary confirmation screen against TSH and forskolin – a post receptor activator of adenylyl cyclase – confirmed one TSHR-specific candidate antagonist molecule (named VA-K-14). This lead molecule had an IC50 of 12.3 μM and a unique chemical structure. A parallel analysis for cell viability indicated that the lead inhibitor was non-cytotoxic at its effective concentrations. In silico docking studies performed using a TSHR transmembrane model showed the hydrophobic contact locations and the possible mode of inhibition of TSHR signaling. Furthermore, this molecule was capable of inhibiting TSHR stimulation by GD patient sera and monoclonal-stimulating TSHR antibodies. In conclusion, we report the identification of a novel small molecule TSHR inhibitor, which has

  7. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst. PMID:22526778

  8. Prokaryotic squalene-hopene cyclases can be converted to citronellal cyclases by single amino acid exchange.

    PubMed

    Siedenburg, Gabriele; Breuer, Michael; Jendrossek, Dieter

    2013-02-01

    Squalene-hopene cyclases (SHCs) are prokaryotic enzymes that catalyse the cyclisation of the linear precursor squalene to pentacyclic hopene. Recently, we discovered that a SHC cloned from Zymomonas mobilis (ZMO-1548 gene product) has the unique property to cyclise the monoterpenoid citronellal to isopulegol. In this study, we performed saturation mutagenesis of three amino acids of the catalytic centre of ZMO-1548 (F428, F486 and W555), which had been previously identified to interact with enzyme-bound substrate. Replacement of F428 by tyrosine increased hopene formation from squalene, but isopulegol-forming activity was strongly reduced or abolished in all muteins of position 428. W555 was essential for hopene formation; however, three muteins (W555Y, W428F or W555T) revealed enhanced cyclisation efficiency with citronellal. The residue at position 486 turned out to be the most important for isopulegol-forming activity. While the presence of phenylalanine or tyrosine favoured cyclisation activity with squalene, several small and/or hydrophobic residues such as cysteine, alanine or isoleucine and others reduced activity with squalene but greatly enhanced isopulegol formation from citronellal. Replacement of the conserved aromatic residue corresponding to F486 to cysteine in other SHCs cloned from Z. mobilis (ZMO-0872), Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (SHC(Aac)), Acetobacter pasteurianus (SHC(Apa)), Streptomyces coelicolor (SHC(Sco)) and Bradyrhizobium japonicum (SHC(Bja)) resulted in more or less strong isopulegol-forming activities from citronellal. In conclusion, many SHCs can be converted to citronellal cyclases by mutagenesis of the active centre thus broadening the applicability of this interesting class of biocatalyst.

  9. The Arabidopsis thaliana K(+)-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) contains a functional cytosolic adenylate cyclase catalytic centre.

    PubMed

    Al-Younis, Inas; Wong, Aloysius; Gehring, Chris

    2015-12-21

    Adenylate cyclases (ACs) catalyse the formation of the second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Although cAMP is increasingly recognised as an important signalling molecule in higher plants, ACs have remained somewhat elusive. Here we used a search motif derived from experimentally tested guanylyl cyclases (GCs), substituted the residues essential for substrate specificity and identified the Arabidopsis thaliana K(+)-uptake permease 7 (AtKUP7) as one of several candidate ACs. Firstly, we show that a recombinant N-terminal, cytosolic domain of AtKUP7(1-100) is able to complement the AC-deficient mutant cyaA in Escherichia coli and thus restoring the fermentation of lactose, and secondly, we demonstrate with both enzyme immunoassays and mass spectrometry that a recombinant AtKUP7(1-100) generates cAMP in vitro. PMID:26638082

  10. Region-Specific Disruption of Adenylate Cyclase Type 1 Gene Differentially Affects Somatosensorimotor Behaviors in Mice(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Akkentli, Fatih; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2014-01-01

    Cover FigureRegion-specific adenylyl cyclase 1 (AC1) loss of function differentially affects both patterning and sensorimotor behaviors in mice. AC1 is expressed at all levels of the somatosensory pathway and plays a major role in refinement and patterning of topographic sensory maps. Cortex-specific AC1 loss of function (CxAC1KO mice) does not affect barrel patterning and activation of specific barrels corresponding to stimulated whiskers and does not impair sensorimotor behaviors. While global (AC1KO) and thalamus-specific (ThAC1KO) AC1 loss of function leads to absence of barrel patterns, selective whisker stimulation activates topographically aligned cortical loci. Despite functional topography of the whisker-barrel cortex, sensorimotor and social behaviors are impaired, indicating the importance of patterning of topographical sensory maps in the neocortex. Adenylate cyclase type I (AC1) is primarily, and, abundantly, expressed in the brain. Intracellular calcium/calmodulin increases regulate AC1 in an activity-dependent manner. Upon stimulation, AC1 produces cAMP and it is involved in the patterning and the refinement of neural circuits. In mice, spontaneous mutations or targeted deletion of the Adcy1 gene, which encodes AC1, resulted in neuronal pattern formation defects. Neural modules in the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex, the barrels, which represent the topographic distribution of the whiskers on the snout, failed to form (Welker et al., 1996; Abdel-Majid et al., 1998). Cortex- or thalamus-specific Adcy1 deletions led to different cortical pattern phenotypes, with thalamus-specific disruption phenotype being more severe (Iwasato et al., 2008; Suzuki et al., 2013). Despite the absence of barrels in the "barrelless"/Adcy1 null mice, thalamocortical terminal bouton density and activation of cortical zones following whisker stimulation were roughly topographic (Abdel-Majid et al., 1998; Gheorghita et al., 2006). To what extent does patterning of the

  11. Signaling from the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor to ERK1 and ERK2 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Involves Transactivation of cKIT

    PubMed Central

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Journé, Fabrice; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa; Ghanem, Ghanem; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C.

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation, phototype and cancer risk. Upon stimulation by αMSH, MC1R triggers the cAMP and ERK1/ERK2 MAPK pathways. In mouse melanocytes, ERK activation by αMSH binding to Mc1r depends on cAMP, and melanocytes are considered a paradigm for cAMP-dependent ERK activation. However, human MC1R variants associated with red hair, fair skin [red hair color (RHC) phenotype], and increased skin cancer risk display reduced cAMP signaling but activate ERKs as efficiently as wild type in heterologous cells, suggesting independent signaling to ERKs and cAMP in human melanocytes. We show that MC1R signaling activated the ERK pathway in normal human melanocytes and melanoma cells expressing physiological levels of endogenous RHC variants. ERK activation was comparable for wild-type and mutant MC1R and was independent on cAMP because it was neither triggered by stimulation of cAMP synthesis with forskolin nor blocked by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine. Stimulation of MC1R with αMSH did not lead to protein kinase C activation and ERK activation was unaffected by protein kinase C inhibitors. Conversely, pharmacological interference, small interfering RNA studies, expression profiles, and functional reconstitution experiments showed that αMSH-induced ERK activation resulted from Src tyrosine kinase-mediated transactivation of the stem cell factor receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for proliferation, differentiation, and survival of melanocyte precursors, thus demonstrating a functional link between the stem cell factor receptor and MC1R. Moreover, this transactivation phenomenon is unique because it is unaffected by natural mutations impairing canonical MC1R signaling through the cAMP pathway. PMID:21084381

  12. Investigating the effects of posttranslational adenylylation on the metal binding sites of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase using lanthanide luminescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Reynaldo, L. P.; Villafranca, J. J.; Horrocks, W. D.

    1996-01-01

    Lanthanide luminescence was used to examine the effects of posttranslational adenylylation on the metal binding sites of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase (GS). These studies revealed the presence of two lanthanide ion binding sites of GS of either adenylylation extrema. Individual emission decay lifetimes were obtained in both H2O and D2O solvent systems, allowing for the determination of the number of water molecules coordinated to each bound Eu3+. The results indicate that there are 4.3 +/- 0.5 and 4.6 +/- 0.5 water molecules coordinated to Eu3+ bound to the n1 site of unadenylylated enzyme, GS0, and fully adenylylated enzyme, GS12, respectively, and that there are 2.6 +/- 0.5 water molecules coordinated to Eu3+ at site n2 for both GS0 and GS12. Energy transfer measurements between the lanthanide donor-acceptor pair Eu3+ and Nd3+, obtained an intermetal distance measurement of 12.1 +/- 1.5 A. Distances between a Tb3+ ion at site n2 and tryptophan residues were also performed with the use of single-tryptophan mutant forms of E. coli GS. The dissociation constant for lanthanide ion binding to site n1 was observed to decrease from Kd = 0.35 +/- 0.09 microM for GS0 to Kd = 0.06 +/- 0.02 microM for GS12. The dissociation constant for lanthanide ion binding to site n2 remained unchanged as a function of adenylylation state; Kd = 3.8 +/- 0.9 microM and Kd = 2.6 +/- 0.7 microM for GS0 and GS12, respectively. Competition experiments indicate that Mn2+ affinity at site n1 decreases as a function of increasing adenylylation state, from Kd = 0.05 +/- 0.02 microM for GS0 to Kd = 0.35 +/- 0.09 microM for GS12. Mn2+ affinity at site n2 remains unchanged (Kd = 5.3 +/- 1.3 microM for GS0 and Kd = 4.0 +/- 1.0 microM for GS12). The observed divalent metal ion affinities, which are affected by the adenylylation state, agrees with other steady-state substrate experiments (Abell LM, Villafranca JJ, 1991, Biochemistry 30:1413-1418), supporting the hypothesis that adenylylation

  13. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure.

    PubMed

    Susick, Laura L; Lowing, Jennifer L; Bosse, Kelly E; Hildebrandt, Clara C; Chrumka, Alexandria C; Conti, Alana C

    2014-08-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  14. Adenylyl cylases 1 and 8 mediate select striatal-dependent behaviors and sensitivity to ethanol stimulation in the adolescent period following acute neonatal ethanol exposure

    PubMed Central

    Susick, Laura L.; Lowing, Jennifer L.; Bosse, Kelly E.; Hildebrandt, Clara C.; Chrumka, Alexandria C.; Conti, Alana C.

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal alcohol exposure in rodents causes dramatic neurodegenerative effects throughout the developing nervous system, particularly in the striatum, acutely after exposure. These acute neurodegenerative effects are augmented in mice lacking adenylyl cyclases 1 and 8 (AC1/8) as neonatal mice with a genetic deletion of both AC isoforms (DKO) have increased vulnerability to ethanol-induced striatal neurotoxicity compared to wild type (WT) controls. While neonatal ethanol exposure is known to negatively impact cognitive behaviors, such as executive functioning and working memory in adolescent and adult animals, the threshold of ethanol exposure required to impinge upon developmental behaviors in mice has not been extensively examined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of neonatal ethanol exposure using various striatal-dependent developmental benchmarks and to assess the impact of AC1/8 deletion on this developmental progression. WT and DKO mice were treated with 2.5 g/kg ethanol or saline on postnatal day (P)6 and later subjected to the wire suspension, negative geotaxis, postural reflex, grid hang, tail suspension and accelerating rotarod tests at various time points. At P30, mice were evaluated for their hypnotic responses to 4.0 g/kg ethanol by using the loss of righting reflex assay and ethanol-induced stimulation of locomotor activity after 2.0 g/kg ethanol. Ethanol exposure significantly impaired DKO performance in the negative geotaxis test while genetic deletion of AC1/8 alone increased grid hang time and decreased immobility time in the tail suspension test with a concomitant increase in hindlimb clasping behavior. Locomotor stimulation was significantly increased in animals that received ethanol as neonates, peaking significantly in ethanol-treated DKO mice compared to ethanol-treated WT controls, while sedation duration following high-dose ethanol challenge was unaffected. These data indicate that the

  15. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  16. Tocopherol Cyclases-Substrate Specificity and Phylogenetic Relations.

    PubMed

    Dłużewska, Jolanta; Szymańska, Renata; Gabruk, Michal; Kós, Peter B; Nowicka, Beatrycze; Kruk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    In the present studies, we focused on substrate specificity of tocopherol cyclase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of the tocopherols and plastochromanol-8, the main plant lipid antioxidants, with special emphasis on the preference for tocopherols and plastochromanol-8 precursors, taking advantage of the recombinant enzyme originating from Arabidopsis thaliana and isolated plastoglobules, thylakoids and various model systems like micelles and thylakoids. Plastoglobules and triacylglycerol micelles were the most efficient reaction environment for the cyclase. In various investigated systems, synthesis of γ-tocopherol proceeded considerably faster than that of plastochromanol-8, probably mainly due to different localization of the corresponding substrates in the analyzed lipid structures. Moreover, our study was complemented by bioinformatics analysis of the phylogenetic relations of the cyclases and sequence motifs, crucial for the enzyme activity, were proposed. The analysis revealed also a group of tocopherol cyclase-like proteins in a number of heterotrophic bacterial species, with a conserved region common with photosynthetic organisms, that might be engaged in the catalytic activity of both groups of organisms. PMID:27462710

  17. General base-general acid catalysis by terpenoid cyclases.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Travis A; Christianson, David W

    2016-07-01

    Terpenoid cyclases catalyze the most complex reactions in biology, in that more than half of the substrate carbon atoms often undergo changes in bonding during the course of a multistep cyclization cascade that proceeds through multiple carbocation intermediates. Many cyclization mechanisms require stereospecific deprotonation and reprotonation steps, and most cyclization cascades are terminated by deprotonation to yield an olefin product. The first bacterial terpenoid cyclase to yield a crystal structure was pentalenene synthase from Streptomyces exfoliatus UC5319. This cyclase generates the hydrocarbon precursor of the pentalenolactone family of antibiotics. The structures of pentalenene synthase and other terpenoid cyclases reveal predominantly nonpolar active sites typically lacking amino acid side chains capable of serving general base-general acid functions. What chemical species, then, enables the Brønsted acid-base chemistry required in the catalytic mechanisms of these enzymes? The most likely candidate for such general base-general acid chemistry is the co-product inorganic pyrophosphate. Here, we briefly review biological and nonbiological systems in which phosphate and its derivatives serve general base and general acid functions in catalysis. These examples highlight the fact that the Brønsted acid-base activities of phosphate derivatives are comparable to the Brønsted acid-base activities of amino acid side chains.

  18. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the “Beta type” promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  19. Diguanylate cyclase DgcP is involved in plant and human Pseudomonas spp. infections.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Isabel M; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Moscoso, Joana A; Faure, Emmanuel; Guery, Benoit; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Filloux, Alain; Ramos, Cayo

    2015-11-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between different lifestyles in bacterial pathogens. Here, we report the identification of DgcP (diguanylate cyclase conserved in Pseudomonads), whose activity in the olive tree pathogen Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi is dependent on the integrity of its GGDEF domain. Furthermore, deletion of the dgcP gene revealed that DgcP negatively regulates motility and positively controls biofilm formation in both the olive tree pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Overexpression of the dgcP gene in P. aeruginosa PAK led to increased exopolysaccharide production and upregulation of the type VI secretion system; in turn, it repressed the type III secretion system, which is a hallmark of chronic infections and persistence for P. aeruginosa. Deletion of the dgcP gene in P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 and P. aeruginosa PAK reduced their virulence in olive plants and in a mouse acute lung injury model respectively. Our results show that diguanylate cyclase DgcP is a conserved Pseudomonas protein with a role in virulence, and confirm the existence of common c-di-GMP signalling pathways that are capable of regulating plant and human Pseudomonas spp. infections.

  20. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the "Beta type" promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening.

  1. Diguanylate cyclase DgcP is involved in plant and human Pseudomonas spp. infections.

    PubMed

    Aragon, Isabel M; Pérez-Mendoza, Daniel; Moscoso, Joana A; Faure, Emmanuel; Guery, Benoit; Gallegos, María-Trinidad; Filloux, Alain; Ramos, Cayo

    2015-11-01

    The second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between different lifestyles in bacterial pathogens. Here, we report the identification of DgcP (diguanylate cyclase conserved in Pseudomonads), whose activity in the olive tree pathogen Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi is dependent on the integrity of its GGDEF domain. Furthermore, deletion of the dgcP gene revealed that DgcP negatively regulates motility and positively controls biofilm formation in both the olive tree pathogen P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi and the human opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Overexpression of the dgcP gene in P. aeruginosa PAK led to increased exopolysaccharide production and upregulation of the type VI secretion system; in turn, it repressed the type III secretion system, which is a hallmark of chronic infections and persistence for P. aeruginosa. Deletion of the dgcP gene in P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335 and P. aeruginosa PAK reduced their virulence in olive plants and in a mouse acute lung injury model respectively. Our results show that diguanylate cyclase DgcP is a conserved Pseudomonas protein with a role in virulence, and confirm the existence of common c-di-GMP signalling pathways that are capable of regulating plant and human Pseudomonas spp. infections. PMID:25809128

  2. Neofunctionalization of Chromoplast Specific Lycopene Beta Cyclase Gene (CYC-B) in Tomato Clade.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Vijee; Pandey, Arun; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2016-01-01

    The ancestor of tomato underwent whole genome triplication ca. 71 Myr ago followed by widespread gene loss. However, few of the triplicated genes are retained in modern day tomato including lycopene beta cyclase that mediates conversion of lycopene to β-carotene. The fruit specific β-carotene formation is mediated by a chromoplast-specific paralog of lycopene beta cyclase (CYC-B) gene. Presently limited information is available about how the variations in CYC-B gene contributed to its neofunctionalization. CYC-B gene in tomato clade contained several SNPs and In-Dels in the coding sequence (33 haplotypes) and promoter region (44 haplotypes). The CYC-B gene coding sequence in tomato appeared to undergo purifying selection. The transit peptide sequence of CYC-B protein was predicted to have a stronger plastid targeting signal than its chloroplast specific paralog indicating a possible neofunctionalization. In promoter of two Bog (Beta old gold) mutants, a NUPT (nuclear plastid) DNA fragment of 256 bp, likely derived from a S. chilense accession, was present. In transient expression assay, this promoter was more efficient than the "Beta type" promoter. CARGATCONSENSUS box sequences are required for the binding of the MADS-box regulatory protein RIPENING INHIBITOR (RIN). The loss of CARGATCONSENSUS box sequence from CYC-B promoter in tomato may be related to attenuation of its efficiency to promote higher accumulation of β-carotene than lycopene during fruit ripening. PMID:27070417

  3. Melatonin Regulates Somatotrope and Lactotrope Function Through Common and Distinct Signaling Pathways in Cultured Primary Pituitary Cells From Female Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D.; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Castaño, Justo P.

