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Sample records for adequate bowel preparation

  1. Cost Effectiveness of Screening Colonoscopy Depends on Adequate Bowel Preparation Rates – A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, James; Karanth, Siddharth; Revere, Frances Lee

    2016-01-01

    Background Inadequate bowel preparation during screening colonoscopy necessitates repeating colonoscopy. Studies suggest inadequate bowel preparation rates of 20–60%. This increases the cost of colonoscopy for our society. Aim The aim of this study is to determine the impact of inadequate bowel preparation rate on the cost effectiveness of colonoscopy compared to other screening strategies for colorectal cancer (CRC). Methods A microsimulation model of CRC screening strategies for the general population at average risk for CRC. The strategies include fecal immunochemistry test (FIT) every year, colonoscopy every ten years, sigmoidoscopy every five years, or stool DNA test every 3 years. The screening could be performed at private practice offices, outpatient hospitals, and ambulatory surgical centers. Results At the current assumed inadequate bowel preparation rate of 25%, the cost of colonoscopy as a screening strategy is above society’s willingness to pay (<$50,000/QALY). Threshold analysis demonstrated that an inadequate bowel preparation rate of 13% or less is necessary before colonoscopy is considered more cost effective than FIT. At inadequate bowel preparation rates of 25%, colonoscopy is still more cost effective compared to sigmoidoscopy and stool DNA test. Sensitivity analysis of all inputs adjusted by ±10% showed incremental cost effectiveness ratio values were influenced most by the specificity, adherence, and sensitivity of FIT and colonoscopy. Conclusions Screening colonoscopy is not a cost effective strategy when compared with fecal immunochemical test, as long as the inadequate bowel preparation rate is greater than 13%. PMID:27936028

  2. Bowel Preparation before Elective Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anjali S.; Kelleher, Deirdre C.; Sigle, Gavin W.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical bowel preps were initially thought to decrease the bacterial load of the colon and therefore decrease infection. Traditional bowel preps include osmotic, laxative, and combination regimen. Data demonstrate that mechanical bowel preps are generally equivalent; however, the addition of oral antibiotics may further reduce the risk of infection. Recent data suggest that mechanical bowel preparations may not be necessary, and that dietary restrictions before surgery may also be obsolete. In this review, the authors address the types of mechanical bowel preparations (MBPs), differences in outcomes between MBPs, the role of oral antibiosis and enemas, the benefits of no MBP, and dietary preparations for elective colon and rectal surgery. PMID:24436665

  3. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  4. Achieving the best bowel preparation for colonoscopy.

    PubMed

    Parra-Blanco, Adolfo; Ruiz, Alex; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Amorós, Ana; Gana, Juan Cristóbal; Ibáñez, Patricio; Ono, Akiko; Fujii, Takahiro

    2014-12-21

    with inflammatory bowel disease, including safety and diagnostic issues, so that the most adequate agent is chosen. Identifying neoplasia is one of the main objectives of colonoscopy with these patients, and the target lesions are often almost invisible with white light endoscopy. Therefore excellent quality preparation is required to find these lesions and to apply advanced methods such as chromoendoscopy. Bowel preparation for patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding represents a challenge, and the strategies available are also reviewed here.

  5. Achieving the best bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Blanco, Adolfo; Ruiz, Alex; Alvarez-Lobos, Manuel; Amorós, Ana; Gana, Juan Cristóbal; Ibáñez, Patricio; Ono, Akiko; Fujii, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    with inflammatory bowel disease, including safety and diagnostic issues, so that the most adequate agent is chosen. Identifying neoplasia is one of the main objectives of colonoscopy with these patients, and the target lesions are often almost invisible with white light endoscopy. Therefore excellent quality preparation is required to find these lesions and to apply advanced methods such as chromoendoscopy. Bowel preparation for patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding represents a challenge, and the strategies available are also reviewed here. PMID:25548470

  6. Does Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy Affect Cognitive Function?

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, P.; Blackburne, H.; Dixon, L.; Dobbs, B.; Eglinton, T.; Ing, A.; Mulder, R.; Porter, R.J.; Wakeman, C.; Frizelle, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonoscopy is a common procedure used in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of bowel disorders. Prior preparation involving potent laxatives is a necessary stage to ensure adequate visualization of the bowel wall. It is known that the sedatives given to most patients during the colonoscopy cause a temporary impairment in cognitive function; however, the potential for bowel preparation to affect cognitive function has not previously been investigated. To assess the effect of bowel preparation for colonoscopy on cognitive function. This was a prospective, nonrandomized controlled study of cognitive function in patients who had bowel preparation for colonoscopy compared with those having gastroscopy and therefore no bowel preparation. Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (MMMSE) and selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Individual test scores and changes between initial and subsequent tests were compared between the groups. Age, gender, and weight were also compared. Forty-three colonoscopy and 25 gastroscopy patients were recruited. The 2 groups were similar for age and gender; however, patients having gastroscopy were heavier. MMMSE scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 28.6 and 29.5 (P = 0.24) at baseline, 28.7 and 29.8 (P = 0.32) at test 2, 28.1 and 28.5 (P = 0.76) at test 3. Motor screening scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 349.3 and 354.1 (P = 0.97) at baseline, 307.5 and 199.7 (P = 0.06) at test 2, 212.0 and 183.2 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Spatial working memory scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 14.4 and 6.7 (P = 0.29) at baseline, 9.7 and 4.3 (P = 0.27) at test 2, 10 and 4.5 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 36.3 and 37.8 (P = 0.84) at baseline, 36.4 and

