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Sample records for adequate antibiotic treatment

  1. Early and adequate antibiotic therapy in the treatment of severe sepsis and septic shock.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, John D; Kollef, Marin H

    2011-10-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are conditions that pose difficult challenges to physicians and the health care system. In the past 10 years, a number of retrospective and prospective observational studies have shed light on the importance of a rapid and systematic approach to treatment of these conditions. A key component is early and appropriate use of antibiotics. Delay of even 6 h can dramatically increase hospital mortality. In addition, multivariate analyses have demonstrated that inappropriate initial antibiotics lead to worse outcomes. The treating physician can rapidly identify risk factors for initial inappropriate antibiotics at the bedside, such as recent antibiotic therapy or recent hospitalization. Organized antibiotic order sets have been shown to significantly improve timely appropriate antibiotic administration in septic patients. Finally, emerging laboratory data suggest that early in the course of septic shock, the pharmacokinetics of common broad spectrum antibiotics may be significantly altered due to increased volumes of distribution having dosing implications for antibiotics in septic shock.

  2. Nebulized antibiotics. An adequate option for treating ventilator-associated respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Barcenilla, F

    2015-03-01

    Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) is a frequent complication in critical patients. The 90% of those who develop it receive broad-spectrum antibiotic (ATB) treatment, without any strong evidence of its favorable impact. The use of nebulized ATB could be a valid treatment option, to reduce the use of systemic ATB and the pressure of selection on the local flora. Several studies suggest that an adequate nebulization technique can ensure high levels of ATB even in areas of lung consolidation, and to obtain clinical and microbiological cure. New studies are needed to properly assess the impact of treatment with nebulized ATB on the emergence of resistance.

  3. [Sinusitis--judicious antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents different forms of sinusitis in children and adults as well as the patomechanism of sinusitis of infective and non-infective origin. The role of bacterial infection has been discussed. Participation of major pathogens of URTI such as S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis has been highlighted and the factors influencing growth of their antibiotic-resistant stains. Guidelines concerning antibiotic therapy in children and adults, depending on disease course, age and factors influencing growth of resistant stains have been presented. Causes of failure in treatment of sinusitis have been analysed eg. in case of bacterial biofilm growth or non-neutrophilic inflammation forms. Antimicrobial treatment concerns mainly acute and aggravated infections. In case of chronic sinusitis, antibiotic therapy is complementary to surgical treatment.

  4. Antibiotics for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Patidar, Kavish R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is complex and therapeutic regimens vary according to the acuity of presentation and the goals of therapy. Most treatments for HE rely on manipulating the intestinal milieu and therefore antibiotics that act on the gut form a key treatment strategy. Prominent antibiotics studied in HE are neomycin, metronidazole, vancomycin and rifaximin. For the management of the acute episode, all antibiotics have been tested. However the limited numbers studied, adverse effects (neomycin oto- and nephrotoxicity, metronidazole neurotoxicity) and potential for resistance emergence (vancomycin-resistant enterococcus) has limited the use of most antibiotics, apart from rifaximin which has the greatest evidence base. Rifaximin has also demonstrated, in conjunction with lactulose, to prevent overt HE recurrence in a multi-center, randomized trial. Despite its cost in the US, rifaximin may prove cost-saving by preventing hospitalizations for overt HE. In minimal/covert HE, rifaximin is the only systematically studied antibiotic. Rifaximin showed improvement in cognition, inflammation, quality-of-life and driving simulator performance but cost-analysis does not favor its use at the current time. Antibiotics, especially rifaximin, have a definite role in the management across the spectrum of HE.

  5. The Impact of Appropriate Antibiotic Prescribing on Treatment Evaluation Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Honoré, Mitonga Kabwebwe; Lubbe, Martie; Serfontein, Jan; Allen, Kirk

    2013-01-01

    The therapeutic impact of inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics is debatable, particularly in situations where infections are treated empirically with multiply prescribed antibiotics. Prescribers may remain under the illusion that such prescriptions are appropriate on the basis of any observed positive treatment outcomes, even though an antibiotic prescribed in such combination therapy may actually be infective against infecting pathogens. This, inevitably, promotes inappropriate antibiotic prescribing. Prescribers may be motivated to make more conscious attempts to prescribe antibiotics appropriately if it is proven that judicious prescribing of antibiotics has positive impacts on treatment outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of appropriate prescribing of antibiotics on treatment outcomes, days of patient hospitalization and costs related to antibiotic treatment. Observational data on antibiotic treatment were collected for a one-month period from case notes of all inpatients (n=307) and outpatients (n=865) at five government and mission hospitals in Lesotho. Prescriptions were classified into categories of appropriateness based on extents to which antibiotics were prescribed according to principles. Treatment success rates, mean days of hospitalization and costs of antibiotic treatments of inpatients treated with specified prescription categories were determined. Appropriate prescribing of antibiotics for inpatients had positive impacts on treatment outcomes, patients’ days of hospitalization for infections and costs of antibiotic treatments. In outpatient settings, appropriate prescribing of antibiotics failed to show any significant impact on costs of antibiotics. Appropriate prescribing of antibiotics had a positive impact on patients’ recovery and costs of antibiotic treatments in inpatient settings.

  6. [Prevention of ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus by adequate treatment with acyclovir].

    PubMed

    Borruat, F X; Buechi, E R; Piguet, B; Fitting, P; Zografos, L; Herbort, C P

    1991-05-01

    We compared the frequency of severe ocular complications secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (HZO) in 232 patients. They were divided into three groups: 1) patients without treatment (n = 164); 2) patients treated adequately (n = 48) with acyclovir (ACV; 5 x 800 mg/d orally and ophthalmic ointment 5 x /d for a minimum of 7 days, given within three days after skin eruption); and, 3) patients treated inadequately (n = 20) with ACV (only topical treatment, insufficient doses, interrupted treatment, delayed treatment). Patients with no treatment or with inadequate treatments showed the same frequency of severe ocular complications (21% (34/164) and 25% (5/20), respectively). In contrast, when adequate treatment of ACV was given complications occurred in only 4% (2/48) of cases. This study emphasizes the need for prompt (within three days after skin eruption) and adequate (5 x 800 mg/d for at least 7 days) treatment of ACV to prevent the severe complications of HZO.

  7. Fungal treatment for the removal of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in veterinary hospital wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lucas, D; Badia-Fabregat, M; Vicent, T; Caminal, G; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Balcázar, J L; Barceló, D

    2016-06-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance represents one of the most important public health concerns and has been linked to the widespread use of antibiotics in veterinary and human medicine. The overall elimination of antibiotics in conventional wastewater treatment plants is quite low; therefore, residual amounts of these compounds are continuously discharged to receiving surface waters, which may promote the emergence of antibiotic resistance. In this study, the ability of a fungal treatment as an alternative wastewater treatment for the elimination of forty-seven antibiotics belonging to seven different groups (β-lactams, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, metronidazoles, sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim) was evaluated. 77% of antibiotics were removed after the fungal treatment, which is higher than removal obtained in conventional treatment plants. Moreover, the effect of fungal treatment on the removal of some antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) was evaluated. The fungal treatment was also efficient in removing ARGs, such as ermB (resistance to macrolides), tetW (resistance to tetracyclines), blaTEM (resistance to β-lactams), sulI (resistance to sulfonamides) and qnrS (reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones). However, it was not possible to establish a clear link between concentrations of antibiotics and corresponding ARGs in wastewater, which leads to the conclusion that there are other factors that should be taken into consideration besides the antibiotic concentrations that reach aquatic ecosystems in order to explain the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance.

  8. A test for adequate wastewater treatment based on glutathione S transferase isoenzyme profile.

    PubMed

    Grammou, A; Samaras, P; Papadimitriou, C; Papadopoulos, A I

    2013-04-01

    Discharge to the environment of treated or non-treated municipal wastewater imposes several threats to coastal and estuarine ecosystems which are difficult to assess. In our study we evaluate the use of the isoenzyme profile of glutathione S transferase (GST) in combination with the kinetic characteristics of the whole enzyme and of heme peroxidase, as a test of adequate treatment of municipal wastewater. For this reason, Artemia nauplii were incubated in artificial seawater prepared by wastewater samples, such as secondary municipal effluents produced by a conventional activated sludge unit and advanced treated effluents produced by the employment of coagulation, activated carbon adsorption and chlorination as single processes or as combined ones. Characteristic changes of the isoenzyme pattern and the enzymes' kinetic properties were caused by chlorinated secondary municipal effluent or by secondary non-chlorinated effluent. Advanced treatment by combination of coagulation and/or carbon adsorption resulted to less prominent changes, suggesting more adequate treatment. Our results suggest that GST isoenzyme profile in combination with the kinetic properties of the total enzyme family is a sensitive test for the evaluation of the adequateness of the treatment of reclaimed wastewater and the reduction of potentially harmful compounds. Potentially, it may offer a 'fingerprint' characteristic of a particular effluent and probably of the treatment level it has been subjected.

  9. [Non antibiotic treatments of Lyme borreliosis].

    PubMed

    Puéchal, X

    2007-01-01

    Non-antibiotic treatment of Lyme borreliosis is only indicated in a few specific clinical situations. In chronic Lyme arthritis, intra-articular steroids are useful to immediately relieve symptomatic joint effusion. Nevertheless, 4 studies with weak methodological evidence were convergent enough to recommend not proposing intra-articular injection before or even immediately after antibiotic treatment. The injection can only be recommended in the treatment of patients whose joint effusion persists despite 2 courses of oral antibiotherapy or one course of IV antibiotherapy. For some experts, the injection can only be made after negative PCR assessment of the joint fluid for spirochetes. This recommendation, although logical, has never been evaluated. Radiation synovectomy may be indicated in persistent synovitis after antibiotherapy and before surgical synovectomy. Further studies are mandatory to confirm the role of radiation synovectomy in the local therapy. Arthroscopic synovectomy can reduce the period of joint inflammation when persistent synovitis is associated with significant pain or limited function. Several experts recommend using the procedure only if synovitis persists after 2 months of antibiotherapy and a negative PCR joint fluid assessment. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are often prescribed for their symptomatic effects. Experimental data is consensual on the deleterious consequences of systemic corticosteroid therapy. Corticosteroids are not indicated in Lyme's disease. In post Lyme's disease syndrome, patient complaints may lead to a multidisciplinary therapeutic management and the use of neuro-psychiatric drugs.

  10. Multifaceted antibiotic treatment analysis of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections.

    PubMed

    Weber, Zhanni; Ariano, Robert; Lagacé-Wiens, Philippe; Zelenitsky, Sheryl

    2016-12-01

    Given the overall prevalence and poor prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (BSIs), the study of treatment strategies to improve patient outcomes is important. The aim of this study was to conduct a multifaceted antibiotic treatment analysis of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) BSI and to characterise optimal early antibiotic therapy (within the first 7 days of drawing the index blood culture) for this serious infection. Antibiotic selection was categorised as optimal targeted (intravenous cloxacillin or cefazolin), optimal broad (piperacillin/tazobactam or meropenem), adequate (vancomycin) or inadequate (other antibiotics or oral therapy). A TSE (timing, selection, exposure) score was developed to comprehensively characterise early antibiotic therapy, where higher points corresponded to prompt initiation, optimal antibiotic selection and longer exposure (duration). Amongst 71 cases of complicated MSSA-BSI, end-of-treatment (EOT) response (i.e. clinical cure) was improved when at least adequate antibiotic therapy was initiated within 24 h [71.7% (33/46) vs. 48.0% (12/25); P = 0.047]. Clinical cure was also more likely when therapy included ≥4 days of optimal targeted antibiotics within the first 7 days [74.4% (29/39) vs. 50.0% (16/32); P = 0.03]. The TSE score was an informative index of early antibiotic therapy, with EOT cure documented in 72.0% (36/50) compared with 42.9% (9/21) of cases with scores above and below 15.2, respectively (P = 0.02). In multivariable analysis, lower Charlson comorbidity index, presence of BSI on admission, and optimising early antibiotic therapy, as described above, were associated with clinical cure in patients with MSSA-BSI.

  11. Using Chemical Reaction Kinetics to Predict Optimal Antibiotic Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Abel zur Wiesch, Pia; Cohen, Ted

    2017-01-01

    Identifying optimal dosing of antibiotics has proven challenging—some antibiotics are most effective when they are administered periodically at high doses, while others work best when minimizing concentration fluctuations. Mechanistic explanations for why antibiotics differ in their optimal dosing are lacking, limiting our ability to predict optimal therapy and leading to long and costly experiments. We use mathematical models that describe both bacterial growth and intracellular antibiotic-target binding to investigate the effects of fluctuating antibiotic concentrations on individual bacterial cells and bacterial populations. We show that physicochemical parameters, e.g. the rate of drug transmembrane diffusion and the antibiotic-target complex half-life are sufficient to explain which treatment strategy is most effective. If the drug-target complex dissociates rapidly, the antibiotic must be kept constantly at a concentration that prevents bacterial replication. If antibiotics cross bacterial cell envelopes slowly to reach their target, there is a delay in the onset of action that may be reduced by increasing initial antibiotic concentration. Finally, slow drug-target dissociation and slow diffusion out of cells act to prolong antibiotic effects, thereby allowing for less frequent dosing. Our model can be used as a tool in the rational design of treatment for bacterial infections. It is easily adaptable to other biological systems, e.g. HIV, malaria and cancer, where the effects of physiological fluctuations of drug concentration are also poorly understood. PMID:28060813

  12. Antibiotic treatment and mortality in patients with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis or bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Thønnings, S; Knudsen, J D; Schønheyder, H C; Søgaard, M; Arpi, M; Gradel, K O; Østergaard, C

    2016-08-01

    Invasive Listeria monocytogenes infections carry a high mortality despite antibiotic treatment. The rareness of the infection makes it difficult to improve antibiotic treatment through randomized clinical trials. This observational study investigated clinical features and outcome of invasive L. monocytogenes infections including the efficacy of empiric and definitive antibiotic therapies. Demographic, clinical and biochemical findings, antibiotic treatment and 30-day mortality for all episodes of L. monocytogenes bacteraemia and/or meningitis were collected by retrospective medical record review in the North Denmark Region and the Capital Region of Denmark (17 hospitals) from 1997 to 2012. Risk factors for 30-day all-cause mortality were assessed by logistic regression. The study comprised 229 patients (median age: 71 years), 172 patients had bacteraemia, 24 patients had meningitis and 33 patients had both. Significant risk factors for 30-day mortality were septic shock (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.4-6.4), altered mental state (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.7-7.6) and inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-8.1). Cephalosporins accounted for 90% of inadequately treated cases. Adequate definitive antibiotic treatment was administered to 195 patients who survived the early period (benzylpenicillin 72, aminopenicillin 84, meropenem 28, sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim 6, and piperacillin/tazobactam 5). Definitive antibiotic treatment with benzylpenicillin or aminopenicillin resulted in a lower 30-day mortality in an adjusted analysis compared with meropenem (OR 0.3; 95% CI 0.1-0.8). In conclusion, inadequate empiric antibiotic therapy and definitive therapy with meropenem were both associated with significantly higher 30-day mortality.

  13. Treatment, promotion, commotion: Antibiotic alternatives in food-producing animals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alternatives to antibiotics in animal agriculture are urgently needed but present a complex problem because of their various uses: disease treatment, disease prevention, and feed efficiency improvement. Numerous antibiotic alternatives, such as feed amended with pre- and probiotics, have been propos...

  14. Antibiotics

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotics are powerful medicines that fight bacterial infections. Used properly, antibiotics can save lives. They either kill bacteria or ... natural defenses can usually take it from there. Antibiotics do not fight infections caused by viruses, such ...

  15. Bacterial Temporal Dynamics Enable Optimal Design of Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Hannah R.; Lopatkin, Allison J.; Anderson, Deverick J.; You, Lingchong

    2015-01-01

    There is a critical need to better use existing antibiotics due to the urgent threat of antibiotic resistant bacteria coupled with the reduced effort in developing new antibiotics. β-lactam antibiotics represent one of the most commonly used classes of antibiotics to treat a broad spectrum of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. However, the rise of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria has limited the use of β-lactams. Due to the concern of complex drug responses, many β-lactams are typically ruled out if ESBL-producing pathogens are detected, even if these pathogens test as susceptible to some β-lactams. Using quantitative modeling, we show that β-lactams could still effectively treat pathogens producing low or moderate levels of ESBLs when administered properly. We further develop a metric to guide the design of a dosing protocol to optimize treatment efficiency for any antibiotic-pathogen combination. Ultimately, optimized dosing protocols could allow reintroduction of a repertoire of first-line antibiotics with improved treatment outcomes and preserve last-resort antibiotics. PMID:25905796

  16. Fate of antibiotics during municipal water recycling treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Le-Minh, N; Khan, S J; Drewes, J E; Stuetz, R M

    2010-08-01

    Municipal water recycling processes are potential human and environmental exposure routes for low concentrations of persistent antibiotics. While the implications of such exposure scenarios are unknown, concerns have been raised regarding the possibility that continuous discharge of antibiotics to the environment may facilitate the development or proliferation of resistant strains of bacteria. As potable and non-potable water recycling schemes are continuously developed, it is imperative to improve our understanding of the fate of antibiotics during conventional and advanced wastewater treatment processes leading to high-quality water reclamation. This review collates existing knowledge with the aim of providing new insight to the influence of a wide range of treatment processes to the ultimate fate of antibiotics during conventional and advanced wastewater treatment. Although conventional biological wastewater treatment processes are effective for the removal of some antibiotics, many have been reported to occur at 10-1000 ng L(-1) concentrations in secondary treated effluents. These include beta-lactams, sulfonamides, trimethoprim, macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and tetracyclines. Tertiary and advanced treatment processes may be required to fully manage environmental and human exposure to these contaminants in water recycling schemes. The effectiveness of a range of processes including tertiary media filtration, ozonation, chlorination, UV irradiation, activated carbon adsorption, and NF/RO filtration has been reviewed and, where possible, semi-quantitative estimations of antibiotics removals have been provided.

  17. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-21

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  18. Role of antibiotics for treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Orna; Elias, Mazen; Peretz, Avi; Saliba, Walid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is thought to be caused by an aberrant immune response to gut bacteria in a genetically susceptible host. The gut microbiota plays an important role in the pathogenesis and complications of the two main inflammatory bowel diseases: Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis. Alterations in gut microbiota, and specifically reduced intestinal microbial diversity, have been found to be associated with chronic gut inflammation in these disorders. Specific bacterial pathogens, such as virulent Escherichia coli strains, Bacteroides spp, and Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, have been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Antibiotics may influence the course of these diseases by decreasing concentrations of bacteria in the gut lumen and altering the composition of intestinal microbiota. Different antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, the combination of both, rifaximin, and anti-tuberculous regimens have been evaluated in clinical trials for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. For the treatment of active luminal CD, antibiotics may have a modest effect in decreasing disease activity and achieving remission, and are more effective in patients with disease involving the colon. Rifamixin, a non absorbable rifamycin has shown promising results. Treatment of suppurative complications of CD such as abscesses and fistulas, includes drainage and antibiotic therapy, most often ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, or a combination of both. Antibiotics might also play a role in maintenance of remission and prevention of post operative recurrence of CD. Data is more sparse for ulcerative colitis, and mostly consists of small trials evaluating ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and rifaximin. Most trials did not show a benefit for the treatment of active ulcerative colitis with antibiotics, though 2 meta-analyses concluded that antibiotic therapy is associated with a modest improvement in clinical symptoms

  19. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class.

    PubMed

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera; Linninge, Caroline; Ahrné, Siv; Højberg, Ole; Licht, Tine Rask; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX), cefotaxime (CTX), vancomycin (VAN), metronidazole (MTZ), or water (CON) daily for 10-11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in permeability did

  20. In silico evaluation and exploration of antibiotic tuberculosis treatment regimens

    DOE PAGES

    Pienaar, Elsje; Dartois, Véronique; Linderman, Jennifer J.; ...

    2015-11-14

    Improvement in tuberculosis treatment regimens requires selection of antibiotics and dosing schedules from a large design space of possibilities. Incomplete knowledge of antibiotic and host immune dynamics in tuberculosis granulomas impacts clinical trial design and success, and variations among clinical trials hamper side-by-side comparison of regimens. Our objective is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of isoniazid and rifampin regimens, and identify modifications to these antibiotics that improve treatment outcomes. We pair a spatio-temporal computational model of host immunity with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on isoniazid and rifampin. The model is calibrated to plasma pharmacokinetic and granuloma bacterial load data frommore » non-human primate models of tuberculosis and to tissue and granuloma measurements of isoniazid and rifampin in rabbit granulomas. We predict the efficacy of regimens containing different doses and frequencies of isoniazid and rifampin. We predict impacts of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modifications on antibiotic efficacy. We demonstrate that suboptimal antibiotic concentrations within granulomas lead to poor performance of intermittent regimens compared to daily regimens. Improvements from dose and frequency changes are limited by inherent antibiotic properties, and we propose that changes in intracellular accumulation ratios and antimicrobial activity would lead to the most significant improvements in treatment outcomes. Results suggest that an increased risk of drug resistance in fully intermittent as compared to daily regimens arises from higher bacterial population levels early during treatment. In conclusion, our systems pharmacology approach complements efforts to accelerate tuberculosis therapeutic development.« less

  1. [Antibiotic treatment in patients amputated for ischemic diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Fernández Montequín, J I; McCook Martínez, J; Lima Santana, B; Velasco Armas, N; Montalvo Diago, J; Mahía Vilas, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty diabetic patients submitted to a major amputation were tested by humo-celullar assays (retarded hypersensibility assays). Reactive patients were subdivided into two groups: one group was treated postoperatively with antibiotics, and the other group was not treated. Both groups were homogeneous in age, hemoglobin concentrations, hematocrit, total proteins, glucemy and history of sepsis or leukocytosis. Five patients treated with antibiotics (33.3%) presented sepsis, one patient was reamputated and one patient died. Between the not treated patients, only three presented sepsis (20%) without any other complications. Authors conclude that the development of sepsis in reactive, diabetic, amputated patients is independent of antibiotic treatment.

  2. Antibiotic treatment selects for cooperative virulence of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Diard, Médéric; Sellin, Mikael E; Dolowschiak, Tamas; Arnoldini, Markus; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-09-08

    Antibiotics are powerful therapeutics but are not equally effective against all cells in bacterial populations. Bacteria that express an antibiotic-tolerant phenotype ("persisters") can evade treatment [1]. Persisters can cause relapses of the infection after the end of the therapy [2]. It is still poorly understood whether persistence affects the evolution of bacterial virulence. During infections, persisters have been found preferentially at particular sites within the host [3, 4]. If bacterial virulence factors are required to reach such sites, treatment with antibiotics could impose selection on the expression of virulence genes, in addition to their well-established effects on bacterial resistance. Here, we report that treatment with antibiotics selects for virulence and fosters transmissibility of Salmonella Typhimurium. In a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea, treatment with the broad-spectrum antibiotic ciprofloxacin reverses the outcome of competition between wild-type bacteria and avirulent mutants that can spontaneously arise during within-host evolution [5]. While avirulent mutants take over the gut lumen and abolish disease transmission in untreated mice, ciprofloxacin tilts the balance in favor of virulent, wild-type bacteria. This is explained by the need for virulence factors to invade gut tissues and form a persistent reservoir. Avirulent mutants remain in the gut lumen and are eradicated. Upon cessation of antibiotic treatment, tissue-lodged wild-type pathogens reseed the gut lumen and thereby facilitate disease transmissibility to new hosts. Our results suggest a general principle by which antibiotic treatment can promote cooperative virulence during within-host evolution, increase duration of transmissibility, and thereby enhance the spread of an infectious disease.

  3. Antibiotic microspheres: preliminary testing for potential treatment of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Ambrose, Catherine G; Gogola, Gloria R; Clyburn, Terry A; Raymond, A Kevin; Peng, Angela S; Mikos, Antonios G

    2003-10-01

    Osteomyelitis is a difficult problem for orthopaedic surgeons. The current standard of treatment requires high doses of antibiotic to be administered parenterally, which can damage vital organs. A local drug delivery system, which targets only the infected tissues, would eliminate some of the complications associated with extended courses of parenteral antibiotic treatment. In the current study, biodegradable microspheres were manufactured from a high molecular weight copolymer of 50% lactic and 50% glycolic acid and the antibiotic tobramycin. Various formulations of microspheres were tested for in vitro elution characteristics to determine the optimum formulation for linear release of antibiotic for at least 4 weeks. The optimal formulation then was implanted into a pouch created in the quadriceps muscle of mice to evaluate the in vivo elution of the antibiotic and the inflammatory response elicited by the microspheres. Results indicate that a sustained linear release of antibiotic from the microspheres is possible for a period of at least 4 weeks and that the inflammatory response was within levels required for the microspheres to be considered biocompatible.

  4. Recurrent urinary tract infections and complications after symptomatic versus antibiotic treatment: follow-up of a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bleidorn, Jutta; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Schmiemann, Guido; Wiese, Birgitt; Gágyor, Ildikó

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in general practice, and are usually treated with antibiotics. Recurrent UTI often pose a serious problem for affected women. Little is known about recurrent UTI and complications when uncomplicated UTI are treated without antibiotics. With ICUTI (Immediate vs. conditional antibiotic use in uncomplicated UTI, funded by BMBF No. 01KG1105) we assessed whether initial symptomatic treatment with ibuprofen could be a treatment alternative for uncomplicated UTI. The presented analysis aims to assess the influence of initial (non-)antibiotic treatment on recurrent UTI rates and pyelonephritis after day 28 up to 6 months after trial participation. Methods: This study is a retrospective long-term follow-up analysis of ICUTI patients, surveyed telephonically six months after inclusion in the trial. Recurrent UTI, pyelonephritis or hospitalizations were documented. Statistical evaluation was performed by descriptive and multivariate analyses with SPSS 21. Results: For the six months follow-up survey, 386 trial participants could be contacted (494 had been included in ICUTI initially, 446 had completed the trial). From day 28 until 6 months after inclusion in ICUTI, 84 recurrent UTI were reported by 80 patients. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed no effect of initial treatment group or antibiotic treatment on number of patients with recurrent UTI. Yet, both analyses showed that patients with a history of previous UTI had significantly more often recurrent UTI. Pyelonephritis occurred in two patients of the antibiotic group and in one patient in the non-antibiotic group. Conclusion: This follow-up analysis of a trial comparing antibiotic vs. symptomatic treatment for uncomplicated UTI showed that non-antibiotic treatment has no negative impact on recurrent UTI rates or pyelonephritis after day 28 and up to six months after initial treatment. Thus, a four week follow-up in UTI trials seems adequate

  5. Antibiotic treatments of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius infection in a dog: a case presentation.

    PubMed

    Decristophoris, P; Mauri, F; Albanese, F; Carnelli, A; Vanzetti, T; Zinsstag, J

    2011-09-01

    We report the antibiotic treatments administered to a female dog with mastitis and successive pyoderma. Microbiological investigations allowed the identification of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius after 54 days of various antibiotic treatments. The isolate carried the mecA gene and was resistant to 9 of 15 tested antibiotics. Consistent antibiotic treatment of the infection was possible only after accurate microbiological diagnosis.

  6. Antibiotic-eluting hydrophilized PMMA bone cement with prolonged bactericidal effect for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Eun Jo; Oh, Se Heang; Lee, In Soo; Kwon, Oh Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2016-05-01

    Osteomyelitis is still considered to be one of the major challenges for orthopedic surgeons despite advanced antiseptic surgical procedures and pharmaceutical therapeutics. In this study, hydrophilized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) bone cements containing Pluronic F68 (EG79PG28EG79) as a hydrophilic additive and vancomycin (F68-VAcements) were prepared to allow the sustained release of the antibiotic for adequate periods of time without any significant loss of mechanical properties. The compressive strengths of the bone cements with Pluronic F68 compositions less than 7 wt% were not significantly different compared with the control vancomycin-loaded bone cement (VAcement). TheF68 (7 wt%)-VAcement showed sustained release of the antibiotic for up to 11 weeks and almost 100% release from the bone cement. It also prohibited the growth ofS. aureus(zone of inhibition) over six weeks (the required period to treat osteomyelitis), and it did not show any notable cytotoxicity. From an animal study using a femoral osteomyelitis rat model, it was observed that theF68 (7 wt%)-VAcement was effective for the treatment of osteomyelitis, probably as a result of the prolonged release of antibiotic from the PMMA bone cement. On the basis of these findings, it can be suggested that the use of Pluronic F68 as a hydrophilic additive for antibiotic-eluting PMMA bone cement can be a promising strategy for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

  7. Clostridium difficile infection: update on emerging antibiotic treatment options and antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dhara; Dang, Minh-Duc; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koo, Hoonmo L; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; DuPont, Herbert L; Garey, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the most common cause of identifiable diarrhea in hospitalized patients. The incidence and severity of CDIs are increasing. The increased incidence and severity of the disease has sparked interest in the optimal treatment of CDI as well as the use of new therapies and drug discovery. Current treatment strategies are inadequate with decreased response rates to metronidazole, and high recurrence rates with the use of metronidazole and oral vancomycin. Although incidence rates continue to be low, in vitro resistance to antibiotics used for the treatment of CDI has been noted. Recently, important data has emerged on new anti-C. difficile antibiotics such as rifaximin, rifalazil, fidaxomicin, nitazoxanide, tigecycline and ramoplanin. The purpose of this review is to provide an update on the in vitro susceptibility and new antibiotic treatment options for CDI. This review will focus primarily on scientific studies published in the last 36 months in order to provide an up-to-date review on the topic. PMID:20455684

  8. Antibiotic treatment of pneumonia and bronchiolitis. A prospective randomised study.

    PubMed Central

    Friis, B; Andersen, P; Brenøe, E; Hornsleth, A; Jensen, A; Knudsen, F U; Krasilnikoff, P A; Mordhorst, C H; Nielsen, S; Uldall, P

    1984-01-01

    Routine administration of antibiotics in the treatment of pneumonia and bronchiolitis in infants and small children was evaluated in an open randomised prospective trial. From 1979-82 136 children between the age of 1 month and 6 years were allocated to one of two treatment groups shortly after their admission to a paediatric ward. Group A patients were to be given antibiotics but those in group B were not. None of the children had received antibiotics before hospital admission. A viral infection was diagnosed in 38 of the 72 patients from group A and in 34 of the 64 patients from group B. Respiratory syncytial virus was detected in 84% of these patients. Samples of tracheal secretions showed no differences between the groups in respect of cytology and bacterial flora. Nor were there any significant differences in the course of acute disease, the frequency of fever relapse and pulmonary complications. Fifteen patients from group B were subsequently treated with antibiotics: two of these developed secondary purulent infections of the middle ear and one showed a slight pleural effusion. These results do not support the routine use of antibiotics in infants and small children admitted to hospital with pneumonia and bronchiolitis. PMID:6391389

  9. Bacteriophages as potential treatment option for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bragg, Robert; van der Westhuizen, Wouter; Lee, Ji-Yun; Coetsee, Elke; Boucher, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    The world is facing an ever-increasing problem with antibiotic resistant bacteria and we are rapidly heading for a post-antibiotic era. There is an urgent need to investigate alterative treatment options while there are still a few antibiotics left. Bacteriophages are viruses that specifically target bacteria. Before the development of antibiotics, some efforts were made to use bacteriophages as a treatment option, but most of this research stopped soon after the discovery of antibiotics. There are two different replication options which bacteriophages employ. These are the lytic and lysogenic life cycles. Both these life cycles have potential as treatment options. There are various advantages and disadvantages to the use of bacteriophages as treatment options. The main advantage is the specificity of bacteriophages and treatments can be designed to specifically target pathogenic bacteria while not negatively affecting the normal microbiota. There are various advantages to this. However, the high level of specificity also creates potential problems, the main being the requirement of highly specific diagnostic procedures. Another potential problem with phage therapy includes the development of immunity and limitations with the registration of phage therapy options. The latter is driving research toward the expression of phage genes which break the bacterial cell wall, which could then be used as a treatment option. Various aspects of phage therapy have been investigated in studies undertaken by our research group. We have investigated specificity of phages to various avian pathogenic E. coli isolates. Furthermore, the exciting NanoSAM technology has been employed to investigate bacteriophage replication and aspects of this will be discussed.

  10. Occurrence of antibiotics in wastewater treatment facilities in Wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karthikeyan, K.G.; Meyer, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Samples from several wastewater treatment facilities in Wisconsin were screened for the presence of 21 antibiotic compounds. These facilities spanned a range of community size served (average daily flow from 0.0212 to 23.6 million gallons/day), secondary treatment processes, geographic locations across the state, and they discharged the treated effluents to both surface and ground waters (for ground water after a soil passage). A total of six antibiotic compounds were detected (1-5 compounds per site), including two sulfonamides (sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole), one tetracycline (tetracycline), fluoroquinolone (ciprofloxacin), macrolide (erythromycin-H2O) and trimethoprim. The frequency of detection of antibiotics was in the following order: tetracycline and trimethoprim (80%) > sulfamethoxazole (70%) > erythromycin-H2O (45%) > ciprofloxacin (40%) > sulfamethazine (10%). However, the soluble concentrations were in the parts-per-billion (ppb) range (??? 1.3 ??g/L), and importantly were unaffected by the size of the wastewater treatment facility. The concentrations detected were within an order of magnitude of those reported for similar systems in Europe and Canada: they were within a factor of two in comparison to those reported for Canada but generally lower relative to those measured in wastewater systems in Europe. Only sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were detected in groundwater monitoring wells adjacent to the treatment systems. Future intensive wastewater monitoring programs in Wisconsin may be limited to the six antibiotic compounds detected in this study. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antibiotic lock for treatment of tunneled hemodialysis catheter bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among catheter-dependent hemodialysis patients. Microorganism biofilm matrix formation in the catheter is the pathogenic process of this entity. Administration of systemic antibiotics and removal of the offending catheter is the most logical treatment. This article discusses an alternative option, instillation of an antibiotic-lock solution into the lumen of the catheter plus systemic antibiotic therapy. Recent studies suggest that this strategy could treat the infection and salvage the catheter, thus avoiding the need for further interventional procedures including but not limited to the removal of the catheter, placement of a temporary catheter, and finally placement of a new permanent catheter. The implementation of this effective approach will reduce morbidity and possibly reduce the cost and interventions associated with it.

  12. Effectiveness of prophylactic antibiotics in the outpatient treatment of burns.

    PubMed

    Boss, W K; Brand, D A; Acampora, D; Barese, S; Frazier, W H

    1985-03-01

    We compared wound infection rates in 133 outpatient burns treated with prophylactic antibiotics in our emergency room and 161 similar, untreated burns. Infection rates in the treated and untreated groups were 3.8% (5/133) and 3.1% (5/161), respectively. Since this was an observational cohort study, it was necessary to demonstrate the comparability of treated and untreated groups with respect to risk factors for infection, including patient age, size, location, and etiology of the burn injury, time since injury, and presence of co-morbidity. The groups were found to be comparable for all risk factors except size of burn: larger burns were over-represented in the treated group (p less than 0.05). Even after controlling for size, antibiotic use did not lower the infection rate. These results argue strongly against routine use of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of outpatient burns.

  13. Antibiotic therapy of aortic graft infection: treatment and prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hodgkiss-Harlow, Kelley D; Bandyk, Dennis F

    2011-12-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after aortic intervention, an uncommon but serious vascular condition, requires patient-specific antibiotic therapy. Effective treatment and prevention requires the vascular surgeon to be cognizant of changing SSI microbiology, advances in antibiotic delivery, and patient characteristics. The majority of aortic graft infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria, with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus now the prevalent pathogen. Nasal carriage of methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S aureus strains, diabetes mellitus, recent hospitalization, a failed arterial reconstruction, and the presence of a groin incision are important SSI risk factors. Overall, the aortic SSI rate is higher than predicted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk category system; ranging from 5% after open or endovascular aortic interventions to as high as 10% to 15% after aortofemoral bypass or uni-aortoiliac grafting with femorofemoral bypass. Perioperative measures to reduce S aureus nares and skin colonization, administration of antibiotic prophylaxis, meticulous wound closure/care, and therapy directed to optimize patient host defense regulation mechanisms (eg, temperature, oxygenation, blood sugar) can minimize SSI occurrence. Antibiotic therapy for aortic graft infection should utilize bactericidal drugs that penetrate bacteria biofilms and can be delivered to the surgical site both parenterally and locally in the form of antibiotic-impregnated beads or prosthetic grafts.

  14. Barriers to help-seeking, detection, and adequate treatment for anxiety and mood disorders: implications for health care policy.

    PubMed

    Mechanic, David

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the focus of health policies and initiatives has been directed toward mental health. More precisely, depressive and anxiety disorders have received particular attention because of their disabling outcomes and prevalence among most populations. Despite this increased interest, numerous issues regarding patients' willingness to seek treatment and the adequate recognition and treatment of these disorders by clinicians remain to be addressed. This article considers the factors that influence patients and physicians in their reticence to acknowledge and adequately treat depression and anxiety disorders. It also reviews the impact of society and the media, together with other factors relating to health care organization and administration that affect the treatment of depression and anxiety. In view of the multifaceted challenge involved, efforts to achieve a consensus in determining treatment for those with depressive and anxiety disorders are essential. A consensus will require easy, measurable, and reliable disability indicators; evidence that treatment of patients with varying levels of need is cost effective; and that persons who most need and would benefit from care can be reliably identified among the highly prevalent population of persons with more transient symptoms. Governments and other policymakers should be encouraged to provide appropriate coverage for access to primary and secondary care, the treatments required, and sufficient resources so that care is available when necessary. An important aspect of the challenge is to incorporate these efforts within the realistic constraints of primary care.

  15. [Bacteriological profile and antibiotic treatment of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Missaoui, K; Marzougui, Y; Kouka, J; Dhibi, Y; Hannachi, Z; Dziri, C; Houissa, M

    2014-01-01

    During the postoperative peritonitis (PPO) the main stay of treatment is the choice of probabilistic antibiotictherapy, it is also the main prognostic factor The aim of our study was to identify anappropriate antibiotic protocol to the current ecology of our unit. It was a retrospective study including 102 patients over a period of 09 years from 1 January 2003 to 3O November 2011. All of them are supported for the treatments off postoperative peritonitis in surgical intensive care unit of a service of general surgery a university hospital Charles Nicolle of Tunis. All bacteriological data (germs and sensitivity), and the terms of therapeutic modality for the empirical antibiotic therapy were listed. The incidence of PPO was Q90%.The average age of our patients was 57 +/- 18 years. The sex ratio was 1.08. One hundred and seven (107) microorganisms were isolated from 72 samples (44 microbial mono, 28 multi microbial). The frequency of gram-positive cocci (GPC) was 16.82%, the Gram-negative bacilli (BGN) was 82.2%. The Enterobacteriaceae have proved particularity resistant. Thus, the ampicillin resistance was 87.14%, that the C3G was 33.80%, the Piperacillin to Tazobactam combination, was 36.5% and that the association Ticarcillin-clavulanic acid was 43.6%. For non-fermenting BGN, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to ticarcillin in 80% of cases, to ceftazidime in 66.6% of cases, PiperacillinTazobactam--in 71.43% of cases, imipenem in 85 72% of cases, colimycin in 100% of cases and Amiklin in 71.43% of cases. For CGP, enterococci were resistant to ampicillin in 50% of cases and vancomycin in 0% of cases. The majority of patients received triple antibiotic therapy (59.8%) or combination therapy (34.3%). The main associations were: cefotaxime + Gentamycin + Metronidazole (35.2%), Amikacin Imipenem + + Metronidazole (12.7%), Imipenem + amikacin (9.8%), Piperacillin / Tazobactam + amikacin (9.8%) + amikacin and ertapenem (5.88%). Probabilitic antibiotic therapy was

  16. Presence of antibiotic resistance genes in a sewage treatment plant in Thibodaux, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Naquin, Anthony; Shrestha, Arsen; Sherpa, Mingma; Nathaniel, Rajkumar; Boopathy, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Increasing uses and disposals of antibiotics to the environment have increased emergence of various antibiotic resistance. One of the sources for the spread of antibiotic resistance is wastewater treatment plant, where bacteria and antibiotics can come in contact and can acquire antibiotics resistance. There are very few studies on this subject from a small town sewage treatment plant. Therefore, this study was conducted using raw sewage as well as treated sewage from a sewage treatment plant in Thibodaux in rural southeast Louisiana in USA. Samples were collected monthly from the Thibodaux sewage treatment plant and the presence of antibiotic resistance genes was monitored. The study showed the presence of antibiotic resistance genes in both raw and treated sewage in every month of the study period. The genetic transformation assay showed the successful transformation of methicillin resistant gene, mecA to an antibiotic sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, which became antibiotic resistant within 24h.

  17. Pharmacological Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease: Is it Progressing Adequately?

    PubMed Central

    Robles, Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Between 1993 and 2000 four acetylcholinesterase inhibitors were marketed as a symptomatic treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), as well as memantine in 2003. Current research is focused on finding drugs that favorably modify the course of the disease. However, their entrance into the market does not seem to be imminent. Research Development: The aim of AD research is to find substances that inhibit certain elements of the AD pathogenic chain (beta- and gamma-secretase inhibitors, alpha-secretase stimulants, beta-amyloid aggregability reducers or disaggregation and elimination inductors, as well as tau-hyperphosphorylation, glutamate excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage reducers, among other action mechanisms). Demonstrating a disease’s retarding effect demands longer trials than those necessary to ascertain symptomatic improvement. Besides, a high number of patients (thousands of them) is necessary, all of which turns out to be difficult and costly. Furthermore, it would be necessary to count on diagnosis and progression markers in the disease’s pre-clinical stage, markers for specific phenotypes, as well as high-selectivity molecules acting only where necessary. In order to compensate these difficulties, drugs acting on several defects of the pathogenic chain or showing both symptomatic and neuroprotective action simultaneously are being researched. Conclusions: There are multiple molecules used in research to modify AD progression. Although it turns out to be difficult to obtain drugs with sufficient efficacy so that their marketing is approved, if they were achieved they would lead to a reduction of AD prevalence. PMID:19461897

  18. Real-Life GOLD 2011 Implementation: The Management of COPD Lacks Correct Classification and Adequate Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Koblizek, Vladimir; Pecen, Ladislav; Zatloukal, Jaromir; Kocianova, Jana; Plutinsky, Marek; Kolek, Vitezslav; Novotna, Barbora; Kocova, Eva; Pracharova, Sarka; Tichopad, Ales

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious, yet preventable and treatable, disease. The success of its treatment relies largely on the proper implementation of recommendations, such as the recently released Global Strategy for Diagnosis, Management, and Prevention of COPD (GOLD 2011, of late December 2011). The primary objective of this study was to examine the extent to which GOLD 2011 is being used correctly among Czech respiratory specialists, in particular with regard to the correct classification of patients. The secondary objective was to explore what effect an erroneous classification has on inadequate use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). In order to achieve these goals, a multi-center, cross-sectional study was conducted, consisting of a general questionnaire and patient-specific forms. A subjective classification into the GOLD 2011 categories was examined, and then compared with the objectively computed one. Based on 1,355 patient forms, a discrepancy between the subjective and objective classifications was found in 32.8% of cases. The most common reason for incorrect classification was an error in the assessment of symptoms, which resulted in underestimation in 23.9% of cases, and overestimation in 8.9% of the patients' records examined. The specialists seeing more than 120 patients per month were most likely to misclassify their condition, and were found to have done so in 36.7% of all patients seen. While examining the subjectively driven ICS prescription, it was found that 19.5% of patients received ICS not according to guideline recommendations, while in 12.2% of cases the ICS were omitted, contrary to guideline recommendations. Furthermore, with consideration to the objectively-computed classification, it was discovered that 15.4% of patients received ICS unnecessarily, whereas in 15.8% of cases, ICS were erroneously omitted. It was therefore concluded that Czech specialists tend either to under-prescribe or overuse inhaled

  19. Presymptomatic diagnosis with MRI and adequate treatment ameliorate the outcome after natalizumab-associated progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Lindå, Hans; von Heijne, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri(®)) is a monoclonal antibody that prevents inflammatory cells from binding to brain endothelial cells and passing into the brain parenchyma. Natalizumab is a highly effective treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is an opportunistic brain JC virus infection that has been shown to be associated with natalizumab treatment. We describe PML in a patient with MS after 44 monthly infusions of natalizumab. With the aid of a routine Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, PML was detected before any unambiguous clinical manifestations had emerged. PML was treated with plasma exchange to accelerate removal of natalizumab. Mirtazapine and mefloquine was promptly added and approximately 1 month after plasma exchange, when an immune-reconstitution-inflammatory-syndrome appeared, steroid treatment was initiated. Steroid treatment was then continued until no virus could be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. The outcome was favorable. We believe that this case clearly illustrates the importance of an early, presymptomatic, detection of PML, and an adequate treatment. We also propose that surveillance with MRI scans, every 3 months after 24 months of treatment, should be performed in JC virus antibody positive natalizumab-treated MS patients in order to detect PML in an early phase.

  20. Antibiotics for the Treatment of Leptospirosis: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Charan, Jaykaran; Saxena, Deepak; Mulla, Summaiya; Yadav, Preeti

    2013-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease prevalent mainly in developing countries and is associated with high case fatality. Antibiotics especially penicillin are the mainstay of treatment for a suspected or confirm case of leptospirosis but role of Penicillin has not been evaluated systematically in the light of current evidence. The present systematic review and meta-analysis is done to evaluate the role of antibiotics in the treatment of leptospirosis. Parallel group clinical trials involving use of penicillin in treatment of leptospirosis were searched from all available sources. Ten clinical trials were found suitable as per laid inclusion criteria eligible for present systematic review and five clinical trials were included in meta-analysis. Clinical trials included for meta-analysis were compared on the basis of mortality, fever days, numbers of patients presenting with oliguria, and number of patients undergoing need-based dialysis. Analysis was done by comprehensive meta-analysis software 2. Qualitative outcomes are summarized as odds ratio and quantitative outcomes are summarized as standard mean difference with 95% confidence interval. Random and fixed models are used for analysis. There was no significant difference between penicillin group and controlled group for mortality (Odds ratio 1.59 (95% CI 0.59-4.29), P = 0.35), fever days (std difference in mean = −0.223 (95% CI 0.394-0.995), P = 0.358), number of patients presenting with oliguria (Odds ratio 1.795 (95% CI 0.325-9.929), P = 0.502), and number of patients who underwent need based dialysis (Odds ratio 1.587 (95% CI 0.919-2.731), P = 0.098). Role of various antibiotics in treatment of leptospirosis is uncertain, and can be attributed to nonavailability of adequate clinical trials. Role of penicillin in the treatment of leptospirosis can be debated. PMID:23930159

  1. Potential role of antibiotics in the treatment of asthma.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Cosentini, Roberto; Tarsia, Paolo; Allegra, Luigi

    2004-09-01

    Although the role of antibiotic treatment in asthma is still disputed, clinical use of antimicrobials in this setting is more widespread than warranted on the basis of indications in the literature. Viral upper respiratory tract infections are known to be involved in asthma exacerbations. More recently, evidence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae involvement in asthma attacks has been reported both in adult and paediatric populations. These pathogens are also involved in chronic asthma, and both in vitro and animal model studies indicate that atypical agents may play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent studies on asthma patients with evidence of atypical infection suggest that specific antimicrobial treatment (basically macrolides or fluoroquinolones) may confer additional advantages compared to standard therapy alone. Furthermore, a considerable amount of data has been gathered describing additional effects associated with macrolide treatment (reduced bronchial hyper-responsiveness, altered cytokine production, etc.). These non-antimicrobial effects have been defined as "anti-inflammatory activity". Should this information be confirmed, the use of macrolides in patients with asthma may be twofold: eradication of occult atypical infection; and reduction in the airway inflammation burden. Future lines of research in this field should attempt to determine whether specific antibiotic treatment may alter the natural history of asthma.

  2. Antibiotic treatment and resistance in chronic wounds of vascular origin

    PubMed Central

    TZANEVA, VALENTINA; MLADENOVA, IRENA; TODOROVA, GALINA; PETKOV, DIMITAR

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim The problem of antibiotic resistance is worldwide and affects many types of pathogens. This phenomenon has been growing for decades and nowadays we are faced with a wide range of worrisome pathogens that are becoming resistant and many pathogens that may soon be untreatable. The aim of this study was to determine the resistance and antibiotic treatment in chronic wounds of vascular origin. Methods We performed a cross sectional study on a sample of patients with chronic vascular wounds, hospitalized between October 2014 and August 2015, in the Clinic of Vascular Surgery in Trakia Hospital Stara Zagora. The statistical analysis of data was descriptive, considering the p value of ≤0.05, the threshold of statistical significance. Results In the group of 110 patients, the significantly most frequent chronic wound (p<0.001) was peripheral arteriopathy (47.3%, CI95%: 38.19–56.54). Among 159 strains, 30% of patients having multiple etiology, the species most frequently isolated were Staphylococcus aureus, E.coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis with a significant predominance (p<0.05) of the Gram negative (55.1%). The spectrum of strains resistance included the Beta-lactams (36.4%, p<0.001), Macrolides (20%), Tetracyclines (9.1%), Aminoglycosides (8.2%) and Fluoroquinolones (4.5%). Conclusions Gram negative microorganisms were the main isolates in patients with vascular chronic wound. Significantly predominant was the resistance to the beta-lactam antibiotics. PMID:27547055

  3. Culture-directed topical antibiotic treatment for chronic rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Greg E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Topical antibiotics, delivered optimally as high-volume culture-directed sinus irrigations, are being increasingly used for recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Their impact on subjective and objective outcome measures, however, is still unclear. Objective: To assess if the use of topical antibiotics in recalcitrant CRS is associated with improved 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test and Lund-Kennedy endoscopic scores, and to determine the negative posttreatment culture “control” rate. Methods: Patients were included in the study if they met diagnostic criteria for CRS, received high-volume topical antibiotic sinus irrigations twice daily for 1 month, between December 2009 and May 2015, and had undergone endoscopic sinus surgery. The primary outcome was the 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test score. Secondary outcomes were the Lund-Kennedy endoscopic score and a negative posttreatment culture “control” rate. Paired t-tests were used to compare pre- and posttreatment scores. Patients with cystic fibrosis were analyzed separately. Results: Of the 58 patients included, 47% had nasal polyposis, 57% had asthma, 16% had aspirin sensitivity, and 55% had environmental allergies. The median Lund-Mackay computed tomography score was 11 (interquartile range, 6–16), and the median time to follow-up was 8 weeks (interquartile range, 6–10 weeks). The 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test scores improved from pre- to posttreatment period, although this was not significant mean 1.5 [confidence interval {CI} 1.3, 1.7] to mean 1.3 [CI 1.1, 1.6]; p = 0.16). Lund-Kennedy endoscopic scores, however, significantly improved from pre- to posttreatment (mean 4.9 [CI 4.3, 5.6] to mean 4.1 [CI 3.5, 4.7]; p = 0.05). Of the 47 patients with complete culture data, 72% had negative posttreatment culture results, defined as “controlled.” Only one patient discontinued treatment, related to discomfort from irrigations. Conclusion: In patients with recalcitrant CRS, the use of

  4. Revolutionising Bacteriology to Improve Treatment Outcomes and Antibiotic Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Livermore, David M

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory investigation of bacterial infections generally takes two days: one to grow the bacteria and another to identify them and to test their susceptibility. Meanwhile the patient is treated empirically, based on likely pathogens and local resistance rates. Many patients are over-treated to prevent under-treatment of a few, compromising antibiotic stewardship. Molecular diagnostics have potential to improve this situation by accelerating precise diagnoses and the early refinement of antibiotic therapy. They include: (i) the use of 'biomarkers' to swiftly distinguish patients with bacterial infection, and (ii) molecular bacteriology to identify pathogens and their resistance genes in clinical specimens, without culture. Biomarker interest centres on procalcitonin, which has given good results particularly for pneumonias, though broader biomarker arrays may prove superior in the future. PCRs already are widely used to diagnose a few infections (e.g. tuberculosis) whilst multiplexes are becoming available for bacteraemia, pneumonia and gastrointestinal infection. These detect likely pathogens, but are not comprehensive, particularly for resistance genes; there is also the challenge of linking pathogens and resistance genes when multiple organisms are present in a sample. Next-generation sequencing offers more comprehensive profiling, but obstacles include sensitivity when the bacterial load is low, as in bacteraemia, and the imperfect correlation of genotype and phenotype. In short, rapid molecular bacteriology presents great potential to improve patient treatments and antibiotic stewardship but faces many technical challenges; moreover it runs counter to the current nostrum of defining resistance in pharmacodynamic terms, rather than by the presence of a mechanism, and the policy of centralising bacteriology services. PMID:24265945

  5. Advanced treatment of urban wastewater by UV radiation: Effect on antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant E. coli strains.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Luigi; Fiorentino, Antonino; Anselmo, Antonella

    2013-06-01

    Urban wastewater treatment plant (UWWTP) effluents are among the possible sources of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) spread into the environment. In this work, the effect of UV radiation on antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains was compared with that of chlorination process. Under the investigated conditions, UV disinfection process resulted in a total inactivation after 60min of irradiation (1.25×10(4)μWscm(-2)) compared to 120min chlorine contact time (initial chlorine dose of 2mgL(-1)). Moreover, no change in E. coli strains' resistance to amoxicillin (AMX) (minimum inhibiting concentration (MIC)>256mgL(-1)) and sulfamethoxazole (SMZ) (MIC>1024mgL(-1)) could be observed after UV treatment, while the treatment affected resistance of the lower resistance strain to ciprofloxacin (CPX) (MIC decreased by 33% and 50% after 60 and 120min, respectively). Contrarily, chlorination process did not affect antibiotic resistance of the investigated E. coli strains. Finally, the effect of UV radiation on the mixture of three antibiotics was also investigated and photodegradation data fit quite well pseudo first order kinetic models with t1/2 values of 14, 20 and 25min for CPX, AMX and SMZ, respectively. According to these results, conventional disinfection processes may not be effective in the inactivation of ARB, and the simultaneous release of ARB and antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations into UWWTP effluent may promote the development of resistance among bacteria in receiving water.

  6. An in vitro combined antibiotic/antibody treatment eliminates toxicity from Shiga toxin-producing E. coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Treating Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) gastrointestinal infections is a difficult endeavor. The utility of antibiotics as an STEC treatment is controversial since antibiotic resistance among STEC isolates is widespread and certain antibiotics dramatically increase express...

  7. Rational design of antibiotic treatment plans: a treatment strategy for managing evolution and reversing resistance.

    PubMed

    Mira, Portia M; Crona, Kristina; Greene, Devin; Meza, Juan C; Sturmfels, Bernd; Barlow, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The development of reliable methods for restoring susceptibility after antibiotic resistance arises has proven elusive. A greater understanding of the relationship between antibiotic administration and the evolution of resistance is key to overcoming this challenge. Here we present a data-driven mathematical approach for developing antibiotic treatment plans that can reverse the evolution of antibiotic resistance determinants. We have generated adaptive landscapes for 16 genotypes of the TEM β-lactamase that vary from the wild type genotype "TEM-1" through all combinations of four amino acid substitutions. We determined the growth rate of each genotype when treated with each of 15 β-lactam antibiotics. By using growth rates as a measure of fitness, we computed the probability of each amino acid substitution in each β-lactam treatment using two different models named the Correlated Probability Model (CPM) and the Equal Probability Model (EPM). We then performed an exhaustive search through the 15 treatments for substitution paths leading from each of the 16 genotypes back to the wild type TEM-1. We identified optimized treatment paths that returned the highest probabilities of selecting for reversions of amino acid substitutions and returning TEM to the wild type state. For the CPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.6 and 1.0. For the EPM model, the optimized probabilities ranged between 0.38 and 1.0. For cyclical CPM treatment plans in which the starting and ending genotype was the wild type, the probabilities were between 0.62 and 0.7. Overall this study shows that there is promise for reversing the evolution of resistance through antibiotic treatment plans.

  8. Local application of free antibiotic powder in the treatment of osteomyelitis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Garcia, E'Stephan J; Sieg, Ryan N; Abdelgawad, Amr A

    2013-08-01

    To date, several strategies have been developed to provide local antibiotic therapy in the treatment of osteomyelitis, such as antibiotic-loaded bone cement, antibiotic-impregnated collagen sponges, polymethylmethacrylate beads, antibiotic-loaded bone graft, antibiotic-loaded synthetic bone substitutes, and antibiotic-coated implants. The optimum carrier for local antibiotic therapy has not been identified. Tibial osteomyelitis using methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was created in a rat model. Rats were assigned to 3 treatment groups: group A, systemic antibiotics only; group B, systemic antibiotics plus surgical debridement; and group C, systemic antibiotics, surgical debridement, and application of cefazolin. Infection was assessed using gross tissue analysis, radiographs, quantitative bacteriology, and histopathology. One-half of the rat tibias were randomly chosen for histological evaluation and the other half were used for microbiological analysis. Radiographs were reviewed and graded by 4 blinded board-certified radiologists. Histology slides were reviewed and graded by a blinded board-certified pathologist. Gross tissue analysis of treatment groups B and C demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in soft tissue infection clearance compared with group A (P<.05). No difference was found between treatment groups B and C. No significant difference existed in gross tissue, radiographic, microbiologic, or histopathologic analyses among the 3 groups for osteomyelitis. The results of this study demonstrated that the local application of free antibiotic powder is as effective as local debridement alone in treating soft tissue infection associated with tibial osteomyelitis in a rat model.

  9. Contemporary treatment of heart failure: is there adequate evidence to support a unique strategy for African-Americans? Con position.

    PubMed

    Ferdinand, Keith C; Serrano, Claudia C; Ferdinand, Daphne P

    2002-08-01

    Heart failure is a substantial cause of increased morbidity and mortality in the African-American population, with poorer prognosis versus white patients. Systolic heart failure is predominantly caused by poorly controlled hypertension in African-Americans. Overall, African-Americans remain underrepresented in morbidity and mortality heart failure trials, and further data are needed to confirm the potential benefit of present therapies and newer approaches to heart failure in African-Americans. Intensive blood pressure control and control of other risk factors, along with the appropriate application of evidence-based therapies including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and approved beta-blockers, are required to decrease racial disparities. Although some data suggest that contemporary treatment with ACE inhibitors and beta-blockers may be less effective in African-Americans in terms of reducing heart failure morbidity and mortality, there is not adequate evidence to support a unique strategy for this population. The use of evidence-based therapies should be equally applied to African-Americans as well as to other ethnic groups while awaiting further studies.

  10. A mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis of antibiotic treatments for bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Annette M; Coetzee, Johann F; da Silva, Natalia; Wang, Chong

    2013-06-01

    In this publication we use mixed treatment comparison meta-analysis to compare the efficacy of antibiotic treatments for bovine respiratory disease in beef cattle. Studies were eligible for the meta-analysis if they were publically available and reported the assessment of antibiotic protocols registered for use in the United States (US) for bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in beef cattle and were conducted in North America. Three electronic databases, the proceedings of two bovine specific conferences, pharmaceutical company web sites and the US Food and Drug Administration website were searched to identify relevant trials. The network of evidence used in the analysis contained 194 trial arms from 93 trials. Of the 93 trials there were 8 with three arms. The network of evidence contained information for 12 antibiotics. The output from the analysis provided information about the risk ratio comparing all possible treatments for BRD including comparisons based only on indirect data. The output also included a relative ranking of the treatments and estimates of the probability that an antibiotic protocol was the worst treatment option.

  11. The drinking water treatment process as a potential source of affecting the bacterial antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaohui; Ma, Xiaolin; Xu, Fengming; Li, Jing; Zhang, Hang; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-11-15

    Two waterworks, with source water derived from the Huangpu or Yangtze River in Shanghai, were investigated, and the effluents were plate-screened for antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) using five antibiotics: ampicillin (AMP), kanamycin (KAN), rifampicin (RFP), chloramphenicol (CM) and streptomycin (STR). The influence of water treatment procedures on the bacterial antibiotic resistance rate and the changes that bacteria underwent when exposed to the five antibiotics at concentration levels ranging from 1 to 100 μg/mL were studied. Multi-drug resistance was also analyzed using drug sensitivity tests. The results indicated that bacteria derived from water treatment plant effluent that used the Huangpu River rather than the Yangtze River as source water exhibited higher antibiotic resistance rates against AMP, STR, RFP and CM but lower antibiotic resistance rates against KAN. When the antibiotic concentration levels ranged from 1 to 10 μg/mL, the antibiotic resistance rates of the bacteria in the water increased as water treatment progressed. Biological activated carbon (BAC) filtration played a key role in increasing the antibiotic resistance rate of bacteria. Chloramine disinfection can enhance antibiotic resistance. Among the isolated ARB, 75% were resistant to multiple antibiotics. Ozone oxidation, BAC filtration and chloramine disinfection can greatly affect the relative abundance of bacteria in the community.

  12. Clinical problems in the antibiotic treatment of gonorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the history of penicillin therapy in gonorrhoea, the author shows that the number of cures effected with the repository penicillins, although originally very high, has diminished considerably in recent years, despite a general tendency to increase the dosage. The reduced efficacy of PAM and benzathine penicillin is demonstrated by an exposition of the current results obtained with these two preparations in the treatment of gonorrhoea patients in London. Some of the difficulties involved in distinguishing between treatment failures and reinfections are discussed. The paper continues with an examination of the possible alternatives to repository penicillin in the treatment of gonorrhoea. Data are given on the comparative efficacy of a number of prepations, including mixed penicillins, phenoxymethyl penicillin and various other antibiotics, such as streptomycin and the tetracycline group. The problem of re-examination of treated gonorrhoea cases is also dealt with, practical reasons being given for restricting the period of follow-up to three weeks. Finally, in a discussion of possible future developments, the author suggests a number of measures designed to prevent a further loss of sensitivity to penicillin in the gonococcus. PMID:13596878

  13. Clinical problems in the antibiotic treatment of gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    WILLCOX, R R

    1958-01-01

    After briefly reviewing the history of penicillin therapy in gonorrhoea, the author shows that the number of cures effected with the repository penicillins, although originally very high, has diminished considerably in recent years, despite a general tendency to increase the dosage. The reduced efficacy of PAM and benzathine penicillin is demonstrated by an exposition of the current results obtained with these two preparations in the treatment of gonorrhoea patients in London. Some of the difficulties involved in distinguishing between treatment failures and reinfections are discussed.The paper continues with an examination of the possible alternatives to repository penicillin in the treatment of gonorrhoea. Data are given on the comparative efficacy of a number of prepations, including mixed penicillins, phenoxymethyl penicillin and various other antibiotics, such as streptomycin and the tetracycline group.The problem of re-examination of treated gonorrhoea cases is also dealt with, practical reasons being given for restricting the period of follow-up to three weeks.Finally, in a discussion of possible future developments, the author suggests a number of measures designed to prevent a further loss of sensitivity to penicillin in the gonococcus.

  14. Microbiological Assessment of Bile and Corresponding Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Christian; Bode, Konrad; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Rudolph, Gerda; Bergemann, Janine; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Chahoud, Fadi; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Sauer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacteria in bile samples and to analyze the clinical relevance of the findings as only limited information about risk factors for elevated frequence of bacterial and fungal strains in routinely collected bile samples has been described so far. A prospective cohort study at a tertiary care center was conducted. Seven hundred forty-four patients underwent 1401 endoscopic retrograde cholangiographies (ERCs) as indicated by liver transplantation (427/1401), primary sclerosing cholangitis (222/1401), choledocholithiasis only (153/1401), obstruction due to malignancy (366/1401), or other conditions (233/1401). Bile samples for microbiological analysis were obtained in all patients. The 71.6% (823/1150) samples had a positive microbiological finding, and 57% (840/1491) of the bacterial isolates were gram-positive. The main species were Enterococcus spp (33%; 494/1491) and Escherichia coli (12%; 179/1491). Of the samples, 53.8% had enteric bacteria and 24.7% had Candida spp; both were associated with clinical and laboratory signs of cholangitis (C-reactive proteins 35.0 ± 50.1 vs 44.8 ± 57.6; 34.5 ± 51.2 vs 52.9 ± 59.7; P < 0.001), age, previous endoscopic intervention, and immunosuppression. Multi-resistant (MR) strains were found in 11.3% of all samples and were associated with clinical and laboratory signs of cholangitis, previous intervention, and immunocompromised status. In subgroup analysis, strain-specific antibiotic therapy based on bile sampling was achieved in 56.3% (89/158) of the patients. In cases with a positive bile culture and available blood culture, blood cultures were positive in 29% of cases (36/124), and 94% (34/36) of blood cultures had microbial species identical to the bile cultures. Bactobilia and fungobilia can usually be detected by routine microbiological sampling, allowing optimized, strain-specific antibiotic treatment. Previous

  15. [Treatment of neurosensory hypoacusis of antibiotic and non-antibiotic etiology with mydocalm and nootropil: comparison of efficacy].

    PubMed

    Alibekov, I M

    1997-01-01

    Mydocalm and nootropil combination was used for treatment of antibiotic neurosensory hypoacusia (24 patients) and non-antibiotic hypoacusis (11 patients). 100 mg of mydocalm was diluted in 10.0 ml of 0.9% sodium chloride and injected intravenously. 20% solution of nootropil (5.0 ml) was injected intramuscularly. The 14-day course produced subjective response. Noise in the ears and heavy head feeling disappeared. As shown by measurements of auditory thresholds, improvement of hearing was only subjective. The responses were similar in both groups of patients.