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin (MT) is secreted by the pineal gland and exhibits a striking circadian rhythm in its release. Depending on the species studied, some pituitary hormones also display marked circadian/seasonal patterns and rhythms of secretion. However, the precise relationship between MT and pituitary function remains controversial, and studies focusing on the direct role of MT in normal pituitary cells are limited to nonprimate species. Here, adult normal primate (baboons) primary pituitary cell cultures were used to determine the direct impact of MT on the functioning of all pituitary cell types from the pars distalis. MT increased GH and prolactin (PRL) expression/release in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, a response that was blocked by somatostatin. However, MT did not significantly affect ACTH, FSH, LH, or TSH expression/release. MT did not alter GHRH- or ghrelin-induced GH and/or PRL secretions, suggesting that MT may activate similar signaling pathways as ghrelin/GHRH. The effects of MT on GH/PRL release, which are likely mediated through MT1 receptor, involve both common (adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/extracellular calcium-channels) and distinct (phospholipase C/intracellular calcium-channels) signaling pathways. Actions of MT on pituitary cells also included regulation of the expression of other key components for the control of somatotrope/lactotrope function (GHRH, ghrelin, and somatostatin receptors). These results show, for the first time in a primate model, that MT directly regulates somatotrope/lactotrope function, thereby lending support to the notion that the actions of MT on these cells might substantially contribute to the define daily patterns of GH and PRL observed in primates and perhaps in humans. PMID:25545385

  4. Neonatal Dexamethasone Treatment Leads to Alterations in Cell Signaling Cascades Controlling Hepatic and Cardiac Function in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Adigun, Abayomi A.; Wrench, Nicola; Seidler, Frederic J.; Slotkin, Theodore A.

    2009-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that early-life glucocorticoid exposure, either involving stress or the therapy of preterm labor, contributes to metabolic and cardiovascular disorders in adulthood. We investigated cellular mechanisms underlying these effects by administering dexamethasone (DEX) to neonatal rats on postnatal (PN) days 1–3 or 7–9, using doses spanning the threshold for somatic growth impairment: 0.05, 0.2 and 0.8 mg/kg. In adulthood, we assessed the effects on hepatic and cardiac cell function mediated through the adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling cascade, which controls neuronal and hormonal inputs that regulate hepatic glucose metabolism and cardiac contractility. Treatment on PN1-3 produced heterologous sensitization of hepatic signaling, with upregulation of AC itself leading to parallel increases in the responses to β-adrenergic or glucagon receptor stimulation, or to activation of G-proteins by fluoride. The effects were seen at the lowest dose but increasing DEX past the point of somatic growth impairment led to loss of the effect in females. Nonmonotonic effects were also present in the heart, where males showed AC sensitization at the lowest dose, with decreasing effects as the dose was raised; females showed progressive deficits of cardiac AC activity. Shifting the exposure to PN7-9 still elicited AC sensitization but with a greater offsetting contribution at the higher doses. Our findings show that, in contrast to growth restriction, the glucocorticoids associated with stress or the therapy of preterm labor are more sensitive and more important contributors to the cellular abnormalities underlying subsequent metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:19853034

  5. Deep Conservation of Genes Required for Both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans Sleep Includes a Role for Dopaminergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Komudi; Ju, Jennifer Y.; Walsh, Melissa B.; DiIorio, Michael A.; Hart, Anne C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Cross-species conservation of sleep-like behaviors predicts the presence of conserved molecular mechanisms underlying sleep. However, limited experimental evidence of conservation exists. Here, this prediction is tested directly. Measurements and Results: During lethargus, Caenorhabditis elegans spontaneously sleep in short bouts that are interspersed with bouts of spontaneous locomotion. We identified 26 genes required for Drosophila melanogaster sleep. Twenty orthologous C. elegans genes were selected based on similarity. Their effect on C. elegans sleep and arousal during the last larval lethargus was assessed. The 20 most similar genes altered both the quantity of sleep and arousal thresholds. In 18 cases, the direction of change was concordant with Drosophila studies published previously. Additionally, we delineated a conserved genetic pathway by which dopamine regulates sleep and arousal. In C. elegans neurons, G-alpha S, adenylyl cyclase, and protein kinase A act downstream of D1 dopamine receptors to regulate these behaviors. Finally, a quantitative analysis of genes examined herein revealed that C. elegans arousal thresholds were directly correlated with amount of sleep during lethargus. However, bout duration varies little and was not correlated with arousal thresholds. Conclusions: The comprehensive analysis presented here suggests that conserved genes and pathways are required for sleep in invertebrates and, likely, across the entire animal kingdom. The genetic pathway delineated in this study implicates G-alpha S and previously known genes downstream of dopamine signaling in sleep. Quantitative analysis of various components of quiescence suggests that interdependent or identical cellular and molecular mechanisms are likely to regulate both arousal and sleep entry. Citation: Singh K, Ju JY, Walsh MB, Dilorio MA, Hart AC. Deep conservation of genes required for both Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans sleep includes a role for

  6. Key role for constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 of MDCK cells in basal signaling and response to released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Gabot, K; Rana, B K; Insel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells release ATP upon mechanical or biochemical activation, initiating P2Y receptor signaling that regulates basal levels of multiple second messengers, including cAMP (J Biol Chem 275: 11735--11739, 2000). Data shown here document inhibition of cAMP formation by Gd(3+) and niflumic acid, channel inhibitors that block ATP release. cAMP production is stimulated via Ca(2+)-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), release of arachidonic acid (AA), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent production of prostaglandins, which activate prostanoid receptors coupled to G(s) and adenylyl cyclase. In the current investigation, we assessed the expression and functional role of the two known isoforms of COX, COX-1 and COX-2. Treatment of cells with either a COX-1-selective inhibitor, SC-560, or COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-58125 or NS-398, inhibited basal and UTP-stimulated cAMP levels. COX inhibitors also decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, implying this response is in part attributable to an action of AA metabolites. These findings imply an important role for the inducible form of COX, COX-2, under basal conditions. Indeed, COX-2 expression was readily detectable by immunoblot, and treatments that induce or reduce COX-2 expression in other cells (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phorbol ester, or dexamethasone) had minimal or no effect on the levels of COX-2 immunoreactivity. RT-PCR using isoform-specific primers detected COX-2 mRNA. We conclude that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in MDCK-D(1) cells and participates in basal and P2Y(2)-mediated signaling, implying a key role for COX-2 in regulation of epithelial cell function. PMID:11443051

  7. Key role for constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 of MDCK cells in basal signaling and response to released ATP.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, R S; Gregorian, C; Drenan, R M; Gabot, K; Rana, B K; Insel, P A

    2001-08-01

    Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells release ATP upon mechanical or biochemical activation, initiating P2Y receptor signaling that regulates basal levels of multiple second messengers, including cAMP (J Biol Chem 275: 11735--11739, 2000). Data shown here document inhibition of cAMP formation by Gd(3+) and niflumic acid, channel inhibitors that block ATP release. cAMP production is stimulated via Ca(2+)-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2), release of arachidonic acid (AA), and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent production of prostaglandins, which activate prostanoid receptors coupled to G(s) and adenylyl cyclase. In the current investigation, we assessed the expression and functional role of the two known isoforms of COX, COX-1 and COX-2. Treatment of cells with either a COX-1-selective inhibitor, SC-560, or COX-2-selective inhibitors, SC-58125 or NS-398, inhibited basal and UTP-stimulated cAMP levels. COX inhibitors also decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation, implying this response is in part attributable to an action of AA metabolites. These findings imply an important role for the inducible form of COX, COX-2, under basal conditions. Indeed, COX-2 expression was readily detectable by immunoblot, and treatments that induce or reduce COX-2 expression in other cells (interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, phorbol ester, or dexamethasone) had minimal or no effect on the levels of COX-2 immunoreactivity. RT-PCR using isoform-specific primers detected COX-2 mRNA. We conclude that COX-2 is constitutively expressed in MDCK-D(1) cells and participates in basal and P2Y(2)-mediated signaling, implying a key role for COX-2 in regulation of epithelial cell function.

  8. The M2 muscarinic receptors are essential for signaling in the heart left ventricle during restraint stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Tomankova, Hana; Valuskova, Paulina; Varejkova, Eva; Rotkova, Jana; Benes, Jan; Myslivecek, Jaromir

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that muscarinic receptors (MRs) in the heart have a role in stress responses and thus investigated changes in MR signaling (gene expression, number of receptors, adenylyl cyclase (AC), phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase A and C (PKA and PKC) and nitric oxide synthase [NOS]) in the left ventricle, together with telemetric measurement of heart rate (HR) in mice (wild type [WT] and M2 knockout [KO]) during and after one (1R) or seven sessions (7R) of restraint stress (seven mice per group). Stress decreased M2 MR mRNA and cell surface MR in the left ventricle in WT mice. In KO mice, 1R, but not 7R, decreased surface MR. Similarly, AC activity was decreased in WT mice after 1R and 7R, whereas in KO mice, there was no change. PLC activity was also decreased after 1R in WT and KO mice. This is in accord with the concept that cAMP is a key player in HR regulation. No change was found with stress in NOS activity. Amount of AC and PKA protein was not changed, but was altered for PKC isoenzymes (PKCα, β, γ, η and ϵ (increased) in KO mice, and PKCι (increased) in WT mice). KO mice were more susceptible to stress as shown by inability to compensate HR during 120 min following repeated stress. The results imply that not only M2 but also M3 are involved in stress signaling and in allostasis. We conclude that for a normal stress response, the expression of M2 MR to mediate vagal responses is essential.

  9. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 regulates cAMP signal within lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Jin; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Takayuki; Egawa, Masato; Kawabe, Junichi; Umemura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are made of multiple subunits with diversified functions. The nAChR alpha 7-subunit has a property of high Ca2+ permeability and may have specific functions and localization within the plasma membrane as a signal transduction molecule. In PC-12 cells, fractionation by sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed that nAChR alpha 7 existed in low-density, cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts where flotillin also exists. In contrast, nAChR alpha 5- and beta2-subunits were located in high-density fractions, out of the lipid rafts. Type 6 adenylyl cyclase (AC6), a calcium-inhibitable isoform, was also found in lipid rafts and was coimmunoprecipitated with nAChR alpha 7. Cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin redistributed nAChR alpha 7 and AC6 diffusely within plasma membranes. Nicotine stimulation reduced forskolin-stimulated AC activity by 35%, and this inhibition was negated by either treatment with alpha-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist of nAChR alpha 7, or cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes. The effect of cholesterol depletion was negated by the addition of cholesterol. These data suggest that nAChR alpha 7 has a specific membrane localization relative to other nAChR subunits and that lipid rafts are necessary to localize nAChR alpha 7 with AC within plasma membranes. In addition, nAChR alpha 7 may regulate the AC activity via Ca2+ within lipid rafts.

  10. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  11. Allosteric regulation of the state of adenylylation of glutamine synthetase in permeabilized cell preparations of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Song, H Y

    1989-08-01

    Following a freeze-thaw cycle, and the treatment of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides with the nonionic detergent Lubrol PX, the permeabilized cell suspensions can be assayed directly both for the intracellular levels of glutamine synthetase and the state of adenylylation (i.e. the average number n of adenylylated subunits/dodecameric molecules). It seems that all components of the bicycle system are retained if cells grown with low concentrations of ammonia as the sole nitrogen source are used. The value of n was dependent upon the concentration of substrates (ATP, Pi) and allosteric effectors (ATP, glutamine and alpha-ketoglutarate) of adenylytransferase. The value of n affected by UTP, the specific substrate of the uridylyltransferase shows first the evidence that the bicycle cascade control system studied in Escherichia coli may exist in this phototrophic bacterium. PMID:2575389

  12. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explain observed abnormalities of phosphorylase activation and sarcoplasmic reticulum function. PMID:6271806

  13. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Kang, In-Hye; Nelson, Mathew D.; Jensen, Tricia M.; Lyuksyutova, Anna I.; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Raizen, David M.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties make bacteriophytochromes particularly attractive for optogenetic applications. However, the lack of understanding of how light-induced conformational changes control output activities has hindered engineering of bacteriophytochrome-based optogenetic tools. Many bacteriophytochromes function as homodimeric enzymes, in which light-induced conformational changes are transferred via α-helical linkers to the rigid output domains. We hypothesized that heterologous output domains requiring homodimerization can be fused to the photosensory modules of bacteriophytochromes to generate light-activated fusions. Here, we tested this hypothesis by engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by light in the near-infrared spectral window using the photosensory module of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteriophytochrome BphG1 and the adenylate cyclase domain from Nostoc sp. CyaB1. We engineered several light-activated fusion proteins that differed from each other by approximately one or two α-helical turns, suggesting that positioning of the output domains in the same phase of the helix is important for light-dependent activity. Extensive mutagenesis of one of these fusions resulted in an adenylate cyclase with a sixfold photodynamic range. Additional mutagenesis produced an enzyme with a more stable photoactivated state. When expressed in cholinergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, the engineered adenylate cyclase affected worm behavior in a light-dependent manner. The insights derived from this study can be applied to the engineering of other homodimeric bacteriophytochromes, which will further expand the optogenetic toolset. PMID:24982160

  14. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  15. Regulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by matricellular thrombospondins: implications for blood flow.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Natasha M; Seeger, Franziska; Garcin, Elsa D; Roberts, David D; Isenberg, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) maintains cardiovascular health by activating soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) to increase cellular cGMP levels. Cardiovascular disease is characterized by decreased NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. Pharmacological activators and stimulators of sGC are being actively pursued as therapies for acute heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. Here we review molecular mechanisms that modulate sGC activity while emphasizing a novel biochemical pathway in which binding of the matricellular protein thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) to the cell surface receptor CD47 causes inhibition of sGC. We discuss the therapeutic implications of this pathway for blood flow, tissue perfusion, and cell survival under physiologic and disease conditions.

  16. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  17. Restoring Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Expression and Function Blocks the Aggressive Course of GliomaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haifeng; Li, Jessica Tao; Zheng, Fang; Martin, Emil; Kots, Alexander Y.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Weisbrodt, Norman; Bögler, Oliver; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The NO and cGMP signaling pathways are of broad physiological and pathological significance. We compared the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in human glioma tissues and cell lines with that of healthy control samples and demonstrated that sGC expression is significantly lower in glioma preparations. Our analysis of GEO databases (National Cancer Institute) further revealed a statistically significant reduction of sGC transcript levels in human glioma specimens. On the other hand, the expression levels of particulate (membrane) guanylyl cyclases (pGC) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) were intact in the glioma cells that we have tested. Pharmacologically manipulating endogenous cGMP generation in glioma cells through either stimulating pGC by ANP/BNP, or blocking PDE by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/zaprinast caused significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation of glioma cells. Genetically restoring sGC expression also correlated inversely with glioma cells growth. Orthotopic implantation of glioma cells transfected with an active mutant form of sGC (sGCα1β1Cys105) in athymic mice increased the survival time by 4-fold over the control. Histological analysis of xenografts overexpressing α1β1Cys105 sGC revealed changes in cellular architecture that resemble the morphology of normal cells. In addition, a decrease in angiogenesis contributed to glioma inhibition by sGC/cGMP therapy. Our study proposes the new concept that suppressed expression of sGC, a key enzyme in the NO/cGMP pathway, may be associated with an aggressive course of glioma. The sGC/cGMP signaling-targeted therapy may be a favorable alternative to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for glioma and perhaps other tumors. PMID:21908708

  18. Isolation and characterization of glutaminyl cyclases from Drosophila: evidence for enzyme forms with different subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Stephan; Lindner, Christiane; Koch, Birgit; Wermann, Michael; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; von Bohlen, Alex; Rudolph, Thomas; Reuter, Gunter; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-09-25

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) present in plants and vertebrates catalyze the formation of pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) from N-terminal glutamine. Pyroglutamyl hormones also identified in invertebrates imply the involvement of QC activity during their posttranslational maturation. Database mining led to the identification of two genes in Drosophila, which putatively encode QCs, CG32412 (DromeQC) and CG5976 (isoDromeQC). Analysis of their primary structure suggests different subcellular localizations. While DromeQC appeared to be secreted due to an N-terminal signal peptide, isoDromeQC contains either an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting or a secretion signal due to generation of different transcripts from gene CG5976. According to the prediction, homologous expression of the corresponding cDNAs in S2 cells revealed either secreted protein in the medium or intracellular QC activity. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemistry support export of isoDromeQC into the mitochondrion. For enzymatic characterization, DromeQC and isoDromeQC were expressed heterologously in Pichia pastoris and Escherichia coli, respectively. Compared to mammalian QCs, the specificity constants were about 1 order of magnitude lower for most of the analyzed substrates. The pH dependence of the specificity constant was similar for both enzymes, indicating the necessity of an unprotonated substrate amino group and two protonated groups of the enzyme, resulting in an asymmetric bell-shaped characteristic. The determination of the metal content of DromeQC revealed equimolar protein-bound zinc. These results prove conserved enzymatic mechanisms between QCs from invertebrates and mammals. Drosophila is the first organism for which isoenzymes of glutaminyl cyclase have been isolated. The identification of a mitochondrial QC points toward yet undiscovered physiological functions of these enzymes. PMID:17722885

  19. TGF-β and opioid receptor signaling crosstalk results in improvement of endogenous and exogenous opioid analgesia under pathological pain conditions.