  7. The burden of bowel preparations in patients undergoing elective colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    El Reda, Zeinab D; Harb, Ali H; Abou Fadel, Carla G; Sarkis, Fayez S; Chalhoub, Jean M; Abou Mrad, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Background An adequate bowel preparation is an important quality measure for optimal colonoscopy. Aims The aim of this article is to study the burden of bowel preparations by examining seven specific variables (hunger, taste, volume, sleep, social, work, and adverse events (AEs)). Methods Ambulatory patients undergoing elective colonoscopy completed a questionnaire regarding their experience with the prescribed preparation. The seven study variables were graded using a numerical scale of 0–10 (best to worst). A score >6 was considered to indicate a significant impact and used as primary outcome. Patients were also asked to grade in descending order what they perceived as the worst aspect of the preparation. Results A total of 216 patients completed the survey. Preparations consisted of split-dose sodium picosulfate (SPS) (n = 49), split-dose 4 l PEG ± menthol (n = 49), full-dose PEG (n = 68), and 2 l split-dose PEG + ascorbic acid (n = 50). Except for work and AEs, all variables were considered to have a negative impact by >20% of patients (range 20.4–34.2). SPS was superior to PEG regimens in taste (4.1% vs. 35.9%) and volume (0% vs. 44.9%) (p < 0.05 for both) but inferior for hunger (30.6% vs. 19.2%; p = 0.09). The addition of menthol to PEG significantly improved taste (22.4% vs. 41.5%; p = 0.02). Sleep disturbances were most common with SPS and least with split-dose PEG (30.6% vs. 17.4%; p < 0.05). Overall, patients ranked volume, taste, and hunger as most burdensome. Conclusions The burden of bowel preparation is substantial. An informed personalized choice of preparation may improve adherence, tolerability and colon cleansing. PMID:27087962

  8. Improving the quality of colonoscopy bowel preparation using an educational video.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Sateesh Reddy; Verma, Siddharth; McGowan, John; Smith, Betsy E; Shroff, Anjali; Gibson, Gregory H; Cheng, Michael; Lowe Ii, Douglas; Gopal, Kavitha; Mohanty, Smruti R

    2013-12-01

    Colonoscopy is the preferred modality for colon cancer screening. A successful colonoscopy requires proper bowel preparation. Adequate bowel preparation continues to remain a limiting factor. One hundred thirty-three patients scheduled for an outpatient colonoscopy were prospectively randomized in a single-blinded manner to video or nonvideo group. In addition to written bowel preparation instructions, patients in the video group viewed a brief instructional video. Quality of colon preparation was measured using the Ottawa Bowel Preparation Quality scale, while patient satisfaction with preparation was evaluated using a questionnaire. Statistical analyses were used to evaluate the impact of the instructional colonoscopy video. There were significant differences in the quality of colonoscopy preparation between the video and the nonvideo groups. Participants who watched the video had better preparation scores in the right colon (P=0.0029), mid-colon (P=0.0027), rectosigmoid (P=0.0008), fluid content (P=0.03) and aggregate score (median score 4 versus 5; P=0.0002). There was no difference between the two groups with regard to patient satisfaction. Income, education level, sex, age and family history of colon cancer had no impact on quality of colonoscopy preparation or patient satisfaction. The addition of an instructional bowel preparation video significantly improved the quality of colon preparation.

  9. Optimizing bowel preparation for colonoscopy: a guide to enhance quality of visualization.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Matthew L; Mir, Fazia; Puli, Srinivas R; Nguyen, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy is an important screening and therapeutic modality for colorectal cancer. Unlike other screening tests, colonoscopy is dependent on pre-procedure bowel preparation. If the bowel preparation is poor, significant pathology may be missed. Many factors are known to improve bowel preparation. This review will highlight those factors that may optimize the bowel preparation, including choice of bowel preparation, grading or scoring of the bowel preparation, special factors that influence preparation, and diet prior to colonoscopy that affects bowel preparation. The aim of the review is to offer suggestions and guide endoscopists on how to optimize the bowel preparation for the patients undergoing colonoscopy.

  10. Optimizing bowel preparation for colonoscopy: a guide to enhance quality of visualization

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, Matthew L.; Mir, Fazia; Puli, Srinivas R.; Nguyen, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    Colonoscopy is an important screening and therapeutic modality for colorectal cancer. Unlike other screening tests, colonoscopy is dependent on pre-procedure bowel preparation. If the bowel preparation is poor, significant pathology may be missed. Many factors are known to improve bowel preparation. This review will highlight those factors that may optimize the bowel preparation, including choice of bowel preparation, grading or scoring of the bowel preparation, special factors that influence preparation, and diet prior to colonoscopy that affects bowel preparation. The aim of the review is to offer suggestions and guide endoscopists on how to optimize the bowel preparation for the patients undergoing colonoscopy. PMID:27065725

  11. Polyethylene glycol versus sodium picosulfalte bowel preparation in the setting of a colorectal cancer screening program

    PubMed Central

    Kherad, Omar; Restellini, Sophie; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Adequate bowel preparation for colonoscopy is an important predictor of colonoscopy quality. OBJECTIVE: To determine the difference in terms of effectiveness between different existing colon cleansing products in the setting of a colorectal cancer screening program. METHODS: The records of consecutive patients who underwent colonoscopy at the Montreal General Hospital (Montreal, Quebec) between April 2013 and April 2014 were retrospectively extracted from a dedicated electronic digestive endoscopic institutional database. RESULTS: Overall, 2867 charts of patients undergoing colonoscopy were assessed, of which 1130 colonoscopies were performed in a screening setting; patients had adequate bowel preparation in 90%. Quality of preparation was documented in only 61%. Bowel preparation was worse in patients receiving sodium picosulfate (PICO) alone compared with polyethylene glycol, in a screening setting (OR 0.3 [95% CI 0.2 to 0.6]). Regardless of the preparation type, the odds of achieving adequate quality cleansing was 6.6 for patients receiving a split-dose regimen (OR 6.6 [95% CI 2.1 to 21.1]). In multivariable analyses, clinical variables associated with inadequate bowel preparation in combined population were use of PICO, a nonsplit regimen and inpatient status. The polyp detection rate was very high (45.6%) and was correlated with withdrawal time. CONCLUSION: Preparation quality needs to be more consistently included in the colonoscopy report. Split-dose regimens increased the quality of colon cleansing across all types of preparations and should be the preferred method of administration. Polyethylene glycol alone provided better bowel cleansing efficacy than PICO in a screening setting but PICO remains an alternative in association with an adjuvant. PMID:26301330