  16. Prophylaxis and Treatment of Anthrax in Pregnant Women: A Systematic Review of Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Meaney-Delman, Dana; Rasmussen, Sonja A.; Beigi, Richard H.; Zotti, Marianne E.; Hutchings, Yalonda; Bower, William A.; Treadwell, Tracee A.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the safety and pharmacokinetics of antibiotics recommended for anthrax post-exposure prophylaxis and treatment in pregnant women. Data Sources Articles were identified in the PUBMED database from inception through December 2012 by searching the keywords ([“pregnancy]” and [generic antibiotic name]). Additionally, hand searches of references from REPROTOX, TERIS, review articles and Briggs’ Drugs in Pregnancy and Lactation were performed. Methods of Study Selection Articles included in the review contain primary data related to the safety and pharmacokinetics among pregnant women of five antibiotics recommended for anthrax post-exposure prophylaxis and treatment (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, doxycycline, amoxicillin), and of nine additional antibiotics recommended as part of the treatment regimen (penicillin, ampicillin, linezolid, clindamycin, meropenem, doripenem, rifampin, chloramphenicol, or vancomycin). Tabulation, Integration and Results The PUBMED search identified 3850 articles for review. Reference hand searching yielded nine additional articles. In total, 112 articles met the inclusion criteria. Conclusions Overall, safety and pharmacokinetic information is limited for these antibiotics. Although small increases in risks for certain anomalies have been observed with some antibiotics recommended for prophylaxis and treatment of anthrax, the absolute risk of these antibiotics appears low. Given the high morbidity and mortality associated with anthrax, antibiotics should be dosed appropriately to ensure that antibiotic levels can be achieved and sustained. Dosing adjustments may be necessary for the beta lactam antibiotics and the fluoroquinolones to achieve therapeutic levels in pregnant women. Data indicate that the beta lactam antibiotics, the fluoroquinolones, and, to a lesser extent, clindamycin enter the fetal compartment, an important consideration in the treatment of anthrax, as these antibiotics may provide

  17. Metabolic and metagenomic outcomes from early-life pulsed antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nobel, Yael R.; Cox, Laura M.; Kirigin, Francis F.; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Yamanishi, Shingo; Teitler, Isabel; Chung, Jennifer; Sohn, Jiho; Barber, Cecily M.; Goldfarb, David S.; Raju, Kartik; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Ruiz, Victoria E.; Li, Huilin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Weinstock, George M.; Sodergren, Erica; Blaser, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian species have co-evolved with intestinal microbial communities that can shape development and adapt to environmental changes, including antibiotic perturbation or nutrient flux. In humans, especially children, microbiota disruption is common, yet the dynamic microbiome recovery from early-life antibiotics is still uncharacterized. Here we use a mouse model mimicking paediatric antibiotic use and find that therapeutic-dose pulsed antibiotic treatment (PAT) with a beta-lactam or macrolide alters both host and microbiota development. Early-life PAT accelerates total mass and bone growth, and causes progressive changes in gut microbiome diversity, population structure and metagenomic content, with microbiome effects dependent on the number of courses and class of antibiotic. Whereas control microbiota rapidly adapts to a change in diet, PAT slows the ecological progression, with delays lasting several months with previous macrolide exposure. This study identifies key markers of disturbance and recovery, which may help provide therapeutic targets for microbiota restoration following antibiotic treatment. PMID:26123276

  18. Metabolic and metagenomic outcomes from early-life pulsed antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Nobel, Yael R; Cox, Laura M; Kirigin, Francis F; Bokulich, Nicholas A; Yamanishi, Shingo; Teitler, Isabel; Chung, Jennifer; Sohn, Jiho; Barber, Cecily M; Goldfarb, David S; Raju, Kartik; Abubucker, Sahar; Zhou, Yanjiao; Ruiz, Victoria E; Li, Huilin; Mitreva, Makedonka; Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Weinstock, George M; Sodergren, Erica; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-06-30

    Mammalian species have co-evolved with intestinal microbial communities that can shape development and adapt to environmental changes, including antibiotic perturbation or nutrient flux. In humans, especially children, microbiota disruption is common, yet the dynamic microbiome recovery from early-life antibiotics is still uncharacterized. Here we use a mouse model mimicking paediatric antibiotic use and find that therapeutic-dose pulsed antibiotic treatment (PAT) with a beta-lactam or macrolide alters both host and microbiota development. Early-life PAT accelerates total mass and bone growth, and causes progressive changes in gut microbiome diversity, population structure and metagenomic content, with microbiome effects dependent on the number of courses and class of antibiotic. Whereas control microbiota rapidly adapts to a change in diet, PAT slows the ecological progression, with delays lasting several months with previous macrolide exposure. This study identifies key markers of disturbance and recovery, which may help provide therapeutic targets for microbiota restoration following antibiotic treatment.

  19. Different recommendations for empiric first-choice antibiotic treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in Europe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective Uncomplicated urinary tract infection (uUTI) is a common reason for antibiotic treatment in primary health care. Due to the increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant uropathogens it is crucial to use the most appropriate antibiotics for first-choice empiric treatment of uUTI. Particularly, it is important to avoid antibiotics associated with a high rate of antimicrobial resistance. This study compares national recommendations from six European countries, investigating recommendations for first-choice antibiotic therapy of uUTI. Setting General practice in six European countries. Method Searches were undertaken on PubMed, the Cochrane Library databases, Google, and Google Scholar. Recommendations from different geographical regions in Europe were investigated: Northern Europe (Denmark, Sweden), Western Europe (Scotland), Central Europe (Germany), Southern Europe (Spain), and Eastern Europe (Croatia). Results The six countries recommended seven different antibiotics. Five countries recommended more than one antibiotic as first-choice treatment. Half of the countries recommended antibiotics associated with a high rate (> 10–20%) of resistant E. coli. All countries recommended at least one antibiotic associated with a low (< 5%) resistance rate. Discussion The differences in first-choice treatment of uUTI could not be explained by differences in local bacterial aetiology or by different patterns of antimicrobial resistance. Despite resistance rates exceeding 10–20%, sulphamethizole, trimethoprim. or fluoroquinolones were recommended in half of the countries. Conclusion Within the European countries there are considerable differences in recommendations for empiric first-choice antibiotic treatment of uUTI. In order to reduce the increasing antimicrobial resistance in Europe, it is important to agree on the most appropriate antibiotics for empiric treatment of uUTI. PMID:24102498

  20. Biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment under tetracycline antibiotic pressure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Meiqing; Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jie; Yang, Jia; Wang, Wenqi; Yang, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    The effect of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic on biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment was studied. A lab-scale Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) with three compartments was used. The reactor was operated with synthetic wastewater in the absence of TC and in the presence of 250 μg/L TC for 90 days, respectively. The removal rate of TC, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), biogas compositions (hydrogen (H2), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2)), and total biogas production in each compartment were monitored in the two operational conditions. Results showed that the removal rate of TC was 14.97–67.97% in the reactor. The presence of TC had a large negative effect on CH4 and CO2 generation, but appeared to have a positive effect on H2 production and VFAs accumulation. This response indicated that the methanogenesis process was sensitive to TC presence, but the acidogenesis process was insensitive. This suggested that the presence of TC had less influence on the degradation of organic matter but had a strong influence on biogas generation. Additionally, the decrease of CH4 and CO2 generation and the increase of H2 and VFAs accumulation suggest a promising strategy to help alleviate global warming and improve resource recovery in an environmentally friendly approach. PMID:27341657

  1. Biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment under tetracycline antibiotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Lu, Meiqing; Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jie; Yang, Jia; Wang, Wenqi; Yang, Zhiquan

    2016-06-24

    The effect of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic on biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment was studied. A lab-scale Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) with three compartments was used. The reactor was operated with synthetic wastewater in the absence of TC and in the presence of 250 μg/L TC for 90 days, respectively. The removal rate of TC, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), biogas compositions (hydrogen (H2), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2)), and total biogas production in each compartment were monitored in the two operational conditions. Results showed that the removal rate of TC was 14.97-67.97% in the reactor. The presence of TC had a large negative effect on CH4 and CO2 generation, but appeared to have a positive effect on H2 production and VFAs accumulation. This response indicated that the methanogenesis process was sensitive to TC presence, but the acidogenesis process was insensitive. This suggested that the presence of TC had less influence on the degradation of organic matter but had a strong influence on biogas generation. Additionally, the decrease of CH4 and CO2 generation and the increase of H2 and VFAs accumulation suggest a promising strategy to help alleviate global warming and improve resource recovery in an environmentally friendly approach.

  2. Biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment under tetracycline antibiotic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Meiqing; Niu, Xiaojun; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jie; Yang, Jia; Wang, Wenqi; Yang, Zhiquan

    2016-06-01

    The effect of tetracycline (TC) antibiotic on biogas generation in anaerobic wastewater treatment was studied. A lab-scale Anaerobic Baffled Reactor (ABR) with three compartments was used. The reactor was operated with synthetic wastewater in the absence of TC and in the presence of 250 μg/L TC for 90 days, respectively. The removal rate of TC, volatile fatty acids (VFAs), biogas compositions (hydrogen (H2), methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2)), and total biogas production in each compartment were monitored in the two operational conditions. Results showed that the removal rate of TC was 14.97–67.97% in the reactor. The presence of TC had a large negative effect on CH4 and CO2 generation, but appeared to have a positive effect on H2 production and VFAs accumulation. This response indicated that the methanogenesis process was sensitive to TC presence, but the acidogenesis process was insensitive. This suggested that the presence of TC had less influence on the degradation of organic matter but had a strong influence on biogas generation. Additionally, the decrease of CH4 and CO2 generation and the increase of H2 and VFAs accumulation suggest a promising strategy to help alleviate global warming and improve resource recovery in an environmentally friendly approach.

  3. High antibiotic resistance rate: A difficult issue for Helicobacter pylori eradication treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei

    2015-12-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is associated with a variety of upper gastrointestinal diseases, including gastric cancer. With the wide application of antibiotics in H. pylori eradication treatment, drug-resistant strains of H. pylori are increasing. H. pylori eradication treatment failure affects the outcome of a variety of diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, antibiotic resistance that affects H. pylori eradication treatment is a challenging situation for clinicians. The ideal H. pylori eradication therapy should be safe, effective, simple, and economical. The eradication rate of triple antibiotic therapy is currently less than 80% in most parts of the world. Antibiotic resistance is the main reason for treatment failure, therefore the standard triple regimen is no longer suitable as a first-line treatment in most regions. H. pylori eradication treatment may fail for a number of reasons, including H. pylori strain factors, host factors, environmental factors, and inappropriate treatment.

  4. Occurrence of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes in a sewage treatment plant and its effluent-receiving river.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian; Xu, Yan; Wang, Hongmei; Guo, Changsheng; Qiu, Huiyun; He, Yan; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Xiaochen; Meng, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The extensive use of antibiotics has caused the contamination of both antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in the environment. In this study, the abundance and distribution of antibiotics and ARGs from a sewage treatment plant (STP) and its effluent-receiving river in Beijing China were characterized. Three classes of antibiotics including tetracycline, sulfonamide and quinolone were quantified by LC-MS/MS. In the secondary effluent they were detected at 195, 2001 and 3866 ng L(-1), respectively, which were higher than in the receiving river water. A total of 13 ARGs (6 tet genes: tetA, tetB, tetE, tetW, tetM and tetZ, 3 sulfonamide genes: sul1, sul2 and sul3, and 4 quinolone genes: gryA, parC, qnrC and qnrD) were determined by quantitative PCR. For all ARGs, sulfonamide resistance genes were present at relatively high concentrations in all samples, with the highest ARG concentration above 10(-1). ARGs remained relatively stable along each sewage treatment process. The abundances of detected ARGs from the STP were also higher than its receiving river. Bivariate correlation analysis showed that relative tet gene copies (tetB/16S-rRNA and tetW/16S-rRNA) were strongly correlated with the concentrations of tetracycline residues (r(2)>0.8, p<0.05), while no significant correlations occurred between sulfonamides and sul genes. A negative correlation between the relative abundance of quinolone resistance gene (qnrC/16S-rRNA) and the concentrations of enrofloxacin (ENR) was also determined. The difference of ARGs levels in the raw influent and secondary effluent suggested that the STP treatment process may induce to increase the abundance of resistance genes. The results showed that the sewage was an important repository of the resistance genes, which need to be effectively treated before discharge into the natural water body.

  5. Removal of antibiotics from surface and distilled water in conventional water treatment processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, C.; Wang, Y.; Loftin, K.; Meyer, M.

    2002-01-01

    Conventional drinking water treatment processes were evaluated under typical water treatment plant conditions to determine their effectiveness in the removal of seven common antibiotics: carbadox, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfadimethoxine, sulfamerazine, sulfamethazine, sulfathiazole, and trimethoprim. Experiments were conducted using synthetic solutions prepared by spiking both distilled/ deionized water and Missouri River water with the studied compounds. Sorption on Calgon WPH powdered activated carbon, reverse osmosis, and oxidation with chlorine and ozone under typical plant conditions were all shown to be effective in removing the studied antibiotics. Conversely, coagulation/flocculation/sedimentation with alum and iron salts, excess lime/soda ash softening, ultraviolet irradiation at disinfection dosages, and ion exchange were all relatively ineffective methods of antibiotic removal. This study shows that the studied antibiotics could be effectively removed using processes already in use many water treatment plants. Additional work is needed on by-product formation and the removal of other classes of antibiotics.

  6. Fate of antibiotics during wastewater treatment and antibiotic distribution in the effluent-receiving waters of the Yellow Sea, northern China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanmin; Liu, Pengxiao; Feng, Yujie; Yang, Fenglin

    2013-08-15

    Antibiotics including three β-lactams, two fluoroquinolones and two macrolides, which were the top seven most prescribed antibiotics in Dalian, China, were selected to investigate their occurrence in six municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and their distribution in the effluent-receiving waters of the Yellow Sea. Four WWTPs employing different treatment technologies were selected to explore the mechanism of antibiotics elimination during wastewater treatment. Results showed that fluoroquinolones and macrolides were dominant species in both WWTPs effluents and the surveyed coastal waters. Biodegradation was the main pathway for β-lactams removal, however, primary treatment performed better than biological treatment for fluoroquinolones removal. Concentrations of macrolides increased dramatically after the biological treatment, which was probably due to the release of macrolides enclosed in feces particles. In the surveyed coastal waters, reduction of antibiotic concentration with distance was observed. Potential environmental risk caused by the occurrence of these antibiotics should be evaluated in future work.

  7. Microbial selectivity of UV treatment on antibiotic-resistant heterotrophic bacteria in secondary effluents of a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mei-Ting; Yuan, Qing-Bin; Yang, Jian

    2013-10-15

    Little is known about the microbial selectivity of UV treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria, and the results of limited studies are conflicting. To understand the effect of UV disinfection on antibiotic resistant bacteria, both total heterotrophic bacteria and antibiotic resistant bacteria (including cephalexin-, ciprofloxacin-, erythromycin-, gentamicin-, vancomycin-, sulfadiazine-, rifampicin-, tetracycline- and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria) were examined in secondary effluent samples from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Bacteria resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline were chosen as the representative of multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their characteristics after UV treatment were also investigated. UV disinfection results in effective inactivation for total heterotrophic bacteria, as well as all antibiotic resistant bacteria. After UV treatment at a fluence of 5 mJ/cm(2), the log reductions of nine types of antibiotic resistant bacteria varied from 1.0 ± 0.1 to 2.4 ± 0.1. Bacteria resistant to both erythromycin and tetracycline had a similar fluence response as did total heterotrophic bacteria. The findings suggest that UV disinfection could eliminate antibiotic resistance in wastewater treatment effluents and thus ensure public health security. Our experimental results indicated that UV disinfection led to enrichment of bacteria with resistance to sulfadiazine, vancomycin, rifampicin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol, while the proportions of cephalexin-, erythromycin-, gentamicin- and ciprofloxacin-resistant bacteria in the wastewater decreased. This reveals the microbial selectivity of UV disinfection for antibiotic resistant bacteria.

  8. [Antibiotic Stewardship].

    PubMed

    Lanckohr, Christian; Ellger, Björn

    2016-02-01

    The adequate management of infections is an important task in critical care medicine which has an effect on patient outcome. As a result, the prevalence of antiinfective therapy is high in intensive care units. In the face of an unsettling development of worldwide microbial resistance, an optimization and reduction of antiinfective therapy is necessary. Antibiotic stewardship tries to improve antiinfective therapy with an interdisciplinary approach. One overall objective of antibiotic stewardship is the reduction of resistance induction in order to preserve the therapeutic efficiency of antibiotics. Intensive care units are important fields of action for antibiotic stewardship interventions. This article reviews available evidence and some practical aspects for antibiotic stewardship.

  9. Antibiotic Treatment and Length of Hospital Stay in Relation to Delivery Mode and Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Ahlén, Katia M.; Örtqvist, Anne K.; Gong, Tong; Wallas, Alva; Ye, Weimin; Lundholm, Cecilia; Almqvist, Catarina

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate how 1) maternal delivery mode and 2) prematurity in infants are associated to antibiotic treatment and length of hospital stay. Methods Women having given birth and infants 0–12 months discharged from hospital between July 2005 and November 2011 were identified from the Swedish National Patient Register. Medical records were reviewed for 203 women and 527 infants. The risk ratio (RR) between antibiotic treatment and 1) delivery mode in women; 2) prematurity in infants was calculated. Length of stay and days of antibiotic therapy were compared by Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results Women: There was an association between emergency caesarean section (CS) and antibiotic treatment (RR 5.0 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2–11.5), but not for elective CS. Length of stay was longer for CS (emergency and elective) compared to vaginal delivery (p<0.01). Infants: RR for antibiotic treatment in preterm compared to term infants was 1.4 (95% CI 1.0–1.9). Length of stay (p<0.01), but not days of therapy (p = 0.17), was higher in preterm compared to term infants. Conclusion We found that emergency CS increased the probability of maternal antibiotic treatment during hospitalisation, but no difference was found between term and preterm infants. The results are well aligned with current guidelines and may be considered in future studies on the effects of antibiotics. PMID:27716779

  10. Phentolamine as a treatment for poor mixing in transposition of the great arteries with adequate intraatrial communication.

    PubMed

    Galal, M O; El-Naggar, W I; Sharfi, M H

    2005-01-01

    Patients with transposition of the great arteries often show poor mixing for different reasons, even after adequate balloon atrial septostomy. We present a patient with such a lesion whose clinical status improved dramatically after phentolamine was applied. We believe this improvement is due to reduction in afterload caused by the alpha(2) blocker and also possibly as a response to a presumptive effect of the drug on the diastolic function of the right ventricle, allowing more left-to-right shunt across the atrial septal defect. Both phenomena can improve cardiac output in such a situation.

  11. A review of the influence of treatment strategies on antibiotic resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Johnson, Natalie; Cizmas, Leslie; McDonald, Thomas J; Kim, Hyunook

    2016-05-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) in the aquatic environment have become an emerging contaminant issue, which has implications for human and ecological health. This review begins with an introduction to the occurrence of ARB and ARG in different environmental systems such as natural environments and drinking water resources. For example, ARG or ARB with resistance to ciprofloxacin, sulfamethoxazole, trimethoprim, quinolone, vancomycin, or tetracycline (e.g., tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(G), tet(O), tet(M), tet(W), sul I, and sul II) have been detected in the environment. The development of resistance may be intrinsic, may be acquired through spontaneous mutations (de novo), or may occur due to horizontal gene transfer from donor bacteria, phages, or free DNA to recipient bacteria. An overview is also provided of the current knowledge regarding inactivation of ARB and ARG, and the mechanism of the effects of different disinfection processes in water and wastewater (chlorination, UV irradiation, Fenton reaction, ozonation, and photocatalytic oxidation). The effects of constructed wetlands and nanotechnology on ARB and ARG are also summarized.

  12. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy. PMID:23559912

  13. Systemic antibiotic therapy in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Grover, Vishakha; Grover, Deepak

    2012-09-01

    Systemic antibiotics in conjunction with scaling and root planing (SRP), can offer an additional benefit over SRP alone in the treatment of periodontitis, in terms of clinical attachment loss (CAL) and pocket depth change, and reduced risk of additional CAL loss. However, antibiotics are not innocuous drugs. Their use should be justified on the basis of a clearly established need and should not be substituted for adequate local treatment. The aim of this review is to discuss the rationale, proper selection, dosage and duration for antibiotic therapy so as to optimize the usefulness of drug therapy.

  14. Autoinducer-2 analogs and electric fields - an antibiotic-free bacterial biofilm combination treatment.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Sowmya; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Guo, Min; Sintim, Herman O; Bentley, William E; Ghodssi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial biofilms are a common cause of chronic medical implant infections. Treatment and eradication of biofilms by conventional antibiotic therapy has major drawbacks including toxicity and side effects associated with high-dosage antibiotics. Additionally, administration of high doses of antibiotics may facilitate the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Thus, there is an urgent need for the development of treatments that are not based on conventional antibiotic therapies. Presented herein is a novel bacterial biofilm combination treatment independent of traditional antibiotics, by using low electric fields in combination with small molecule inhibitors of bacterial quorum sensing - autoinducer-2 analogs. We investigate the effect of this treatment on mature Escherichia coli biofilms by application of an alternating and offset electric potential in combination with the small molecule inhibitor for 24 h using both macro and micro-scale devices. Crystal violet staining of the macro-scale biofilms shows a 46 % decrease in biomass compared to the untreated control. We demonstrate enhanced treatment efficacy of the combination therapy using a high-throughput polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic biofilm analysis platform. This microfluidic flow cell is designed to reduce the growth variance of in vitro biofilms while providing an integrated control, and thus allows for a more reliable comparison and evaluation of new biofilm treatments on a single device. We utilize linear array charge-coupled devices to perform real-time tracking of biomass by monitoring changes in optical density. End-point confocal microscopy measurements of biofilms treated with the autoinducer analog and electric fields in the microfluidic device show a 78 % decrease in average biofilm thickness in comparison to the negative controls and demonstrate good correlation with real-time optical density measurements. Additionally, the combination treatment showed 76 % better treatment

  15. Antibiotic treatment for Helicobacter pylori: Is the end coming?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Choi, Duck Joo; Chung, Jun-Won

    2015-01-01

    Infection with the Gram-negative pathogen Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been associated with gastro-duodenal disease and the importance of H. pylori eradication is underscored by its designation as a group I carcinogen. The standard triple therapy consists of a proton pump inhibitor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, although many other regimens are used, including quadruple, sequential and concomitant therapy regimens supplemented with metronidazole, clarithromycin and levofloxacin. Despite these efforts, current therapeutic regimens lack efficacy in eradication due to antibiotic resistance, drug compliance and antibiotic degradation by the acidic stomach environment. Antibiotic resistance to clarithromycin and metronidazole is particularly problematic and several approaches have been proposed to overcome this issue, such as complementary probiotic therapy with Lactobacillus. Other studies have identified novel molecules with an anti-H. pylori effect, as well as tailored therapy and nanotechnology as viable alternative eradication strategies. This review discusses current antibiotic therapy for H. pylori infections, limitations of this type of therapy and predicts the availability of newly developed therapies for H. pylori eradication. PMID:26558152

  16. New Is Old, and Old Is New: Recent Advances in Antibiotic-Based, Antibiotic-Free and Ethnomedical Treatments against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Xie, Jun-Qiu; Zhang, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen of wound infections. Thus far, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become the major causative agent in wound infections, especially for nosocomial infections. MRSA infections are seldom eradicated by routine antimicrobial therapies. More concerning, some strains have become resistant to the newest antibiotics of last resort. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of a polymyxin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae, by which resistance to the last group of antibiotics will likely spread rapidly. The worst-case scenario, “a return to the pre-antibiotic era”, is likely in sight. A perpetual goal for antibiotic research is the discovery of an antibiotic that lacks resistance potential, such as the recent discovery of teixobactin. However, when considering the issue from an ecological and evolutionary standpoint, it is evident that it is insufficient to solve the antibiotic dilemma through the use of antibiotics themselves. In this review, we summarized recent advances in antibiotic-based, antibiotic-free and ethnomedical treatments against MRSA wound infections to identify new clues to solve the antibiotic dilemma. One potential solution is to use ethnomedical drugs topically. Some ethnomedical drugs have been demonstrated to be effective antimicrobials against MRSA. A decline in antibiotic resistance can therefore be expected, as has been demonstrated when antibiotic-free treatments were used to limit the use of antibiotics. It is also anticipated that these drugs will have low resistance potential, although there is only minimal evidence to support this claim to date. More clinical trials and animal tests should be conducted on this topic. PMID:27120596

  17. Elucidating selection processes for antibiotic resistance in sewage treatment plants using metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Hammarén, Rickard; Pal, Chandan; Östman, Marcus; Björlenius, Berndt; Flach, Carl-Fredrik; Fick, Jerker; Kristiansson, Erik; Tysklind, Mats; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2016-12-01

    Sewage treatment plants (STPs) have repeatedly been suggested as "hotspots" for the emergence and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. A critical question still unanswered is if selection pressures within STPs, caused by residual antibiotics or other co-selective agents, are sufficient to specifically promote resistance. To address this, we employed shotgun metagenomic sequencing of samples from different steps of the treatment process in three Swedish STPs. In parallel, concentrations of selected antibiotics, biocides and metals were analyzed. We found that concentrations of tetracycline and ciprofloxacin in the influent were above predicted concentrations for resistance selection, however, there was no consistent enrichment of resistance genes to any particular class of antibiotics in the STPs, neither for biocide and metal resistance genes. The most substantial change of the bacterial communities compared to human feces occurred already in the sewage pipes, manifested by a strong shift from obligate to facultative anaerobes. Through the treatment process, resistance genes against antibiotics, biocides and metals were not reduced to the same extent as fecal bacteria. The OXA-48 gene was consistently enriched in surplus and digested sludge. We find this worrying as OXA-48, still rare in Swedish clinical isolates, provides resistance to carbapenems, one of our most critically important classes of antibiotics. Taken together, metagenomics analyses did not provide clear support for specific antibiotic resistance selection. However, stronger selective forces affecting gross taxonomic composition, and with that resistance gene abundances, limit interpretability. Comprehensive analyses of resistant/non-resistant strains within relevant species are therefore warranted.

  18. The effectiveness of sewage treatment processes to remove faecal pathogens and antibiotic residues.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Rahzia; Pool, Edmund John

    2012-01-01

    Pathogens and antibiotics enter the aquatic environment via sewage effluents and may pose a health risk to wild life and humans. The aim of this study was to determine the levels of faecal bacteria, and selected antibiotic residues in raw wastewater and treated sewage effluents from three different sewage treatment plants in the Western Cape, South Africa. Sewage treatment plant 1 and 2 use older technologies, while sewage treatment plant 3 has been upgraded and membrane technologies were incorporated in the treatment processes. Coliforms and Escherichia coli (E. coli) were used as bioindicators for faecal bacteria. A chromogenic test was used to screen for coliforms and E. coli. Fluoroquinolones and sulfamethoxazole are commonly used antibiotics and were selected to monitor the efficiency of sewage treatment processes for antibiotic removal. Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISAs) were used to quantitate antibiotic residues in raw and treated sewage. Raw intake water at all treatment plants contained total coliforms and E. coli. High removal of E. coli by treatment processes was evident for treatment plant 2 and 3 only. Fluoroquinolones and sulfamethoxazole were detected in raw wastewater from all sewage treatment plants. Treatment processes at plant 1 did not reduce the fluoroquinolone concentration in treated sewage effluents. Treatment processes at plant 2 and 3 reduced the fluoroquinolone concentration by 21% and 31%, respectively. Treatment processes at plant 1 did not reduce the sulfamethoxazole concentration in treated sewage effluents. Treatment processes at plant 2 and 3 reduced sulfamethoxazole by 34% and 56%, respectively. This study showed that bacteria and antibiotic residues are still discharged into the environment. Further research needs to be undertaken to improve sewage treatment technologies, thereby producing a better quality treated sewage effluent.

  19. A computational tool integrating host immunity with antibiotic dynamics to study tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Elsje; Cilfone, Nicholas A; Lin, Philana Ling; Dartois, Véronique; Mattila, Joshua T; Butler, J Russell; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-02-21

    While active tuberculosis (TB) is a treatable disease, many complex factors prevent its global elimination. Part of the difficulty in developing optimal therapies is the large design space of antibiotic doses, regimens and combinations. Computational models that capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotics at the site of infection can aid in reducing the design space of costly and time-consuming animal pre-clinical and human clinical trials. The site of infection in TB is the granuloma, a collection of immune cells and bacteria that form in the lung, and new data suggest that penetration of drugs throughout granulomas is problematic. Here we integrate our computational model of granuloma formation and function with models for plasma pharmacokinetics, lung tissue pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for two first line anti-TB antibiotics. The integrated model is calibrated to animal data. We make four predictions. First, antibiotics are frequently below effective concentrations inside granulomas, leading to bacterial growth between doses and contributing to the long treatment periods required for TB. Second, antibiotic concentration gradients form within granulomas, with lower concentrations toward their centers. Third, during antibiotic treatment, bacterial subpopulations are similar for INH and RIF treatment: mostly intracellular with extracellular bacteria located in areas non-permissive for replication (hypoxic areas), presenting a slowly increasing target population over time. Finally, we find that on an individual granuloma basis, pre-treatment infection severity (including bacterial burden, host cell activation and host cell death) is predictive of treatment outcome.

  20. A computational tool integrating host immunity with antibiotic dynamics to study tuberculosis treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Pienaar, Elsje; Cilfone, Nicholas A.; Lin, Philana Ling; Dartois, Veronique; Mattila, Joshua T.; Butler, J. Russell; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2014-12-08

    While active tuberculosis (TB) is a treatable disease, many complex factors prevent its global elimination. Part of the difficulty in developing optimal therapies is the large design space of antibiotic doses, regimens and combinations. Computational models that capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotics at the site of infection can aid in reducing the design space of costly and time-consuming animal pre-clinical and human clinical trials. The site of infection in TB is the granuloma, a collection of immune cells and bacteria that form in the lung, and new data suggest that penetration of drugs throughout granulomas is problematic. In this paper, we integrate our computational model of granuloma formation and function with models for plasma pharmacokinetics, lung tissue pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for two first line anti-TB antibiotics. The integrated model is calibrated to animal data. We make four predictions. First, antibiotics are frequently below effective concentrations inside granulomas, leading to bacterial growth between doses and contributing to the long treatment periods required for TB. Second, antibiotic concentration gradients form within granulomas, with lower concentrations toward their centers. Third, during antibiotic treatment, bacterial subpopulations are similar for INH and RIF treatment: mostly intracellular with extracellular bacteria located in areas non-permissive for replication (hypoxic areas), presenting a slowly increasing target population over time. In conclusion, we find that on an individual granuloma basis, pre-treatment infection severity (including bacterial burden, host cell activation and host cell death) is predictive of treatment outcome.

  1. Occurrence of antibiotics in eight sewage treatment plants in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lihong; Shi, Yali; Li, Wenhui; Niu, Hongyun; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2012-02-01

    The occurrence, removal efficiency and seasonal variation of 22 antibiotics, including eight fluoroquinolones, nine sulfonamides and five macrolides, were investigated in eight sewage treatment plants (STPs) in Beijing, China. A total of 14 antibiotics were detected in wastewater samples, with the maximum concentration being 3.1 μg L(-1) in the influent samples and 1.2 μg L(-1) in the effluent samples. The most frequently detected antibiotics were ofloxacin, norfloxacin, sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin and roxithromycin; of these, the concentration of ofloxacin was the highest in most of the influent and effluent samples. Eighteen antibiotics were detected in the sludge samples, with concentrations ranging from 1.0×10(-1) to 2.1×10(4) μg kg(-1). The dominant antibiotics found in the sludge samples were the fluoroquinolones, with ofloxacin having the highest concentration in all the sludge samples. The antibiotics could not be removed completely by the STPs, and the mean removal efficiency ranged from -34 to 72%. Of all the antibiotics, the fluoroquinolones were removed comparatively more efficiently, probably due to their adsorption to sludge. Seasonal variation of the antibiotics in the sludge samples was also studied. The concentrations of antibiotics in winter were higher than in spring and autumn. Since the total levels of the fluoroquinolones detected in the influent samples were lower than the predicted no-effect concentration (PNEC) of 8.0 μg L(-1), the residues of these antibiotics would be unlikely to have adverse effects on microorganisms involved in sewage treatment processes.

  2. Impact of dairy manure pre-application treatment on manure composition, soil dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes, and abundance of antibiotic-resistance genes on vegetables at harvest.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yuan-Ching; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Scott, Andrew; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Marti, Romain; Topp, Edward

    2017-03-01

    Manuring ground used for crop production is an important agricultural practice. Should antibiotic-resistant enteric bacteria carried in the manure be transferred to crops that are consumed raw, their consumption by humans or animals will represent a route of exposure to antibiotic resistance genes. Treatment of manures prior to land application is a potential management option to reduce the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes entrained with manure application. In this study, dairy manure that was untreated, anaerobically digested, mechanically dewatered or composted was applied to field plots that were then cropped to lettuce, carrots and radishes. The impact of treatment on manure composition, persistence of antibiotic resistance gene targets in soil following application, and distribution of antibiotic resistance genes and bacteria on vegetables at harvest was determined. Composted manure had the lowest abundance of antibiotic resistance gene targets compared to the other manures. There was no significant difference in the persistence characteristics of antibiotic resistance genes following land application of the various manures. Compared to unmanured soil, antibiotic resistance genes were detected more frequently in soil receiving raw or digested manure, whereas they were not in soil receiving composted manure. The present study suggests that vegetables grown in ground receiving raw or digested manure are at risk of contamination with manure-borne antibiotic resistant bacteria, whereas vegetables grown in ground receiving composted manure are less so.

  3. Adherence to Hospital Antibiotic Policy for Treatment of Escherichia coli ESBL in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, K. Gnana; Deshpande, Shreeram A.; Aravazhi, Anbu N.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Escherichia coli are the most common uropathogen worldwide accounting for 80% of the Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs). Nosocomial infections caused by Multi-drug resistant Gram negative bacteria expressing Extended Spectrum β Lactamase enzyme, pose a serious therapeutic challenge to clinicians due to limited therapeutic options. Stringent adherence to Hospital Antibiotic Policy in treating Urinary Escherichia coli ESBLs is a borne necessity. Aim A clinical audit was undertaken in the form of a cross-sectional study to evaluate the compliance on appropriate antibiotic prescription and strict adherence to Hospital Antibiotic Policy for therapeutic management of the patients infected with urinary Escherichia coli ESBL producers. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional medical audit on adherence to treatment of Escherichia coli ESBL producers from in-patients diagnosed to have urinary tract infections for a duration of 7 months was conducted as a prospective study. Clinical data, culture and sensitivity reports of the patient diagnosed with urinary Escherichia coli ESBLs were compared with the treatment chart to ensure strict adherence to hospital antibiotic policy for appropriate therapy by physicians. Data were analysed using IBM SPSS version 20 software. Results The incidence of uncomplicated cystitis, pyelonephritis and complicated pyelonephritis cases were 65.24% (107 out of 164), 20.7% (34 out of 164) and 14.02% (23 out of 164) respectively. Resistance to individual fluoroquinolones like norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin were found to be 60%, 59% and 47.5% respectively. As per hospital antibiotic policy, fluoroquinolones were prescribed in only 23% of the patients for the treatment of urinary Escherichia coli ESBLs. Conclusion Irrational utilization of antibiotics and non-adherence to antibiotic policy could have been the significant risk factors for drug resistance. Optimized antibiotic use, Microbiology laboratory support and periodic

  4. Wastewater treatment contributes to selective increase of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongli; Marrs, Carl F; Simon, Carl; Xi, Chuanwu

    2009-06-01

    The occurrence and spread of multi-drug resistant bacteria is a pressing public health problem. The emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics is common in areas where antibiotics are heavily used, and antibiotic-resistant bacteria also increasingly occur in aquatic environments. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the impact of the wastewater treatment process on the prevalence of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter spp. in the wastewater and its receiving water. During two different events (high-temperature, high-flow, 31 degrees C; and low-temperature, low-flow, 8 degrees C), 366 strains of Acinetobacter spp. were isolated from five different sites, three in a wastewater treatment plant (raw influent, second effluent, and final effluent) and two in the receiving body (upstream and downstream of the treated wastewater discharge point). The antibiotic susceptibility phenotypes were determined by the disc-diffusion method for 8 antibiotics, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), chloramphenicol (CHL), ciprofloxacin (CIP), colistin (CL), gentamicin (GM), rifampin (RA), sulfisoxazole (SU), and trimethoprim (TMP). The prevalence of antibiotic resistance in Acinetobacter isolates to AMC, CHL, RA, and multi-drug (three antibiotics or more) significantly increased (p<0.01) from the raw influent samples (AMC, 8.7%; CHL, 25.2%; RA, 63.1%; multi-drug, 33.0%) to the final effluent samples (AMC, 37.9%; CHL, 69.0%; RA, 84.5%; multi-drug, 72.4%), and was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the downstream samples (AMC, 25.8%; CHL, 48.4%; RA, 85.5%; multi-drug, 56.5%) than in the upstream samples (AMC, 9.5%; CHL, 27.0%; RA, 65.1%; multi-drug, 28.6%). These results suggest that wastewater treatment process contributes to the selective increase of antibiotic resistant bacteria and the occurrence of multi-drug resistant bacteria in aquatic environments.

  5. Antibiotics in Wastewater of a Rural and an Urban Hospital before and after Wastewater Treatment, and the Relationship with Antibiotic Use—A One Year Study from Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Lien, La Thi Quynh; Hoa, Nguyen Quynh; Chuc, Nguyen Thi Kim; Thoa, Nguyen Thi Minh; Phuc, Ho Dang; Diwan, Vishal; Dat, Nguyen Thanh; Tamhankar, Ashok J.; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby

    2016-01-01

    Hospital effluents represent an important source for the release of antibiotics and antibiotic resistant bacteria into the environment. This study aims to determine concentrations of various antibiotics in wastewater before and after wastewater treatment in a rural hospital (60 km from the center of Hanoi) and in an urban hospital (in the center of Hanoi) in Vietnam, and it aims to explore the relationship between antibiotic concentrations in wastewater before wastewater treatment and quantities of antibiotics used in the rural hospital, over a period of one year in 2013. Water samples were collected using continuous sampling for 24 h in the last week of every month. The data on quantities of antibiotics delivered to all inpatient wards were collected from the Pharmacy department in the rural hospital. Solid-phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were used for chemical analysis. Significant concentrations of antibiotics were present in the wastewater both before and after wastewater treatment of both the rural and the urban hospital. Ciprofloxacin was detected at the highest concentrations in the rural hospital’s wastewater (before treatment: mean = 42.8 µg/L; after treatment: mean = 21.5 µg/L). Metronidazole was detected at the highest concentrations in the urban hospital’s wastewater (before treatment: mean = 36.5 µg/L; after treatment: mean = 14.8 µg/L). A significant correlation between antibiotic concentrations in wastewater before treatment and quantities of antibiotics used in the rural hospital was found for ciprofloxacin (r = 0.78; p = 0.01) and metronidazole (r = 0.99; p < 0.001). PMID:27314366

  6. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry improves appropriateness of antibiotic treatment of bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Vlek, Anne L M; Bonten, Marc J M; Boel, C H Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture broths. Use of the MALDI-TOF MS for rapid identification of microorganisms from blood culture broths can reduce the turnaround time to identification and may lead to earlier appropriate treatment of bacteremia. During February and April 2010, direct MALDI-TOF MS was routinely performed on all positive blood cultures. During December 2009 and March 2010 no direct MALDI-TOF MS was used. Information on antibiotic therapy was collected from the hospital and intensive care units' information systems from all positive blood cultures during the study period. In total, 253 episodes of bacteremia were included of which 89 during the intervention period and 164 during the control period. Direct performance of MALDI-TOF MS on positive blood culture broths reduced the time till species identification by 28.8-h and was associated with an 11.3% increase in the proportion of patients receiving appropriate antibiotic treatment 24 hours after blood culture positivity (64.0% in the control period versus 75.3% in the intervention period (p0.01)). Routine implementation of this technique increased the proportion of patients on adequate antimicrobial treatment within 24 hours.

  7. Antibiotic treatment expands the resistance reservoir and ecological network of the phage metagenome.

    PubMed

    Modi, Sheetal R; Lee, Henry H; Spina, Catherine S; Collins, James J

    2013-07-11

    The mammalian gut ecosystem has considerable influence on host physiology, but the mechanisms that sustain this complex environment in the face of different stresses remain obscure. Perturbations to the gut ecosystem, such as through antibiotic treatment or diet, are at present interpreted at the level of bacterial phylogeny. Less is known about the contributions of the abundant population of phages to this ecological network. Here we explore the phageome as a potential genetic reservoir for bacterial adaptation by sequencing murine faecal phage populations following antibiotic perturbation. We show that antibiotic treatment leads to the enrichment of phage-encoded genes that confer resistance via disparate mechanisms to the administered drug, as well as genes that confer resistance to antibiotics unrelated to the administered drug, and we demonstrate experimentally that phages from treated mice provide aerobically cultured naive microbiota with increased resistance. Systems-wide analyses uncovered post-treatment phage-encoded processes related to host colonization and growth adaptation, indicating that the phageome becomes broadly enriched for functionally beneficial genes under stress-related conditions. We also show that antibiotic treatment expands the interactions between phage and bacterial species, leading to a more highly connected phage-bacterial network for gene exchange. Our work implicates the phageome in the emergence of multidrug resistance, and indicates that the adaptive capacity of the phageome may represent a community-based mechanism for protecting the gut microflora, preserving its functional robustness during antibiotic stress.

  8. In silico evaluation and exploration of antibiotic tuberculosis treatment regimens

    SciTech Connect

    Pienaar, Elsje; Dartois, Véronique; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2015-11-14

    Improvement in tuberculosis treatment regimens requires selection of antibiotics and dosing schedules from a large design space of possibilities. Incomplete knowledge of antibiotic and host immune dynamics in tuberculosis granulomas impacts clinical trial design and success, and variations among clinical trials hamper side-by-side comparison of regimens. Our objective is to systematically evaluate the efficacy of isoniazid and rifampin regimens, and identify modifications to these antibiotics that improve treatment outcomes. We pair a spatio-temporal computational model of host immunity with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic data on isoniazid and rifampin. The model is calibrated to plasma pharmacokinetic and granuloma bacterial load data from non-human primate models of tuberculosis and to tissue and granuloma measurements of isoniazid and rifampin in rabbit granulomas. We predict the efficacy of regimens containing different doses and frequencies of isoniazid and rifampin. We predict impacts of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modifications on antibiotic efficacy. We demonstrate that suboptimal antibiotic concentrations within granulomas lead to poor performance of intermittent regimens compared to daily regimens. Improvements from dose and frequency changes are limited by inherent antibiotic properties, and we propose that changes in intracellular accumulation ratios and antimicrobial activity would lead to the most significant improvements in treatment outcomes. Results suggest that an increased risk of drug resistance in fully intermittent as compared to daily regimens arises from higher bacterial population levels early during treatment. In conclusion, our systems pharmacology approach complements efforts to accelerate tuberculosis therapeutic development.

  9. Efficacy of Single and Combined Antibiotic Treatments of Anthrax in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Shay; Altboum, Zeev; Glinert, Itai; Schlomovitz, Josef; Sittner, Assa; Bar-David, Elad; Kobiler, David

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory anthrax is a fatal disease in the absence of early treatment with antibiotics. Rabbits are highly susceptible to infection with Bacillus anthracis spores by intranasal instillation, succumbing within 2 to 4 days postinfection. This study aims to test the efficiency of antibiotic therapy to treat systemic anthrax in this relevant animal model. Delaying the initiation of antibiotic administration to more than 24 h postinfection resulted in animals with systemic anthrax in various degrees of bacteremia and toxemia. As the onset of symptoms in humans was reported to start on days 1 to 7 postexposure, delaying the initiation of treatment by 24 to 48 h (time frame for mass distribution of antibiotics) may result in sick populations. We evaluated the efficacy of antibiotic administration as a function of bacteremia levels at the time of treatment initiation. Here we compare the efficacy of treatment with clarithromycin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (Augmentin), imipenem, vancomycin, rifampin, and linezolid to the previously reported efficacy of doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. We demonstrate that treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid were as effective as doxycycline and ciprofloxacin, curing rabbits exhibiting bacteremia levels of up to 105 CFU/ml. Clarithromycin and rifampin were shown to be effective only as a postexposure prophylactic treatment but failed to treat the systemic (bacteremic) phase of anthrax. Furthermore, we evaluate the contribution of combined treatment of clindamycin and ciprofloxacin, which demonstrated improvement in efficacy compared to ciprofloxacin alone. PMID:26392505

  10. Efficacy of Single and Combined Antibiotic Treatments of Anthrax in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Shay; Altboum, Zeev; Glinert, Itai; Schlomovitz, Josef; Sittner, Assa; Bar-David, Elad; Kobiler, David; Levy, Haim

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory anthrax is a fatal disease in the absence of early treatment with antibiotics. Rabbits are highly susceptible to infection with Bacillus anthracis spores by intranasal instillation, succumbing within 2 to 4 days postinfection. This study aims to test the efficiency of antibiotic therapy to treat systemic anthrax in this relevant animal model. Delaying the initiation of antibiotic administration to more than 24 h postinfection resulted in animals with systemic anthrax in various degrees of bacteremia and toxemia. As the onset of symptoms in humans was reported to start on days 1 to 7 postexposure, delaying the initiation of treatment by 24 to 48 h (time frame for mass distribution of antibiotics) may result in sick populations. We evaluated the efficacy of antibiotic administration as a function of bacteremia levels at the time of treatment initiation. Here we compare the efficacy of treatment with clarithromycin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (Augmentin), imipenem, vancomycin, rifampin, and linezolid to the previously reported efficacy of doxycycline and ciprofloxacin. We demonstrate that treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, imipenem, vancomycin, and linezolid were as effective as doxycycline and ciprofloxacin, curing rabbits exhibiting bacteremia levels of up to 10(5) CFU/ml. Clarithromycin and rifampin were shown to be effective only as a postexposure prophylactic treatment but failed to treat the systemic (bacteremic) phase of anthrax. Furthermore, we evaluate the contribution of combined treatment of clindamycin and ciprofloxacin, which demonstrated improvement in efficacy compared to ciprofloxacin alone.

  11. Oral antibiotic treatment of staphylococcal bone and joint infections in adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Kim, Eu Suk; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2014-02-01

    Bone and joint infections, especially implant-associated infections, are difficult to cure. Long-term antibiotic therapy, combined with appropriate surgery and the removal of prostheses, is required. The most common causative organisms in bone and joint infections are staphylococci. Oral agents are often used after an initial course of parenteral antibiotic treatment. However, it is unclear which oral regimens are most effective in staphylococcal bone and joint infections. We review various oral antibiotic regimens and discuss which regimens are effective for this indication.

  12. Can guidelines for the treatment of respiratory infections lead to reduced rates of antibiotic resistance?

    PubMed

    Niederman, M S

    2001-09-01

    Guidelines have been developed for the therapy of both community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), and, potentially, if applied appropriately, could lead to a containment or reduction in the frequency of antibiotic resistance. In the therapy of CAP, guidelines could minimize the use of excessive antibiotic therapy, and if they also improve the accuracy of therapy, they could minimize the emergence of resistant organisms in the community. However, the impact of such guidelines on resistance remains to be shown. In the near future, CAP guidelines could help contain the growing problem of quinolone-resistant pneumococci by advocating the use of the most effective of the new agents, administered at the optimal dosages. When managing HAP, the use of guidelines could improve outcome by leading to a greater percentage of patients receiving adequate empiric antibiotic therapy. It remains uncertain whether such an approach can minimize the emergence of antibiotic resistance, particularly in the intensive care unit (ICU), but it is clear that if guidelines are to be accurate, they must account for the resistance patterns that are unique to each individual hospital setting. To date, the use of computer-assisted guidelines for the therapy of nosocomial infections has been successful in minimizing the frequency of inadequate therapy, with no negative impact on antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic restriction policies have been proposed as a way to have an impact on resistance, with variable effects. In the future, antibiotic rotation is likely to be studied as a way to reduce resistance, particularly in the ICU, but a number of practical issues may limit the efficacy of such an approach.

  13. Antibiotic prescription in the treatment of odontogenic infection by health professionals: A factor to consensus

    PubMed Central

    González-Martínez, Raquel; Cortell-Ballester, Isidoro; Herráez-Vilas, José M.; Arnau-de Bolós, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the attitude of dentists and family doctors in prescribing antibiotics for the treatment of dental infections. Study Design: A poll was performed to determine the differences in the prescription of antibiotics for the treatment of odontogenic infection by dentists and family doctors of the primary care department of the Catalan Health Care Service. Results: A hundred polls were distributed among family doctors, and another 100 ones among primary care dentists assigned to the Catalan Health Care Service of the Generalitat de Catalunya. Of the total of questionnaires distributed, 63 were retuned and answered from dentists and 71 from family doctors. Eighty-one percent of dentists included in the opinion poll considered amoxicillin as the first antibiotic choice for the treatment of odontogenic infections, while 73.2% of family doctors preferred the combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. With regard to antibiotics of choice in patients allergic to penicillin, 67.7% of family doctors preferred macrolides (25.4% opted for clarithromycin, 25.4% for erythromycin and 16.9% for spiramycin). However, clindamycin was the antibiotic most frequently prescribed by dentists (66.7%), followed by erythromycin (28.6%). Conclusions: The results of this study show a large discrepancy in the criteria for the treatment of odontogenic infections on the part of leading professionals involved in the management of this condition. Although the most common prescription involved beta-lactam antibiotics in both groups, several significant differences have been detected with regard to the second antibiotic choice. Key words:Odontogenic infections, antibiotics, antimicrobials. PMID:22143715

  14. Antibiotic-impregnated beads for the treatment of aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Healy, Aaron H; Reid, Bruce B; Allred, Bryce D; Doty, John R

    2012-03-01

    Infection of a prosthetic graft after replacement of the ascending aorta is an uncommon but life-threatening complication of surgery. We report the use of antibiotic-impregnated calcium sulfate beads in a patient with ascending aortic graft infection to provide localized, high-dose therapy to the infected region. Perigraft placement of antibiotic beads provides an alternative method for the treatment of aortic graft infection.

  15. Antibiotic treatment of metritis in dairy cows-A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Haimerl, P; Arlt, S; Borchardt, S; Heuwieser, W

    2017-03-29

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of the treatment of bovine metritis with common antibiotic and nonantibiotic treatment options. Acute puerperal metritis, a systemic and potentially painful illness with rectal temperature >39.5°C and signs of toxemia due to an infection of the uterus, occurs within 21 d after parturition. Because of the infectious nature, antibiotics are considered beneficial for the treatment of acute puerperal metritis. Each use of an antimicrobial drug, however, is associated with selective pressure for eventual emergence of resistant bacteria. The 23 trials evaluated in the course of a previously conducted systematic review were the basis for meta-analytic investigations. Selected trials were screened regarding their eligibility for the following investigations: (1) comparison of different antibiotic treatments with respect to metritis prevalence at time of re-examination, (2) efficacy of ceftiofur treatment with respect to metritis prevalence at time of re-examination, (3) comparison of efficacy of antibiotic versus nonantibiotic drugs with respect to metritis prevalence at time of re-examination, and (4) equivalence assessment of treatment effects on reproductive performance measures. Where at least 3 trials had investigated the same outcome variable and met the inclusion criteria (inclusion of a control or reference group diagnosed with metritis; reporting means and standard deviation in case of continuous data), meta-analytic investigations were carried out. Due to a shortage of comparable studies, we could not conduct investigations (1) and (3). Ceftiofur treatment of 828 metritic cows was associated with a decrease in the prevalence of metritis following treatment in comparison to 804 untreated cows. In conclusion, meta-analytic investigations uncovered a need for more high-quality studies. Furthermore, a positive effect of the most commonly used antibiotic drug, ceftiofur, for the treatment of bovine

  16. Occurrence, fate and interrelation of selected antibiotics in sewage treatment plants and their receiving surface water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Hong; Que, Chen-Jing; Xu, Gang; Sun, Yan-Feng; Ma, Jing; Xu, Hui; Sun, Rui; Tang, Liang

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence and fate of 12 commonly used antibiotics, two fluoroquinolones (FQs), three sulfonamides (SAs), three macrolides (MLs), two β-lactams and two tetracyclines (TCs), were studied in four sewage treatment plants (STPs) and their receiving water, the Huangpu River, Shanghai. The levels of selected antibiotics in the STPs ranged from ngL(-1) to μgL(-1), while ofloxacin (OFL) was predominant (reach up to 2936.94ngL(-1)). The highest and lowest proportions were of FQs (STP 1, STP 2 and STP 3) and TCs (in four STPs) respectively in both influents and effluents. And the second-highest proportion was of FQs in STP 4 (only 2% lower than the highest). What could be inferred was that the usage of TCs were extremely low while the usage of FQs were larger than other antibiotics in our study area. The elimination of antibiotics through these STPs was incomplete and a wide range of removal efficiencies (-442.8% to 100%) during the treatment was observed. Based on the mass loadings as well as the per-capita mass loadings of target antibiotics in four STPs, OFL was considered the primary contaminant herein. In the Huangpu River, 3 antibiotics were not detected in any water samples, while the detection frequencies of 4 antibiotics were 100%. The highest concentration detected in the river was 53.91ngL(-1) of sulfapyridine (SD). The Spearman correlation analysis of antibiotics in STPs and the nearby water samples suggests that the antibiotics discharged from some STPs might influence the receiving water to some extent. Moreover, most of the hazard quotient (HQ) values in STP effluents were one order magnitude higher than those in their receiving water. However, there is no imminent significant ecotoxicological risk caused by any single compound in the effluents and receiving waters.

  17. Effects of a realistic mixture of antibiotics on resistant and nonresistant sewage sludge bacteria in laboratory-scale treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Al-Ahmad, Ali; Haiss, Annette; Unger, Jörg; Brunswick-Tietze, Andrea; Wiethan, Jürgen; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2009-08-01

    The detection of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in sewage treatment plants (STPs) has stimulated a discussion on the origin and selection of resistant bacteria during sewage treatment. Currently, there is little data available regarding the effects of realistic mixtures of antibiotics on the bacteria present in the aeration tanks of STPs. In this study we used four laboratory-scale sewage treatment plants (LSSTPs) to study the effects of antibiotics on bacteria during sewage treatment under standardized conditions. Two plants were fed with a mixture of antibiotics at two concentration levels based on the average annual input of antibiotics into German municipal STPs. The total operational period was 84 days. A multiresistant bacterium (Acinetobacter baumannii) was added twice to two of the plants. The fate of the multiresistant bacterium was monitored. The mix of antibiotics did not affect the purification efficiency. The presence of the antibiotics did not favour the multiresistant bacterium. No difference was detected between the test plant and the controls.

  18. Microbial profiles at baseline and not the use of antibiotics determine the clinical outcome of the treatment of chronic periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, S; Laine, M L; Buijs, M J; Brandt, B W; Crielaard, W; Loos, B G; Zaura, E

    2016-02-01

    Antibiotics are often used in the treatment of chronic periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss. However, evidence in favour of a microbial indication for the prescription of antibiotics is lacking, which may increase the risk of the possible indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and consequent, microbial resistance. Here, using an open-ended technique, we report the changes in the subgingival microbiome up to one year post-treatment of patients treated with basic periodontal therapy with or without antibiotics. Antibiotics resulted in a greater influence on the microbiome 3 months after therapy, but this difference disappeared at 6 months. Greater microbial diversity, specific taxa and certain microbial co-occurrences at baseline and not the use of antibiotics predicted better clinical treatment outcomes. Our results demonstrate the predictive value of specific subgingival bacterial profiles for the decision to prescribe antibiotics in the treatment of periodontitis, but they also indicate the need for alternative therapies based on ecological approaches.

  19. Microbial profiles at baseline and not the use of antibiotics determine the clinical outcome of the treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bizzarro, S.; Laine, M. L.; Buijs, M. J.; Brandt, B. W.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B. G.; Zaura, E.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used in the treatment of chronic periodontitis, which is a major cause of tooth loss. However, evidence in favour of a microbial indication for the prescription of antibiotics is lacking, which may increase the risk of the possible indiscriminate use of antibiotics, and consequent, microbial resistance. Here, using an open-ended technique, we report the changes in the subgingival microbiome up to one year post-treatment of patients treated with basic periodontal therapy with or without antibiotics. Antibiotics resulted in a greater influence on the microbiome 3 months after therapy, but this difference disappeared at 6 months. Greater microbial diversity, specific taxa and certain microbial co-occurrences at baseline and not the use of antibiotics predicted better clinical treatment outcomes. Our results demonstrate the predictive value of specific subgingival bacterial profiles for the decision to prescribe antibiotics in the treatment of periodontitis, but they also indicate the need for alternative therapies based on ecological approaches. PMID:26830979

  20. Modulation of the gut microbiota with antibiotic treatment suppresses whole body urea production in neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Puiman, Patrycja; Stoll, Barbara; Mølbak, Lars; de Bruijn, Adrianus; Schierbeek, Henk; Boye, Mette; Boehm, Günther; Renes, Ingrid; van Goudoever, Johannes; Burrin, Douglas

    2013-02-01

    We examined whether changes in the gut microbiota induced by clinically relevant interventions would impact the bioavailability of dietary amino acids in neonates. We tested the hypothesis that modulation of the gut microbiota in neonatal pigs receiving no treatment (control), intravenously administered antibiotics, or probiotics affects whole body nitrogen and amino acid turnover. We quantified whole body urea kinetics, threonine fluxes, and threonine disposal into protein, oxidation, and tissue protein synthesis with stable isotope techniques. Compared with controls, antibiotics reduced the number and diversity of bacterial species in the distal small intestine (SI) and colon. Antibiotics decreased plasma urea concentrations via decreased urea synthesis. Antibiotics elevated threonine plasma concentrations and turnover, as well as whole body protein synthesis and proteolysis. Antibiotics decreased protein synthesis rate in the proximal SI and liver but did not affect the distal SI, colon, or muscle. Probiotics induced a bifidogenic microbiota and decreased plasma urea concentrations but did not affect whole body threonine or protein metabolism. Probiotics decreased protein synthesis in the proximal SI but not in other tissues. In conclusion, modulation of the gut microbiota by antibiotics and probiotics reduced hepatic ureagenesis and intestinal protein synthesis, but neither altered whole body net threonine balance. These findings suggest that changes in amino acid and nitrogen metabolism resulting from antibiotic- or probiotic-induced shifts in the microbiota are localized to the gut and liver and have limited impact on whole body growth and anabolism in neonatal piglets.

  1. A Biomathematical Model of Pneumococcal Lung Infection and Antibiotic Treatment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Schirm, Sibylle; Ahnert, Peter; Wienhold, Sandra; Mueller-Redetzky, Holger; Nouailles-Kursar, Geraldine; Loeffler, Markus; Witzenrath, Martin; Scholz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is considered to be one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The outcome depends on both, proper antibiotic treatment and the effectivity of the immune response of the host. However, due to the complexity of the immunologic cascade initiated during infection, the latter cannot be predicted easily. We construct a biomathematical model of the murine immune response during infection with pneumococcus aiming at predicting the outcome of antibiotic treatment. The model consists of a number of non-linear ordinary differential equations describing dynamics of pneumococcal population, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, neutrophils and macrophages fighting the infection and destruction of alveolar tissue due to pneumococcus. Equations were derived by translating known biological mechanisms and assuming certain response kinetics. Antibiotic therapy is modelled by a transient depletion of bacteria. Unknown model parameters were determined by fitting the predictions of the model to data sets derived from mice experiments of pneumococcal lung infection with and without antibiotic treatment. Time series of pneumococcal population, debris, neutrophils, activated epithelial cells, macrophages, monocytes and IL-6 serum concentrations were available for this purpose. The antibiotics Ampicillin and Moxifloxacin were considered. Parameter fittings resulted in a good agreement of model and data for all experimental scenarios. Identifiability of parameters is also estimated. The model can be used to predict the performance of alternative schedules of antibiotic treatment. We conclude that we established a biomathematical model of pneumococcal lung infection in mice allowing predictions regarding the outcome of different schedules of antibiotic treatment. We aim at translating the model to the human situation in the near future. PMID:27196107

  2. Cecum Lymph Node Dendritic Cells Harbor Slow-Growing Bacteria Phenotypically Tolerant to Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dolowschiak, Tamas; Wotzka, Sandra Y.; Lengefeld, Jette; Slack, Emma; Grant, Andrew J.; Ackermann, Martin; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-01-01

    In vivo, antibiotics are often much less efficient than ex vivo and relapses can occur. The reasons for poor in vivo activity are still not completely understood. We have studied the fluoroquinolone antibiotic ciprofloxacin in an animal model for complicated Salmonellosis. High-dose ciprofloxacin treatment efficiently reduced pathogen loads in feces and most organs. However, the cecum draining lymph node (cLN), the gut tissue, and the spleen retained surviving bacteria. In cLN, approximately 10%–20% of the bacteria remained viable. These phenotypically tolerant bacteria lodged mostly within CD103+CX3CR1−CD11c+ dendritic cells, remained genetically susceptible to ciprofloxacin, were sufficient to reinitiate infection after the end of the therapy, and displayed an extremely slow growth rate, as shown by mathematical analysis of infections with mixed inocula and segregative plasmid experiments. The slow growth was sufficient to explain recalcitrance to antibiotics treatment. Therefore, slow-growing antibiotic-tolerant bacteria lodged within dendritic cells can explain poor in vivo antibiotic activity and relapse. Administration of LPS or CpG, known elicitors of innate immune defense, reduced the loads of tolerant bacteria. Thus, manipulating innate immunity may augment the in vivo activity of antibiotics. PMID:24558351

  3. Occurrence of antibiotics in pharmaceutical industrial wastewater, wastewater treatment plant and sea waters in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Tahrani, Leyla; Van Loco, Joris; Ben Mansour, Hedi; Reyns, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Antibiotics are among the most commonly used group of pharmaceuticals in human medicine. They can therefore reach surface and groundwater bodies through different routes, such as wastewater treatment plant effluents, surface runoff, or infiltration of water used for agricultural purposes. It is well known that antibiotics pose a significant risk to environmental and human health, even at low concentrations. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of aminoglycosides and phenicol antibiotics in municipal wastewaters, sea water and pharmaceutical effluents in Tunisia. All analysed water samples contained detectable levels of aminoglycoside and phenicol antibiotics. The highest concentrations in wastewater influents were observed for neomycin and kanamycin B (16.4 ng mL(-1) and 7.5 ng mL(-1), respectively). Chloramphenicol was found in wastewater influents up to 3 ng mL(-1). It was observed that the waste water treatment plants were not efficient in completely removing these antibiotics. Chloramphenicol and florfenicol were found in sea water samples near aquaculture sites at levels up to, respectively, 15.6 ng mL(-1) and 18.4 ng mL(-1). Also aminoglycoside antibiotics were found near aquaculture sites with the highest concentration of 3.4 ng mL(-1) for streptomycin. In pharmaceutical effluents, only gentamycin was found at concentrations up to 19 ng mL(-1) over a sampling period of four months.

  4. Can Surgery Be Avoided? Exclusive Antibiotic Treatment for Pelvic Actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, E. M.; Markey, C. M.; Johnson, A. M.; Morales-Ramirez, P. B.

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic actinomycosis is an uncommon, slowly progressing granulomatous infection that has been associated with the presence of intrauterine devices. Due to its unspecific clinical and radiologic findings, it can mimic pelvic or intra-abdominal malignancy leading to mutilating surgery of high morbidity. Rarely, diagnosis is made preoperatively and in most cases surgical intervention is necessary. The patient in our case is a 42-year-old female with an IUD for 15 years diagnosed with pelvic actinomycosis. Patient was uniquely diagnosed preoperatively through paracentesis and treated conservatively with prolonged antibiotic therapy and without any type of surgical intervention. Follow-up at 1 year showed almost complete radiologic resolution of the inflammatory mass, nutritional recovery, and absence of symptoms. Pelvic actinomycosis can be successfully diagnosed and treated medically without surgical interventions. PMID:28299218

  5. Conservative treatment in a patient with diabetic osteomyelitis: antibiotic treatment is sufficient for complete bone regeneration in selected cases.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Sune Møller; Frøkjær, Johnny; Yderstræde, Knud

    2015-11-18

    Diabetic foot ulcers are commonly complicated by bone involvement and osteomyelitis. Diagnosing diabetic osteomyelitis can be problematic. However, positive findings at clinical examination and X-ray may set the diagnosis. Recent guidelines suggest that selected cases of diabetic osteomyelitis can be treated conservatively with antibiotics. We report on the successful treatment of a 52-year-old man with diabetes with osteomyelitis in the distal phalanx of a toe. On X-ray, the affected phalanx appeared completely eroded. However, regeneration of the bone tissue was observed following outpatient treatment with antibiotics. We therefore encourage doctors to provide conservative treatment for selected cases of diabetic osteomyelitis.

  6. Antibiotic-resistant genes and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the effluent of urban residential areas, hospitals, and a municipal wastewater treatment plant system.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Strong, P J; Chen, Hong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we determined the abundance of 8 antibiotics (3 tetracyclines, 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim), 12 antibiotic-resistant genes (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 antibiotic-resistant bacteria (tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, and combined resistance), and class 1 integron integrase gene (intI1) in the effluent of residential areas, hospitals, and municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) systems. The concentrations of total/individual targets (antibiotics, genes, and bacteria) varied remarkably among different samples, but the hospital samples generally had a lower abundance than the residential area samples. The WWTP demonstrated removal efficiencies of 50.8% tetracyclines, 66.8% sulfonamides, 0.5 logs to 2.5 logs tet genes, and less than 1 log of sul and intI1 genes, as well as 0.5 log to 1 log removal for target bacteria. Except for the total tetracycline concentration and the proportion of tetracycline-resistant bacteria (R (2) = 0.330, P < 0.05), there was no significant correlation between antibiotics and the corresponding resistant bacteria (P > 0.05). In contrast, various relationships were identified between antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (P < 0.05). Tet (A) and tet (B) displayed noticeable relationships with both tetracycline and combined antibiotic-resistant bacteria (P < 0.01).