    PubMed

    Lantero, Aquilino; Tramullas, Mónica; Pílar-Cuellar, Fuencisla; Valdizán, Elsa; Santillán, Rosa; Roques, Bernard P; Hurlé, María A

    2014-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) protects against neuroinflammatory events underlying neuropathic pain. TGF-β signaling enhancement is a phenotypic characteristic of mice lacking the TGF-β pseudoreceptor BAMBI (BMP and activin membrane-bound inhibitor), which leads to an increased synaptic release of opioid peptides and to a naloxone-reversible hypoalgesic/antiallodynic phenotype. Herein, we investigated the following: (1) the effects of BAMBI deficiency on opioid receptor expression, functional efficacy, and analgesic responses to endogenous and exogenous opioids; and (2) the involvement of the opioid system in the antiallodynic effect of TGF-β1. BAMBI-KO mice were subjected to neuropathic pain by sciatic nerve crash injury (SNI). Gene (PCR) and protein (Western blot) expressions of μ- and δ-opioid receptors were determined in the spinal cord. The inhibitory effects of agonists on the adenylyl cyclase pathway were investigated. Two weeks after SNI, wild-type mice developed mechanical allodynia and the functionality of μ-opioid receptors was reduced. By this time, BAMBI-KO mice were protected against allodynia and exhibited increased expression and function of opioid receptors. Four weeks after SNI, when mice of both genotypes had developed neuropathic pain, the analgesic responses induced by morphine and RB101 (an inhibitor of enkephalin-degrading enzymes, which increases the synaptic levels of enkephalins) were enhanced in BAMBI-KO mice. Similar results were obtained in the formalin-induced chemical-inflammatory pain model. Subcutaneous TGF-β1 infusion prevented pain development after SNI. The antiallodynic effect of TGF-β1 was naloxone-sensitive. In conclusion, modulation of the endogenous opioid system by TGF-β signaling improves the analgesic effectiveness of exogenous and endogenous opioids under pathological pain conditions. PMID:24719115

  20. Opposing needling promotes behavior recovery and exerts neuroprotection via the cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway in transient MCAO rats

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, YIJING; YANG, SHANLI; TAO, JING; LIN, ZHICHENG; YE, XIAOQIAN; YOU, YONGMEI; PENG, JUN; HONG, ZHENFENG; CHEN, LIDIAN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A(PKA)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) signal transduction pathway triggered by γ-aminobutyric acid class B (GABAB) receptor activation is involved in neuroprotection against ischemia and behavioral recovery induced by opposing needling (ON). A total of 80 rats were randomly divided into four groups: A sham operation group, an ischemia group, an ON group and an ON group effectively inhibited by the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP35384 (n=20/group). The behavior of the rats was assessed by their neurological deficit score, whereas the impairment of gait was examined using the CatWalk system. The volume of cerebral infarction was examined upon treatment with 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. The expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were examined by western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and the activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC), cAMP and PKA in the serum was detected using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the present study, in comparison with other groups, the ON group exhibited a reduced score for the neurological deficit, the stride length and swing speed were improved, and the volume of infarction was reduced. However, these effects were reversed upon administration of CGP35384. Additionally, the expression levels of CREB, GABAB1 and GABAB2 were increased in the ON group. The levels of AC, cAMP and PKA in the serum were also increased in the ON group, whereas the addition of CGP35384 reversed these effects. The results of the present study demonstrated that ON markedly protected the brain against transient cerebral ischemic injury, and this effect was possibly mediated by the activation of the GABAB/cAMP/PKA/CREB signal transduction pathway. These findings implied that ON may be a potential therapeutic method for treating stroke. PMID:26780954

  1. Lasting effects of developmental dexamethasone treatment on neural cell number and size, synaptic activity, and cell signaling: critical periods of vulnerability, dose-effect relationships, regional targets, and sex selectivity.

    PubMed

    Kreider, Marisa L; Tate, Charlotte A; Cousins, Mandy M; Oliver, Colleen A; Seidler, Frederic J; Slotkin, Theodore A

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids administered to prevent respiratory distress in preterm infants are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. To evaluate the long-term effects on forebrain development, we treated developing rats with dexamethasone (Dex) at 0.05, 0.2, or 0.8 mg/kg, doses below or spanning the range in clinical use, testing the effects of administration during three different stages: gestational days 17-19, postnatal days 1-3, or postnatal days 7-9. In adulthood, we assessed biomarkers of neural cell number and size, cholinergic presynaptic activity, neurotransmitter receptor expression, and synaptic signaling mediated through adenylyl cyclase (AC), in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and striatum. Even at doses that were devoid of lasting effects on somatic growth, Dex elicited deficits in the number and size of neural cells, with the largest effect in the cerebral cortex. Indices of cholinergic synaptic function (choline acetyltransferase, hemicholinium-3 binding) indicated substantial hyperactivity in males, especially in the hippocampus, effectively eliminating the normal sex differences for these parameters. However, the largest effects were seen for cerebrocortical cell signaling mediated by AC, where Dex treatment markedly elevated overall activity while obtunding the function of G-protein-coupled catecholaminergic or cholinergic receptors that stimulate or inhibit AC; uncoupling was noted despite receptor upregulation. Again, the effects on signaling were larger in males and offset the normal sex differences in AC. These results indicate that, during critical developmental periods, Dex administration evokes lasting alterations in neural cell numbers and synaptic function in forebrain regions, even at doses below those used in preterm infants.

  2. Activation of Bombyx neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor A4 via a Gαi-dependent signaling pathway by direct interaction with neuropeptide F from silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaoyan; Yang, Huipeng; He, Xiaobai; Liao, Yuan; Zheng, Congxia; Zhou, Qi; Zhu, Chenggang; Zhang, Guozheng; Gao, Jimin; Zhou, Naiming

    2014-02-01

    Members of the mammalian neuropeptide Y (NPY) family serve as neurotransmitters and contribute to a diversity of physiological functions. Although neuropeptide F (NPF), the NPY-like orthologs from insects, have been identified, the NPF receptors and their signaling and physiological functions remain largely unknown. In this study, we established the stable and transient functional expression of a Bombyx orphan G protein-coupled receptor, BNGR-A4, in both mammalian HEK293 and insect SF21 cells. We identified Bombyx mori NPFs as specific endogenous ligands for the Bombyx Neuropeptide GPCR A4 (BNGR-A4) and, accordingly, named the receptor BomNPFR. Our results demonstrated that BomNPFR was activated by synthetic BomNPF1a and BomNPF1b at a high efficacy and by BomNPF2 at a low efficacy. This activation led to a decrease of forskolin or adipokinetic hormone peptide-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity, an increase of intracellular Ca(2+), the activation of ERK1/2 signaling and receptor internalization. Moreover, a Rhodamine-labeled BomNPF1a peptide was found to bind specifically to BomNPFR. The results derived from quantitative RT-PCR analysis and dsRNA-mediated knockdown experiments demonstrated the possible role of BomNPFR in the regulation of food intake and growth. Our results provide the first in-depth information on BomNPFR-mediated signaling for the further elucidation of the BomNPF/BomNPFR system in the regulation of fundamental physiological processes. PMID:24374022

  3. Crystal structure of papaya glutaminyl cyclase, an archetype for plant and bacterial glutaminyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Wintjens, René; Belrhali, Hassan; Clantin, Bernard; Azarkan, Mohamed; Bompard, Coralie; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle; Looze, Yvan; Villeret, Vincent

    2006-03-24

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) (EC 2.3.2.5) catalyze the intramolecular cyclization of protein N-terminal glutamine residues into pyroglutamic acid with the concomitant liberation of ammonia. QCs may be classified in two groups containing, respectively, the mammalian enzymes, and the enzymes from plants, bacteria, and parasites. The crystal structure of the QC from the latex of Carica papaya (PQC) has been determined at 1.7A resolution. The structure was solved by the single wavelength anomalous diffraction technique using sulfur and zinc as anomalous scatterers. The enzyme folds into a five-bladed beta-propeller, with two additional alpha-helices and one beta hairpin. The propeller closure is achieved via an original molecular velcro, which links the last two blades into a large eight stranded beta-sheet. The zinc ion present in the PQC is bound via an octahedral coordination into an elongated cavity located along the pseudo 5-fold axis of the beta-propeller fold. This zinc ion presumably plays a structural role and may contribute to the exceptional stability of PQC, along with an extended hydrophobic packing, the absence of long loops, the three-joint molecular velcro and the overall folding itself. Multiple sequence alignments combined with structural analyses have allowed us to tentatively locate the active site, which is filled in the crystal structure either by a Tris molecule or an acetate ion. These analyses are further supported by the experimental evidence that Tris is a competitive inhibitor of PQC. The active site is located at the C-terminal entrance of the PQC central tunnel. W83, W110, W169, Q24, E69, N155, K225, F22 and F67 are highly conserved residues in the C-terminal entrance, and their putative role in catalysis is discussed. The PQC structure is representative of the plants, bacterial and parasite enzymes and contrasts with that of mammalian enzymes, that may possibly share a conserved scaffold of the bacterial aminopeptidase.

  4. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide requires parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C to entrain circadian rhythms to a predictable phase

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.; Tsai, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Circadian oscillations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) depend on transcriptional repression by Period (PER)1 and PER2 proteins within single cells and on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) signaling between cells. Because VIP is released by SCN neurons in a circadian pattern, and, after photic stimulation, it has been suggested to play a role in the synchronization to environmental light cycles. It is not known, however, if or how VIP entrains circadian gene expression or behavior. Here, we tested candidate signaling pathways required for VIP-mediated entrainment of SCN rhythms. We found that single applications of VIP reset PER2 rhythms in a time- and dose-dependent manner that differed from light. Unlike VIP-mediated signaling in other cell types, simultaneous antagonism of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities was required to block the VIP-induced phase shifts of SCN rhythms. Consistent with this, VIP rapidly increased intracellular cAMP in most SCN neurons. Critically, daily VIP treatment entrained PER2 rhythms to a predicted phase angle within several days, depending on the concentration of VIP and the interval between VIP applications. We conclude that VIP entrains circadian timing among SCN neurons through rapid and parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities. PMID:21389307

  5. A Novel Function for Arabidopsis CYCLASE1 in Programmed Cell Death Revealed by Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Analysis of Extracellular Matrix Proteins.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah J; Kroon, Johan T M; Simon, William J; Slabas, Antoni R; Chivasa, Stephen

    2015-06-01

    Programmed cell death is essential for plant development and stress adaptation. A detailed understanding of the signal transduction pathways that regulate plant programmed cell death requires identification of the underpinning protein networks. Here, we have used a protagonist and antagonist of programmed cell death triggered by fumonisin B1 as probes to identify key cell death regulatory proteins in Arabidopsis. Our hypothesis was that changes in the abundance of cell death-regulatory proteins induced by the protagonist should be blocked or attenuated by concurrent treatment with the antagonist. We focused on proteins present in the mobile phase of the extracellular matrix on the basis that they are important for cell-cell communications during growth and stress-adaptive responses. Salicylic acid, a plant hormone that promotes programmed cell death, and exogenous ATP, which can block fumonisin B1-induced cell death, were used to treat Arabidopsis cell suspension cultures prior to isobaric-tagged relative and absolute quantitation analysis of secreted proteins. A total of 33 proteins, whose response to salicylic acid was suppressed by ATP, were identified as putative cell death-regulatory proteins. Among these was CYCLASE1, which was selected for further analysis using reverse genetics. Plants in which CYCLASE1 gene expression was knocked out by insertion of a transfer-DNA sequence manifested dramatically increased cell death when exposed to fumonisin B1 or a bacterial pathogen that triggers the defensive hypersensitive cell death. Although pathogen inoculation altered CYCLASE1 gene expression, multiplication of bacterial pathogens was indistinguishable between wild type and CYCLASE1 knockout plants. However, remarkably severe chlorosis symptoms developed on gene knockout plants in response to inoculation with either a virulent bacterial pathogen or a disabled mutant that is incapable of causing disease in wild type plants. These results show that CYCLASE1, which

  6. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3

    PubMed Central

    Osicka, Radim; Osickova, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Cerny, Jiri; Sebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion and signaling receptors that are essential for metazoan existence. Some integrins contain an I-domain that is a major ligand binding site. The ligands preferentially engage the active forms of the integrins and trigger signaling cascades that alter numerous cell functions. Here we found that the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, preferentially binds an inactive form of the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3), using a site outside of its I-domain. CyaA binding did not trigger downstream signaling of CR3 in human monocytes and CyaA-catalyzed elevation of cAMP effectively blocked CR3 signaling initiated by a natural ligand. This unprecedented type of integrin-ligand interaction distinguishes CyaA from all other known ligands of the I-domain-containing integrins and provides a mechanistic insight into the previously observed central role of CyaA in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10766.001 PMID:26650353

  7. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique ligand of the integrin complement receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Osicka, Radim; Osickova, Adriana; Hasan, Shakir; Bumba, Ladislav; Cerny, Jiri; Sebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric cell surface adhesion and signaling receptors that are essential for metazoan existence. Some integrins contain an I-domain that is a major ligand binding site. The ligands preferentially engage the active forms of the integrins and trigger signaling cascades that alter numerous cell functions. Here we found that the adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA), a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, preferentially binds an inactive form of the integrin complement receptor 3 (CR3), using a site outside of its I-domain. CyaA binding did not trigger downstream signaling of CR3 in human monocytes and CyaA-catalyzed elevation of cAMP effectively blocked CR3 signaling initiated by a natural ligand. This unprecedented type of integrin-ligand interaction distinguishes CyaA from all other known ligands of the I-domain-containing integrins and provides a mechanistic insight into the previously observed central role of CyaA in the pathogenesis of B. pertussis. PMID:26650353

  8. Concanavalin A amplifies both beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor-adenylate cyclase-linked pathways in cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Singh, K J; Hines, D K; Honbo, N Y; Karliner, J S

    1991-01-01

    Concanavalin A (Con A) is a tetrameric plant lectin that disrupts plasma membrane-cytoskeletal interactions and alters plasma membrane fluidity. We used Con A as a probe to explore beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor-mediated regulation of cAMP in intact neonatal rat ventricular myocytes. Preincubation with Con A, 0.5 micrograms/ml, attenuated 1 microM (-)-norepinephrine (NE)-induced downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors and resulted in a 50% augmentation of cAMP accumulation stimulated by 1 microM NE. Con A also augmented forskolin (1-10 microM)-stimulated cAMP accumulation by an average of 37% (P less than 0.05); however, Con A preincubation had no effect on basal or cholera toxin-stimulated cAMP content. The muscarinic cholinergic agonist carbachol (1-100 microM) decreased 1 microM NE-stimulated cAMP generation by an average of 32% (n = 7, P less than 0.05); preincubation with Con A further enhanced the inhibitory effect of carbachol by 18% (n = 7, P less than 0.05). Carbachol (1 microM) for 2 h decreased muscarinic cholinergic receptor density in whole cells by 33%; preincubation with Con A prevented this receptor downregulation. Con A pretreatment did not affect (-)-isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in cell homogenates, suggesting that an intact cytoarchitecture is necessary for Con A to augment cAMP formation. We conclude that Con A, through its modulation of beta-adrenergic and muscarinic cholinergic receptor signaling, amplifies both stimulatory and inhibitory adenylate cyclase-linked pathways in intact neonatal ventricular myocytes. These data suggest the possibility that plasma membrane-cytoskeletal interaction is an important regulator of transmembrane signaling because interference with this interaction results in alterations in cAMP accumulation mediated by both beta-adrenergic- and muscarinic cholinergic-adenylate cyclase pathways. PMID:1653274

  9. Interaction of retinal guanylate cyclase with the alpha subunit of transducin: potential role in transducin localization.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Derek H; Nair, K Saidas; Levay, Konstantin; Peshenko, Igor V; Crabb, John W; Dizhoor, Alexander M; Slepak, Vladlen Z

    2009-02-01

    Vertebrate phototransduction is mediated by cGMP, which is generated by retGC (retinal guanylate cyclase) and degraded by cGMP phosphodiesterase. Light stimulates cGMP hydrolysis via the G-protein transducin, which directly binds to and activates phosphodiesterase. Bright light also causes relocalization of transducin from the OS (outer segments) of the rod cells to the inner compartments. In the present study, we show experimental evidence for a previously unknown interaction between G(alphat) (the transducin alpha subunit) and retGC. G(alphat) co-immunoprecipitates with retGC from the retina or from co-transfected COS-7 cells. The retGC-G(alphat) complex is also present in cones. The interaction also occurs in mice lacking RGS9 (regulator of G-protein signalling 9), a protein previously shown to associate with both G(alphat) and retGC. The G(alphat)-retGC interaction is mediated primarily by the kinase homology domain of retGC, which binds GDP-bound G(alphat) stronger than the GTP[S] (GTPgammaS; guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate) form. Neither G(alphat) nor G(betagamma) affect retGC-mediated cGMP synthesis, regardless of the presence of GCAP (guanylate cyclase activating protein) and Ca2+. The rate of light-dependent transducin redistribution from the OS to the inner segments is markedly accelerated in the retGC-1-knockout mice, while the migration of transducin to the OS after the onset of darkness is delayed. Supplementation of permeabilized photoreceptors with cGMP does not affect transducin translocation. Taken together, these results suggest that the protein-protein interaction between G(alphat) and retGC represents a novel mechanism regulating light-dependent translocation of transducin in rod photoreceptors.