  12. Determinants of Bowel Preparation Quality and Its Association With Adenoma Detection: A Prospective Colonoscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Ching, Jessica Y L; Chan, Victor C W; Lam, Thomas Y T; Luk, Arthur K C; Tang, Raymond S Y; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Ng, Simon S M; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2016-01-01

    The predictors of poor bowel preparation in colorectal cancer screening participants have not been adequately studied, and the association between the quality of bowel preparation and adenoma detection has not been firmly established. This study examined the determinants of poor bowel preparation, and evaluated its relationship with adenoma detection.We included subjects aged between 50 and 70 years who received colonoscopy between 2008 and 2014 in a colorectal cancer screening program in Hong Kong. The quality of the bowel preparation was assessed by colonoscopists, and the factors associated with poor bowel cleansing were evaluated by a binary logistic regression analysis. A multivariate regression model was constructed to evaluate if poor bowel preparation was associated with detection of colorectal neoplasia.From 5470 screening participants (average age 57.7 years, SD 4.9), 1891 (34.6%) had poor or fair bowel preparation. The average cecal intubation time was 7.0 minutes (SD 5.4; range 1.22-36.9 minutes) and the average colonoscopy withdrawal time was 10.8 minutes (SD 6.9; range 6.0-107.0 minutes). Among all, 26.5% had colorectal neoplasia and 5.5% had advanced neoplasia. Older age (≥60 years; adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.19-1.38, P = 0.02-0.04), male sex (AOR = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19-1.60, P < 0.001), and current smoking (AOR = 1.41, 95% CI 1.14-1.75, P = 0.002) were significantly associated with poor/fair bowel preparation. Poorer cleansing resulted in significantly lower detection rate of neoplasia (AOR = 0.35-0.62) and advanced neoplasia (AOR = 0.36-0.50) irrespective of polyp size.Steps to improve proper procedures of bowel preparation are warranted, especially among subjects at risk of poor bowel preparation. Strategies should be implemented to improve bowel cleansing, which is now demonstrated as a definite quality indicator.

  13. Importance of reporting segmental bowel preparation scores during colonoscopy in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Momeni, Mojdeh; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Anand, Sury; Singhal, Shashideep

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the impact of reporting bowel preparation using Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) in clinical practice. METHODS: The study was a prospective observational cohort study which enrolled subjects reporting for screening colonoscopy. All subjects received a gallon of polyethylene glycol as bowel preparation regimen. After colonoscopy the endoscopists determined quality of bowel preparation using BBPS. Segmental scores were combined to calculate composite BBPS. Site and size of the polyps detected was recorded. Pathology reports were reviewed to determine advanced adenoma detection rates (AADR). Segmental AADR’s were calculated and categorized based on the segmental BBPS to determine the differential impact of bowel prep on AADR. RESULTS: Three hundred and sixty subjects were enrolled in the study with a mean age of 59.2 years, 36.3% males and 63.8% females. Four subjects with incomplete colonoscopy due BBPS of 0 in any segment were excluded. Based on composite BBPS subjects were divided into 3 groups; Group-0 (poor bowel prep, BBPS 0-3) n = 26 (7.3%), Group-1 (Suboptimal bowel prep, BBPS 4-6) n = 121 (34%) and Group-2 (Adequate bowel prep, BBPS 7-9) n = 209 (58.7%). AADR showed a linear trend through Group-1 to 3; with an AADR of 3.8%, 14.8% and 16.7% respectively. Also seen was a linear increasing trend in segmental AADR with improvement in segmental BBPS. There was statistical significant difference between AADR among Group 0 and 2 (3.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05), Group 1 and 2 (14.8% vs 16.7%, P < 0.05) and Group 0 and 1 (3.8% vs 14.8%, P < 0.05). χ2 method was used to compute P value for determining statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Segmental AADRs correlate with segmental BBPS. It is thus valuable to report segmental BBPS in colonoscopy reports in clinical practice. PMID:25852286

  14. Patient compliance and suboptimal bowel preparation with split-dose bowel regimen in average-risk screening colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Menees, Stacy B.; Kim, H. Myra; Wren, Patricia; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Elta, Grace H.; Foster, Stephanie; Korsnes, Sheryl; Graustein, Brittany; Schoenfeld, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Background Although split-dose bowel regimen is recommended in colon cancer screening and surveillance guidelines, implementation in clinical practice has seemingly lagged because of concerns of patient compliance. Objectives To assess patient compliance with the split-dose bowel regimen and assess patient- and preparation process–related factors associated with compliance and bowel preparation adequacy. Design Prospective survey cohort. Setting Tertiary care setting. Patients Average-risk patients undergoing colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening between August 2011 and January 2013. Main Outcome Measurements Split-dose bowel regimen patient-reported compliance and bowel preparation adequacy with the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score. Results Surveys and Boston Bowel Preparation Scale score data were completed in 462 participants; 15.4% were noncompliant with the split-dose bowel regimen, and suboptimal bowel preparation (score < 5) was reported in 16% of all procedures. White (P = .009) and married (P = .01) subjects were least likely to be noncompliant, whereas Hispanic subjects and those who reported incomes of US$75,000 or less were most likely to be noncompliant (P = .004). Participants who were noncompliant with split-dosing were less likely to follow the other laxative instructions and more likely to have their colonoscopy appointment before 10:30 am. Compliance differed by bowel preparation type (P = .003, χ2 test), with those who used MiraLAX showing the highest compliance, followed by polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution and other bowel preparations. Noncompliance with split-dose bowel preparation (odds ratio 6.7; 95% confidence interval, 3.2–14.2) was the strongest predictor of suboptimal bowel preparation. Limitations Patient self-report, performed at tertiary care center. Conclusions Overall, 1 in 7 patients do not comply with a split-dose bowel regimen. Ensuring compliance with the split-dose bowel regimen will reduce the risk of a

  15. The impact of diet liberalization on bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Walter, James; Francis, Gloria; Matro, Rebecca; Kedika, Ramalinga; Grosso, Rachael; Keith, Scott W.; Kastenberg, David