  7. Treatment of acute puerperal metritis with flunixin meglumine in addition to antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Drillich, M; Voigt, D; Forderung, D; Heuwieser, W

    2007-08-01

    The objective of this field trial was to evaluate effects of a single administration of 2.2 mg/kg of body weight (BW) of flunixin meglumine (FM) in addition to a systemic antibiotic treatment in cows with acute puerperal metritis (APM). Outcome variables tested were proportion of cows with a fever, prevalence of chronic endometritis 18 to 22 and 32 to 35 d in milk (DIM), and reproductive performance measures in the current lactation. In addition, serum concentrations of haptoglobin and fibrinogen were analyzed. Daily milk yield within 6 d after the first treatment was recorded. Cows were examined 4 to 5 DIM by rectal palpation and vaginoscopy, and rectal temperature was measured. Fetid vulvar discharge and a body temperature > or = 39.5 degrees C were signs of APM. Cows with APM were treated in the reference group with 1.0 mg/kg of BW of ceftiofur on 3 to 5 consecutive days (CEF, n = 119). In the study group, cows received the same antibiotic treatment as in CEF and 2.2 mg/kg of BW of FM on treatment d 1 (CEF + FM, n = 119). Blood samples were collected 4, 6, and 10 DIM and analyzed for concentrations of haptoglobin and fibrinogen. A group of cows without APM remained untreated and served as controls (n = 9). There were no significant differences between CEF and CEF + FM in the proportion of cows with fever 1 d after the first treatment (33.6 vs. 46.2%), milk yield per milking 10 DIM (7.5 +/- 0.3 vs. 7.6 +/- 0.3 kg in primiparous, 9.6 +/- 0.4 vs. 10.6 +/- 0.4 kg in multiparous cows), prevalence of chronic endometritis 32 to 35 DIM (64.3 vs. 52.2%), and in reproductive performance (31.5 vs. 34.3% conception to first AI, 58.0 vs. 54.6% pregnancy rate, 107.8 +/- 36.9 vs. 101.6 +/- 41.4 d open). Compared with the control, CEF and CEF + FM had significantly greater concentrations of haptoglobin (1.1 +/- 0.28 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.06 and 1.8 +/- 0.07 mg/mL at 4 DIM; 0.3 +/- 0.15 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.06 and 1.2 +/- 0.07 mg/mL at 10 DIM) and fibrinogen (2.2 +/- 0.17 vs. 3.9 +/- 0.14 and

  8. Impact of probiotic supplements on microbiome diversity following antibiotic treatment of mice.

    PubMed

    Grazul, Hannah; Kanda, L Leann; Gondek, David

    2016-01-01

    Shifts in microbial populations of the intestinal tract have been associated with a multitude of nutritional, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. The limited diversity following antibiotic treatments creates a window for opportunistic pathogens, diarrhea, and inflammation as the microbiome repopulates. Depending on the antibiotics used, microbial diversity can take weeks to months to recover. To alleviate this loss of diversity in the intestinal microbiota, supplementation with probiotics has become increasingly popular. However, our understanding of the purported health benefits of these probiotic bacteria and their ability to shape the microbiome is significantly lacking. This study examined the impact of probiotics concurrent with antibiotic treatment or during the recovery phase following antibiotic treatment of mice. We found that probiotics did not appear to colonize the intestine themselves or shift the overall diversity of the intestinal microbiota. However, the probiotic supplementation did significantly change the types of bacteria which were present. In particular, during the recovery phase the probiotic caused a suppression of Enterobacteriaceae outgrowth (Shigella and Escherichia) while promoting a blooming of Firmicutes, particularly from the Anaerotruncus genus. These results indicate that probiotics have a significant capacity to remodel the microbiome of an individual recovering from antibiotic therapy.

  9. A computational tool integrating host immunity with antibiotic dynamics to study tuberculosis treatment

    DOE PAGES

    Pienaar, Elsje; Cilfone, Nicholas A.; Lin, Philana Ling; ...

    2014-12-08

    While active tuberculosis (TB) is a treatable disease, many complex factors prevent its global elimination. Part of the difficulty in developing optimal therapies is the large design space of antibiotic doses, regimens and combinations. Computational models that capture the spatial and temporal dynamics of antibiotics at the site of infection can aid in reducing the design space of costly and time-consuming animal pre-clinical and human clinical trials. The site of infection in TB is the granuloma, a collection of immune cells and bacteria that form in the lung, and new data suggest that penetration of drugs throughout granulomas is problematic.more » In this paper, we integrate our computational model of granuloma formation and function with models for plasma pharmacokinetics, lung tissue pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for two first line anti-TB antibiotics. The integrated model is calibrated to animal data. We make four predictions. First, antibiotics are frequently below effective concentrations inside granulomas, leading to bacterial growth between doses and contributing to the long treatment periods required for TB. Second, antibiotic concentration gradients form within granulomas, with lower concentrations toward their centers. Third, during antibiotic treatment, bacterial subpopulations are similar for INH and RIF treatment: mostly intracellular with extracellular bacteria located in areas non-permissive for replication (hypoxic areas), presenting a slowly increasing target population over time. In conclusion, we find that on an individual granuloma basis, pre-treatment infection severity (including bacterial burden, host cell activation and host cell death) is predictive of treatment outcome.« less

  10. Antibiotic Treatment for First Episode of Acute Otitis Media Is Not Associated with Future Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    te Molder, Marthe; de Hoog, Marieke L. A.; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Smit, Henriette A.; Schilder, Anne G. M.; Damoiseaux, Roger A. M. J.; Venekamp, Roderick P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media (AOM) has been suggested to increase the risk of future AOM episodes by causing unfavorable shifts in microbial flora. Because current evidence on this topic is inconclusive and long-term follow-up data are scarce, we wanted to estimate the effect of antibiotic treatment for a first AOM episode occurring during infancy on AOM recurrences and AOM-related health care utilization later in life. Methods We obtained demographic information and risk factors from data of the Wheezing Illnesses Study Leidsche Rijn, a prospective birth cohort study in which all healthy newborns born in Leidsche Rijn (between 2001 and 2012), The Netherlands, were enrolled. These data were linked to children’s primary care electronic health records up to the age of four. Children with at least one family physician-diagnosed AOM episode before the age of two were included in analyses. The exposure of interest was the prescription of oral antibiotics (yes vs no) for a child’s first AOM episode before the age of two years. Results 848 children were included in analyses and 512 (60%) children were prescribed antibiotics for their first AOM episode. Antibiotic treatment was not associated with an increased risk of total AOM recurrences (adjusted rate ratio: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.78–1.13), recurrent AOM (≥3 episodes in 6 months or ≥4 in one year; adjusted risk ratio: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.57–1.11), or with increased AOM-related health care utilization during children’s first four years of life. Conclusions Oral antibiotic treatment of a first AOM episode occurring during infancy does not affect the number of AOM recurrences and AOM-related health care utilization later in life. This information can be used when weighing the pros and cons of various AOM treatment options. PMID:27632355

  11. Additive effects of exogenous IL-12 supplementation and antibiotic treatment in infection prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Brandon M; Lindsey, Brock A; Clovis, Nina B; Smith, E Suzanne; Hobbs, Gerald R; Hubbard, David F; Emery, Sanford E; Barnett, John B; Li, Bingyun

    2012-02-01

    The increasing clinical incidence and host risk of open fracture-associated infections, as well as the reduced effectiveness of conventional antibiotics to treat such infections, have driven the development of new therapies for the prophylaxis of open fracture-associated infections. We investigated percutaneous supplementation of a natural cytokine (i.e., interleukin 12p70 or IL-12) at an open fracture site to reduce open fracture-associated infections. We also determined the efficacy of the combination therapy of IL-12 and conventional antibiotic therapy in the prophylaxis of open fracture-associated infections. An open femur fracture infection model was produced by direct inoculation of a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus after creating a femur fracture using rats. The animals were assigned to one of four groups: no drug administration, percutaneous supplementation of IL-12, intraperitoneal administration of the antibiotic ampicillin, or percutaneous IL-12 in combination with intraperitoneal ampicillin. Animals were euthanized at postoperative days 6, 10, 14, and 21. Percutaneous IL-12 led to a reduction in infection at postoperative days 6 and 10. For the first time, exogenous IL-12 was found to have additive effects in the prevention of infection when combined with conventional treatment (i.e., antibiotic therapy). Combination therapy of ampicillin and IL-12 substantially reduced the infection rate at postoperative day 6 and also decreased the time needed for complete inhibition of infection. Therefore, exogenous IL-12, providing a mechanism of protection independent of antibiotic resistance, complements the routine use of antibiotics.

  12. Chlamydial Antibiotic Resistance and Treatment Failure in Veterinary and Human Medicine.

    PubMed

    Borel, Nicole; Leonard, Cory; Slade, Jessica; Schoborg, Robert V

    The Chlamydiaceae are widespread pathogens of both humans and animals. Chlamydia trachomatis infection causes blinding trachoma and reproductive complications in humans. Chlamydia pneumoniae causes human respiratory tract infections and atypical pneumonia. Chlamydia suis infection is associated with conjunctivitis, diarrhea, and failure to gain weight in domestic swine. Chlamydial infections in humans and domesticated animals are generally controlled by antibiotic treatment-particularly macrolides (usually azithromycin) and tetracyclines (tetracycline and doxycycline). Tetracycline-containing feed has also been used to limit infections and promote growth in livestock populations, although its use has decreased because of growing concerns about antimicrobial resistance development. Because Sandoz and Rockey published an elegant review of chlamydial anti-microbial resistance in 2010, we will review the following: (i) antibiotic resistance in C. suis, (ii) recent evidence for acquired resistance in human chlamydial infections, and (iii) recent non-genetic mechanisms of antibiotic resistance that may contribute to treatment failure.

  13. [Antibiotic treatment of appendicular peritonitis in children: is the oral route done?].

    PubMed

    Berthe-Aucejo, A; Postaire, M; Cheikhlard, A; Zahar, J-R; Bourget, P

    2012-12-01

    The use of intravenously administered antibiotics has several disadvantages including hospitalization costs, infectious risk, and patient discomfort. The objective of this study was to estimate the proportion of children receiving intravenous antibiotic therapy (IV), for whom there was a switch to an oral route conforming to the criteria established by the American Pediatric Surgical Association (APSA). A cohort of 100 children hospitalized for acute appendicitis with generalized peritonitis or abscess were analyzed. In this study, we compared the criteria of switching to an oral route as recommended by the APSA (disappearance of the pain, normalization of white blood cells, afebrile for 48 hours, return to bowel function) and by reports from the literature (afebrile, tolerating regular diet). In 47.5% of the children, there was a switch to an oral route conforming to the APSA recommendations. In children having a late switch, the average duration of the IV treatment was of 7.6 ± 3.6 days associated with 62 days of avoidable IV antibiotics. The duration of hospitalization and antibiotic treatment was significantly higher in children having a late switch (P=0.04; P=0.01, respectively). Concerning the criteria reported in the literature, 14.5% of children were not switched to an oral route. Meeting the criteria from the literature would have resulted in 199 days of avoidable IV antibiotics. A significant number of days of IV antibiotics could have been avoided. However, the large number of exclusion criteria in the APSA analysis suggests that practitioners do not follow these recommendations or objective criteria. The criteria proposed in the literature could decrease the duration of IV antibiotics and the associated hospitalization costs.

  14. Factors Associated with Antibiotic Misuse in Outpatient Treatment for Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Schroeck, Jennifer L.; Ruh, Christine A.; Sellick, John A.; Ott, Michael C.; Mattappallil, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has promoted the appropriate use of antibiotics since 1995 when it initiated the National Campaign for Appropriate Antibiotic Use in the Community. This study examined upper respiratory tract infections included in the campaign to determine the degree to which antibiotics were appropriately prescribed and subsequent admission rates in a veteran population. This study was a retrospective chart review conducted among outpatients with a diagnosis of a respiratory tract infection, including bronchitis, pharyngitis, sinusitis, or nonspecific upper respiratory tract infection, between January 2009 and December 2011. The study found that 595 (35.8%) patients were treated appropriately, and 1,067 (64.2%) patients received therapy considered inappropriate based on the Get Smart Campaign criteria. Overall the subsequent readmission rate was 1.5%. The majority (77.5%) of patients were prescribed an antibiotic. The most common antibiotics prescribed were azithromycin (39.0%), amoxicillin-clavulanate (13.2%), and moxifloxacin (7.5%). A multivariate regression analysis demonstrated significant predictors of appropriate treatment, including the presence of tonsillar exudates (odds ratio [OR], 0.6; confidence interval [CI], 0.3 to 0.9), fever (OR, 0.6; CI, 0.4 to 0.9), and lymphadenopathy (OR, 0.4; CI, 0.3 to 0.6), while penicillin allergy (OR, 2.9; CI, 1.7 to 4.7) and cough (OR, 1.6; CI, 1.1 to 2.2) were significant predictors for inappropriate treatment. Poor compliance with the Get Smart Campaign was found in outpatients for respiratory infections. Results from this study demonstrate the overprescribing of antibiotics, while providing a focused view of improper prescribing. This article provides evidence that current efforts are insufficient for curtailing inappropriate antibiotic use. PMID:25870064

  15. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment and Subsequent Childhood Type 1 Diabetes: A Nationwide Danish Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bergholt, Thomas; Bouaziz, Olivier; Arpi, Magnus; Eriksson, Frank; Rasmussen, Steen; Keiding, Niels; Løkkegaard, Ellen C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies link antibiotic treatment and delivery by cesarean section with increased risk of chronic diseases through changes of the gut-microbiota. We aimed to evaluate the association of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment during the first two years of life with subsequent onset of childhood type 1 diabetes and the potential effect-modification by mode of delivery. Materials and Methods A Danish nationwide cohort study including all singletons born during 1997–2010. End of follow-up by December 2012. Four national registers provided information on antibiotic redemptions, outcome and confounders. Redemptions of antibiotic prescriptions during the first two years of life was classified into narrow-spectrum or broad-spectrum antibiotics. Children were followed from age two to fourteen, both inclusive. The risk of type 1 diabetes with onset before the age of 15 years was assessed by Cox regression. A total of 858,201 singletons contributed 5,906,069 person-years, during which 1,503 children developed type 1 diabetes. Results Redemption of broad-spectrum antibiotics during the first two years of life was associated with an increased rate of type 1 diabetes during the following 13 years of life (HR 1.13; 95% CI 1.02 to 1.25), however, the rate was modified by mode of delivery. Broad-spectrum antibiotics were associated with an increased rate of type 1 diabetes in children delivered by either intrapartum cesarean section (HR 1.70; 95% CI 1.15 to 2.51) or prelabor cesarean section (HR 1.63; 95% CI 1.11 to 2.39), but not in vaginally delivered children. Number needed to harm was 433 and 562, respectively. The association with broad-spectrum antibiotics was not modified by parity, genetic predisposition or maternal redemption of antibiotics during pregnancy or lactation. Conclusions Redemption of broad-spectrum antibiotics during infancy is associated with an increased risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children delivered by cesarean section. PMID:27560963

  16. Antibiotic Treatment of Severe Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease with Procalcitonin: A Randomized Noninferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    Verduri, Alessia; Luppi, Fabrizio; D’Amico, Roberto; Balduzzi, Sara; Vicini, Roberto; Liverani, Anna; Ruggieri, Valentina; Plebani, Mario; Barbaro, Maria Pia Foschino; Spanevello, Antonio; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Papi, Alberto; Fabbri, Leonardo Michele; Beghè, Bianca

    2015-01-01

    Background The duration of antibiotic treatment of exacerbations of COPD (ECOPD) is controversial. Serum procalcitonin (PCT) is a biomarker of bacterial infection used to identify the cause of ECOPD. Methods and Findings We investigated whether a PCT-guided plan would allow a shorter duration of antibiotic treatment in patients with severe ECOPD. For this multicenter, randomized, non-inferiority trial, we enrolled 184 patients hospitalized with ECOPD from 18 hospitals in Italy. Patients were assigned to receive antibiotics for 10 days (standard group) or for either 3 or 10 days (PCT group). The primary outcome was the rate of ECOPD at 6 months. Having planned to recruit 400 patients, we randomized only 183: 93 in the PCT group and 90 in the standard group. Thus, the completed study was underpowered. The ECOPD rate at 6 months between PCT-guided and standard antibiotic treatment was not significant (% difference, 4.04; 90% confidence interval [CI], −7.23 to 15.31), but the CI included the non-inferiority margin of 15. In the PCT-guided group, about 50% of patients were treated for 3 days, and there was no difference in primary or secondary outcomes compared to patients treated for 10 days. Conclusions Although the primary and secondary clinical outcomes were no different for patients treated for 3 or 10 days in the PCT group, the conclusion that antibiotics can be safely stopped after 3 days in patients with low serum PCT cannot be substantiated statistically. Thus, the results of this study are inconclusive regarding the noninferiority of the PCT-guided plan compared to the standard antibiotic treatment. The study was funded by Agenzia Italiana del Farmaco (AIFA-FARM58J2XH). Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01125098). Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01125098 PMID:25760346

  17. Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae; versatile bacterial pathogens confronting antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Davin-Regli, Anne; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae have been reported as important opportunistic and multiresistant bacterial pathogens for humans during the last three decades in hospital wards. These Gram-negative bacteria have been largely described during several outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections in Europe and particularly in France. The dissemination of Enterobacter sp. is associated with the presence of redundant regulatory cascades that efficiently control the membrane permeability ensuring the bacterial protection and the expression of detoxifying enzymes involved in antibiotic degradation/inactivation. In addition, these bacterial species are able to acquire numerous genetic mobile elements that strongly contribute to antibiotic resistance. Moreover, this particular fitness help them to colonize several environments and hosts and rapidly and efficiently adapt their metabolism and physiology to external conditions and environmental stresses. Enterobacter is a versatile bacterium able to promptly respond to the antibiotic treatment in the colonized patient. The balance of the prevalence, E. aerogenes versus E. cloacae, in the reported hospital infections during the last period, questions about the horizontal transmission of mobile elements containing antibiotic resistance genes, e.g., the efficacy of the exchange of resistance genes Klebsiella pneumoniae to Enterobacter sp. It is also important to mention the possible role of antibiotic use in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases in this E. aerogenes/E. cloacae evolution.

  18. Enterobacter aerogenes and Enterobacter cloacae; versatile bacterial pathogens confronting antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Davin-Regli, Anne; Pagès, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Enterobacter aerogenes and E. cloacae have been reported as important opportunistic and multiresistant bacterial pathogens for humans during the last three decades in hospital wards. These Gram-negative bacteria have been largely described during several outbreaks of hospital-acquired infections in Europe and particularly in France. The dissemination of Enterobacter sp. is associated with the presence of redundant regulatory cascades that efficiently control the membrane permeability ensuring the bacterial protection and the expression of detoxifying enzymes involved in antibiotic degradation/inactivation. In addition, these bacterial species are able to acquire numerous genetic mobile elements that strongly contribute to antibiotic resistance. Moreover, this particular fitness help them to colonize several environments and hosts and rapidly and efficiently adapt their metabolism and physiology to external conditions and environmental stresses. Enterobacter is a versatile bacterium able to promptly respond to the antibiotic treatment in the colonized patient. The balance of the prevalence, E. aerogenes versus E. cloacae, in the reported hospital infections during the last period, questions about the horizontal transmission of mobile elements containing antibiotic resistance genes, e.g., the efficacy of the exchange of resistance genes Klebsiella pneumoniae to Enterobacter sp. It is also important to mention the possible role of antibiotic use in the treatment of bacterial infectious diseases in this E. aerogenes/E. cloacae evolution. PMID:26042091

  19. COMBINED TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL MELIODOSIS WITH ANTIBIOTICS AND SULFADIMESIN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    sulfamethazine) and chlortetracylein; 75% to 90% of the white mice, treated with these substances, remained alive. Tetracyclin and oxytetracyclin ...Sulfodimerin therapy, combined with monomycetin, tetracyclin , oxytetracylcin, bicyllin, streptomycin, mycerin and levomycetin, in treatment of animals

  20. Identification of antibiotic-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Zanotto, Carlo; Bissa, Massimiliano; Illiano, Elena; Mezzanotte, Valeria; Marazzi, Francesca; Turolla, Andrea; Antonelli, Manuela; De Giuli Morghen, Carlo; Radaelli, Antonia

    2016-12-01

    The emergence and diffusion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been a major public health problem for many years now. In this study, antibiotic-resistance of coliforms and Escherichia coli were investigated after their isolation from samples collected in a municipal wastewater treatment plant in the Milan area (Italy) along different points of the treatment sequence: inflow to biological treatment; outflow from biological treatment following rapid sand filtration; and outflow from peracetic acid disinfection. The presence of E. coli that showed resistance to ampicillin (AMP) and chloramphenicol (CAF), used as representative antibiotics for the efficacy against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. After determining E. coli survival using increasing AMP and CAF concentrations, specific single-resistant (AMP(R) or CAF(R)) and double-resistant (AMP(R)/CAF(R)) strains were identified among E. coli colonies, through amplification of the β-lactamase Tem-1 (bla) and acetyl-transferase catA1 (cat) gene sequences. While a limited number of CAF(R) bacteria was observed, most AMP(R) colonies showed the specific resistance genes to both antibiotics, which was mainly due to the presence of the bla gene sequence. The peracetic acid, used as disinfection agent, showed to be very effective in reducing bacteria at the negligible levels of less than 10 CFU/100 mL, compatible with those admitted for the irrigation use of treated waters.

  1. A mixed treatment meta-analysis of antibiotic treatment options for bovine respiratory disease - An update.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, A M; Yuan, C; Cullen, J N; Coetzee, J F; da Silva, N; Wang, C

    2016-09-15

    Bovine respiratory disease is the most economically important disease of feedlot cattle in North America. Choice of antibiotic is a critical factor for producers and veterinarians. We previously published a mixed-treatment comparison meta-analysis that combined evidence from published trials and published estimates of comparative efficacy for 12 antibiotics registered for use in the USA. Some of the comparative efficacy estimates were based only on indirect evidence. Since the original review was published, new studies that provide direct evidence of comparative efficacy have been published. We updated the original review to include the current evidence. We also compared the results from the indirect estimates from the prior model with the observed results from randomized control trials. We repeated the original search and found that five of the new studies met the criteria for inclusion in the updated review. Four of these studies provided new data on direct comparisons of active drugs. The results from one study (performed in 2002) that compared ceftiofur pinna and enrofloxacin were inconsistent with the network and were excluded from the analysis. Three new direct comparison studies examined gamithromycin compared with tulathromycin, florfenicol, and tilmicosin. The results of our analysis suggested that the indirect estimates from the prior model provided reasonable estimates of the risk ratios revealed by the primary studies. For example, for the comparison of gamithromycin (referent) with tulathromycin, the original model predicted a risk ratio of re-treatment of 0.54 (95% credible interval 0.27-0.87). The subsequent randomized controlled trial revealed that the observed risk ratio of re-treatment was 0.59 (95% confidence interval 0.45-0.78). The results of other comparisons were also similar. For the gamithromycin (referent) to florfenicol comparison, the observed randomized trial RR was 1.17 (95% confidence interval 0.83-1.64) and the indirect estimate of

  2. Impact of pre-application treatment on municipal sludge composition, soil dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes, and abundance of antibiotic-resistance genes on vegetables at harvest.

    PubMed

    Lau, Calvin Ho-Fung; Li, Bing; Zhang, Tong; Tien, Yuan-Ching; Scott, Andrew; Murray, Roger; Sabourin, Lyne; Lapen, David R; Duenk, Peter; Topp, Edward

    2017-06-01

    In many jurisdictions sludge recovered from the sewage treatment process is a valued fertilizer for crop production. Pre-treatment of sewage sludge prior to land application offers the potential to abate enteric microorganisms that carry genes conferring resistance to antibiotics. Pre-treatment practices that accomplish this should have the desirable effect of reducing the risk of contamination of crops or adjacent water with antibiotic resistance genes carried in these materials. In the present study, we obtained municipal sludge that had been subjected to one of five treatments. There were, anaerobic-digestion or aerobic-digestion, in both instances with and without dewatering; and heat-treatment and pelletization. Each of the five types of biosolids was applied to an agricultural field at commercial rates, following which lettuce, carrots and radishes were planted. Based on qPCR, the estimated antibiotic gene loading rates were comparable with each of the five biosolids. However, the gene abundance in soil following application of the pelletized biosolids was anomalously lower than expected. Following application, the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes decreased in a generally coherent fashion, except sul1 which increased in abundance during the growing season in the soil fertilized with pelletized biosolids. Based on qPCR and high throughput sequencing evidence for transfer of antibiotic resistance genes from the biosolids to the vegetables at harvest was weak. Clostridia were more abundant in soils receiving any of the biosolids except the pelletized. Overall, the behavior of antibiotic resistance genes in soils receiving aerobically or anaerobically-digested biosolids was consistent and coherent with previous studies. However, dynamics of antibiotic resistance genes in soils receiving the heat treated pelletized biosolids were very different, and the underlying mechanisms merit investigation.

  3. Bacterial fitness shapes the population dynamics of antibiotic-resistant and -susceptible bacteria in a model of combined antibiotic and anti-virulence treatment.

    PubMed

    Ternent, Lucy; Dyson, Rosemary J; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Jabbari, Sara

    2015-05-07

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotic treatment is a huge concern: introduction of any new antibiotic is shortly followed by the emergence of resistant bacterial isolates in the clinic. This issue is compounded by a severe lack of new antibiotics reaching the market. The significant rise in clinical resistance to antibiotics is especially problematic in nosocomial infections, where already vulnerable patients may fail to respond to treatment, causing even greater health concern. A recent focus has been on the development of anti-virulence drugs as a second line of defence in the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections. This treatment, which weakens bacteria by reducing their virulence rather than killing them, should allow infections to be cleared through the body׳s natural defence mechanisms. In this way there should be little to no selective pressure exerted on the organism and, as such, a predominantly resistant population should be less likely to emerge. However, before the likelihood of resistance to these novel drugs emerging can be predicted, we must first establish whether such drugs can actually be effective. Many believe that anti-virulence drugs would not be powerful enough to clear existing infections, restricting their potential application to prophylaxis. We have developed a mathematical model that provides a theoretical framework to reveal the circumstances under which anti-virulence drugs may or may not be successful. We demonstrate that by harnessing and combining the advantages of antibiotics with those provided by anti-virulence drugs, given infection-specific parameters, it is possible to identify treatment strategies that would efficiently clear bacterial infections, while preventing the emergence of antibiotic-resistant subpopulations. Our findings strongly support the continuation of research into anti-virulence drugs and demonstrate that their applicability may reach beyond infection prevention.

  4. Monitoring and evaluation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria at a municipal wastewater treatment plant in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Jing; Hu, Hong-Ying; Lu, Sun-Qin; Li, Yi; Tang, Fang; Lu, Yun; Wei, Bin

    2012-07-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is becoming a concern of public health. In order to acquire information on the emission of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from WWTP effluents into natural waters, both average antibiotic tolerance and concentrations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the effluent of a WWTP in Beijing, China were investigated. A new index of IC(50)/MIC ratio (the antibiotic concentration required to inhibit 50% of total heterotrophic bacteria compared to the highest minimum inhibitory concentration value of a group of pathogens according to a specific antibiotic, as defined by CLSI) was used to reflect the average antibiotic tolerance of total heterotrophic bacteria in the secondary effluent. The results showed that the IC(50)/MIC ratios of heterotrophic bacteria in the secondary effluent to penicillin, ampicillin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol and rifampicin were >2, >1, >1, and 1.08, respectively, which reflected a significantly high general level of heterotrophic bacteria found in the secondary effluent resistant to these five antibiotics. The concentrations of penicillin-, ampicillin-, cephalothin-, and chloramphenicol-resistant bacteria were as high as 1.5×10(4)-1.9×10(5), 1.2×10(4)-1.5×10(5), 8.9×10(3)-1.9×10(5) and 2.6×10(4)-2.0×10(5) CFU/mL, and the average percentages in relation to total heterotrophic bacteria were 63%, 47%, 55%, and 69%, respectively. The concentrations of tetracycline- and rifampicin-resistant bacteria were 840-6.1×10(3) and 310-6.1×10(4) CFU/mL with average percentages of 2.6% and 11%, respectively. Furthermore, our study found that five- and six-antibiotic-resistant bacteria were widely distributed in four types of enterobacteria from the secondary effluent. The presence of multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacteria from effluents of WWTPs into natural waters could pose a serious problem as a secondary pollutant of drinking water.

  5. [Saccharomyces boulardii modulates dendritic cell properties and intestinal microbiota disruption after antibiotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Collignon, A; Sandré, C; Barc, M-C

    2010-09-01

    Saccharomyces boulardii is a non-pathogenic yeast with biotherapeutic properties that has been used successfully to prevent and to treat various infectious and antibiotic-associated diarrheas. The intestinal microbiota is responsible for colonization resistance and immune response to pathogens but can be disrupted by antibiotics and lose its barrier effect. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system with the ability to initiate a primary immune response or immune tolerance. In a human microbiota-associated mouse model, we evaluated the influence of S. boulardii on the composition of the microbiota and on the properties of dendritic cells in normal homeostatic conditions and after antibiotic-induced stress. The DCs were derived from splenic precursors. Membrane antigen expression and phagocytosis of FITC-latex beads by DCs were evaluated by flow cytometry. The molecular analysis of the microbiota was performed with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) combined with flow cytometry or confocal microscopy using group specific 16S rRNA targeted probes. This evaluation was conducted during and after a 7-day oral treatment with amoxicillin-clavulanic acid alone and in combination with the administration of the yeast. The antibiotic treatment increased the phagocytic activity of DCs. Their antigen presenting function (MHC class II antigen and CD 86 costimulatory molecule membrane expression) was up-regulated. This reflects a functional activation of DCs. In the presence of S. boulardii, the modification of membrane antigen expression was down regulated. To correlate these modifications to the microbiota disruption, we analyzed in parallel the composition of the intestinal microbiota. As previously shown, the amoxicillin-clavulanic acid treatment, both alone and with S. boulardii, did not quantitatively alter the total microbiota. In contrast, after one day of the antibiotic treatment the Clostridium coccoides group decreased

  6. Hemifacial Spasm From Lyme Disease: Antibiotic Treatment Points to the Cause.

    PubMed

    LeWitt, Tessa M

    A wide range of etiologies can cause hemifacial spasm (HFS), including infection. In this case report, a 44-year-old woman developed HFS and was explored surgically 7 years later. No abnormalities were found. Afterward, treatment of a surgical wound infection with an oral cephalosporin resulted in a temporary HFS remission that had never occurred previously. This antibiotic experience prompted further workup for an underlying infection, which ultimately led to diagnosis of Lyme disease. Presentation of HFS due to Lyme disease has not been reported. Because its diagnosis can be occult and antibiotic therapy can be both diagnostic and therapeutic, Lyme disease should be a consideration for cases of HFS.

  7. Invited review: Antibiotic treatment of metritis in dairy cows: a systematic approach.

    PubMed

    Haimerl, P; Heuwieser, W

    2014-11-01

    Acute puerperal metritis (APM) is an acute systemic illness with fever ≥ 39.5 °C and signs of toxemia due to an infection of the uterus occurring within 21 d after parturition. Because of the infectious nature of APM, antibiotics are considered beneficial for its treatment. Each use of an antimicrobial drug, however, is associated with selective pressure for the emergence of resistant bacteria. Hence, there is a significant need to encourage prudent use of antibiotics and alternative therapies to antibiotics. Therefore, the objective of this study was to systematically review the current literature on treatment of APM. A comprehensive and systematic literature search was conducted utilizing the PubMed and CAB Abstracts databases to identify literature focusing on the antibiotic therapy of puerperal metritis in the cow. After application of specific exclusion criteria, 21 publications comprising 23 trials remained for final evaluation. Data extraction revealed that the majority of the studies (n = 19) were attributable to the highest evidence level. Of 21 studies controlled, 11 had an untreated group and 3 a positive control group. The majority of the studies (n = 17) applied ceftiofur for the treatment of APM. Concerning the efficacy of ceftiofur, 7 studies observed clinical improvement, whereas none found improved reproductive performance. Fewer than half of the studies (n = 10) performed a bacteriological examination and only 4 implemented an antibiotic susceptibility test. Also, 3 studies (13.0%) described a self-cure rate per se. Little attention was given to the issue of bacterial resistance (n = 3), the need for reducing the application of antibiotics (n = 2), or guidelines for prudent use of antibiotics (n = 1). Our findings demonstrate that implementation of bacteriological examinations, sensitivity testing, and determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations, as well as reporting and discussion of critical issues (e.g., self-cure rates, resistance

  8. Antibiotics and bioactive natural products in treatment of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A brief review.

    PubMed

    Kali, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus strains with Methicillin resistance are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, aggressive course, multiple drug resistance and hospital outbreaks. Several first and second line antibiotics are rapidly becoming ineffective for treatment due to emergence of resistance. Extracts of medicinal plants are rich source of unique phytochemicals. Plants used in traditional medicine have been reported to have significant anti-MRSA activity. The objective of this review is to provide a brief overview of antibiotics as well as anti-MRSA natural products and their future prospect.

  9. Are antibiotics a safe and effective treatment for acute uncomplicated appendicitis?

    PubMed

    Moraga, Felipe; Ahumada, Vanessa; Crovari, Fernando

    2016-01-26

    Acute appendicitis is a common cause of acute abdominal pain and the most frequent cause of emergency abdominal surgery. In the last two decades, growing evidence has been published about the use of antibiotics as the exclusive treatment for acute appendicitis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified only one systematic review including one pertinent randomized trial. We generated a summary of findings following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of antibiotics to treat acute uncomplicated appendicitis may be less effective than appendectomy and probably increases major complications compared with appendectomy.

  10. Occurrence, distribution and potential affecting factors of antibiotics in sewage sludge of wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenhui; Shi, Yali; Gao, Lihong; Liu, Jiemin; Cai, Yaqi

    2013-02-15

    The occurrence and distribution of eight quinolones, nine sulfonamides, and five macrolides were investigated in sewage sludge from 45 wastewater treatment plants in 23 cities in China. Among all the antibiotics considered, quinolones were the dominant antibiotics detected in all samples [total concentrations up to 8905 μg/kg, dry weight (dw)], followed by macrolides (85.1 μg/kg, dw), and sulfonamides (22.7 μg/kg, dw). High concentrations of quinolones in sewage sludge indicated that antibiotics are widely used and extensive pollutants in China. Significant differences were observed for the total concentrations of antibiotics in sludge samples among the 45 WWTPs. To evaluate the potential factors affecting the antibiotic levels in sewage sludge, wastewater and sludge characteristics, as well as the operational conditions and treatment techniques in WWTPs were investigated. The results indicated that the antibiotic levels in sewage sludge depend to a great extent on wastewater characteristics. Significant correlation between total organic carbon (TOC) and total concentrations of antibiotics was also found in studied WWTPs, indicating that TOC could affect the sludge adsorption capability to the antibiotics to some extent. Moreover, the relation between treatment techniques and the total concentrations of antibiotics in sludge showed that antibiotic levels in sludge increased with longer solid retention time.

  11. Pre-hospital antibiotic treatment and mortality caused by invasive meningococcal disease, adjusting for indication bias

    PubMed Central

    Perea-Milla, Emilio; Olalla, Julián; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Martos, Francisco; Matute-Cruz, Petra; Carmona-López, Guadalupe; Fornieles, Yolanda; Cayuela, Aurelio; García-Alegría, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Background Mortality from invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) has remained stable over the last thirty years and it is unclear whether pre-hospital antibiotherapy actually produces a decrease in this mortality. Our aim was to examine whether pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy reduces mortality from IMD, adjusting for indication bias. Methods A retrospective analysis was made of clinical reports of all patients (n = 848) diagnosed with IMD from 1995 to 2000 in Andalusia and the Canary Islands, Spain, and of the relationship between the use of pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy and mortality. Indication bias was controlled for by the propensity score technique, and a multivariate analysis was performed to determine the probability of each patient receiving antibiotics, according to the symptoms identified before admission. Data on in-hospital death, use of antibiotics and demographic variables were collected. A logistic regression analysis was then carried out, using death as the dependent variable, and pre-hospital antibiotic use, age, time from onset of symptoms to parenteral antibiotics and the propensity score as independent variables. Results Data were recorded on 848 patients, 49 (5.72%) of whom died. Of the total number of patients, 226 had received oral antibiotics before admission, mainly betalactams during the previous 48 hours. After adjusting the association between the use of antibiotics and death for age, time between onset of symptoms and in-hospital antibiotic treatment, pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy remained a significant protective factor (Odds Ratio for death 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.15–0.93). Conclusion Pre-hospital oral antibiotherapy appears to reduce IMD mortality. PMID:19344518

  12. Rapid and Profound Shifts in the Vaginal Microbiota Following Antibiotic Treatment for Bacterial Vaginosis

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Bryan T.; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.; Fredricks, David N.; Schiffer, Joshua T.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a common polymicrobial disease associated with numerous negative reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus acquisition. BV is treatable with antibiotics, but relapse is common. A more detailed understanding of bacterial dynamics during antibiotic therapy for BV could identify conditions that favor establishment, maintenance, and eradication of BV-associated bacterial species, thereby improving treatment outcomes. Methods. We used mathematical models to analyze daily quantitative measurements of 11 key bacterial species during metronidazole treatment for 15 cases of BV. Results. We identified complete reorganization of vaginal bacterial composition within a day of initiating therapy. Although baseline bacterial levels predicted a longer time to clearance, all anaerobic species were eliminated rapidly within a median of 3 days. However, reemergence of BV-associated species was common following treatment cessation. Gardnerella vaginalis, a facultative anaerobe, was cleared more slowly than anaerobic BV-associated species, and levels of G. vaginalis often rebounded during treatment. We observed gradual Lactobacillus species growth, indicating that untargeted microbes fill the transient vacuum formed during treatment. Conclusions. Under antibiotic pressure, the human microbiome can undergo rapid shifts on a scale of hours. When treatment is stopped, BV-associated bacteria quickly reemerge, suggesting a possible role for intermittent prophylactic treatment. PMID:25676470

  13. Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: Pathogenesis, Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms, and Prospective Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Moonhee; Park, Kwang Seung; Bae, Il Kwon; Kim, Young Bae; Cha, Chang-Jun; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired nosocomial infections in the modern healthcare system. Due to the prevalence of infections and outbreaks caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, few antibiotics are effective for treating infections caused by this pathogen. To overcome this problem, knowledge of the pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii is important. In this review, we summarize current studies on the virulence factors that contribute to A. baumannii pathogenesis, including porins, capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, phospholipases, outer membrane vesicles, metal acquisition systems, and protein secretion systems. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of this organism, including acquirement of β-lactamases, up-regulation of multidrug efflux pumps, modification of aminoglycosides, permeability defects, and alteration of target sites, are also discussed. Lastly, novel prospective treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii are summarized.

  14. Biology of Acinetobacter baumannii: Pathogenesis, Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms, and Prospective Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Jung Hun; Park, Moonhee; Park, Kwang Seung; Bae, Il Kwon; Kim, Young Bae; Cha, Chang-Jun; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is undoubtedly one of the most successful pathogens responsible for hospital-acquired nosocomial infections in the modern healthcare system. Due to the prevalence of infections and outbreaks caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii, few antibiotics are effective for treating infections caused by this pathogen. To overcome this problem, knowledge of the pathogenesis and antibiotic resistance mechanisms of A. baumannii is important. In this review, we summarize current studies on the virulence factors that contribute to A. baumannii pathogenesis, including porins, capsular polysaccharides, lipopolysaccharides, phospholipases, outer membrane vesicles, metal acquisition systems, and protein secretion systems. Mechanisms of antibiotic resistance of this organism, including acquirement of β-lactamases, up-regulation of multidrug efflux pumps, modification of aminoglycosides, permeability defects, and alteration of target sites, are also discussed. Lastly, novel prospective treatment options for infections caused by multi-drug resistant A. baumannii are summarized. PMID:28348979

  15. Antibiotics resistance of Helicobacter pylori and treatment modalities in children with H. pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Pediatric infection with Helicobacter pylori may occur early in childhood and persist lifelong. Global pediatric clinical studies have reported a decreasing tendency in the overall rate of H. pylori eradication. In pediatric patients with H. pylori infection, pediatric patients with peptic ulcer, and the first-degree relatives of patients with a history of gastric cancer, it is commonly recommended that H. pylori strains be eradicated. Antibiotic drug resistance to H. pylori, which has been reported to vary widely between geographic regions, is mainly associated with treatment failure in these patients. It is therefore imperative that the antibiotic resistance rates of H. pylori in children and adolescents be meticulously monitored across countries and throughout geographic regions. This paper particularly focuses on the antibiotic drug resistance of H. pylori and the thearpy of pediatric H. pylori infection cases.

  16. [Antibiotics for treatment of infections by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)].

    PubMed

    Stahlmann, R

    2014-10-01

    Over the last 50 years methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) spread globally. Vancomycin is still the most recommended antibiotic for MRSA-infections. Teicoplanin is an alternative glycopeptide with longer elimination half-life. Telavancin is a more recently developed derivative of vancomycin with similar clinical efficacy as vancomycin. It is not recommended for treatment of patients with renal insufficiency. Nephrotoxicity limits the therapeutic use of glycopeptide antibiotics. The oxazolidinone linezolid exhibits similar to superior therapeutic efficacy. Hematologic controls are necessary during treatment with this antibacterial agent. Neurotoxic effects have been observed mainly in patients who received prolonged linezolid treatment. Attention must be paid to possible interactions with concomitantly given drugs acting on the serotonergic system. New therapeutic options arise with ceftaroline, the first β-lactam antibiotic with activity against MRSA. However, controlled clinical trials with pulmonary MRSA infections have not been conducted with ceftaroline. Daptomycin, a lipopeptide, and tigecycline, a glycylcyclin are active in vitro against MRSA as well, but are also not indicated in pulmonary MRSA infections. These antibiotics show in an exemplary manner that antibacterial activity in vitro is an important prerequisite, but relevant data for a therapeutic decision should be derived from randomized controlled clinical double-blind trials.

  17. Newer antibiotics for the treatment of peritoneal dialysis-related peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Terry King-Wing; Leung, Chi Bon; Chow, Kai Ming; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Szeto, Cheuk Chun

    2016-01-01

    Peritonitis is a debilitating infectious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Drug-resistant bacterial peritonitis typically has a lower response rate to antibiotics. In the past 15 years, newer antibiotics with activities against drug-resistant Gram-positive bacteria have been developed. In most circumstances, peritonitis due to methicillin-resistant staphylococci responds to vancomycin. If vancomycin cannot be used due to allergy and/or non-susceptibility, there is increasing evidence that linezolid and daptomycin are the drugs of choice. It is reasonable to start linezolid orally or intravenously, but subsequent dose reduction may be necessary in case of myelosuppression. Daptomycin can be given intravenously or intraperitoneally and has excellent anti-biofilm activity. Other treatment options for drug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial peritonitis include teicoplanin, tigecycline and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Teicoplanin is not available in some countries (e.g. the USA). Tigecycline can only be given intravenously. Quinupristin/dalfopristin is ineffective against Enterococcus faecalis and there is only low-quality evidence to support its efficacy in the treatment of peritonitis. Effective newer antibiotics against drug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are lacking. Polymyxins can be considered, but evidence on its efficacy is limited. In this review, we will discuss the potential use of newer antibiotics in the treatment of drug-resistant bacterial peritonitis in PD patients. PMID:27478608

  18. Antibiotic treatment at delivery shapes the initial oral microbiome in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Arango, Luisa F.; Barrett, Helen L.; McIntyre, H. David.; Callaway, Leonie K.; Morrison, Mark; Dekker Nitert, Marloes

    2017-01-01

    Oral microorganisms are important determinants of health and disease. The source of the initial neonatal microbiome and the factors dictating initial human oral microbiota development are unknown. This study aimed to investigate this in placental, oral and gut microbiome profiles from 36 overweight or obese mother-baby dyads as determined by 16S rRNA sequencing. Expression of five antibiotic resistance genes of the β-lactamase class was analysed in the infant oral microbiota samples by QPCR. The neonatal oral microbiota was 65.35% of maternal oral, 3.09% of placental, 31.56% of unknown and 0% of maternal gut origin. Two distinct neonatal oral microbiota profiles were observed: one strongly resembling the maternal oral microbiota and one with less similarity. Maternal exposure to intrapartum antibiotics explained the segregation of the profiles. Families belonging to Proteobacteria were abundant after antibiotics exposure while the families Streptococcaceae, Gemellaceae and Lactobacillales dominated in unexposed neonates. 26% of exposed neonates expressed the Vim-1 antibiotic resistance gene. These findings indicate that maternal intrapartum antibiotic treatment is a key regulator of the initial neonatal oral microbiome. PMID:28240736

  19. Combined treatment with the antibiotics kanamycin and streptomycin promotes the conjugation of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Yi; Xu, Pei-Pei; Xia, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Jing; Xiong, Juan; Li, Yue-Zhong

    2013-11-01

    It is widely accepted that antibiotics provide a critical selective pressure for the horizontal transfer of antibiotic resistance between bacterial species. This study demonstrated that a combination of low doses of kanamycin and streptomycin, which inhibited the growth of recipient and donor cells, respectively, had positive effects on the transmission of the conjugation plasmids pRK2013, pSU2007, and RP4 from Escherichia coli DH5α to HB101 at their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). Administration of either antibiotic alone as well as other antibiotics in combination or alone did not have this effect. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed that 60 proteins were downregulated and 14 proteins were upregulated in the conjugation of E. coli DH5α (pRK2013) and HB101 in the presence of kanamycin and streptomycin. Of these proteins, 64 were subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. Two antibiotic-induced genes encoding oligopeptide-binding protein (OppA) and ribose-binding protein (RbsB) were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. When these genes were deleted, the number of transconjugants decreased in the same fashion as when the cells were treated with kanamycin and streptomycin. These results indicate that the process of E. coli conjugation may be promoted by combination treatment with kanamycin and streptomycin and that two proteins potentially participated in this process.

  20. Nanostructured Platforms for the Sustained and Local Delivery of Antibiotics in the Treatment of Osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a critical view of the current state of the development of nanoparticulate and other solid-state carriers for the local delivery of antibiotics in the treatment of osteomyelitis. Mentioned are the downsides of traditional means for treating bone infection, which involve systemic administration of antibiotics and surgical debridement, along with the rather imperfect local delivery options currently available in the clinic. Envisaged are more sophisticated carriers for the local and sustained delivery of antimicrobials, including bioresorbable polymeric, collagenous, liquid crystalline, and bioglass- and nanotube-based carriers, as well as those composed of calcium phosphate, the mineral component of bone and teeth. A special emphasis is placed on composite multifunctional antibiotic carriers of a nanoparticulate nature and on their ability to induce osteogenesis of hard tissues demineralized due to disease. An ideal carrier of this type would prevent the long-term, repetitive, and systemic administration of antibiotics and either minimize or completely eliminate the need for surgical debridement of necrotic tissue. Potential problems faced by even hypothetically “perfect” antibiotic delivery vehicles are mentioned too, including (i) intracellular bacterial colonies involved in recurrent, chronic osteomyelitis; (ii) the need for mechanical and release properties to be adjusted to the area of surgical placement; (iii) different environments in which in vitro and in vivo testings are carried out; (iv) unpredictable synergies between drug delivery system components; and (v) experimental sensitivity issues entailing the increasing subtlety of the design of nanoplatforms for the controlled delivery of therapeutics. PMID:25746204

  1. Antibiotic susceptibility profile of Aeromonas species isolated from wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Igbinosa, Isoken H; Okoh, Anthony I

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant Aeromonas species isolated from Alice and Fort Beaufort wastewater treatment plant in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined using the disc diffusion method, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was employed for the detection of antibiotics resistance genes. Variable susceptibilities were observed against ciprofloxacin, chloramphenicol, nalidixic acid, gentamicin, minocycline, among others. Aeromonas isolates from both locations were 100% resistant to penicillin, oxacillin, ampicillin, and vancomycin. Higher phenotypic resistance was observed in isolates from Fort Beaufort compared to isolates from Alice. Class A pse1 β-lactamase was detected in 20.8% of the isolates with a lower detection rate of 8.3% for bla(TEM) gene. Class 1 integron was present in 20.8% of Aeromonas isolates while class 2 integron and TetC gene were not detected in any isolate. The antibiotic resistance phenotypes observed in the isolates and the presence of β-lactamases genes detected in some isolates are of clinical and public health concern as this has consequences for antimicrobial chemotherapy of infections associated with Aeromonas species. This study further supports wastewater as potential reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants in the environment.

  2. An In Vitro Combined Antibiotic-Antibody Treatment Eliminates Toxicity from Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Craig; Zhang, Guodong; Patfield, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Treating Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) gastrointestinal infections is difficult. The utility of antibiotics for STEC treatment is controversial, since antibiotic resistance among STEC isolates is widespread and certain antibiotics dramatically increase the expression of Shiga toxins (Stxs), which are some of the most important virulence factors in STEC. Stxs contribute to life-threatening hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which develops in considerable proportions of patients with STEC infections. Understanding the antibiotic resistance profiles of STEC isolates and the Stx induction potential of promising antibiotics is essential for evaluating any antibiotic treatment of STEC. In this study, 42 O157:H7 or non-O157 STEC isolates (including the “big six” serotypes) were evaluated for their resistance against 22 antibiotics by using an antibiotic array. Tigecycline inhibited the growth of all of the tested STEC isolates and also inhibited the production of Stxs (Stx2 in particular). In combination with neutralizing antibodies to Stx1 and Stx2, the tigecycline-antibody treatment fully protected Vero cells from Stx toxicity, even when the STEC bacteria and the Vero cells were cultured together. The combination of an antibiotic such as tigecycline with neutralizing antibodies presents a promising strategy for future STEC treatments. PMID:26100707

  3. Antibiotic treatment in pneumonia due to Q fever.

    PubMed Central

    Sobradillo, V; Zalacain, R; Capelastegui, A; Uresandi, F; Corral, J

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether Q fever responds better to doxycycline or erythromycin is unknown. METHODS: The efficacy of doxycycline and erythromycin in the treatment of pneumonia due to Q fever was assessed in a prospective, randomised, double blind study of 82 patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia and features suggestive of Q fever infection; 48 proved to have Q fever. Of the 48, 23 received doxycycline 100 mg twice a day and 25 patients received erythromycin 500 mg six hourly, both for 10 days. RESULTS: Both treatment groups had similar demographic characteristics. Fever showed a more rapid reduction in the doxycycline group (3(1.6) days versus 4.3(2) days). Side effects were observed in two patients receiving doxycycline compared with 11 patients receiving erythromycin (p less than 0.01). No differences were observed in other clinical or radiological measures. By day 40 the chest radiograph was normal in 47 of 48 patients. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the self limiting and benign nature of most cases of pneumonia due to Q fever. Doxycycline was more effective than erythromycin. PMID:1585291

  4. Ulcer pain in patients with venous leg ulcers related to antibiotic treatment and compression therapy.

    PubMed

    Akesson, Nina; Oien, Rut Frank; Forssell, Henrik; Fagerström, Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare venous leg ulcer patients with and without ulcer pain to see whether ulcer pain affected the use of antibiotic treatment and compression therapy throughout healing. A total of 431 patients with venous leg ulcers were included during the study period. Every patient was registered in a national quality registry for patients with hard-to-heal leg, foot, and pressure ulcers. A high incidence of ulcer pain (57%) was found when the patients entered the study. Patients with ulcer pain had been treated more extensively with antibiotics both before and during the study period. Throughout healing there was a significant reduction of antibiotic use among patients in the 'no pain' group, from 44% to 23% (P=0.008). There was no significant difference between the two groups concerning compression therapy (85% vs. 88%), but 12% of patients in the 'pain' group did not get their prescribed compression compared with 6% of patients in the 'no pain' group. The groups did not differ significantly in terms of ulcer duration, ulcer size or healing time. This study shows a high incidence of ulcer pain, confirming that pain has a great impact on patients with venous leg ulcers. Results further suggest that the presence of ulcer pain increases the prescription of antibiotics but does not affect the use of compression therapy. Several advantages were found from using a national quality registry. The registry is a valuable clinical tool showing the importance of accurate diagnosis and effective treatment.

  5. Comparison of therapeutic antibiotic treatments on tissue-engineered human skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Angela L; Schurr, Michael J; Schlosser, Sandy J; Comer, Allen R; Allen-Hoffmann, B Lynn

    2008-05-01

    For regenerative medicine to gain clinical acceptance, the effects of commonly used treatment regimens on bioengineered organs must be considered. The antibiotics mafenide acetate (mafenide) and neomycin plus polymyxin (neo/poly) are routinely used to irrigate postoperative skin grafts on contaminated wounds. The effects of these clinically used antibiotics were investigated using tissue-engineered human skin substitutes generated with primary human keratinocytes or the near-diploid human keratinocyte cell line, Near-diploid Immortal Keratinocytes. Following topical or dermal treatment, the skin substitutes were assayed for viability, tissue morphology, glycogen content, and the expression of active caspase 3. Mafenide, but not neo/poly, induced morphological and biochemical changes in tissue-engineered skin substitutes. Keratinocytes in all histological layers of mafenide-treated skin substitutes exhibited ballooning degeneration and glycogen depletion. Mafenide-treatment also triggered separation of basal keratinocytes from the underlying dermis. None of the antibiotic treatments induced apoptosis, as measured by active caspase 3 immunostaining. The results demonstrate that mafenide, but not neo/poly, is detrimental to the viability and structural integrity of tissue-engineered human skin substitutes. These findings highlight the need to identify treatment regimens that are compatible with and hence enable the therapeutic efficacy of first-generation bioengineered organs such as skin.

  6. Antibiotic treatment and long term prognosis of reactive arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Laasila, K; Laasonen, L; Leirisalo-Repo, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether a three month course of lymecycline has an effect on the long term prognosis of reactive arthritis (ReA). Methods: In 1987–88 a double-blind controlled study with three month course of lymecycline/placebo was conducted. 17 of 23 patients treated at the outpatient department of Helsinki University Central Hospital volunteered to take part in a follow up study, where a physical examination were performed, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, rheumatoid factor, and radiographs of the lumbosacral spine and sacroiliac joints and of symptomatic peripheral joints were examined. Results: 16/17 (94%) patients reported some kind of back pain and 10/17 (59%) peripheral joint symptoms during the follow up. Two patients had unilateral grade 1 sacroiliitis, one patient grade 4 sacroiliitis, and one patient bilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis. In one patient the disease had progressed to ankylosing spondylitis (AS), and in another to chronic spondyloarthropathy. In addition, two patients had small erosions in radiocarpal joints. No statistically significant differences were found between placebo and lymecycline groups in the development of chronic arthritis, sacroiliitis, or AS. Conclusion: The results of the initial study showed that long term treatment with lymecycline in patients with acute ReA decreased the duration of arthritis in those with Chlamydia trachomatis triggered ReA, but not in other patients with ReA. Ten years after the acute arthritis one patient had developed AS, and three had radiological sacroiliitis, three patients had radiological changes at peripheral joints. Long term lymecycline treatment did not change the natural history of the disease. PMID:12810429

  7. Impact of an Antibiotic Restriction Program on Antibiotic Utilization in the Treatment of Community Acquired Pneumonia in a Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Mohammad D.; Cadle, Richard M.; Agbahiwe, Sylvester O.; Musher, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The impact of an Antibiotic Restriction Program (ARP) on the patterns of antibiotic use in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) was examined. We also evaluated the association between the ARP and the length of hospital stay in regard to CAP treatment and cost savings associated with the implementation of the ARP. Methods A retrospective cohort study of patients admitted with CAP was conducted at two six-month periods, one prior to the ARP and one after the ARP. The health system’s Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS) was used to obtain demographics, length of hospital stays, readmission rates, blood culture results, co–morbidities, antibiotic use, and durations of therapy. A total of 130 patients met the inclusion criteria for the final analyses. Average drug costs, employee salaries, and the cost of laboratory procedures were used to assess cost savings associated with the ARP. Results From a total of 132 antibiotics that were ordered to treat CAP in the pre-ARP period, 28 were restricted (21.2%). However, the number of restricted antibiotics ordered was significantly reduced to 12 out of 114 (10.2%) antibiotics ordered in the post-ARP period (P = 0.024). In post-ARP implementation, mean length of hospital stay was also significantly reduced from 7.6 to 5.8 days (P = 0.017), and although not statistically significant, 30-day readmission rates declined from 16.9% to 6.2% (P = 0.097). The ARP was also associated with $943 savings per patient treated for CAP. Conclusions In addition to a decrease in the antibiotic utilization and the mean length of hospital stay, the ARP may have yielded cost savings and reduced the readmission rates for those patients admitted and treated for CAP. PMID:21318422

  8. The antibiotic treatment of community-acquired, atypical, and nosocomial pneumonias.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A

    1995-05-01

    Optimal antibiotic regimens and duration of treatment are not universally agreed on for community-acquired or nosocomial pneumonias. Experience suggests that community-acquired pneumonias may be treated for less than 2 weeks with a combination of intravenous and oral antibiotics of appropriate spectrum that penetrate the lung, have a good safety profile, do not foster the development of resistance, and are cost-effective. After initial intravenous therapy, oral switch therapy may be begun as soon as the patient defervesces clinically, which is usually 3 days after admission. Switching to oral therapy does not invariably lead to earlier hospital discharge. There is no "standard of care" for pneumonias, but guidelines for empiric use have existed for decades. The least expensive beta-lactamase stable antibiotic should be used as monotherapy for the empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. Because community-acquired atypical pneumonias are clinically distinct from bacterial pneumonias owing to their extrapulmonary features, clinicians should be able to differentiate atypical pneumonias from bacterial pneumonias, which permits prompt and appropriate treatment. Nosocomial pneumonias remain a difficult diagnostic challenge. Therapeutically the most important principle in treating nosocomial pneumonia is to provide for double-drug coverage against P. aeruginosa. Differentiation of respiratory tract colonization from respiratory tract invasion remains the central key issue in patients with pulmonary infiltrates acquired during hospitalization. Most patients complete their course of intravenous therapy for nosocomial pneumonia leaving little or no time for completion of their therapy by oral antibiotics. Hospital-acquired atypical pneumonias are largely limited to legionnaires' disease, which is a more difficult diagnosis than in the community-acquired setting. Clinicians taking care of patients with pneumonia should employ a simplified therapeutic approach using

  9. Removal of antibiotics from wastewater by sewage treatment facilities in Hong Kong and Shenzhen, China.

    PubMed

    Gulkowska, A; Leung, H W; So, M K; Taniyasu, S; Yamashita, N; Yeung, Leo W Y; Richardson, Bruce J; Lei, A P; Giesy, J P; Lam, Paul K S

    2008-01-01

    Concentrations of nine antibiotics [erythromycin-H(2)O (ERY-H(2)O); trimethoprim (TMP); tetracycline (TET); norfloxacin (NOR); penicillin G (PEN G); penicillin V (PEN V); cefalexin (CLX); cefotaxim (CTX); and cefazolin (CFZ)] were measured in influent and effluent samples from four sewage treatment plants (STPs) in Hong Kong as well as in influent samples from one STP in Shenzhen. Levels of PEN V and CFZ were below method detection limits in all of the samples analyzed. CLX concentrations were the highest in most of the Hong Kong samples, ranging from 670 to 2900 ng/L and 240 to 1800 ng/L in influent and effluent samples, respectively, but CLX was not detected in the samples from Shenzhen. Comparatively lower concentrations were observed for ERY-H(2)O (470-810 ng/L) and TET (96-1300 ng/L) in the influent samples from all STPs in Hong Kong. CTX was found to be the dominant antibiotic in the Shenzhen STP influents with a mean concentration of 1100 ng/L, but occurred at lower concentrations in Hong Kong sewage. These results likely reflect regional variations in the prescription and use patterns of antibiotics between Hong Kong and Shenzhen. Antibiotic removal efficiencies depended on their chemical properties and the wastewater treatment processes used. In general, relatively higher removal efficiencies were observed for NOR (5-78%) and TET (7-73%), which are readily adsorbed to particulate matter, while lower removal efficiencies were observed for ERY-H(2)O (9-19%), which is relatively persistent in the environment. Antibiotics were removed more efficiently at Hong Kong STPs employing secondary treatment processes compared with those using primary treatment only. Concentrations of NOR measured in effluents from STPs in Hong Kong were lower than the predicted no-effect concentration of 8000 ng/L determined in a previous study. Therefore, concentrations of antibiotics measured in this preliminary study would be unlikely to cause adverse effects on microorganisms used

  10. Lack of an effect of antibiotic treatment on prolonged detection of chlamydial DNA in murine genital tract infection.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Dawn M; Nagarajan, Uma; O'Connell, Catherine; Andrews, Charles W; Darville, Toni

    2007-07-01

    Mice treated with antibiotics early or late after active infection had resolved were examined for chlamydial DNA in endocervical swabs. The early eradication of infection limited oviduct pathology, despite the continued detection of chlamydial DNA by nested PCR. Late antibiotic treatment had no effect on the ability to detect DNA or oviduct pathology.

  11. Conservative Nonhormonal Options for the Treatment of Male Infertility: Antibiotics, Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, and Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, Rosita A.

    2017-01-01

    The nonhormonal medical treatment can be divided into empirical, when the cause has not been identified, and nonempirical, if the pathogenic mechanism causing male infertility can be solved or ameliorated. The empirical nonhormonal medical treatment has been proposed for patients with idiopathic or noncurable oligoasthenoteratozoospermia and for normozoospermic infertile patients. Anti-inflammatory, fibrinolytic, and antioxidant compounds, oligo elements, and vitamin supplementation may be prescribed. Infection, inflammation, and/or increased oxidative stress often require a specific treatment with antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and/or antioxidants. Combined therapies can contribute to improve sperm quality. PMID:28164122

  12. [Treatment of lower limb osteomyelitis by a local bone substitute supplemented with antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Berner, A; Linde, H J; Schubert, T; Nerlich, M; Englert, C

    2008-01-01

    A seriously injured tsunami victim with complicated osteomyelitis is presented. The patient was treated with a new resorbable bone substitute, which can be loaded with different antibiotics. The successful treatment is illustrated by the clinical, radiological and histological features. Bilateral open fractures of the lower leg with open elbow fracture led to a bilateral amputation of the lower legs and the right arm because of a beginning sepsis. The following intramedullary osteitis with multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecium was treated with the bone substitute PerOssal combined with systemic and local application of vancomycin and systemic application of ceftazidime and meropenem. This case report illustrates the concept of an additional local antibiotic treatment of osteomyelitis by a bone substitute also functioning as a drug delivery system.

  13. Gut microbiota-produced succinate promotes C. difficile infection after antibiotic treatment or motility disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Jessica A.; Wu, Katherine J.; Hryckowian, Andrew J.; Bouley, Donna M.; Weimer, Bart C.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The mechanisms underlying C. difficile expansion after microbiota disturbance are just emerging. We assessed the gene expression profile of C. difficile within the intestine of gnotobiotic mice to identify genes regulated in response to either dietary or microbiota compositional changes. In the presence of the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, C. difficile induces a pathway that metabolizes the microbiota fermentation end-product succinate to butyrate. The low concentration of succinate in the microbiota of conventional mice is transiently elevated upon antibiotic treatment or chemically-induced intestinal motility disturbance, and C. difficile exploits this succinate spike to expand in the perturbed intestine. A C. difficile mutant compromised in succinate utilization is at a competitive disadvantage during these perturbations. Understanding the metabolic mechanisms involved in microbiota-C. difficile interactions may help to identify approaches for the treatment and prevention of C. difficile-associated diseases. PMID:25498344

  14. Sustained release of antibiotic complexed by multivalent ion: in vitro and in vivo study for the treatment of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Na, Seung Yeon; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Jin A; Lee, In Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2014-12-10

    The main aims of this study are (i) the development of an antibiotic complexed with multivalent ion, which can allow sustained release of the antibiotic without any additional matrix or difficult process and (ii) the feasibility study of the ion-complexed antibiotic as a therapeutic technique for peritonitis treatment. An ion-complexed antibiotic is prepared by simple mixing of two aqueous solutions containing an ionized (water-soluble) drug (tetracycline) and a multivalent counter ionic compound. The ion-complexed antibiotic shows a continuous release of the antibiotic up to 21 days, and thus prolonged anti-bacterial effect by gradual ionic exchange between the multivalent ions in the complex and same-charged monovalent ions in surrounding medium. From the in vivo animal study using a cecum perforated peritonitis mouse model, the ion-complexed antibiotic group shows sufficient anti-bacterial effect and thus effectively treat the peritonitis because of the extermination of the contaminated enteric bacteria in the peritoneum during wound healing of injury cecum (by the sustained release of antibiotic from the ion complex). These results suggest that the ion-complexed antibiotic system may be promising for the effective treatment of the peritonitis caused by frequent gastrointestinal defect in clinical fields.

  15. Metagenomic profiling of antibiotic resistance genes and mobile genetic elements in a tannery wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; Miao, Yu; Shi, Peng; Liu, Bo; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotics are often used to prevent sickness and improve production in animal agriculture, and the residues in animal bodies may enter tannery wastewater during leather production. This study aimed to use Illumina high-throughput sequencing to investigate the occurrence, diversity and abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in aerobic and anaerobic sludge of a full-scale tannery wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Metagenomic analysis showed that Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Actinobacteria dominated in the WWTP, but the relative abundance of archaea in anaerobic sludge was higher than in aerobic sludge. Sequencing reads from aerobic and anaerobic sludge revealed differences in the abundance of functional genes between both microbial communities. Genes coding for antibiotic resistance were identified in both communities. BLAST analysis against Antibiotic Resistance Genes Database (ARDB) further revealed that aerobic and anaerobic sludge contained various ARGs with high abundance, among which sulfonamide resistance gene sul1 had the highest abundance, occupying over 20% of the total ARGs reads. Tetracycline resistance genes (tet) were highly rich in the anaerobic sludge, among which tet33 had the highest abundance, but was absent in aerobic sludge. Over 70 types of insertion sequences were detected in each sludge sample, and class 1 integrase genes were prevalent in the WWTP. The results highlighted prevalence of ARGs and MGEs in tannery WWTPs, which may deserve more public health concerns.

  16. Oropharyngeal gonorrhoea: rate of co-infection with sexually transmitted infection, antibiotic susceptibility and treatment outcome.

    PubMed

    Manavi, K; Zafar, F; Shahid, H

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the rate of co-infections with other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), antibiotic susceptibility and management of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea diagnosed in a busy genitourinary medicine clinic. The method involved a retrospective study on consecutive patients diagnosed with oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. A total of 131 patients were diagnosed with oropharyngeal gonorrhoea over the study period. The median age of the infected patients was 28 (interquartile range: 22 to 35) years. Forty-one (31%) of patients were younger than 24 years. High rates of co-infection with urethral gonorrhoea (37%), rectal gonorrhoea (37%) or chlamydial infection (16%) were identified. Thirty patients (23%) had only oropharyngeal infection. Twenty-two (17%) patients' isolates showed resistance to at least one antibiotic. Antibiotic resistance among oropharyngeal gonococcal isolates was above 5% between 2000 and 2009. Test-of-cure (TOC) was carried out for only 63 (48%) of patients; none had positive culture. Among 46 isolates treated with cefixime 400 mg/stat, 27 (59%) had TOC; all were negative. Repeat TOC was not carried out for any of the patients. In conclusion, successful management of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea should comprise of counselling, partner notification and TOC after treatment with appropriate antibiotic regimen.

  17. Streptokinase Treatment Reverses Biofilm-Associated Antibiotic Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen; Zobek, Natalia; Dreier, Cindy; Haaber, Jakob; Ingmer, Hanne; Larsen, Ole Halfdan; Meyer, Rikke L.