  10. A new small molecule inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Filipa; Gane, Paul; Hampden-Smith, Kathryn; Allerston, Charles K.; Garthwaite, John; Selwood, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a haem containing enzyme that regulates cardiovascular homeostasis and multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system. Commonly used inhibitors of sGC activity act through oxidation of the haem moiety, however they also bind haemoglobin and this limits their bioavailability for in vivo studies. We have discovered a new class of small molecule inhibitors of sGC and have characterised a compound designated D12 (compound 10) which binds to the catalytic domain of the enzyme with a KD of 11 μM in a SPR assay. PMID:26264842

  11. Expression of a fungal sesquiterpene cyclase gene in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Hohn, T M; Ohlrogge, J B

    1991-09-01

    The complete coding sequence for the trichodiene synthase gene from Fusarium sporotrichioides was introduced into tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) under the regulation of the cauliflower mosiac virus 35S promoter. Expression of trichodiene synthase was demonstrated in the leaves of transformed plants. Leaf homogenates incubated with [(3)H]farnesyl pyrophosphate produced trichodiene as a major product. Trichodiene was detected in the leaves of a transformed plant at a level of 5 to 10 nanograms per gram fresh weight. The introduction of a fungal sesquiterpene cyclase gene into tobacco has resulted in the expression of an active enzyme and the accumulation of low levels of its sesquiterpenoid product. PMID:16668409

  12. Intestinal Enteroids Model Guanylate Cyclase C-Dependent Secretion Induced by Heat-Stable Enterotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Amanda M; Blomain, Erik S; Merlino, Dante J; Wang, Fang; Crissey, Mary Ann S; Kraft, Crystal L; Rappaport, Jeff A; Snook, Adam E; Lynch, John P; Waldman, Scott A

    2016-10-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) causes ∼20% of the acute infectious diarrhea (AID) episodes worldwide, often by producing heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), which are peptides structurally homologous to paracrine hormones of the intestinal guanylate cyclase C (GUCY2C) receptor. While molecular mechanisms mediating ST-induced intestinal secretion have been defined, advancements in therapeutics have been hampered for decades by the paucity of disease models that integrate molecular and functional endpoints amenable to high-throughput screening. Here, we reveal that mouse and human intestinal enteroids in three-dimensional ex vivo cultures express the components of the GUCY2C secretory signaling axis. ST and its structural analog, linaclotide, an FDA-approved oral secretagog, induced fluid accumulation quantified simultaneously in scores of enteroid lumens, recapitulating ETEC-induced intestinal secretion. Enteroid secretion depended on canonical molecular signaling events responsible for ETEC-induced diarrhea, including cyclic GMP (cGMP) produced by GUCY2C, activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), and opening of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CFTR abrogated enteroid fluid secretion, providing proof of concept for the utility of this model to screen antidiarrheal agents. Intestinal enteroids offer a unique model, integrating the GUCY2C signaling axis and luminal fluid secretion, to explore the pathophysiology of, and develop platforms for, high-throughput drug screening to identify novel compounds to prevent and treat ETEC diarrheal disease. PMID:27481254

  13. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  14. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-01-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  15. Adenyl cyclase and interleukin 6 are downstream effectors of parathyroid hormone resulting in stimulation of bone resorption.

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, E M; Shaw, S M; Gornik, S A; Banks, M A

    1995-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone and other bone resorptive agents function, at least in part, by inducing osteoblasts to secrete cytokines that stimulate both differentiation and resorptive activity of osteoclasts. We previously identified two potentially important cytokines by demonstrating that parathyroid hormone induces expression by osteoblasts of IL-6 and leukemia inhibitory factor without affecting levels of 14 other cytokines. Although parathyroid hormone activates multiple signal transduction pathways, induction of IL-6 and leukemia inhibitory factor is dependent on activation of adenyl cyclase. This study demonstrates that adenyl cyclase is also required for stimulation of osteoclast activity in cultures containing osteoclasts from rat long bones and UMR106-01 rat osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells. Since the stimulation by parathyroid hormone of both cytokine production and bone resorption depends on the same signal transduction pathway, we hypothesized that IL-6 might be a downstream effector of parathyroid hormone. We found that addition of exogenous IL-6 mimics the ability of parathyroid hormone to stimulate bone resorption. More importantly, an antibody directed against the IL-6 receptor blocks moderate stimulation of osteoclast activity induced by the hormone. Interestingly, strong stimulation of resorption overcomes this dependence on IL-6. Thus, parathyroid hormone likely induces multiple, redundant cytokines that can overcome the IL-6 requirement associated with moderate stimulation. Taken together with studies showing that many other bone resorptive agents also stimulate IL-6 production, our results suggest that IL-6 may be a downstream effector of these agents as well as of parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:7657797

  16. Identification of Arabidopsis Cyclase-associated Protein 1 as the First Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Plant Actin

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Faisal; Guérin, Christophe; von Witsch, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton powers organelle movements, orchestrates responses to abiotic stresses, and generates an amazing array of cell shapes. Underpinning these diverse functions of the actin cytoskeleton are several dozen accessory proteins that coordinate actin filament dynamics and construct higher-order assemblies. Many actin-binding proteins from the plant kingdom have been characterized and their function is often surprisingly distinct from mammalian and fungal counterparts. The adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) has recently been shown to be an important regulator of actin dynamics in vivo and in vitro. The disruption of actin organization in cap mutant plants indicates defects in actin dynamics or the regulated assembly and disassembly of actin subunits into filaments. Current models for actin dynamics maintain that actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin removes ADP–actin subunits from filament ends and that profilin recharges these monomers with ATP by enhancing nucleotide exchange and delivery of subunits onto filament barbed ends. Plant profilins, however, lack the essential ability to stimulate nucleotide exchange on actin, suggesting that there might be a missing link yet to be discovered from plants. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana CAP1 (AtCAP1) is an abundant cytoplasmic protein; it is present at a 1:3 M ratio with total actin in suspension cells. AtCAP1 has equivalent affinities for ADP– and ATP–monomeric actin (Kd ∼ 1.3 μM). Binding of AtCAP1 to ATP–actin monomers inhibits polymerization, consistent with AtCAP1 being an actin sequestering protein. However, we demonstrate that AtCAP1 is the first plant protein to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange on actin. Even in the presence of ADF/cofilin, AtCAP1 can recharge actin monomers and presumably provide a polymerizable pool of subunits to profilin for addition onto filament ends. In turnover assays, plant profilin, ADF, and CAP act cooperatively to promote flux of

  17. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-09-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr-Tyr cross-linking (o,o‧-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  18. Structural analysis of an oxygen-regulated diguanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Barends, Thomas R M; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger that is involved in switching between motile and sessile lifestyles. Given the medical importance of biofilm formation, there has been increasing interest in understanding the synthesis and degradation of cyclic di-GMPs and their regulation in various bacterial pathogens. Environmental cues are detected by sensing domains coupled to GGDEF and EAL or HD-GYP domains that have diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively, producing and degrading cyclic di-GMP. The Escherichia coli protein DosC (also known as YddV) consists of an oxygen-sensing domain belonging to the class of globin sensors that is coupled to a C-terminal GGDEF domain via a previously uncharacterized middle domain. DosC is one of the most strongly expressed GGDEF proteins in E. coli, but to date structural information on this and related proteins is scarce. Here, the high-resolution structural characterization of the oxygen-sensing globin domain, the middle domain and the catalytic GGDEF domain in apo and substrate-bound forms is described. The structural changes between the iron(III) and iron(II) forms of the sensor globin domain suggest a mechanism for oxygen-dependent regulation. The structural information on the individual domains is combined into a model of the dimeric DosC holoprotein. These findings have direct implications for the oxygen-dependent regulation of the activity of the cyclase domain.

  19. Membrane guanylate cyclase, a multimodal transduction machine: history, present, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    A sequel to these authors' earlier comprehensive reviews which covered the field of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC) from its origin to the year 2010, this article contains 13 sections. The first is historical and covers MGC from the year 1963–1987, summarizing its colorful developmental stages from its passionate pursuit to its consolidation. The second deals with the establishment of its biochemical identity. MGC becomes the transducer of a hormonal signal and founder of the peptide hormone receptor family, and creates the notion that hormone signal transduction is its sole physiological function. The third defines its expansion. The discovery of ROS-GC subfamily is made and it links ROS-GC with the physiology of phototransduction. Sections ROS-GC, a Ca2+-Modulated Two Component Transduction System to Migration Patterns and Translations of the GCAP Signals Into Production of Cyclic GMP are Different cover its biochemistry and physiology. The noteworthy events are that augmented by GCAPs, ROS-GC proves to be a transducer of the free Ca2+ signals generated within neurons; ROS-GC becomes a two-component transduction system and establishes itself as a source of cyclic GMP, the second messenger of phototransduction. Section ROS-GC1 Gene Linked Retinal Dystrophies demonstrates how this knowledge begins to be translated into the diagnosis and providing the molecular definition of retinal dystrophies. Section Controlled By Low and High Levels of [Ca2+]i, ROS-GC1 is a Bimodal Transduction Switch discusses a striking property of ROS-GC where it becomes a “[Ca2+]i bimodal switch” and transcends its signaling role in other neural processes. In this course, discovery of the first CD-GCAP (Ca2+-dependent guanylate cyclase activator), the S100B protein, is made. It extends the role of the ROS-GC transduction system beyond the phototransduction to the signaling processes in the synapse region between photoreceptor and cone ON-bipolar cells; in section Ca2

  20. Nitric Oxide Receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Undergoes Splicing Regulation in Differentiating Human Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharin, Vladislav G.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important mediator molecule in mammalian physiology, initiates a number of signaling mechanisms by activating the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Recently, a new role for NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in embryonic development and cell differentiation has emerged. The changes in expression of NO synthase isoforms and various sGC subunits has been demonstrated during human and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiation. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that nascent α1 sGC transcript undergoes alternative splicing and that expression of α1 sGC splice forms directly affects sGC activity. Expression of sGC splice variants in the process of human ES (hES) cells differentiation has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate that α1 sGC undergoes alternative splicing during random hES differentiation for the first time. Our results indicate that C-α1 sGC splice form is expressed at high levels in differentiating cells and its intracellular distribution varies from canonical α1 sGC subunit. Together, our data suggest that alternative splicing of sGC subunits is associated with differentiation of hES cells. PMID:20964618

  1. NO and CO Differentially Activate Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase via a Heme Pivot-bend Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,X.; Sayed, N.; Beuve, A.; van den Akker, F.

    2007-01-01

    Diatomic ligand discrimination by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is paramount to cardiovascular homeostasis and neuronal signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates sGC activity 200-fold compared with only four-fold by carbon monoxide (CO). The molecular details of ligand discrimination and differential response to NO and CO are not well understood. These ligands are sensed by the heme domain of sGC, which belongs to the heme nitric oxide oxygen (H-NOX) domain family, also evolutionarily conserved in prokaryotes. Here we report crystal structures of the free, NO-bound, and CO-bound H-NOX domains of a cyanobacterial homolog. These structures and complementary mutational analysis in sGC reveal a molecular ruler mechanism that allows sGC to favor NO over CO while excluding oxygen, concomitant to signaling that exploits differential heme pivoting and heme bending. The heme thereby serves as a flexing wedge, allowing the N-terminal subdomain of H-NOX to shift concurrent with the transition of the six- to five-coordinated NO-bound state upon sGC activation. This transition can be modulated by mutations at sGC residues 74 and 145 and corresponding residues in the cyanobacterial H-NOX homolog.

  2. Nitric oxide-independent vasodilator rescues heme-oxidized soluble guanylate cyclase from proteasomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Meurer, Sabine; Pioch, Sylke; Pabst, Tatjana; Opitz, Nils; Schmidt, Peter M; Beckhaus, Tobias; Wagner, Kristina; Matt, Simone; Gegenbauer, Kristina; Geschka, Sandra; Karas, Michael; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Müller-Esterl, Werner

    2009-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an essential vasodilator. In vascular diseases, oxidative stress attenuates NO signaling by both chemical scavenging of free NO and oxidation and downregulation of its major intracellular receptor, the alphabeta heterodimeric heme-containing soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). Oxidation can also induce loss of the heme of sGC, as well as the responsiveness of sGC to NO. sGC activators such as BAY 58-2667 bind to oxidized/heme-free sGC and reactivate the enzyme to exert disease-specific vasodilation. Here, we show that oxidation-induced downregulation of sGC protein extends to isolated blood vessels. Mechanistically, degradation was triggered through sGC ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The heme-binding site ligand BAY 58-2667 prevented sGC ubiquitination and stabilized both alpha and beta subunits. Collectively, our data establish oxidation-ubiquitination of sGC as a modulator of NO/cGMP signaling and point to a new mechanism of action for sGC activating vasodilators by stabilizing their receptor, oxidized/heme-free sGC. PMID:19478201

  3. Identification of Small Molecules That Antagonize Diguanylate Cyclase Enzymes To Inhibit Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Sloup, Rudolph E.; Parashar, Vijay; Smith, Joshua M.; Kim, Eric E.; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Neiditch, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is responsible for numerous chronic infections, causing a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be resolved, as bacteria in biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. New strategies to treat biofilm-based infections are critically needed. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widely conserved second-messenger signal essential for biofilm formation. As this signaling system is found only in bacteria, it is an attractive target for the development of new antibiofilm interventions. Here, we describe the results of a high-throughput screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes that synthesize c-di-GMP. We report seven small molecules that antagonize these enzymes and inhibit biofilm formation by Vibrio cholerae. Moreover, two of these compounds significantly reduce the total concentration of c-di-GMP in V. cholerae, one of which also inhibits biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a continuous-flow system. These molecules represent the first compounds described that are able to inhibit DGC activity to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:22850508

  4. DgcA, a diguanylate cyclase from Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae regulates bacterial pathogenicity on rice

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianmei; Zou, Xia; Huang, Liangbo; Bai, Tenglong; Liu, Shu; Yuan, Meng; Chou, Shan-Ho; He, Ya-Wen; Wang, Haihong; He, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is the causal agent of rice blight disease as well as a serious phytopathogen worldwide. It is also one of the model organisms for studying bacteria-plant interactions. Current progress in bacterial signal transduction pathways has identified cyclic di-GMP as a major second messenger molecule in controlling Xanthomonas pathogenicity. However, it still remains largely unclear how c-di-GMP regulates the secretion of bacterial virulence factors in Xoo. In this study, we focused on the important roles played by DgcA (XOO3988), one of our previously identified diguanylate cyclases in Xoo, through further investigating the phenotypes of several dgcA-related mutants, namely, the dgcA-knockout mutant ΔdgcA, the dgcA overexpression strain OdgcA, the dgcA complemented strain CdgcA and the wild-type strain. The results showed that dgcA negatively affected virulence, EPS production, bacterial autoaggregation and motility, but positively triggered biofilm formation via modulating the intracellular c-di-GMP levels. RNA-seq data further identified 349 differentially expressed genes controlled by DgcA, providing a foundation for a more solid understanding of the signal transduction pathways in Xoo. Collectively, the present study highlights DgcA as a major regulator of Xoo virulence, and can serve as a potential target for preventing rice blight diseases. PMID:27193392

  5. Identification of small molecules inhibiting diguanylate cyclases to control bacterial biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Luo, Chunyuan; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Feng, Xiarong; Koestler, Benjamin; Waters, Christopher M; Palys, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria is an important virulence factor in the development of numerous chronic infections, thereby causing a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be resolved, as bacteria in biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. An urgent need for new strategies to treat biofilm-based infections is critically needed. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widely conserved second-messenger signal essential for biofilm formation. The absence of this signalling system in higher eukaryotes makes it an attractive target for the development of new anti-biofilm agents. In this study, the results of an in silico pharmacophore-based screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes that synthesize c-di-GMP are described. Four small molecules, LP 3134, LP 3145, LP 4010 and LP 1062 that antagonize these enzymes and inhibit biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in a continuous-flow system are reported. All four molecules dispersed P. aeruginosa biofilms and inhibited biofilm development on urinary catheters. One molecule dispersed A. baumannii biofilms. Two molecules displayed no toxic effects on eukaryotic cells. These molecules represent the first compounds identified from an in silico screen that are able to inhibit DGC activity to prevent biofilm formation. PMID:24117391

  6. Identification of small molecules inhibiting diguanylate cyclases to control bacterial biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Sambanthamoorthy, Karthik; Luo, Chunyuan; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan; Feng, Xiarong; Koestler, Benjamin; Waters, Christopher M; Palys, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Biofilm formation by pathogenic bacteria is an important virulence factor in the development of numerous chronic infections, thereby causing a severe health burden. Many of these infections cannot be resolved, as bacteria in biofilms are resistant to the host's immune defenses and antibiotic therapy. An urgent need for new strategies to treat biofilm-based infections is critically needed. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a widely conserved second-messenger signal essential for biofilm formation. The absence of this signalling system in higher eukaryotes makes it an attractive target for the development of new anti-biofilm agents. In this study, the results of an in silico pharmacophore-based screen to identify small-molecule inhibitors of diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes that synthesize c-di-GMP are described. Four small molecules, LP 3134, LP 3145, LP 4010 and LP 1062 that antagonize these enzymes and inhibit biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii in a continuous-flow system are reported. All four molecules dispersed P. aeruginosa biofilms and inhibited biofilm development on urinary catheters. One molecule dispersed A. baumannii biofilms. Two molecules displayed no toxic effects on eukaryotic cells. These molecules represent the first compounds identified from an in silico screen that are able to inhibit DGC activity to prevent biofilm formation.

  7. Guanylyl cyclase C in colorectal cancer: susceptibility gene and potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jieru E; Li, Peng; Pitari, Giovanni M; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A

    2009-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumor-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. While mechanisms underlying this disease have been elucidated over the past two decades, these molecular insights have failed to translate into efficacious therapy. The oncogenomic view of cancer suggests that terminal transformation reflects the sequential corruption of signal transduction circuits regulating key homeostatic mechanisms, whose multiplicity underlies the therapeutic resistance of most tumors to interventions targeting individual pathways. Conversely, the paucity of mechanistic insights into proximal pathophysiological processes that initiate and amplify oncogenic circuits preceding accumulation of mutations and transformation impedes development of effective prevention and therapy. In that context, guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the intestinal receptor for the paracrine hormones guanylin and uroguanylin, whose early loss characterizes colorectal transformation, has emerged as a component of lineage-specific homeostatic programs organizing spatiotemporal patterning along the crypt-surface axis. Dysregulation of GCC signaling, reflecting hormone loss, promotes tumorigenesis through reprogramming of replicative and bioenergetic circuits and genomic instability. Compensatory upregulation of GCC in response to hormone loss provides a unique translational opportunity for prevention and treatment of colorectal tumors by hormone-replacement therapy.