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Dietary restrictions are integral to colonoscopy preparation and impact patient satisfaction. Utilizing split-dose, lower-volume polyethylene glycol 3350-electrolyte solution (PEG-ELS), this study compared colon preparation adequacy of a low-residue diet to clear liquids using a validated grading scale. Patients and methods This was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, single-center non-inferiority study evaluating diet the day prior to outpatient colonoscopy. Subjects were randomized to a Low-Residue diet for breakfast and lunch, or Clears only. All subjects received split dose PEG-ELS. The primary endpoint was preparation adequacy using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS), with adequate defined as a score > 5. Secondary endpoints included mean BBPS scores for the entire colon and individual segments, satisfaction, adverse events, polyp and adenoma detection rates, and impact on sleep and daily activities. Results Final analysis included 140 subjects, 72 assigned to Clears and 68 to Low-Residue. The Low-Residue diet was non-inferior to Clears (risk difference = – 5.08 %, P = 0.04) after adjusting for age. Mean colon cleansing scores were not significantly different overall and for individual colonic segments. Satisfaction with the Low-Residue diet was significantly greater (P = 0.01). The adenoma detection rate was not statistically significantly different between study groups, but the number of adenomas detected was significantly greater with Clears (P = 0.01). Adverse events and impact on sleep and activities did not differ significantly between diet arms. Conclusions A low-residue diet for breakfast and lunch the day prior to colonoscopy was non-inferior to clear liquids alone for achieving adequate colon cleansing when using split dose PEG-ELS. PMID:28382323

  16. Bowel preparation regimens for colon capsule endoscopy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nigar, Sofia; Paleti, Vani; Lane, Devin; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is being actively evaluated as an emerging complementary or alternative procedure for evaluation of the colon. The yield of CCE is significantly dependent on the quality of bowel preparation. In addition to achieving a stool-free colon the bowel preparation protocols need to decrease bubble effect and aid propulsion of the capsule. An extensive English literature search was done using PubMed with search terms of colon capsule endoscopy, PillCam and bowel preparation. Full-length articles which met the criteria were included for review. A total of 12 studies including 1149 patients were reviewed. There was significant variability in the type of bowel preparation regimens. Large-volume (3–4 liters) polyethylene glycol (PEG) was the most widely used laxative. Lower volumes of PEG showed comparable results but larger studies are needed to determine efficacy. Sodium phosphate was used as an effective booster in most studies. Magnesium citrate and ascorbic acid are emerging as promising boosters to replace sodium phosphate when it is contraindicated. The potential benefit of prokinetics needs further evaluation. Over the past decade there has been significant improvement in the bowel preparation regimens for CCE. Further experience and studies are likely to standardize the bowel preparation regimens before CCE is adopted into routine clinical practice. PMID:24790642

  17. Randomized controlled trial: Standard versus supplemental bowel preparation in patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yueyue; Jia, Xinyong; Liu, Baozhen; Qi, Yanmei; Zhang, Xiubin; Ji, Rui; Yu, Yanbo; Zuo, Xiuli; Li, Yanqing

    2017-01-01

    Background Bristol stool form 1 and 2 is an important predictor of inadequate bowel preparation. Aim To evaluate the efficacy of supplemental preparation in bowel cleansing quality among patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2, as well as the feasibility of tailored bowel preparation guided by Bristol stool form scale. Methods Patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2 from 3 Chinese tertiary hospitals randomly received either 2 L PEG-ELP (group A) or 10 mg bisacodyl plus 2 L PEG-ELP (group B); patients with Bristol stool form 3 to 7 received 2 L PEG-ELP (group C) for bowel preparation. The primary endpoint is the rate of adequate bowel reparation for the whole colon. The adequate bowel preparation rate for separate colon segments, the polyp detection rate (PDR), tolerability, acceptability, sleeping quality and compliance were evaluated as secondary endpoints. Results 700 patients were randomized. In per-protocol analysis, patients in group B attained significantly higher successful preparation rate than group A (88.7% vs. 61.2%, p<0.001) and similar with group C (88.7% vs. 85.0%, p = 0.316). The PDR in group B was significantly higher than group A (43.2% vs. 25.7%, p<0.001). Acceptability was much higher in group B and C. Conclusions 10 mg bisacodyl plus 2 L PEG-ELP can significantly improve both bowel preparation quality and PDR in patients with Bristol stool form 1 and 2. Bristol stool form scale may be an easy and efficient guide for tailored bowel preparation before colonoscopy. PMID:28241037

  18. What is the best strategy for successful bowel preparation under special conditions?

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Hong, Su Jin

    2014-01-01

    Adequate bowel preparation is important for successful colonoscopic examination. Several effective colonic cleansing agents are available and routinely prescribed, but each carries its own limitations and benefits from particular dosing regimens. The most frequently prescribed colonic cleansing agent, the polyethylene glycol (PEG) cathartic solution, suffers from low patient compliance in general, due to its unpalatable taste and smell coupled with the large ingested volumes required. However, PEG is preferred over other cathartics for use in individuals of advanced age, sufferers of chronic kidney disease, heart failure and inflammatory bowel disease, and women who are pregnant or lactating. The laxative agents sodium phosphate (NaP) and sodium picosulfate plus magnesium citrate have been applied and have improved patient compliance and tolerance. NaP, however, should be avoided in individuals with impaired renal function or plasma clearance, such as those with chronic kidney disease, who are taking drugs that affect renal function, or who suffer from heart failure. Other special conditions that may affect an individual’s tolerance of the cathartic agent or ability to complete the administration routine include stroke, severe constipation, hematochezia, suspicious lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and mental disorders such as dementia. All ingestible bowel preparation solutions can be instilled into the stomach and duodenum through nasogastric tube or esophagogastroduodenoscope with the aid of a water irrigation pump for patients with difficulties swallowing or ingesting the large volumes of fluid required. In addition, dietary regimens based on clear liquids and low-residue foods for 1-4 d prior to the colonoscopy may be supplemental bowel preparation strategies. Achieving an effective and safe cleansing of the bowel is important for successful colonoscopy in all patients, so full knowledge of the individual’s condition and capabilities is necessary to select