    2016-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus is a serious complication to the use of medical implants. A central part of the pathogenesis relies on S. aureus’ ability to adhere to host extracellular matrix proteins, which adsorb to medical implants and stimulate biofilm formation. Being coagulase positive, S. aureus furthermore induces formation of fibrin fibers from fibrinogen in the blood. Consequently, we hypothesized that fibrin is a key component of the extracellular matrix of S. aureus biofilms under in vivo conditions, and that the recalcitrance of biofilm infections can be overcome by combining antibiotic treatment with a fibrinolytic drug. We quantified S. aureus USA300 biofilms grown on peg-lids in brain heart infusion (BHI) broth with 0%–50% human plasma. Young (2 h) and mature (24 h) biofilms were then treated with streptokinase to determine if this lead to dispersal. Then, the minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) of 24 h old biofilms was measured for vancomycin and daptomycin alone or in combination with 10 µg/mL rifampicin in the presence or absence of streptokinase in the antibiotic treatment step. Finally, biofilms were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Addition of human plasma stimulated biofilm formation in BHI in a dose-dependent manner, and biofilms could be partially dispersed by streptokinase. The biofilms could be eradicated with physiologically relevant concentrations of streptokinase in combination with rifampicin and vancomycin or daptomycin, which are commonly used antibiotics for treatment of S. aureus infections. Fibronolytic drugs have been used to treat thromboembolic events for decades, and our findings suggest that their use against biofilm infections has the potential to improve the efficacy of antibiotics in treatment of S. aureus biofilm infections. PMID:27681928

  18. [Sanitary microbiological aspects of the treatment of wastes from antibiotic manufacture in biological ponds].

    PubMed

    Leonova, V E; Karpukhin, V F

    1987-03-01

    Efficiency of decreasing sewage contamination was estimated under laboratory conditions by the Coli index in additional treatment of antibiotic production sewage in bioponds with higher aquatic plants. It was shown that the sewage decontamination in summer was intensive due to vital activity of complex biocenosis of the higher aquatic plants and algae and reached the required levels. This allowed to use much lower quantities of the reagents in chlorination of water for circulating water supply.

  19. Severe peritonitis caused by Citrobacter freundii and successful treatment with double antibiotic coverage.

    PubMed

    Kataria, A; Saad, E

    2015-01-01

    Serratia, Pseudomonas/Providencia, indole-positive Proteus/Acinetobacter/Morganella, Citrobacter, Enterobacter and Hafnia group of organisms cause peritoneal dialysis (PD)-related peritonitis with high morbidity and mortality. Peritonitis caused by Citrobacter freundii is uncommon, and it may lead to catheter removal despite antimicrobial treatment. We describe a case of PD-related peritonitis caused by C. freundii, which was successfully treated with double antibiotic coverage.

  20. Pre-treatment with antibiotics and Escherichia coli to equalize the gut microbiota in conventional mice.

    PubMed

    Linninge, Caroline; Ahrné, Siv; Molin, Göran

    2015-01-01

    The composition of the gut microbiota can vary widely between individual mice of the same batch and thereby affect the resulting outcome in experimental studies. Therefore, an efficient method is needed to equalize the gut microbiota prior to the start of critical experiments. In order to minimize variations in gut microbiota between animals and provide the animals with a Gram-negative flora exposing lipopolysaccharides in the cell-walls, C57BL/6 mice were given a mixture of ampicillin, metronidazole and clindamycin in the drinking water for 3 days and then Escherichia coli for two additional days. Treatment with antibiotics alone or with antibiotics in combination with E. coli was well tolerated by all animals. Body weight and liver weight were not affected, although higher hepatic fat content was found in treated animals (p < 0.05). The diversity of the gut microbiota was strongly reduced in animals treated with antibiotics and antibiotics in combination with E. coli (p < 0.01), without affecting the total amount of bacteria. Cloned and sequenced 16S rRNA genes showed high presence of Enterobacteriaceae and Porphymonadaceae in the treated animals. Analysis with Principal Component Analysis gave a clear separation of the composition in microbiota between different treatment groups. The described treatment efficiently equalized the gut microbiota and provided the animals with a strong abundance of Enterobacteriaceae without changing the total load of bacteria. This is a straightforward, lenient and efficient method of pre-treatment to equalize the gut microbiota of mice as a starting procedure of animal studies.

  1. Clinical Rationale for Confirmation Testing After Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Implications of Rising Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Howden, Colin W.; Chey, William D.; Vakil, Nimish B.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is one of the most common chronic bacterial infections worldwide. International guidelines recommend H pylori eradication in several scenarios: patients with peptic ulcer disease, patients who have had endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, and patients with a gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma). There is variability among the guidelines for other conditions. Treatment options for H pylori infection include triple, quadruple, and sequential therapy. Ideally, patients in whom previous eradication attempts failed and those suspected to have resistant strains should be considered for antimicrobial sensitivity testing, which requires culture of gastric mucosal biopsies; such testing, however, has limited availability in the United States. Resistance rates vary by location depending on local antibiotic usage rates. As such, the success rates associated with different regimens vary throughout the world. Many patients with H pylori infection are asymptomatic, whereas others are diagnosed with the infection during evaluation of dyspeptic symptoms or following a diagnosis of peptic ulcer. Symptoms may not be an accurate indicator of treatment success. The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) endorses the carbon 13-labeled urea breath test (13C-UBT) as the most reliable test to confirm H pylori eradication. This clinical roundtable monograph begins with an overview of H pylori infection and then discusses treatment, antibiotic resistance, management of patients with antibiotic resistance, and posttreatment testing, with a focus on the ACG guidelines. PMID:25892981

  2. Partial regression of duodenal lesions of intestinal follicular lymphoma after antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Tomonori; Imaeda, Hiroyuki; Kizaki, Masahiro; Hosoe, Naoki; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Ogata, Haruhiko; Iwao, Yasushi; Kameyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Yasuo; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2010-10-01

    A 51-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of duodenal lesions of lymphoma. Endoscopy showed multiple tiny smooth whitish granules in the second portion of the duodenum including the papilla of Vater. Biopsy specimens showed medium-sized centrocyte-like cells forming lymphoid follicles, and immunohistology showed positive staining for bcl-2 and CD10. A small bowel series showed multiple granular lesions extending from the second portion of the duodenum to the proximal jejunum and the proximal ileum. On the basis of these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as stage I follicular lymphoma (FL). Although the patient was negative for Helicobacter pylori, he underwent antibiotic treatment. The lesions improved 3 months after antibiotic treatment, but biopsy specimens showed residual lymphoma cells. The patient therefore received combination chemotherapy with rituximab. Endoscopy 4 months later showed regression of FL, and there was no evidence of recurrence during 3 years of follow up. The partial regression of duodenal lesions of intestinal FL may be due to the effect of antibiotic treatment.

  3. Compliance of pediatric patients with treatment involving antibiotic suspensions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, J E; Wahrenberger, C

    1999-07-01

    In collaboration with 11 German pediatricians in private practice, this pilot study assessed the treatment compliance of 289 pediatric patients (56.1% male: mean age, 53.9+/-35.6 months) who were given antibiotic suspensions (selection and duration determined by the pediatrician) to treat the following bacterial infections: acute otitis media, 34.6%; group A streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis/scarlet fever, 28.7%; lower respiratory tract infection, 18.3%; sinusitis/sinobronchitis, 9.3%; and other infections, 9.0%. The most frequently used antibiotics were amoxicillin (26.3%), erythromycin estolate (19.0%), penicillin V benzathine (14.2%), and cefaclor (13.5%). Compliance was assessed by means of a standardized telephone interview and a urine test that detects antibacterial activity using a Bacillus subtilis spore suspension. Overall compliance (positive urine test result at the end of the planned treatment period) was 79.6% (230 of 289 patients). Compliance was highest with erythromycin estolate (94.5%), followed by penicillin V benzathine (85.4%), cefaclor (76.9%), and amoxicillin (71.1%). Good compliance was also significantly associated with a patient age of > or =3 years and a treatment duration of > or =7 days. Compliance was not significantly influenced by the underlying bacterial infection. In summary, 20.4% of patients were noncompliant when treated with antibiotic suspensions.

  4. Prevalence and predictors of initial oral antibiotic treatment failure in adult emergency department patients with cellulitis: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Quirke, Michael; Boland, Fiona; Fahey, Tom; O'Sullivan, Ronan; Hill, Arnold; Stiell, Ian; Wakai, Abel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Assessment of cellulitis severity in the emergency department (ED) setting is problematic. Given the lack of research performed to describe the epidemiology and management of cellulitis, it is unsurprising that heterogeneous antibiotic prescribing and poor adherence to guidelines is common. It has been shown that up to 20.5% of ED patients with cellulitis require either a change in route or dose of the initially prescribed antibiotic regimen. The current treatment failure rate for empirically prescribed oral antibiotic therapy in Irish EDs is unknown. The association of patient risk factors with treatment failure has not been described in our setting. Lower prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-associated infection, differing antibiotic prescribing preferences and varying availability of outpatient intravenous therapy programmes may result in different rates of empiric antibiotic treatment failure from those previously described. Methods and analysis Consecutive ED patients with cellulitis will be enrolled on a 24/7 basis from 3 Irish EDs. A prespecified set of clinical variables will be measured on each patient discharged on empiric oral antibiotic therapy. A second independent study recruiter will assess at least 10% of cases for each of the predictor variables. Follow-up by telephone call will occur at 14 days for all discharged patients where measurement of the primary outcome will occur. Our primary outcome is treatment failure, defined as a change in route of antibiotic administration from oral to intravenous antibiotic. Our secondary outcome is change in dose or type of prescribed antibiotic. A cohort of approximately 152 patients is required to estimate the proportion of patients failing oral antibiotic treatment with a margin of error of 0.05 around the estimate. Ethics and dissemination Full ethics approval has been granted. An integrated dissemination plan, involving diverse clinical specialties and

  5. Removal of antibiotics in wastewater by enzymatic treatment with fungal laccase - Degradation of compounds does not always eliminate toxicity.

    PubMed

    Becker, Dennis; Varela Della Giustina, Saulo; Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Schoevaart, Rob; Barceló, Damià; de Cazes, Matthias; Belleville, Marie-Pierre; Sanchez-Marcano, José; de Gunzburg, Jean; Couillerot, Olivier; Völker, Johannes; Oehlmann, Jörg; Wagner, Martin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the performance of immobilised laccase (Trametes versicolor) was investigated in combination with the mediator syringaldehyde (SYR) in removing a mixture of 38 antibiotics in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR). Antibiotics were spiked in osmosed water at concentrations of 10μg·L(-1) each. Laccase without mediator did not reduce the load of antibiotics significantly. The addition of SYR enhanced the removal: out of the 38 antibiotics, 32 were degraded by >50% after 24h. In addition to chemical analysis, the samples' toxicity was evaluated in two bioassays (a growth inhibition assay and the Microtox assay). Here, the addition of SYR resulted in a time-dependent increase of toxicity in both bioassays. In cooperation with SYR, laccase effectively removes a broad range of antibiotics. However, this enhanced degradation induces unspecific toxicity. If this issue is resolved, enzymatic treatment may be a valuable addition to existing water treatment technologies.

  6. Surface-Localized Spermidine Protects the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane from Antibiotic Treatment and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lori; Mulcahy, Heidi; Kanevets, Uliana; Shi, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular DNA acts as a cation chelator and induces the expression of antibiotic resistance genes regulated by Mg2+ levels. Here we report the characterization of novel DNA-induced genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are annotated as homologs of the spermidine synthesis genes speD (PA4773) and speE (PA4774). The addition of sublethal concentrations of DNA and membrane-damaging antibiotics induced expression of the genes PA4773 to PA4775, as shown using transcriptional lux fusions and quantitative RT-PCR. Exogenous polyamine addition prevented DNA- and peptide-mediated gene induction. Mutation of PA4774 resulted in an increased outer membrane (OM) susceptibility phenotype upon polymyxin B, CP10A, and gentamicin treatment. When the membrane-localized fluorescent probe C11-BODIPY581/591 was used as an indicator of peroxidation of membrane lipids, the PA4774::lux mutant demonstrated an increased susceptibility to oxidative membrane damage from H2O2 treatment. Addition of exogenous polyamines protected the membranes of the PA4774::lux mutant from polymyxin B and H2O2 treatment. Polyamines from the outer surface were isolated and shown to contain putrescine and spermidine by using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The PA4774::lux mutant did not produce spermidine on the cell surface, but genetic complementation restored surface spermidine production as well as the antibiotic and oxidative stress resistance phenotypes of the membrane. We have identified new functions for spermidine on the cell surface and propose that polyamines are produced under Mg2+-limiting conditions as an organic polycation to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to stabilize and protect the outer membrane against antibiotic and oxidative damage. PMID:22155771

  7. Limited Bacterial Diversity within a Treatment Plant Receiving Antibiotic-Containing Waste from Bulk Drug Production

    PubMed Central

    Shouche, Yogesh S.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2016-01-01

    Biological treatment of waste water from bulk drug production, contaminated with high levels of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, can lead to massive enrichment of antibiotic resistant bacteria, resistance genes and associated mobile elements, as previously shown. Such strong selection may be boosted by the use of activated sludge (AS) technology, where microbes that are able to thrive on the chemicals within the wastewater are reintroduced at an earlier stage of the process to further enhance degradation of incoming chemicals. The microbial community structure within such a treatment plant is, however, largely unclear. In this study, Illumina-based 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing was applied to investigate the bacterial communities of different stages from an Indian treatment plant operated by Patancheru Environment Technology Limited (PETL) in Hyderabad, India. The plant receives waste water with high levels of fluoroquinolones and applies AS technology. A total of 1,019,400 sequences from samples of different stages of the treatment process were analyzed. In total 202, 303, 732, 652, 947 and 864 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained at 3% distance cutoff in the equilibrator, aeration tanks 1 and 2, settling tank, secondary sludge and old sludge samples from PETL, respectively. Proteobacteria was the most dominant phyla in all samples with Gammaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria being the dominant classes. Alcaligenaceae and Pseudomonadaceae, bacterial families from PETL previously reported to be highly multidrug resistant, were the dominant families in aeration tank samples. Despite regular addition of human sewage (approximately 20%) to uphold microbial activity, the bacterial diversity within aeration tanks from PETL was considerably lower than corresponding samples from seven, regular municipal waste water treatment plants. The strong selection pressure from antibiotics present may be one important factor in structuring the microbial community in PETL

  8. Successful treatment of biofilm infections using shock waves combined with antibiotic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Janardhanraj, S.; Srinandan, C. S.; Datey, Akshay; Strugnell, Richard A.; Gopalan, Jagadeesh; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria secrete a highly hydrated framework of extracellular polymer matrix on suitable substrates and embed within the matrix to form a biofilm. Bacterial biofilms are observed on many medical devices, endocarditis, periodontitis and lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Bacteria in biofilm are protected from antibiotics and >1,000 times of the minimum inhibitory concentration may be required to treat biofilm infections. Here, we demonstrated that shock waves could be used to remove Salmonella, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus biofilms in urinary catheters. The studies were extended to a Pseudomonas chronic pneumonia lung infection and Staphylococcus skin suture infection model in mice. The biofilm infections in mice, treated with shock waves became susceptible to antibiotics, unlike untreated biofilms. Mice exposed to shock waves responded to ciprofloxacin treatment, while ciprofloxacin alone was ineffective in treating the infection. These results demonstrate for the first time that, shock waves, combined with antibiotic treatment can be used to treat biofilm infection on medical devices as well as in situ infections. PMID:26658706

  9. High-throughput quantification of antibiotic resistance genes from an urban wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Karkman, Antti; Johnson, Timothy A; Lyra, Christina; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tamminen, Manu; Tiedje, James M; Virta, Marko

    2016-03-01

    Antibiotic resistance among bacteria is a growing problem worldwide, and wastewater treatment plants have been considered as one of the major contributors to the dissemination of antibiotic resistance to the environment. There is a lack of comprehensive quantitative molecular data on extensive numbers of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in different seasons with a sampling strategy that would cover both incoming and outgoing water together with the excess sludge that is removed from the process. In order to fill that gap we present a highly parallel quantitative analysis of ARGs and horizontal gene transfer potential over four seasons at an urban wastewater treatment plant using a high-throughput qPCR array. All analysed transposases and two-thirds of primer sets targeting ARGs were detected in the wastewater. The relative abundance of most of the genes was highest in influent and lower in effluent water and sludge. The resistance profiles of the samples cluster by sample location with a shift from raw influent through the final effluents and dried sludge to the sediments. Wastewater discharge enriched only a few genes, namely Tn25 type transposase gene and clinical class 1 integrons, in the sediment near the discharge pipe, but those enriched genes may indicate a potential for horizontal gene transfer.

  10. Effect of in vivo neutralization of tumor necrosis alpha on the efficacy of antibiotic treatment in systemic Salmonella enterica infections

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Andrew J.; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Immunity can co-operate with antibiotics, but can also antagonize drug efficacy by segregating the bacteria to areas of the body that are less accessible to antimicrobials, and by selecting for subpopulations with low division rates that are often difficult to eradicate. We studied the effect of an anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive anti-TNFα treatment, which accelerates bacterial growth in the tissues and inhibits or reverses the formation of granulomas, on the efficacy of ampicillin and ciprofloxacin during a systemic Salmonella enterica infection of the mouse. The anti-TNFα treatment neither precluded nor enhanced the efficacy of antibiotic treatment. However, the anti-TNFα treatment rendered the animals susceptible to the rapid relapse of the infection seen after cessation of the antibiotic treatment. Reactivation of an established infection, due to late administration of anti-TNFα antibodies, could be successfully controlled by antibiotics, but full clearance of the bacterial load from the tissues was not achieved. We conclude that the lack of TNFα does not preclude the efficacy of antibiotic treatment and must be monitored with care due to post-treatment relapses. Combinations of anti-cytokine compounds and antibiotic molecules may not be the best way to treat persistent infections with intracellular bacteria like Salmonella. PMID:28087648

  11. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and probiotics in treatment for hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Bongaerts, Ger; Severijnen, René; Timmerman, Harro

    2005-01-01

    In order to reduce ammonia production by urease-positive bacteria Solga recently hypothesised (S.F. Solga, Probiotics can treat hepatic encephalopathy, Medical Hypotheses 2003; 61: 307-13), that probiotics are new therapeutics for hepatic encephalopathy (HE), and that they may replace antibiotics and lactulose. This influenced our view of the effect of antibiotics, prebiotics, e.g., lactulose, and probiotics on intestinal bacteria in the treatment of HE. Intestinal ammonia arises from aminoacids after bacterial de-amination and not from urea making urease-positive bacteria irrelevant. Antibiotics are not preferred in the treatment of HE, since ammonia-producing antibiotic-resistant bacteria may survive and replace ammonia-producing antibiotic-susceptible bacteria. Intestinal prebiotics are carbohydrate-like compounds, such as lactulose and resistant starch, that beneficially affects host's health in a different manner than normal food. In the small bowel prebiotics are not absorbed and digested, but are fermented in the colon by colonic bacteria. Fermentation of prebiotics yields lactic, acetic and butyric acids, as well as gas especially hydrogen (H2). The massive H2 volumes cause rapid intestinal hurry and thus massive amounts of colonic bacteria, not only urease-positive bacteria, but also deaminating bacteria, are removed and intestinal uptake of toxic bacterial metabolites, e.g., ammonia, reduced. As living non-pathogenic micro-organisms, probiotics beneficially affect the host's health by fermenting non-absorbed sugars, especially in the small bowel. Thus, they reduce the substrate of the other bacteria, and simultaneously they create a surplus of fermentation products which may affect the non-probiotic flora. Regarding the fermentation products (lactic acid, ethanol, acetic acid and CO2) five groups of probiotic micro-organisms are known. It is argued that probiotic, CO2-producing (facultatively) heterolactic lactobacilli, i.e., lactobacilli, that produce

  12. Impact of galacto-oligosaccharides on the gut microbiota composition and metabolic activity upon antibiotic treatment during in vitro fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ladirat, Stephanie E; Schuren, Frank H J; Schoterman, Margriet H C; Nauta, Arjen; Gruppen, Harry; Schols, Henk A

    2014-01-01

    Prebiotics are considered to have potential to reduce disturbances in the gut microbiota induced by antibiotics. Results in literature are, however, not consistent. The current in vitro study conducted in a fermentation screening platform allowed to unambiguously compare the impact of galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) on adult gut microbiota composition and activity upon treatment with four antibiotics at two doses. The changes in relative abundance of bacteria upon antibiotic treatment and the growth of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus upon GOS addition were antibiotic and dose dependent. This conclusion explains discrepancies in literature and indicates that particular combinations of GOS antibiotic should be studied. The combination GOS-Amoxicillin was especially of interest as, after decrease in Bifidobacterium levels, a recovery of mainly Bifidobacterium longum was observed and could be correlated with specific degradation patterns of GOS. Next to different degradation profiles of individual GOS, an accumulation of monosaccharides and intermediate organic acids was observed in antibiotic-treated microbiota as compared to nontreated microbiota. This showed that although GOS were utilized and beneficial bacteria could grow in 3 of 4 antibiotics tested, the metabolic activity of an antibiotic-treated microbiota was still disturbed as compared to the nontreated microbiota.

  13. Fate of antibiotic resistance genes in sewage treatment plant revealed by metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Li, Bing; Zou, Shichun; Fang, Herbert H P; Zhang, Tong

    2014-10-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a serious threat to human health. Sewage treatment plant (STP) is one of the major sources of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in natural environment. High-throughput sequencing-based metagenomic approach was applied to investigate the broad-spectrum profiles and fate of ARGs in a full scale STP. Totally, 271 ARGs subtypes belonging to 18 ARGs types were identified by the broad scanning of metagenomic analysis. Influent had the highest ARGs abundance, followed by effluent, anaerobic digestion sludge and activated sludge. 78 ARGs subtypes persisted through the biological wastewater and sludge treatment process. The high removal efficiency of 99.82% for total ARGs in wastewater suggested that sewage treatment process is effective in reducing ARGs. But the removal efficiency of ARGs in sludge treatment was not as good as that in sewage treatment. Furthermore, the composition of microbial communities was examined and the correlation between microbial community and ARGs was investigated using redundancy analysis. Significant correlation between 6 genera and the distribution of ARGs were found and 5 of the 6 genera included potential pathogens. This is the first study on the fate of ARGs in STP using metagenomic analysis with high-throughput sequencing and hopefully would enhance our knowledge on fate of ARGs in STP.

  14. Electrochemical oxidation of tetracycline antibiotics using a Ti/IrO2 anode for wastewater treatment of animal husbandry.

    PubMed

    Miyata, M; Ihara, I; Yoshid, G; Toyod, K; Umetsu, K

    2011-01-01

    In animal husbandry, antibiotics are widely used to treat and prevent diseases or to promote growth. The use of antibiotics for domestic animals enables to promote safety of livestock products and enhance productivity. Tetracycline antibiotics (TCs) are one of the primarily used groups of antibiotics for cattle and swine. However, the unintentional spreading of antibiotics from animal waste to the environment may leave out drug residues, promoting resistant strains of bacteria, and will adversely affect the ecosystem and human health. To prevent the spread of veterinary antibiotics in the environment, it is required to treat residual antibiotics in livestock wastewater. In this study, we investigated the electrochemical oxidation of TCs to treat livestock wastewater. The concentrations of TCs in aqueous solutions were reduced from 100 mg/L to less than 0.6 mg/L by 6 h of electrochemical treatment using a Ti/IrO2 anode with Na2SO4 electrolyte. The concentration of oxytetracycline (OTC) in livestock wastewater was also reduced from 100 mg/L to less than 0.7 mg/L by the same treatment. Thus, the electrochemical oxidation using a Ti/IrO2 anode with Na2SO4 electrolyte was found to be effective for degradation of TCs. The results suggest that the electrochemical oxidation method is a promising treatment for TCs in livestock wastewater.

  15. Clinical considerations in the treatment of acne vulgaris and other inflammatory skin disorders: focus on antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Leyden, James J; Del Rosso, James Q; Webster, Guy F

    2007-06-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is an anaerobic bacterium that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acne. Certain antibiotics that can inhibit P acnes colonization also have demonstrated anti-inflammatory activities in the treatment of acne, rosacea, and other noninfectious diseases. Decreased sensitivity of P acnes to antibiotics, such as erythromycin and tetracycline, has developed and may be associated with therapeutic failure. Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) is a nonantibiotic antibacterial agent that is highly effective against P acnes and for which no resistance against it has been detected to date. Retinoids are important components in combination therapy for acne, including use with antibiotics, and can serve as an alternative to these agents in maintenance therapy. By increasing our understanding of the multifaceted actions of antibiotics and the known clinical implications of antibiotic resistance, physicians can improve their decision making in prescribing these agents.

  16. A historical overview of bacteriophage therapy as an alternative to antibiotics for the treatment of bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Wittebole, Xavier; De Roock, Sophie; Opal, Steven M

    2014-01-01

    The seemingly inexorable spread of antibiotic resistance genes among microbial pathogens now threatens the long-term viability of our current antimicrobial therapy to treat severe bacterial infections such as sepsis. Antibiotic resistance is reaching a crisis situation in some bacterial pathogens where few therapeutic alternatives remain and pan-resistant strains are becoming more prevalent. Non-antibiotic therapies to treat bacterial infections are now under serious consideration and one possible option is the therapeutic use of specific phage particles that target bacterial pathogens. Bacteriophage therapy has essentially been re-discovered by modern medicine after widespread use of phage therapy in the pre-antibiotic era lost favor, at least in Western countries, after the introduction of antibiotics. We review the current therapeutic rationale and clinical experience with phage therapy as a treatment for invasive bacterial infection as novel alternative to antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:23973944

  17. Comparison of the ozonation and Fenton process performances for the treatment of antibiotic containing manure.

    PubMed

    Uslu, Merih Otker; Balcioğlu, Işil Akmehmet

    2009-05-15

    An integrated treatment method based on magnesium salt extraction followed by chemical oxidation was used for the treatment of a veterinary antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC) contaminated cow manure since animal manure can be an important source for antibiotic pollution in the environment. Pretreatment with magnesium salt enhanced the efficiencies of subsequent oxidation processes by extracting 63.9% of OTC from the manure thereby making it more favorable for oxidation with the hydroxyl radicals produced by the Fenton and ozone oxidation processes. Both the 24 h Fenton oxidation process with 434 mM H(2)O(2) and 43.4 mM Fe(2+) doses and the 1-h ozonation process with an applied ozone dose of 2.5 mg min(-1) provided more than 90% OTC removal from the manure slurry. However, the second-order OTC removal rate constant of Fenton process (119 M(-1)s(-1)) was remarkably lower than that obtained with the ozonation process (548 M(-1)s(-1)). The oxidant dose was a significant factor for the efficiency of the Fenton treatment but not for the ozone treatment. The efficiencies of both the Fenton and ozone oxidation processes were not affected by the pH adjustment of the manure slurry.

  18. Dynamics of bacterial community development in the reef coral Acropora muricata following experimental antibiotic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, M. J.; Croquer, A.; Bythell, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    Development of the bacterial community associated with the coral Acropora muricata (= formosa) was monitored using 16S rRNA gene-based techniques and abundance counts over time following experimental modification of the existing microbial community using the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Abundance of bacteria was reduced >99% by the treatment, resulting in significant changes in bacterial community structure. Following redeployment to their natural environment, some settlement and re-growth of bacteria took place within a few hours, including ribosomal types that were not present, or in low abundance, in the natural microbiota. However, complete recovery of the bacterial community required longer than 96 h, which indicates a relatively slow settlement and growth of bacteria from the water column and suggests that turnover of the natural community is similarly slow. The early developing community was dominated by antibiotic-resistant bacteria from the natural microbiota that survived the treatment and proliferated in the absence of natural competitors, but also included some non-resident ribotypes colonizing from the water column. Almost, all these opportunists were significantly reduced or eliminated within 96 h after treatment, demonstrating a high resilience in the natural bacterial community. Potential pathogens, including a Clostridium sp., inhabited the coral at low abundances, only becoming prevalent when the natural microbiota was disturbed by the treatment. The healthy coral-associated microbiota appears to be strongly controlled by microbial interactions.

  19. Heat treatment effects on the antimicrobial activity of macrolide and lincosamide antibiotics in milk.

    PubMed

    Zorraquino, M A; Althaus, R L; Roca, M; Molina, M P

    2011-02-01

    Antibiotic residues in milk can cause serious problems for consumers and the dairy industry. Heat treatment of milk may diminish the antimicrobial activity of these antibiotic residues. This study analyzed the effect of milk processing (60 °C for 30 min, 120 °C for 20 min, and 140 °C for 10 s) on the antimicrobial activity of milk samples fortified with three concentrations of three macrolides (erythromycin: 20, 40 and 80 μg/liter; spiramycin: 100, 200, and 400 μg/liter; and tylosin: 500, 1,000, and 2,000 μg/liter) and one lincosamide (lincomycin: 1,000, 2,000, and 4,000 μg/liter). To measure the loss of antimicrobial activity, a bioassay based on the growth inhibition of Micrococcus luteus was done. The data were analyzed using a multiple linear regression model. The results indicate that treatment at 120 °C for 20 min produces inactivation percentages of 93% (erythromycin), 64% (spiramycin), 51% (tylosin), and 5% (lincomycin), while treatment at 140 °C for 10 s results in generally lower percentages (30% erythromycin, 35% spiramycin, 12% tylosin, and 5% lincomycin). The lowest loss or lowest reduction of antimicrobial activity (21% erythromycin and 13% spiramycin) was obtained by treatment at 60 °C for 30 min.

  20. Combination therapy including serratiopeptidase improves outcomes of mechanical-antibiotic treatment of periimplantitis.

    PubMed

    Sannino, G; Gigola, P; Puttini, M; Pera, F; Passariello, C

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed as a retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes of cases of periimplantitis treated by mechanical debridement and the administration of antibiotics combined or not with the administration of either the proteolytic enzyme serratiopeptidase (SPEP) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Clinical charts of 544 partially edentulous patients treated for periimplantitis between June 1996 and December 2010 were analyzed to obtain clinical data of the affected implants just before the beginning of treatment and 12 months later to evaluate the outcomes of combined mechanical antibiotic treatment alone or in combination with the co-administration of the anti-inflammatory SPEP or NSAIDs. The comparative analysis revealed that therapeutic outcomes were significantly different in the three groups. Failure rate in the group that received SPEP (6 percent) was significantly lower compared to the group that received NSAIDS (16.9 percent; P less than 0.01) and to the group that received no anti-inflammatory therapy (18.9 percent; P less than 0.01). Treatment including SPEP was associated with significantly better healing also when successful treatments alone were considered. The data reported in this paper strongly support the hypothesis that SPEP is a valid addition to protocols for the combined therapy of peri-implantitis. In fact, it allows to enhance success rates significantly and also favors better tissue repair around successfully treated implants as compared to other regimens.

  1. How antibiotic resistances could change Helicobacter pylori treatment: A matter of geography?

    PubMed Central

    Ierardi, Enzo; Giorgio, Floriana; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Leo, Alfredo; Principi, Mariabeatrice

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic management of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) remains an unsolved issue. Indeed, no therapeutic regimen is able to cure the infection in all treated patients, and in many the infection persists despite the administration of several consecutive standard therapies. Although antibiotic resistance reports describe alarming results, the outcome of therapeutic regimens does not seem to parallel this scenario in most cases, since a successful performance is often reached in more than 80% of cases. However, the phenomenon of increasing antibiotic resistance is being closely studied, and the results show controversial aspects even in the same geographic area. For the continents of Europe, America, Asia, Africa, and Oceania, minimal and maximal values of resistance to the main antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin) feature wide ranges in different countries. The real enigma is therefore linked to the several different therapeutic regimens, which show results that often do not parallel the in vitro findings even in the same areas. A first aspect to be emphasized is that some regimens are limited by their use in very small geographic districts. Moreover, not all therapeutic trials have considered bacterial and host factors affecting the therapeutic outcome. The additional use of probiotics may help to reduce adverse events, but their therapeutic impact is doubtful. In conclusion, the “ideal therapy”, paradoxically, appears to be a “utopia”, despite the unprecedented volume of studies in the field and the real breakthrough in medical practice made by the discovery and treatment of H. pylori. The ample discrepancies observed in the different areas do not encourage the development of therapeutic guidelines that could be valid worldwide. On these bases, one of the main challenges for the future might be identifying a successful solution to overcome antibiotic resistances. In this context, geography must be considered a

  2. How antibiotic resistances could change Helicobacter pylori treatment: A matter of geography?

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Enzo; Giorgio, Floriana; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Leo, Alfredo; Principi, Mariabeatrice

    2013-12-07

    Therapeutic management of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) remains an unsolved issue. Indeed, no therapeutic regimen is able to cure the infection in all treated patients, and in many the infection persists despite the administration of several consecutive standard therapies. Although antibiotic resistance reports describe alarming results, the outcome of therapeutic regimens does not seem to parallel this scenario in most cases, since a successful performance is often reached in more than 80% of cases. However, the phenomenon of increasing antibiotic resistance is being closely studied, and the results show controversial aspects even in the same geographic area. For the continents of Europe, America, Asia, Africa, and Oceania, minimal and maximal values of resistance to the main antibiotics (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin) feature wide ranges in different countries. The real enigma is therefore linked to the several different therapeutic regimens, which show results that often do not parallel the in vitro findings even in the same areas. A first aspect to be emphasized is that some regimens are limited by their use in very small geographic districts. Moreover, not all therapeutic trials have considered bacterial and host factors affecting the therapeutic outcome. The additional use of probiotics may help to reduce adverse events, but their therapeutic impact is doubtful. In conclusion, the "ideal therapy", paradoxically, appears to be a "utopia", despite the unprecedented volume of studies in the field and the real breakthrough in medical practice made by the discovery and treatment of H. pylori. The ample discrepancies observed in the different areas do not encourage the development of therapeutic guidelines that could be valid worldwide. On these bases, one of the main challenges for the future might be identifying a successful solution to overcome antibiotic resistances. In this context, geography must be considered a relevant

  3. Antibiotic Resistance in the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis: A 20-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Victoria S.; Dhaliwal, Deepinder K.; Raju, Leela; Kowalski, Regis P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We compared the resistance patterns of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) keratitis isolates to common topically applied ophthalmic antimicrobials. Methods We reviewed the antibiotic susceptibility results of 122 MRSA and 276 MSSA keratitis isolates from January 1993 to November 2012. In vitro susceptibility testing of each SA isolate was performed using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion based on modified serum interpretations for cefoxitin, bacitracin, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, gatifloxacin, gentamicin, moxifloxacin, ofloxacin, polymyxin B, sulfamethoxazole, tobramycin, and trimethoprim. Results MRSA represented 30.7% (122 of 398) of the total SA isolates. All SA isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, while less susceptible to the fluoroquinolones than to the non-fluoroquinolones. In comparison to MSSA, MRSA was significantly more resistant to all antibiotics tested other than polymyxin B (both equally resistant) and vancomycin (both equally susceptible) (p<0.001). Besides vancomycin, MRSA demonstrated the best susceptibilities to sulfamethoxazole (94.3%), bacitracin (89.3%), trimethoprim (88.5%), and gentamicin (86.1%). Additionally, MRSA was found to be significantly more resistant to the second-generation fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin) than to the fourth-generation fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin). An increase in resistance to the fourth-generation fluoroquinolones was detected for both MRSA and MSSA over the study period. Conclusions The in vitro susceptibilities of commonly used topical antibiotics differ for MRSA and MSSA isolates, thus successful treatment of bacterial keratitis should be supported with laboratory studies. Vancomycin remains the treatment of choice for MRSA keratitis. The empiric use of second-generation fluoroquinolones appears to be contraindicated in the treatment of MRSA keratitis. PMID:25811722

  4. Development of a Long-Term Ascending Urinary Tract Infection Mouse Model for Antibiotic Treatment Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hvidberg, Hanne; Struve, Carsten; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Christensen, Nils; Rasmussen, Søren N.; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2000-01-01

    A model of ascending unobstructed urinary tract infection (UTI) in mice was developed to study the significance of the antibiotic concentration in urine, serum, and kidney tissue for efficacy of treatment of UTI in general and pyelonephritis in particular. Outbred Ssc-CF1 female mice were used throughout the study, and Escherichia coli was used as the pathogen. The virulence of 11 uropathogenic E. coli isolates and 1 nonpathogenic laboratory E. coli strain was examined. Strain C175-94 achieved the highest counts in the kidneys, and this strain was subsequently used as the infecting organism. The model gave reproducible bladder infections, i.e., bacteria were recovered from 22 of 23 control mice after 3 days, and histological examination of kidney tissue showed that of 14 infected kidneys, 7 (50%) showed major histological changes, whereas 3 of 36 uninfected kidneys showed major histological changes (P = 0.018). Once the model was established, the efficacies of different doses of cefuroxime and gentamicin, corresponding to active concentrations in urine only or in urine, serum, and kidney tissue simultaneously, were examined. All cefuroxime doses resulted in significantly lower counts in urine than control treatments, but the dose which produced concentrations of cefuroxime only in urine and not in serum or kidney tissue had no effect on kidney infection. Even low doses of gentamicin (0.05 mg/mouse) resulted in concentrations in renal tissue for prolonged times due to accumulation. All gentamicin doses had a significant effect (compared to the effect of the control treatment) on bacterial counts in urine and kidneys. The antibiotic effect on bacterial counts in bladders was negligible for unknown reasons. Use of the mouse UTI model is feasible for study of the effect of an antibiotic in the urinary system, although the missing antibacterial effect in the bladder needs further evaluation. PMID:10602738

  5. The population genetics of antibiotic resistance: integrating molecular mechanisms and treatment contexts.

    PubMed

    MacLean, R Craig; Hall, Alex R; Perron, Gabriel G; Buckling, Angus

    2010-06-01

    Despite efforts from a range of disciplines, our ability to predict and combat the evolution of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is limited. This is because resistance evolution involves a complex interplay between the specific drug, bacterial genetics and both natural and treatment ecology. Incorporating details of the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and ecology into evolutionary models has proved useful in predicting the dynamics of resistance evolution. However, putting these models to practical use will require extensive collaboration between mathematicians, molecular biologists, evolutionary ecologists and clinicians.

  6. Urban wastewater treatment plants as hotspots for antibiotic resistant bacteria and genes spread into the environment: a review.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, L; Manaia, C; Merlin, C; Schwartz, T; Dagot, C; Ploy, M C; Michael, I; Fatta-Kassinos, D

    2013-03-01

    Urban wastewater treatment plants (UWTPs) are among the main sources of antibiotics' release into the environment. The occurrence of antibiotics may promote the selection of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB), which shade health risks to humans and animals. In this paper the fate of ARB and ARGs in UWTPs, focusing on different processes/technologies (i.e., biological processes, advanced treatment technologies and disinfection), was critically reviewed. The mechanisms by which biological processes influence the development/selection of ARB and ARGs transfer are still poorly understood. Advanced treatment technologies and disinfection process are regarded as a major tool to control the spread of ARB into the environment. In spite of intense efforts made over the last years to bring solutions to control antibiotic resistance spread in the environment, there are still important gaps to fill in. In particular, it is important to: (i) improve risk assessment studies in order to allow accurate estimates about the maximal abundance of ARB in UWTPs effluents that would not pose risks for human and environmental health; (ii) understand the factors and mechanisms that drive antibiotic resistance maintenance and selection in wastewater habitats. The final objective is to implement wastewater treatment technologies capable of assuring the production of UWTPs effluents with an acceptable level of ARB.

  7. Vacuum Sealing Drainage Treatment Combined with Antibiotic-Impregnated Bone Cement for Treatment of Soft Tissue Defects and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Liang, Jiulong; Zhao, Jun; Quan, Liangliang; Jia, Xunyuan; Li, Mingchao; Tao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the combined effect of vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) and antibiotic-loaded bone cement on soft tissue defects and infection. Material/Methods This prospective non-blinded study recruited 46 patients with soft tissue defects and infection from January 2010 to May 2014 and randomly divided them into experimental and control groups (n=23). Patients in the experimental group were treated with VSD and antibiotic-loaded bone cement, while the patients in the control group were treated with VSD only. Results In the experimental group, the wound was healed in 23 cases at 4 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 12 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 6 cases and 5 cases, respectively. No infection reoccurred in 1-year follow-up. In the control group, the wound was healed in 15 cases at 6 weeks postoperatively, of which direct suture was performed in 8 cases, and additional free flap transplantation or skin grafting was performed in 3 cases and 4 cases, respectively. In the other 8 cases the wound was healed at 8 weeks postoperatively. Infection reoccurred in 3 cases during the follow-up. The experimental group had significantly fewer VSD dressing renewals, shorter time needed until the wound was ready for surgery, shorter duration of antibiotic administration, faster wound healing, and shorter hospital stay than the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions The combination of VSD and antibiotic bone cement might be a better method for treatment of soft tissue defects and infection. PMID:27281233

  8. Short-term antibiotic treatment has differing long-term impacts on the human throat and gut microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobsson, H.; Jernberg, C.; Andersson, A.F.; Sjolund-Karlsson, M.; Jansson, J.K.; Engstrand, L.

    2010-01-15

    Antibiotic administration is the standard treatment for the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, the main causative agent of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, the long-term consequences of this treatment on the human indigenous microbiota are relatively unexplored. Here we studied short- and long-term effects of clarithromycin and metronidazole treatment, a commonly used therapy regimen against H. pylori, on the indigenous microbiota in the throat and in the lower intestine. The bacterial compositions in samples collected over a four year period were monitored by analyzing the 16S rRNA gene using 454-based pyrosequencing and terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). While the microbial communities of untreated control subjects were relatively stable over time, dramatic shifts were observed one week after antibiotic treatment with reduced bacterial diversity in all treated subjects in both locations. While the microbiota of the different subjects responded uniquely to the antibiotic treatment some general trends could be observed; such as a dramatic decline in Actinobacteria in both throat and feces immediately after treatment. Although the diversity of the microbiota subsequently recovered to resemble the pre treatment states, the microbiota remained perturbed in some cases for up to four years post treatment. In addition, four years after treatment high levels of the macrolide resistance gene erm(B) were found, indicating that antibiotic resistance, once selected for, can persist for longer periods of time than previously recognized. This highlights the importance of a restrictive antibiotic usage in order to prevent subsequent treatment failure and potential spread of antibiotic resistance.

  9. The evolution of antibiotic resistance: insight into the roles of molecular mechanisms of resistance and treatment context.

    PubMed

    Maclean, R Craig; Hall, Alex R; Perron, Gabriel G; Buckling, Angus

    2010-08-01

    The widespread use of antibiotics has markedly improved public health over the last 60 years. However, the efficacy of antibiotic treatment is rapidly decreasing as a result of the continual spread of antibiotic resistance in pathogen populations. The evolution of antibiotic resistance is an amazingly simple example of adaptation by natural selection, and there is growing interest among evolutionary biologists in using evolutionary principles to help understand and combat the spread of resistance in pathogen populations. In this article, we review recent progress in our understanding of the underlying evolutionary forces that drive antibiotic resistance. Recent work has shown that both the mechanisms of antibiotic action and resistance, as well as the treatment context in which resistance evolves, influence the evolution of resistance in predictable ways. We argue that developing predictive models of resistance evolution that can be used to prevent the spread of resistance in pathogen populations requires integrating the treatment context and the molecular biology of resistance into the same evolutionary framework.

  10. Removal of total and antibiotic resistant bacteria in advanced wastewater treatment by ozonation in combination with different filtering techniques.

    PubMed

    Lüddeke, Frauke; Heß, Stefanie; Gallert, Claudia; Winter, Josef; Güde, Hans; Löffler, Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Elimination of bacteria by ozonation in combination with charcoal or slow sand filtration for advanced sewage treatment to improve the quality of treated sewage and to reduce the potential risk for human health of receiving surface waters was investigated in pilot scale at the sewage treatment plant Eriskirch, Baden-Wuerttemberg/Germany. To determine the elimination of sewage bacteria, inflowing and leaving wastewater of different treatment processes was analysed in a culture-based approach for its content of Escherichia coli, enterococci and staphylococci and their resistance against selected antibiotics over a period of 17 month. For enterococci, single species and their antibiotic resistances were identified. In comparison to the established flocculation filtration at Eriskirch, ozonation plus charcoal or sand filtration (pilot-scale) reduced the concentrations of total and antibiotic resistant E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci. However, antibiotic resistant E. coli and staphylococci apparently survived ozone treatment better than antibiotic sensitive strains. Neither vancomycin resistant enterococci nor methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were detected. The decreased percentage of antibiotic resistant enterococci after ozonation may be explained by a different ozone sensitivity of species: Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis, which determined the resistance-level, seemed to be more sensitive for ozone than other Enterococcus-species. Overall, ozonation followed by charcoal or sand filtration led to 0.8-1.1 log-units less total and antibiotic resistant E. coli, enterococci and staphylococci, as compared to the respective concentrations in treated sewage by only flocculation filtration. Thus, advanced wastewater treatment by ozonation plus charcoal or sand filtration after common sewage treatment is an effective tool for further elimination of microorganisms from sewage before discharge in surface waters.

  11. Bladder catheterization increases susceptibility to infection that can be prevented by prophylactic antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Goh, H.M. Sharon; Holec, Sarah; Albert, Matthew L.; Williams, Rohan B.H.; Ingersoll, Molly A.; Kline, Kimberly A.

    2016-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are the most common hospital-associated infections. Here, we report that bladder catheterization initiated a persistent sterile inflammatory reaction within minutes of catheter implantation. Catheterization resulted in increased expression of genes associated with defense responses and cellular migration, with ensuing rapid and sustained innate immune cell infiltration into the bladder. Catheterization also resulted in hypersensitivity to Enterococcus faecalis and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection, in which colonization was achieved using an inoculum 100-fold lower than the ID90 for infection of an undamaged urothelium with the same uropathogens. As the time of catheterization increased, however, colonization by the Gram-positive uropathogen E. faecalis was reduced, whereas catheterization created a sustained window of vulnerability to infection for Gram-negative UPEC over time. As CAUTI contributes to poorer patient outcomes and increased health care expenditures, we tested whether a single prophylactic antibiotic treatment, concurrent with catheterization, would prevent infection. We observed that antibiotic treatment protected against UPEC and E. faecalis bladder and catheter colonization as late as 6 hours after implantation. Thus, our study has revealed a simple, safe, and immediately employable intervention, with the potential to decrease one of the most costly hospital-incurred infections, thereby improving patient and health care economic outcome. PMID:27699248

  12. High-throughput profiling of antibiotic resistance genes in drinking water treatment plants and distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Xu, Like; Ouyang, Weiying; Qian, Yanyun; Su, Chao; Su, Jianqiang; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are present in surface water and often cannot be completely eliminated by drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). Improper elimination of the ARG-harboring microorganisms contaminates the water supply and would lead to animal and human disease. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to determine the most effective ways by which DWTPs can eliminate ARGs. Here, we tested water samples from two DWTPs and distribution systems and detected the presence of 285 ARGs, 8 transposases, and intI-1 by utilizing high-throughput qPCR. The prevalence of ARGs differed in the two DWTPs, one of which employed conventional water treatments while the other had advanced treatment processes. The relative abundance of ARGs increased significantly after the treatment with biological activated carbon (BAC), raising the number of detected ARGs from 76 to 150. Furthermore, the final chlorination step enhanced the relative abundance of ARGs in the finished water generated from both DWTPs. The total enrichment of ARGs varied from 6.4-to 109.2-fold in tap water compared to finished water, among which beta-lactam resistance genes displayed the highest enrichment. Six transposase genes were detected in tap water samples, with the transposase gene TnpA-04 showing the greatest enrichment (up to 124.9-fold). We observed significant positive correlations between ARGs and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) during the distribution systems, indicating that transposases and intI-1 may contribute to antibiotic resistance in drinking water. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the diversity and abundance of ARGs in drinking water treatment systems utilizing high-throughput qPCR techniques in China.

  13. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    , photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V(20 Gy). The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  14. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa’n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-10-01

    -only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p < 0.001). As expected, photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy}. The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  15. Pilot study of seasonal occurrence and distribution of antibiotics and drug resistant bacteria in wastewater treatment plants in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Birošová, Lucia; Mackulak, Tomáš; Bodík, Igor; Ryba, Jozef; Škubák, Jaroslav; Grabic, Roman

    2014-08-15

    This work presents environmental and quality-control data from the analyses of 33 antibiotics in influent and effluent water from two waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) in the capital and the biggest city of Slovakia. Seeing that consumption of antibiotics depends on epidemiological season, samples were collected during February and August. Among assessed antibiotics ciprofloxacin and clarithromycin were detected in highest concentrations in influent water. Seasonal changes were observed only in plant A when antibiotic concentrations decreased. On the other hand an increase in some cases was observed in plant B. Insufficient degradation of some macrolides, sulfonamides and trimethoprim was detected according to their higher concentrations in effluent water. Contact of antibiotics in subinhibitory concentrations and sludge bacteria in WWTPs represent the base for the development of significant levels of microbial resistance. Simultaneously, antibiotic resistance of fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci from sewage sludge was evaluated. Majority of coliform bacteria were found to be resistant to ampicillin and gentamicin. A significant seasonal difference was determined only in case of high-level resistance. In summer samples, an increase in the strains resistant to concentrations higher than the resistance breakpoints established by EUCAST and NCCLS was observed. No antibiotic resistance in streptococci was observed. However, as a part of sewage sludge is mixed with compost and utilized in agriculture, better processing of sludge should be considered.

  16. Natural history of the infant gut microbiome and impact of antibiotic treatment on bacterial strain diversity and stability.

    PubMed

    Yassour, Moran; Vatanen, Tommi; Siljander, Heli; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Härkönen, Taina; Ryhänen, Samppa J; Franzosa, Eric A; Vlamakis, Hera; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gevers, Dirk; Lander, Eric S; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2016-06-15

    The gut microbial community is dynamic during the first 3 years of life, before stabilizing to an adult-like state. However, little is known about the impact of environmental factors on the developing human gut microbiome. We report a longitudinal study of the gut microbiome based on DNA sequence analysis of monthly stool samples and clinical information from 39 children, about half of whom received multiple courses of antibiotics during the first 3 years of life. Whereas the gut microbiome of most children born by vaginal delivery was dominated by Bacteroides species, the four children born by cesarean section and about 20% of vaginally born children lacked Bacteroides in the first 6 to 18 months of life. Longitudinal sampling, coupled with whole-genome shotgun sequencing, allowed detection of strain-level variation as well as the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes. The microbiota of antibiotic-treated children was less diverse in terms of both bacterial species and strains, with some species often dominated by single strains. In addition, we observed short-term composition changes between consecutive samples from children treated with antibiotics. Antibiotic resistance genes carried on microbial chromosomes showed a peak in abundance after antibiotic treatment followed by a sharp decline, whereas some genes carried on mobile elements persisted longer after antibiotic therapy ended. Our results highlight the value of high-density longitudinal sampling studies with high-resolution strain profiling for studying the establishment and response to perturbation of the infant gut microbiome.

  17. Diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of acute otitis media: report from International Primary Care Network.

    PubMed Central

    Froom, J; Culpepper, L; Grob, P; Bartelds, A; Bowers, P; Bridges-Webb, C; Grava-Gubins, I; Green, L; Lion, J; Somaini, B

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The relation between a history of disorders suggestive of acute otitis media, symptoms, and findings of an examination of the tympanic membrane and doctors' certainty of diagnosis. Also, to examine differences in prescribing habits for acute otitis media among doctors from different countries. DESIGN--Questionnaires were completed by participating doctors for a maximum of 15 consecutive patients presenting with presumed acute otitis media. SETTING--General practices in Australia, Belgium, Great Britain, Israel, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Canada, Switzerland, and the United States. PATIENTS--3660 Children divided into the three age groups 0-12 months, 13-30 months, and greater than or equal to 31 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--General practitioners' responses to questions on their diagnostic certainty and resolution of patients' symptoms after two months. RESULTS--The diagnostic certainty in patients aged 0-12 months was 58.0%. This increased to 66.0% in those aged 13-30 months and 73.3% in those aged greater than or equal to 31 months. In all age groups diagnostic certainty was positively associated with the finding of a tympanic membrane that was discharging pus or bulging. Redness of the membrane and pain were also associated with certainty in patients aged 13-30 months, and a history of decreased hearing or recent upper respiratory infection was positively associated in patients aged greater than or equal to 31 months. The proportion of patients prescribed antibiotics varied greatly among the countries, from 31.2% in The Netherlands to 98.2% in both Australia and New Zealand, as did the duration of treatment. Patients who did not take antibiotics had a higher rate of recovery than those who did; the rate of recovery did not differ between different types of antibiotic. CONCLUSIONS--Doctors' certainty of diagnosis of acute otitis media was linked to patient's age. Improved criteria or techniques for diagnosing acute otitis media, especially in

  18. Bacterial biofilm mechanical properties persist upon antibiotic treatment and survive cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrelli, K.; Galy, O.; Latour-Lambert, P.; Kirwan, L.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.; Henry, N.

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria living on surfaces form heterogeneous three-dimensional consortia known as biofilms, where they exhibit many specific properties one of which is an increased tolerance to antibiotics. Biofilms are maintained by a polymeric network and display physical properties similar to that of complex fluids. In this work, we address the question of the impact of antibiotic treatment on the physical properties of biofilms based on recently developed tools enabling the in situ mapping of biofilm local mechanical properties at the micron scale. This approach takes into account the material heterogeneity and reveals the spatial distribution of all the small changes that may occur in the structure. With an Escherichia coli biofilm, we demonstrate using in situ fluorescent labeling that the two antibiotics ofloxacin and ticarcillin—targeting DNA replication and membrane assembly, respectively—induced no detectable alteration of the biofilm mechanical properties while they killed the vast majority of the cells. In parallel, we show that a proteolytic enzyme that cleaves extracellular proteins into short peptides, but does not alter bacterial viability in the biofilm, clearly affects the mechanical properties of the biofilm structure, inducing a significant increase of the material compliance. We conclude that conventional biofilm control strategy relying on the use of biocides targeting cells is missing a key target since biofilm structural integrity is preserved. This is expected to efficiently promote biofilm resilience, especially in the presence of persister cells. In contrast, the targeting of polymer network cross-links—among which extracellular proteins emerge as major players—offers a promising route for the development of rational multi-target strategies to fight against biofilms.

  19. Prolonged antibiotic treatment induces a diabetogenic intestinal microbiome that accelerates diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kirsty; Godovannyi, Artem; Ma, Caixia; Zhang, YiQun; Ahmadi-Vand, Zahra; Dai, Chaunbin; Gorzelak, Monika A; Chan, YeeKwan; Chan, Justin M; Lochner, Arion; Dutz, Jan P; Vallance, Bruce A; Gibson, Deanna L

    2016-02-01

    Accumulating evidence supports that the intestinal microbiome is involved in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) pathogenesis through the gut-pancreas nexus. Our aim was to determine whether the intestinal microbiota in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model played a role in T1D through the gut. To examine the effect of the intestinal microbiota on T1D onset, we manipulated gut microbes by: (1) the fecal transplantation between non-obese diabetic (NOD) and resistant (NOR) mice and (2) the oral antibiotic and probiotic treatment of NOD mice. We monitored diabetes onset, quantified CD4+T cells in the Peyer's patches, profiled the microbiome and measured fecal short-chain fatty acids (SCFA). The gut microbiota from NOD mice harbored more pathobionts and fewer beneficial microbes in comparison with NOR mice. Fecal transplantation of NOD microbes induced insulitis in NOR hosts suggesting that the NOD microbiome is diabetogenic. Moreover, antibiotic exposure accelerated diabetes onset in NOD mice accompanied by increased T-helper type 1 (Th1) and reduced Th17 cells in the intestinal lymphoid tissues. The diabetogenic microbiome was characterized by a metagenome altered in several metabolic gene clusters. Furthermore, diabetes susceptibility correlated with reduced fecal SCFAs. In an attempt to correct the diabetogenic microbiome, we administered VLS#3 probiotics to NOD mice but found that VSL#3 colonized the intestine poorly and did not delay diabetes. We conclude that NOD mice harbor gut microbes that induce diabetes and that their diabetogenic microbiome can be amplified early in life through antibiotic exposure. Protective microbes like VSL#3 are insufficient to overcome the effects of a diabetogenic microbiome.

  20. Characterization and comparative analysis of antibiotic resistance plasmids isolated from a wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Rahube, Teddie O; Viana, Laia S; Koraimann, Günther; Yost, Christopher K

    2014-01-01

    A wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) is an environment high in nutrient concentration with diverse bacterial populations and can provide an ideal environment for the proliferation of mobile elements such as plasmids. WWTPs have also been identified as reservoirs for antibiotic resistance genes that are associated with human pathogens. The objectives of this study were to isolate and characterize self-transmissible or mobilizable resistance plasmids associated with effluent from WWTP. An enrichment culture approach designed to capture plasmids conferring resistance to high concentrations of erythromycin was used to capture plasmids from an urban WWTP servicing a population of ca. 210,000. DNA sequencing of the plasmids revealed diversity of plasmids represented by incompatibility groups IncU, col-E, IncFII and IncP-1β. Genes coding resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics (macrolide, tetracycline, beta-lactam, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, sulphonamide), quaternary ammonium compounds and heavy metals were co-located on these plasmids, often within transposable and integrative mobile elements. Several of the plasmids were self-transmissible or mobilizable and could be maintained in the absence of antibiotic selection. The IncFII plasmid pEFC36a showed the highest degree of sequence identity to plasmid R1 which has been isolated in England more than 50 years ago from a patient suffering from a Salmonella infection. Functional conservation of key regulatory features of this F-like conjugation module were demonstrated by the finding that the conjugation frequency of pEFC36a could be stimulated by the positive regulator of plasmid R1 DNA transfer genes, TraJ.

  1. Antibiotic Impregnated Bone Cement for the Treatment of Osteomelitis and Severe Open Fractures: Expanded Options for Surgeons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Impregnated Bone Cement for the treatment of Osteomelitis and Severe Open Fractures: Expanded Options for Surgeons PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: CDR...34Antibiotic Impregnated Bone Cement for the treatment of Osteomelitis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0221 and Severe Open Fractures: Expanded Options for

  2. Occurrence and removal of antibiotics and the corresponding resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants: effluents' influence to downstream water environment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianan; Cheng, Weixiao; Xu, Like; Jiao, Yanan; Baig, Shams Ali; Chen, Hong

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the occurrence of 8 antibiotics [3 tetracyclines (TCs), 4 sulfonamides, and 1 trimethoprim (TMP)], 12 antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) (10 tet, 2 sul), 4 types of bacteria [no antibiotics, anti-TC, anti-sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and anti-double], and intI1 in two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were assessed and their influences in downstream lake were investigated. Both WWTPs' effluent demonstrated some similarities, but the abundance and removal rate varied significantly. Results revealed that biological treatment mainly removed antibiotics and ARGs, whereas physical techniques were found to eliminate antibiotic resistance bacteria (ARBs) abundance (about 1 log for each one). UV disinfection did not significantly enhance the removal efficiency, and the release of the abundantly available target contaminants from the excess sludge may pose threats to human and the environment. Different antibiotics showed diverse influences on the downstream lake, and the concentrations of sulfamethazine (SM2) and SMX were observed to increase enormously. The total ARG abundance ascended about 0.1 log and some ARGs (e.g., tetC, intI1, tetA) increased due to the high input of the effluent. In addition, the abundance of ARB variation in the lake also changed, but the abundance of four types of bacteria remained stable in the downstream sampling sites.

  3. Long-Term Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment: Effects on Survival, Immunocompetence and Reproduction Success of Parasemia plantaginis (Lepidoptera: Erebidae).

    PubMed

    Dickel, Franziska; Freitak, Dalial; Mappes, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of insect species are nowadays reared under laboratory conditions. Rearing of insects always implicates the risk of diseases, among which microbial infections are the most frequent and difficult problems. Although there are effective prophylactic treatments, the side effects of applied antibiotics are not well understood. We examined the effect of prophylactic antibiotic treatment on the overwintering success of wood tiger moth (Parasemia plantaginis) larvae, and the postdiapause effect on their life-history traits. Four weeks before hibernation larvae were treated with a widely used antibiotic (fumagillin). We monitored moths' survival and life-history traits during the following 10 mo, and compared them to those of untreated control larvae. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment had no effect on survival but we show effects on some life-history traits by decreasing the developmental time of treated larvae. However, we also revealed relevant negative effects, as antibiotic treated individuals show a decreased number of laid eggs and also furthermore a suppressed immunocompetence. These results implicate, that a prophylactic medication can also lead to negative effects on life-history traits and reproductive success, which should be seriously taken in consideration when applying a prophylactic treatment to laboratory reared insect populations.

  4. Long-Term Prophylactic Antibiotic Treatment: Effects on Survival, Immunocompetence and Reproduction Success of Parasemia plantaginis (Lepidoptera: Erebidae)

    PubMed Central

    Dickel, Franziska; Freitak, Dalial; Mappes, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Hundreds of insect species are nowadays reared under laboratory conditions. Rearing of insects always implicates the risk of diseases, among which microbial infections are the most frequent and difficult problems. Although there are effective prophylactic treatments, the side effects of applied antibiotics are not well understood. We examined the effect of prophylactic antibiotic treatment on the overwintering success of wood tiger moth (Parasemia plantaginis) larvae, and the postdiapause effect on their life-history traits. Four weeks before hibernation larvae were treated with a widely used antibiotic (fumagillin). We monitored moths’ survival and life-history traits during the following 10 mo, and compared them to those of untreated control larvae. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment had no effect on survival but we show effects on some life-history traits by decreasing the developmental time of treated larvae. However, we also revealed relevant negative effects, as antibiotic treated individuals show a decreased number of laid eggs and also furthermore a suppressed immunocompetence. These results implicate, that a prophylactic medication can also lead to negative effects on life-history traits and reproductive success, which should be seriously taken in consideration when applying a prophylactic treatment to laboratory reared insect populations. PMID:27271967

  5. Antibiotic treatment for acute haematogenous osteomyelitis of childhood: moving towards shorter courses and oral administration.

    PubMed

    Pääkkönen, M; Peltola, H

    2011-10-01

    Acute haematogenous osteomyelitis (AHOM) of childhood usually affects the long bones of the lower limbs. Although almost any agent may cause AHOM, Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterium, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and, in some countries, Salmonella spp. and Kingella kingae. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has improved the diagnostic accuracy of traditional radiography and scintigraphy. Except for the pre-treatment diagnostic sample from bone before the institution of antibiotic therapy, no other surgery is usually required. Traditionally, non-neonatal AHOM has been treated with a 1-3-month course of antibiotics, including an intravenous (i.v.) phase for the first weeks, but recent prospective randomised studies challenge this approach. For most uncomplicated cases, a course of 20 days including an i.v. period of 2-4 days suffices, provided large enough doses of a well-absorbed agent (clindamycin or a first-generation cephalosporin, local resistance permitting) are used, administration is four times daily and most symptoms and signs subside within a few days. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is a good guide in monitoring the course of illness, and the antimicrobial can usually be discontinued if CRP has decreased to <20 mg/L. Newer and costly agents, such as linezolid, should be reserved for cases due to resistant S. aureus strains. AHOM in neonates and immunocompromised patients probably requires a different approach. Because sequelae may develop slowly, follow-up for at least 1 year post hospitalisation is recommended.

  6. INTRAVENOUS REGIONAL ANTIBIOTIC PERFUSION THERAPY AS AN ADJUNCTIVE TREATMENT FOR DIGITAL LESIONS IN SEABIRDS.

    PubMed

    Fiorello, Christine V

    2017-03-01

    Foot infections are a common problem among seabirds in wildlife rehabilitation. Pododermatitis and digital infections are often challenging to treat because of the presence of suboptimal substrates, abnormal weight-bearing due to injuries, and suboptimal nutritional or health status. Seabirds represent the majority of animals requiring rehabilitation after oil spills, and foot problems are a common reason for euthanasia among these birds. Antibiotic intravenous regional perfusion therapy is frequently used in humans and other species to treat infections of the distal extremities, but it has not been evaluated in seabirds. During the 2015 Refugio oil spill response, four birds with foot lesions (pododermatitis, osteomyelitis, or both) were treated with ampicillin/sulbactam administered intravenously to the affected limb(s) in addition to systemic antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Three of the birds, all brown pelicans ( Pelecanus occidentalis ) recovered rapidly and were released. Two of these birds had acute pododermatitis and were treated once with intravenous regional perfusion. They were released approximately 3 wk after the perfusion therapy. The third pelican had osteomyelitis of a digit. It was treated twice with intravenous regional perfusion and was released about 1 mo after the initial perfusion therapy. The fourth bird, a Pacific loon ( Gavia pacifica ), was treated once with perfusion therapy but did not respond to treatment and was euthanatized. No serious adverse effects were observed. This technique should be explored further in avian species.

  7. Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA Growth and Biofilm Formation after Treatment with Antibiotics and SeNPs.

    PubMed

    Cihalova, Kristyna; Chudobova, Dagmar; Michalek, Petr; Moulick, Amitava; Guran, Roman; Kopel, Pavel; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-10-16

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a dangerous pathogen resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Due to its resistance, it is difficult to manage the infections caused by this strain. We examined this issue in terms of observation of the growth properties and ability to form biofilms in sensitive S. aureus and MRSA after the application of antibiotics (ATBs)-ampicillin, oxacillin and penicillin-and complexes of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with these ATBs. The results suggest the strong inhibition effect of SeNPs in complexes with conventional ATBs. Using the impedance method, a higher disruption of biofilms was observed after the application of ATB complexes with SeNPs compared to the group exposed to ATBs without SeNPs. The biofilm formation was intensely inhibited (up to 99%±7% for S. aureus and up to 94%±4% for MRSA) after application of SeNPs in comparison with bacteria without antibacterial compounds whereas ATBs without SeNPs inhibited S. aureus up to 79%±5% and MRSA up to 16%±2% only. The obtained results provide a basis for the use of SeNPs as a tool for the treatment of bacterial infections, which can be complicated because of increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional ATB drugs.

  8. Impacts of Antibiotic and Bacteriophage Treatments on the Gut-Symbiont-Associated Blissus insularis (Hemiptera: Blissidae)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yao; Buss, Eileen A.; Boucias, Drion G.