  8. Multiple diguanylate cyclase-coordinated regulation of pyoverdine synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yicai; Yuan, Mingjun; Mohanty, Anee; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Liu, Yang; Chua, Song Lin; Nielsen, Thomas E; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Cao, Bin; Yang, Liang

    2015-06-01

    The nucleotide signalling molecule bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays an essential role in regulating microbial virulence and biofilm formation. C-di-GMP is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) enzymes and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes. One intrinsic feature of c-di-GMP signalling is the abundance of DGCs and PDEs encoded by many bacterial species. It is unclear whether the different DGCs or PDEs coordinately establish the c-di-GMP regulation or function independently of each other. Here, we provide evidence that multiple DGCs are involved in regulation of c-di-GMP on synthesis of the major iron siderophore pyoverdine in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Constitutive expression of the WspG or YedQ DGC in P. aeruginosa is able to induce its pyoverdine synthesis. Induction of pyoverdine synthesis by high intracellular c-di-GMP depends on the synthesis of exopolysaccharides and another two DGCs, SiaD and SadC. SiaD was found to boost the c-di-GMP synthesis together with constitutively expressing YedQ. The exopolysaccharides and the SiaD DGC were found to modulate the expression of the RsmY/RsmZ ncRNAs. Induction of the RsmY/RsmZ ncRNAs might enhance the pyoverdine synthesis through SadC. Our study sheds light on a novel multiple DGC-coordinated c-di-GMP regulatory mechanism of bacteria. PMID:25683454

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in stress-related disorders: data convergence from animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The maladaptive expression and function of several stress-associated hormones have been implicated in pathological stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Among these, recent evidence has suggested that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has critical roles in central neurocircuits mediating stress-related emotional behaviors. We describe the PACAPergic systems, the data implicating PACAP in stress biology and how altered PACAP expression and signaling may result in psychopathologies. We include our work implicating PACAP signaling within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in mediating the consequences of stressor exposure and relatedly, describe more recent studies suggesting that PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) may impact the emotional aspects of chronic pain states. In aggregate, these results are consistent with data suggesting that PACAP dysregulation is associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. PMID:25636177

  10. Mutations in a guanylate cyclase GCY-35/GCY-36 modify Bardet-Biedl syndrome-associated phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mok, Calvin A; Healey, Michael P; Shekhar, Tanvi; Leroux, Michel R; Héon, Elise; Zhen, Mei

    2011-10-01

    Ciliopathies are pleiotropic and genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by defective development and function of the primary cilium. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins localize to the base of cilia and undergo intraflagellar transport, and the loss of their functions leads to a multisystemic ciliopathy. Here we report the identification of mutations in guanylate cyclases (GCYs) as modifiers of Caenorhabditis elegans bbs endophenotypes. The loss of GCY-35 or GCY-36 results in suppression of the small body size, developmental delay, and exploration defects exhibited by multiple bbs mutants. Moreover, an effector of cGMP signalling, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, EGL-4, also modifies bbs mutant defects. We propose that a misregulation of cGMP signalling, which underlies developmental and some behavioural defects of C. elegans bbs mutants, may also contribute to some BBS features in other organisms. PMID:22022287

  11. Inhibition of heat shock protein 90 attenuates adenylate cyclase sensitization after chronic morphine treatment.

    PubMed

    Koshimizu, Taka-aki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyoshi; Tsuda, Hidetoshi; Fujiwara, Yoko; Shibata, Katsushi; Hirasawa, Akira; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Fujimura, Akio

    2010-02-19

    Cellular adaptations to chronic opioid treatment result in enhanced responsiveness of adenylate cyclase and an increase in forskolin- or agonist-stimulated cAMP production. It is, however, not known whether chaperone molecules such as heat shock proteins contribute to this adenylate cyclase sensitization. Here, we report that treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an inhibitor of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), led to effective attenuation of morphine-induced adenylate cyclase sensitization. In SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells, morphine significantly increased RNA transcript and protein levels of type I adenylate cyclase, leading to sensitization. Whole-genome tiling array analysis revealed that cAMP response element-binding protein, an important mediator for cellular adaptation to morphine, associated with the proximal promoter of Hsp90AB1 not only in SK-N-SH cells but also in rat PC12 and human embryonic kidney cells. Hsp90AB1 transcript and protein levels increased significantly during morphine treatment, and co-application of geldanamycin (0.1-10 nM) effectively suppressed the increase in forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activation by 56%. Type I adenylate cyclase, but not Hsp90AB1, underwent significant degradation during geldanamycin treatment. These results indicate that Hsp90 is a new pharmacological target for the suppression of adenylate cyclase sensitization induced by chronic morphine treatment.

  12. The Effects of Thrombin on Adenyl Cyclase Activity and a Membrane Protein from Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Brodie, G. N.; Baenziger, Nancy Lewis; Chase, Lewis R.; Majerus, Philip W.

    1972-01-01

    Washed human platelets were incubated with 0.1-1.0 U/ml human thrombin and the effects on adenyl cyclase activity and on a platelet membrane protein (designated thrombin-sensitive protein) were studied. Adenyl cyclase activity was decreased 70-90% when intact platelets were incubated with thrombin. The T½ for loss of adenyl cyclase activity was less than 15 sec at 1 U/ml thrombin. There was no decrease of adenyl cyclase activity when sonicated platelets or isolated membranes were incubated with these concentrations of thrombin. Loss of adenyl cyclase activity was relatively specific since the activities of other platelet membrane enzymes were unaffected by thrombin. Prior incubation of platelets with dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), prostaglandin E1, or theophylline protected adenyl cyclase from inhibition by thrombin. Incubation of intact but not disrupted platelets with thrombin resulted in the release of thrombin-sensitive protein from the platelet membrane. The rapid release of this protein (T½ < 15 sec) at low concentrations of thrombin suggested that removal of thrombin-sensitive protein from the platelet membrane is an integral part of the platelet release reaction. This hypothesis is supported by the parallel effects of thrombin on adenyl cyclase activity and thrombin-sensitive protein release in the presence of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E1, and theophylline at varying concentrations of thrombin. Images PMID:4331802

  13. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  14. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  15. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  16. Identification of the silkworm quail gene reveals a crucial role of a receptor guanylyl cyclase in larval pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Masashi; Kiuchi, Takashi; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Diverse color patterns on the integument of lepidopteran larvae play important roles in their survival through camouflage, mimicry, sexual signaling, and aposematism. In the silkworm Bombyx mori, many color pattern variations have been preserved in inbred strains making them a good model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie color pattern formation. In this study, we focused on the silkworm quail (q) mutant, which exhibits abnormalities in multiple pigment biosynthesis pathways. Positional cloning of the q gene revealed that disruption of a guanylyl cyclase gene, BmGC-I, is responsible for its abnormal pigmentation. In q mutants, we identified a 16-bp deletion in the BmGC-I transcript, resulting in the production of a premature stop codon. Knockout of the BmGC-I gene resulted in the q-like abnormal pigmentation, thereby demonstrating that the BmGC-I gene is involved in the pigment biosynthesis pathway in the integument. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that BmGC-I was strongly expressed in the fourth instar on day 2. Our results suggest that BmGC-I deficiency affects the pigment biosynthesis pathway, which supports the involvement of guanylyl cyclase in larval coloration.

  17. Acute up-regulation of the rat brain somatostatin receptor-effector system by leptin is related to activation of insulin signaling and may counteract central leptin actions.

    PubMed

    Perianes-Cachero, A; Burgos-Ramos, E; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Canelles, S; Frago, L M; Hervás-Aguilar, A; de Frutos, S; Toledo-Lobo, M V; Mela, V; Viveros, M P; Argente, J; Chowen, J A; Arilla-Ferreiro, E; Barrios, V

    2013-11-12

    Leptin and somatostatin (SRIF) have opposite effects on food seeking and ingestive behaviors, functions partially regulated by the frontoparietal cortex and hippocampus. Although it is known that the acute suppression of food intake mediated by leptin decreases with time, the counter-regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. Our aims were to analyze the effect of acute central leptin infusion on the SRIF receptor-effector system in these areas and the implication of related intracellular signaling mechanisms in this response. We studied 20 adult male Wister rats including controls and those treated intracerebroventricularly with a single dose of 5 μg of leptin and sacrificed 1 or 6h later. Density of SRIF receptors was unchanged at 1h, whereas leptin increased the density of SRIF receptors at 6h, which was correlated with an elevated capacity of SRIF to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in both areas. The functional capacity of SRIF receptors was unaltered as cell membrane levels of αi1 and αi2 subunits of G inhibitory proteins were unaffected in both brain areas. The increased density of SRIF receptors was due to enhanced SRIF receptor subtype 2 (sst2) protein levels that correlated with higher mRNA levels for this receptor. These changes in sst2 mRNA levels were concomitant with increased activation of the insulin signaling, c-Jun and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB); however, activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 was reduced in the cortex and unchanged in the hippocampus and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 remained unchanged in these areas. In addition, the leptin antagonist L39A/D40A/F41A blocked the leptin-induced changes in SRIF receptors, leptin signaling and CREB activation. In conclusion, increased activation of insulin signaling after leptin infusion is related to acute up-regulation of the SRIF receptor-effector system that may antagonize short-term leptin actions in the rat brain.

  18. Tetrahydrobiopterin protects soluble guanylate cyclase against oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kurt; Neubauer, Andrea; Kolesnik, Bernd; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Werner, Ernst R; Gorren, Antonius C F; Mayer, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a major endogenous vasoprotective agent that improves endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and scavenging of superoxide and peroxynitrite. Therefore, administration of BH4 is considered a promising therapy for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Here we report on a novel function of BH4 that might contribute to the beneficial vascular effects of the pteridine. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with nitroglycerin (GTN) or 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) resulted in heme oxidation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), as evident from diminished NO-induced cGMP accumulation that was paralleled by increased cGMP response to a heme- and NO-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase [4-([(4-carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-([4'-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy)phenyl)ethyl]amino]methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770)]. Whereas scavenging of superoxide and/or peroxynitrite with superoxide dismutase, tiron, Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin, and urate had no protective effects, supplementation of the cells with BH4, either by application of BH4 directly or of its precursors dihydrobiopterin or sepiapterin, completely prevented the inhibition of NO-induced cGMP accumulation by GTN and ODQ. Tetrahydroneopterin had the same effect, and virtually identical results were obtained with RFL-6 fibroblasts, suggesting that our observation reflects a general feature of tetrahydropteridines that is unrelated to NO synthase function and not limited to endothelial cells. Protection of sGC against oxidative inactivation may contribute to the known beneficial effects of BH4 in cardiovascular disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:22648973

  19. The cAMP signaling system inhibits the repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage by promoting Epac1-mediated proteasomal degradation of XRCC1 protein in human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Eun-Ah; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits repair of {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system inhibits DNA damage repair by decreasing XRCC1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP signaling system decreases XRCC1 expression by promoting its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The promotion of XRCC1 degradation by cAMP signaling system is mediated by Epac1. -- Abstract: Cyclic AMP is involved in the regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cellular growth and proliferation. Recently, the cAMP signaling system was found to modulate DNA-damaging agent-induced apoptosis by regulating the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins and inhibitors of apoptosis. Thus, we hypothesized that the cAMP signaling may modulate DNA repair activity, and we investigated the effects of the cAMP signaling system on {gamma}-ray-induced DNA damage repair in lung cancer cells. Transient expression of a constitutively active mutant of stimulatory G protein (G{alpha}sQL) or treatment with forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase activator, augmented radiation-induced DNA damage and inhibited repair of the damage in H1299 lung cancer cells. Expression of G{alpha}sQL or treatment with forskolin or isoproterenol inhibited the radiation-induced expression of the XRCC1 protein, and exogenous expression of XRCC1 abolished the DNA repair-inhibiting effect of forskolin. Forskolin treatment promoted the ubiquitin and proteasome-dependent degradation of the XRCC1 protein, resulting in a significant decrease in the half-life of the protein after {gamma}-ray irradiation. The effect of forskolin on XRCC1 expression was not inhibited by PKA inhibitor, but 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP, an Epac-selective cAMP analog, increased ubiquitination of XRCC1 protein and decreased XRCC1 expression. Knockdown of Epac1 abolished the effect of 8-pCPT-2 Prime -O-Me-cAMP and restored XRCC1 protein level following {gamma}-ray irradiation. From

  20. Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-C gene leads to a paradoxical phenotype of viable but heat-stable enterotoxin-resistant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, S; Lopez, M J; Kuhn, M; Garbers, D L

    1997-01-01

    Heat-stable enterotoxins (STa), which cause an acute secretory diarrhea, have been suggested to mediate their actions through the guanylyl cyclase-C (GC-C) receptor. The GC-C gene was disrupted by insertion of neo into exon 1 and subsequent homologous recombination. GC-C null mice contained no detectable GC-C protein. Intestine mucosal guanylyl cyclase activity was approximately 16-fold higher in wild-type mice than in the GC-C null mice, and STa-stimulable guanylyl cyclase activity was absent in the null animals. Thus, GC-C is the major cyclase activity present in the intestine, and also completely accounts for the STa-induced elevations of cGMP. Gavage with STa resulted in marked fluid accumulation within the intestine of wild-type and heterozygous suckling mice, but GC-C null animals were resistant. In addition, infection with enterotoxigenic bacteria that produce STa led to diarrhea and death in wild-type and heterozygous mice, while the null mice were protected. Cholera toxin, in contrast, continued to cause diarrhea in GC-C null mice, demonstrating that the cAMP signaling pathway remained intact. Markedly different diets (high carbohydrate, fat, or protein) or the inclusion of high salt (K+, Na+) in the drinking water or diet also did not severely affect the null animals. Given that GC-C is a major intestinal receptor in all mammals, the pressure to retain a functional GC-C in the face of diarrhea-inflicted mortality remains unexplained. Therefore, GC-C likely provides a protective effect against stressors not yet tested, possibly pathogens other than noninvasive enterotoxigenic bacteria. PMID:9294128

  1. Coupling signalling pathways to transcriptional control: nuclear factors responsive to cAMP.

    PubMed

    Tamai, K T; Monaco, L; Nantel, F; Zazopoulos, E; Sassone-Corsi, P

    1997-01-01

    Several endocrine and neuronal functions are governed by the cAMP-dependent signalling pathway. In eukaryotes, transcriptional regulation upon stimulation of the adenylyl cyclase signalling pathway is mediated by a family of cAMP-responsive nuclear factors. This family consists of a large number of members that may act as activators or repressors. These factors contain the basic domain/ leucine zipper motifs and bind as dimers to cAMP-response elements (CRE). The function of CRE-binding proteins (CREBs) is modulated by phosphorylation by several kinases. Direct activation of gene expression by CREB requires phosphorylation by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A to the serine-133 residue. Among the repressors, ICER (Inducible cAMP Early Repressor) deserves special mention. ICER is generated from an alternative CREM promoter and constitutes the only inducible cAMP-responsive element binding protein. Furthermore, ICER negatively autoregulates the alternative promoter, thus generating a feedback loop. In contrast to the other members of the CRE-binding protein family, ICER expression is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. The kinetics of ICER expression are characteristic of an early response gene. Our results indicate that CREM plays a key physiological and developmental role within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have previously shown that the transcriptional activator CREM is highly expressed in postmeiotic cells. Spermiogenesis is a complex process by which postmeiotic male germ cells differentiate into mature spermatozoa. This process involves remarkable structural and biochemical changes that are under the hormonal control of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. We have addressed the specific role of CREM in spermiogenesis using CREM-mutant mice generated by homologous recombination. Analysis of the seminiferous epithelium from mutant male mice reveals that spermatogenesis stops at the first step of spermiogenesis. Late spermatids are

  2. Permanent, sex-selective effects of prenatal or adolescent nicotine exposure, separately or sequentially, in rat brain regions: indices of cholinergic and serotonergic synaptic function, cell signaling, and neural cell number and size at 6 months of age.

    PubMed

    Slotkin, Theodore A; MacKillop, Emiko A; Rudder, Charles L; Ryde, Ian T; Tate, Charlotte A; Seidler, Frederic J

    2007-05-01

    Nicotine is a neuroteratogen that disrupts neurodevelopment and synaptic function, with vulnerability extending into adolescence. We assessed the permanence of effects in rats on indices of neural cell number and size, and on acetylcholine and serotonin (5HT) systems, conducting assessments at 6 months of age, after prenatal nicotine exposure, adolescent exposure, or sequential exposure in both periods. For prenatal nicotine, indices of cell number and size showed few abnormalities by 6 months, but there were persistent deficits in cerebrocortical choline acetyltransferase activity and hemicholinium-3 binding to the presynaptic choline transporter, a pattern consistent with cholinergic hypoactivity; these effects were more prominent in males than females. The expression of 5HT receptors also showed permanent effects in males, with suppression of the 5HT(1A) subtype and upregulation of 5HT(2) receptors. In addition, cell signaling through adenylyl cyclase showed heterologous uncoupling of neurotransmitter responses. Nicotine exposure in adolescence produced lasting effects that were similar to those of prenatal nicotine. However, when animals were exposed to prenatal nicotine and received nicotine subsequently in adolescence, the adverse effects then extended to females, whereas the net effect in males was similar to that of prenatal nicotine by itself. Our results indicate that prenatal or adolescent nicotine exposure evoke permanent changes in synaptic function that transcend the recovery of less-sensitive indices of structural damage; further, prenatal exposure sensitizes females to the subsequent adverse effects of adolescent nicotine, thus creating a population that may be especially vulnerable to the lasting behavioral consequences of nicotine intake in adolescence.