  19. What is the best strategy for successful bowel preparation under special conditions?

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun Jeong; Hong, Su Jin

    2014-03-21

    Adequate bowel preparation is important for successful colonoscopic examination. Several effective colonic cleansing agents are available and routinely prescribed, but each carries its own limitations and benefits from particular dosing regimens. The most frequently prescribed colonic cleansing agent, the polyethylene glycol (PEG) cathartic solution, suffers from low patient compliance in general, due to its unpalatable taste and smell coupled with the large ingested volumes required. However, PEG is preferred over other cathartics for use in individuals of advanced age, sufferers of chronic kidney disease, heart failure and inflammatory bowel disease, and women who are pregnant or lactating. The laxative agents sodium phosphate (NaP) and sodium picosulfate plus magnesium citrate have been applied and have improved patient compliance and tolerance. NaP, however, should be avoided in individuals with impaired renal function or plasma clearance, such as those with chronic kidney disease, who are taking drugs that affect renal function, or who suffer from heart failure. Other special conditions that may affect an individual's tolerance of the cathartic agent or ability to complete the administration routine include stroke, severe constipation, hematochezia, suspicious lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and mental disorders such as dementia. All ingestible bowel preparation solutions can be instilled into the stomach and duodenum through nasogastric tube or esophagogastroduodenoscope with the aid of a water irrigation pump for patients with difficulties swallowing or ingesting the large volumes of fluid required. In addition, dietary regimens based on clear liquids and low-residue foods for 1-4 d prior to the colonoscopy may be supplemental bowel preparation strategies. Achieving an effective and safe cleansing of the bowel is important for successful colonoscopy in all patients, so full knowledge of the individual's condition and capabilities is necessary to select the

  20. Age Is the Only Predictor of Poor Bowel Preparation in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Dorreen, Alastair; Al Dhahab, Hisham; Fein, Michael; Xiong, Xin; O' Byrne, Mike; Ait, Imene; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N

    2016-01-01

    We examine the impact of key variables on the likelihood of inpatient poor bowel preparation for colonoscopy. Records of inpatients that underwent colonoscopy at our institution between January 2010 and December 2011 were retrospectively extracted. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to assess the effect of clinical variables on the odds of poor preparation. Tested predictors included age; gender; use of narcotics; heavy medication burden; comorbidities; history of previous abdominal surgery; neurological disorder; product used for bowel preparation, whether or not the bowel regimen was given as split or standard dose; and time of endoscopy. Overall, 244 patients were assessed including 83 (34.0%, 95% CI: 28.1-39.9%) with poor bowel preparation. Cecal intubation was achieved in 81.1% of patients (95% CI: 76.2-86.0%). When stratified by quality of bowel preparation, cecal intubation was achieved in only 65.9% (95% CI: 60.0-71.9%) of patients with poor bowel preparation and 89.9% (95% CI: 86.1-93.7%) of patient with good bowel preparation. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, only advancing age was an independent predictor of poor bowel preparation (OR = 1.026, CI: 1.006 to 1.045, and p = 0.008). Age is the only independent predictor of poor bowel preparation amongst hospitalized patients.

  1. Efficacy of a multifactorial strategy for bowel preparation in diabetic patients undergoing colonoscopy: a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Gonzalez, Marco Antonio; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A; Seoane, Agustin; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Carot, Laura; Fernandez-Clotet, Agnés; Raga, Agnés; Pantaleon, Miguel A; Barranco, Luis; Bory, Felipe; Lorenzo-Zuñiga, Vicente

    2016-11-01

    Background and study aims: Previous studies have reported that diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for inadequate bowel preparation. Current guidelines do not recommend a specific preparation for this patient population. The aims of this study were to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of an adapted preparation protocol for colon cleansing in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients and methods: This randomized, single-blind, parallel group, superiority trial compared a conventional bowel preparation protocol (CBP) with a diabetes-specific preparation protocol (DSP). The CBP included a low-fiber diet for 3 days followed by a clear liquid diet for 24 hours before colonoscopy. The DSP included a multifactorial strategy combining an educational intervention, a low-fiber diet, and adjustment of blood glucose-lowering agents. All patients received 4 L of a polyethylene glycol solution in a split-dose regimen. The endoscopists were blinded to the preparation protocol. The primary outcome measure was inadequate bowel preparation according to the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale. Secondary outcome measures included hypoglycemic events, tolerability, and acceptability. Results: A total of 150 patients were included in the study (74 CBP and 76 DSP). Both groups were comparable in terms of baseline characteristics. Inadequate bowel cleansing was more frequent following CBP than DSP (20 % vs. 7 %, P = 0.014; risk ratio 3.1, 95 % confidence interval 1.2 - 8). Only CBP and performance status were independently associated with inadequate bowel preparation. Both preparations were equally tolerated and accepted by patients, and side-effects were similar between the groups. Conclusions: A multifactorial strategy for bowel preparation in patients with diabetes undergoing colonoscopy showed a threefold reduction in the rate of inadequate bowel preparation, with no differences in safety and tolerability compared with conventional preparation.

  2. Coffee Enema for Preparation for Small Bowel Video Capsule Endoscopy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Ryu, Ho Sang

    2014-01-01

    Coffee enemas are believed to cause dilatation of bile ducts and excretion of bile through the colon wall. Proponents of coffee enemas claim that the cafestol palmitate in coffee enhances the activity of glutathione S-transferase, an enzyme that stimulates bile excretion. During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), excreted bile is one of the causes of poor preparation of the small bowel. This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and effect of coffee enema for preparation of the small bowel during VCE. In this pilot study, 17 of 34 patients were assigned to the coffee enema plus polyethylene glycol (PEG) 2 L ingestion group, whereas the 17 remaining control patients received 2 L of PEG only. The quality of bowel preparation was evaluated in the two patient groups. Bowel preparations in the proximal segments of small bowel were not differ between two groups. In the mid and distal segments of the small intestine, bowel preparations tend to be better in patients who received coffee enemas plus PEG than in patients who received PEG only. The coffee enema group did not experience any complications or side effects. Coffee enemas may be a feasible option, and there were no clinically significant adverse events related to coffee enemas. More prospective randomized studies are warranted to improve small bowel preparation for VCE. PMID:25136541