    2016-01-01

    The Southern chinch bug, Blissus insularis, possesses specialized midgut crypts that harbor dense populations of the exocellular symbiont Burkholderia. Oral administration of antibiotics suppressed the gut symbionts in B. insularis and negatively impacted insect host fitness, as reflected by retarded development, smaller body size, and higher susceptibility to an insecticide, bifenthrin. Considering that the antibiotics probably had non-lethal but toxic effects on host fitness, attempts were conducted to reduce gut symbionts using bacteriophage treatment. Soil-lytic phages active against the cultures of specific Burkholderia ribotypes were successfully isolated using a soil enrichment protocol. Characterization of the BiBurk16MC_R phage determined its specificity to the Bi16MC_R_vitro ribotype and placed it within the family Podoviridae. Oral administration of phages to fifth-instar B. insularis, inoculated with Bi16MC_R_vitro as neonates had no deleterious effects on host fitness. However, the ingested phages failed to impact the crypt-associated Burkholderia. The observed inactivity of the phage was likely due to the blockage of the connection between the anterior and posterior midgut regions. These findings suggest that the initial colonization by Burkholderia programs the ontogeny of the midgut, providing a sheltered residence protected from microbial antagonists. PMID:27827869

  9. Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA Growth and Biofilm Formation after Treatment with Antibiotics and SeNPs

    PubMed Central

    Cihalova, Kristyna; Chudobova, Dagmar; Michalek, Petr; Moulick, Amitava; Guran, Roman; Kopel, Pavel; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a dangerous pathogen resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Due to its resistance, it is difficult to manage the infections caused by this strain. We examined this issue in terms of observation of the growth properties and ability to form biofilms in sensitive S. aureus and MRSA after the application of antibiotics (ATBs)—ampicillin, oxacillin and penicillin—and complexes of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with these ATBs. The results suggest the strong inhibition effect of SeNPs in complexes with conventional ATBs. Using the impedance method, a higher disruption of biofilms was observed after the application of ATB complexes with SeNPs compared to the group exposed to ATBs without SeNPs. The biofilm formation was intensely inhibited (up to 99% ± 7% for S. aureus and up to 94% ± 4% for MRSA) after application of SeNPs in comparison with bacteria without antibacterial compounds whereas ATBs without SeNPs inhibited S. aureus up to 79% ± 5% and MRSA up to 16% ± 2% only. The obtained results provide a basis for the use of SeNPs as a tool for the treatment of bacterial infections, which can be complicated because of increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional ATB drugs. PMID:26501270

  10. Resolution of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm infection using vaccination and antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Brady, Rebecca A; O'May, Graeme A; Leid, Jeff G; Prior, Megan L; Costerton, J William; Shirtliff, Mark E

    2011-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections, particularly those from methicillin-resistant strains (i.e., MRSA), are reaching epidemic proportions, with no effective vaccine available. The vast number and transient expression of virulence factors in the infectious course of this pathogen have made the discovery of protective antigens particularly difficult. In addition, the divergent planktonic and biofilm modes of growth with their accompanying proteomic changes also demonstrate significant hindrances to vaccine development. In this study, a multicomponent vaccine was evaluated for its ability to clear a staphylococcal biofilm infection. Antigens (glucosaminidase, an ABC transporter lipoprotein, a conserved hypothetical protein, and a conserved lipoprotein) were chosen since they were found in previous studies to have upregulated and sustained expression in a biofilm, both in vitro and in vivo. Antibodies against these antigens were first used in microscopy studies to localize their expression in in vitro biofilms. Each of the four antigens showed heterogeneous production in various locations within the complex biofilm community in the biofilm. Based upon these studies, the four antigens were delivered simultaneously as a quadrivalent vaccine in order to compensate for this varied production. In addition, antibiotic treatment was also administered to clear the remaining nonattached planktonic cells since the vaccine antigens may have been biofilm specific. The results demonstrated that when vaccination was coupled with vancomycin treatment in a biofilm model of chronic osteomyelitis in rabbits, clinical and radiographic signs of infection significantly reduced by 67 and 82%, respectively, compared to infected animals that were either treated with vancomycin or left untreated. In contrast, vaccination alone resulted in a modest, and nonsignificant, decrease in clinical (34% reduction) and radiographic signs (9% reduction) of infection, compared to nonvaccinated animal groups

  11. Ixodes pacificus Ticks Maintain Embryogenesis and Egg Hatching after Antibiotic Treatment of Rickettsia Endosymbiont

    PubMed Central

    Kurlovs, Andre H.; Li, Jinze; Cheng, Du; Zhong, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    Rickettsia is a genus of intracellular bacteria that causes a variety of diseases in humans and other mammals and associates with a diverse group of arthropods. Although Rickettsia appears to be common in ticks, most Rickettsia-tick relationships remain generally uncharacterized. The most intimate of these associations is Rickettsia species phylotype G021, a maternally and transstadially transmitted endosymbiont that resides in 100% of I. pacificus in California. We investigated the effects of this Rickettsia phylotype on I. pacificus reproductive fitness using selective antibiotic treatment. Ciprofloxacin was 10-fold more effective than tetracycline in eliminating Rickettsia from I. pacificus, and quantitative PCR results showed that eggs from the ciprofloxacin-treated ticks contained an average of 0.02 Rickettsia per egg cell as opposed to the average of 0.2 in the tetracycline-treated ticks. Ampicillin did not significantly affect the number of Rickettsia per tick cell in adults or eggs compared to the water-injected control ticks. We found no relationship between tick embryogenesis and rickettsial density in engorged I. pacificus females. Tetracycline treatment significantly delayed oviposition of I. pacificus ticks, but the antibiotic’s effect was unlikely related to Rickettsia. We also demonstrated that Rickettsia-free eggs could successfully develop into larvae without any significant decrease in hatching compared to eggs containing Rickettsia. No significant differences in the incubation period, egg hatching rate, and the number of larvae were found between any of the antibiotic-treated groups and the water-injected tick control. We concluded that Rickettsia species phylotype G021 does not have an apparent effect on embryogenesis, oviposition, and egg hatching of I. pacificus. PMID:25105893

  12. In vivo verification of in vitro model of antibiotic treatment of device-related infection.

    PubMed Central

    Blaser, J; Vergères, P; Widmer, A F; Zimmerli, W

    1995-01-01

    Device-related infections are difficult to treat with antibiotics alone. Standard susceptibility tests do not correlate with treatment success. Therefore, the utility of a pharmacokinetic in vitro model has been evaluated in comparison with the tissue-cage infection model in guinea pigs. The bactericidal activity of 28 treatment regimens has been studied by using three different test strains. In vitro efficacy was defined as reduction in the number of suspended or adherent bacteria, and in vivo efficacy was defined as reduction in the number of bacteria in tissue-cage fluid. Test results between the two models (in vivo and in vitro) correlated well, with correlation coefficients of 0.85 for in vivo efficacy versus in vitro efficacy against suspended bacteria and 0.72 for in vivo efficacy versus in vitro efficacy against adherent bacteria (P < 0.05) for Staphylococcus aureus, 0.96 and 0.82 (P < 0.05) for Staphylococcus epidermidis, and 0.89 and 0.97 for Escherichia coli, respectively. In contrast, standard susceptibility tests, ratios of MICs to trough or peak levels, ratios of the area under the curve to the MIC, or time above the MIC were not predictive for therapeutic outcome in either the in vitro or in vivo model. In both models, the bactericidal activity levels with combination regimens were significantly higher than those with single-drug regimens (P < 0.001). Furthermore, rifampin combinations with either vancomycin, teicoplanin, fleroxacin, or ciprofloxacin were significantly more bactericidal against adherent bacteria than netilmicin combinations with vancomycin or daptomycin (P < 0.01). Thus, in vivo verification of the pharmacokinetic in vitro model correlated well with the animal model. The in vitro model offers an alternative to ther animal model in experiments that screen and assess antibiotic regimens against device-related infections. PMID:7625801

  13. Antibiotic Treatment of Experimental Staphylococcus aureus Infections of the Bovine Mammary Gland

    PubMed Central

    Newbould, F. H. S.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental infections were produced in 78 quarters of 17 cows by the infusion of small numbers of a single strain of Staphylococcus aureus. In each single experiment three quarters in a cow were infected, with the fourth left as a control. At times varying from three to 60 days after the infusion of organisms, a standard intramammary antibiotic treatment was administered on a single occasion. A cure was arbitrarily defined as the absence of the organism in foremilk, from direct plating and replated incubated milk, together with return to normal somatic cell count levels as determined by an electronic counter. With these standardized conditions the effects of a number of cow associated factors on the outcome of the therapy were determined. Forty-three of the 78 quarters (55%) were cured by the standard treatment. Significant differences in percentages of quarters cured were found to be associated with the duration of infection before therapy, the lactation age of the cow, the length of time in lactation, somatic cell count in milk at time of treatment, the location of the quarter in the udder and individual cows. No significant effects on the outcome of the standard treatment were found associated with the number of bacteria in the secretion at the time of treatment, previous infection and cure in a quarter nor the season of the year in which treatment was given. Of the 35 quarters in which infection recurred following treatment, organisms were reisolated from 12 within four days, 18 between five and nine days, four between ten and 17 days and one after 28 days. From these data it is apparent that if, as has been suggested, models such as described are to be used for efficacy trials, standardization of some parameters is essential. PMID:4279760

  14. Antibiotic treatment for pyelonephritis in children: multicentre randomised controlled non-inferiority trial

    PubMed Central

    Toffolo, Antonella; Zucchetta, Pietro; Dall'Amico, Roberto; Gobber, Daniela; Calderan, Alessandro; Maschio, Francesca; Pavanello, Luigi; Molinari, Pier Paolo; Scorrano, Dante; Zanchetta, Sergio; Cassar, Walburga; Brisotto, Paolo; Corsini, Andrea; Sartori, Stefano; Dalt, Liviana Da; Murer, Luisa; Zacchello, Graziella

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy of oral antibiotic treatment alone with treatment started parenterally and completed orally in children with a first episode of acute pyelonephritis. Design Multicentre, randomised controlled, open labelled, parallel group, non-inferiority trial. Setting 28 paediatric units in north east Italy. Participants 502 children aged 1 month to <7 years with clinical pyelonephritis. Intervention Oral co-amoxiclav (50 mg/kg/day in three doses for 10 days) or parenteral ceftriaxone (50 mg/kg/day in a single parenteral dose) for three days, followed by oral co-amoxiclav (50 mg/kg/day in three divided doses for seven days). Main outcomes measures Primary outcome was the rate of renal scarring. Secondary measures of efficacy were time to defervescence (<37°C), reduction in inflammatory indices, and percentage with sterile urine after 72 hours. An exploratory subgroup analysis was conducted in the children in whom pyelonephritis was confirmed by dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy within 10 days after study entry. Results Intention to treat analysis showed no significant differences between oral (n=244) and parenteral (n=258) treatment, both in the primary outcome (scarring scintigraphy at 12 months 27/197 (13.7%) v 36/203 (17.7%), difference in risk −4%, 95% confidence interval −11.1% to 3.1%) and secondary outcomes (time to defervescence 36.9 hours (SD 19.7) v 34.3 hours (SD 20), mean difference 2.6 (−0.9 to 6.0); white cell count 9.8×109/l (SD 3.5) v 9.5×109/l (SD 3.1), mean difference 0.3 (−0.3 to 0.9); percentage with sterile urine 185/186 v 203/204, risk difference −0.05% (−1.5% to 1.4%)). Similar results were found in the subgroup of 278 children with confirmed acute pyelonephritis on scintigraphy at study entry. Conclusions Treatment with oral antibiotics is as effective as parenteral then oral treatment in the management of the first episode of clinical pyelonephritis in children. Trial registration Clinical Trials

  15. Quality assessment of diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of infectious diseases in primary care: a systematic review of quality indicators

    PubMed Central

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Monrad, Rikke Nygaard; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Arpi, Magnus; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify existing quality indicators (QIs) for diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of patients with infectious diseases in primary care. Design A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE. We included studies with a description of the development of QIs for diagnosis and antibiotic use in patients with infectious diseases in primary care. We extracted information about (1) type of infection; (2) target for quality assessment; (3) methodology used for developing the QIs; and (4) whether the QIs were developed for a national or international application. The QIs were organised into three categories: (1) QIs focusing on the diagnostic process; (2) QIs focusing on the decision to prescribe antibiotics; and (3) QIs concerning the choice of antibiotics. Results Eleven studies were included in this review and a total of 130 QIs were identified. The majority (72%) of the QIs were focusing on choice of antibiotics, 22% concerned the decision to prescribe antibiotics, and few (6%) concerned the diagnostic process. Most QIs were either related to respiratory tract infections or not related to any type of infection. A consensus method (mainly the Delphi technique), based on either a literature study or national guidelines, was used for the development of QIs in all of the studies. Conclusions The small number of existing QIs predominantly focuses on the choice of antibiotics and is often drug-specific. There is a remarkable lack of diagnostic QIs. Future development of new QIs, especially disease-specific QIs concerning the diagnostic process, is needed. Key Points In order to improve the use of antibiotics in primary care, measurable instruments, such as quality indicators, are needed to assess the quality of care being provided.A total of 11 studies were found, including 130 quality indicators for diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of infectious diseases in primary care.The majority of the identified quality indicators were focusing on the

  16. Abundance of antibiotic resistance genes in five municipal wastewater treatment plants in the Monastir Governorate, Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Rafraf, Ikbel Denden; Lekunberri, Itziar; Sànchez-Melsió, Alexandre; Aouni, Mahjoub; Borrego, Carles M; Balcázar, José Luis

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a growing and significant threat to global public health, requiring better understanding of the sources and mechanisms involved in its emergence and spread. We investigated the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) before and after treatment in five wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) located in different areas of the Monastir Governorate (Tunisia). Three of these WWTPs (Frina, Sahline and Zaouiet) use a conventional activated sludge process as secondary treatment, whereas the WWTP located in Beni Hassen applies an ultraviolet disinfection step after the activated sludge process and the WWTP located in Moknine treats wastewater using naturally aerated lagoons as a secondary treatment process. The abundance of six ARGs (blaCTX-M, blaTEM, qnrA, qnrS, sul I and ermB) and the class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) were determined by quantitative PCR. All ARGs and the intI1 gene were detected in the wastewater samples, except the blaCTX-M gene, which was not detected in both influent and effluent samples from Sahline and Beni Hassen WWTPs, and the qnrS gene, which was not detected neither in the WWTP influent in Moknine nor in the WWTP effluent in Beni Hassen. Although the relative concentration of ARGs was generally found to be similar between samples collected before and after the wastewater treatment, the abundance of blaCTX-M, blaTEM, and qnrS genes was higher in the effluent of the Frina WWTP which, unlike other WWTPs, not only receives domestic or industrial sewage but also untreated hospital waste. To the best of our knowledge, this study quantified for the first time the abundance of ARGs in different Tunisian WWTPs, and the results agree with previous studies suggesting that conventional wastewater treatment does not efficiently reduce ARGs. Therefore, these findings could be useful to improve the design or operation of WWTPs.

  17. Diversity and antibiotic resistance of Aeromonas spp. in drinking and waste water treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Figueira, Vânia; Vaz-Moreira, Ivone; Silva, Márcia; Manaia, Célia M

    2011-11-01

    The taxonomic diversity and antibiotic resistance phenotypes of aeromonads were examined in samples from drinking and waste water treatment plants (surface, ground and disinfected water in a drinking water treatment plant, and raw and treated waste water) and tap water. Bacteria identification and intra-species variation were determined based on the analysis of the 16S rRNA, gyrB and cpn60 gene sequences. Resistance phenotypes were determined using the disc diffusion method. Aeromonas veronii prevailed in raw surface water, Aeromonas hydrophyla in ozonated water, and Aeromonas media and Aeromonas puntacta in waste water. No aeromonads were detected in ground water, after the chlorination tank or in tap water. Resistance to ceftazidime or meropenem was detected in isolates from the drinking water treatment plant and waste water isolates were intrinsically resistant to nalidixic acid. Most of the times, quinolone resistance was associated with the gyrA mutation in serine 83. The gene qnrS, but not the genes qnrA, B, C, D or qepA, was detected in both surface and waste water isolates. The gene aac(6')-ib-cr was detected in different waste water strains isolated in the presence of ciprofloxacin. Both quinolone resistance genes were detected only in the species A. media. This is the first study tracking antimicrobial resistance in aeromonads in drinking, tap and waste water and the importance of these bacteria as vectors of resistance in aquatic environments is discussed.

  18. Bioaerosol emissions and detection of airborne antibiotic resistance genes from a wastewater treatment plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Liantong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Xu, Caijia; Dong, Liming; Yao, Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    Air samples from twelve sampling sites (including seven intra-plant sites, one upwind site and four downwind sites) from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing were collected using a Reuter Centrifugal Sampler High Flow (RCS); and their microbial fractions were studied using culturing and high throughput gene sequence. In addition, the viable (fluorescent) bioaerosol concentrations for 7 intra-plant sites were also monitored for 30 min each using an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS). Both air and water samples collected from the plant were investigated for possible bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and integrons using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the air near sludge thickening basin was detected to have the highest level of culturable bacterial aerosols (up to 1697 CFU/m3) and fungal aerosols (up to 930 CFU/m3). For most sampling sites, fluorescent peaks were observed at around 3-4 μm, except the office building with a peak at 1.5 μm, with a number concentration level up to 1233-6533 Particles/m3. About 300 unique bacterial species, including human opportunistic pathogens, such as Comamonas Testosteroni and Moraxella Osloensis, were detected from the air samples collected over the biological reaction basin. In addition, we have detected the sul2 gene resistant to cotrimoxazole (also known as septra, bactrim and TMP-SMX) and class 1 integrase gene from the air samples collected from the screen room and the biological reaction basin. Overall, the screen room, sludge thickening basin and biological reaction basin imposed significant microbial exposure risks, including those from airborne antibiotic resistance genes.

  19. Zolav®: a new antibiotic for the treatment of acne

    PubMed Central

    Dinant, Alexa; Boulos, Ramiz A

    2016-01-01

    Background Acne is a prominent skin condition affecting >80% of teenagers and young adults and ~650 million people globally. Isotretinoin, a vitamin A derivative, is currently the standard of care for treatment. However, it has a well-established teratogenic activity, a reason for the development of novel and low-risk treatment options for acne. Objective To investigate the effectiveness of Zolav®, a novel antibiotic as a treatment for acne vulgaris. Materials and methods Minimum inhibitory concentration of Zolav® against Propionibacterium acnes was determined by following a standard protocol using Mueller-Hinton broth and serial dilutions in a 96-well plate. Cytotoxicity effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells and lung cells in the presence of Zolav® were investigated by determining the growth inhibition (GI50) concentration, total growth inhibition concentration, and the lethal concentration of 50% (LC50). The tryptophan auxotrophic mutant of Escherichia coli strain, WP2 uvrA (ATCC 49979), was used for the AMES assay with the addition of Zolav® tested for its ability to reverse the mutation and induce bacterial growth. The in vivo effectiveness of Zolav® was tested in a P. acnes mouse intradermal model where the skin at the infection site was removed, homogenized, and subjected to colony-forming unit (CFU) counts. Results Susceptibility testing of Zolav® against P. acnes showed a minimum inhibitory concentration of 2 µg/mL against three strains with no cytotoxicity and no mutagenicity observed at the highest concentrations tested, 30 µM and 1,500 µg/plate, respectively. The use of Zolav® at a concentration of 50 µg/mL (q8h) elicited a two-log difference in CFU/g between the treatment group and the control. Conclusion This study demonstrates the potential of Zolav® as a novel treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:27042015

  20. Anaerobic treatment of antibiotic production wastewater pretreated with enhanced hydrolysis: Simultaneous reduction of COD and ARGs.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qizhen; Zhang, Yu; Gao, Yingxin; Tian, Zhe; Yang, Min

    2017-03-01

    The presence of high concentration antibiotics in wastewater can disturb the stability of biological wastewater treatment systems and promote generation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during the treatment. To solve this problem, a pilot system consisting of enhanced hydrolysis pretreatment and an up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor in succession was constructed for treating oxytetracycline production wastewater, and the performance was evaluated in a pharmaceutical factory in comparison with a full-scale anaerobic system operated in parallel. After enhanced hydrolysis under conditions of pH 7 and 85 °C for 6 h, oxytetracycline production wastewater with an influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 11,086 ± 602 mg L(-1) was directly introduced into the pilot UASB reactor. With the effective removal of oxytetracycline and its antibacterial potency (from 874 mg L(-1) to less than 0.61 mg L(-1) and from 900 mg L(-1) to less than 0.84 mg L(-1), respectively) by the enhanced hydrolysis pretreatment, an average COD removal rate of 83.2%, 78.5% and 68.9% was achieved at an organic loading rate of 3.3, 4.8 and 5.9 kg COD m(-3) d(-1), respectively. At the same time, the relative abundances of the total tetracycline (tet) genes and a mobile element (Class 1 integron (intI1)) in anaerobic sludge on day 96 were one order of magnitude lower than those in inoculated sludge on day 0 (P < 0.01). The reduction of ARGs was further demonstrated by metagenomic sequencing. By comparison, the full-scale anaerobic system treating oxytetracycline production wastewater with an influent COD of 3720 ± 128 mg L(-1) after dilution exhibited a COD removal of 51 ± 4% at an organic loading rate (OLR) 1.2 ± 0.2 kg m(-3) d(-1), and a total tet gene abundance in sludge was five times higher than the pilot-scale system (P < 0.01). The above result demonstrated that enhanced hydrolysis as a pretreatment method could enable efficient anaerobic treatment of

  1. Removal of antibiotic resistance genes from wastewater treatment plant effluent by coagulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Lu, Yong-Ze; Zeng, Raymond J; Yu, Han-Qing

    2017-03-15

    Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), as emerging environmental contaminants, have become a threat to human health. Recent studies have demonstrated that the effluent from wastewater treatment plants is a significant point source of ARGs released into the environment. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of coagulation technology in the removal of ARGs from treated wastewater. Specifically, we measured the removal of five ARGs (two sulfonamide resistance genes, sulI and sulII, and three tetracycline resistance genes, tetO, tetW and tetQ) and the class 1 integron intI1 gene via the application of two coagulants: FeCl3 and polyferric chloride (PFC). Moreover, the removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), NH3N and total phosphorus (TP) in the coagulation process was investigated. The coagulation process effectively removed ARGs from the effluent with 0.5-log to 3.1-log reductions. Significant removal correlations were observed between dissolved NH3N and DOC, intI1 and sulI, sulII and tetO, sulII and tetW, and tetO and tetW, implying that the co-removal of DOC, dissolved NH3N, the intI1 gene and different ARGs played an important role in ARG loss during coagulation with Fe-based coagulants. These results indicate that coagulation may play a promising role in ARG reduction in wastewater treatment plants.

  2. Home intravenous antibiotic treatment for febrile episodes in immune-compromised pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Shemesh, E; Yaniv, I; Drucker, M; Hadad, S; Goshen, Y; Stein, J; Ash, S; Fisher, S; Zaizov, R

    1998-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the feasibility of home intravenous antibiotic treatment (HIAT) for febrile episodes in immune-compromised (neutropenic, splenectomized), low-risk pediatric patients. Thirty hematology-oncology patients who presented to our emergency room from January 1993 to January 1995 and who suffered from a febrile episode and were considered at low risk for septic complications were immediately discharged on HIAT. Patients were followed for at least 3 weeks after recovery. Patients and parents were retrospectively questioned about adverse effects and about their degree of satisfaction with home treatment. Patients who required hospitalization during this period were considered unresponsive to HIAT and were analyzed for causes and adverse effects. Thirteen out of 60 (22%) febrile episodes, or eight out of 42 (19%) episodes of fever and neutropenia eventually led to hospitalization. Pseudomonas species infections were associated with the highest rate of unresponsiveness (88%). A central venous catheter infection developed in two cases following HIAT (two cases out of 640 days of therapy). No other complications were identified. No infection-related morbidity was observed. Patients and parents were highly satisfied with HIAT and wanted to use it again, if necessary. Immediate discharge on HIAT for low-risk pediatric immune-compromised patients suffering from a febrile episode is feasible, safe, and well accepted by patients and families. Patients who are found to have Pseudomonas infections should probably be hospitalized. Our results are preliminary and must be confirmed by a prospective, randomized trial before definite recommendations can be made.

  3. [Duration of treatment and oral administrad on of antibiotics in community acquired pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Bernal-Vargas, Mónica A; Cortés, Jorge A

    2016-04-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, with high treatment costs due to hospitalization and complications (adverse events due to medications, antibiotic resistance, healthcare associated infections, etc.). It has been proposed administration of short courses and early switch of intravenous administration to oral therapy to avoid costs and complications. There are recommendations about these topics in national and intemational guidelines, based on clinical trials which do not demónstrate diffe-rences in mortality and complications when there is an early change from intravenous administration to the oral route. There are no statistically significant differences in safety and resolution of the disease when short and long treatment schemes were compared. In this review we present the most important guidelines and clinical studies, taking into account the pharmacological differences between different medications. It is considered that early switch from intravenous to oral administration route and use of short cycles in CAP is safe and brings benefits to patients and institutions.

  4. Appropriateness of antibiotic treatment in intravenous drug users, a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Dominik; Viktorin, Nina; Wolbers, Marcel; Laifer, Gerd; Leimenstoll, Bernd; Fluckiger, Ursula; Battegay, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    patients died: 6.4% died during hospitalization (1.2% infection-related) and 13.6% of patients died after discharge. Conclusion Appropriate antibiotic therapy according to standard guidelines in hospitalized intravenous drug users is generally practicable and successful. In a minority alternative treatments may be indicated, although associated with a higher risk of relapse. PMID:18387181

  5. A New, Potent, and Placenta-Permeable Macrolide Antibiotic, Solithromycin, for the Prevention and Treatment of Bacterial Infections in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Keelan, Jeffrey A.; Payne, Matthew S.; Kemp, Matthew W.; Ireland, Demelza J.; Newnham, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Intrauterine infection–inflammation is a major cause of early preterm birth and subsequent neonatal mortality and acute or long-term morbidity. Antibiotics can be administered in pregnancy to prevent preterm birth either prophylactically to women at high risk for preterm delivery, or to women with diagnosed intrauterine infection, prelabor rupture of membranes, or in suspected preterm labor. The therapeutic goals of each of these scenarios are different, with different pharmacological considerations, although effective antimicrobial therapy is an essential requirement. An ideal antibiotic for these clinical indications would be (a) one that is easily administered and orally bioactive, (b) has a favorable adverse effect profile (devoid of reproductive toxicity or teratogenicity), (c) is effective against the wide range of microorganisms known to be commonly associated with intra-amniotic infection, (d) provides effective antimicrobial protection within both the fetal and amniotic compartments after maternal delivery, (e) has anti-inflammatory properties, and (f) is effective against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Here, we review the evidence from clinical, animal, and ex vivo/in vitro studies that demonstrate that a new macrolide-derived antibiotic – solithromycin – has all of these properties and, hence, may be an ideal antibiotic for the treatment and prevention of intrauterine infection-­related pregnancy complications. While this evidence is extremely encouraging, it is still preliminary. A number of key studies need to be completed before solithromycin’s true potential for use in pregnancy can be ascertained. PMID:27066004

  6. Native valve Proteus mirabilis endocarditis: successful treatment of a rare entity formulated by in vitro synergy antibiotic testing

    PubMed Central

    Brotzki, Caroline R; Mergenhagen, Kari A; Bulman, Zackery P; Tsuji, Brian T; Berenson, Charles S

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Infective endocarditis caused by Proteus mirabilis is a rare and poorly reported disease, with no well-defined effective antibiotic regimen. Here, we present a case of P. mirabilis aortic valve endocarditis. We reviewed prior cases and treatment regimens, and devised effective treatment, which was guided by in vitro sensitivity and synergy testing on the pathogen. Our patient survived without complications or the need for a surgical intervention. PMID:27797858

  7. Native valve Proteus mirabilis endocarditis: successful treatment of a rare entity formulated by in vitro synergy antibiotic testing.

    PubMed

    Brotzki, Caroline R; Mergenhagen, Kari A; Bulman, Zackery P; Tsuji, Brian T; Berenson, Charles S

    2016-10-20

    Infective endocarditis caused by Proteus mirabilis is a rare and poorly reported disease, with no well-defined effective antibiotic regimen. Here, we present a case of P. mirabilis aortic valve endocarditis. We reviewed prior cases and treatment regimens, and devised effective treatment, which was guided by in vitro sensitivity and synergy testing on the pathogen. Our patient survived without complications or the need for a surgical intervention.

  8. Are we adequately preparing the next generation of physicians to prescribe exercise as prevention and treatment? Residents express the desire for more training in exercise prescription

    PubMed Central

    Solmundson, Kara; Koehle, Michael; McKenzie, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is a key intervention for chronic disease, yet few physicians provide exercise prescription (EP). EP is an important component in larger strategies of reducing non-communicable disease (NCD). Our objective was to assess Family Medicine Residents (FMR) knowledge, competence, and perspectives of EP to help inform future curriculum development. Methods A 49-item cross-sectional survey was administered to 396 University of British Columbia FMR. Residents’ EP knowledge, competence, attitudes/beliefs, current practices, personal physical activity levels, and perspectives of training were assessed using, primarily, a 7-point Likert scale. Results The response rate was 80.6% (319/396). After eliminating 25 that failed to meet the inclusion criteria, 294 were included in the final analysis. The majority 95.6% of FMR reported EP as important in their future practice, despite having low knowledge of the Canadian PA Guidelines (mean score 1.77/4), low self-reported competence prescribing exercise as prevention (mean score 13.35/21), and rating themselves “somewhat incompetent” prescribing exercise to patients with chronic disease (mean score 11.26/21). FMR believe PA is integral to their patients’ health (98.0%), sedentary behaviour is harmful (97.9%), and feel a responsibility to discuss PA with patients (99.7%). Few FMR (14.9%) perceived their training in EP as adequate and 91.0% desire more. Conclusions FMR report EP is important, yet do not perceive they are sufficiently prepared to provide EP. In future curricular development, medical educators should consider residents’ low knowledge, competence, perceived program support, and their expressed desire for more training in exercise prescription. PMID:28344695

  9. Host-dependent Induction of Transient Antibiotic Resistance: A Prelude to Treatment Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z.; Heithoff, Douglas M.; Ersoy, Selvi C.; Shimp, William R.; House, John K.; Marth, Jamey D.; Smith, Jeffrey W.; Mahan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Current antibiotic testing does not include the potential influence of host cell environment on microbial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance, hindering appropriate therapeutic intervention. We devised a strategy to identify the presence of host–pathogen interactions that alter antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings revealed a bacterial mechanism that promotes antibiotic resistance in vivo at concentrations of drug that far exceed dosages determined by standardized antimicrobial testing. This mechanism has escaped prior detection because it is reversible and operates within a subset of host tissues and cells. Bacterial pathogens are thereby protected while their survival promotes the emergence of permanent drug resistance. This host-dependent mechanism of transient antibiotic resistance is applicable to multiple pathogens and has implications for the development of more effective antimicrobial therapies. PMID:26501114

  10. Host-dependent Induction of Transient Antibiotic Resistance: A Prelude to Treatment Failure.

    PubMed

    Kubicek-Sutherland, Jessica Z; Heithoff, Douglas M; Ersoy, Selvi C; Shimp, William R; House, John K; Marth, Jamey D; Smith, Jeffrey W; Mahan, Michael J

    2015-09-01

    Current antibiotic testing does not include the potential influence of host cell environment on microbial susceptibility and antibiotic resistance, hindering appropriate therapeutic intervention. We devised a strategy to identify the presence of host-pathogen interactions that alter antibiotic efficacy in vivo. Our findings revealed a bacterial mechanism that promotes antibiotic resistance in vivo at concentrations of drug that far exceed dosages determined by standardized antimicrobial testing. This mechanism has escaped prior detection because it is reversible and operates within a subset of host tissues and cells. Bacterial pathogens are thereby protected while their survival promotes the emergence of permanent drug resistance. This host-dependent mechanism of transient antibiotic resistance is applicable to multiple pathogens and has implications for the development of more effective antimicrobial therapies.

  11. Photodynamic Treatment versus Antibiotic Treatment on Helicobacter pylori Using RAPD-PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Batanouny, M. H.; Amin, R. M.; Ibrahium, M. K.; El Gohary, S.; Naga, M. I.; Salama, M. S.

    2009-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic bacterial infections in humans and is important in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal disease, such as duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, Gastric adenocarcinoma, and lymphoma. Gastric adenocarcinoma remains one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of photodynamic treatment and medication treatment of Helicobacter pylori using RAPD-PCR. The lethal photosensitization effect was determined by mixing suspensions of H.pylori with Toluidine blue O (TBO) and plating out on blood agar before irradiation with Helium neon (He-Ne) 632.8 nm. The susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori isolates to metronidazole and azithromycin were examined by E-test. Nine random primers were used to screen genetic polymorphism in DNA of different H.pylori groups. Six of them produced RAPD products while three failed to generate any product. The resulting data showed that, although the overall genetic differences between control groups and laser treated groups was higher than that between control groups and azithromycin treated groups yet it still law genetic variability. The main cause of cell death of PDT using TBO as a photosensitizer was mainly cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane.

  12. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  13. Antibiotic resistance genes fate and removal by a technological treatment solution for water reuse in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Luprano, Maria Laura; De Sanctis, Marco; Del Moro, Guido; Di Iaconi, Claudio; Lopez, Antonio; Levantesi, Caterina

    2016-11-15

    In order to mitigate the potential effects on the human health which are associated to the use of treated wastewater in agriculture, antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) are required to be carefully monitored in wastewater reuse processes and their spread should be prevented by the development of efficient treatment technologies. Objective of this study was the assessment of ARGs reduction efficiencies of a novel technological treatment solution for agricultural reuse of municipal wastewaters. The proposed solution comprises an advanced biological treatment (Sequencing Batch Biofilter Granular Reactor, SBBGR), analysed both al laboratory and pilot scale, followed by sand filtration and two different disinfection final stages: ultraviolet light (UV) radiation and peracetic acid (PAA) treatments. By Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), the presence of 9 ARGs (ampC, mecA, ermB, sul1, sul2, tetA, tetO, tetW, vanA) were analysed and by quantitative PCR (qPCR) their removal was determined. The obtained results were compared to the reduction of total bacteria (16S rDNA gene) and of a faecal contamination indicator (Escherichia coli uidA gene). Only four of the analysed genes (ermB, sul1, sul2, tetA) were detected in raw wastewater and their abundance was estimated to be 3.4±0.7 x10(4) - 9.6±0.5 x10(9) and 1.0±0.3 x10(3) to 3.0±0.1 x10(7) gene copies/mL in raw and treated wastewaters, respectively. The results show that SBBGR technology is promising for the reduction of ARGs, achieving stable removal performance ranging from 1.0±0.4 to 2.8±0.7 log units, which is comparable to or higher than that reported for conventional activated sludge treatments. No reduction of the ARGs amount normalized to the total bacteria content (16S rDNA), was instead obtained, indicating that these genes are removed together with total bacteria and not specifically eliminated. Enhanced ARGs removal was obtained by sand filtration, while no reduction was achieved by both UV and PAA disinfection

  14. Appendicitis during pregnancy in a Greenlandic Inuit woman; antibiotic treatment as a bridge-to-surgery in a remote area.

    PubMed

    Dalsgaard Jensen, Trine; Penninga, Luit

    2016-05-18

    Appendicitis during pregnancy causes severe diagnostic problems, and is associated with an increase in perforation rate and morbidity compared to that in the normal population. In addition, it may cause preterm birth and fetal loss. In remote areas, appendicitis during pregnancy, besides presenting diagnostic problems, also creates treatment difficulties. In Northern Greenland, geographical distances are vast, and weather conditions can be extreme. We report a case of a Greenlandic Inuit woman who presented with appendicitis during pregnancy. The nearest hospital with surgical and anaesthetic care was located nearly 1200 km away, and, due to extreme weather conditions, she could not be transferred immediately. She was treated with intravenous antibiotic treatment, and after weather conditions had improved, she was transferred by aeroplane and underwent appendicectomy. She recovered without complications. Our case suggests that appendicitis during pregnancy may be treated with antibiotics in remote areas until surgical treatment is available.

  15. Antibiotics for gram-positive organisms.

    PubMed

    Pagan, F S

    1981-01-01

    Most infections due to Gram-positive organisms can be treated with quite a small number of antibiotics. Penicillin, cloxacillin, and erythromycin should be enough to cover 90 per cent of Gram-positive infections. The relatively narrow spectrum of these drugs should be the incentive to prescribers to use them selectively, together with adequate bacteriological investigation, in order to achieve effective treatment with a minimum of disturbance to the patient's normal bacterial flora and without any other harmful side effects.

  16. Efficient removal of antibiotics in surface-flow constructed wetlands, with no observed impact on antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Björn; Khan, Ghazanfar Ali; Weisner, Stefan E B; Ehde, Per Magnus; Fick, Jerker; Lindgren, Per-Eric

    2014-04-01

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about pharmaceuticals including antibiotics as environmental contaminants. Antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater have been suggested to affect bacterial population dynamics and to promote dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Conventional wastewater treatment processes do not always adequately remove pharmaceuticals causing environmental dissemination of low levels of these compounds. Using constructed wetlands as an additional treatment step after sewage treatment plants have been proposed as a cheap alternative to increase reduction of wastewater contaminants, however this means that the natural microbial community of the wetlands becomes exposed to elevated levels of antibiotics. In this study, experimental surface-flow wetlands in Sweden were continuously exposed to antibiotics of concentrations commonly encountered in wastewater. The aim was to assess the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands and to evaluate the impact of low levels of antibiotics on bacterial diversity, resistance development and expression in the wetland bacterial community. Antibiotic concentrations were measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and the effect on the bacterial diversity was assessed with 16S rRNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Real-time PCR was used to detect and quantify antibiotic resistance genes and integrons in the wetlands, during and after the exposure period. The results indicated that the antibiotic removal efficiency of constructed wetlands was comparable to conventional wastewater treatment schemes. Furthermore, short-term treatment of the constructed wetlands with environmentally relevant concentrations (i.e. 100-2000 ng×l(-1)) of antibiotics did not significantly affect resistance gene concentrations, suggesting that surface-flow constructed wetlands are well-suited for wastewater treatment purposes.

  17. Do parents of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) receive adequate information about the disorder and its treatments? A qualitative investigation

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Rana; Borst, Jacqueline M; Yong, Cheng Wei; Aslani, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent pediatric neurodevelopmental condition, commonly treated using pharmacological agents such as stimulant medicines. The use of these agents remains contentious, placing parents in a difficult position when deciding to initiate and/or continue their child’s treatment. Parents refer to a range of information sources to assist with their treatment decision-making. This qualitative study aimed to investigate 1) parents’ ADHD-related knowledge pre- and post-diagnosis, 2) the information sources accessed by parents, 3) whether parents’ information needs were met post-diagnosis, and 4) parents’ views about strategies to meet their information needs. Methods Three focus groups (n=16 parents), each lasting 1.0–1.5 hours were conducted. Focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method, coded, and categorized into themes. Results Generally, parents had limited ADHD-related knowledge prior to their child’s diagnosis and perceived prescription medicines indicated for ADHD in a negative context. Parents reported improved knowledge after their child’s diagnosis; however, they expressed dissatisfaction with information that they accessed, which was often technical and not tailored to their child’s needs. Verbal information sought from health care professionals was viewed to be reliable but generally medicine-focused and not necessarily comprehensive. Parents identified a need for concise, tailored information about ADHD, the medicines used for its treatment, and changes to their child’s medication needs with age. They also expressed a desire for increased availability of support groups and tools to assist them in sourcing information from health care professionals during consultations, such as question prompt lists. Conclusion There are gaps in parents’ knowledge about ADHD and its treatment, and an expressed need for

  18. Treatment of infected tibial nonunions with debridement, antibiotic beads, and the Ilizarov method.

    PubMed

    McHale, Kathleen A; Ross, Amy E

    2004-09-01

    This study of 10 patients presents the early results of a protocol of debridement, antibiotic bead placement, and use of the Ilizarov method with a circular external fixator for treatment of infected nonunions of the tibia in a military population. The nonunions resulted from high-energy fractures in nine cases and an osteotomy in one. The Ilizarov techniques used were transport (five cases), shortening and secondary lengthening (two cases), minimal resection with compression (one case), and resection with bone grafting (two cases). Flap coverage was required for five patients. There were two recurrences of infection (20%) among patients with the most compromised soft tissue. Only 50% of patients were able to perform limited duties while wearing the external fixator. Only four patients returned to active duty; however, three patients from special operations units were able to return to jump status. Six patients underwent medical retirement because of insufficient function, resulting from decreased ankle or knee range of motion and arthrosis or muscle weakness.

  19. Shift in antibiotic resistance gene profiles associated with nanosilver during wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yanjun; Metch, Jacob W; Yang, Ying; Pruden, Amy; Zhang, Tong

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the response of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to nanosilver (Ag) in lab-scale nitrifying sequencing batch reactors (SBRs), compared to Ag(+)-dosed and undosed controls. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) targeting sul1, tet(O), ermB and the class I integron gene intI1 and corresponding RNA expression did not indicate measureable effects of nanoAg or Ag(+) on abundance or expression of these genes. However, high-throughput sequencing based metagenomic analysis provided a much broader profile of gene responses and revealed a greater abundance of aminoglycoside resistance genes (mainly strA) in reactors dosed with nanoAg. In contrast, bacitracin and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistance genes were more abundant in the SBRs dosed with Ag(+). The distinct ARG profiles associated with nanoAg and Ag(+) were correlated with the taxonomic composition of the microbial communities. This study indicates that nanoAg may interact with bacteria differently from Ag(+) during biological wastewater treatment. Therefore, it cannot necessarily be assumed that nanosilver behaves identically as Ag(+) when conducting a risk assessment for release into the environment.

  20. Genotoxicity of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment: formation and QSAR simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wei, Dongbin; Du, Yuguo

    2016-10-01

    Lots of unexpected disinfection by-products were formed during the chlorination disinfection of contaminated water bodies, leading to a potential threat to human health and ecological safety. In this study, SOS/umu assay was used to trace the genotoxicity variation of 20 quinolone compounds during the chlorination disinfection. Furthermore, two- and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship models were developed based on the electronic and hydrophobic properties of the quinolones, which were used to quantify the impact of the different structural features of the compounds on their genotoxicity variation. The results revealed that quinolones bearing hydrophilic substituents with less H-bond donors and negative charge at the 1-position of the quinolone ring exhibited a positive correlation with genotoxicity elevation. More notably, the chlorination of quinolones in both ultrapure water and secondary effluent matrices provided comparable levels of genotoxicity, indicating that our research could potentially be used to evaluate the environmental risk of quinolone antibiotics in chlorination disinfection treatment.

  1. Finding alternatives to antibiotics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires new treatments. The availability of new antibiotics has severely declined, and so alternatives to antibiotics need to be considered in both animal agriculture and human medicine. Products for disease prevention are different than products for d...

  2. Antibiotic resistant in microorganisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial agents are necessary for use in veterinary medicine including the production of food producing animals. Antibiotic use is indicated for the treatment of bacterial target organisms and/or disease for which the antibiotic was developed. However, an unintended consequence of antibiotic ...

  3. Clinical Impact of MALDI-TOF MS Identification and Rapid Susceptibility Testing on Adequate Antimicrobial Treatment in Sepsis with Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Verroken, Alexia; Defourny, Lydwine; le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Belkhir, Leïla; Laterre, Pierre-François; Delmée, Michel; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-01-01

    Shortening the turn-around time (TAT) of positive blood culture (BC) identification (ID) and susceptibility results is essential to optimize antimicrobial treatment in patients with sepsis. We aimed to evaluate the impact on antimicrobial prescription of a modified workflow of positive BCs providing ID and partial susceptibility results for Enterobacteriaceae (EB), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on the day of BC positivity detection. This study was divided into a pre-intervention period (P0) with a standard BC workflow followed by 2 intervention periods (P1, P2) with an identical modified workflow. ID was performed with MALDI-TOF MS from blood, on early or on overnight subcultures. According to ID results, rapid phenotypic assays were realized to detect third generation cephalosporin resistant EB/P. aeruginosa or methicillin resistant S. aureus. Results were transmitted to the antimicrobial stewardship team for patient’s treatment revision. Times to ID, to susceptibility results and to optimal antimicrobial treatment (OAT) were compared across the three study periods. Overall, 134, 112 and 154 positive BC episodes in P0, P1 and P2 respectively were included in the analysis. Mean time to ID (28.3 hours in P0) was reduced by 65.3% in P1 (10.2 hours) and 61.8% in P2 (10.8 hours). Mean time to complete susceptibility results was reduced by 27.5% in P1 and 27% in P2, with results obtained after 32.4 and 32.6 hours compared to 44.7 hours in P0. Rapid tests allowed partial susceptibility results to be obtained after a mean time of 11.8 hours in P1 and 11.7 hours in P2. Mean time to OAT was decreased to 21.6 hours in P1 and to 17.9 hours in P2 compared to 36.1 hours in P0. Reducing TAT of positive BC with MALDI-TOF MS ID and rapid susceptibility testing accelerated prescription of targeted antimicrobial treatment thereby potentially improving the patients’ clinical outcome. PMID:27228001

  4. Clinical Impact of MALDI-TOF MS Identification and Rapid Susceptibility Testing on Adequate Antimicrobial Treatment in Sepsis with Positive Blood Cultures.

    PubMed

    Verroken, Alexia; Defourny, Lydwine; le Polain de Waroux, Olivier; Belkhir, Leïla; Laterre, Pierre-François; Delmée, Michel; Glupczynski, Youri

    2016-01-01

    Shortening the turn-around time (TAT) of positive blood culture (BC) identification (ID) and susceptibility results is essential to optimize antimicrobial treatment in patients with sepsis. We aimed to evaluate the impact on antimicrobial prescription of a modified workflow of positive BCs providing ID and partial susceptibility results for Enterobacteriaceae (EB), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus on the day of BC positivity detection. This study was divided into a pre-intervention period (P0) with a standard BC workflow followed by 2 intervention periods (P1, P2) with an identical modified workflow. ID was performed with MALDI-TOF MS from blood, on early or on overnight subcultures. According to ID results, rapid phenotypic assays were realized to detect third generation cephalosporin resistant EB/P. aeruginosa or methicillin resistant S. aureus. Results were transmitted to the antimicrobial stewardship team for patient's treatment revision. Times to ID, to susceptibility results and to optimal antimicrobial treatment (OAT) were compared across the three study periods. Overall, 134, 112 and 154 positive BC episodes in P0, P1 and P2 respectively were included in the analysis. Mean time to ID (28.3 hours in P0) was reduced by 65.3% in P1 (10.2 hours) and 61.8% in P2 (10.8 hours). Mean time to complete susceptibility results was reduced by 27.5% in P1 and 27% in P2, with results obtained after 32.4 and 32.6 hours compared to 44.7 hours in P0. Rapid tests allowed partial susceptibility results to be obtained after a mean time of 11.8 hours in P1 and 11.7 hours in P2. Mean time to OAT was decreased to 21.6 hours in P1 and to 17.9 hours in P2 compared to 36.1 hours in P0. Reducing TAT of positive BC with MALDI-TOF MS ID and rapid susceptibility testing accelerated prescription of targeted antimicrobial treatment thereby potentially improving the patients' clinical outcome.

  5. Mass flow of antibiotics in a wastewater treatment plant focusing on removal variations due to operational parameters.

    PubMed

    Marx, Conrad; Günther, Norbert; Schubert, Sara; Oertel, Reinhard; Ahnert, Markus; Krebs, Peter; Kuehn, Volker

    2015-12-15

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are not designed to purposefully eliminate antibiotics and therefore many previous investigations have been carried out to assess their fate in biological wastewater treatment processes. In order to consolidate previous findings regarding influencing factors like the solid and hydraulic retention time an intensive monitoring was carried out in a municipal WWTP in Germany. Over a period of 12months daily samples were taken from the in- and effluent as well as diverse sludge streams. The 14 selected antibiotics and one metabolite cover the following classes: cephalosporins, diaminopyrimidines, fluoroquinolones, lincosamide, macrolides, penicillins, sulfonamides and tetracyclines. Out of the 15 investigated substances, the removal of only clindamycin and ciprofloxacin show significant correlations to SRT, temperature, HRT and nitrogen removal. The dependency of clindamycin's removal could be related to the significant negative removal (i.e. production) of clindamycin in the treatment process and was corrected using the human metabolite clindamycin-sulfoxide. The average elimination was adjusted from -225% to 3% which suggests that clindamycin can be considered as an inert substance during the wastewater treatment process. Based on the presented data, the mass flow analysis revealed that macrolides, clindamycin/clindamycin-sulfoxide and trimethoprim were mainly released with the effluent, while penicillins, cephalosporins as well as sulfamethoxazole were partly degraded in the studied WWTP. Furthermore, levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin are the only antibiotics under investigation with a significant mass fraction bound to primary, excess and digested sludge. Nevertheless, the sludge concentrations are highly inconsistent which leads to questionable results. It remains unclear whether the inconsistencies are due to insufficiencies in sampling and/or analytical determination or if the fluctuations can be considered reasonable for

  6. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... lives. But there is a growing problem of antibiotic resistance. It happens when bacteria change and become able ... resistant to several common antibiotics. To help prevent antibiotic resistance Don't use antibiotics for viruses like colds ...

  7. Effects of antenna placement and antibiotic treatment on loss of simulated transmitters and mortality in hybrid striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isely, J.J.; Young, S.P.; Jones, T.A.; Schaffler, James J.

    2002-01-01

    We compared the effects of two antenna placements (trailing and nontrailing) and antibiotic treatments (treated and nontreated) on mortality and transmitter loss in hybrid striped bass Morone saxatilis ?? M. chrysops (364 ?? 28 mm total length, 645 ?? 129 g [mean ?? SD]) implanted with simulated transmitters and held in the laboratory for 90 d. Although antibiotic treatment significantly increased the time to first mortality in fish surgically implanted with simulated transmitters (by an average of 14 d), we did not detect an effect on cumulative mortality. We also did not detect an effect of antenna type on the time to first mortality, but cumulative mortality was higher in the trailing antenna groups (50%) than in the nontrailing antenna groups (12%). Three transmitters were expelled during the study, all from trailing-antenna treatment groups, indicating a significant effect of antenna placement on the level of transmitter expulsion. Antibiotic treatment appears to be effective in preventing initial postsurgical infection; however, the antenna may serve as a continuous source of irritation and route of infection into the body cavity. The potential for infection and mortality in experimental animals must be weighed against the improved performance of transmitters with trailing antennas.

  8. Optimizing Antibiotic Dosing Strategies for the Treatment of Gram-negative Infections in the Era of Resistance.

    PubMed

    Monogue, Marguerite L; Kuti, Joseph L; Nicolau, David P

    2016-01-01

    Gram-negative organisms are an increasing source of concern within the healthcare setting due to their common presence as a cause of infection and emerging resistance to current therapies. However, current antimicrobial dosing recommendations may be insufficient for the treatment of gram-negative infections. Applying knowledge of an antibiotic's pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profile when designing a dosing regimen leads to a greater likelihood of achieving optimal exposure, including against gram-negative pathogens with higher MICs. Additionally, administering antibiotics directly to the site of infection, such as via aerosolization for pneumonia, is another method to achieve optimized drug exposure at the site of infection. Incorporating these treatment strategies into clinical practice will assist antimicrobial stewardship programs in successfully treating gram-negative infections.

  9. Distribution of antibiotic resistance in the effluents of ten municipal wastewater treatment plants in China and the effect of treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Ben, Weiwei; Wang, Jian; Cao, Rukun; Yang, Min; Zhang, Yu; Qiang, Zhimin

    2017-04-01

    Municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents represent an important contamination source of antibiotic resistance, threatening the ecological safety of receiving environments. In this study, the release of antibiotic resistance to sulfonamides and tetracyclines in the effluents of ten WWTPs in China was investigated. Results indicate that the concentrations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) ranged from 1.1 × 10(1) to 8.9 × 10(3) CFU mL(-1) and 3.6 × 10(1) (tetW) to 5.4 × 10(6) (tetX) copies mL(-1), respectively. There were insignificant correlations of the concentrations of ARB and ARGs with those of corresponding antibiotics. Strong correlations were observed between the total concentrations of tetracycline resistance genes and sulfonamide resistance genes, and both of which were significantly correlated with intI1 concentrations. Statistical analysis of the effluent ARG concentrations in different WWTPs revealed an important role of disinfection in eliminating antibiotic resistance. The release rates of ARB and ARGs through the effluents of ten WWTPs ranged from 5.9 × 10(12) to 4.8 × 10(15) CFU d(-1) and 6.4 × 10(12) (tetW) to 1.7 × 10(18) (sul1) copies d(-1), respectively. This study helps the effective assessment and scientific management of ecological risks induced by antibiotic resistance discharged from WWTPs.

  10. The Composition and Spatial Patterns of Bacterial Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in 19 Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bing; Xia, Yu; Wen, Xianghua; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance are of concern for environmental safety and public health. Accumulating evidence suggests that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are as an important sink and source of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Virulence genes (encoding virulence factors) are good indicators for bacterial pathogenic potentials. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathogenic potentials and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs, bacterial virulence genes and ARGs in 19 WWTPs covering a majority of latitudinal zones of China were surveyed by using GeoChip 4.2. A total of 1610 genes covering 13 virulence factors and 1903 genes belonging to 11 ARG families were detected respectively. The bacterial virulence genes exhibited significant spatial distribution patterns of a latitudinal biodiversity gradient and a distance-decay relationship across China. Moreover, virulence genes tended to coexist with ARGs as shown by their strongly positive associations. In addition, key environmental factors shaping the overall virulence gene structure were identified. This study profiles the occurrence, composition and distribution of virulence genes and ARGs in current WWTPs in China, and uncovers spatial patterns and important environmental variables shaping their structure, which may provide the basis for further studies of bacterial virulence factors and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs. PMID:27907117

  11. Acquired Genetic Mechanisms of a Multiresistant Bacterium Isolated from a Treatment Plant Receiving Wastewater from Antibiotic Production

    PubMed Central

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R. B.; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Larsson, D. G. Joakim

    2013-01-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24038701

  12. Acquired genetic mechanisms of a multiresistant bacterium isolated from a treatment plant receiving wastewater from antibiotic production.

    PubMed

    Johnning, Anna; Moore, Edward R B; Svensson-Stadler, Liselott; Shouche, Yogesh S; Larsson, D G Joakim; Kristiansson, Erik

    2013-12-01

    The external environment, particularly wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), where environmental bacteria meet human commensals and pathogens in large numbers, has been highlighted as a potential breeding ground for antibiotic resistance. We have isolated the extensively drug-resistant Ochrobactrum intermedium CCUG 57381 from an Indian WWTP receiving industrial wastewater from pharmaceutical production contaminated with high levels of quinolones. Antibiotic susceptibility testing against 47 antibiotics showed that the strain was 4 to >500 times more resistant to sulfonamides, quinolones, tetracyclines, macrolides, and the aminoglycoside streptomycin than the type strain O. intermedium LMG 3301T. Whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in the Indian strain causing amino acid substitutions in the target enzymes of quinolones. We also characterized three acquired regions containing resistance genes to sulfonamides (sul1), tetracyclines [tet(G) and tetR], and chloramphenicol/florfenicol (floR). Furthermore, the Indian strain harbored acquired mechanisms for horizontal gene transfer, including a type I mating pair-forming system (MPFI), a MOBP relaxase, and insertion sequence transposons. Our results highlight that WWTPs serving antibiotic manufacturing may provide nearly ideal conditions for the recruitment of resistance genes into human commensal and pathogenic bacteria.

  13. The Composition and Spatial Patterns of Bacterial Virulence Factors and Antibiotic Resistance Genes in 19 Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Xia, Yu; Wen, Xianghua; Wang, Xiaohui; Yang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Jizhong; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity and antibiotic resistance are of concern for environmental safety and public health. Accumulating evidence suggests that wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are as an important sink and source of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Virulence genes (encoding virulence factors) are good indicators for bacterial pathogenic potentials. To achieve a comprehensive understanding of bacterial pathogenic potentials and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs, bacterial virulence genes and ARGs in 19 WWTPs covering a majority of latitudinal zones of China were surveyed by using GeoChip 4.2. A total of 1610 genes covering 13 virulence factors and 1903 genes belonging to 11 ARG families were detected respectively. The bacterial virulence genes exhibited significant spatial distribution patterns of a latitudinal biodiversity gradient and a distance-decay relationship across China. Moreover, virulence genes tended to coexist with ARGs as shown by their strongly positive associations. In addition, key environmental factors shaping the overall virulence gene structure were identified. This study profiles the occurrence, composition and distribution of virulence genes and ARGs in current WWTPs in China, and uncovers spatial patterns and important environmental variables shaping their structure, which may provide the basis for further studies of bacterial virulence factors and antibiotic resistance in WWTPs.

  14. Long-term effects of antibiotics on the elimination of chemical oxygen demand, nitrification, and viable bacteria in laboratory-scale wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susan; Winter, Josef; Gallert, Claudia

    2012-10-01

    Antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals are contaminants of the environment because of their widespread use and incomplete removal by microorganisms during wastewater treatment. The influence of a mixture of ciprofloxacin (CIP), gentamicin (GM), sulfamethoxazole (SMZ)/trimethoprim (TMP), and vancomycin (VA), up to a final concentration of 40 mg/L, on the elimination of chemical oxygen demand (COD), nitrification, and survival of bacteria, as well as the elimination of the antibiotics, was assessed in a long-term study in laboratory treatment plants (LTPs). In the presence of 30 mg/L antibiotics, nitrification of artificial sewage by activated sludge ended at nitrite. Nitrate formation was almost completely inhibited. No nitrification at all was possible in the presence of 40 mg/L antibiotics. The nitrifiers were more sensitive to antibiotics than heterotrophic bacteria. COD elimination in antibiotic-stressed LTPs was not influenced by ≤20 mg/L antibiotics. Addition of 30 mg/L antibiotic mixture decreased COD removal efficiency for a period, but the LTPs recovered. Similar results were obtained with 40 mg/L antibiotic mixture. The total viable count of bacteria was not affected negatively by the antibiotics. It ranged from 2.2 × 10(6) to 8.2 × 10(6) colony-forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) compared with the control at 1.4 × 10(6)-6.3 × 10(6) CFU/mL. Elimination of the four antibiotics during phases of 2.4-30 mg/L from the liquid was high for GM (70-90 %), much lower for VA, TMP, and CIP (0-50 %), and highly fluctuating for SMZ (0-95 %). The antibiotics were mainly adsorbed to the sludge and not biodegraded.

  15. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gueimonde, Miguel; Sánchez, Borja; G. de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Margolles, Abelardo

    2013-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue. PMID:23882264

  16. Soil-borne reservoirs of antibiotic-resistant bacteria are established following therapeutic treatment of dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinxin; Zhao, Zhe; Orfe, Lisa; Subbiah, Murugan; Call, Douglas R

    2016-02-01

    We determined if antibiotics residues that are excreted from treated animals can contribute to persistence of resistant bacteria in agricultural environments. Administration of ceftiofur, a third-generation cephalosporin, resulted in a ∼ 3 log increase in ceftiofur-resistant Escherichia coli found in the faeces and pen soils by day 10 (P = 0.005). This resistant population quickly subsided in faeces, but was sustained in the pen soil (∼ 4.5 log bacteria g(-1)) throughout the trial (1 month). Florfenicol treatment resulted in a similar pattern although the loss of florfenicol-resistant E. coli was slower for faeces and remained stable at ∼ 6 log bacteria g(-1) in the soil. Calves were treated in pens where eGFP-labelled E. coli were present in the bedding (∼ 2 log g(-1)) resulting in amplification of the eGFP E. coli population ∼ 2.1 log more than eGFP E. coli populations in pens with untreated calves (day 4; P < 0.005). Excreted residues accounted for > 10-fold greater contribution to the bedding reservoir compared with shedding of resistant bacteria in faeces. Treatment with therapeutic doses of ceftiofur or florfenicol resulted in 2-3 log g(-1) more bacteria than the estimated ID50 (2.83 CFU g(-1)), consistent with a soil-borne reservoir emerging after antibiotic treatment that can contribute to the long-term persistence of antibiotic resistance in animal agriculture.

  17. In Vivo Selection of Pan-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii during Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoonjung; Bae, Il Kwon; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Colistin resistance in Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) is mediated by a complete loss of lipopolysaccharide production via mutations in lpxA, lpxC, and lpxD gene or lipid A modifications via mutations in the pmrA and pmrB genes. However, the exact mechanism of therapy-induced colistin resistance in A. baumannii is not well understood. Materials and Methods We investigated the genotypic and phenotypic changes that underlie pan-drug resistance mechanisms by determining differences between the alterations in extensively drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii (AB001 and AB002) isolates and a pan-drug resistant (PDR) counterpart (AB003) recovered from one patient before and after antibiotic treatment, respectively. Results All three clinical isolates shared an identical sequence type (ST138), belonging to the global epidemic clone, clonal complex 92, and all produced OXA-23 carbapenemase. The PDR AB003 showed two genetic differences, acquisition of armA gene and an amino acid substitution (Glu229Asp) in pmrB gene, relative to XDR isolates. No mutations were detected in the pmrA, pmrC, lpxA, lpxC, or lpxD genes in all three isolates. In matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis, the three isolates commonly showed two major peaks at 1728 m/z and 1912 m/z, but peaks at 2034 m/z, 2157 m/z, 2261 m/z, and 2384 m/z were detected only in the PDR A. baumannii AB003 isolate. Conclusion Our results show that changes in lipid A structure via a mutation in the pmrB gene and acquisition of armA gene might confer resistance to colistin and aminoglycosides to XDR A. baumannii strains, resulting in appearance of a PDR A. baumannii strain of ST138. PMID:26069113

  18. Antibiotic treatment enhances the genome-wide mutation rate of target cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Hongan; Miller, Samuel F; Strauss, Chloe; Zhao, Chaoxian; Cheng, Lei; Ye, Zhiqiang; Griffin, Katherine; Te, Ronald; Lee, Heewook; Chen, Chi-Chun; Lynch, Michael

    2016-05-03

    Although it is well known that microbial populations can respond adaptively to challenges from antibiotics, empirical difficulties in distinguishing the roles of de novo mutation and natural selection have left several issues unresolved. Here, we explore the mutational properties of Escherichia coli exposed to long-term sublethal levels of the antibiotic norfloxacin, using a mutation accumulation design combined with whole-genome sequencing of replicate lines. The genome-wide mutation rate significantly increases with norfloxacin concentration. This response is associated with enhanced expression of error-prone DNA polymerases and may also involve indirect effects of norfloxacin on DNA mismatch and oxidative-damage repair. Moreover, we find that acquisition of antibiotic resistance can be enhanced solely by accelerated mutagenesis, i.e., without direct involvement of selection. Our results suggest that antibiotics may generally enhance the mutation rates of target cells, thereby accelerating the rate of adaptation not only to the antibiotic itself but to additional challenges faced by invasive pathogens.

  19. Antibiotic treatment enhances the genome-wide mutation rate of target cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hongan; Miller, Samuel F.; Strauss, Chloe; Zhao, Chaoxian; Cheng, Lei; Ye, Zhiqiang; Griffin, Katherine; Te, Ronald; Lee, Heewook; Chen, Chi-Chun; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that microbial populations can respond adaptively to challenges from antibiotics, empirical difficulties in distinguishing the roles of de novo mutation and natural selection have left several issues unresolved. Here, we explore the mutational properties of Escherichia coli exposed to long-term sublethal levels of the antibiotic norfloxacin, using a mutation accumulation design combined with whole-genome sequencing of replicate lines. The genome-wide mutation rate significantly increases with norfloxacin concentration. This response is associated with enhanced expression of error-prone DNA polymerases and may also involve indirect effects of norfloxacin on DNA mismatch and oxidative-damage repair. Moreover, we find that acquisition of antibiotic resistance can be enhanced solely by accelerated mutagenesis, i.e., without direct involvement of selection. Our results suggest that antibiotics may generally enhance the mutation rates of target cells, thereby accelerating the rate of adaptation not only to the antibiotic itself but to additional challenges faced by invasive pathogens. PMID:27091991

  20. [Treatment in the event of antibiotic prophylaxis failure in gynecologic surgery. A retrospective study of 20 cases].

    PubMed

    Paparella, P; Zullo, M A; Astorri, A L; Bondì, M; Maglione, A; Oliva, C; Mancuso Bondì, S

    1994-09-01

    A retrospective study was performed of the type of treatment used in 20 patients undergoing gynecological surgery in whom antibiotic prophylaxis with Mezlocillin (2 g i.v.) had failed. Patients were subdivided into three groups: A) Initial therapy with Mezlocillin (8 patients, 2 g/die i.m.) or Cefotetan (2 patients, 2 g/die i.m.) and subsequent addition of Gentamicin (8 patients, 240 mg/die i.m.) or Tobramycin (2 patients, 200 mg/die i.m.) and subsequently Metronidazole (7 patients, 1.5 g/die per os). B) Therapy with Imipenem/Cilastatin (6 patients, 1.5 g/die i.m.). C) Therapy with Imipenem/Cilastatin (4 patients, 1.5 g/die i.m.) after a variety of antibiotics: Cotrimoxazole (Trimethoprim 160 mg/die and sulphamethoxazole 800 mg/die per os), Pefloxacin (800 mg/die per os), Cefotetan (2 g/die i.m.) and Mezlocillin (2 g/die i.m.). Time taken to lower temperature was shorter in Group B (3.5 days) compared to Group A (6.8 days) and Group C (10 days). Postoperative hospital stay was also shorter in Group B (9 days) compared to Group C (16.5 days) and Group A (11.1 days). The immediate administration of an antibiotic active against Gram+ and Gram- germs, aerobes and anaerobes is therefore useful in the event of failure of antibiotic prophylaxis, rather than the use in succession of associations of antibiotics with a limited spectrum.

  1. [Treatment of chronic osteomyelitis with antibiotic-loaded calcium phosphate cement].

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong-Wei; Huang, Hong-Bin; Zhao, Gang-Sheng; Ji, Xiang-Rong

    2008-01-01

    The antibiotic delayed release system which has the characteristics of high local antibiotic concentration,few adverse effects, slow release and long duration, has became one of important methods of treating chronic osteomyelitis. Because of its double action as drug carrier and bone repair material which can induce bone growth and degrade synchronously, drug impregnated calcium phosphate cement (diCPC) is an ideal and safe antibiotic slow release carrier. After clearing focus thoroughly, defect implant with diCPC is an effective method, which has the virtues of convenient operation, good effects and short staying time etc. This paper aims to summarize the biological properties, experimental study and clinical application of diCPC.