  3. Exquisite sensitivity to subsecond, picomolar nitric oxide transients conferred on cells by guanylyl cyclase-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, Andrew M.; Bartus, Katalin; Reynell, Clare; Constantinou, Sophie; Halvey, Edward J.; Held, Kara F.; Dostmann, Wolfgang R.; Vernon, Jeffrey; Garthwaite, John

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) functions as a diffusible transmitter in most tissues of the body and exerts its effects by binding to receptors harboring a guanylyl cyclase transduction domain, resulting in cGMP accumulation in target cells. Despite its widespread importance, very little is known about how this signaling pathway operates at physiological NO concentrations and in real time. To address these deficiencies, we have exploited the properties of a novel cGMP biosensor, named δ-FlincG, expressed in cells containing varying mixtures of NO-activated guanylyl cyclase and cGMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase activity. Responsiveness to NO, signifying a physiologically relevant rise in cGMP to 30 nM or more, was seen at concentrations as low as 1 pM, making cells by far the most sensitive NO detectors yet encountered. Even cells coexpressing phosphodiesterase-5, a cGMP-activated isoform found in many NO target cells, responded to NO in concentrations as low as 10 pM. The dynamics of NO capture and signal transduction was revealed by administering timed puffs of NO from a local pipette. A puff lasting only 100 ms, giving a calculated peak intracellular NO concentration of 23 pM, was detectable. The results could be encapsulated in a quantitative model of cellular NO-cGMP signaling, which recapitulates the NO responsiveness reported previously from crude cGMP measurements on native cells, and which explains how NO is able to exert physiological effects at extremely low concentrations, when only a tiny proportion of its receptors would be occupied. PMID:21135206

  4. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  5. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of the Essential Diadenylate Cyclase CdaA from Listeria monocytogenes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Dickmanns, Achim; Neumann, Piotr; Gunka, Katrin; Arens, Johannes; Kaever, Volkhard; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified second messenger cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is involved in several important cellular processes, such as cell wall metabolism, maintenance of DNA integrity, ion transport, transcription regulation, and allosteric regulation of enzyme function. Interestingly, c-di-AMP is essential for growth of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Although the genome of B. subtilis encodes three c-di-AMP-producing diadenlyate cyclases that can functionally replace each other, the phylogenetically related human pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus possess only one enzyme, the diadenlyate cyclase CdaA. Because CdaA is also essential for growth of these bacteria, the enzyme is a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. Here we present the first crystal structure of the L. monocytogenes CdaA diadenylate cyclase domain that is conserved in many human pathogens. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the cyclase revealed an unusual metal cofactor requirement. PMID:25605729

  6. Hydrogen peroxide stimulation of CFTR reveals an Epac-mediated, soluble AC-dependent cAMP amplification pathway common to GPCR signalling

    PubMed Central

    Ivonnet, P; Salathe, M; Conner, G E

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE H2O2 is widely understood to regulate intracellular signalling. In airway epithelia, H2O2 stimulates anion secretion primarily by activating an autocrine PGE2 signalling pathway via EP4 and EP1 receptors to initiate cytic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR)-mediated Cl− secretion. This study investigated signalling downstream of the receptors activated by H2O2. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Anion secretion by differentiated bronchial epithelial cells was measured in Ussing chambers during stimulation with H2O2, an EP4 receptor agonist or β2-adrenoceptor agonist in the presence and absence of inhibitors of ACs and downstream effectors. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]I) changes were followed by microscopy using fura–2-loaded cells and PKA activation followed by FRET microscopy. KEY RESULTS Transmembrane adenylyl cyclase (tmAC) and soluble AC (sAC) were both necessary for H2O2 and EP4 receptor-mediated CFTR activation in bronchial epithelia. H2O2 and EP4 receptor agonist stimulated tmAC to increase exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) activity that drives PLC activation to raise [Ca2+]i via Ca2+ store release (and not entry). Increased [Ca2+]i led to sAC activation and further increases in CFTR activity. Stimulation of sAC did not depend on changes in [HCO3−]. Ca2+-activated apical KCa1.1 channels and cAMP-activated basolateral KV7.1 channels contributed to H2O2-stimulated anion currents. A similar Epac-mediated pathway was seen following β2-adrenoceptor or forskolin stimulation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS H2O2 initiated a complex signalling cascade that used direct stimulation of tmACs by Gαs followed by Epac-mediated Ca2+ crosstalk to activate sAC. The Epac-mediated Ca2+ signal constituted a positive feedback loop that amplified CFTR anion secretion following stimulation of tmAC by a variety of stimuli. PMID:25220136

  7. Interactions between lysergic acid diethylamide and dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hungen, K V; Roberts, S; Hill, D F

    1975-08-22

    Investigations were carried out on the interactions of the hallucinogenic drug, D-lysergic acid diethylamide (D-LSD), and other serotonin antagonists with catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in cell-free preparations from different regions of rat brain. In equimolar concentration, D-LSD, 2-brono-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), or methysergide (UML) strongly blocked maximal stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by either norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from cerebral cortices of young adult rats. D-LSD also eliminated the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of equimolar concentrations of norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from rat hippocampus. The effects of this hallucinogenic agent on adenylate cyclase activity were most striking in particulate preparations from corpus striatum. Thus, in 10 muM concentration, D-LSD not only completely eradicated the response to 10 muM dopamine in these preparations but also consistently stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. L-LSD (80 muM) was without effect. Significant activation of striatal adenylate cyclase was produced by 0.1 muM D-LSD. Activation of striatal adenylate cyclase of either D-LSD or dopamine was strongly blocked by the dopamine-blocking agents trifluoperazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, and haloperidol. The stimulatory effects of D-LSD and dopamine were also inhibited by the serotonin-blocking agents, BOL, 1-methyl-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (MLD), and cyproheptadine, but not by the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent, propranolol. However, these serotonin antagonists by themselves were incapable of stimulating adenylate cyclase activity in the striatal preparations. Several other hallucinogens, which were structurally related to serotonin, were also inactive in this regard, e.g., mescaline, N,N-dimethyltryptamine, psilocin and bufotenine. Serotonin itself produced a small stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in striatal preparations and

  8. Self-limitation of intravenous tocolysis with beta2-adrenergic agonists is mediated through receptor G protein uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Frambach, Torsten; Müller, Thomas; Freund, Sebastian; Engelhardt, Stefan; Sütterlin, Marc; Lohse, Martin J; Dietl, Johannes

    2005-05-01

    Tocolysis with a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist is the most common approach to premature labor management after the 25th wk of pregnancy. However, prolonged treatment is associated with a marked loss of efficacy. The biochemical mechanisms involved remain unclear. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fenoterol on beta-adrenergic receptor signal transduction in human myometrium. Myometrial biopsy specimens were obtained from 40 women at cesarean section between the 25th and 34th wk of pregnancy. Nineteen patients had received no tocolysis (controls, group I) and 21 had been treated with fenoterol (<48 h in 10, group II; > or = 48 h in 11, group III). As methods we used membrane preparation, adenylyl cyclase assay and cAMP RIA. Adenylyl cyclase activity was determined by the measurement of cAMP levels to evaluate signal transduction after stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol, G protein with GTP, and adenylyl cyclase with forskolin. The functional activity of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G(s)) and adenylyl cyclase was not altered by fenoterol treatment. In the control group, the increase in adenylyl cyclase activity in response to GTP plus isoproterenol was greater than in response to GTP alone. The increase was reduced by 50% in group II and was insignificant in group III. There was no correlation between gestational age and basal adenylyl cyclase activity. Intravenous tocolysis with the beta2-adrenergic receptor agonist fenoterol leads to complete desensitization of the beta-adrenergic receptor system. In addition to the known reduction in receptor number (down-regulation) as underlying mechanism, uncoupling of the receptor from the stimulatory G protein G(s) was identified.

  9. Genetic modifiers of hypertension in soluble guanylate cyclase α1–deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Raher, Michael J.; Kirby, Andrew; Mohd, Shahid; Baron, David M.; Hayton, Sarah R.; Tainsh, Laurel T.; Sips, Patrick Y.; Rauwerdink, Kristen M.; Yan, Qingshang; Tainsh, Robert E.T.; Shakartzi, Hannah R.; Stevens, Christine; Decaluwé, Kelly; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria da Gloria; Malhotra, Rajeev; Van de Voorde, Johan; Wang, Tong; Brouckaert, Peter; Daly, Mark J.; Bloch, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an essential role in regulating hypertension and blood flow by inducing relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Male mice deficient in a NO receptor component, the α1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGCα1), are prone to hypertension in some, but not all, mouse strains, suggesting that additional genetic factors contribute to the onset of hypertension. Using linkage analyses, we discovered a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 1 that was linked to mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the context of sGCα1 deficiency. This region is syntenic with previously identified blood pressure–related QTLs in the human and rat genome and contains the genes coding for renin. Hypertension was associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Further, we found that RAAS inhibition normalized MAP and improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in sGCα1-deficient mice. These data identify the RAAS as a blood pressure–modifying mechanism in a setting of impaired NO/cGMP signaling. PMID:22565307

  10. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Matthew M.; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E.; Frenkel, Mogen M.; Reilly, Michael J.; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A.; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive.

  11. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Markus; Naumann, Christin; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4) have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enzyme activity control by protein-protein interaction. Here, these analyses were extended by detailed analysis of recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Treatment of purified AOC2 with SDS at different temperatures, chemical cross-linking experiments and protein structure analysis by molecular modelling approaches were performed. Several salt bridges between monomers and a hydrophobic core within the AOC2 trimer were identified and functionally proven by site-directed mutagenesis. The data obtained showed that AOC2 acts as a trimer. Finally, AOC activity was determined in heteromers formed by pairwise combinations of the four AOC isoforms. The highest activities were found for heteromers containing AOC4 + AOC1 and AOC4 + AOC2, respectively. All data are in line with an enzyme activity control of all four AOCs by heteromerization, thereby supporting a putative fine-tuning in JA formation by various regulatory principles. PMID:27135223

  12. Activity Regulation by Heteromerization of Arabidopsis Allene Oxide Cyclase Family Members.

    PubMed

    Otto, Markus; Naumann, Christin; Brandt, Wolfgang; Wasternack, Claus; Hause, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) are lipid-derived signals in plant stress responses and development. A crucial step in JA biosynthesis is catalyzed by allene oxide cyclase (AOC). Four genes encoding functional AOCs (AOC1, AOC2, AOC3 and AOC4) have been characterized for Arabidopsis thaliana in terms of organ- and tissue-specific expression, mutant phenotypes, promoter activities and initial in vivo protein interaction studies suggesting functional redundancy and diversification, including first hints at enzyme activity control by protein-protein interaction. Here, these analyses were extended by detailed analysis of recombinant proteins produced in Escherichia coli. Treatment of purified AOC2 with SDS at different temperatures, chemical cross-linking experiments and protein structure analysis by molecular modelling approaches were performed. Several salt bridges between monomers and a hydrophobic core within the AOC2 trimer were identified and functionally proven by site-directed mutagenesis. The data obtained showed that AOC2 acts as a trimer. Finally, AOC activity was determined in heteromers formed by pairwise combinations of the four AOC isoforms. The highest activities were found for heteromers containing AOC4 + AOC1 and AOC4 + AOC2, respectively. All data are in line with an enzyme activity control of all four AOCs by heteromerization, thereby supporting a putative fine-tuning in JA formation by various regulatory principles. PMID:27135223

  13. Regulation of intraocular pressure by soluble and membrane guanylate cyclases and their role in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Ksander, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by visual field defects that ultimately lead to irreversible blindness (Alward, 2000; Anderson et al., 2006). By the year 2020, an estimated 80 million people will have glaucoma, 11 million of which will be bilaterally blind. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common type of glaucoma. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is currently the only risk factor amenable to treatment. How IOP is regulated and can be modulated remains a topic of active investigation. Available therapies, mostly geared toward lowering IOP, offer incomplete protection, and POAG often goes undetected until irreparable damage has been done, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches, drug targets, and biomarkers (Heijl et al., 2002; Quigley, 2011). In this review, the role of soluble (nitric oxide (NO)-activated) and membrane-bound, natriuretic peptide (NP)-activated guanylate cyclases that generate the secondary signaling molecule cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the regulation of IOP and in the pathophysiology of POAG will be discussed. PMID:24904270

  14. Structure and Mechanism of the Diterpene Cyclase ent-Copalyl Diphosphate Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS) reveals three α-helical domains (α, β, γ), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the βγ domains in CPS but exclusively in the α domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions. PMID:21602811

  15. Crystal Structures of the Catalytic Domain of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Allerston, Charles K.; von Delft, Frank; Gileadi, Opher

    2013-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) catalyses the synthesis of cyclic GMP in response to nitric oxide. The enzyme is a heterodimer of homologous α and β subunits, each of which is composed of multiple domains. We present here crystal structures of a heterodimer of the catalytic domains of the α and β subunits, as well as an inactive homodimer of β subunits. This first structure of a metazoan, heteromeric cyclase provides several observations. First, the structures resemble known structures of adenylate cyclases and other guanylate cyclases in overall fold and in the arrangement of conserved active-site residues, which are contributed by both subunits at the interface. Second, the subunit interaction surface is promiscuous, allowing both homodimeric and heteromeric association; the preference of the full-length enzyme for heterodimer formation must derive from the combined contribution of other interaction interfaces. Third, the heterodimeric structure is in an inactive conformation, but can be superposed onto an active conformation of adenylate cyclase by a structural transition involving a 26° rigid-body rotation of the α subunit. In the modelled active conformation, most active site residues in the subunit interface are precisely aligned with those of adenylate cyclase. Finally, the modelled active conformation also reveals a cavity related to the active site by pseudo-symmetry. The pseudosymmetric site lacks key active site residues, but may bind allosteric regulators in a manner analogous to the binding of forskolin to adenylate cyclase. This indicates the possibility of developing a new class of small-molecule modulators of guanylate cyclase activity targeting the catalytic domain. PMID:23505436

  16. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenylate cyclase in phototransduction by limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J E; Kaupp, U B; Malbon, C C

    1984-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological measurements were made on photoreceptor cells from Limulus ventral eyes to investigate the possible role of cyclic AMP and adenylate cyclase in the visual transduction mechanism. Cyclic AMP content in a photoreceptor-enriched fraction (the end organs) of Limulus ventral eyes was approximately 15 pmol/mg protein. The cyclic AMP content was increased by bathing eyes in 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine or forskolin and was increased almost 100-fold when bathed in both. Illumination did not change cyclic AMP content significantly in any of these conditions. Discrete events that can be recorded electrophysiologically occur spontaneously in darkness. An increase in the frequency of discrete events is evoked by dim illumination. The discrete events are a sign of excitation of Limulus photoreceptor cells. Drug-induced changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness were not correlated with changes in cyclic AMP content. Adenylate cyclase activity measured from a small number of pooled photoreceptor clusters was stimulated by fluoride and vanadate ions, hydrolysis-resistant analogues of GTP, cholera toxin and forskolin. The Limulus enzyme is similar pharmacologically to mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Activation of adenylate cyclase by drugs was not correlated with changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness. A heat-treated Lubrol extract of membranes from Limulus ventral eyes reconstituted the adenylate cyclase activity of membranes from S49 mouse lymphoma cyc- mutant cells which lack a functional regulatory protein. These findings suggest that Limulus ventral eye photoreceptors contain a regulatory protein that mediates the activation of adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides, fluoride or cholera toxin. This regulatory protein is homologous with that found in mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Our findings suggest that

  17. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin.

  18. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin. PMID:22642150

  19. Opioid-receptor (OR) signaling cascades in rat cerebral cortex and model cell lines: the role of plasma membrane structure.

    PubMed

    Ujčíková, H; Brejchová, J; Vošahlíková, M; Kagan, D; Dlouhá, K; Sýkora, J; Merta, L; Drastichová, Z; Novotný, J; Ostašov, P; Roubalová, L; Parenti, M; Hof, M; Svoboda, P

    2014-01-01

    Large number of extracellular signals is received by plasma membrane receptors which, upon activation, transduce information into the target cell interior via trimeric G-proteins (GPCRs) and induce activation or inhibition of adenylyl cyclase enzyme activity (AC). Receptors for opioid drugs such as morphine (micro-OR, delta-OR and kappa-OR) belong to rhodopsin family of GPCRs. Our recent results indicated a specific up-regulation of AC I (8-fold) and AC II (2.5-fold) in plasma membranes (PM) isolated from rat brain cortex exposed to increasing doses of morphine (10-50 mg/kg) for 10 days. Increase of ACI and ACII represented the specific effect as the amount of ACIII-ACIX, prototypical PM marker Na, K-ATPase and trimeric G-protein alpha and beta subunits was unchanged. The up-regulation of ACI and ACII faded away after 20 days since the last dose of morphine. Proteomic analysis of these PM indicated that the brain cortex of morphine-treated animals cannot be regarded as being adapted to this drug because significant up-regulation of proteins functionally related to oxidative stress and alteration of brain energy metabolism occurred. The number of delta-OR was increased 2-fold and their sensitivity to monovalent cations was altered. Characterization of delta-OR-G-protein coupling in model HEK293 cell line indicated high ability of lithium to support affinity of delta-OR response to agonist stimulation. Our studies of PM structure and function in context with desensitization of GPCRs action were extended by data indicating participation of cholesterol-enriched membrane domains in agonist-specific internalization of delta-OR. In HEK293 cells stably expressing delta-OR-G(i)1alpha fusion protein, depletion of PM cholesterol was associated with the decrease in affinity of G-protein response to agonist stimulation, whereas maximum response was unchanged. Hydrophobic interior of isolated PM became more "fluid", chaotically organized and accessible to water molecules

  20. Dimerization Domain of Retinal Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase 1 (RetGC1) Is an Essential Part of Guanylyl Cyclase-activating Protein (GCAP) Binding Interface.