  3. YouTube™ as a Source of Instructional Videos on Bowel Preparation: a Content Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ajumobi, Adewale B; Malakouti, Mazyar; Bullen, Alexander; Ahaneku, Hycienth; Lunsford, Tisha N

    2016-12-01

    Instructional videos on bowel preparation have been shown to improve bowel preparation scores during colonoscopy. YouTube™ is one of the most frequently visited website on the internet and contains videos on bowel preparation. In an era where patients are increasingly turning to social media for guidance on their health, the content of these videos merits further investigation. We assessed the content of bowel preparation videos available on YouTube™ to determine the proportion of YouTube™ videos on bowel preparation that are high-content videos and the characteristics of these videos. YouTube™ videos were assessed for the following content: (1) definition of bowel preparation, (2) importance of bowel preparation, (3) instructions on home medications, (4) name of bowel cleansing agent (BCA), (5) instructions on when to start taking BCA, (6) instructions on volume and frequency of BCA intake, (7) diet instructions, (8) instructions on fluid intake, (9) adverse events associated with BCA, and (10) rectal effluent. Each content parameter was given 1 point for a total of 10 points. Videos with ≥5 points were considered by our group to be high-content videos. Videos with ≤4 points were considered low-content videos. Forty-nine (59 %) videos were low-content videos while 34 (41 %) were high-content videos. There was no association between number of views, number of comments, thumbs up, thumbs down or engagement score, and videos deemed high-content. Multiple regression analysis revealed bowel preparation videos on YouTube™ with length >4 minutes and non-patient authorship to be associated with high-content videos.

  4. How Efficacious Are Patient Education Interventions to Improve Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kurlander, Jacob E.; Sondhi, Arjun R.; Waljee, Akbar K.; Menees, Stacy B.; Connell, Cathleen M.; Schoenfeld, Philip S.; Saini, Sameer D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Bowel preparation is inadequate in a large proportion of colonoscopies, leading to multiple clinical and economic harms. While most patients receive some form of education before colonoscopy, there is no consensus on the best approach. Aims This systematic review aimed to evaluate the efficacy of patient education interventions to improve bowel preparation. Methods We searched the Cochrane Database, CINAHL, EMBASE, Ovid, and Web of Science. Inclusion criteria were: (1) a patient education intervention; (2) a primary aim of improving bowel preparation; (3) a validated bowel preparation scale; (4) a prospective design; (5) a concurrent control group; and, (6) adult participants. Study validity was assessed using a modified Downs and Black scale. Results 1,080 abstracts were screened. Seven full text studies met inclusion criteria, including 2,660 patients. These studies evaluated multiple delivery platforms, including paper-based interventions (three studies), videos (two studies), re-education telephone calls the day before colonoscopy (one study), and in-person education by physicians (one study). Bowel preparation significantly improved with the intervention in all but one study. All but one study were done in a single center. Validity scores ranged from 13 to 24 (maximum 27). Four of five abstracts and research letters that met inclusion criteria also showed improvements in bowel preparation. Statistical and clinical heterogeneity precluded meta-analysis. Conclusion Compared to usual care, patient education interventions appear efficacious in improving the quality of bowel preparation. However, because of the small scale of the studies and individualized nature of the interventions, results of these studies may not be generalizable to other settings. Healthcare practices should consider systematically evaluating their current bowel preparation education methods before undertaking new interventions. PMID:27741260

  5. Preassessment Interview Improves the Efficacy and Safety of Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Rothnie, Alexander; Higgins, Andy; Grewal, Amandeep; Arndtz, Katherine; Brookes, Matthew. J.; Mathew, Ray

    2016-01-01

    Aim. To determine whether preassessment improves bowel preparation quality and prevents renal deterioration for chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods. Data was collected prospectively starting in January 2011 for 12 months. Patients were divided according to the presence or absence of preassessment and stratified to one of three risk groups based on patient's comorbidities and identified risk factors for poor bowel preparation; group 1 had no risk factors, group 2 had 1 risk factor, and group 3 patients had 2 or more risk factors. The association between preassessment and bowel preparation quality was analyzed using binary logistic regression. Results. 1840 colonoscopies were carried out during the period. Total number analyzed was 1704. 404 patients were preassessed. Preassessment patients had significantly better bowel preparation across all groups (OR 1.605; p = 0.002). Group 3 patients were 52% more likely to have good bowel preparation (p = 0.04) if they had been preassessed. Eighty-eight patients were identified with an eGFR < 60 mL/min. There was a significant difference in the eGFR percentage change between patients with preassessment and those without (p = 0.006). Conclusions. Face-to-face preassessment appears to improve the quality of bowel preparation and aids in minimizing the risk of renal injury in patients with CKD. PMID:28018894

  6. Enhanced education for bowel preparation before colonoscopy: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhu; Zhang, Ming Ming; Li, Yue Yue; Li, Li Xiang; Li, Yan Qing

    2017-01-09

    Colonoscopy remains the mainstay in the diagnosis and monitoring for colorectal cancer and other colorectal lesions. The diagnostic efficiency of colonoscopy highly depends on the quality of bowel preparation, which is closely associated with patient's compliance to preparation instructions. In addition, the procedural requirements of bowel preparation are often complex and difficult to be comprehended and memorized by patients, especially those with lower health literacy and motivation. Therefore, in recent years, many educational methods have been constantly developed, such as educational booklets, cartoon visual aids, educational videos, the short message service, the telephone, social media applications and smart phone applications. These educational methods have significantly improved the compliance with the instructions for bowel preparation and ultimately promoted the visualisation of colon in patients undergoing colonoscopy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Bowel preparation before microvascular free colon transfer for head and neck reconstruction: is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi; Salgado, Christopher J; Hsu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Kuang-Te; Feng, Guan-Ming