  2. Research on the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in children by macrolide antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xu-qiang; Deng, Li; Lu, Gen; He, Chun-hui; Wu, Pei-qiong; Xie, Zhi-wei; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    To observe a therapeutic effect of macrolide antibiotics in children with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Fifty-four cases of children with Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia were randomly divided into an observation group (n=30) and a control group (n=24). The observation group was treated with macrolide antibiotics and cefoperazone/sulbactam. The control group was treated with cefoperazone/sulbactam during a course of 10–14 days. The total effective rate was 93.3% in the observation group, and 58.3% in the control group, and results in the observation group were superior to the control group notably (P>0.05). There were no significant differences in bacterial clearance rate, adverse reaction rate between two groups (P>0.05). The combined application of cefoperazone/sulbactam with macrolide antibiotics to treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in children would be a more effective clinical method. PMID:28352740

  3. High-level colonisation of the human gut by Verrucomicrobia following broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Dubourg, Grégory; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Armougom, Fabrice; Robert, Catherine; Audoly, Gilles; Papazian, Laurent; Raoult, Didier

    2013-02-01

    The gut microbiota is mainly composed of the phyla Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria; the Verrucomicrobia phylum is occasionally observed. Antibiotics can change the bacterial diversity of the gut, with limited changes in the proportions of phyla. In this study, the gut repertoire of two patients who received a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen was studied. As part of a large gut microbiota study, two stool samples were analysed: one sample was collected after broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy in a patient with Coxiella burnetii vascular infection (Patient A); and the other sample was collected from a patient admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (Patient B). Samples were subjected to Gram staining, electron microscopy, 16S rRNA V6 amplicon pyrosequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). In parallel, the antibiotic susceptibility of Akkermansia muciniphila Muc(T) strain was studied and this strain was observed by electron microscopy. Pyrosequencing revealed that a large proportion of the sequences were associated with Verrucomicrobia (proportions of 44.9% and 84.6% for Patients A and B, respectively). All of the phylotypes were represented by a single species (A. muciniphila), and neither patient presented significant gastrointestinal disorders. Electron microscopy and FISH with specific Verrucomicrobia probes confirmed the presence of the bacterium. The Muc(T) strain was susceptible to imipenem and doxycycline but resistant to vancomycin and metronidazole. Dramatic colonisation of the human gut microbiota by the Verrucomicrobia phylum following a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen occurred without significant gastrointestinal manifestations, suggesting that influenced by external factors such as antibiotics, the gut repertoire remains partially unknown.

  4. Reporter phage and breath tests: emerging phenotypic assays for diagnosing active tuberculosis, antibiotic resistance, and treatment efficacy.

    PubMed

    Jain, Paras; Thaler, David S; Maiga, Mamoudou; Timmins, Graham S; Bishai, William R; Hatfull, Graham F; Larsen, Michelle H; Jacobs, William R

    2011-11-15

    The rapid and accurate diagnosis of active tuberculosis (TB) and its drug susceptibility remain a challenge. Phenotypic assays allow determination of antibiotic susceptibilities even if sequence data are not available or informative. We review 2 emerging diagnostic approaches, reporter phage and breath tests, both of which assay mycobacterial metabolism. The reporter phage signal, Green fluorescent protein (GFP) or β-galactosidase, indicates transcription and translation inside the recipient bacilli and its attenuation by antibiotics. Different breath tests assay, (1) exhaled antigen 85, (2) mycobacterial urease activity, and (3) detection by trained rats of disease-specific odor in sputum, have also been developed. When compared with culture, reporter phage assays shorten the time for initial diagnosis of drug susceptibility by several days. Both reporter phage and breath tests have promise as early markers to determine the efficacy of treatment. While sputum often remains smear and Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA positive early in the course of efficacious antituberculous treatment, we predict that both breath and phage tests will rapidly become negative. If this hypothesis proves correct, phage assays and breath tests could become important surrogate markers in early bactericidal activity (EBA) studies of new antibiotics.

  5. Chitosan coating to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of calcium sulfate-based antibiotic therapy in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Beenken, Karen E; Smith, James K; Skinner, Robert A; Mclaren, Sandra G; Bellamy, William; Gruenwald, M Johannes; Spencer, Horace J; Jennings, Jessica A; Haggard, Warren O; Smeltzer, Mark S

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate that coating calcium sulfate with deacetylated chitosan enhances the elution profile of daptomycin by prolonging the period during which high concentrations of antibiotic are released. Coatings reduced initial bolus release of daptomycin by a factor of 10 to approximately 1000 µg/ml, and levels remained above 100 µg/ml for up to 10 days. Chitosan-coated and uncoated calcium sulfate implants with and without 15% daptomycin were evaluated in an experimental model of staphylococcal osteomyelitis through bacteriology scores, radiology, histopathology, and Gram staining. Significant reduction in bacteriology scores was observed for implants containing daptomycin and coated with chitosan compared with all the other groups. We confirm that the use of chitosan-coated calcium sulfate beads for local antibiotic delivery can be correlated with an improved therapeutic outcome following surgical debridement in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis.

  6. Systemic antibiotics in periodontics.

    PubMed

    Slots, Jørgen

    2004-11-01

    This position paper addresses the role of systemic antibiotics in the treatment of periodontal disease. Topical antibiotic therapy is not discussed here. The paper was prepared by the Research, Science and Therapy Committee of the American Academy of Periodontology. The document consists of three sections: 1) concept of antibiotic periodontal therapy; 2) efficacy of antibiotic periodontal therapy; and 3) practical aspects of antibiotic periodontal therapy. The conclusions drawn in this paper represent the position of the American Academy of Periodontology and are intended for the information of the dental profession.

  7. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs

    PubMed Central

    SOARES, Geisla Mary Silva; FIGUEIREDO, Luciene Cristina; FAVERI, Marcelo; CORTELLI, Sheila Cavalca; DUARTE, Poliana Mendes; FERES, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections. PMID:22858695

  8. Mechanisms of action of systemic antibiotics used in periodontal treatment and mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs.

    PubMed

    Soares, Geisla Mary Silva; Figueiredo, Luciene Cristina; Faveri, Marcelo; Cortelli, Sheila Cavalca; Duarte, Poliana Mendes; Feres, Magda

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotics are important adjuncts in the treatment of infectious diseases, including periodontitis. The most severe criticisms to the indiscriminate use of these drugs are their side effects and, especially, the development of bacterial resistance. The knowledge of the biological mechanisms involved with the antibiotic usage would help the medical and dental communities to overcome these two problems. Therefore, the aim of this manuscript was to review the mechanisms of action of the antibiotics most commonly used in the periodontal treatment (i.e. penicillin, tetracycline, macrolide and metronidazole) and the main mechanisms of bacterial resistance to these drugs. Antimicrobial resistance can be classified into three groups: intrinsic, mutational and acquired. Penicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin are broad-spectrum drugs, effective against gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. Bacterial resistance to penicillin may occur due to diminished permeability of the bacterial cell to the antibiotic; alteration of the penicillin-binding proteins, or production of β-lactamases. However, a very small proportion of the subgingival microbiota is resistant to penicillins. Bacteria become resistant to tetracyclines or macrolides by limiting their access to the cell, by altering the ribosome in order to prevent effective binding of the drug, or by producing tetracycline/macrolide-inactivating enzymes. Periodontal pathogens may become resistant to these drugs. Finally, metronidazole can be considered a prodrug in the sense that it requires metabolic activation by strict anaerobe microorganisms. Acquired resistance to this drug has rarely been reported. Due to these low rates of resistance and to its high activity against the gram-negative anaerobic bacterial species, metronidazole is a promising drug for treating periodontal infections.

  9. Streptococcus mutans infective endocarditis complicated by vertebral discitis following dental treatment without antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sujata; Bowler, Ian C J W; Bunch, Christopher; Prendergast, Bernard; Webster, Daniel P

    2010-10-01

    We report what we believe is the first reported case of Streptococcus mutans endocarditis complicated by vertebral discitis. The case is particularly interesting and topical as it occurred in a patient with pre-existing cardiac valvular disease who had recently had a dental procedure without antibiotic prophylaxis following a dramatic shift in the UK guidelines.

  10. Systemic Antibiotics in Periodontal Treatment of Diabetic Patients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Caroline Moura Martins Lobo; Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Santos, Ana Paula Pires; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa

    2015-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of systemic antibiotics in combination with scaling and root planing (SRP) on periodontal parameters, tooth loss and oral health-related quality of life in diabetes patients. Materials and Methods Two independent reviewers screened for controlled clinical trials with at least 6-month follow-up in six electronic databases, registers of clinical trials, meeting abstracts and four major dental journals. After duplicates removal, electronic and hand searches yielded 1,878 records; 18 full-text articles were independently read by two reviewers. To evaluate the additional effect of antibiotic usage, pooled weighted mean differences and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a fixed effects model. Results Five studies met the inclusion criteria, four of which were included in meta-analyses. The meta-analyses showed a significant effect favouring SRP plus antibiotic for reductions in mean probing depth (PD) (-0.22 mm [-0.34, -0.11]) and mean percentage of bleeding on probing (BoP) (4% [-7, -1]). There was no significant effect for clinical attachment level gain and plaque index reduction. No study reported on tooth loss and oral health-related quality of life. Conclusion Adjunctive systemic antibiotic use in diabetic patients provides a small additional benefit in terms of reductions in mean PD and mean percentage of BoP. Registration PROSPERO: CRD42013006389. PMID:26693909

  11. Corticosteroid/Antibiotic Treatment of Septic Shock: An Evaluation of Mechanisms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-29

    We have succeeded in developing the first effective therapy to prevent death from septic shock induced by a 100% lethal dose of live E . coli organisms...sodium succinate, and the aminoglycoside antibiotic, gentamicin sulfate. Application of the therapy soon after initiation of E . coli administration

  12. Antibiotic resistance in Escherichia coli strains isolated from Antarctic bird feces, water from inside a wastewater treatment plant, and seawater samples collected in the Antarctic Treaty area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbia, Virginia; Bello-Toledo, Helia; Jiménez, Sebastián; Quezada, Mario; Domínguez, Mariana; Vergara, Luis; Gómez-Fuentes, Claudio; Calisto-Ulloa, Nancy; González-Acuña, Daniel; López, Juana; González-Rocha, Gerardo

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a problem of global concern and is frequently associated with human activity. Studying antibiotic resistance in bacteria isolated from pristine environments, such as Antarctica, extends our understanding of these fragile ecosystems. Escherichia coli strains, important fecal indicator bacteria, were isolated on the Fildes Peninsula (which has the strongest human influence in Antarctica), from seawater, bird droppings, and water samples from inside a local wastewater treatment plant. The strains were subjected to molecular typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis to determine their genetic relationships, and tested for antibiotic susceptibility with disk diffusion tests for several antibiotic families: β-lactams, quinolones, aminoglycosides, tetracyclines, phenicols, and trimethoprim-sulfonamide. The highest E. coli count in seawater samples was 2400 cfu/100 mL. Only strains isolated from seawater and the wastewater treatment plant showed any genetic relatedness between groups. Strains of both these groups were resistant to β-lactams, aminoglycosides, tetracycline, and trimethoprim-sulfonamide.In contrast, strains from bird feces were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested. We conclude that naturally occurring antibiotic resistance in E. coli strains isolated from Antarctic bird feces is rare and the bacterial antibiotic resistance found in seawater is probably associated with discharged treated wastewater originating from Fildes Peninsula treatment plants.

  13. Monitoring and evaluation of antibiotic resistance genes in four municipal wastewater treatment plants in Harbin, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qinxue; Yang, Lian; Duan, Ruan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2016-05-01

    The development and proliferation of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic and environmental microorganisms is of great concern for public health. In this study, the distribution and removal efficiency of intI1 and eight subtypes of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) for tetracycline, sulfonamides, beta-lactams resistance in four municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Harbin, which locates in Songhua River basin in cold areas of China, were monitored by real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR. The results showed that intI1 and 6 ARGs except for blaTEM and blaSHV were detected in wastewater and sludge samples and 0.3-2.7 orders of magnitude of ARGs removal efficiency in the four WWTPs were observed. The investigation on the removal of ARGs of different treatment units in one WWTP showed that the biological treatment unit played the most important role in ARGs removal (1.2-1.8 orders of magnitude), followed by UV disinfection, while primary physical treatment units can hardly remove any ARGs. Although all the WWTPs can remove ARGs effectively, ARGs concentrations are still relatively high in the effluent, their further attenuation should be investigated.

  14. Antibiotic Treatment in End-of-Life Cancer Patients—A Retrospective Observational Study at a Palliative Care Center in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Helde-Frankling, Maria; Bergqvist, Jenny; Bergman, Peter; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to elucidate whether palliative cancer patients benefit from antibiotic treatment in the last two weeks of life when an infection is suspected. Method: We reviewed medical records from 160 deceased palliative cancer patients that had been included in previous studies on vitamin D and infections. Patients treated with antibiotics during the last two weeks of life were identified and net effects of treatment (symptom relief) and possible adverse events were extracted from medical records. Results: Seventy-nine patients (49%) had been treated with antibiotics during the last two weeks in life. In 37% (n = 29), the treatment resulted in evident symptom relief and among these 50% had a positive bacterial culture, 43% had a negative culture and in 7% no culture was taken. Among the patients with no or unknown effect of antibiotics, 50% had a positive culture. When the indication for antibiotic treatment was to avoid or treat sepsis, symptom relief was achieved in 50% of the patients (n = 19). Only 4% (n = 3) of the patients experienced adverse events of the treatment (diarrhea, nausea). Conclusions: Treating infections with antibiotics in the last weeks of life may improve the quality of life for palliative cancer patients, especially if sepsis is suspected or confirmed. According to our results, the beneficial effects outweigh the potentially negative outcomes. PMID:27608043

  15. Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women Antibiotic Resistance Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... these products really help. To Learn More about Antibiotic Resistance Get Smart About Antibiotics (Video) Fact Sheets ...

  16. Feeding bovine milks with low or high IgA levels is associated with altered re-establishment of murine intestinal microbiota after antibiotic treatment

    PubMed Central

    Young, Wayne; Cakebread, Julie A.; Haigh, Brendan J.

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are a vital and commonly used therapeutic tool, but their use also results in profound changes in the intestinal microbiota that can, in turn, have significant health consequences. Understanding how the microbiota recovers after antibiotic treatment will help to devise strategies for mitigating the adverse effects of antibiotics. Using a mouse model, we have characterized the changes occurring in the intestinal microbiota immediately after five days exposure to ampicillin, and then at three and fourteen days thereafter. During the fourteen day period of antibiotic recovery, groups of mice were fed either water, cows’ milk containing high levels of IgA, or cows’ milk containing low levels of IgA as their sole source of liquid. Effects on microbiota of feeding milks for 14 days were also assessed in groups of mice that had no ampicillin exposure. Changes in microbiota were measured by high throughput sequencing of the V4 to V6 variable regions of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. As expected, exposure to ampicillin led to profound changes to the types and abundance of bacteria present, along with a loss of diversity. At 14 days following antibiotic exposure, mice fed water had recovered microbiota compositions similar to that prior to antibiotics. However, feeding High-IgA milk to mice that has been exposed to antibiotics was associated with altered microbiota compositions, including increased relative abundance of Lactobacillus and Barnesiella compared to the start of the study. Mice exposed to antibiotics then fed Low-IgA milk also showed increased Barnesiella at day 14. Mice without antibiotic perturbation, showed no change in their microbiota after 14 days of milk feeding. Overall, these findings add to a knowledge platform for optimizing intestinal function after treatment with antibiotics in the human population. PMID:27703861

  17. Functional consequences of microbial shifts in the human gastrointestinal tract linked to antibiotic treatment and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ester; Bargiela, Rafael; Diez, María Suárez; Friedrichs, Anette; Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Gosalbes, María José; Knecht, Henrik; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Artacho, Alejandro; Ruiz, Alicia; Campoy, Cristina; Latorre, Amparo; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés; Suárez, Antonio; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P; Ferrer, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The microbiomes in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of individuals receiving antibiotics and those in obese subjects undergo compositional shifts, the metabolic effects and linkages of which are not clearly understood. Herein, we set to gain insight into these effects, particularly with regard to carbohydrate metabolism, and to contribute to unravel the underlying mechanisms and consequences for health conditions. We measured the activity level of GIT carbohydrate-active enzymes toward 23 distinct sugars in adults patients (n = 2) receiving 14-d β-lactam therapy and in obese (n = 7) and lean (n = 5) adolescents. We observed that both 14 d antibiotic-treated and obese subjects showed higher and less balanced sugar anabolic capacities, with 40% carbohydrates being preferentially processed as compared with non-treated and lean patients. Metaproteome-wide metabolic reconstructions confirmed that the impaired utilization of sugars propagated throughout the pentose phosphate metabolism, which had adverse consequences for the metabolic status of the GIT microbiota. The results point to an age-independent positive association between GIT glycosidase activity and the body mass index, fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance (r ( 2) ≥ 0.95). Moreover, antibiotics altered the active fraction of enzymes controlling the thickness, composition and consistency of the mucin glycans. Our data and analyses provide biochemical insights into the effects of antibiotic usage on the dynamics of the GIT microbiota and pin-point presumptive links to obesity. The knowledge and the hypotheses generated herein lay a foundation for subsequent, systematic research that will be paramount for the design of "smart" dietary and therapeutic interventions to modulate host-microbe metabolic co-regulation in intestinal homeostasis.

  18. Should patients with hip joint prosthesis receive antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Ingar; Snorrason, Finnur; Lingaas, Egil

    2010-01-01

    The safety committee of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) recommended in 2009 that clinicians should consider antibiotic prophylaxis for all patients with total joint replacement before any invasive procedure that may cause bacteremia. This has aroused confusion and anger among dentists asking for the evidence. The present review deals with different aspects of the rationale for this recommendation giving attention to views both in favor of and against it. PMID:21523226

  19. Systemic and local bactericidal potentiality in late lactation Holstein-Friesian cows following a combined antibiotics and Enterococcus faecium SF68 dry-cow treatment.

    PubMed

    Tiantong, Attapol; Piamya, Piya; Chen, Shuen-Ei; Liu, Wen-Bor; Chang, Fang-Yu; Lin, Pei-Chi; Nagahata, Hajime; Chang, Chai-Ju

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic dry-cow treatment contributes a major part to the total use of antibiotics in dairy herds. Enterococcus faecium strain SF68 (SF68) was of human origin but has been authorized in EU as probiotic feed additive. In the present study, one of the front and rear quarters of twelve late lactation Holstein-Friesian cows were infused once with a commercial antibiotic dry-cow formula (antibiotics quarter) on the first milk-stasis day (d 1), when the contrallateral quarters were infused with 5 x 10(8)-CFU SF68 plus half-dose antibiotic dry-cow formula (SF68/antibiotics quarter) meanwhile. Gelatinase level and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production capacity were measured for blood and quarter secretion. The results showed that the count of blood total leukocytes minorly decreased on d 3 only but the microscopic somatic cell count (MSCC) continuously increased up to d 7, especially in SF68/antibiotics quarters. Plasma level of gelatinase A remained similar up to d 7 but gelatinase B was not detectable in plasma throughout the study. The level of gelatinase A in quarter secretion increased up to d 7 but gelatinase B increased even more drastically, especially in SF68/antibiotics quarters. The ROS production capacity of blood leukocytes increased temporarily only on d 3, but that of milk cells continuously increased up to d 7, especially in SF68/antitiotics quarters. Overall, late lactation Holstein-Friesian cows were systemically adaptable to the combined antibiotics and SF68 dry-cow treatment, while the local bactericidal potentiality in mammary gland was actively responsive to additional SF68 intramammary treatment.

  20. Silver nanoparticle-embedded polymersome nanocarriers for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geilich, Benjamin M.; van de Ven, Anne L.; Singleton, Gloria L.; Sepúlveda, Liuda J.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Webster, Thomas J.

    2015-02-01

    The rapidly diminishing number of effective antibiotics that can be used to treat infectious diseases and associated complications in a physician's arsenal is having a drastic impact on human health today. This study explored the development and optimization of a polymersome nanocarrier formed from a biodegradable diblock copolymer to overcome bacterial antibiotic resistance. Here, polymersomes were synthesized containing silver nanoparticles embedded in the hydrophobic compartment, and ampicillin in the hydrophilic compartment. Results showed for the first time that these silver nanoparticle-embedded polymersomes (AgPs) inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli transformed with a gene for ampicillin resistance (bla) in a dose-dependent fashion. Free ampicillin, AgPs without ampicillin, and ampicillin polymersomes without silver nanoparticles had no effect on bacterial growth. The relationship between the silver nanoparticles and ampicillin was determined to be synergistic and produced complete growth inhibition at a silver-to-ampicillin ratio of 1 : 0.64. In this manner, this study introduces a novel nanomaterial that can effectively treat problematic, antibiotic-resistant infections in an improved capacity which should be further examined for a wide range of medical applications.

  1. A new strategy to destroy antibiotic resistant microorganisms: antimicrobial photodynamic treatment.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Tim

    2009-07-01

    Photodynamic activity of chemical compounds towards microorganisms was first published at the turn of 20th century and it is based on the concept that a chemical compound, known as the photosensitizer, is localized preferentially in the microorganism and subsequently activated by low doses of visible light of an appropriate wavelength to generate reactive oxygen species that are toxic to the target microorganisms. Processes, in which absorption of light by a photosensitizer induces chemical changes in another molecule, are defined as photosensitizing reactions. Since the middle of the last century, antibacterial photosensitizing reactions were forgotten because of the discovery and the beginning of the Golden Age of antibiotics. Certainly, in the last decades the worldwide rise in antibiotic resistance has driven research to the development of new anti-microbial strategies. Different classes of molecules including phenothiazine, porphyrines, phthalocyanines, and fullerenes have demonstrated antimicrobial efficacy against a broad spectrum of antibiotic resistant microorganisms upon illumination. Due to their extended pi-conjugated system these molecules absorb visible light, have a high triplet quantum yield and can generate reactive oxygen species upon illumination. This mini-review will focus on some major advances regarding physical and chemical properties of photosensitizers and light sources that appear to be suitable in the field of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. Currently, topical application of a photosensitizer on infected tissues and subsequent illumination seems to be the most promising feature of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy, thereby not harming the surrounding tissue or disturbing the residual bacteria-flora of the tissue.

  2. Aortic graft infection and mycotic aneurysm with Streptococcus equi zooepidemicus: two cases with favorable outcome of antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Altreuther, Martin; Lange, Conrad; Myhre, Hans Olav; Hannula, Raisa

    2013-02-01

    Infections with Streptococcus equi zooepidemicus are rare and are associated with contact with animals or animal products. There are very few reports about infected vascular grafts or aneurysms with this etiology. We present two patients. The first is a 77-year-old man with an infected bifurcated graft four years after an open operation for an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). The second is a 72-year-old man with a symptomatic mycotic AAA, treated with endovascular aneurysm repair. Both received prolonged treatment with bactericidal antibiotics and responded well. Follow-up time at present is 5.5 years for the first, and 4.5 years for the second, patient.

  3. Antibiotic resistance, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and ampC gene in two typical municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Su, Hao-Chang; Ying, Guang-Guo; He, Liang-Ying; Liu, You-Sheng; Zhang, Rui-Quan; Tao, Ran

    2014-02-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and ampC gene were investigated for Escherichia coli isolates from two typical municipal wastewater treatment plants in both dry and wet seasons by using the antibiotic susceptibility test and PCR assay, respectively. The results showed that 98.4% of the isolates (1056) were found resistant to antibiotic(s) tested and 90.6% showed multiple resistances to at least three antibiotics. Tetracycline was found to have the highest resistance frequency (70.8%), followed by ampicillin (65.1%), whereas ceftazidime had the lowest resistance frequency of 9.0%. Moreover, 39.2% of the E. coli isolates were carrying plasmids. intI1 had the highest detection rate in the plasmids (38.1%), followed by qnrS, ampC, qnrB, intI2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr. The disinfection process (UV and chlorination) could significantly reduce the number of bacteria, but percentage of the resistant bacteria, resistance frequency for each antibiotic, MAR index and detection rate of the plasmid-mediated resistance genes were all found increasing in the effluents of biological units. The results of this study showed that a more frequent horizontal gene transfer occurred in the biological units. Wastewater treatment plants were an important medium for the recombination and dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment.

  4. Redeploying β-Lactam Antibiotics as a Novel Antivirulence Strategy for the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Elaine M.; Rudkin, Justine K.; Coughlan, Simone; Clair, Geremy C.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Gore, Suzanna; Xia, Guoqing; Black, Nikki S.; Downing, Tim; O'Neill, Eoghan; Kadioglu, Aras; O'Gara, James P.

    2016-11-14

    Innovative approaches to the use of existing antibiotics is an important strategy in efforts to address the escalating antimicrobial resistance crisis. Here, the beta-lactam antibiotic oxacillin was shown to significantly attenuate the virulence of MRSA despite the pathogen being resistant to this drug. Oxacillin-mediated repression of the Agr quorum-sensing system and altered cell wall architecture, was associated with reduced cytolytic activity and increased susceptibility to host killing. These findings support the inclusion of -lactam antibiotics as an adjunctive anti-virulence therapy in the treatment of MRSA infections, with the potential to significantly improve patient outcomes in a safe, cost effective manner.

  5. Ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia as a life-threatening complication of antibiotic treatment of 'chronic Lyme disease'.

    PubMed

    De Wilde, Maarten; Speeckaert, Marijn; Callens, Rutger; Van Biesen, Wim

    2017-04-01

    'Chronic Lyme disease' is a controversial condition. As any hard evidence is lacking that unresolved systemic symptoms, following an appropriately diagnosed and treated Lyme disease, are related to a chronic infection with the tick-borne spirochaetes of the Borrelia genus, the term 'chronic Lyme disease' should be avoided and replaced by the term 'post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome.' The improper prescription of prolonged antibiotic treatments for these patients can have an impact on the community antimicrobial resistance and on the consumption of health care resources. Moreover, these treatments can be accompanied by severe complications. In this case report, we describe a life-threatening ceftriaxone-induced immune hemolytic anemia with an acute kidney injury (RIFLE-stadium F) due to a pigment-induced nephropathy in a 76-year-old woman, who was diagnosed with a so-called 'chronic Lyme disease.'

  6. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Lane, Todd W.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2016-01-01

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. We subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-term treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are “keystone” OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure of the microbiota

  7. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Lane, Todd W.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Yu, Eizadora T.

    2016-07-26

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. Here we subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-term treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are “keystone” OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Lastly, taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure of the

  8. Changes in the Structure of the Microbial Community Associated with Nannochloropsis salina following Treatments with Antibiotics and Bioactive Compounds

    DOE PAGES

    Geng, Haifeng; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary B.; Lane, Todd W.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Open microalgae cultures host a myriad of bacteria, creating a complex system of interacting species that influence algal growth and health. Many algal microbiota studies have been conducted to determine the relative importance of bacterial taxa to algal culture health and physiological states, but these studies have not characterized the interspecies relationships in the microbial communities. Here we subjected Nanochroloropsis salina cultures to multiple chemical treatments (antibiotics and quorum sensing compounds) and obtained dense time-series data on changes to the microbial community using 16S gene amplicon metagenomic sequencing (21,029,577 reads for 23 samples) to measure microbial taxa-taxa abundance correlations. Short-termmore » treatment with antibiotics resulted in substantially larger shifts in the microbiota structure compared to changes observed following treatment with signaling compounds and glucose. We also calculated operational taxonomic unit (OTU) associations and generated OTU correlation networks to provide an overview of possible bacterial OTU interactions. This analysis identified five major cohesive modules of microbiota with similar co-abundance profiles across different chemical treatments. The Eigengenes of OTU modules were examined for correlation with different external treatment factors. This correlation-based analysis revealed that culture age (time) and treatment types have primary effects on forming network modules and shaping the community structure. Additional network analysis detected Alteromonadeles and Alphaproteobacteria as having the highest centrality, suggesting these species are “keystone” OTUs in the microbial community. Furthermore, we illustrated that the chemical tropodithietic acid, which is secreted by several species in the Alphaproteobacteria taxon, is able to drastically change the structure of the microbiota within 3 h. Lastly, taken together, these results provide valuable insights into the structure

  9. Antibiotic treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis based on rapid urine test and local epidemiology: lessons from a primary care series

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute uncomplicated cystitis (AUC) is an ideal target of optimization for antibiotic therapy in primary care. Because surveillance networks on urinary tract infections (UTI) mix complicated and uncomplicated UTI, reliable epidemiological data on AUC lack. Whether the antibiotic choice should be guided by a rapid urine test (RUT) for leukocytes and nitrites has not been extensively studied in daily practice. The aim of this primary care study was to investigate local epidemiology and RUT-daily use to determine the optimal strategy. Methods General practitioners included 18–65 years women with symptoms of AUC, performed a RUT and sent urines for analysis at a central laboratory. Different treatment strategies were simulated based on RUT and resistance results. Results Among 347 enrolled patients, 78% had a positive urine culture. Escherichia coli predominated (71%) with high rates of susceptibility to nitrofurantoin (100%), fosfomycin (99%), ofloxacin (97%), and even pivmecillinam (87%) and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (87%). Modelization showed that the systematic use of RUT would reduce by 10% the number of patients treated. Fosfomycin for patients with positive RUT offered a 90% overall bacterial coverage, compared to 98% for nitrofurantoin. 95% for ofloxacin, 86% for trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and 78% for pivmecillinam. Conclusion Local epidemiology surveillance data not biased by complicated UTI demonstrates that the worldwide increase in antibiotic resistance has not affected AUC yet. Fosfomycin first line in all patients with positive RUT seems the best treatment strategy for AUC, combining good bacterial coverage with expected low toxicity and limited effect on fecal flora. Trial registration The current study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00958295) PMID:24612927

  10. Changes in the aerobic vaginal bacterial mucous load after treatment with intravaginal sponges in anoestrous ewes: effect of medroxiprogesterone acetate and antibiotic treatment use.

    PubMed

    Gatti, M; Zunino, P; Ungerfeld, R

    2011-04-01

    Intravaginal sponges (IS) impregnated with progestagens are widely used for oestrous synchronization in ewes. As progestogens depress the immuno response, the first aim was to determine whether medroxiprogesterone acetate (MAP) content affects the vaginal bacteria number (VBN) in IS-treated anoestrous ewes. The second aim was to compare the effectiveness of different antibiotic treatments to control the VBN increase caused by IS. In both experiments, IS were inserted during 14 days in anoestrous ewes. In the first, 11 ewes received commercial sponges (50 mg MAP), and 10 ewes received placebo sponges. For the second experiment, IS were inserted in three groups (n = 12/group), containing oxytetracycline im (20 mg/kg); injected into the sponge (0.02 mg), or control (no antibiotic). At sponge withdrawal, all ewes received 300 UI eCG. Mucous samples were collected from the vagina before sponge insertion, at sponge withdrawal, 24, 48 and 72 h later, and the VBN (colony-forming units per ml; CFU/ml) was counted after 48-h incubation. Medroxiprogesterone content did not affect VBN (log CFU/ml: 4.3 ± 0.2 vs 4.4 ± 0.2 with and without MAP, respectively). Bacterial number increased from 3.5 ± 0.2 at sponge insertion to 6.9 ± 0.1 at sponge withdrawal (p < 0.0001) and decreased the following day to 4.3 ± 0.2 (p < 0.0001). In the second experiment, VBN increased at sponge withdrawal (p < 0.0001) in all groups and decreased the following day (p < 0.0001). The CFU/ml at sponge withdrawal was lower in ewes treated with antibiotics (p < 0.0001), being even lower when local rather than systemic antibiotic was administered (log CFU/ml: 3.3 ± 1.8 vs 7.2 ± 1.8). The day of oestrous VBN was similar for all treatments and similar to that observed before sponge insertion. We concluded that MAP does not influence the increase in VBN, as the main effect is provoked by the sponge device itself, and local antibiotic treatment resulted in a lower bacterial growth than systemic treatments.

  11. Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea (ARG)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Twitter STD on Facebook Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Antibiotic-Resistant Gonorrhea Basic Information Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Page Surveillance Trends and Treatment Challenges Laboratory Issues Antibiotic resistance (AR) is the ability of bacteria to ...

  12. Treatment of uncomplicated symptomatic urinary tract infections: Resistance patterns and misuse of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    George, Carolin Elizabeth; Norman, Gift; Ramana, G Venkata; Mukherjee, Devashri; Rao, Tata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Uncomplicated but symptomatic urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem seen in practice. The study was undertaken to assess the most common pathogens responsible for uncomplicated symptomatic UTIs and the antimicrobial resistance pattern in a hospital in Bangalore. The study also explores the issue of antibiotic usage for these patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Medicine department of a tertiary hospital in Bangalore. In all, 196 patients presented with symptoms of UTI. Bacterial growth was determined by standard microbiology techniques on freshly voided mid-steam urine samples collected from recruited patients. Patients’ demographic data, urine culture results, resistance rates to antimicrobial agents and prescribed empiric antimicrobial therapy were analyzed. Results: The prevalence of UTI was 32.1%; majority (67.9%) of the symptomatic did not have UTI based on culture report. Gram-negative bacteria constituted the largest group with a prevalence of 84.1% (53/63), with Escherichia coli being the most common (70%) uropathogen. Gram-negative isolates showed high level of sensitivity to amikacin (90.6%) and nitrofurantoin (77.4%). Most of the gram-positive organisms were susceptible to nitrofurantoin (70%) and gentamicin (50%). Uropathogens isolated demonstrated high resistance to cotrimoxazole, fluoroquinolones, and beta-lactam antibiotics. It was found out that 30.1% of the patients were wrongly managed of which 14.7% were over treated. Conclusion: UTI can be over diagnosed and over treated on the basis of clinical signs, symptoms and urine microscopy. In the era of emerging anti-microbial resistance, effective counseling and delay in antibiotic initiation or empirical therapy with a short course of nitrofurantoin is highly recommended. Empirical therapy guidelines should be updated periodically to reflect changes in antimicrobial resistance of uropathogens. PMID:26288784

  13. Occurrences and fate of selected human antibiotics in influents and effluents of sewage treatment plant and effluent-receiving river Yamuna in Delhi (India).

    PubMed

    Mutiyar, Pravin K; Mittal, Atul K

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics consumption has increased worldwide, and their residues are frequently reported in aquatic environments. It is believed that antibiotics reach aquatic water bodies through sewage. Medicine consumed for healthcare practices are often released into sewage, and after sewage treatment plant, it reaches the receiving water bodies of lakes or rivers. In the present study, we determined the fate of some commonly used antibiotics in a sewage treatment plant (STP) located in Delhi and the environmental concentration of these antibiotics in the Yamuna River, which receives the sewage and industrial effluent of Delhi. There are many reports on antibiotics occurrences in STP and river water worldwide, but monitoring data from the Indian subcontinent is sparse. Samples were taken from a STP and from six sampling sites on the Yamuna River. Several antibiotics were tested for using offline solid-phase extraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography equipped with photodiode array analysis. Recoveries varied from 25.5-108.8 %. Ampicillin had the maximum concentration in wastewater influents (104.2 ± 98.11 μg l(-1)) and effluents (12.68 ± 8.38 μg l(-1)). The fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins had the lower concentrations. Treatment efficiencies varied between 55 and 99 %. Significant amounts of antibiotics were discharged in effluents and were detected in the receiving water body. The concentration of antibiotics in the Yamuna River varied from not detected to 13.75 μg l(-1) (ampicillin) for the compounds investigated.

  14. Investigation and management of an outbreak of multispecies mycobacteriosis in Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus fosteri) including the use of triple antibiotic treatment.

    PubMed

    Strike, T B; Feltrer, Y; Flach, E; Macgregor, S K; Guillaume, S

    2017-04-01

    Disease due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is common in fish. Current recommendations focus on outbreak management by depopulating entire fish stocks and disinfecting tanks. Treatment is not advocated. Treatment may be appropriate, however, where individual, valuable fish are concerned. ZSL London Zoo managed an outbreak of mycobacteriosis in a valuable group of imported F1 captive-bred Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus fosteri) by depopulation, isolation, extensive testing and daily oral antibiotic treatment. Four species of Mycobacterium (M. marinum, M. fortuitum, M. chelonae and M. peregrinum) were involved in this outbreak, each with unique antibiotic sensitivities. Triple therapy with rifampicin, doxycycline and enrofloxacin for 8 months was the most effective antibiotic combination, resulting in full disease resolution. No side effects were noted and, more than 18 months post-treatment, no recurrence had occurred. This is the first report of mycobacterial disease in lungfish and the first report of a polymycobacterial outbreak in fish involving these four species of Mycobacterium. This report demonstrates the value of extensive isolation and identification. Also, as therapies currently advised in standard texts did not reflect the antibiotic sensitivity of the NTM found in the fish reported here, we recommend that antibiotic treatment should always be based on sensitivity testing.

  15. A cost-effectiveness analysis of identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by antibiotic treatment to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses.

    PubMed

    Bank, S; Christensen, K; Kristensen, L H; Prag, J

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to estimate the cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) saved by identifying Fusobacterium necrophorum in throat swabs followed by proper antibiotic treatment, to reduce the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and peritonsillar abscesses (PTA) originating from a pharyngitis. The second purpose was to estimate the population size required to indicate that antibiotic treatment has an effect. Data from publications and our laboratory were collected. Monte Carlo simulation and one-way sensitivity analysis were used to analyse cost-effectiveness. The cost-effectiveness analysis shows that examining throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds for F. necrophorum followed by antibiotic treatment will probably be less costly than most other life-saving medical interventions, with a median cost of US$8,795 per QALY saved. To indicate a reduced incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA in Denmark, the intervention probably has to be followed for up to 5 years. Identifying F. necrophorum in throat swabs from 15- to 24-year-olds followed by proper antibiotic treatment only requires a reduction of 20-25 % in the incidence of Lemierre's syndrome and PTA to be cost-effective. This study warrants further examination of the effect of antibiotic treatment on the outcome of F. necrophorum acute and recurrent pharyngitis, as well as the effect on Lemierre's syndrome and PTA.

  16. Metagenomic analysis of bacterial community composition and antibiotic resistance genes in a wastewater treatment plant and its receiving surface water.

    PubMed

    Tang, Junying; Bu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xu-Xiang; Huang, Kailong; He, Xiwei; Ye, Lin; Shan, Zhengjun; Ren, Hongqiang

    2016-10-01

    The presence of pathogenic bacteria and the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) may pose big risks to the rivers that receive the effluent from municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, we investigated the changes of bacterial community and ARGs along treatment processes of one WWTP, and examined the effects of the effluent discharge on the bacterial community and ARGs in the receiving river. Pyrosequencing was applied to reveal bacterial community composition including potential bacterial pathogen, and Illumina high-throughput sequencing was used for profiling ARGs. The results showed that the WWTP had good removal efficiency on potential pathogenic bacteria (especially Arcobacter butzleri) and ARGs. Moreover, the bacterial communities of downstream and upstream of the river showed no significant difference. However, the increase in the abundance of potential pathogens and ARGs at effluent outfall was observed, indicating that WWTP effluent might contribute to the dissemination of potential pathogenic bacteria and ARGs in the receiving river.

  17. Experimental antibiotic treatment identifies potential pathogens of white band disease in the endangered Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis.

    PubMed

    Sweet, M J; Croquer, A; Bythell, J C

    2014-08-07

    Coral diseases have been increasingly reported over the past few decades and are a major contributor to coral decline worldwide. The Caribbean, in particular, has been noted as a hotspot for coral disease, and the aptly named white syndromes have caused the decline of the dominant reef building corals throughout their range. White band disease (WBD) has been implicated in the dramatic loss of Acropora cervicornis and Acropora palmata since the 1970s, resulting in both species being listed as critically endangered on the International Union for Conservation of Nature Red list. The causal agent of WBD remains unknown, although recent studies based on challenge experiments with filtrate from infected hosts concluded that the disease is probably caused by bacteria. Here, we report an experiment using four different antibiotic treatments, targeting different members of the disease-associated microbial community. Two antibiotics, ampicillin and paromomycin, arrested the disease completely, and by comparing with community shifts brought about by treatments that did not arrest the disease, we have identified the likely candidate causal agent or agents of WBD. Our interpretation of the experimental treatments is that one or a combination of up to three specific bacterial types, detected consistently in diseased corals but not detectable in healthy corals, are likely causal agents of WBD. In addition, a histophagous ciliate (Philaster lucinda) identical to that found consistently in association with white syndrome in Indo-Pacific acroporas was also consistently detected in all WBD samples and absent in healthy coral. Treatment with metronidazole reduced it to below detection limits, but did not arrest the disease. However, the microscopic disease signs changed, suggesting a secondary role in disease causation for this ciliate. In future studies to identify a causal agent of WBD via tests of Henle-Koch's postulates, it will be vital to experimentally control for populations

  18. Biotic acts of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Aminov, Rustam I.

    2013-01-01

    Biological functions of antibiotics are not limited to killing. The most likely function of antibiotics in natural microbial ecosystems is signaling. Does this signaling function of antibiotics also extend to the eukaryotic – in particular mammalian – cells? In this review, the host modulating properties of three classes of antibiotics (macrolides, tetracyclines, and β-lactams) will be briefly discussed. Antibiotics can be effective in treatment of a broad spectrum of diseases and pathological conditions other than those of infectious etiology and, in this capacity, may find widespread applications beyond the intended antimicrobial use. This use, however, should not compromise the primary function antibiotics are used for. The biological background for this inter-kingdom signaling is also discussed. PMID:23966991

  19. Co-occurrence of integrase 1, antibiotic and heavy metal resistance genes in municipal wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Di Cesare, Andrea; Eckert, Ester M; D'Urso, Silvia; Bertoni, Roberto; Gillan, David C; Wattiez, Ruddy; Corno, Gianluca

    2016-05-01

    The impact of human activities on the spread and on the persistence of antibiotic resistances in the environment is still far from being understood. The natural background of resistances is influenced by human activities, and the wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are among the main sources of the release of antibiotic resistance into the environment. The various treatments of WWTPs provide a number of different environmental conditions potentially favoring the selection of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and thereby their well-documented spread in the environment. Although the distribution of different ARGs in WWTPs has been deeply investigated, very little is known on the ecology and on the molecular mechanisms underlying the selection of specific ARGs. This study investigates the fate of diverse ARGs, heavy metal resistance genes (HMRGs) and of a mobile element (the class I integron) in three WWTPs. Abundances of the different genetic markers were correlated to each other and their relation to biotic and abiotic factors (total organic carbon, total nitrogen, prokaryotic cell abundance and its relative distribution in single cells and aggregates) influencing the microbial communities in the different treatment phases in three WWTPs, were investigated. Water samples were analyzed for the abundance of six ARGs (tetA, sulII, blaTEM, blaCTXM,ermB, and qnrS), two HMRGs (czcA and arsB), and of the class I integron (int1). The measured variables clustered in two well-defined groups, the first including tetA, ermB, qnrS and the different biotic and abiotic factors, and a second group around the genes sulII, czcA, arsB and int1. Moreover, the dynamics of sulII, HMRGs, and int1 correlated strongly. Our results suggest a potentially crucial role of HMRGs in the spread, mediated by mobile elements, of some ARGs, i.e. sulII. The possibility of a relation between heavy metal contamination and the spread of ARGs in WWTPs calls for further research to clarify the mechanisms

  20. Monitoring and assessing the impact of wastewater treatment on release of both antibiotic-resistant bacteria and their typical genes in a Chinese municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2014-08-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are important hotspots for the spread of antibiotic resistance. However, the release and impact factors of both antibiotic resistant bacteria and the relevant genes over long periods in WWTPs have rarely been investigated. In this study, the fate of bacteria and genes resistant to six commonly used antibiotics was assessed over a whole year. In WWTP effluent and biosolids, a high prevalence of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to vancomycin, cephalexin, sulfadiazine and erythromycin were detected, each with a proportion of over 30%. The corresponding genes (vanA, ampC, sulI and ereA) were all detected in proportions of (2.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-10), (6.2 ± 3.2) × 10(-9), (1.2 ± 0.8) × 10(-7) and (7.6 ± 4.8) × 10(-8), respectively, in the effluent. The sampling season imposed considerable influence on the release of all ARB. High release loads of most ARB were detected in the spring, while low release loads were generally found in the winter. In comparison, the ARG loads changed only slightly over various seasons. No statistical relevance was found between all ARB abundances and their corresponding genes over the long-term investigation period. This inconsistent behavior indicates that bacteria and genes should both be considered when exploring resistance characteristics in wastewater. A redundancy analysis was adopted to assess the impact of wastewater quality and operational conditions on antibiotic resistance. The results indicated that most ARB and ARG proportions were positively related to the COD and turbidity of the raw sewage, while negatively related to those of the effluent. DO and temperature exhibited strong negative relevance to most ARB prevalence.

  1. Antibiotic resistance of mixed biofilms in cystic fibrosis: impact of emerging microorganisms on treatment of infection.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Susana Patrícia; Ceri, Howard; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Pereira, Maria Olívia

    2012-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder associated with multispecies infections where interactions between classical and newly identified bacteria might be crucial to understanding the persistent colonisation in CF lungs. This study investigated the interactions between two emerging species, Inquilinus limosus and Dolosigranulum pigrum, and the conventional CF pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by evaluating the ability to develop biofilms of mixed populations and then studying their susceptibility patterns to eight different antimicrobials. Monospecies biofilms formed by I. limosus and D. pigrum produced significantly less biomass than P. aeruginosa and displayed greater sensitivity to antimicrobials. However, when in dual-species biofilms with P. aeruginosa, the emerging species I. limosus and D. pigrum were crucial in increasing tolerance of the overall consortia to most antibiotics, even without a change in the number of biofilm-encased cells. These results may suggest that revising these and other species interactions in CF might enable the development of more suitable and effective therapies in the future.

  2. New silica nanostructure for the improved delivery of topical antibiotics used in the treatment of staphylococcal cutaneous infections.

    PubMed

    Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Ghitulica, Cristina Daniela; Voicu, Georgeta; Huang, Keng-Shiang; Yang, Chih-Hui; Ficai, Anton; Vasile, Bogdan Stefan; Grumezescu, Valentina; Bleotu, Coralia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-03-25

    In this paper, we report the synthesis, characterization (FT-IR, XRD, BET, HR-TEM) and bioevaluation of a novel γ-aminobutiric acid/silica (noted GABA-SiO₂ or γ-SiO₂) hybrid nanostructure, for the improved release of topical antibiotics, used in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections. GABA-SiO₂ showed IR bands which were assigned to Si-O-Si (stretch mode). The XRD pattern showed a broad peak in the range of 18-30° (2θ), indicating an amorphous structure. Based on the BET analysis, estimations about surface area (438.14 m²/g) and pore diameters (4.76 nm) were done. TEM observation reveals that the prepared structure presented homogeneity and an average size of particles not exceeding 10nm. The prepared nanostructure has significantly improved the anti-staphylococcal activity of bacitracin and kanamycin sulfate, as demonstrated by the drastic decrease of the minimal inhibitory concentration of the respective antibiotics loaded in the GABA-SiO₂ nanostructure. These results, correlated with the high biocompatibility of this porous structure, are highlighting the possibility of using this carrier for the local delivery of the antimicrobial substances in lower active doses, thus reducing their cytotoxicity and side-effects.

  3. A recent evaluation of empirical cephalosporin treatment and antibiotic resistance of changing bacterial profiles in spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Yakar, Tolga; Güçlü, Mustafa; Serin, Ender; Alişkan, Hikmet; Husamettin, Erdamar

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this research is to evaluate the recent changes in microorganisms causing spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in cirrhotic patients, antibiotic resistance, and response to empirical cephalosporin therapy. A total of 218 patients with ascites secondary to cirrhosis were enrolled. Parenteral cefotaxime or cefepime was given to patients who had a neutrophil count of 250/mm(3) or more or a positive bacterial culture of ascitic fluid. Antibiotic failure was defined by an absence of clinical improvement and an insufficient decrease in neutrophil count of ascites (<25% of initial value) by the third day of therapy. Of all the patients, 44.6% had culture-negative neutrocytic ascites, 24.8% had spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and 10.1% had monomicrobial nonneutrocytic bacterascites. Growth in culture was observed in 76 patients (34.9%). The two most common isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli (33.8%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS; 19.7%). The two cephalosporins were effective against E. coli (82%) and but not against CoNS (44%), while levofloxacin showed reasonable activity against both E. coli (71%) and CoNS (90%) in vitro. We confirmed a recent increased incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Levofloxacin seems to be a good alternative treatment for patients with uncomplicated spontaneous ascites infections.

  4. Comparison of NF membrane fouling and cleaning by two pretreatment strategies for the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianxing; Li, Kun; Yu, Dawei; Zhang, Junya; Wei, Yuansong; Chen, Meixue; Shan, Baoqing

    2016-01-01

    The nanofiltration (NF) membrane fouling characteristics and cleaning strategies were investigated and compared for treating membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent and MBR-granular activated carbon (GAC) effluent of an antibiotic production wastewater by DK membrane. Results showed that the fouling of treating MBR effluent was more severe than that of treating MBR-GAC effluent. After filtering for 216 h, the difference of membrane flux decline was obvious between MBR effluent and MBR-GAC effluent, with 14.9% and 10.3% flux decline, respectively. Further study showed that organic fouling is the main NF membrane fouling in the advanced treatment of antibiotic production wastewater for both of the two different effluents. Soluble microbial by-product like and tyrosine-like substances were the dominant components in the foulants, whereas humic-like substances existing in the effluents had little contribution to the NF membrane fouling. A satisfactory efficiency of NF chemical cleaning could be obtained using combination of acid (HCl, pH 2.0-2.5) and alkali (NaOH + 0.3 wt% NaDS, pH 10.0-10.5). The favorable cleaning strategy is acid-alkali for treating the MBR-GAC effluent, while it is alkali-acid for treating the MBR effluent.

  5. Cross-sectional Pilot Study of Antibiotic Resistance in Propionibacterium Acnes Strains in Indian Acne Patients Using 16S-RNA Polymerase Chain Reaction: A Comparison Among Treatment Modalities Including Antibiotics, Benzoyl Peroxide, and Isotretinoin

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, Kabir; Gupta, Tanvi; Kumar, Bipul; Gautam, Hemant K; Garg, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Background: Antibiotic resistance is a worldwide problem in acne patients due to regional prescription practices, patient compliance, and genomic variability in Propionibacterium acnes, though the effect of treatment on the resistance has not been comprehensively analyzed. Aims: Our primary objective was to assess the level of antibiotic resistance in the Indian patients and to assess whether there was a difference in the resistance across common treatment groups. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional, institutional based study was undertaken and three groups of patients were analyzed, treatment naïve, those on antibiotics and patients on benzoyl peroxide (BPO) and/isotretinoin. The follicular content was sampled and the culture was verified with 16S rRNA polymerase chain reaction, genomic sequencing, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assessment was done for erythromycin (ERY), azithromycin (AZI), clindamycin (CL), tetracycline (TET), doxycycline (DOX), minocycline (MINO), and levofloxacin (LEVO). The four groups of patients were compared for any difference in the resistant strains. Results: Of the 52 P. acnes strains isolated (80 patients), high resistance was observed to AZI (100%), ERY (98%), CL (90.4%), DOX (44.2%), and TETs (30.8%). Low resistance was observed to MINO (1.9%) and LEVO (9.6%). Statistical difference was seen in the resistance between CL and TETs; DOX/LEVO and DOX/MINO (P < 0.001). High MIC90 (≥256 μg/ml) was seen with CL, macrolides, and TETs; moreover, low MIC90 was observed to DOX (16 μg/ml), MINO (8 μg/ml), and LEVO (4 μg/ml). Though the treatment group with isotretinoin/BPO had the least number of resistant strains there was no statistical difference in the antibiotic resistance among the various groups of patients. Conclusions: High resistance was seen among the P. acnes strains to macrolides-lincosamides (AZI and CL) while MINO and LEVO resistance was low. PMID:26955094

  6. Microbial sequencing methods for monitoring of anaerobic treatment of antibiotics to optimize performance and prevent system failure.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan

    2016-06-01

    As a result of developments in molecular technologies and the use of sequencing technologies, the analyses of the anaerobic microbial community in biological treatment process has become increasingly prevalent. This review examines the ways in which microbial sequencing methods can be applied to achieve an extensive understanding of the phylogenetic and functional characteristics of microbial assemblages in anaerobic reactor if the substrate is contaminated by antibiotics which is one of the most important toxic compounds. It will discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with microbial sequencing techniques that are more commonly employed and will assess how a combination of the existing methods may be applied to develop a more comprehensive understanding of microbial communities and improve the validity and depth of the results for the enhancement of the stability of anaerobic reactors.

  7. Antibiotic Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... resistance develops, the antibiotic is not able to kill the germs causing the infection. Your infection may ... to vaginal yeast infections. This happens because antibiotics kill the normal bacteria in the vagina and this ...

  8. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991–2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Berni, Ellen; Scott, Laura A.; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; De Voogd, Hanka; Rocha, Monica S.; Butler, Chris C.; Morgan, Christopher Ll.; Currie, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45%) episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), 89,558 (11%) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), 286,969 (35%) for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and 79,224 (10%) for acute otitis media (AOM). The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%), penicillin-V (24%), erythromycin (11%), flucloxacillin (11%) and oxytetracycline (6%). In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991–1999 and for LRTIs in 2000–2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%. PMID:27384588

  9. Pre-packing of cost effective antibiotic cement beads for the treatment of traumatic osteomyelitis in the developing world - an in-vitro study based in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Noor, S; Gilson, A; Kennedy, K; Swanson, A; Vanny, V; Mony, K; Chaudhry, T; Gollogly, J

    2016-04-01

    The developing world often lacks the resources to effectively treat the most serious injuries including osteomyelitis following open fractures or surgical fracture treatment. Antibiotic cement beads are a widely accepted method of delivering antibiotics locally to the infected area following trauma. This study is based in Cambodia, a low income country struggling to recover from a recent genocide. The study aims to test the effectiveness of locally made antibiotic beads and analyse their effectiveness after being gas sterilised, packaged and kept in storage Different antibiotic beads were manufactured locally using bone cement and tested against MRSA bacteria grown from a case of osteomyelitis. Each antibiotic was tested before and after a process of gas sterilisation as well as later being tested after storage in packaging up to 42 days. The gentamicin, vancomycin, amikacin and ceftriaxone beads all inhibited growth of the MRSA on the TSB and agar plates, both before and after gas sterilisation. All four antibiotics continued to show similar zones of inhibition after 42 days of storage. The results show significant promise to produce beads with locally obtainable ingredients in an austere environment and improve cost effectiveness by storing them in a sterilised condition.

  10. Stent-Graft Placement with Early Debridement and Antibiotic Treatment for Femoral Pseudoaneurysms in Intravenous Drug Addicts

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Qining Meng, Xiyun Li, Fenghe Wang, Xuehu Cheng, Jun Huang, Wen Ren, Wei Zhao, Yu

    2015-06-15

    PurposeExplore the application of endovascular covered stent-graft (SG) placement in femoral pseudoaneurysms in intravenous drug addicts.Materials and MethodsWe evaluated a consecutive series of pseudoaneurysm in intravenous drug addicts treated with SGs from August 2010 to December 2013.Results15 patients with 16 arterial pseudoaneurysms were enrolled in this study. All were males with a mean age of 36.9 years. Hemorrhage was the most common reason (93.8 %) for seeking medical care, and 3 of these patients were in hemorrhagic shock at admission. All patients received broad-spectrum antibiotics, and debridement and drainage were implemented after SG placement. 7 of the 13 cases which had microbiologic results showed mixed infections, while gram-negative bacteria were the major pathogens. Except for 2 patients, who were lost to follow-up, two new pseudoaneurysms formed due to delayed debridement, and one stent thrombosis occurred, none of the remaining cases had SG infection or developed claudication.ConclusionsSG placement controls massive hemorrhage rapidly, gives enough time for subsequent treatment for pseudoaneurysms due to intravenous drug abuse, and reduces the incidence of postoperative claudication. With appropriate broad-spectrum antibiotics and early debridement, the incidence of SG infection is relatively low. It is an effective alternative especially as temporary bridge measure for critical patients. However, the high cost, uncertain long-term prospects, high demand for medical adherence, and the risk of using the conduits for re-puncture call for a cautious selection of patients. More evidence is required for the application of this treatment.

  11. High Individuality of Respiratory Bacterial Communities in a Large Cohort of Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients under Continuous Antibiotic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Rolf; Sauer-Heilborn, Annette; Welte, Tobias; Jauregui, Ruy; Brettar, Ingrid; Guzman, Carlos A.; Höfle, Manfred G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Routine clinical diagnostics of CF patients focus only on a restricted set of well-known pathogenic species. Recent molecular studies suggest that infections could be polymicrobial with many bacteria not detected by culture-based diagnostics. Methodology and Principal Findings A large cohort of 56 adults with continuous antibiotic treatment was studied and different microbial diagnostic methods were compared, including culture-independent and culture-based bacterial diagnostics. A total of 72 sputum samples including longitudinal observations was analysed by 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison. Prevalence of known pathogens was highly similar among all methods but the vast spectrum of bacteria associated with CF was only revealed by culture-independent techniques. The sequence comparison enabled confident determination of the bacterial community composition and revealed a high diversity and individuality in the communities across the cohort. Results of microbiological analyses were further compared with individual host factors, such as age, lung function and CFTR genotype. No statistical relationship between these factors and the diversity of the entire community or single bacterial species could be identified. However, patients with non-ΔF508 mutations in the CFTR gene often had low abundances of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Persistence of specific bacteria in some communities was demonstrated by longitudinal analyses of 13 patients indicating a potential clinical relevance of anaerobic bacteria, such as Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus millerii. Conclusions The high individuality in community composition and the lack of correlation to clinical host factors might be due to the continuous treatment with antibiotics. Since this is current practice for adult CF patients, the life-long history of the patient and the varying selection pressure on the related microbial communities should be a focus of future studies and its relation to disease progression

  12. Residue levels and discharge loads of antibiotics in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), hospital lagoons, and rivers within Lake Victoria Basin, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kimosop, Selly Jemutai; Getenga, Z M; Orata, F; Okello, V A; Cheruiyot, J K

    2016-09-01

    The detection of antibiotics in water systems has instigated great environmental concern due to the toxicological effects associated with these compounds. Their discharge into the environment results from the ubiquity of use in medical, veterinary, and agricultural practices. Some of the effects of antibiotics include development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, making it difficult to treat diseases, variation in natural microbial communities, and enzyme activities. In this study, the first comprehensive survey of some frequently used antibiotics namely ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX), sulfamethoxazole (SMX), chloramphenicol (CAP), and ciprofloxacin (CPF) within Lake Victoria Basin of Kenya is presented. Sludge and wastewater samples were collected from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and hospital lagoons within the study area. Samples were extracted and cleaned by solid-phase extraction, and analysis was carried out using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All wastewater samples and sludge collected contained quantifiable levels of the selected antibiotics. The highest concentrations were recorded for AMP with WWTPs and hospitals having 0.36 ± 0.04 and 0.79 ± 0.07 μg/L, respectively. In sludge samples, SMX recorded the highest concentrations of 276 ± 12 ng/g. The high levels in sludge indicate the preferential partition of antibiotics onto solid phase, posing great danger to consumers of crops grown in biosolid-amended soils. The daily discharge loads of antibiotics from nine WWTPs ranged between 80.75 and 3044.9 mg day(-1) with a total discharge of 6395.85 mg day(-1), signifying a high potential of water resource pollution within the region. This report will aid in the assessment of the risks posed by antibiotics released into the environment.

  13. Chemical and toxicological evolution of the antibiotic sulfamethoxazole under ozone treatment in water solution.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Ramos, María del Mar; Mezcua, Milagros; Agüera, Ana; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; Gonzalo, Soledad; Rodríguez, Antonio; Rosal, Roberto

    2011-08-15

    This work studied the elimination paths of the sulfonamide antibiotic sulfamethoxazole by ozonation in fast kinetic regime. The ozonation runs were performed in conditions favouring either the direct attack of the ozone molecule or the indirect attack by ozone-generated radical species with initial concentration of 0.150 mM. When doses of ozone were transferred to the liquid phase 0.2mM, in no case did sulfamethoxazole remain in solution. Two main transformation pathways were found involving the preferential attack of molecular ozone or radical pathway and leading to the formation of six intermediates, which were identified by LC-ESI-QTOF-MS. Both routes took place simultaneously in the different conditions tested, leading to a hydroxylation reaction of the benzene ring, oxidation of the amino group on the benzene ring, oxidation of the methyl group and the double bond in the isoxazole ring and S-N bond cleavage. The most abundant reaction intermediate was that resulting from S-N bond cleavage. The toxicity of partially ozonated samples for Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata revealed the formation of toxic by-products during the early stages of reaction and the persistence of considerable toxicity after the total depletion of sulfamethoxazole.

  14. Pancreatic Necrosis and Gas in the Retroperitoneum: Treatment with Antibiotics Alone

    PubMed Central

    Rasslan, Roberto; da Costa Ferreira Novo, Fernando; Rocha, Marcelo Cristiano; Bitran, Alberto; de Souza Rocha, Manoel; de Oliveira Bernini, Celso; Rasslan, Samir; Utiyama, Edivaldo Massazo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present our experience in the management of patients with infected pancreatic necrosis without drainage. METHODS: The records of patients with pancreatic necrosis admitted to our facility from 2011 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: We identified 61 patients with pancreatic necrosis. Six patients with pancreatic necrosis and gas in the retroperitoneum were treated exclusively with clinical support without any type of drainage. Only 2 patients had an APACHE II score >8. The first computed tomography scan revealed the presence of gas in 5 patients. The Balthazar computed tomography severity index score was >9 in 5 of the 6 patients. All patients were treated with antibiotics for at least 3 weeks. Blood cultures were positive in only 2 patients. Parenteral nutrition was not used in these patients. The length of hospital stay exceeded three weeks for 5 patients; 3 patients had to be readmitted. A cholecystectomy was performed after necrosis was completely resolved; pancreatitis recurred in 2 patients before the operation. No patients died. CONCLUSIONS: In selected patients, infected pancreatic necrosis (gas in the retroperitoneum) can be treated without percutaneous drainage or any additional surgical intervention. Intervention procedures should be performed for patients who exhibit clinical and laboratory deterioration. PMID:28273241

  15. In Vitro and In Vivo Antibacterial Evaluation of Cadazolid, a New Antibiotic for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Enderlin, Michel; Klenk, Axel; Fournier, Elvire; Hubschwerlen, Christian; Ritz, Daniel; Kelly, Ciaran P.; Keck, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea with significant morbidity and mortality, and new options for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) are needed. Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic that is currently in clinical development for treatment of CDAD. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial evaluation of cadazolid against C. difficile. Cadazolid showed potent in vitro activity against C. difficile with a MIC range of 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml, including strains resistant to linezolid and fluoroquinolones. In time-kill kinetics experiments, cadazolid showed a bactericidal effect against C. difficile isolates, with >99.9% killing in 24 h, and was more bactericidal than vancomycin. In contrast to metronidazole and vancomycin, cadazolid strongly inhibited de novo toxin A and B formation in stationary-phase cultures of toxigenic C. difficile. Cadazolid also inhibited C. difficile spore formation substantially at growth-inhibitory concentrations. In the hamster and mouse models for CDAD, cadazolid was active, conferring full protection from diarrhea and death with a potency similar to that of vancomycin. These findings support further investigations of cadazolid for the treatment of CDAD. PMID:24277020

  16. In vitro and in vivo antibacterial evaluation of cadazolid, a new antibiotic for treatment of Clostridium difficile infections.

    PubMed

    Locher, Hans H; Seiler, Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Schroeder, Susanne; Pfaff, Philippe; Enderlin, Michel; Klenk, Axel; Fournier, Elvire; Hubschwerlen, Christian; Ritz, Daniel; Kelly, Ciaran P; Keck, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated diarrhea with significant morbidity and mortality, and new options for the treatment of C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) are needed. Cadazolid is a new oxazolidinone-type antibiotic that is currently in clinical development for treatment of CDAD. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo antibacterial evaluation of cadazolid against C. difficile. Cadazolid showed potent in vitro activity against C. difficile with a MIC range of 0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml, including strains resistant to linezolid and fluoroquinolones. In time-kill kinetics experiments, cadazolid showed a bactericidal effect against C. difficile isolates, with >99.9% killing in 24 h, and was more bactericidal than vancomycin. In contrast to metronidazole and vancomycin, cadazolid strongly inhibited de novo toxin A and B formation in stationary-phase cultures of toxigenic C. difficile. Cadazolid also inhibited C. difficile spore formation substantially at growth-inhibitory concentrations. In the hamster and mouse models for CDAD, cadazolid was active, conferring full protection from diarrhea and death with a potency similar to that of vancomycin. These findings support further investigations of cadazolid for the treatment of CDAD.

  17. The intrauterine treatment of the retained foetal membrane in dairy goats by ozone: novel alternative to antibiotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Djuricic, D; Valpotic, H; Samardzija, M

    2015-04-01

    One of the major post-parturient complications in dairy goats is the retention of foetal membrane (RFM), which negatively influences their health, reproductive efficacy and welfare. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of intrauterine either ozone (OZ) or antibiotic (AB) treatments to establish the use of OZ as a novel and potential alternative to AB therapy in does with the RFM. The study was performed on 7 herds of dairy goats (n = 563) kept in the farms in Croatia. The conception rate was 563 of 641 total matings or 87.83%. The does from selected farms were observed during early puerperium and were divided into animals without the RFM (n = 522) and with the RFM (n = 41), treated either with foam spray OZ (n = 21) or with foaming AB oxytetracycline tablets (n = 20). The does with the RFM were mated successfully and became pregnant next kidding season, regardless of the treatment applied. Treatment with OZ attained similar results to the standard AB therapy, indicating that it could be novel potential alternative therapy of the RFM in dairy goats.

  18. Occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in landfill leachate treatment plant and its effluent-receiving soil and surface water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Xu, Yan-Bin; He, Xiao-Lin; Huang, Lu; Ling, Jia-Yin; Zheng, Li; Du, Qing-Ping

    2016-11-01

    The antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) from urban waste may spread to the environment with the discharge of leachate. Fifteen types of ARGs, including tetracycline, sulfonamides, AmpC β-lactamase and the class 1 integron gene were detected in the samples from the largest leachate treatment plant (LTP) in Guangzhou and its effluent receiving bodies (soil and surface water). The results showed that ARGs in leachates were in high levels and varied with seasons. The abundance of ARGs in the influent from high to low was in the turn of summer, winter, spring. About 2 to 4 orders of magnitude of ARGs were eliminated by the whole leachate treatment process. The predominant ARGs in the receiving soil were intI1, tetB, sul2, tetA and tetX, while those in the receiving surface water were sul2, intI1 and sul1, and the concentrations of ARGs in the receiving bodies were higher than those in the other natural bodies by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude. In addition, the results of bivariate correlation analysis showed that the abundances of ARGs (tetC, tetW, sul1, sul2, intI1 and FOX) were in significant correlation with the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr) (p < 0.05). LTPs are more likely to be sources of ARGs than wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and need to be focused on.

  19. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  20. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  1. Combination antibiotics for the treatment of Chlamydia-induced reactive arthritis: is a cure in sight?