    PubMed

    Peshenko, Igor V; Olshevskaya, Elena V; Dizhoor, Alexander M

    2015-08-01

    The photoreceptor-specific proteins guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) bind and regulate retinal membrane guanylyl cyclase 1 (RetGC1) but not natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA). Study of RetGC1 regulation in vitro and its association with fluorescently tagged GCAP in transfected cells showed that R822P substitution in the cyclase dimerization domain causing congenital early onset blindness disrupted RetGC1 ability to bind GCAP but did not eliminate its affinity for another photoreceptor-specific protein, retinal degeneration 3 (RD3). Likewise, the presence of the NPRA dimerization domain in RetGC1/NPRA chimera specifically disabled binding of GCAPs but not of RD3. In subsequent mapping using hybrid dimerization domains in RetGC1/NPRA chimera, multiple RetGC1-specific residues contributed to GCAP binding by the cyclase, but the region around Met(823) was the most crucial. Either positively or negatively charged residues in that position completely blocked GCAP1 and GCAP2 but not RD3 binding similarly to the disease-causing mutation in the neighboring Arg(822). The specificity of GCAP binding imparted by RetGC1 dimerization domain was not directly related to promoting dimerization of the cyclase. The probability of coiled coil dimer formation computed for RetGC1/NPRA chimeras, even those incapable of binding GCAP, remained high, and functional complementation tests showed that the RetGC1 active site, which requires dimerization of the cyclase, was formed even when Met(823) or Arg(822) was mutated. These results directly demonstrate that the interface for GCAP binding on RetGC1 requires not only the kinase homology region but also directly involves the dimerization domain and especially its portion containing Arg(822) and Met(823).

  1. Common Extracellular Sensory Domains in Transmembrane Receptors for Diverse Signal Transduction Pathways in Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Zhulin, Igor B.; Nikolskaya, Anastasia N.; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2003-01-01

    Transmembrane receptors in microorganisms, such as sensory histidine kinases and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins, are molecular devices for monitoring environmental changes. We report here that sensory domain sharing is widespread among different classes of transmembrane receptors. We have identified two novel conserved extracellular sensory domains, named CHASE2 and CHASE3, that are found in at least four classes of transmembrane receptors: histidine kinases, adenylate cyclases, predicted diguanylate cyclases, and either serine/threonine protein kinases (CHASE2) or methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (CHASE3). Three other extracellular sensory domains were shared by at least two different classes of transmembrane receptors: histidine kinases and either diguanylate cyclases, adenylate cyclases, or phosphodiesterases. These observations suggest that microorganisms use similar conserved domains to sense similar environmental signals and transmit this information via different signal transduction pathways to different regulatory circuits: transcriptional regulation (histidine kinases), chemotaxis (methyl-accepting proteins), catabolite repression (adenylate cyclases), and modulation of enzyme activity (diguanylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases). The variety of signaling pathways using the CHASE-type domains indicates that these domains sense some critically important extracellular signals. PMID:12486065

  2. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-15

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C-Gi-phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  3. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C–Gi–phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:18006579

  4. Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Calmodulin, Adenylyl Cyclase, and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II Are Required for Late, but Not Early, Long-Term Memory Formation in the Honeybee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Sandoz, Jean-Christophe; Devaud, Jean-Marc; Lormant, Flore; Mizunami, Makoto; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Memory is a dynamic process that allows encoding, storage, and retrieval of information acquired through individual experience. In the honeybee "Apis mellifera," olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) has shown that besides short-term memory (STM) and mid-term memory (MTM), two phases of long-term memory (LTM)…

  5. Repeated immobilization stress disturbed steroidogenic machinery and stimulated the expression of cAMP signaling elements and adrenergic receptors in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Stojkov, Natasa J; Janjic, Marija M; Bjelic, Maja M; Mihajlovic, Aleksandar I; Kostic, Tatjana S; Andric, Silvana A

    2012-05-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of acute (2 h daily) and repeated (2 h daily for 2 or 10 consecutive days) immobilization stress (IMO) on: 1) the steroidogenic machinery homeostasis; 2) cAMP signaling; and the expression of receptors for main markers of 3) adrenergic and 4) glucocorticoid signaling in Leydig cells of adult rats. The results showed that acute IMO inhibited steroidogenic machinery in Leydig cells by downregulation of Scarb1 (scavenger receptor class B), Cyp11a1 (cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme), Cyp17a1 (17α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase), and Hsd17b3 (17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase) expression. In addition to acute IMO effects, repeated IMO increased transcription of Star (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) and Arr19 (androgen receptor corepressor 19 kDa) in Leydig cells. In the same cells, the transcription of adenylyl cyclases (Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10) and cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases (Pde4a, Pde4b, Pde4d, Pde7a, Pde8a) was stimulated, whereas the expression of the genes encoding protein kinase A subunits were unaffected. Ten times repeated IMO increased the levels of all adrenergic receptors and β-adrenergic receptor kinase (Adrbk1) in Leydig cells. The transcription analysis was supported by cAMP/testosterone production. In this signaling scenario, partial recovery of testosterone production in medium/content was detected. The physiological significance of the present results was proven by ex vivo application of epinephrine, which increased cAMP/testosterone production by Leydig cells from control rats in greater fashion than from stressed. IMO did not affect the expression of transcripts for Crhr1/Crhr2 (corticotropin releasing hormone receptors), Acthr (adrenocorticotropin releasing hormone receptor), Gr (glucocorticoid receptor), and Hsd11b1 [hydroxysteroid (11-β) dehydrogenase 1], while all types of IMO stimulated the expression of Hsd11b2, the unidirectional oxidase with high affinity to inactivate

  6. Inhibitory signaling by CB1 receptors in smooth muscle mediated by GRK5/β-arrestin activation of ERK1/2 and Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Sriwai, Wimolpak; Huang, Jiean; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-03-01

    We examined whether CB1 receptors in smooth muscle conform to the signaling pattern observed with other Gi-coupled receptors that stimulate contraction via two Gβγ-dependent pathways (PLC-β3 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/integrin-linked kinase). Here we show that the anticipated Gβγ-dependent signaling was abrogated. Except for inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via Gαi, signaling resulted from Gβγ-independent phosphorylation of CB1 receptors by GRK5, recruitment of β-arrestin1/2, and activation of ERK1/2 and Src kinase. Neither uncoupling of CB1 receptors from Gi by pertussis toxin (PTx) or Gi minigene nor expression of a Gβγ-scavenging peptide had any effect on ERK1/2 activity. The latter was abolished in muscle cells expressing β-arrestin1/2 siRNA. CB1 receptor internalization and both ERK1/2 and Src kinase activities were abolished in cells expressing kinase-deficient GRK5(K215R). Activation of ERK1/2 and Src kinase endowed CB1 receptors with the ability to inhibit concurrent contractile activity. We identified a consensus sequence (102KSPSKLSP109) for phosphorylation of RGS4 by ERK1/2 and showed that expression of a RGS4 mutant lacking Ser103/Ser108 blocked the ability of anandamide to inhibit acetylcholine-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis or enhance Gαq:RGS4 association and inactivation of Gαq. Activation of Src kinase by anandamide enhanced both myosin phosphatase RhoA-interacting protein (M-RIP):RhoA and M-RIP:MYPT1 association and inhibited Rho kinase activity, leading to increase of myosin light chain (MLC) phosphatase activity and inhibition of sustained muscle contraction. Thus, unlike other Gi-coupled receptors in smooth muscle, CB1 receptors did not engage Gβγ but signaled via GRK5/β-arrestin activation of ERK1/2 and Src kinase: ERK1/2 accelerated inactivation of Gαq by RGS4, and Src kinase enhanced MLC phosphatase activity, leading to inhibition of ACh-stimulated contraction.

  7. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K; Makino, Clint L

    2015-04-24

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca(2+)]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mM for ROS-GC1 and 39 mM for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca(2+) nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca(2+)]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity. PMID:25767116

  8. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme.

  9. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  10. Requirement of cAMP Signaling for Schwann Cell Differentiation Restricts the Onset of Myelination

    PubMed Central

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  11. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    PubMed

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  12. Compartmentalization of Distinct cAMP Signaling Pathways in Mammalian Sperm*♦

    PubMed Central

    Wertheimer, Eva; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltran, José L.; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Douglas; Escoffier, Jessica; Salicioni, Ana M.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Mager, Jesse; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization competence is acquired in the female tract in a process known as capacitation. Capacitation is needed for the activation of motility (e.g. hyperactivation) and to prepare the sperm for an exocytotic process known as acrosome reaction. Although the HCO3−-dependent soluble adenylyl cyclase Adcy10 plays a role in motility, less is known about the source of cAMP in the sperm head. Transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs) are another possible source of cAMP. These enzymes are regulated by stimulatory heterotrimeric Gs proteins; however, the presence of Gs or tmACs in mammalian sperm has been controversial. In this study, we used Western blotting and cholera toxin-dependent ADP-ribosylation to show the Gs presence in the sperm head. Also, we showed that forskolin, a tmAC-specific activator, induces cAMP accumulation in sperm from both WT and Adcy10-null mice. This increase is blocked by the tmAC inhibitor SQ22536 but not by the Adcy10 inhibitor KH7. Although Gs immunoreactivity and tmAC activity are detected in the sperm head, PKA is only found in the tail, where Adcy10 was previously shown to reside. Consistent with an acrosomal localization, Gs reactivity is lost in acrosome-reacted sperm, and forskolin is able to increase intracellular Ca2+ and induce the acrosome reaction. Altogether, these data suggest that cAMP pathways are compartmentalized in sperm, with Gs and tmAC in the head and Adcy10 and PKA in the flagellum. PMID:24129574

  13. Signaling through Lrg1, Rho1 and Pkc1 Governs Candida albicans Morphogenesis in Response to Diverse Cues

    PubMed Central

    Leach, Michelle D.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Robbins, Nicole; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    The capacity to transition between distinct morphological forms is a key virulence trait for diverse fungal pathogens. A poignant example of a leading opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans for which an environmentally responsive developmental program underpins virulence is Candida albicans. C. albicans mutants that are defective in the transition between yeast and filamentous forms typically have reduced virulence. Although many positive regulators of C. albicans filamentation have been defined, there are fewer negative regulators that have been implicated in repression of filamentation in the absence of inducing cues. To discover novel negative regulators of filamentation, we screened a collection of 1,248 C. albicans homozygous transposon insertion mutants to identify those that were filamentous in the absence of inducing cues. We identified the Rho1 GAP Lrg1, which represses filamentous growth by stimulating Rho1 GTPase activity and converting Rho1 to its inactive, GDP-bound form. Deletion of LRG1 or introduction of a RHO1 mutation that locks Rho1 in constitutively active, GTP-bound state, leads to filamentation in the absence of inducing cues. Deletion of the Rho1 downstream effector PKC1 results in defective filamentation in response to diverse host-relevant inducing cues, including serum. We further established that Pkc1 is not required to sense filament-inducing cues, but its kinase activity is critical for the initiation of filamentous growth. Our genetic analyses revealed that Pkc1 regulates filamentation independent of the canonical MAP kinase cascade. Further, although Ras1 activation is not impaired in a pkc1Δ/pkc1Δ mutant, adenylyl cyclase activity is reduced, consistent with a model in which Pkc1 functions in parallel with Ras1 in regulating Cyr1 activation. Thus, our findings delineate a signaling pathway comprised of Lrg1, Rho1 and Pkc1 with a core role in C. albicans morphogenesis, and illuminate functional relationships that govern activation

  14. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  15. A lycopene β-cyclase/lycopene ε-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce α-carotene and β-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as α-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ε-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of α-carotene and β-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the α-carotene-to-β-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids α-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi.

  16. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Ori J; Orr, Mona W; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T

    2014-01-17

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains.

  17. High-throughput screening using the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay identifies ebselen as an inhibitor of diguanylate cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, Ori J.; Orr, Mona W.; Wang, Yan; Lee, Vincent T.

    2013-01-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics has motivated recent efforts to identify new drug candidates that target virulence factors or their regulatory pathways. One such antivirulence target is the cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP) signaling pathway, which regulates biofilm formation, motility, and pathogenesis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that utilizes cdiGMP-regulated polysaccharides, including alginate and pellicle polysaccharide (PEL), to mediate virulence and antibiotic resistance. CdiGMP activates PEL and alginate biosynthesis by binding to specific receptors including PelD and Alg44. Mutations that abrogate cdiGMP binding to these receptors prevent polysaccharide production. Identification of small molecules that can inhibit cdiGMP binding to the allosteric sites on these proteins could mimic binding defective mutants and potentially reduce biofilm formation or alginate secretion. Here, we report the development of a rapid and quantitative high-throughput screen for inhibitors of protein-cdiGMP interactions based on the differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA). Using this approach, we identified ebselen as an inhibitor of cdiGMP binding to receptors containing an RxxD domain including PelD and diguanylate cyclases (DGC). Ebselen reduces diguanylate cyclase activity by covalently modifying cysteine residues. Ebselen oxide, the selenone analogue of ebselen, also inhibits cdiGMP binding through the same covalent mechanism. Ebselen and ebselen oxide inhibit cdiGMP regulation of biofilm formation and flagella-mediated motility in P. aeruginosa through inhibition of diguanylate cyclases. The identification of ebselen provides a proof-of-principle that a DRaCALA high-throughput screening approach can be used to identify bioactive agents that reverse regulation of cdiGMP signaling by targeting cdiGMP-binding domains. PMID:24134695

  18. Stimulation of hormone-responsive adenylate cyclase activity by a factor present in the cell cytosol.

    PubMed Central

    MacNeil, S; Crawford, A; Amirrasooli, H; Johnson, S; Pollock, A; Ollis, C; Tomlinson, S

    1980-01-01

    1. Homogenates of whole tissues were shown to contain both intracellular and extracellular factors that affected particulate adenylate cyclase activity in vitro. Factors present in the extracellular fluids produced an inhibition of basal, hormone- and fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity but factors present in the cell cytosol increased hormone-stimulated activity with relatively little effect on basal or fluoride-stimulated enzyme activity. 2. The existence of this cytosol factor or factors was investigated using freshly isolated human platelets, freshly isolated rat hepatocytes, and cultured cells derived from rat osteogenic sarcoma, rat calvaria, mouse melanoma, pig aortic endothelium, human articular cartilage chondrocytes and human bronchial carcinoma (BEN) cells. 3. The stimulation of the hormone response by the cytosol factor ranged from 60 to 890% depending on the tissue of origin of the adenylate cyclase. 4. In each case the behaviour of the factor was similar to the action of GTP on that particular adenylate cyclase preparation. 5. No evidence of tissue or species specificity was found, as cytosols stimulated adenylate cyclase from their own and unrelated tissues to the same degree. 6. In the human platelet, the inclusion of the cytosol in the assay of adenylate cyclase increased the rate of enzyme activity in response to stimulation by prostaglandin E1 without affecting the amount of prostaglandin E1 required for half-maximal stimulation or the characteristics of enzyme activation by prostaglandin E. PMID:7396869

  19. Role of soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the physiological effects of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Severina, I S

    1998-07-01

    In this review the molecular mechanisms underlying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. It has been shown that these effects are directly connected with the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and the accumulation of cyclic 3;,5;-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). The mechanism of guanylate cyclase activation by NO is analyzed, especially the role and biological significance of the nitrosyl--heme complex formed as a result of interaction of guanylate cyclase heme with NO and the role of sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme in this process. Using new approaches for studying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide in combination with the newly obtained data on the regulatory role of guanylate cyclase in the platelet aggregation process, the most important results were obtained regarding the molecular bases providing for a directed search for and creation of new effective antihypertensive and antiaggregatory preparations. In studying the molecular mechanism for directed activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by new NO donors, a series of hitherto unknown enzyme activators generating NO and involved in the regulation of hemostasis and vascular tone were revealed. PMID:9721331

  20. Overexpression and characterization of lycopene cyclase (CrtY) from marine bacterium Paracoccus haeundaensis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Hyug; Ji, Keunho; Kim, Young Tae

    2013-02-01

    Lycopene cyclase converts lycopene to beta-carotene by catalyzing the formation of two beta-rings at each end of the linear carotene structure. This reaction takes place as a two-step reaction in which both sides of of the lycopene molecule are cyclized into beta-carotene rings via the monocyclic gamma-carotene as an intermediate. The crtY gene coding for lycopene cyclase from Paracoccus haeundaensis consists of 1,158 base pairs encoding 386 amino acids residues. An expression plasmid containing the crtY gene (pET44a-CrtY) was constructed and expressed in Escherichia coli, and produced a recombinant protein of approximately 43 kDa, corresponding to the molecular mass of lycopene cyclase. The expressed protein was purified to homogeneity by His-tag affinity chromatography and showed enzymatic activity corresponding to lycopene cyclase. We also determined the lycopene substrate specificity and NADPH cofactor requirements of the purified protein. The Km values for lycopene and NADPH were 3.5 microM and 2 mM, respectively. The results obtained from this study will provide a wider base of knowledge on the enzyme characterization of lycopene cyclase at the molecular level.

  1. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides

    PubMed Central

    Gagne, Steve J.; Stout, Jake M.; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M.; Page, Jonathan E.