    2004-06-01

    Mechanical bowel preparation before any intestinal operation, especially when the large intestine is involved, is routine practice for most surgeons. This practice has been questioned by many colorectal surgeons, with convincing data showing the lack of benefit of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation. Free microvascular transfer of the large intestine is occasionally performed for reconstruction of the upper esophagus, as it provides a better size match for the oropharynx than other visceral organs. Nine patients underwent reconstruction of the cervical esophagus and voice tube using a segment of ileocolon. In all patients, the cervical esophagus was reconstructed using the ascending colon and the voice tube was reconstructed using the ileal segment. Both were transferred as one free flap. All patients underwent the procedure without any form of preoperative mechanical bowel preparation. The patients were able to tolerate a solid diet at the end of the mean follow-up period of 7 months, and all esophagograms showed no evidence of stricture formation. One patient developed a fistula at the recipient site that was treated with a regional flap, one patient developed a superficial wound infection of the abdominal wall, and one patient developed a postoperative abdominal wound dehiscence after several episodes of excessive coughing. Microvascular transfer of a large intestinal segment without preoperative mechanical bowel preparation for the reconstruction of the esophagus is a safe procedure. It can avoid the discomfort and complications associated with mechanical bowel preparation. If preoperative mechanical bowel preparation is preferred, the results of this study, which are based on nine patients, demonstrate the safety of this practice in cases where the patient did not follow proper instructions or in cases where the use of the colon was not anticipated preoperatively.

  8. The comparison of the influence between two different bowel preparation methods on sepsis after prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim, Mehmet Erol; Badem, Huseyin; Cavis, Mucahit; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Cimentepe, Ersin; Unal, Dogan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) guided prostate needle biopsy has been performed to diagnose and stage prostate cancer for many years. There are many different bowel preparation protocols to diminish the infectious complications, but there is no standardized consensus among urologists. Therefore, we aimed to assess two different bowel preparation methods on the rate of infectious complications in patients who underwent TRUS–guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods A total of 387 cases of TRUS–guided prostate biopsy were included in this retrospective study. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis with ciprofloxacin (500 mg) twice a day orally for 7 days starting on the day before the biopsy. The patients were divided into two groups according to the bowel preparation method used. Patients (Group 1, n = 164) only received self–administrated phosphate enema) on the morning of the prostate biopsy. Other patients (Group 2, n = 223) received sennasoid a–b laxatives the night before the prostate biopsy. Infectious complications were classified as sepsis, fever (greater than 38°C) without sepsis, and other clinical infections. Results Major complications developed in 14 cases (3.8%), including 3 cases (0.8%) of urinary retention, and 11 (3%) infectious complications, all of which were sepsis. There were 3 and 8 cases of urosepsis in Group 1 and Group 2, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between both Groups regarding to the rates of urosepsis (p = 0.358). Conclusions Despite both methods of bowel preparation, sodium phosphate enema or sennasoid a–b calcium laxatives, before TRUS–guided prostate biopsy have similar effect on the rate of urosepsis, so both methods of bowel preparation can be safely used. PMID:25914845

  9. Meta-analysis: The effect of patient education on bowel preparation for colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chen-Wang; Shih, Shou-Chuan; Wang, Horng-Yuan; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Wang, Tsang-En; Hung, Chien-Yuan; Shieh, Tze-Yu; Lin, Yang-Sheng; Chen, Ming-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: The proportion of outpatients with inadequate bowel preparation before colonoscopy is high owing to patient unawareness of its importance and poor adherence to instructions. This meta-analysis aimed to determine the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation before colonoscopy. Patients and methods: A comprehensive literature review identified randomized controlled trials measuring the effect of educational intervention on the quality of bowel preparation. Two reviewers independently screened relevant articles, extracted data, and assessed the risk of bias. The primary outcome was the quality of each bowel preparation before colonoscopy, using a particular assessment scale. The secondary outcomes were polyp detection rates during the procedure and the need for a repeat colonoscopy due to incomplete examination. Results: Nine randomized controlled trials were included in this meta-analysis. In all, 2885 patients were enrolled, with 1458 receiving education and 1427 assigned to the control group. An educational intervention before colonoscopy significantly improved bowel preparation (relative risk [RR] = 1.22; 95 % confidence interval [CI], 1.10 – 1.36), however, no significant differences were identified in polyp detection rates (RR = 1.14; 95 %CI 0.87 – 1.51) or the need for repeat colonoscopy (RR = 0.52; 95 %CI 0.25 – 1.04) between the groups. Asymmetry in the appearance of the funnel plot and the result of Egger test (P < 0.001) suggested that publication bias existed. Conclusions: Evidence from these randomized controlled trials shows that a brief counseling session with patients before colonoscopy ensures better bowel preparation. However, evidence is insufficient to assess improvements in polyp detection rate and avoidance of a repeat colonoscopy. Despite these encouraging observations, this meta-analysis had some limitations, including potential publication bias

  10. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and athletic participation: are we adequately preparing for sports integration?

    PubMed

    Taxter, Alysha; Foss, Kim Barber; Melson, Paula; Ford, Kevin R; Shaffer, Michael; Myer, Gregory D

    2012-09-01

    Children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) now have well-controlled disease due to improved therapies and management strategies. Children with JIA are more active than in the past and often participate in dynamic, high-loading sports. Standard measures of disease control include examination findings, laboratory values, and patient-directed surveys. However, these standards do not address the subtle deficits in biomechanics and neuromuscular control, which could place affected joints at higher risk for injury. Currently, there are limited evidence-based guidelines to structure conditioning recommendations as to the fitness and mechanics needed to provide safe integration into sports in this population; therefore, tools that objectively measure function with high accuracy and precision may be warranted. Previous work using 3-dimensional motion analysis demonstrated usefulness in guiding physical therapy treatment to correct these deficits. The use of a multidisciplinary team, including physical therapy, rheumatology, and sports medicine, is crucial for preparing these children to return to play. We suggest that the child transition into a sport preparatory-conditioning program to address any underlying deficits. A pediatric exercise specialist who is sensitive to the needs of this population can work with a physical therapist to then appropriately integrate the child safely into sport. Encouraging an active lifestyle is vital to the management of JIA and does not worsen the symptoms associated with childhood arthritis.

  11. [Bowel preparation for colonoscopy. Any significant progress on the horizon?].