    PubMed Central

    Carter, John D; Gérard, Hervé C; Whittum-Hudson, Judith A; Hudson, Alan P

    2011-01-01

    The inflammatory arthritis that develops in some patients subsequent to urogenital infection by the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, and that induced subsequent to pulmonary infection with C. pneumoniae, both have proved difficult to treat in either their acute or chronic forms. Over the last two decades, molecular genetic and other studies of these pathogens have provided a good deal of information regarding their metabolic and genetic structures, as well as the detailed means by which they interact with their host cells. In turn, these insights have provided for the first time a window into the bases for treatment failures for the inflammatory arthritis. In this article we discuss the biological bases for those treatment failures, provide suggestions as to research directions that should allow improvement in treatment modalities, and speculate on how treatment regimens that currently show promise might be significantly improved over the near future using nanotechological means. PMID:21853013

  2. Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease.

    PubMed

    Vangay, Pajau; Ward, Tonya; Gerber, Jeffrey S; Knights, Dan

    2015-05-13

    Antibiotics are by far the most common medications prescribed for children. Recent epidemiological data suggests an association between early antibiotic use and disease phenotypes in adulthood. Antibiotic use during infancy induces imbalances in gut microbiota, called dysbiosis. The gut microbiome's responses to antibiotics and its potential link to disease development are especially complex to study in the changing infant gut. Here, we synthesize current knowledge linking antibiotics, dysbiosis, and disease and propose a framework for studying antibiotic-related dysbiosis in children. We recommend future studies into the microbiome-mediated effects of antibiotics focused on four types of dysbiosis: loss of keystone taxa, loss of diversity, shifts in metabolic capacity, and blooms of pathogens. Establishment of a large and diverse baseline cohort to define healthy infant microbiome development is essential to advancing diagnosis, interpretation, and eventual treatment of pediatric dysbiosis. This approach will also help provide evidence-based recommendations for antibiotic usage in infancy.

  3. Treatment of non-vital immature teeth with amoxicillin-containing triple antibiotic paste resulting in apexification

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyon-Beom; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Hwang, In-Nam; Oh, Won-Mann

    2015-01-01

    A recent treatment option for non-vital immature teeth in young patients is revascularization with triple antibiotic paste (TAP). However, tooth discoloration was reported with the use of conventional minocycline-containing TAP. In this case report, amoxicillin-containing TAP was used for revascularization of non-vital immature teeth to prevent tooth discoloration. At the 1 yr follow up, the teeth were asymptomatic on clinical examination and showed slight discoloration of the crown due to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) filling rather than amoxicillin-containing TAP. Radiographic examination revealed complete resolution of the periapical radiolucency, and closed apex with obvious periodontal ligament space. However, the root growth was limited, and the treatment outcome was more like apexification rather than revascularization. These results may be due to unstable blood clot formation which could not resist the condensation force of MTA filling, whether or not a collagen matrix was in place. These cases showed that although revascularization was not successful, apexification could be expected, resulting in the resolution of the periapical radiolucency and the closure of the apex. Therefore, it is worthwhile attempting revascularization of non-vital immature teeth in young patients. PMID:26587419

  4. Abundance and fate of antibiotics and hormones in a vegetative treatment system receiving cattle feedlot runoff

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetative treatment systems (VTS) have been developed and built as an alternative to conventional holding pond systems for managing run-off from animal feeding operations. Initially developed to manage runoff nutrients via uptake by grasses, their effectiveness at removing other runoff contaminant...

  5. Sampling the antibiotic resistome.

    PubMed

    D'Costa, Vanessa M; McGrann, Katherine M; Hughes, Donald W; Wright, Gerard D

    2006-01-20

    Microbial resistance to antibiotics currently spans all known classes of natural and synthetic compounds. It has not only hindered our treatment of infections but also dramatically reshaped drug discovery, yet its origins have not been systematically studied. Soil-dwelling bacteria produce and encounter a myriad of antibiotics, evolving corresponding sensing and evading strategies. They are a reservoir of resistance determinants that can be mobilized into the microbial community. Study of this reservoir could provide an early warning system for future clinically relevant antibiotic resistance mechanisms.

  6. Effectiveness of Steroid/Antibiotic Treatment in Primates Administered LD100 Escherichia coli.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    probability for survival of baboons given LD100 E . coli . The present study was designed to determine if baboons would recover when initiation of treatment...was delayed until they had sustained E . coli -induced systemic hypotension for a period of approximately three hours. Sixteen adult baboons were each...administered a two-hour infusion of LD100 E . coli . All eight untreated animals died within 42 hours. Five of the eight baboons treated after

  7. Targeting Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chellat, Mathieu F.; Raguž, Luka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Finding strategies against the development of antibiotic resistance is a major global challenge for the life sciences community and for public health. The past decades have seen a dramatic worldwide increase in human‐pathogenic bacteria that are resistant to one or multiple antibiotics. More and more infections caused by resistant microorganisms fail to respond to conventional treatment, and in some cases, even last‐resort antibiotics have lost their power. In addition, industry pipelines for the development of novel antibiotics have run dry over the past decades. A recent world health day by the World Health Organization titled “Combat drug resistance: no action today means no cure tomorrow” triggered an increase in research activity, and several promising strategies have been developed to restore treatment options against infections by resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:27000559

  8. Addressing resistance to antibiotics in systematic reviews of antibiotic interventions.

    PubMed

    Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David J; Afshari, Arash; Pace, Nathan Leon; Cullum, Nicky; Williams, Hywel C; Smyth, Alan; Skoetz, Nicole; Del Mar, Chris; Schilder, Anne G M; Yahav, Dafna; Tovey, David

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotics are among the most important interventions in healthcare. Resistance of bacteria to antibiotics threatens the effectiveness of treatment. Systematic reviews of antibiotic treatments often do not address resistance to antibiotics even when data are available in the original studies. This omission creates a skewed view, which emphasizes short-term efficacy and ignores the long-term consequences to the patient and other people. We offer a framework for addressing antibiotic resistance in systematic reviews. We suggest that the data on background resistance in the original trials should be reported and taken into account when interpreting results. Data on emergence of resistance (whether in the body reservoirs or in the bacteria causing infection) are important outcomes. Emergence of resistance should be taken into account when interpreting the evidence on antibiotic treatment in randomized controlled trials or systematic reviews.

  9. Variation of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater treatment plant with A(2)O-MBR system.

    PubMed

    Du, Jing; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Ding, Lili; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan

    2015-03-01

    The variation of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs)-tetG, tetW, tetX, sul1, and intI1-in a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant with A(2)O-MBR system was studied. The concentrations of five resistance genes both in influent and in membrane bioreactor (MBR) effluent decreased as sul1 > intI1 > tetX > tetG > tetW, and an abundance of sul1 was statistically higher than three other tetracycline resistance genes (tetG, tetW, and tetX) (p < 0.05). The concentrations of five ARGs in the influent were all higher in spring (median 10(5.81)-10(7.32) copies mL(-1)) than they were in other seasons, and tetW, tetX, and sul1 reached its lowest concentration in autumn (10(4.61)-10(6.81) copies mL(-1)). The concentration of ARGs in wastewater decreased in the anaerobic effluent and anoxic effluent, but increased in the aerobic effluent, and then sharply declined in the MBR effluent. The reduction of tetW, intI1, and sul1 was all significantly positively correlated with the reduction of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) in the wastewater treatment process (p < 0.01). The concentration of ARGs (copies mg(-1)) in sludge samples increased along the treatment process, but the abundance of five ARGs (ratio of ARGs to 16S rDNA) remained the same from anaerobic to anoxic to aerobic basins, while an increment ratio in MBR was observed for all ARGs.

  10. Biofilm-Grown Burkholderia cepacia Complex Cells Survive Antibiotic Treatment by Avoiding Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen; Sass, Andrea; Bazzini, Silvia; De Roy, Karen; Udine, Claudia; Messiaen, Thomas; Riccardi, Giovanna; Boon, Nico; Nelis, Hans J.; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar; Coenye, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The presence of persister cells has been proposed as a factor in biofilm resilience. In the present study we investigated whether persister cells are present in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) biofilms, what the molecular basis of antimicrobial tolerance in Bcc persisters is, and how persisters can be eradicated from Bcc biofilms. After treatment of Bcc biofilms with high concentrations of various antibiotics often a small subpopulation survived. To investigate the molecular mechanism of tolerance in this subpopulation, Burkholderia cenocepacia biofilms were treated with 1024 µg/ml of tobramycin. Using ROS-specific staining and flow cytometry, we showed that tobramycin increased ROS production in treated sessile cells. However, approximately 0.1% of all sessile cells survived the treatment. A transcriptome analysis showed that several genes from the tricarboxylic acid cycle and genes involved in the electron transport chain were downregulated. In contrast, genes from the glyoxylate shunt were upregulated. These data indicate that protection against ROS is important for the survival of persisters. To confirm this, we determined the number of persisters in biofilms formed by catalase mutants. The persister fraction in ΔkatA and ΔkatB biofilms was significantly reduced, confirming the role of ROS detoxification in persister survival. Pretreatment of B. cenocepacia biofilms with itaconate, an inhibitor of isocitrate lyase (ICL), the first enzyme in the glyoxylate shunt, reduced the persister fraction approx. 10-fold when the biofilms were subsequently treated with tobramycin. In conclusion, most Bcc biofilms contain a significant fraction of persisters that survive treatment with high doses of tobramycin. The surviving persister cells downregulate the TCA cycle to avoid production of ROS and at the same time activate an alternative pathway, the glyoxylate shunt. This pathway may present a novel target for combination therapy. PMID:23516582

  11. Deciphering the Bacterial Microbiome of Citrus Plants in Response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’-Infection and Antibiotic Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Muqing; Powell, Charles A.; Benyon, Lesley S.; Zhou, Hui; Duan, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial microbiomes of citrus plants were characterized in response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las)-infection and treatments with ampicillin (Amp) and gentamicin (Gm) by Phylochip-based metagenomics. The results revealed that 7,407 of over 50,000 known Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) in 53 phyla were detected in citrus leaf midribs using the PhyloChip™ G3 array, of which five phyla were dominant, Proteobacteria (38.7%), Firmicutes (29.0%), Actinobacteria (16.1%), Bacteroidetes (6.2%) and Cyanobacteria (2.3%). The OTU62806, representing ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’, was present with a high titer in the plants graft-inoculated with Las-infected scions treated with Gm at 100 mg/L and in the water-treated control (CK1). However, the Las bacterium was not detected in the plants graft-inoculated with Las-infected scions treated with Amp at 1.0 g/L or in plants graft-inoculated with Las-free scions (CK2). The PhyloChip array demonstrated that more OTUs, at a higher abundance, were detected in the Gm-treated plants than in the other treatment and the controls. Pairwise comparisons indicated that 23 OTUs from the Achromobacter spp. and 12 OTUs from the Methylobacterium spp. were more abundant in CK2 and CK1, respectively. Ten abundant OTUs from the Stenotrophomonas spp. were detected only in the Amp-treatment. These results provide new insights into microbial communities that may be associated with the progression of citrus huanglongbing (HLB) and the potential effects of antibiotics on the disease and microbial ecology. PMID:24250784

  12. How competition governs whether moderate or aggressive treatment minimizes antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Colijn, Caroline; Cohen, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how our use of antimicrobial drugs shapes future levels of drug resistance is crucial. Recently, there has been debate over whether an aggressive (i.e., high dose) or more moderate (i.e., lower dose) treatment of individuals will most limit the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate how one can understand and resolve these apparently contradictory conclusions. We show that a key determinant of which treatment strategy will perform best at the individual level is the extent of effective competition between resistant and sensitive pathogens within a host. We extend our analysis to the community level, exploring the spectrum between strict inter-strain competition and strain independence. From this perspective as well, we find that the magnitude of effective competition between resistant and sensitive strains determines whether an aggressive approach or moderate approach minimizes the burden of resistance in the population. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10559.001 PMID:26393685

  13. Epigallocatechin Gallate Remodels Overexpressed Functional Amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Increases Biofilm Susceptibility to Antibiotic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Stenvang, Marcel; Dueholm, Morten S; Vad, Brian S; Seviour, Thomas; Zeng, Guanghong; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Søndergaard, Mads T; Christiansen, Gunna; Meyer, Rikke Louise; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Otzen, Daniel E

    2016-12-16

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is the major polyphenol in green tea. It has antimicrobial properties and disrupts the ordered structure of amyloid fibrils involved in human disease. The antimicrobial effect of EGCG against the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been shown to involve disruption of quorum sensing (QS). Functional amyloid fibrils in P. aeruginosa (Fap) are able to bind and retain quorum-sensing molecules, suggesting that EGCG interferes with QS through structural remodeling of amyloid fibrils. Here we show that EGCG inhibits the ability of Fap to form fibrils; instead, EGCG stabilizes protein oligomers. Existing fibrils are remodeled by EGCG into non-amyloid aggregates. This fibril remodeling increases the binding of pyocyanin, demonstrating a mechanism by which EGCG can affect the QS function of functional amyloid. EGCG reduced the amyloid-specific fluorescent thioflavin T signal in P. aeruginosa biofilms at concentrations known to exert an antimicrobial effect. Nanoindentation studies showed that EGCG reduced the stiffness of biofilm containing Fap fibrils but not in biofilm with little Fap. In a combination treatment with EGCG and tobramycin, EGCG had a moderate effect on the minimum bactericidal eradication concentration against wild-type P. aeruginosa biofilms, whereas EGCG had a more pronounced effect when Fap was overexpressed. Our results provide a direct molecular explanation for the ability of EGCG to disrupt P. aeruginosa QS and modify its biofilm and strengthens the case for EGCG as a candidate in multidrug treatment of persistent biofilm infections.

  14. Novel Antibiotic Susceptibility Tests by the ATP-Bioluminescence Method Using Filamentous Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Noriaki; Nakajima, Moto-O; O’Hara, Koji; Sawai, Tetsuo

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by the ATP-bioluminescence method has been noted for its speed; it provides susceptibility results within 2 to 5 h. However, several disagreements between the ATP method and standard methodology have been reported. The present paper describes a novel ATP method in a 3.5-h test which overcomes these deficiencies through the elimination of false-resistance discrepancies in tests on gram-negative bacteria with β-lactam agents. In our test model using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and piperacillin, it was shown that ATP in filamentous cells accounted for the false resistance. We found that 0.5% 2-amino-2-methyl-1,3-propanediol (AMPD) extracted ATP from the filamentous cells without affecting normal cells and that 0.3 U of adenosine phosphate deaminase (APDase)/ml simultaneously digested the extracted ATP. We used the mixture of these reagents for the pretreatment of cells in a procedure we named filamentous cell treatment, prior to ATP measurements. This novel ATP method with the filamentous cell treatment eliminated false-resistance discrepancies in tests on P. aeruginosa with β-lactam agents, including piperacillin, cefoperazone, aztreonam, imipenem-cilastatin, ceftazidime, and cefsulodin. Furthermore, this novel methodology produced results which agreed with those of the standard microdilution method in other tests on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Enterococcus faecalis, for non-β-lactam agents, such as fosfomycin, ofloxacin, minocycline, and aminoglycosides. MICs obtained by the novel ATP method were also in agreement with those obtained by the agar dilution method of susceptibility testing. From these results, it was shown that the novel ATP method could be used successfully to test the activities of antimicrobial agents with the elimination of the previously reported discrepancies. PMID:9624485

  15. Antibiotics for Treatment of Clostridium difficile Infection in Hospitalized Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Horton, Henry A; Dezfoli, Seper; Berel, Dror; Hirsch, Julianna; Ippoliti, Andrew; McGovern, Dermot; Kaur, Manreet; Shih, David; Dubinsky, Marla; Targan, Stephan R; Fleshner, Phillip; Vasiliauskas, Eric A; Grein, Jonathan; Murthy, Rekha; Melmed, Gil Y

    2014-09-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), namely ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), have worse outcomes with Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), including increased readmissions, colectomy, and death. Oral vancomycin is recommended for the treatment of severe CDI, while metronidazole is the standard of care for nonsevere infection. We aimed to assess treatment outcomes of CDI in IBD. We conducted a retrospective observational study of inpatients with CDI and IBD from January 2006 through December 2010. CDI severity was assessed using published criteria. Outcomes included readmission for CDI within 30 days and 12 weeks, length of stay, colectomy, and death. A total of 114 patients met inclusion criteria (UC, 62; CD, 52). Thirty-day readmissions were more common among UC than CD patients (24.2% versus 9.6%; P=0.04). Same-admission colectomy occurred in 27.4% of UC patients and 0% of CD patients (P<0.01). Severe CDI was more common among UC than CD patients (32.2% versus 19.4%; P=0.12) but not statistically significant. Two patients died from CDI-associated complications (UC, 1; CD, 1). Patients with UC and nonsevere CDI had fewer readmissions and shorter lengths of stay when treated with a vancomycin-containing regimen compared to those treated with metronidazole (30-day readmissions, 31.0% versus 0% [P=0.04]; length of stay, 13.62 days versus 6.38 days [P=0.02]). Patients with UC and nonsevere CDI have fewer readmissions and shorter lengths of stay when treated with a vancomycin-containing regimen relative to those treated with metronidazole alone. Patients with ulcerative colitis and CDI should be treated with vancomycin.

  16. [GEIPC-SEIMC and GTEI-SEMICYUC recommendations for antibiotic treatment of gram positive coccal infections in the critical patient].

    PubMed

    Olaechea Astigarraga, P M; Garnacho Montero, J; Grau Cerrato, S; Rodríguez Colomo, O; Palomar Martínez, M; Zaragoza Crespo, R; Muñoz García-Paredes, P; Cerdá Cerdá, E; Alvarez Lerma, F

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, an increment of infections caused by gram-positive cocci has been documented in nosocomial and hospital-acquired infections. In diverse countries, a rapid development of resistance to common antibiotics against gram-positive cocci has been observed. This situation is exceptional in Spain but our country might be affected in the near future. New antimicrobials active against these multi-drug resistant pathogens are nowadays available. It is essential to improve our current knowledge about pharmacokinetic properties of traditional and new antimicrobials to maximize its effectiveness and to minimize toxicity. These issues are even more important in critically ill patients because inadequate empirical therapy is associated with therapeutic failure and a poor outcome. Experts representing two scientific societies (Grupo de estudio de Infecciones en el Paciente Critico de la SEIMC and Grupo de trabajo de Enfermedades Infecciosas de la SEMICYUC) have elaborated a consensus document based on the current scientific evidence to summarize recommendations for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-positive cocci in critically ill patients.

  17. Beyond conventional antibiotics for the future treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections: two novel alternatives.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Devocelle, Marc; Humphreys, Hilary

    2012-08-01

    The majority of antibiotics currently used to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) infections target bacterial cell wall synthesis or protein synthesis. Only daptomycin has a novel mode of action. Reliance on limited targets for MRSA chemotherapy, has contributed to antimicrobial resistance. Two alternative approaches to the treatment of S. aureus infection, particularly those caused by MRSA, that have alternative mechanisms of action and that address the challenge of antimicrobial resistance are cationic host defence peptides and agents that target S. aureus virulence. Cationic host defence peptides have multiple mechanisms of action and are less likely than conventional agents to select resistant mutants. They are amenable to modifications that improve their stability, effectiveness and selectivity. Some cationic defence peptides such as bactenecin, mucroporin and imcroporin have potent in vitro bactericidal activity against MRSA. Antipathogenic agents also have potential to limit the pathogenesis of S aureus. These are generally small molecules that inhibit virulence targets in S. aureus without killing the bacterium and therefore have limited capacity to promote resistance development. Potential antipathogenic targets include the sortase enzyme system, the accessory gene regulator (agr) and the carotenoid biosynthetic pathway. Inhibitors of these targets have been identified and these may have potential for further development.

  18. 5 CFR 919.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate evidence. 919.900 Section 919.900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.900 Adequate...

  19. Determination of antibiotics in sewage from hospitals, nursery and slaughter house, wastewater treatment plant and source water in Chongqing region of Three Gorge Reservoir in China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chang, Xiaotian; Meyer, M.T.; Liu, Xiuying; Zhao, Q.; Hao, Chen; Chen, J.-a.; Qiu, Z.; Yang, L.; Cao, J.; Shu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Sewage samples from 4 hospitals, 1 nursery, 1 slaughter house, 1 wastewater treatment plant and 5 source water samples of Chongqing region of Three Gorge Reservoir were analyzed for macrolide, lincosamide, trimethoprim, fluorouinolone, sulfonamide and tetracycline antibiotics by online solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that the concentration of ofloxacin (OFX) in hospital was the highest among all water environments ranged from 1.660????g/L to 4.240????g/L and norfloxacin (NOR, 0.136-1.620????g/L), ciproflaxacin (CIP, ranged from 0.011????g/L to 0.136????g/L), trimethoprim (TMP, 0.061-0.174????g/L) were commonly detected. Removal range of antibiotics in the wastewater treatment plant was 18-100% and the removal ratio of tylosin, oxytetracycline and tetracycline were 100%. Relatively higher removal efficiencies were observed for tylosin (TYL), oxytetracycline (OXY) and tetracycline (TET)(100%), while lower removal efficiencies were observed for Trimethoprim (TMP, 1%), Epi-iso-chlorotetracycline (EICIC, 18%) and Erythromycin-H2O (ERY-H2O, 24%). Antibiotics were removed more efficiently in primary treatment compared with those in secondary treatment. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Selection of antibiotic resistance at very low antibiotic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sandegren, Linus

    2014-05-01

    Human use of antibiotics has driven the selective enrichment of pathogenic bacteria resistant to clinically used drugs. Traditionally, the selection of resistance has been considered to occur mainly at high, therapeutic levels of antibiotics, but we are now beginning to understand better the importance of selection of resistance at low levels of antibiotics. The concentration of an antibiotic varies in different body compartments during treatment, and low concentrations of antibiotics are found in sewage water, soils, and many water environments due to natural production and contamination from human activities. Selection of resistance at non-lethal antibiotic concentrations (below the wild-type minimum inhibitory concentration) occurs due to differences in growth rate at the particular antibiotic concentration between cells with different tolerance levels to the antibiotic. The minimum selective concentration for a particular antibiotic is reached when its reducing effect on growth of the susceptible strain balances the reducing effect (fitness cost) of the resistance determinant in the resistant strain. Recent studies have shown that resistant bacteria can be selected at concentrations several hundred-fold below the lethal concentrations for susceptible cells. Resistant mutants selected at low antibiotic concentrations are generally more fit than those selected at high concentrations but can still be highly resistant. The characteristics of selection at low antibiotic concentrations, the potential clinical problems of this mode of selection, and potential solutions will be discussed.

  1. Treatment of diarrhea in young children: results from surveys on the perception and use of oral rehydration solutions, antibiotics, and other therapies in India and Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Zwisler, Greg; Simpson, Evan; Moodley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background Diarrheal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children under five. Although oral rehydration solution (ORS) has tremendous therapeutic benefits, coverage of and demand for this product have remained low in many developing countries. This study surveyed caregivers and health care providers in India and Kenya to gather information about perceptions and use of various diarrhea treatments, assess reasons for low ORS use, and identify opportunities for expanding ORS use. Methods The project team conducted two rounds of semi–structured, quantitative surveys with more than 2000 caregivers in India and Kenya in 2012. A complementary survey covered more than 500 pharmacy staff and health care workers in both countries. In Kenya, the team also surveyed rural pharmacies to gather pricing and sales data. Results Although caregivers generally had very positive perceptions of ORS, they typically ranked antibiotics ahead of ORS as the strongest medicine for diarrhea (in India 62% ranked antibiotics first and 23% ranked ORS first, n = 404; in Kenya results were 55% and 29%, n = 401). Many caregivers had misconceptions about the purpose and effectiveness of various treatments. For example, most caregivers who gave ORS at last episode expected it to stop their child’s diarrhea (65% in India, n = 190; 73% in Kenya, n = 154). There were noteworthy differences between India and Kenya in the selection and sourcing of treatments. Much of the money spent by families during the last episode of diarrhea was for inappropriate treatments. This was especially true in India, where rural households typically spent US$ 2.29 (median for the 79% of rural households that paid for health care services or treatments, n = 199) with most of this going to pay fees of private health workers and/or for antibiotics. Conclusions Caregivers’ primary treatment goal is to stop diarrhea, and many believe that antibiotics or ORS will accomplish this

  2. [The history of antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Yazdankhah, Siamak; Lassen, Jørgen; Midtvedt, Tore; Solberg, Claus Ola

    2013-12-10

    The development of chemical compounds for the treatment of infectious diseases may be divided into three phases: a) the discovery in the 1600s in South America of alkaloid extracts from the bark of the cinchona tree and from the dried root of the ipecacuanha bush, which proved effective against, respectively, malaria (quinine) and amoebic dysentery (emetine); b) the development of synthetic drugs, which mostly took place in Germany, starting with Paul Ehrlich's (1854-1915) discovery of salvarsan (1909), and crowned with Gerhard Domagk's (1895-1964) discovery of the sulfonamides (1930s); and c) the discovery of antibiotics. The prime example of the latter is the development of penicillin in the late 1920s following a discovery by a solitary research scientist who never worked in a team and never as part of a research programme. It took another ten years or so before drug-quality penicillin was produced, with research now dependent on being conducted in large collaborative teams, frequently between universities and wealthy industrial companies. The search for new antibiotics began in earnest in the latter half of the 1940s and was mostly based on soil microorganisms. Many new antibiotics were discovered in this period, which may be termed «the golden age of antibiotics». Over the past three decades, the development of new antibiotics has largely stalled, while antibiotic resistance has increased. This situation may require new strategies for the treatment of infectious diseases.

  3. Antibiotic treatment algorithm development based on a microarray nucleic acid assay for rapid bacterial identification and resistance determination from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Rödel, Jürgen; Karrasch, Matthias; Edel, Birgit; Stoll, Sylvia; Bohnert, Jürgen; Löffler, Bettina; Saupe, Angela; Pfister, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Rapid diagnosis of bloodstream infections remains a challenge for the early targeting of an antibiotic therapy in sepsis patients. In recent studies, the reliability of the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-positive and Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GP and BC-GN) assays for the rapid identification of bacteria and resistance genes directly from positive BCs has been demonstrated. In this work, we have developed a model to define treatment recommendations by combining Verigene test results with knowledge on local antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial pathogens. The data of 275 positive BCs were analyzed. Two hundred sixty-three isolates (95.6%) were included in the Verigene assay panels, and 257 isolates (93.5%) were correctly identified. The agreement of the detection of resistance genes with subsequent phenotypic susceptibility testing was 100%. The hospital antibiogram was used to develop a treatment algorithm on the basis of Verigene results that may contribute to a faster patient management.

  4. The adult cystic fibrosis airway microbiota is stable over time and infection type, and highly resilient to antibiotic treatment of exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Fodor, Anthony A; Klem, Erich R; Gilpin, Deirdre F; Elborn, J Stuart; Boucher, Richard C; Tunney, Michael M; Wolfgang, Matthew C

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by defective mucociliary clearance and chronic airway infection by a complex microbiota. Infection, persistent inflammation and periodic episodes of acute pulmonary exacerbation contribute to an irreversible decline in CF lung function. While the factors leading to acute exacerbations are poorly understood, antibiotic treatment can temporarily resolve pulmonary symptoms and partially restore lung function. Previous studies indicated that exacerbations may be associated with changes in microbial densities and the acquisition of new microbial species. Given the complexity of the CF microbiota, we applied massively parallel pyrosequencing to identify changes in airway microbial community structure in 23 adult CF patients during acute pulmonary exacerbation, after antibiotic treatment and during periods of stable disease. Over 350,000 sequences were generated, representing nearly 170 distinct microbial taxa. Approximately 60% of sequences obtained were from the recognized CF pathogens Pseudomonas and Burkholderia, which were detected in largely non-overlapping patient subsets. In contrast, other taxa including Prevotella, Streptococcus, Rothia and Veillonella were abundant in nearly all patient samples. Although antibiotic treatment was associated with a small decrease in species richness, there was minimal change in overall microbial community structure. Furthermore, microbial community composition was highly similar in patients during an exacerbation and when clinically stable, suggesting that exacerbations may represent intrapulmonary spread of infection rather than a change in microbial community composition. Mouthwash samples, obtained from a subset of patients, showed a nearly identical distribution of taxa as expectorated sputum, indicating that aspiration may contribute to colonization of the lower airways. Finally, we observed a strong correlation between low species richness and poor lung function. Taken together, these

  5. Right dose, right now: using big data to optimize antibiotic dosing in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Elbers, Paul W G; Girbes, Armand; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Bosman, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics save lives and are essential for the practice of intensive care medicine. Adequate antibiotic treatment is closely related to outcome. However this is challenging in the critically ill, as their pharmacokinetic profile is markedly altered. Therefore, it is surprising that critical care physicians continue to rely on standard dosing regimens for every patient, regardless of the actual clinical situation. This review outlines the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles that underlie the need for individualized and personalized drug dosing. At present, therapeutic drug monitoring may be of help, but has major disadvantages, remains unavailable for most antibiotics and has produced mixed results. We therefore propose the AutoKinetics concept, taking decision support for antibiotic dosing back to the bedside. By direct interaction with electronic patient records, this opens the way for the use of big data for providing the right dose at the right time in each patient.

  6. Active educational intervention as a tool to improve safe and appropriate use of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shehadeh, Mayadah B; Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Hammad, Eman A

    2016-09-01

    Misconception about antibiotics use among the public has been widely outlined to be a main reason for inappropriate use of antibiotics including failure to complete treatment, skipping of doses, re-use of leftover medicines and overuse of antibiotics. The study was devised to evaluate whether education might be a potential strategy to promote safer use of antibiotics and reducing self-medication. Two hundred seventy one adults were asked to complete two questionnaires; a pre and posteducation. The questionnaires comprised of three parts consisting of 17 statements assessing the knowledge on: appropriate use, safe use and resistance of antibiotics. Knowledge score was estimated by calculating the percentage of correct responses. The mean (SD) knowledge score pre-education was 59.4% (20.3). However, posteducation the score was 65.9% (17.9), p < 0.001(t-test). Knowledge scores were classified as poor, adequate and good. Posteducation, participants within poor and adequate knowledge categories were significantly shifted to the good category describing better knowledge, McNemar-χ2 = 28.7, df = 3, p < 0.001. It is concluded that using tailored education material targeting antibiotic need and use with a major aim of improving the public knowledge about antibiotics can be an effective and feasible strategy. This pilot study could be considered as the starting point for a wider scale public educational intervention study and national antibiotic campaign. However, the improvement in participant's knowledge might not reflect an actual change in antibiotics-seeking behaviour or future retention of knowledge. Future research should seek to assess the impact of education on participant's behaviour.

  7. Short Course of Antibiotics Not Best for Kids' Ear Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... significant concerns regarding overuse of antibiotics and increased antibiotic resistance, we conducted this trial to see if reducing ... treatment would be equally effective along with decreased antibiotic resistance and fewer adverse reactions," Dr. Alejandro Hoberman said ...

  8. Mathematical Modeling of Bacterial Kinetics to Predict the Impact of Antibiotic Colonic Exposure and Treatment Duration on the Amount of Resistant Enterobacteria Excreted

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thu Thuy; Guedj, Jeremie; Chachaty, Elisabeth; de Gunzburg, Jean; Andremont, Antoine; Mentré, France

    2014-01-01

    Fecal excretion of antibiotics and resistant bacteria in the environment are major public health threats associated with extensive farming and modern medical care. Innovative strategies that can reduce the intestinal antibiotic concentrations during treatments are in development. However, the effect of lower exposure on the amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted has not been quantified, making it difficult to anticipate the impact of these strategies. Here, we introduce a bacterial kinetic model to capture the complex relationships between drug exposure, loss of susceptible enterobacteria and growth of resistant strains in the feces of piglets receiving placebo, 1.5 or 15 mg/kg/day ciprofloxacin, a fluoroquinolone, for 5 days. The model could well describe the kinetics of drug susceptible and resistant enterobacteria observed during treatment, and up to 22 days after treatment cessation. Next, the model was used to predict the expected amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted over an average piglet's lifetime (150 days) when varying drug exposure and treatment duration. For the clinically relevant dose of 15 mg/kg/day for 5 days, the total amount of resistant enterobacteria excreted was predicted to be reduced by 75% and 98% when reducing treatment duration to 3 and 1 day treatment, respectively. Alternatively, for a fixed 5-days treatment, the level of resistance excreted could be reduced by 18%, 33%, 57.5% and 97% if 3, 5, 10 and 30 times lower levels of colonic drug concentrations were achieved, respectively. This characterization on in vivo data of the dynamics of resistance to antibiotics in the colonic flora could provide new insights into the mechanism of dissemination of resistance and can be used to design strategies aiming to reduce it. PMID:25210849

  9. [Antibiotic stewardship].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2014-09-01

    Resistance against antibiotics is continuously increasing throughout the world and has become a very serious problem. For just this reason "Antibiotic Stewardship Programs" have been developed. These programs are intended to lead to a sustained improvement in the situation and to assure a rational practice for the prescription of anti-infective agents in medical facilities. The aim is to prescribe the correct antibiotic therapy to the right patient at the most appropriate point in time. An AWMF S3 guideline on this topic published by the German Society for Infectiology (S3-Leitlinie StrategienzurSicherungrationalerAntibiotika-AnwendungimKrankenhaus.AWMF-Registernummer 092/001 - S3 Guideline on Strategies for the Rational Use of Antibiotics in Hospitals. AWMF - Registry Number 092/001) has been available since the end of 2013. An essential aspect therein is the expert interdisciplinary cooperation of a team comprising a clinically experienced infectiologist, a hospital pharmacist and a consultant for microbiology.

  10. The influential roles of antibiotics prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients with peptic ulcer bleeding after initial endoscopic treatments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Jen-Chieh; Tai, Wei-Chen; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wang, Jing-Houng; Lu, Sheng-Nan; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2014-01-01

    The influential roles of antibiotic prophylaxis on cirrhotic patients with peptic ulcer bleeding are still not well documented. The purpose of this study is to clarify these influential roles and to identify the risk factors associated with rebleeding, bacterial infection and in-hospital mortality. A cross-sectional, chart review study was conducted on 210 cirrhotic patients with acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage who underwent therapeutic endoscopic procedures. Patients were divided into group A (with prophylactic intravenous ceftriaxone, n = 74) and group B (without antibiotics, n = 136). The outcomes were length of hospital days, prevention of infection, rebleeding rate and in-hospital mortality. Our results showed that more patients suffered from rebleeding and infection in group B than group A (31.6% vs. 5.4%; p<0.001 and 25% vs. 10.8%; p = 0.014 respectively). The risk factors for rebleeding were active alcoholism, unit of blood transfusion, Rockall score, model for end-stage liver disease score and antibiotic prophylaxis. The risk factors for infection were active alcoholism, Child-Pugh C, Rockall score and antibiotic prophylaxis. Rockall score was the predictive factor for in-hospital mortality. In conclusions, antibiotic prophylaxis in cirrhotic patients after endoscopic interventions for acute peptic ulcer hemorrhage reduced infections and rebleeding rate but not in-hospital mortality. Rockall score was the predictive factor of in-hospital mortality.

  11. Basis for selecting optimum antibiotic regimens for secondary peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Maseda, Emilio; Gimenez, Maria-Jose; Gilsanz, Fernando; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Adequate management of severely ill patients with secondary peritonitis requires supportive therapy of organ dysfunction, source control of infection and antimicrobial therapy. Since secondary peritonitis is polymicrobial, appropriate empiric therapy requires combination therapy in order to achieve the needed coverage for both common and more unusual organisms. This article reviews etiological agents, resistance mechanisms and their prevalence, how and when to cover them and guidelines for treatment in the literature. Local surveillances are the basis for the selection of compounds in antibiotic regimens, which should be further adapted to the increasing number of patients with risk factors for resistance (clinical setting, comorbidities, previous antibiotic treatments, previous colonization, severity…). Inadequate antimicrobial regimens are strongly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Awareness of resistance epidemiology and of clinical consequences of inadequate therapy against resistant bacteria is crucial for clinicians treating secondary peritonitis, with delicate balance between optimization of empirical therapy (improving outcomes) and antimicrobial overuse (increasing resistance emergence).

  12. Paediatric antibiotic prescriptions in primary care in the Alpes-Maritimes area of southeastern France between 2008 and 2013.

    PubMed

    Touboul-Lundgren, P; Bruno, P; Bailly, L; Dunais, B; Pradier, C

    2017-03-01

    France has remained among the top five European countries for ambulatory antibiotic consumption since such monitoring began in 1998. Young children are major antibiotic consumers, in spite of the viral origin of most infections in this population. Recommendations were updated in 2011 to limit prescriptions. In order to assess their impact, diagnoses and prescriptions were compared in a population of children attending daycare centres in southeastern France in 2008 and 2012. Trends in the reimbursement of paediatric antibiotic prescriptions by the national health insurance (NHI) for the whole area were also studied. Distribution of diagnoses accounting for antibiotic treatment and type of antibiotic prescribed over the previous 3 months to children below 4 years of age attending daycare centres in the Alpes-Maritimes area in southeastern France were compared between 2008 and 2012 prior to and following the availability of these new recommendations. Trends in reimbursed ambulatory antibiotic prescriptions by general practitioners and paediatricians in the area were studied for this age group from 2008 to 2012 and in 2013. The majority of recorded diagnoses concerned upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). Inappropriate antibiotic prescription persisted for colds and bronchitis in similar proportions during both surveys. Improvement in the choice of antibiotic with fewer prescriptions for third-generation cephalosporins was observed both in daycare centres and according to NHI data; however, this was mainly recorded among paediatricians. The management of paediatric URTI still needs improvement, pointing to the need to investigate and adequately address the reasons for inappropriate antibiotic prescription.

  13. A bioabsorbable delivery system for antibiotic treatment of osteomyelitis. The use of lactic acid oligomer as a carrier.

    PubMed

    Wei, G; Kotoura, Y; Oka, M; Yamamuro, T; Wada, R; Hyon, S H; Ikada, Y

    1991-03-01

    We prepared a composite of D,L-lactic acid oligomer and dideoxykanamycin B for use as a biodegradable antibiotic delivery system with sustained effect. The composite was implanted in the distal portion of the rabbit femur, and the effective concentration of the antibiotic was measured in the cortex, the cancellous bone, and the bone marrow. In all bone tissues around the implant, the concentration of antibiotic exceeded the minimum inhibitory concentration for the common causative organisms of osteomyelitis for six weeks. Most of the implant material had been absorbed and the bone marrow had been repaired to a nearly normal state within nine weeks of implantation. The implant caused no systemic side effects, and it is likely to prove clinically useful as a drug delivery system for treating chronic osteomyelitis.

  14. A Case of Recurrent Meningitis Caused by Rhodococcus species Successfully Treated with Antibiotic Treatment and Intrathecal Injection of Vancomycin through an Ommaya Reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kanglok; Rho, Min; Yu, Miyeon; Kwak, Joohee; Hong, Seungpyo; Kim, Jisoong; Kim, Yeonjae

    2015-01-01

    Human infection by Rhodococcus species is rare and mostly limited to immunocompromised hosts such as patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or organ transplant recipients. The most common strain is R. equi, and the most common clinical presentation is pulmonary infection, reported in 80% of Rhodococcus spp. infections. The central nervous system is an uncommon infection site. We report a case of a patient with pneumonia, brain abscess, and recurrent meningitis caused by Rhodococcus spp. He initially presented with pneumonia with necrosis, which progressed to brain abscess and recurrent meningitis. Rhodococcus spp. was identified from the cerobrospinal fluid (CSF) collected during his fourth hospital admission. Despite prolonged treatment with appropriate antibiotics, meningitis recurred three times. Finally, in order to administer antibiotics directly into the CSF and bypass the blood-brain barrier, an Ommaya reservoir was inserted for administration of 90 days of intrathecal vancomycin and amikacin in conjunction with intravenous and oral antibiotics; the patient was finally cured with this treatment regimen. PMID:26483993

  15. [Antibiotics in primary care].

    PubMed

    Steciwko, Andrzej; Lubieniecka, Małgorzata; Muszyńska, Agnieszka

    2011-05-01

    Discovered in the forties of the twentieth century antimicrobial agents have changed the world. Currently, due to their overuse, we are threatened by the increasing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics, and soon we may face a threat of inability to fight these pathogens. For that reason, the world, European and national organizations introduce antibiotics protection programs. In Poland since 2004, the National Program of Protection of Antibiotics is being held. The concept of rational antibiotic therapy is associated not only with the appropriate choice of therapy or antimicrobial dosage but also with a reduction in costs associated with a refund of medicines. Antibiotics are prescribed mostly by primary care physicians (GP), and about one fifth of visits to family doctor's office ends with prescribing antimicrobial drug. These trends are probably related to both the difficulty in applying the differential diagnosis of viral and bacterial infection in a primary care doctor's office, as well as patient's conviction about the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in viral infections. However, although patients often want to influence the therapeutic decisions and ask their doctor for prescribing antimicrobial drug, the right conversation with a doctor alone is the critical component in satisfaction with medical care. Many countries have established standards to clarify the indications for use of antibiotics and thereby reduce their consumption. The next step is to monitor the prescribing and use of these drugs and to assess the rise of drug resistance in the area. In Poland, the recommendations regarding outpatient respiratory tract infections treatment were published and usage of antimicrobial agents monitoring has begun. However, lack of publications covering a broad analysis of antibiotic therapy and drug resistance on Polish territory is still a problem. Modem medicine has yet another tool in the fight against bacteria--they are bacteriophages. Phage therapy is

  16. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment following laparoscopic robot-assisted radical prostatectomy for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections: did the AUA guidelines make a difference?

    PubMed

    Haifler, Miki; Mor, Yoram; Dotan, Zohar; Ramon, Jacob; Zilberman, Dorit E

    2016-12-16

    We sought to evaluate the effectiveness of the American Urological Association (AUA) antibiotic prophylaxis guidelines in patients undergoing robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RALP). Our prospective registry database was reviewed for all RALP cases. The following variables were evaluated: age, associated comorbidities, body mass index (BMI), total operative time, length of stay (LOS), prostate weight, pathological grade and stage. Until 11/2011, RALP patients were treated with antibiotics administered in the operating room and continued until urethral catheter removal. Since 11/2011, all patients were treated with a single intravenous dose of Cephalosporin and Aminoglycoside given within 30 min of surgical incision. The rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) was evaluated in both groups. 229 RALP patients were identified. The first 60 patients (26.2%) were treated according to the old protocol (Group 1) while the remaining 169 (73.8%) were treated according to the new protocol (Group 2). Group match was identified in all categories but LOS. Moreover, LOS was found to be longer in Group 1 compared with Group 2 (5.8 vs. 4.5 days, p < 0.001). CAUTI rate was similar in both groups (8.3 vs. 8.9%, respectively, p = 0.89). Logistic regression analysis did not demonstrate any association between treatment protocol and potential risk for CAUTI. Therefore, a single preoperative dose of antibiotics does not increase the rate of CAUTI following RALP compared with prolonged antibiotic treatment. Moreover, it was found to be associated with shorter LOS. Complying with the AUA guidelines may reduce morbidity and medical costs.

  17. Broad scope method for creating humanized animal models for animal health and disease research through antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hintze, Korry J; Cox, James E; Rompato, Giovanni; Benninghoff, Abby D; Ward, Robert E; Broadbent, Jeff; Lefevre, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, mouse humanization studies have used human fecal transfer to germ-free animals. This practice requires gnotobiotic facilities and is restricted to gnotobiotic mouse lines, which limits humanized mouse research. We have developed a generalizable method to humanize non germ-free mice using antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer. The method involves depleting resident intestinal microbiota with broad-spectrum antibiotics, introducing human microbiota from frozen fecal samples by weekly gavage, and maintaining mice in HEPA-filtered microisolator cages. Pyrosequencing cecal microbiota 16S rRNA genes showed that recipient mice adopt a humanized microbiota profile analogous to their human donors, and distinct from mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) or untreated control mice. In the humanized mice, 75% of the sequence mass was observed in their respective human donor and conversely, 68% of the donor sequence mass was recovered in the recipient mice. Principal component analyses of GC- and HPLC-separated cecal metabolites were performed to determine effects of transplanted microbiota on the metabolome. Cecal metabolite profiles of mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) and control mice were dissimilar from each other and from humanized mice. Metabolite profiles for mice humanized from different donor samples clustered near each other, yet were sufficiently distinct that separate clusters were apparent for each donor. Also, cecal concentrations of 57 metabolites were significantly different between humanization treatments. These data demonstrate that our protocol can be used to humanize non germ-free mice and is sufficiently robust to generate metabolomic differences between mice humanized from different human donors. PMID:24637796

  18. The treatment of intramedullary osteomyelitis of the femur and tibia using the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator system and antibiotic cement rods.

    PubMed

    Kanakaris, N; Gudipati, S; Tosounidis, T; Harwood, P; Britten, S; Giannoudis, P V

    2014-06-01

    Intramedullary infection in long bones represents a complex clinical challenge, with an increasing incidence due to the increasing use of intramedullary fixation. We report a prospective case series using an intramedullary reaming device, the Reamer-Irrigator-Aspirator (RIA) system, in association with antibiotic cement rods for the treatment of lower limb long bone infections. A total of 24 such patients, 16 men and eight women, with a mean age of 44.5 years (17 to 75), 14 with femoral and 10 with tibial infection, were treated in a staged manner over a period of 2.5 years in a single referral centre. Of these, 21 patients had had previous surgery, usually for fixation of a fracture (seven had sustained an open fracture originally and one had undergone fasciotomies). According to the Cierny-Mader classification system, 18 patients were classified as type 1A, four as 3A (discharging sinus tract), one as type 4A and one as type 1B. Staphylococcus species were isolated in 20 patients (83.3%). Local antibiotic delivery was used in the form of impregnated cement rods in 23 patients. These were removed at a mean of 2.6 months (1 to 5). Pathogen-specific antibiotics were administered systemically for a mean of six weeks (3 to 18). At a mean follow-up of 21 months (8 to 36), 23 patients (96%) had no evidence of recurrent infection. One underwent a planned trans-tibial amputation two weeks post-operatively due to peripheral vascular disease and chronic recalcitrant osteomyelitis of the tibia and foot. The combination of RIA reaming, the administration of systemic pathogen-specific antibiotics and local delivery using impregnated cement rods proved to be a safe and efficient form of treatment in these patients.

  19. Broad scope method for creating humanized animal models for animal health and disease research through antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Korry J; Cox, James E; Rompato, Giovanni; Benninghoff, Abby D; Ward, Robert E; Broadbent, Jeff; Lefevre, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, mouse humanization studies have used human fecal transfer to germ-free animals. This practice requires gnotobiotic facilities and is restricted to gnotobiotic mouse lines, which limits humanized mouse research. We have developed a generalizable method to humanize non germ-free mice using antibiotic treatment and human fecal transfer. The method involves depleting resident intestinal microbiota with broad-spectrum antibiotics, introducing human microbiota from frozen fecal samples by weekly gavage, and maintaining mice in HEPA-filtered microisolator cages. Pyrosequencing cecal microbiota 16S rRNA genes showed that recipient mice adopt a humanized microbiota profile analogous to their human donors, and distinct from mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) or untreated control mice. In the humanized mice, 75% of the sequence mass was observed in their respective human donor and conversely, 68% of the donor sequence mass was recovered in the recipient mice. Principal component analyses of GC- and HPLC-separated cecal metabolites were performed to determine effects of transplanted microbiota on the metabolome. Cecal metabolite profiles of mice treated with only antibiotics (no fecal transfer) and control mice were dissimilar from each other and from humanized mice. Metabolite profiles for mice humanized from different donor samples clustered near each other, yet were sufficiently distinct that separate clusters were apparent for each donor. Also, cecal concentrations of 57 metabolites were significantly different between humanization treatments. These data demonstrate that our protocol can be used to humanize non germ-free mice and is sufficiently robust to generate metabolomic differences between mice humanized from different human donors.

  20. Zinc as an adjunct to antibiotics for the treatment of severe pneumonia in children <5 years: a meta-analysis of randomised-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Tie, Hong-Tao; Tan, Qi; Luo, Ming-Zhu; Li, Qiang; Yu, Jia-Lin; Wu, Qing-Chen

    2016-03-14

    The effect of Zn, as an adjunct to antibiotics, on the treatment of severe pneumonia in young children is still under debate; therefore, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the therapeutic role of Zn for severe pneumonia in children younger than 5 years. PubMed, Cochrane library and Embase databases were systematically searched from inception until October 2015 for randomised-controlled trials (RCT) that assessed the effect of Zn as an adjunct to antibiotics for severe pneumonia. Random-effects model was used for calculating the pooled estimates, and intention-to-treat principle was also applied. Nine RCT involving 2926 children were included. Overall, the pooled results showed that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to reduce the time to recovery from severe pneumonia (hazard ratios (HR)=1·04; 95% CI 0·90, 1·19; I(2)=39%; P=0·58), hospital length of stay (HR=1·04; 95% CI 0·83, 1·33; I(2)=57%; P=0·74), treatment failure (relative risk (RR)=0·95; 95% CI 0·79, 1·14; I(2)=20%; P=0·58) or change of antibiotics (RR=1·07; 95% CI 0·79, 1·45; I(2)=44%; P=0·67). In addition, continuous outcomes were consistent while meta-analysed with standard mean difference, and all outcomes remained stable in intention-to-treat analysis. No significant differences were observed in the two groups between death rate, adverse events or recovery times of severe pneumonia indicators. Our results suggested that adjunct treatment with Zn failed to benefit young children in the treatment of severe pneumonia. Considering the clinical heterogeneity, baseline characteristics of children, definition of severe pneumonia and Zn supplement way should be taken into consideration in future research. This study was registered at PRESPERO as CRD42015019798.

  1. Collective antibiotic tolerance: Mechanisms, dynamics, and intervention

    PubMed Central

    Meredith, Hannah R.; Srimani, Jaydeep K.; Lee, Anna J.; Lopatkin, Allison J.; You, Lingchong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria have developed resistance against every antibiotic at an alarming rate, considering the timescale at which new antibiotics are developed. Thus, there is a critical need to use antibiotics more effectively, extend the shelf life of existing antibiotics, and minimize their side effects. This requires understanding the mechanisms underlying bacterial drug responses. Past studies have focused on survival in the presence of antibiotics by individual cells, as genetic mutants or persisters. In contrast, a population of bacterial cells can collectively survive antibiotic treatments lethal to individual cells. This tolerance can arise by diverse mechanisms, including resistance-conferring enzyme production, titration-mediated bistable growth inhibition, swarming, and inter-population interactions. These strategies can enable rapid population recovery after antibiotic treatment, and provide a time window for otherwise susceptible bacteria to acquire inheritable genetic resistance. Here, we emphasize the potential for targeting collective antibiotic tolerance behaviors as an antibacterial treatment strategy. PMID:25689336

  2. The effect of discontinued use of antimicrobial growth promoters on the risk of therapeutic antibiotic treatment in Danish farrow-to-finish pig farms.

    PubMed

    Vigre, H; Larsen, P B; Andreasen, M; Christensen, J; Jorsal, S E

    2008-01-01

    This study estimated the effect of discontinued use of antimicrobial growth promoters (duAGPs) on the risk of antibiotic treatment for diarrhoea, arthritis, pneumonia, unthriving and miscellaneous disorders in Danish pig farms. The estimation was done in a case-crossover study comparing: (1) the proportion of days per farm where treatment was performed (PDT) and (2) the proportion of pigs treated per day per farm at days where treatment was performed (PPT) before and after duAGPs at 68 farrow-to-finish farms. The farms were selected using a two-stage (veterinarian/farm) convenience sampling. On average, during the first year after duAGPs there was a significant increase in the risk of antibiotic treatment for diarrhoea (PDT: OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.8; PPT: OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.2). However, the effect varied among farms--some farms experienced substantial problems, while others experienced few problems after duAGPs. No effect was identified for the risk of treatment for other diseases.

  3. Synthetic Beta-Lactam Antibiotic as a Selective Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis Inducer: Significance in Breast Cancer Prevention and Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    organ transplant. The novel histone deacetylase inhibitor, FK228, has been recently isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum (22). This antibiotic is a...Okuhara: Action of FR901228, a novel antitumor bicyclic depsipeptide produced by Chromobacterium violaceum no. 968, on Ha-ras transformed NIH3T3 cells

  4. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  5. The determinants of the antibiotic resistance process

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Beatriz Espinosa; Altagracia Martínez, Marina; Sánchez Rodríguez, Martha A; Wertheimer, Albert I

    2009-01-01

    Background: The use of antibiotic drugs triggers a complex interaction involving many biological, sociological, and psychological determinants. Resistance to antibiotics is a serious worldwide problem which is increasing and has implications for morbidity, mortality, and health care both in hospitals and in the community. Objectives: To analyze current research on the determinants of antibiotic resistance and comprehensively review the main factors in the process of resistance in order to aid our understanding and assessment of this problem. Methods: We conducted a MedLine search using the key words “determinants”, “antibiotic”, and “antibiotic resistance” to identify publications between 1995 and 2007 on the determinants of antibiotic resistance. Publications that did not address the determinants of antibiotic resistance were excluded. Results: The process and determinants of antibiotic resistance are described, beginning with the development of antibiotics, resistance and the mechanisms of resistance, sociocultural determinants of resistance, the consequences of antibiotic resistance, and alternative measures proposed to combat antibiotic resistance. Conclusions: Analysis of the published literature identified the main determinants of antibiotic resistance as irrational use of antibiotics in humans and animal species, insufficient patient education when antibiotics are prescribed, lack of guidelines for treatment and control of infections, lack of scientific information for physicians on the rational use of antibiotics, and lack of official government policy on the rational use of antibiotics in public and private hospitals. PMID:21694883

  6. Treatment of Infections in Young Infants in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Frontline Health Worker Diagnosis and Antibiotic Access

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anne CC; Chandran, Aruna; Herbert, Hadley K.; Kozuki, Naoko; Markell, Perry; Shah, Rashed; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Baqui, Abdullah H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inadequate illness recognition and access to antibiotics contribute to high case fatality from infections in young infants (<2 months) in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We aimed to address three questions regarding access to treatment for young infant infections in LMICs: (1) Can frontline health workers accurately diagnose possible bacterial infection (pBI)?; (2) How available and affordable are antibiotics?; (3) How often are antibiotics procured without a prescription? Methods and Findings We searched PubMed, Embase, WHO/Health Action International (HAI), databases, service provision assessments (SPAs), Demographic and Health Surveys, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, and grey literature with no date restriction until May 2014. Data were identified from 37 published studies, 46 HAI national surveys, and eight SPAs. For study question 1, meta-analysis showed that clinical sign-based algorithms predicted bacterial infection in young infants with high sensitivity (87%, 95% CI 82%–91%) and lower specificity (62%, 95% CI 48%–75%) (six studies, n = 14,254). Frontline health workers diagnosed pBI in young infants with an average sensitivity of 82% (95% CI 76%–88%) and specificity of 69% (95% CI 54%–83%) (eight studies, n = 11,857) compared to physicians. For question 2, first-line injectable agents (ampicillin, gentamicin, and penicillin) had low variable availability in first-level health facilities in Africa and South Asia. Oral amoxicillin and cotrimoxazole were widely available at low cost in most regions. For question 3, no studies on young infants were identified, however 25% of pediatric antibiotic purchases in LMICs were obtained without a prescription (11 studies, 95% CI 18%–34%), with lower rates among infants <1 year. Study limitations included potential selection bias and lack of neonatal-specific data. Conclusions Trained frontline health workers may screen for pBI in young infants with relatively high sensitivity

  7. Predicting antibiotic resistance.

    PubMed

    Martínez, José L; Baquero, Fernando; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-12-01

    The treatment of bacterial infections is increasingly complicated because microorganisms can develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. This article discusses the information that is required to predict when antibiotic resistance is likely to emerge in a bacterial population. Indeed, the development of the conceptual and methodological tools required for this type of prediction represents an important goal for microbiological research. To this end, we propose the establishment of methodological guidelines that will allow researchers to predict the emergence of resistance to a new antibiotic before its clinical introduction.

  8. Antibiotic / Antimicrobial Resistance Glossary

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  9. Facts about Antibiotic Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  10. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  11. Validation and Application of a Dried Blood Spot Assay for Biofilm-Active Antibiotics Commonly Used for Treatment of Prosthetic Implant Infections

    PubMed Central

    Knippenberg, Ben; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Clark, Ben; Dyer, John; Batty, Kevin T.; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2016-01-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) antibiotic assays can facilitate pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) studies in situations where venous blood sampling is logistically difficult. We sought to develop, validate, and apply a DBS assay for rifampin (RIF), fusidic acid (FUS), and ciprofloxacin (CIP). These antibiotics are considered active against organisms in biofilms and are therefore commonly used for the treatment of infections associated with prosthetic implants. A liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy DBS assay was developed and validated, including red cell partitioning and thermal stability for each drug and the rifampin metabolite desacetyl rifampin (Des-RIF). Plasma and DBS concentrations in 10 healthy adults were compared, and the concentration-time profiles were incorporated into population PK models. The limits of quantification for RIF, Des-RIF, CIP, and FUS in DBS were 15 μg/liter, 14 μg/liter, 25 μg/liter, and 153 μg/liter, respectively. Adjusting for hematocrit, red cell partitioning, and relative recovery, DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable to measured plasma concentrations for each antibiotic (r > 0.95; P < 0.0001), and Bland-Altman plots showed no significant bias. The final population PK estimates of clearance, volume of distribution, and time above threshold MICs for measured and DBS-predicted plasma concentrations were comparable. These drugs were stable in DBSs for at least 10 days at room temperature and 1 month at 4°C. The present DBS antibiotic assays are robust and can be used as surrogates for plasma concentrations to provide valid PK and PK/PD data in a variety of clinical situations, including therapeutic drug monitoring or studies of implant infections. PMID:27270283

  12. Do topical antibiotics help corneal epithelial trauma?

    PubMed Central

    King, J. W.; Brison, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    Topical antibiotics are routinely used in emergency rooms to treat corneal trauma, although no published evidence supports this treatment. In a noncomparative clinical trial, 351 patients with corneal epithelial injuries were treated without antibiotics. The infection rate was 0.7%, suggesting that such injuries can be safely and effectively managed without antibiotics. A comparative clinical trial is neither warranted nor feasible. PMID:8268742

  13. The discovery of a novel antibiotic for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections: a story of an effective academic–industrial partnership

    PubMed Central

    Mann, John; Taylor, Peter W.; Dorgan, Colin R.; Johnson, Peter D.; Wilson, Francis X.; Vickers, Richard; Dale, Aaron G

    2015-01-01

    Academic drug discovery is playing an increasingly important role in the identification of new therapies for a wide range of diseases. There is no one model that guarantees success. We describe here a drug discovery story where chance, the ability to capitalise on chance, and the assembling of a range of expertise, have all played important roles in the discovery and subsequent development of an antibiotic chemotype based on the bis-benzimidazole scaffold, with potency against a number of current therapeutically challenging diseases. One compound in this class, SMT19969, has recently entered Phase 2 human clinical trials for the treatment of Clostridium difficile infections. PMID:26949507

  14. Effects of sustained antibiotic bactericidal treatment on Chlamydia trachomatis-infected epithelial-like cells (HeLa) and monocyte-like cells (THP-1 and U-937).

    PubMed

    Mpiga, Philomene; Ravaoarinoro, Madeleine

    2006-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a human pathogen that causes multiple diseases worldwide. Despite appropriate therapy with existing antichlamydial antibiotics, chronic exacerbated diseases often occur and lead to serious sequelae. Since C. trachomatis has been found to enter a persistent state after exposure to deleterious conditions, the role of persistence in the failure of chlamydial antibiotherapy is questioned. HeLa, THP-1 and U-937 cells were infected with 10(4)C. trachomatis serovar L2 infectious particles. Three days later the infected cells were treated with minimal bactericidal concentrations of doxycycline (DOX), erythromycin (ERY) or tetracycline (TET) for 24 days or 30 days. Antibiotic efficacy was assessed by measuring chlamydial inclusions and infectious particles, by investigating the resumption of chlamydial growth after antibiotic removal and by testing Chlamydia viability using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction targeting unprocessed 16S rRNA, processed 16S rRNA and Omp-1 mRNA. Treatment of infected HeLa cells with the usual antichlamydial antibiotics suppressed chlamydial active growth. The infection remained unapparent. However, 24 days post treatment the bacterium was found to be viable, as proved by continued expression of unprocessed and processed 16S rRNA and Omp-1 mRNA. This inactive unapparent chlamydial state is not infectious, suggesting Chlamydia persistence. Chlamydia trachomatis also developed persistence both in permissive THP-1 and non-permissive U-937 cells. Unlike in HeLa cells, persistent chlamydial infection in THP-1 and U-937 cells was resolved after 30 days of DOX treatment. Of interest, we noticed that only THP-1 and U-937 cells that were persistently infected following their interaction with infected HeLa cells remained capable of transmitting active infection to HeLa cells. These findings suggest that DOX, TET and ERY, usually administered to combat chlamydial diseases, fail to resolve persistent infection occurring

  15. [Strategies to avoid antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Kees, M G

    2013-03-01

    Antibiotics are used very frequently in critically ill patients as a causal and often life-saving treatment; however, the high density of use of broad spectrum antibiotics contributes to a further deterioration in resistance trends, which makes a rational prescription behavior mandatory. This particularly includes measures which lead to the reduction of antibiotic use, i.e. rigorous indications, targeted de-escalation and limited duration. For optimal efficacy of a necessary treatment the integration of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles can be helpful.

  16. Antibiotic-Associated Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    Antibiotic-associated diarrhea Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Antibiotic-associated diarrhea refers to passing loose, watery stools ... after taking medications used to treat bacterial infections (antibiotics). Most often, antibiotic-associated diarrhea is mild and ...

  17. Evaluation of the impact of non-inpatient i.v. antibiotic treatment for acute infections on the hospital, primary care services and the patient.

    PubMed

    Parker, S E; Nathwani, D; O'Reilly, D; Parkinson, S; Davey, P G

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of providing i.v. antibiotic therapy outside hospital. The main outcome measures were the direct costs of providing i.v. antibiotic therapy in the community compared with standard hospital treatment and the perceptions of patients and General Practitioners (GPs). A total of 29 patients entered the study, of whom 15 received teicoplanin and 14 ceftriaxone. The costs of drugs exceeded the cost of the estimated alternative treatments (median Pound Sterling 208 and Pound Sterling 126 respectively) and this was only partially compensated for by a small reduction in costs of consumables. The staff time required to train patients was compensated for by savings in drug preparation and administration. Sensitivity analysis showed that these conclusions were sensitive to drug and patient selection, and that treatment of skin and soft tissue infections outside hospital with ceftriaxone was likely to have similar variable costs to treatment in hospital with drugs such as flucloxacillin. Non-inpatient i.v. (NIPIV) therapy was estimated to save a total of 532 bed days in the year of the study. Patients strongly preferred non-inpatient treatment to hospital treatment. GPs identified a number of potential disadvantages, mainly concerning safety and lack of support for patients at home. Following the study a strategy for development of NIPIV services in Tayside has been developed with local GPs and a plan has been agreed for funding a community liaison nurse based on the impact of NIPIV therapy on future bed requirements in Dundee Teaching Hospitals Trust.

  18. Ongoing Trials of Simplified Antibiotic Regimens for the Treatment of Serious Infections in Young Infants in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: The current World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation for treatment of severe infection in young infants is hospitalization and parenteral antibiotic therapy. Hospital care is generally not available outside large cities in low- and middle-income countries and even when available is not acceptable or affordable for many families. Previous research in Bangladesh and India demonstrated that treatment outside hospitals may be possible. Research: A set of research studies with common protocols testing simplified antibiotic regimens that can be provided at the lowest-level health-care facility or at home are nearing completion. The studies are large individually randomized controlled trials that are set up in the context of a program, which provides home visits by community health workers to detect serious illness in young infants with assessment and treatment at an outpatient health facility near home. This article summarizes the policy implications of the research studies. Policy Implications: The studies are expected to result in information that would inform WHO guidelines on simple, safe and effective regimens for the treatment of clinical severe infection and pneumonia in newborns and young infants in settings where referral is not possible. The studies will also inform the inputs and process required to establish outpatient treatment of newborn and young infant infections at health facilities near the home. We expect that the information from research and the resulting WHO guidelines will form the basis of policy dialogue by a large number of stakeholders at the country level to implement outpatient treatment of neonatal infections and thereby reduce neonatal and infant mortality resulting from infection. PMID:23945576

  19. Resistance profile for pathogens causing urinary tract infection in a pediatric population, and antibiotic treatment response at a University Hospital, 2010-2011

    PubMed Central

    Vélez Echeverri, Catalina; Serrano, Ana Katherina; Ochoa-García, Carolina; Rojas Rosas, Luisa; María Bedoya, Ana; Suárez, Margarita; Hincapié, Catalina; Henao, Adriana; Ortiz, Diana; Vanegas, Juan José; Zuleta, John Jairo; Espinal, David

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in childhood and causes acute and chronic morbidity and long-term hypertension and chronic kidney disease. Objectives: To describe the demographic characteristics, infectious agents, patterns of antibiotic resistance, etiologic agent and profile of susceptibility and response to empirical treatment of UTI in a pediatric population. Methods: This is a descriptive, retrospective study. Results: Included in the study were 144 patients, 1:2.06 male to female ratio. The most common symptom was fever (79.9%) and 31.3% had a history of previous UTI. 72.0% of the patients had positive urine leukocyte count (>5 per field), urine gram was positive in 85.0% of samples and gram negative bacilli accounted for 77.8% for the total pathogens isolated. The most frequent uropathogens isolated were Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Our E.coli isolates had a susceptibility rate higher than 90% to most of the antibiotics used, but a resistance rate of 42.6% to TMP SMX and 45.5% to ampicillin sulbactam. 6.3% of E. coli was extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producer strains. The most frequent empirical antibiotic used was amikacin, which was used in 66.0% of the patients. 17 of 90 patients who underwent voiding cistouretrography (VCUG) had vesicoureteral reflux. Conclusion: This study revealed that E. coli was the most frequent pathogen of community acquired UTI. We found that E. coli and other uropathogens had a high resistance rate against TMP SMX and ampicillin sulbactam. In order to ensure a successful empirical treatment, protocols should be based on local epidemiology and susceptibility rates. PMID:24970958

  20. Linking changes in antibiotic effluent concentrations to flow, removal and consumption in four different UK sewage treatment plants over four years.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew C; Jürgens, Monika D; Nakada, Norihide; Hanamoto, Seiya; Singer, Andrew C; Tanaka, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    The arrival and discharge of seven antibiotics were monitored at two trickling filter sewage treatment plants of 6000 and 11,000 population equivalents (PE) and two activated sludge plants of 33,000 and 162,000 PE in Southern England. The investigation consisted of 24 h composite samples taken on two separate days every summer from 2012 to 2015 and in the winter of 2015 (January) from influent and effluent. The average influent concentrations generally matched predictions based on England-wide prescription data for trimethoprim, sulfamethoxazole, azithromycin, oxytetracycline and levofloxacin (within 3-fold), but were 3-10 times less for clarithromycin, whilst tetracycline influent concentrations were 5-17 times greater than expected. Over the four years, effluent concentrations at a single sewage plant varied by up to 16-fold for clarithromycin, 10-fold for levofloxacin and sulfamethoxazole, 7-fold for oxytetracycline, 6-fold for tetracycline, 4-fold for azithromycin and 3-fold for trimethoprim. The study attempted to identify the principal reasons for this variation in effluent concentration. By measuring carbamazepine and using it as a conservative indicator of transport through the treatment process, it was found that flow and hence concentration could alter by up to 5-fold. Measuring influent and effluent concentrations allowed assessments to be made of removal efficiency. In the two activated sludge plants, antibiotic removal rates were similar for the tested antibiotics but could vary by several-fold at the trickling filter plants. However, for clarithromycin and levofloxacin the variations in effluent concentration were above that which could be explained by either flow and/or removal alone so here year on year changes in consumption are likely to have played a role.