    2012-01-01

    Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2–C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity. PMID:22802619

  2. Identification of olivetolic acid cyclase from Cannabis sativa reveals a unique catalytic route to plant polyketides.

    PubMed

    Gagne, Steve J; Stout, Jake M; Liu, Enwu; Boubakir, Zakia; Clark, Shawn M; Page, Jonathan E

    2012-07-31

    Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids are responsible for the psychoactive and medicinal properties of Cannabis sativa L. (marijuana). The first intermediate in the cannabinoid biosynthetic pathway is proposed to be olivetolic acid (OA), an alkylresorcinolic acid that forms the polyketide nucleus of the cannabinoids. OA has been postulated to be synthesized by a type III polyketide synthase (PKS) enzyme, but so far type III PKSs from cannabis have been shown to produce catalytic byproducts instead of OA. We analyzed the transcriptome of glandular trichomes from female cannabis flowers, which are the primary site of cannabinoid biosynthesis, and searched for polyketide cyclase-like enzymes that could assist in OA cyclization. Here, we show that a type III PKS (tetraketide synthase) from cannabis trichomes requires the presence of a polyketide cyclase enzyme, olivetolic acid cyclase (OAC), which catalyzes a C2-C7 intramolecular aldol condensation with carboxylate retention to form OA. OAC is a dimeric α+β barrel (DABB) protein that is structurally similar to polyketide cyclases from Streptomyces species. OAC transcript is present at high levels in glandular trichomes, an expression profile that parallels other cannabinoid pathway enzymes. Our identification of OAC both clarifies the cannabinoid pathway and demonstrates unexpected evolutionary parallels between polyketide biosynthesis in plants and bacteria. In addition, the widespread occurrence of DABB proteins in plants suggests that polyketide cyclases may play an overlooked role in generating plant chemical diversity.

  3. Sweet tastants stimulate adenylate cyclase coupled to GTP-binding protein in rat tongue membranes.

    PubMed

    Striem, B J; Pace, U; Zehavi, U; Naim, M; Lancet, D

    1989-05-15

    Sucrose and other saccharides, which produce an appealing taste in rats, were found to significantly stimulate the activity of adenylate cyclase in membranes derived from the anterior-dorsal region of rat tongue. In control membranes derived from either tongue muscle or tongue non-sensory epithelium, the effect of sugars on adenylate cyclase activity was either much smaller or absent. Sucrose enhanced adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-related manner, and this activation was dependent on the presence of guanine nucleotides, suggesting the involvement of a GTP-binding protein ('G-protein'). The activation of adenylate cyclase by various mono- and di-saccharides correlated with their electrophysiological potency. Among non-sugar sweeteners, sodium saccharin activated the enzyme, whereas aspartame and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone did not, in correlation with their sweet-taste effectiveness in the rat. Sucrose activation of the enzyme was partly inhibited by Cu2+ and Zn2+, in agreement with their effect on electrophysiological sweet-taste responses. Our results are consistent with a sweet-taste transduction mechanism involving specific receptors, a guanine-nucleotide-binding protein and the cyclic AMP-generating enzyme adenylate cyclase.

  4. Alternative splicing impairs soluble guanylyl cyclase function in aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Golunski, Eva; Laing, Susan T; Estrera, Anthony L; Sharina, Iraida G

    2014-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) receptor soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key regulator of several important vascular functions and is important for maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis and vascular plasticity. Diminished sGC expression and function contributes to pathogenesis of several cardiovascular diseases. However, the processes that control sGC expression in vascular tissue remain poorly understood. Previous work in animal and cell models revealed the complexity of alternative splicing of sGC genes and demonstrated its importance in modulation of sGC function. The aim of this study was to examine the role of alternative splicing of α1 and β1 sGC in healthy and diseased human vascular tissue. Our study found a variety of α1 and β1 sGC splice forms expressed in human aorta. Their composition and abundance were different between samples of aortic tissue removed during surgical repair of aortic aneurysm and samples of aortas without aneurysm. Aortas with aneurysm demonstrated decreased sGC activity, which correlated with increased expression of dysfunctional sGC splice variants. In addition, the expression of 55-kDa oxidation-resistant α1 isoform B sGC (α1-IsoB) was significantly lower in aortic samples with aneurysm. The α1-IsoB splice variant was demonstrated to support sGC activity in aortic lysates. Together, our results suggest that alternative splicing contributes to diminished sGC function in vascular dysfunction. Precise understanding of sGC splicing regulation could help to design new therapeutic interventions and to personalize sGC-targeting therapies in treatments of vascular disease.

  5. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation. PMID:24646224

  6. Molecular characterization of tick salivary gland glutaminyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Steven W; Browning, Rebecca E; Chao, Chien-Chung; Bateman, Robert C; Ching, Wei-Mei; Karim, Shahid

    2013-09-01

    Glutaminyl cyclase (QC) catalyzes the cyclization of N-terminal glutamine residues into pyroglutamate. This post-translational modification extends the half-life of peptides and, in some cases, is essential in binding to their cognate receptor. Due to its potential role in the post-translational modification of tick neuropeptides, we report the molecular, biochemical and physiological characterization of salivary gland QC during the prolonged blood feeding of the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) and the gulf-coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum). QC sequences from I. scapularis and A. maculatum showed a high degree of amino acid identity to each other and other arthropods and residues critical for zinc binding/catalysis (D159, E202, and H330) or intermediate stabilization (E201, W207, D248, D305, F325, and W329) are conserved. Analysis of QC transcriptional gene expression kinetics depicts an upregulation during the bloodmeal of adult female ticks prior to fast-feeding phases in both I. scapularis and A. maculatum suggesting a functional link with bloodmeal uptake. QC enzymatic activity was detected in saliva and extracts of tick salivary glands and midguts. Recombinant QC was shown to be catalytically active. Furthermore, knockdown of QC transcript by RNA interference resulted in lower enzymatic activity, and small, unviable egg masses in both studied tick species as well as lower engorged tick weights for I. scapularis. These results suggest that the post-translational modification of neurotransmitters and other bioactive peptides by QC is critical to oviposition and potentially other physiological processes. Moreover, these data suggest that tick-specific QC-modified neurotransmitters/hormones or other relevant parts of this system could potentially be used as novel physiological targets for tick control. PMID:23770496

  7. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  8. Mutation in the C-Di-AMP Cyclase dacA Affects Fitness and Resistance of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dengler, Vanina; McCallum, Nadine; Kiefer, Patrick; Christen, Philipp; Patrignani, Andrea; Vorholt, Julia A.; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Senn, Maria M.

    2013-01-01

    Faster growing and more virulent strains of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are increasingly displacing highly resistant MRSA. Elevated fitness in these MRSA is often accompanied by decreased and heterogeneous levels of methicillin resistance; however, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not yet fully understood. Whole genome sequencing was used to investigate the genetic basis of this apparent correlation, in an isogenic MRSA strain pair that differed in methicillin resistance levels and fitness, with respect to growth rate. Sequencing revealed only one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the diadenylate cyclase gene dacA in the faster growing but less resistant strain. Diadenylate cyclases were recently discovered to synthesize the new second messenger cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP). Introduction of this mutation into the highly resistant but slower growing strain reduced resistance and increased its growth rate, suggesting a direct connection between the dacA mutation and the phenotypic differences of these strains. Quantification of cellular c-di-AMP revealed that the dacA mutation decreased c-di-AMP levels resulting in reduced autolysis, increased salt tolerance and a reduction in the basal expression of the cell wall stress stimulon. These results indicate that c-di-AMP affects cell envelope-related signalling in S. aureus. The influence of c-di-AMP on growth rate and methicillin resistance in MRSA indicate that altering c-di-AMP levels could be a mechanism by which MRSA strains can increase their fitness levels by reducing their methicillin resistance levels. PMID:24013956

  9. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  10. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Matthew M; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E; Frenkel, Mogen M; Reilly, Michael J; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  11. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-Ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R H; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-06-14

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  12. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Matthew M.; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E.; Frenkel, Mogen M.; Reilly, Michael J.; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A.; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  13. Soluble guanylate cyclase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase colocalize in rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Lin, L H; Talman, W T

    2005-03-01

    Nitric oxide has been implicated in transmission of cardiovascular signals in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS). Pharmacological studies suggest that activation of neurons by nitric oxide in the NTS may involve soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). However, anatomical data supporting this suggestion have not been available. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that neurons and fibers containing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) lie in close proximity to those containing sGC and the two enzymes colocalize in some neurons and fibers in the NTS. We perfused six rats and obtained brain stem sections for double immunofluorescent staining utilizing antibodies selective for sGC and for nNOS combined with confocal microscopy. The distribution and staining intensity of nNOS-immunoreactivity (IR) was similar to our earlier reports. IR of sGC was present in cell bodies, proximal dendrites and fibers of many brain stem regions. Strong sGC-IR was noted in the hypoglossal, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and gracilis nuclei. The NTS exhibited moderate sGC-IR. Superimposed images showed that many NTS neurons contained both nNOS-IR and sGC-IR. The percentage of sGC-IR positive cells that were also nNOS-IR positive differed among NTS subnuclei. Similarly, the percentage of nNOS-IR positive cells that were also sGC positive differed among NTS subnuclei. Fibers stained for both nNOS-IR and sGC-IR were also present in NTS subnuclei. In addition, we identified fibers that were stained for nNOS-IR or sGC-IR alone and often found such singly labeled fibers apposed to each other. These data support our hypothesis and provide anatomical support for the suggestion that nitroxidergic activation of the NTS involves sGC.

  14. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  15. Inhibition of hormonally regulated adenylate cyclase by the beta gamma subunit of transducin.

    PubMed Central

    Bockaert, J; Deterre, P; Pfister, C; Guillon, G; Chabre, M

    1985-01-01

    Transducin (T), the GTP-binding protein of the retina activates the cGMP phosphodiesterase system, and presents analogies with the proteins GS and Gi which respectively mediate adenylate cyclase activation and inhibition by hormone receptors. These proteins are all comprised of an alpha subunit carrying the GTP-binding site and a beta gamma subunit made of two peptides. The beta peptide (35 kd) appears similar in the three proteins. We demonstrate here that purified T beta gamma inhibits adenylate cyclase from human platelet membranes. This inhibition was observed when adenylate cyclase was stimulated by GTP, prostaglandin E1 (PGE1), NaF and forskolin, but not when stimulated by GTP(gamma)S. In the presence of GTP and forskolin, the T beta gamma-induced maximal inhibition was not additive with the alpha 2-receptor-induced adenylate cyclase inhibition mediated by Gi. Both inhibitions were suppressed at high Mg2+ concentrations, which as also known to dissociate T beta gamma from T alpha-GDP. This suggests that these adenylate cyclase inhibitions are due to the formation of inactive complexes of GS alpha-GDP with T beta gamma or Gi beta gamma. T beta gamma-induced inhibition did not require detergent and could be suppressed by simple washing. T beta gamma effects are dependent on its concentration rather than on its total amount. This suggests that T beta gamma can operate in solution with no integration into the membrane. Similar inhibitory effects of T beta gamma are observed on adenylate cyclase from anterior pituitary and lymphoma S49 cell lines. PMID:3861319

  16. Dephosphorylation of juxtamembrane serines and threonines of the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase is required for rapid resumption of oocyte meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone

    PubMed Central

    Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Egbert, Jeremy R.; Edmund, Aaron B.; Uliasz, Tracy F.; Dickey, Deborah M.; Yee, Siu-Pok; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses until luteinizing hormone (LH) acts on the granulosa cells of the follicle surrounding the oocyte to restart the cell cycle. An essential event in this process is a decrease in cyclic GMP in the granulosa cells, and part of the cGMP decrease results from dephosphorylation and inactivation of the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) guanylyl cyclase, also known as guanylyl cyclase B. However, it is unknown whether NPR2 dephosphorylation is essential for LH-induced meiotic resumption. Here, we prevented NPR2 dephosphorylation by generating a mouse line in which the seven regulatory serines and threonines of NPR2 were changed to the phosphomimetic amino acid glutamate (Npr2–7E). Npr2–7E/7E follicles failed to show a decrease in enzyme activity in response to LH, and the cGMP decrease was attenuated; correspondingly, LH-induced meiotic resumption was delayed. Meiotic resumption in response to EGF receptor activation was likewise delayed, indicating that NPR2 dephosphorylation is a component of the pathway by which EGF receptor activation mediates LH signaling. We also found that most of the NPR2 protein in the follicle was present in the mural granulosa cells. These findings indicate that NPR2 dephosphorylation in the mural granulosa cells is essential for the normal progression of meiosis in response to LH and EGF receptor activation. In addition, these studies provide the first demonstration that a change in phosphorylation of a transmembrane guanylyl cyclase regulates a physiological process, a mechanism that may also control other developmental events. PMID:26522847

  17. Dephosphorylation of juxtamembrane serines and threonines of the NPR2 guanylyl cyclase is required for rapid resumption of oocyte meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Edmund, Aaron B; Uliasz, Tracy F; Dickey, Deborah M; Yee, Siu-Pok; Potter, Lincoln R; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2016-01-01

    The meiotic cell cycle of mammalian oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses until luteinizing hormone (LH) acts on the granulosa cells of the follicle surrounding the oocyte to restart the cell cycle. An essential event in this process is a decrease in cyclic GMP in the granulosa cells, and part of the cGMP decrease results from dephosphorylation and inactivation of the natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2) guanylyl cyclase, also known as guanylyl cyclase B. However, it is unknown whether NPR2 dephosphorylation is essential for LH-induced meiotic resumption. Here, we prevented NPR2 dephosphorylation by generating a mouse line in which the seven regulatory serines and threonines of NPR2 were changed to the phosphomimetic amino acid glutamate (Npr2-7E). Npr2-7E/7E follicles failed to show a decrease in enzyme activity in response to LH, and the cGMP decrease was attenuated; correspondingly, LH-induced meiotic resumption was delayed. Meiotic resumption in response to EGF receptor activation was likewise delayed, indicating that NPR2 dephosphorylation is a component of the pathway by which EGF receptor activation mediates LH signaling. We also found that most of the NPR2 protein in the follicle was present in the mural granulosa cells. These findings indicate that NPR2 dephosphorylation in the mural granulosa cells is essential for the normal progression of meiosis in response to LH and EGF receptor activation. In addition, these studies provide the first demonstration that a change in phosphorylation of a transmembrane guanylyl cyclase regulates a physiological process, a mechanism that may also control other developmental events.

  18. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Maite Rocío; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Domizi, Pablo; Arias, Agostina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ruiz, María Laura; and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  19. CelR, an Ortholog of the Diguanylate Cyclase PleD of Caulobacter, Regulates Cellulose Synthesis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, D. Michael; Su, Shengchang; Baccaro, Brenna E.; Banta, Lois M.

    2013-01-01

    Cellulose fibrils play a role in attachment of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to its plant host. While the genes for cellulose biosynthesis in the bacterium have been identified, little is known concerning the regulation of the process. The signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) has been linked to the regulation of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis in many bacterial species, including A. tumefaciens. In this study, we identified two putative diguanylate cyclase genes, celR (atu1297) and atu1060, that influence production of cellulose in A. tumefaciens. Overexpression of either gene resulted in increased cellulose production, while deletion of celR, but not atu1060, resulted in decreased cellulose biosynthesis. celR overexpression also affected other phenotypes, including biofilm formation, formation of a polar adhesion structure, plant surface attachment, and virulence, suggesting that the gene plays a role in regulating these processes. Analysis of celR and Δcel mutants allowed differentiation between phenotypes associated with cellulose production, such as biofilm formation, and phenotypes probably resulting from c-di-GMP signaling, which include polar adhesion, attachment to plant tissue, and virulence. Phylogenetic comparisons suggest that species containing both celR and celA, which encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase, adapted the CelR protein to regulate cellulose production while those that lack celA use CelR, called PleD, to regulate specific processes associated with polar localization and cell division. PMID:24038703

  20. Defective responsiveness of adenylate cyclase to forskolin in the Drosophila memory mutant rutabaga.

    PubMed

    Dudai, Y; Sher, B; Segal, D; Yovell, Y

    1985-12-01

    The Drosophila memory mutant rutabaga (rut) has been previously shown to have a defective subpopulation (or functional state) of the enzyme adenylate cyclase. We report here that the reduced adenylate cyclase activity is also associated with a defective responsiveness of the enzyme to forskolin. Forskolin activation isotherms of the enzyme in normal membranes reveal low- and high-affinity forskolin-interacting components; the residual enzyme in the mutant shows a smaller proportion of the high-affinity response. In addition, in mutant membrane preparations, forskolin fails to shift the Km of the enzyme for free Mg2+ and for MgATP, in contrast to the situation in the normal tissue. The defect in the responsiveness to forskolin in rut is even more pronounced in a Lubrol-solubilized enzyme preparation, and is due to intrinsic properties of the cyclase system rather than to the absence (or presence) of a soluble, or detergent solubilized, factor in rut. The reduced forskolin responsiveness maps to the X chromosomal segment 12F5-6 to 13A1-5, within the region previously reported to span the locus that controls both the abortive memory and the lack of Ca2+-stimulation of adenylate cyclase in rut17. The possible relevance of the findings to postulated molecular mechanisms of short-term memory formation is discussed. PMID:3935769

  1. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the {beta}-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. {beta}-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in {beta}-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic subtype. This BAT {beta}-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial {beta}-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability.

  2. Mode of coupling between the beta-adrenergic receptor and adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tolkovsky, A M; Levitzki, A

    1978-09-01

    The mode of coupling of the beta-adrenergic receptor to the enzyme adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes was analyzed in detail. A number of experimental techniques have been used: (1) measurement of the kinetics of cyclase activation to its permanetly active state in the presence of guanylyl imidodiphosphate, as a function of hormone concentrations; (2) measurement of antagonist and agoinst binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor prior and subsequent to the enzyme activation by hormone and guanylyl imidodiphosphate. On the bases of these two approaches, all the models of receptor to enzyme coupling which involve an equilibrium between the enzyme and the receptor can be rejected. The binding and the kinetic data, however, can be fitted by two diametrically opposed models of receptor to enzyme coupling: (a) the precouped enzyme-receptor model where activation of the enzyme occurs, according to the following scheme: formula (see text) where H is the hormone, RE is the precoupled respetor-enzyme complex, k1 and k2 are the rate constants describing hormone binding, and k is the rate constant characterizing the formation of HRE' from the intermediate HRE. According to this model, the activated complex is composed of all of the interacting species. (b) The other model is the collision coupling mechanism: formula (see test) wheere KH is the horome-receptor dissociation constant, k1 is the bimolecular rate constant governing the formation of HRE, and k3 the rate constant governing the activation of the enzyme. In this case the intermediate never accumulates and constitutes only a small fraction of the tot