  1. Antibiotic prophylaxis in otolaryngologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Obeso, Sergio; Rodrigo, Juan P; Sánchez, Rafael; López, Fernando; Díaz, Juan P; Suárez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 80s, numerous clinical trials have shown a significant reduction in the incidence of infections in clean-contaminated upper respiratory tract surgery, due to perioperative use of antibiotics; however, there is no consensus about the best antibiotic protocol. Moreover, there are no universally accepted guidelines about flap reconstructive procedures. In otological and rhinological surgery, tonsillectomy, cochlear implant and laryngo-pharyngeal laser surgery, the use of antibiotics frequently depends on institutional or personal preferences rather than the evidence available. We reviewed clinical trials on different otorhinolaryngological procedures, assessing choice of antibiotic, length of treatment and administration route. There are no clinical trials for laryngo-pharyngeal laser surgery. Nor are there clinical trials on implant cochlear surgery or neurosurgical clean-contaminated procedures, but in these circumstances, antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended.

  2. blaTEM and vanA as indicator genes of antibiotic resistance contamination in a hospital-urban wastewater treatment plant system.

    PubMed

    Narciso-da-Rocha, Carlos; Varela, Ana R; Schwartz, Thomas; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M

    2014-12-01

    Four indicator genes were monitored by quantitative PCR in hospital effluent (HE) and in the raw and treated wastewater of the municipal wastewater treatment plant receiving the hospital discharge. The indicator genes were the class 1 integrase gene intI1, to assess the capacity of bacteria to be involved in horizontal gene transfer processes; blaTEM, one of the most widespread antibiotic resistance genes in the environment, associated with Enterobacteriaceae; vanA, an antibiotic resistance gene uncommon in the environment and frequent in clinical isolates; and marA, part of a locus related to the stress response in Enterobacteriaceae. Variation in the abundance of these genes was analysed as a function of the type of water, and possible correlations with cultivable bacteria, antimicrobial residue concentrations, and bacterial community composition and structure were analysed. HE was confirmed as an important source of blaTEM and vanA genes, and wastewater treatment showed a limited capacity to remove these resistance genes. The genes blaTEM and vanA presented the strongest correlations with culturable bacteria, antimicrobial residues and some bacterial populations, representing interesting candidates as indicator genes to monitor resistance in environmental samples. The intI1 gene was the most abundant in all samples, demonstrating that wastewater bacterial populations hold a high potential for gene acquisition.

  3. [The drug sensitivity of enterohemorragic Escherichia coli and antibiotics treatment for hemorrhagic enterocolitis--from an outbreak of enterocolitis in Sakai city].

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, N; Yagi, K; Yamamoto, T; Yoshioka, K; Kubo, S

    1997-07-01

    In July, 1996, a massive outbreak of hemorrhagic enterocolitis involving more than 5,000 people was caused by enterohemorragic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 occurred mainly among elementary school children of Sakai City, Japan. The antibacterial activities in vitro against EHEC from stool specimens were determined. Norfloxacin showed the highest antibacterial activity, and fosfomycin, kanamycin, ampicillin, cefaclor were considered as effective drugs. But doxycycline showed lower antibacterial activities compared to other examined drugs, and it appears necessary to take antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli into consideration when a treatment regimen is determined. As a result of the oral administration of fosfomycin to 95 patients of hemorrhagic enterocolitis and carrier, no patients developed complications with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). However, a study of 17 patients with HUS demonstrated the fact that most of them were subjected to intravenous administration of fosfomycin. It may be needed to consider oral administration route of effective antibiotics in the treatment of enterocolitis in order to maintain high concentrations of a drug in the intestine.

  4. Comparative evaluation of the short-term bactericidal potential of a steroid-antibiotic combination versus steroid in the treatment of chronic bacterial blepharitis and conjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Shulman, D G; Sargent, J B; Stewart, R H; Mester, U

    1996-01-01

    The effects of four days' treatment with topical Maxitrol (neomycin sulphate 3500 IU/mL, polymyxin-B sulphate 6000 IU/mL with dexamethasone 0.1%) were compared with those of Maxidex (dexamethasone 0.1% alone) in a double-masked study in 111 patients with bacterial blepharitis or conjunctivitis, 95 of whom were evaluable for efficacy. The majority of patients (N = 80) had chronic blepharitis. Maxitrol treatment resulted in a significantly greater reduction (90%) in bacterial counts and bacterial eradication (50%) compared with Maxidex (34% and 17% respectively). Maxitrol treatment also produced a significantly greater reduction in conjunctival discharge than did Maxidex, while the treatments were equally effective in alleviating other ocular signs and symptoms. It was concluded that use of a fixed dose combination steroid-antibiotic product was more effective for bacterial control and therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of chronic blepharitis and conjunctivitis patients than treatment with steroid alone. However, in the long-term treatment of chronic blepharitis the well-known toxic problems of neomycin sulphate have to be taken into account.

  5. Antibiotic Cycling and Antibiotic Mixing: Which One Best Mitigates Antibiotic Resistance?

    PubMed

    Beardmore, Robert Eric; Peña-Miller, Rafael; Gori, Fabio; Iredell, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Can we exploit our burgeoning understanding of molecular evolution to slow the progress of drug resistance? One role of an infection clinician is exactly that: to foresee trajectories to resistance during antibiotic treatment and to hinder that evolutionary course. But can this be done at a hospital-wide scale? Clinicians and theoreticians tried to when they proposed two conflicting behavioral strategies that are expected to curb resistance evolution in the clinic, these are known as "antibiotic cycling" and "antibiotic mixing." However, the accumulated data from clinical trials, now approaching 4 million patient days of treatment, is too variable for cycling or mixing to be deemed successful. The former implements the restriction and prioritization of different antibiotics at different times in hospitals in a manner said to "cycle" between them. In antibiotic mixing, appropriate antibiotics are allocated to patients but randomly. Mixing results in no correlation, in time or across patients, in the drugs used for treatment which is why theorists saw this as an optimal behavioral strategy. So while cycling and mixing were proposed as ways of controlling evolution, we show there is good reason why clinical datasets cannot choose between them: by re-examining the theoretical literature we show prior support for the theoretical optimality of mixing was misplaced. Our analysis is consistent with a pattern emerging in data: neither cycling or mixing is a priori better than the other at mitigating selection for antibiotic resistance in the clinic.

  6. Empiric Antibiotic Treatment of Erythema Migrans-Like Skin Lesions As a Function of Geography: A Clinical and Cost Effectiveness Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Brinkerhoff, R. Jory; Wormser, Gary P.; Clemen, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas. PMID:24107201

  7. Empiric antibiotic treatment of erythema migrans-like skin lesions as a function of geography: a clinical and cost effectiveness modeling study.

    PubMed

    Lantos, Paul M; Brinkerhoff, R Jory; Wormser, Gary P; Clemen, Robert

    2013-12-01

    The skin lesion of early Lyme disease, erythema migrans (EM), is so characteristic that routine practice is to treat all such patients with antibiotics. Because other skin lesions may resemble EM, it is not known whether presumptive treatment of EM is appropriate in regions where Lyme disease is rare. We constructed a decision model to compare the cost and clinical effectiveness of three strategies for the management of EM: Treat All, Observe, and Serology as a function of the probability that an EM-like lesion is Lyme disease. Treat All was found to be the preferred strategy in regions that are endemic for Lyme disease. Where Lyme disease is rare, Observe is the preferred strategy, as presumptive treatment would be expected to produce excessive harm and increased costs. Where Lyme disease is rare, clinicians and public health officials should consider observing patients with EM-like lesions who lack travel to Lyme disease-endemic areas.

  8. Comparative effectiveness of different oral antibiotics regimens for treatment of urinary tract infection in outpatients: an analysis of national representative claims database.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Tse Gabriel; Lee, Shih-Hao; Chang, Shy-Shin; Lee, Si-Huei; Lee, Matthew; Fang, Cheng-Chung; Chen, Shyr-Chyr; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2014-12-01

    There are very limited data on the postmarketing outcome comparison of different guideline antibiotic regimens for patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). We carried out a population-based comparative effectiveness study from year 2000 through 2009, using the administrative data of 2 million patients from the National Health Informatics Project of Taiwan. Treatment failure was defined as either hospitalization or emergency department visits for UTI. Odd ratios were computed using conditional logistic regression models matched on propensity score. We identified 73,675 individuals with UTI, of whom 54,796 (74.4%) received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), 4184 (5.7%) received ciprofloxacin, 3142 (4.3%) received levofloxacin, 5984 (8.1%) received ofloxacin, and 5569 (7.6%) received norfloxacin. Compared with TMP-SMX, the composite treatment failure was significantly lowered for norfloxacin in propensity score (PS) matching analyses (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.54-0.99). Both norfloxacin (PS-matched OR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47-0.98) and ofloxacin (PS-matched OR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.49-0.99) had significantly lowered composite treatment failure rate when compared with ciprofloxacin. Subgroup analysis suggested that both norfloxacin and ofloxacin were more effective in female patients without complications (W/O indwelling catheters, W/O bedridden status and W/O spinal cord injury), when compared with either TMP-SMX or ciprofloxacin. Among outpatients receiving oral fluoroquinolone therapy for UTIs, there was evidence of superiority of norfloxacin or ofloxacin over ciprofloxacin or TMP-SMX in terms of treatment failure. Given the observational nature of this study and regional difference in antibiotic resistance patterns, more studies are required to validate our results.

  9. A tailored implementation strategy to reduce the duration of intravenous antibiotic treatment in community-acquired pneumonia: a controlled before-and-after study.

    PubMed

    Engel, M F; Bruns, A H W; Hulscher, M E J L; Gaillard, C A J M; Sankatsing, S U C; Teding van Berkhout, F; Emmelot-Vonk, M H; Kuck, E M; Steeghs, M H M; den Breeijen, J H; Stellato, R K; Hoepelman, A I M; Oosterheert, J J

    2014-11-01

    We previously showed that 40 % of clinically stable patients hospitalised for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are not switched to oral therapy in a timely fashion because of physicians' barriers. We aimed to decrease this proportion by implementing a novel protocol. In a multi-centre controlled before-and-after study, we evaluated the effect of an implementation strategy tailored to previously identified barriers to an early switch. In three Dutch hospitals, a protocol dictating a timely switch strategy was implemented using educational sessions, pocket reminders and active involvement of nursing staff. Primary outcomes were the proportion of patients switched timely and the duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy. Length of hospital stay (LOS), patient outcome, education effects 6 months after implementation and implementation costs were secondary outcomes. Statistical analysis was performed using mixed-effects models. Prior to implementation, 146 patients were included and, after implementation, 213 patients were included. The case mix was comparable. The implementation did not change the proportion of patients switched on time (66 %). The median duration of intravenous antibiotic administration decreased from 4 days [interquartile range (IQR) 2-5] to 3 days (IQR 2-4), a decrease of 21 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 11 %; 30 %) in the multi-variable analysis. LOS and patient outcome were comparable before and after implementation. Forty-three percent (56/129) of physicians attended the educational sessions. After 6 months, 24 % (10/42) of the interviewed attendees remembered the protocol's main message. Cumulative implementation costs were 5,798 (20/reduced intravenous treatment day). An implementation strategy tailored to previously identified barriers reduced the duration of intravenous antibiotic administration in hospitalised CAP patients by 1 day, at minimal cost.

  10. Bacterial communities associated with the digestive tract of the predatory ground beetle, Poecilus chalcites, and their response to laboratory rearing and antibiotic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Lehman

    2008-06-01

    Ground beetles such as Poecilus chalcites (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are beneficial insects in agricultural systems where they contribute to the control of insect and weed pests. We assessed the complexity of bacterial communities occurring in the digestive tracts of field-collected P. chalcites using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses of polymerase chain reaction-amplified 16S rRNA genes. Bacterial identification was performed by the construction of 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and sequence analysis. Intestinal bacteria in field-collected beetles were then compared to those from groups of beetles that were reared in the lab on an artificial diet with and without antibiotics. Direct cell counts estimated 1.5 × 10S bacteria per milliliter of gut. The digestive tract of field-collected P. chalcites produced an average of 4.8 terminal restriction fragments (tRF) for each beetle. The most abundant clones were affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus, followed by the taxa Enterobacteriaceae, Clostridia, and Bacteriodetes. The majority of the sequences recovered were closely related to those reported from other insect gastrointestinal tracts. Lab-reared beetles produced fewer tRF, an average of 3.1 per beetle, and a reduced number of taxa with a higher number of clones from the family Enterobacteriaceae compared to the field-collected beetles. Antibiotic treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the number of tRF per beetle and selected for a less diverse set of bacterial taxa. We conclude that the digestive tract of P. chalcites is colonized by a simple community of bacteria that possess autochthonous characteristics. Laboratory-reared beetles harbored the most common bacteria found in field-collected beetles, and these bacterial communities may be manipulated in the laboratory with the addition of antibiotics to the diet to allow study of functional roles.

  11. Changes in Serum IgA Antibody Levels against the Glycopeptidolipid Core Antigen during Antibiotic Treatment of Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Jhun, Byung Woo; Kim, Su-Young; Park, Hye Yun; Jeon, Kyeongman; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2017-03-28

    We evaluated serial changes in the levels of serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody to the glycopeptidolipid (GPL) core antigen during antibiotic treatment in 57 patients with M. avium complex (MAC) lung disease, at baseline (T0) and after 3 months (T3) and 6 months (T6) of treatment. The median patient age was 59 years and 37 (65%) were female. Etiologic organisms included M. avium in 32 (56%) patients and M. intracellulare in 25 (44%). Seven (12%) patients had the fibrocavitary form of the disease on computed tomography. After 12 months of treatment, 42 (74%) patients achieved favorable responses, whereas 15 (26%) patients had unfavorable responses defined as no sputum culture conversion within 12 months of treatment. The initial median serum anti-GPL IgA levels in the 57 patients was 3.50 U/mL, and measurements at T0 (median 3.50 U/mL), T3 (median 2.71 U/mL), and T6 (median 2.61 U/mL) revealed significant decreases following treatment (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that an initially elevated anti-GPL IgA level (> 3.50 U/mL) was associated with an unfavorable response (P = 0.049). Our data suggest that elevated anti-GPL IgA levels may reflect disease activity, which may help to predict treatment response in patients with MAC lung disease.

  12. Multiple antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli from a tropical rain forest stream

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco, C.E.; Alvarez, H.J.; Ortiz, N.; Bisbal, M.; Arias, W.; Baerga, C.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    High densities of fecal coliforms were obtained from a pristine site and sewage contaminated site in a tropical rain forest watershed in Puerto Rico. Confirmation of fecal coliform isolates as Escherichia coli was significantly lower than for temperate waters. Antibiotic resistance and multiple antibiotic resistance were common for isolates at both sites; however, the site receiving sewage effluent had a greater proportion of multiple antibiotic resistant isolates. R. plasmids were recovered from 4 MAR isolates, 2 from each site. All recovered plasmids were approximately 1 kilobase. The recovered plasmid were also capable of transforming E. coli HB101 in vitro. The high concentrations of enterobacteriaceae, small R-plasmid size, R-plasmid transformability, and long term survival of fecal origin bacteria in tropical freshwater environments give increasing importance to adequate sewage treatment, and better indicator monitoring methods for tropical areas.

  13. Improved Therapeutic Regimens for Treatment of Post-Traumatic Ocular Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    injury and adequate treatment. This proposal was designed to analyze the effectiveness of antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and non -conventional...analysis of non - conventional therapies to identify those that may be implemented for future treatment of blinding bacterial infections of the eye...was designed to analyze the effectiveness of antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, and non -conventional agents that target bacterial and host virulence

  14. Treatment with antibiotics is detrimental to the recovery of viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultured from milk and colostrum of dairy cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotic cocktails are frequently used as secondary decontaminants prior to the culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). This study investigated whether secondary incubation with an antibiotic cocktail containing vancomycin, nalidixic acid, and amphotericin B after primary exp...

  15. Detection and antibiotic treatment of Mycoplasma arginini contamination in a mouse epithelial cell line restore normal cell physiology.

    PubMed

    Boslett, Brianna; Nag, Subhra; Resnick, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma contamination of cultured cell lines is difficult to detect by routine observation. Infected cells can display normal morphology and the slow growth rate of mycoplasma can delay detection for extended periods of time, compromising experimental results. Positive identification of mycoplasma typically requires cells to be either fixed and stained for DNA or processed with PCR. We present a method to detect mycoplasma using live-cell optical microscopy typically used for routine observation of cell cultures. Images of untreated mycoplasma-infected epithelial cells alongside images of infected cells treated with Plasmocin, a commercially available antibiotic targeted to mycoplasma, are shown. We found that optical imaging is an effective screening tool for detection of mycoplasma contamination. Importantly, we found that cells regained normal function after the contamination was cleared. In conclusion, we present a technique to diagnose probable mycoplasma infections in live cultures without fixation, resulting in faster response times and decreased loss of cell material.

  16. Prolonged infusion versus intermittent boluses of β-lactam antibiotics for treatment of acute infections: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Teo, Jocelyn; Liew, Yixin; Lee, Winnie; Kwa, Andrea Lay-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    The clinical advantages of prolonged (extended/continuous) infusion remain controversial. Previous studies and reviews have failed to show consistent clinical benefits of extending the infusion time. This meta-analysis sought to determine whether prolonged β-lactam infusions were associated with a reduction in mortality and improvement in clinical success. A search of PubMed, EMBASE and The Cochrane Library for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing prolonged infusion with intermittent bolus administration of the same antibiotic in hospitalised adult patients was conducted. Primary outcomes evaluated were mortality and clinical success. A total of 29 studies with 2206 patients (18 RCTs and 11 observational studies) were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with intermittent boluses, use of prolonged infusion appeared to be associated with a significant reduction in mortality [pooled relative risk (RR) = 0.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.83] and improvement in clinical success (RR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.21). Statistically significant benefit was supported by non-randomised studies (mortality, RR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.43-0.76; clinical success, RR = 1.34, 95% CI 1.02-1.76) but not by RCTs (mortality, RR = 0.83, 95% CI 0.57-1.21; clinical success, RR = 1.05, 95% CI 0.99-1.12). The positive results from observational studies, especially in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance, serve to justify the imperative need to conduct a large-scale, well-designed, multicentre RCT involving critically ill patients infected with high minimum inhibitory concentration pathogens to clearly substantiate this benefit.

  17. Treatment of microbial biofilms in the post-antibiotic era: prophylactic and therapeutic use of antimicrobial peptides and their design by bioinformatics tools.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Maccari, Giuseppe; Nifosì, Riccardo

    2014-04-01

    The treatment for biofilm infections is particularly challenging because bacteria in these conditions become refractory to antibiotic drugs. The reduced effectiveness of current therapies spurs research for the identification of novel molecules endowed with antimicrobial activities and new mechanisms of antibiofilm action. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic agents, because they represent a novel class of antibiotics with a wide spectrum of activity and a low rate in inducing bacterial resistance. Over the past decades, a large number of naturally occurring AMPs have been identified or predicted from various organisms as effector molecules of the innate immune system playing a crucial role in the first line of defense. Recent studies have shown the ability of some AMPs to act against microbial biofilms, in particular during early phases of biofilm development. Here, we provide a review of the antimicrobial peptides tested on biofilms, highlighting their advantages and disadvantages for prophylactic and therapeutic applications. In addition, we describe the strategies and methods for de novo design of potentially active AMPs and discuss how informatics and computational tools may be exploited to improve antibiofilm effectiveness.

  18. Breast-feeding, day-care attendance and the frequency of antibiotic treatments from 1.5 to 5 years: a population-based longitudinal study in Canada.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Lise; Girard, Manon

    2005-05-01

    This paper aims to study, at the population level, the protective role of breast-feeding on child health and its relation to day-care attendance during the first 5 years of life. The analysis, done on a national sample of children, uses antibiotic treatments as a general measure of health. It takes into account mother's education level, family poverty level, mother's smoking status during pregnancy and after birth, mother's age, sex, gestation duration, and birth rank. The analyses were performed using data from the Longitudinal Study of Child Development in Quebec (LSCDQ), conducted by Santé Québec, a division of the Institut de la Statistique du Québec (ISQ). The study was based on face-to-face interviews and included a set of questionnaires addressed to the children's mothers and fathers. A total of 1841 were included in the sample analyzed. Detailed information on breast-feeding and complementary feeding was collected at 5 and 17 months through face-to-face interviews with the most knowledgeable person, generally the mother. From this information, it has been possible to estimate breast-feeding duration and exclusivity. Our results indicate that the positive effects of breast-feeding on health persist up to the second year of life, even in the presence of day-care attendance. The analyses indicate that breast-feeding reduced the number of antibiotic treatments given to children entering day care before 2.5 years of age. The study also indicates that the more-at-risk children could be protected by breast-feeding and by being taken care of in a familial setting, especially before 2.5 years of age. Mother's education, family poverty level, and other social inequality indicators did not play a role in the frequency of antibiotic treatments. Over the long term, it will be important to continue to monitor the health of children and to implement public health interventions aimed at reducing health problems among children of preschool age.

  19. Delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng-Hua; Bao, Yan; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jun

    2014-11-30

    Despite the wide use of antibiotics, bacterial infection is still one of the leading causes of hospitalization and mortality. The clinical failure of antibiotic therapy is linked with low bioavailability, poor penetration to bacterial infection sites, and the side effects of antibiotics, as well as the antibiotic resistance properties of bacteria. Antibiotics encapsulated in nanoparticles or microparticles made up of a biodegradable polymer have shown great potential in replacing the administration of antibiotics in their "free" form. Polymeric particles provide protection to antibiotics against environmental deactivation and alter antibiotic pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Polymeric particles can overcome tissue and cellular barriers and deliver antibiotics into very dense tissues and inaccessible target cells. Polymeric particles can be modified to target or respond to particular tissues, cells, and even bacteria, and thereby facilitate the selective concentration or release of the antibiotic at infection sites, respectively. Thus, the delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles augments the level of the bioactive drug at the site of infection while reducing the dosage and the dosing frequency. The end results are improved therapeutic effects as well as decreased "pill burden" and drug side effects in patients. The main objective of this review is to analyze recent advances and current perspectives in the use of polymeric antibiotic delivery systems in the treatment of bacterial infection.

  20. Environmental and Public Health Implications of Water Reuse: Antibiotics, Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria, and Antibiotic Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Pei-Ying; Al-Jassim, Nada; Ansari, Mohd Ikram; Mackie, Roderick I.

    2013-01-01

    Water scarcity is a global problem, and is particularly acute in certain regions like Africa, the Middle East, as well as the western states of America. A breakdown on water usage revealed that 70% of freshwater supplies are used for agricultural irrigation. The use of reclaimed water as an alternative water source for agricultural irrigation would greatly alleviate the demand on freshwater sources. This paradigm shift is gaining momentum in several water scarce countries like Saudi Arabia. However, microbial problems associated with reclaimed water may hinder the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation. Of particular concern is that the occurrence of antibiotic residues in the reclaimed water can select for antibiotic resistance genes among the microbial community. Antibiotic resistance genes can be associated with mobile genetic elements, which in turn allow a promiscuous transfer of resistance traits from one bacterium to another. Together with the pathogens that are present in the reclaimed water, antibiotic resistant bacteria can potentially exchange mobile genetic elements to create the “perfect microbial storm”. Given the significance of this issue, a deeper understanding of the occurrence of antibiotics in reclaimed water, and their potential influence on the selection of resistant microorganisms would be essential. In this review paper, we collated literature over the past two decades to determine the occurrence of antibiotics in municipal wastewater and livestock manure. We then discuss how these antibiotic resistant bacteria may impose a potential microbial risk to the environment and public health, and the knowledge gaps that would have to be addressed in future studies. Overall, the collation of the literature in wastewater treatment and agriculture serves to frame and identify potential concerns with respect to antibiotics, antibiotic resistant bacteria, and antibiotic resistance genes in reclaimed water. PMID:27029309

  1. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors.A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L.The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg.In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L.

  2. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors. A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L. The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg. In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L. PMID:27902589

  3. Successful Antibiotic Treatment of Severe Staphylococcal Infection of a Long Stent Graft in the Superficial Femoral Artery with Graft Preservation in the Long Term

    SciTech Connect

    Treitl, Marcus; Rademacher, Antje; Becker-Lienau, Johanna; Reiser, Maximilian F.; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Czihal, Michael

    2011-06-15

    Introduction: Bacterial infection of endovascular stent grafts is a serious condition, regularly leading to graft replacement by open bypass surgery.Case ReportWe describe the case of a staphylococcal infection of a 150-mm covered stent graft (Gore Viabahn), placed in the superficial femoral artery. Stent graft infection was successfully treated by oral administration of penicillinase-resistant flucloxacillin and the lipopeptide daptomycin with complete graft preservation, not requiring surgical treatment. During 1-year follow-up, the graft infection did not reappear. However, the patient developed restenosis at the proximal margin of the stent with recurrence of mild claudication, so far treated conservatively. Conclusion: With the increased use of covered stent grafts in the peripheral vasculature, the frequency of graft infection will increase. We demonstrate that with newly developed antibiotics, it is possible to treat this severe complication conservatively, with complete graft preservation and without the need for bypass surgery in selected cases.

  4. Use of small-angle X-ray scattering to resolve intracellular structure changes of Escherichia coli cells induced by antibiotic treatment1

    PubMed Central

    von Gundlach, A. R.; Garamus, V. M.; Willey, T. M.; Ilavsky, J.; Hilpert, K.; Rosenhahn, A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to whole Escherichia coli cells is challenging owing to the variety of internal constituents. To resolve their contributions, the outer shape was captured by ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering and combined with the internal structure resolved by SAXS. Building on these data, a model for the major structural components of E. coli was developed. It was possible to deduce information on the occupied volume, occurrence and average size of the most important intracellular constituents: ribosomes, DNA and proteins. E. coli was studied after treatment with three different antibiotic agents (chloramphenicol, tetracycline and rifampicin) and the impact on the intracellular constituents was monitored. PMID:27980516

  5. Antibiotic-loaded plaster of Paris implants coated with poly lactide-co-glycolide as a controlled release delivery system for the treatment of bone infections.

    PubMed

    Benoit, M A; Mousset, B; Delloye, C; Bouillet, R; Gillard, J

    1997-01-01

    Plaster of Paris implants containing vancomycin (60 mg/g of carrier) were prepared in order to be used as local delivery system for the treatment of bone infections. The regulation of the release rate was performed by coating the carrier with a polylactide-co-glycolide polymer composed by 10% (w/w) polyglycolic acid and 90% (w/w) racemic poly (D,L-lactic acid). The release of the antibiotic from the biodegradable matrix was evaluated in vitro. From this investigation, it is clear that the drug elution depends on the coating depth. After a burst effect occurring on the first day of the experiment, therapeutic concentrations were measured during one week when uncoated implants were used. The coating allowed decrease of the burst effect and extended efficient release to more than five weeks when the implants were embedded with six layers (162 microns) of PLA45GA10. This delivery system was implanted into the femoral condyle of rabbits. It was shown that the in vivo release was also closely regulated by the coating depth. In all bone tissues (bone marrow and cortical bone) surrounding the pellets, the drug concentration exceeded the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration for the common causative organisms of bone infections (Staphylococcus aureus) for at least four weeks without inducing serum toxic levels. Due to its cheapness, facility of use and sterilization, biocompatibility and biodegradability, plaster of Paris coated with PLA45GA10 polymer giving a controlled release of vancomycin appears to be a promising sustained release delivery system of antibiotics for the treatment of bone and joint infections.

  6. Reviving old antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Theuretzbacher, Ursula; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Cantón, Rafael; Giske, Christian G; Mouton, Johan W; Nation, Roger L; Paul, Mical; Turnidge, John D; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    In the face of increasing antimicrobial resistance and the paucity of new antimicrobial agents it has become clear that new antimicrobial strategies are urgently needed. One of these is to revisit old antibiotics to ensure that they are used correctly and to their full potential, as well as to determine whether one or several of them can help alleviate the pressure on more recent agents. Strategies are urgently needed to 're-develop' these drugs using modern standards, integrating new knowledge into regulatory frameworks and communicating the knowledge from the research bench to the bedside. Without a systematic approach to re-developing these old drugs and rigorously testing them according to today's standards, there is a significant risk of doing harm to patients and further increasing multidrug resistance. This paper describes factors to be considered and outlines steps and actions needed to re-develop old antibiotics so that they can be used effectively for the treatment of infections.

  7. [Resistance to antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Jesús Silva

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is a major public health problem around the world causing high rates of morbi-mortality and economic problems in hospital settings. Major bacterial causing nosocomial infections are: extended-spectrum beta-lactameses (ESBL) producing enterobacteria, methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, metallo fl-lactamases (MBL) producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus spp, Acinetobacter baumani. This last bacteria is not very often isolated in hospital settings yet, but it is multi-resistance pathogen causing high mortality. Helicobacter pylori, which is not a nosocomial pathogen but is associated to gastric diseases (from gastritis to gastric cancer). Infections prevention, to obtain an accuracy diagnostic and effective treatment, use antibiotic wisely and pathogen dissemination prevention (hand washing), are important steps to control the bacterial resistance.

  8. In vitro and in vivo characterization of CB-183,315, a novel lipopeptide antibiotic for treatment of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Mascio, Carmela T M; Mortin, Lawrence I; Howland, Karen T; Van Praagh, Andrew D G; Zhang, Shuxin; Arya, Anu; Chuong, Cun Lan; Kang, Chunfeng; Li, Tongchuan; Silverman, Jared A

    2012-10-01

    CB-183,315 is a novel lipopeptide antibiotic structurally related to daptomycin currently in phase 3 clinical development for Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). We report here the in vitro mechanism of action, spontaneous resistance incidence, resistance by serial passage, time-kill kinetics, postantibiotic effect, and efficacy of CB-183,315 in a hamster model of lethal infection. In vitro data showed that CB-183,315 dissipated the membrane potential of Staphylococcus aureus without inducing changes in membrane permeability to small molecules. The rate of spontaneous resistance to CB-183,315 at 8× the MIC was below the limit of detection in C. difficile. Under selective pressure by serial passage with CB-183,315 against C. difficile, the susceptibility of the bacteria changed no more than 2-fold during 15 days of serial passages. At 16× the MIC, CB-183,315 produced a ≥3-log reduction of C. difficile in the time-kill assay. The postantibiotic effect of CB-183,315 at 8× the MIC was 0.9 h. At 80× the MIC the postantibiotic effect was more than 6 h. In the hamster model of CDAD, CB-183,315 and vancomycin both demonstrated potent efficacy in resolving initial disease onset, even at very low doses. After the conclusion of dosing, CB-183,315 and vancomycin showed a similar dose- and time-dependent pattern with respect to rates of CDAD recurrence.

  9. Antibiotic Modification of Native Grafts: Improving upon nature's scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ketonis, Constantinos

    The use of allograft bone in orthopaedics, spine surgery and dentistry is invaluable for helping restore bone defects and promote osteointegration. However, one, and perhaps the most important, problem associated with the use of allograft is infection. It is a devastating complication for patients and physicians alike, and necessitates repeated surgeries, extended treatment and often times results in increased morbidity and poor outcomes. Previous attempts to incorporate antibiotics into allograft by soaking the graft in antibiotic solution have enjoyed limited success in providing adequate protection against bacterial colonization. To overcome problems associated with controlled release systems, I have described a novel chemical modification that allows for the attachment of vancomycin, or other antibiotics, to free amines of allograft bone thus rendering the graft bactericidal over a long time period. This modification, as evaluated by immunohistochemistry, allowed for the uniform and stable attachment of antibiotics to allograft without adversely affecting its potential for incorporation with bone. Modified allograft, placed in the presence of S. aureus, did not allow colonization by bacteria as evaluated by fluorescent imaging, scanning microscopy, and direct bacterial counts. More importantly, inhibition of bacterial colonization resulted in prevention of biofilm formation. Furthermore, I show that the spectrum of activity of the parent antibiotic was maintained, as the construct was not active against E. coli challenges. Comparison of this technology with simple antibiotic incorporation demonstrated that the covalently-coupled antibiotic did not elute from the bone, but rather remained attached and active on the surface for times out to one year, times that are far longer than currently can be achieved with the elution technologies. Despite its potent activity against bacteria, modified bone remained biocompatible allowing attachment of osteoblastic

  10. Antibiotic prescribing practices by dentists: a review

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla Saeed; Abu-Hammad, Osama Abdalla; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud Khaled; Khraisat, Ameen Sameh; Shehabi, Asem Ata

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotics are prescribed by dentists for treatment as well as prevention of infection. Indications for the use of systemic antibiotics in dentistry are limited, since most dental and periodontal diseases are best managed by operative intervention and oral hygiene measures. However, the literature provides evidence of inadequate prescribing practices by dentists, due to a number of factors ranging from inadequate knowledge to social factors. Here we review studies that investigated the pattern of antibiotic use by dentists worldwide. The main defects in the knowledge of antibiotic prescribing are outlined. The main conclusion is that, unfortunately, the prescribing practices of dentists are inadequate and this is manifested by over-prescribing. Recommendations to improve antibiotic prescribing practices are presented in an attempt to curb the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance and other side effects of antibiotic abuse. PMID:20668712

  11. Local antibiotic delivery with demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Christine S; Supronowicz, Peter R; Zhukauskas, Rasa M; Gill, Elise; Cobb, Ronald R

    2012-03-01

    A method of care for these infected nonunions is prolonged intravenous systemic antibiotic treatment and implantation of methyl methacrylate antibiotic carrier beads to delivery high local doses of antibiotics. This method requires a second surgery to remove the beads once the infection has cleared. Recent studies have investigated the use of biodegradable materials that have been impregnated with antibiotics as tools to treat bone infections. In the present study, human demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was investigated for its ability to be loaded with an antibiotic. The data presented herein demonstrates that this osteoinductive and biodegradable material can be loaded with gentamicin and release clinically relevant levels of the drug for at least 13 days in vitro. This study also demonstrates that the antibiotic loaded onto the graft has no adverse effects on the osteoinductive nature of the DBM as measured in vitro and in vivo. This bone void filler may represent a promising option for local antibiotic delivery in orthopedic applications.

  12. Cognitive Impairment by Antibiotic-Induced Gut Dysbiosis: Analysis of Gut Microbiota-Brain Communication

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Esther E.; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis. PMID:26923630

  13. Cognitive impairment by antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis: Analysis of gut microbiota-brain communication.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Esther E; Farzi, Aitak; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Reichmann, Florian; Jačan, Angela; Wagner, Bernhard; Zinser, Erwin; Bordag, Natalie; Magnes, Christoph; Fröhlich, Eleonore; Kashofer, Karl; Gorkiewicz, Gregor; Holzer, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that disruption of the gut microbial community (dysbiosis) impairs mental health. Germ-free mice and antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis are two approaches to establish causality in gut microbiota-brain relationships. However, both models have limitations, as germ-free mice display alterations in blood-brain barrier and brain ultrastructure and antibiotics may act directly on the brain. We hypothesized that the concerns related to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis can only adequately be addressed if the effect of intragastric treatment of adult mice with multiple antibiotics on (i) gut microbial community, (ii) metabolite profile in the colon, (iii) circulating metabolites, (iv) expression of neuronal signaling molecules in distinct brain areas and (v) cognitive behavior is systematically investigated. Of the antibiotics used (ampicillin, bacitracin, meropenem, neomycin, vancomycin), ampicillin had some oral bioavailability but did not enter the brain. 16S rDNA sequencing confirmed antibiotic-induced microbial community disruption, and metabolomics revealed that gut dysbiosis was associated with depletion of bacteria-derived metabolites in the colon and alterations of lipid species and converted microbe-derived molecules in the plasma. Importantly, novel object recognition, but not spatial, memory was impaired in antibiotic-treated mice. This cognitive deficit was associated with brain region-specific changes in the expression of cognition-relevant signaling molecules, notably brain-derived neurotrophic factor, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B, serotonin transporter and neuropeptide Y system. We conclude that circulating metabolites and the cerebral neuropeptide Y system play an important role in the cognitive impairment and dysregulation of cerebral signaling molecules due to antibiotic-induced gut dysbiosis.

  14. Magnetic separation of antibiotics by electrochemical magnetic seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, I.; Toyoda, K.; Beneragama, N.; Umetsu, K.

    2009-03-01

    Magnetic separation of several classes of antibiotics was investigated using electrochemical magnetic seeding. Electrocoagulation with a sacrificial anode followed by addition of magnetite particles was applied for the magnetic seeding of antibiotics. With electrochemical magnetic seeding using an iron anode, tetracycline antibiotics (oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, doxycycline and tetracycline) and cephalosporin antibiotic (cefdinir) were rapidly removed from synthetic wastewater by magnetic separation using a neodymium magnet. Iron and aluminium anodes were suitable for magnetic seeding of the antibiotics. The results indicated that the ability of antibiotics to form strong complex with iron and aluminium allowed the higher removal by magnetic separation. This method would be appropriate for rapid treatment of antibiotics in wastewater.

  15. Antibiotic expected effectiveness and cost under real life microbiology: evaluation of ertapenem and ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia for elderly patients in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Santiago; Lozano, Virginia; Valladares, Amparo; Cavanillas, Rafael; Xie, Yang; Nocea, Gonzalo

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical efficacy of antibiotics may be affected by changes in the susceptibility of microorganisms to antimicrobial agents. The purpose of this study is to assess how these changes could affect the initial efficacy of ertapenem and ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in elderly patients and the potential consequences this may have in health care costs. Methods Initial efficacy in elderly was obtained from a combined analysis of two multicenter, randomized studies. An alternative scenario was carried out using initial efficacy data according to the pneumonia severity index (PSI). Country-specific pathogens distribution was obtained from a national epidemiological study, and microbiological susceptibilities to first- and second-line therapies were obtained from Spanish or European surveillance studies. A decision analytic model was used to compare ertapenem versus ceftriaxone for CAP inpatient treatment. Inputs of the model were the expected effectiveness previously estimated and resource use considering a Spanish national health system perspective. Outcomes include difference in proportion of successfully treated patients and difference in total costs between ertapenem and ceftriaxone. The model performed one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results First-line treatment of CAP with ertapenem led to a higher proportion of successfully treated patients compared with ceftriaxone in Spain. One-way sensitivity analysis showed that length of stay was the key parameter of the model. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that ertapenem can be a cost-saving strategy compared with ceftriaxone, with a 59% probability of being dominant (lower costs with additional health benefits) for both, elderly patients (>65 years) and patients with PSI >3. Conclusion The incorporation of the current antimicrobial susceptibility into the initial clinical efficacy has a significant impact in outcomes and costs in CAP treatment. The

  16. Combination antibiotic treatment versus monotherapy for multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant, and pandrug-resistant Acinetobacter infections: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Poulikakos, P; Tansarli, G S; Falagas, M E

    2014-10-01

    Controversy surrounds combination treatment or monotherapy against multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR), and pandrug-resistant (PDR) Acinetobacter infections in clinical practice. We searched the PubMed and Scopus databases for studies reporting on the clinical outcomes of patients infected with MDR, XDR, and PDR Acinetobacter spp. with regard to the administered intravenous antibiotic treatment. Twelve studies reporting on 1,040 patients suffering from 1,044 infectious episodes of MDR Acinetobacter spp. were included. The overall mortality between studies varied from 28.6 to 70 %; from 25 to 100 % in the monotherapy arm and from 27 to 57.1 % in the combination arm. Combination treatment was superior to monotherapy in three studies, where carbapenem with ampicillin/sulbactam (mortality 30.8 %, p = 0.012), carbapenem with colistin (mortality 23 %, p = 0.009), and combinations of colistin with rifampicin, sulbactam with aminoglycosides, tigecycline with colistin and rifampicin, and tigecycline with rifampicin and amikacin (mortality 27 %, p < 0.05) were used against MDR Acinetobacter spp. resistant at least to carbapenems. The benefit was not validated in the remaining studies. Clinical success varied from 42.4 to 76.9 % and microbiological eradication varied from 32.7 to 67.3 %. Adverse events referred mainly to polymixins nephrotoxicity that varied from 19 to 50 %. The emergence of resistance was noted with tigecycline regimens in off-label uses in three studies. The available data preclude a firm recommendation with regard to combination treatment or monotherapy. For the time being, combination treatment may be preferred for severely ill patients. We urge for randomized controlled trials examining the optimal treatment of infections due to MDR, XDR, and PDR Acinetobacter spp.

  17. A Pilot Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Augmentation of Antibiotic Treatment in Youth with Pediatric Acute-Onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome-Related Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Cary; Selles, Robert R.; Wu, Monica S.; King, Morgan A.; Patel, Priyal D.; Hanks, Camille E.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: This study reports an open trial of family-based cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) exhibiting an onset pattern consistent with pediatric acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome (PANS). Methods: Eleven primarily Caucasian youth with PANS-related OCD (range=4–14 years; 6 boys) who were incomplete responders to antibiotic treatment, received family-based CBT delivered either face-to-face or via web camera. Results: All participants completing treatment (8 of 8) were considered improved at posttreatment, and average obsessive-compulsive symptom severity was reduced by 49%. Significant reductions in obsessive-compulsive symptom severity and in clinician- and parent-rated OCD-related impairment were noted. Reductions in parent- and child-rated anxiety, child-rated OCD-related impairment, and comorbid neuropsychiatric symptoms were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Gains were maintained at follow-up, with 100% (6 of 6) of those assessed remaining improved. Implications for treatment and further research are discussed. PMID:25978743

  18. Broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Holen, Øyunn; Alberg, Torunn; Blix, Hege Salvesen; Smith, Ingrid; Neteland, Marion Iren; Eriksen, Hanne Merete

    2017-03-01

    BACKGROUND One of the objectives in the action plan to reduce antimicrobial resistance in the health services in Norway is to reduce the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Norwegian hospitals. This study describes the use of certain broad-spectrum antibiotics mentioned in the action plan in Norwegian hospitals, and assesses prescribing practices in relation to the Norwegian guidelines for antibiotic use in hospitals.MATERIAL AND METHOD Data were analysed from a nationwide non-identifiable point prevalence survey in May 2016 where all systemic use of antibiotics was recorded.RESULTS Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for 33 % of all antibiotics prescribed. Altogether 84 % of all broad-spectrum antibiotics were prescribed as treatment, 8 % were for prophylactic use, and 8 % were classified as other/unknown. Lower respiratory tract infections were the most frequent indication for treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics, involving 30 % of all broad-spectrum treatment.INTERPRETATION This point prevalence survey in Norwegian hospitals in spring 2016 indicates a possibility for reducing the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics in the treatment of lower respiratory tract infections and for prophylactic use. Reduction of healthcare-associated infections may also contribute.

  19. Occurence of antibiotic compounds found in the water column and bottom sediments from a stream receiving two waste water treatment plant effluents in northern New Jersey, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibs, Jacob; Heckathorn, Heather A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Klapinski, Frank R.; Alebus, Marzooq; Lippincott, Robert

    2013-01-01

    An urban watershed in northern New Jersey was studied to determine the presence of four classes of antibiotic compounds (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines) and six degradates in the water column and bottom sediments upstream and downstream from the discharges of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a drinking-water intake (DWI). Many antibiotic compounds in the four classes not removed by conventional WWTPs enter receiving waters and partition to stream sediments. Samples were collected at nine sampling locations on 2 days in September 2008. Two of the nine sampling locations were background sites upstream from two WWTP discharges on Hohokus Brook. Another background site was located upstream from a DWI on the Saddle River above the confluence with Hohokus Brook. Because there is a weir downstream of the confluence of Hohokus Brook and Saddle River, the DWI receives water from Hohokus Brook at low stream flows. Eight antibiotic compounds (azithromycin (maximum concentration 0.24 μg/L), ciprofloxacin (0.08 μg/L), enrofloxacin (0.015 μg/L), erythromycin (0.024 μg/L), ofloxacin (0.92 μg/L), sulfamethazine (0.018 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (0.25 μg/L), and trimethoprim (0.14 μg/L)) and a degradate (erythromycin-H2O (0.84 μg/L)) were detected in the water samples from the sites downstream from the WWTP discharges. The concentrations of six of the eight detected compounds and the detected degradate compound decreased with increasing distance downstream from the WWTP discharges. Azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and trimethoprim were detected in stream-bottom sediments. The concentrations of three of the four compounds detected in sediments were highest at a sampling site located downstream from the WWTP discharges. Trimethoprim was detected in the sediments from a background site. Pseudo-partition coefficients normalized for streambed sediment organic carbon concentration were calculated for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and

  20. Efficacy of anti-inflammatory or antibiotic treatment in patients with non-complicated acute bronchitis and discoloured sputum: randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Moragas, Ana; Bayona, Carolina; Morros, Rosa; Pera, Helena; Plana-Ripoll, Oleguer; Cots, Josep M; Miravitlles, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy of oral anti-inflammatory or antibiotic treatment compared with placebo in the resolution of cough in patients with uncomplicated acute bronchitis and discoloured sputum. Design Multicentre, parallel, single blinded placebo controlled, randomised clinical trial. Setting Nine primary care centres in Spain. Participants Adults aged 18 to 70 presenting symptoms associated with respiratory tract infection of less than one week’s duration, with cough as the predominant symptom, the presence of discoloured sputum, and at least one other symptom of lower respiratory tract infection (dyspnoea, wheezing, chest discomfort, or chest pain). Interventions Patients were randomised to receive either ibuprofen 600 mg three times daily, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid 500 mg/125 mg three times daily, or placebo three times daily for 10 days. The duration of symptoms was measured with a diary card. Main outcome measure Number of days with frequent cough after the randomisation visit. Results 416 participants were randomised (136 to ibuprofen, 137 to antibiotic, and 143 to placebo) and 390 returned their symptom diaries fully completed. The median number of days with frequent cough was slightly lower among patients assigned to ibuprofen (9 days, 95% confidence interval 8 to 10 days) compared with those receiving amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (11 days, 10 to 12 days) or placebo (11 days, 8 to 14 days), albeit without statistically significant differences. Neither amoxicillin-clavulanic acid nor ibuprofen increased the probability of cough resolution (hazard ratio 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.35 and 1.23, 0.93 to 1.61, respectively) compared with placebo. Adverse events were observed in 27 patients, and were more common in the antibiotic arm (12%) than ibuprofen or placebo arms (5% and 3%, respectively; P<0.01). Conclusion No significant differences were observed in the number of days with cough between patients with uncomplicated acute

  1. Occurrence and partitioning of antibiotic compounds found in the water column and bottom sediments from a stream receiving two wastewater treatment plant effluents in northern New Jersey, 2008.

    PubMed

    Gibs, Jacob; Heckathorn, Heather A; Meyer, Michael T; Klapinski, Frank R; Alebus, Marzooq; Lippincott, Robert L

    2013-08-01

    An urban watershed in northern New Jersey was studied to determine the presence of four classes of antibiotic compounds (macrolides, fluoroquinolones, sulfonamides, and tetracyclines) and six degradates in the water column and bottom sediments upstream and downstream from the discharges of two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and a drinking-water intake (DWI). Many antibiotic compounds in the four classes not removed by conventional WWTPs enter receiving waters and partition to stream sediments. Samples were collected at nine sampling locations on 2 days in September 2008. Two of the nine sampling locations were background sites upstream from two WWTP discharges on Hohokus Brook. Another background site was located upstream from a DWI on the Saddle River above the confluence with Hohokus Brook. Because there is a weir downstream of the confluence of Hohokus Brook and Saddle River, the DWI receives water from Hohokus Brook at low stream flows. Eight antibiotic compounds (azithromycin (maximum concentration 0.24 μg/L), ciprofloxacin (0.08 μg/L), enrofloxacin (0.015 μg/L), erythromycin (0.024 μg/L), ofloxacin (0.92 μg/L), sulfamethazine (0.018 μg/L), sulfamethoxazole (0.25 μg/L), and trimethoprim (0.14 μg/L)) and a degradate (erythromycin-H2O (0.84 μg/L)) were detected in the water samples from the sites downstream from the WWTP discharges. The concentrations of six of the eight detected compounds and the detected degradate compound decreased with increasing distance downstream from the WWTP discharges. Azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and trimethoprim were detected in stream-bottom sediments. The concentrations of three of the four compounds detected in sediments were highest at a sampling site located downstream from the WWTP discharges. Trimethoprim was detected in the sediments from a background site. Pseudo-partition coefficients normalized for streambed sediment organic carbon concentration were calculated for azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and

  2. Development of antibiotic resistance genes in microbial communities during long-term operation of anaerobic reactors in the treatment of pharmaceutical wastewater.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Ince, Bahar; Ince, Orhan

    2015-10-15

    Biological treatment processes offer the ideal conditions in which a high diversity of microorganisms can grow and develop. The wastewater produced during these processes is contaminated with antibiotics and, as such, they provide the ideal setting for the acquisition and proliferation of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). This research investigated the occurrence and variation in the ARGs found during the one-year operation of the anaerobic sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) used to treat pharmaceutical wastewater that contained combinations of sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline-erythromycin (STE) and sulfamethoxazole-tetracycline (ST). The existence of eighteen ARGs encoding resistance to sulfamethoxazole (sul1, sul2, sul3), erythromycin (ermA, ermF, ermB, msrA, ereA), tetracycline (tetA, tetB, tetC, tetD, tetE, tetM, tetS, tetQ, tetW, tetX) and class Ι integron gene (intΙ 1) in the STE and ST reactors was investigated by quantitative real-time PCR. Due to the limited availability of primers to detect ARGs, Illumina sequencing was also performed on the sludge and effluent of the STE and ST reactors. Although there was good reactor performance in the SBRs, which corresponds to min 80% COD removal efficiency, tetA, tetB, sul1, sul2 and ermB genes were among those ARGs detected in the effluent from STE and ST reactors. A comparison of the ARGs acquired from the STE and ST reactors revealed that the effluent from the STE reactor had a higher number of ARGs than that from the ST reactor; this could be due to the synergistic effects of erythromycin. According to the expression of genes results, microorganisms achieve tetracycline and erythromycin resistance through a combination of three mechanisms: efflux pumping protein, modification of the antibiotic target and modifying enzymes. There was also a significant association between the presence of the class 1 integron and sulfamethoxazole resistance genes.

  3. New antibiotic therapies for acne and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Mays, Rana Majd; Gordon, Rachel A; Wilson, Janice M; Silapunt, Sirunya

    2012-01-01

    Acne and rosacea compromise a substantial portion of the dermatology clinical practice. Over the past century, many treatment modalities have been introduced with antibiotics playing a major role. Today, both oral and topical antibiotics are used in the management of acne and rosacea, with several novel formulations and/or combination regimens recently introduced. The latest studies suggest anti-inflammatory actions to be the most likely mechanism of antibiotics in acne and rosacea, shifting the focus to subantimicrobial-dose oral antibiotics and/or topical antibiotic regimens as the preferred first-line agents. Here we will discuss the most recent oral and topical antibiotic therapies available for treatment of acne and rosacea, with special focus on efficacy data, indication, dosing, and mechanism of action.

  4. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  5. Contamination Profiles and Mass Loadings of Macrolide Antibiotics and Illicit Drugs from a Small Urban Wastewater Treatment Plant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Information is limited regarding sources, distribution, environmental behavior, and fate of prescribed and illicit drugs. Wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can be one of the sources of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCP) into streams, rivers and lakes. The ...

  6. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-11-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance.

  7. Optimising Antibiotic Usage to Treat Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Iona K.; Hoyle, Andy; Ochoa, Gabriela; Baker-Austin, Craig; Taylor, Nick G. H.

    2016-01-01

    The increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria poses a threat to the continued use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has been identified as a significant driver in the emergence of resistance. Finding optimal treatment regimens is therefore critical in ensuring the prolonged effectiveness of these antibiotics. This study uses mathematical modelling to analyse the effect traditional treatment regimens have on the dynamics of a bacterial infection. Using a novel approach, a genetic algorithm, the study then identifies improved treatment regimens. Using a single antibiotic the genetic algorithm identifies regimens which minimise the amount of antibiotic used while maximising bacterial eradication. Although exact treatments are highly dependent on parameter values and initial bacterial load, a significant common trend is identified throughout the results. A treatment regimen consisting of a high initial dose followed by an extended tapering of doses is found to optimise the use of antibiotics. This consistently improves the success of eradicating infections, uses less antibiotic than traditional regimens and reduces the time to eradication. The use of genetic algorithms to optimise treatment regimens enables an extensive search of possible regimens, with previous regimens directing the search into regions of better performance. PMID:27892497

  8. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  9. Dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes and their potential removal by on-farm treatment processes in nine swine feedlots in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Ben, Weiwei; Wang, Jian; Pan, Xun; Qiang, Zhimin

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) encoding resistance to sulfonamide and tetracycline antibiotics in nine swine feedlots located in Shandong Province of China, and examined their potential removal by various on-farm treatment processes. Results indicate that the target ARGs were widely distributed in swine wastes, with mean relative abundances ranging from 3.3 × 10(-5) (tetC) to 5.2 × 10(-1) (tetO) in swine manure and from 7.3 × 10(-3) (tetC) to 1.7 × 10(-1) (tetO) in swine wastewater. The mean relative ARG abundances ranged from 9.9 × 10(-5) (tetW) to 1.1 × 10(-2) (tetO) in soils and from 3.1 × 10(-4) (tetW) to 1.1 × 10(-2) (sul2) in receiving river sediments, indicating that the farmland application of swine manure compost and the discharge of swine wastewater promoted the dissemination of ARGs into adjacent environments. Microbial fermentation bed (MFB) could reduce the relative ARG abundances by 0-1.18 logs. However, septic tank, biogas digester and natural drying methods were relatively ineffective for ARG removal, and the relative abundances of some ARGs (i.e., tetC, tetG, sul1, and sul2) even increased by 0.74-3.90 logs in treated wastes. Bacterial diversity analysis indicates that the evolution of bacterial communities in the MFB played a crucial role in eliminating the ARGs. This study helps the effective assessment and management of ecological risks arising from ARGs in swine feedlots.

  10. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  11. In-feed antibiotic effects on the swine intestinal microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibiotics have been administered to agricultural animals for disease treatment, disease prevention, and growth promotion for over 50 years. The impact of such antibiotic use on the treatment of human diseases is hotly debated. Based on metagenomic and qPCR analysis, we show that antibiotic resis...

  12. Systemic antibiotic treatment of clinical endometritis in dairy cows with ceftiofur or two doses of cloprostenol in a 14-d interval.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, T B; Westermann, S; Drillich, M; Plöntzke, J; Heuwieser, W

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the systemic antibiotic treatment of clinical endometritis in dairy cows with ceftiofur with a treatment protocol consisting of two doses of prostaglandin F(2alpha) analogue cloprostenol in a 14-d interval. On 2 commercial dairy farms, housing a total of 1900 Holstein cows, all cows that calved between June 2008 and January 2009 were examined 21-27d in milk (DIM) by vaginoscopy. Cows with clinical signs of endometritis, i.e. vaginal discharge containing flecks of pus, mucopurulent material or purulent mucus, were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups. Cows in group CEF (n=141) received 1 mg/kg BW of ceftiofur (i.m.) on 3 consecutive days. Cows in group CLP (n=140) received 0.5 mg of cloprostenol (i.m.) at the day of enrolment and 14d later. All cows were re-examined by vaginoscopy 42-48 DIM. Proportion of cows cured, i.e. cows with clear, translucent or no mucus, 42-48 DIM (74.2 and 80.2% in groups CEF and CLP, respectively) was not affected by treatment group (P=0.09). The voluntary waiting period was set at 40 DIM. Artificial insemination (AI) submission rate, days to first service, first service conception rate, days open and proportion of cows pregnant did not differ between the groups. In conclusion, the systemic treatment with 1.0 mg/kg BW of ceftiofur on 3 consecutive days in cows with signs of clinical endometritis 21-27 DIM was equivalent to an intervention protocol consisting of two doses of cloprostenol in a 14-d interval.

  13. Recurrent urinary tract infections and complications after symptomatic versus antibiotic treatment: follow-up of a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bleidorn, Jutta; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Schmiemann, Guido; Wiese, Birgitt; Gágyor, Ildikó

    2016-01-01

    Hintergrund: Unkomplizierte Harnwegsinfekte (HWI) sind eine häufige Erkrankung in der Allgemeinmedizin und werden üblicherweise antibiotisch behandelt. Rezidive stellen dabei ein ernstzunehmendes Problem für betroffene Frauen dar. Über Rezidive und Komplikationen nach nicht-antibiotischer Behandlung unkomplizierter Harnwegsinfekte ist wenig bekannt.Mit der Studie ICUTI (Immediate vs. conditional antibiotic use in uncomplicated UTI, gefördert vom BMBF 01KG1105) wurde untersucht, ob eine initial symptomatische Behandlung mit Ibuprofen eine alternative Behandlungsmöglichkeit beim Harnwegsinfekt darstellt. Die hier vorgestellte Analyse hatte zum Ziel, den Einfluss einer initialen (nicht)antibiotischen Therapie auf das Auftreten von Rezidiven und Pyelonephritiden zwischen Tag 28 und 6 Monaten nach Einschluss in die Studie darzustellen.Methode: Retrospektive Analyse der 6-Monats-Nachbefragung der ICUTI-Teilnehmer. Durch telefonische Befragung 6 Monate nach Einschluss in die Studie wurde das Auftreten von Rezidiven, Pyelonephritiden und Krankenhausaufnahmen dokumentiert. Die statistische Auswertung erfolgte durch deskriptive und multivariate Analysen mit SPSS 21.Ergebnisse: Bei der 6-Monats-Nachbefragung wurden 386 ICUTI-Teilnehmerinnen erreicht (494 waren in ICUTI eingeschlossen worden, 446 hatten die Studie beendet). Zwischen Tag 28 und 6 Monaten nach Einschluss in ICUTI berichteten 80 Patientinnen insgesamt 84 Rezidive. In der univariaten und in der multivariaten Analyse zeigte sich kein Einfluss der initialen Behandlungsgruppe oder einer antibiotischen Behandlung auf die Zahl der Patientinnen mit Rezidiven. Allerdings zeigten beide Analysen, dass Patientinnen mit vorherigen Harnwegsinfekten signifikant häufiger weitere Rezidive bekamen. Pyelonephritiden traten bei zwei Patientinnen in der antibiotisch behandelten Gruppe und bei einer Patientin in der nicht antibiotisch behandelten Gruppe auf.Schlussfolgerung: Die Follow-up-Analyse der Nachbefragung nach einem

  14. Antibiotics in dental implants: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Surapaneni, Hemchand; Yalamanchili, Pallavi Samatha; Basha, Md. Hafeez; Potluri, Sushma; Elisetti, Nirupa; Kiran Kumar, M. V.

    2016-01-01

    The routine use of antibiotics in oral implant treatment seems to be widespread. The pre- or post-operative use of antibiotics in conjunction with implant surgery and its correlation with failure and success rates are poorly documented in the literature. The debate regarding overprescription of antibiotics raises the need for a critical evaluation of proper antibiotic coverage in association with implant treatment. The benefits of prophylactic antibiotics are well-recognized in dentistry. However, their routine use in the placement of endosseous dental implants remains controversial. The purpose of this review is to know the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in implant dentistry. PMID:27829741

  15. Antibiotic treatment with ampicillin accelerates the healing of colonic damage impaired by aspirin and coxib in the experimental colitis. Importance of intestinal bacteria, colonic microcirculation and proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Zwolinska-Wcislo, M; Krzysiek-Maczka, G; Ptak-Belowska, A; Karczewska, E; Pajdo, R; Sliwowski, Z; Urbanczyk, K; Drozdowicz, D; Konturek, S J; Pawlik, W W; Brzozowski, T

    2011-06-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for their anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic effects, however their use is associated with the broad spectrum of side effects observed in human as well as the experimental animals. Despite damaging activity of NSAIDs in upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract, these drugs exert deleterious influence in lower GI tract, including colon. The role of GI microflora in the pathogenesis of NSAIDs-induced experimental colonic damage is not completely understood. The aim of this study was 1) to evaluate the relative importance of the GI microflora on the experimental colonic damage in the presence of caused by NSAID, and 2) to assess the efficacy of antibiotic treatment with ampicillin on the process of healing of colitis. We compared the effect of vehicle, ASA applied 40 mg/kg intragastrically (i.g.) or the selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor, celecoxib (25 mg/kg i.g.) without or with ampicillin treatment (800 mg/kg i.g.) administered throughout the period of 10 days, on the intensity of TNBS-induced colitis in rats. The severity of colonic damage, the alterations in the colonic blood flow (CBF) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, the mucosal expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, COX-2, VEGF and iNOS and the plasma concentration of TNF-α and IL-1β were assessed. In all rats, the faeces samples as well as those from the colonic mucosa, blood, liver and spleen underwent microbiological evaluation for intestinal bacterial species including Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. The administration of TNBS resulted in macroscopic and microscopic lesions accompanied by the significant fall in the CBF, an increase in tissue weight and 4-5-fold rise in the MPO activity and a significant increase in the plasma IL-1β and TNF-α levels. ASA or celecoxib significantly increased the area of colonic lesions, enhanced MPO activity and caused the marked increase in colonic tissue weight and plasma IL-1β and TNF

  16. Skip the Antibiotics for Mild Eczema in Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164083.html Skip the Antibiotics for Mild Eczema in Kids Skin condition cleared ... March 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Despite widespread use, antibiotics are not an effective treatment for milder cases ...

  17. A comparative study of the use of bioactive glass S53P4 and antibiotic-loaded calcium-based bone substitutes in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis: a retrospective comparative study.

    PubMed

    Romanò, C L; Logoluso, N; Meani, E; Romanò, D; De Vecchi, E; Vassena, C; Drago, L

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of chronic osteomyelitis often includes surgical debridement and filling the resultant void with antibiotic-loaded polymethylmethacrylate cement, bone grafts or bone substitutes. Recently, the use of bioactive glass to treat bone defects in infections has been reported in a limited series of patients. However, no direct comparison between this biomaterial and antibiotic-loaded bone substitute has been performed. In this retrospective study, we compared the safety and efficacy of surgical debridement and local application of the bioactive glass S53P4 in a series of 27 patients affected by chronic osteomyelitis of the long bones (Group A) with two other series, treated respectively with an antibiotic-loaded hydroxyapatite and calcium sulphate compound (Group B; n = 27) or a mixture of tricalcium phosphate and an antibiotic-loaded demineralised bone matrix (Group C; n = 22). Systemic antibiotics were also used in all groups. After comparable periods of follow-up, the control of infection was similar in the three groups. In particular, 25 out of 27 (92.6%) patients of Group A, 24 out of 27 (88.9%) in Group B and 19 out of 22 (86.3%) in Group C showed no infection recurrence at means of 21.8 (12 to 36), 22.1 (12 to 36) and 21.5 (12 to 36) months follow-up, respectively, while Group A showed a reduced wound complication rate. Our results show that patients treated with a bioactive glass without local antibiotics achieved similar eradication of infection and less drainage than those treated with two different antibiotic-loaded calcium-based bone substitutes.

  18. Uptake of three antibiotics and an anti-epileptic drug by wheat plants spray irrigated with wastewater treatment plant effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With rising demands on water supplies necessitating water reuse, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent is often used to irrigate agricultural lands. Emerging contaminants, like pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), are frequently found in effluent due to limited removal during WWT...

  19. Symptom load and general function among patients with erythema migrans: a prospective study with a 1-year follow-up after antibiotic treatment in Norwegian general practice

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Knut Eirik; Hjetland, Reidar; Reiso, Harald; Lindbæk, Morten; Tschudi-Madsen, Hedda

    2017-01-01

    Objective Promptly treated erythema migrans (EM) has good prognosis. However, some patients report persistent symptoms. Do patients with EM have more symptoms than the general population? We describe individual symptoms and general function in EM-patients at time of diagnosis and one year after treatment. Design Prospective study with 1-year follow up after treatment. Questionnaires included a modified version of the Subjective Health Complaints Inventory, comprising three additional Lyme borreliosis (LB) related symptoms. General function was assessed using a five-point scale modified from the COOP/WONCA charts. Setting Norwegian general practice. Subjects A total of 188 patients were included in a randomized controlled trial comparing three antibiotic regimens for EM, of whom 139 had complete data for this study. Main outcome measures Individual symptoms, symptom load and general function. Results Mild symptoms were common, reported by 84.9% at baseline and by 85.6% at follow-up. At baseline, patients reported a mean of 5.4 symptoms, compared with 6.2 after one year. Severely bothersome symptoms and severely impaired general function were rare. Tiredness was the most reported symptom both at baseline and at follow-up. Palsy (other than facial) was the least reported symptom, but the only one with a significant increase. However, this was not associated to the EM. Conclusion The symptom load was comparable to that reported in the general population. We found an increase in symptom load at follow-up that did not significantly affect general function. Implication: Monitoring patients’ symptom loads prior to treatment reduce the probability of attributing follow-up symptoms to LB. Key points Erythema migrans has a good prognosis.Patients treated for erythema migrans have a slight increase in symptom load one year after treatment. This increase does not affect general function. The levels of subjective health complaints in patients treated for erythema migrans are

  20. [Enteropathogens and antibiotics].

    PubMed

    González-Torralba, Ana; García-Esteban, Coral; Alós, Juan-Ignacio

    2015-08-12

    Infectious gastroenteritis remains a public health problem. The most severe cases are of bacterial origin. In Spain, Campylobacter and Salmonella are the most prevalent bacterial genus, while Yersinia and Shigella are much less frequent. Most cases are usually self-limiting and antibiotic therapy is not generally indicated, unless patients have risk factors for severe infection and shigellosis. Ciprofloxacin, third generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, ampicillin, cotrimoxazole and doxycycline are the most recommended drugs. The susceptibility pattern of the different bacteria determines the choice of the most appropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to analyse the current situation, developments, and evolution of resistance and multidrug resistance in these 4 enteric pathogens.