    PubMed

    Rivero-Sánchez, Liseth; Pellisé, María

    2015-04-01

    Colonoscopy is the method of choice for colorectal cancer screening. To be effective, screening colonoscopy must have high quality standards. The key element is the quality of the preparation. However, up to 20% of patients are inadequately prepared and, at present, anterograde washing is the least tolerated part of the procedure. In the choice of preparation, safety is a prerequisite and efficacy is a priority. Tolerance is a secondary but nevertheless influential factor in the quality of preparation and has consequently been the primary focus of many recent studies. In the last few years, a rapidly increasing number of studies have evaluated new drugs, dosages and adjuvant therapies to improve efficacy and tolerability. These studies have collaterally shown that inadequate preparation and lack of adherence to the prescribed regimen can be partially predicted, making it essential to identify this patient subgroup and invest the necessary effort in their instruction. New individualized and flexible approaches are expected for the different clinical scenarios. The search for the ideal colonoscopy preparation, which would be tolerable, safe and above all effective, remains open.

  12. Acute hyponatremia with seizure and mental change after oral sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young Sun; Nam, Kyung Min; Park, Jang Ho; Byun, Sang Hwan; Ryu, Jin Suck; Kim, Hyun Ju

    2014-12-01

    Sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate (Picolight Powder), which is used as a bowel preparation for the colon and the rectum, can cause a severe electrolyte imbalance like hyponatremia. When hyponatremia gets severe or occurs rapidly, it can lead to death due to associated complications. We have experienced a case of hyponatremia associated with seizure and loss of consciousness in a 76-year-old woman, who took sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate as a bowel preparation for colonoscopy. She was taking thiazide and synthroid for the treatment of hypertension and hypothyroidism, respectively, and she had other underlying medical conditions such as a history of seizure and dementia. Following the diagnosis of hyponatremia, we used an intravenous injection of 3% NaCl to normalize the sodium level in her serum, and her associated symptoms soon disappeared.

  13. Polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid for bowel preparation in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Keum, Bora; Yoo, In Kyung; Kim, Seung Han; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Chun, Hoon Jai; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck; Kim, Myung Gyu; Jo, Sang Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The safety of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid has not been fully investigated in patients with renal insufficiency. High-dose ascorbic acid could induce hyperoxaluria, thereby causing tubule-interstitial nephritis and renal failure. This study aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid in patients with chronic kidney disease. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data on colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid (n = 61) and 4 L polyethylene glycol (n = 80). The safety of the 2 groups was compared by assessing the differences in laboratory findings before and after bowel cleansing. The laboratory findings were not significantly different before and after the administration of 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid or 4 L polyethylene glycol. In both groups, the estimated glomerular filtration rate was not influenced by the administration of the bowel-cleansing agent. Patients’ reports on tolerance and acceptability were better in the 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid group than in the 4 L polyethylene glycol group. The 2 L polyethylene glycol plus ascorbic acid solution is a safe choice for bowel preparation before colonoscopy in patients with impaired renal function. PMID:27603372

  14. Predictors of suboptimal bowel preparation in asymptomatic patients undergoing average-risk screening colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Govani, Shail M; Elliott, Eric E; Menees, Stacy B; Judd, Stephanie L; Saini, Sameer D; Anastassiades, Constantinos P; Urganus, Annette L; Boyce, Suzanna J; Schoenfeld, Philip S

    2016-01-01

    AIM To identify risk factors for a suboptimal preparation among a population undergoing screening or surveillance colonoscopy. METHODS Retrospective review of the University of Michigan and Veteran’s Administration (VA) Hospital records from 2009 to identify patients age 50 and older who underwent screening or surveillance procedure and had resection of polyps less than 1 cm in size and no more than 2 polyps. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer were excluded. Suboptimal procedures were defined as procedure preparations categorized as fair, poor or inadequate by the endoscopist. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors of suboptimal preparation. RESULTS Of 4427 colonoscopies reviewed, 2401 met our inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Of our population, 16% had a suboptimal preparation. African Americans were 70% more likely to have a suboptimal preparation (95%CI: 1.2-2.4). Univariable analysis revealed that narcotic and tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) use, diabetes, prep type, site (VA vs non-VA), and presence of a gastroenterology (GI) fellow were associated with suboptimal prep quality. In a multivariable model controlling for gender, age, ethnicity, procedure site and presence of a GI fellow, diabetes [odds ratio (OR) = 2.3; 95%CI: 1.6-3.2], TCA use (OR = 2.5; 95%CI: 1.3-4.9), narcotic use (OR = 1.7; 95%CI: 1.2-2.5) and Miralax-Gatorade prep vs 4L polyethylene glycol 3350 (OR = 0.6; 95%CI: 0.4-0.9) were associated with a suboptimal prep quality. CONCLUSION Diabetes, narcotics use and TCA use were identified as predictors of poor preparation in screening colonoscopies while Miralax-Gatorade preps were associated with better bowel preparation. PMID:27668072

  15. Comorbid Illness, Bowel Preparation, and Logistical Constraints Are Key Reasons for Outpatient Colonoscopy Nonattendance

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Deepti

    2016-01-01

    Background. Colonoscopy nonattendance is a challenge for outpatient clinics globally. Absenteeism results in a potential delay in disease diagnosis and loss of hospital resources. This study aims to determine reasons for colonoscopy nonattendance from a Canadian perspective. Design. Demographic data, reasons for nonattendance, and patient suggestions for improving compliance were elicited from 49 out of 144 eligible study participants via telephone questionnaire. The 49 nonattenders were compared to age and sex matched controls for several potential contributing factors. Results. Nonattendance rates were significantly higher in winter months; the OR of nonattendance was 5.2 (95% CI, 1.6 to 17.0, p < 0.001) in winter versus other months. Being married was positively associated with attendance. There was no significant association between nonattendance and any of the other variables examined. The top 3 reasons for nonattendance were being too unwell to attend the procedure, being unable to complete bowel preparation, or experiencing logistical challenges. Conclusions. Colonoscopy attendance rates appear to vary significantly by season and it may be beneficial to book more colonoscopies in the summer or overbook in the winter. Targets for intervention include more tailored teaching sessions, reminders, taxi chits, and developing a hospital specific colonoscopy video regarding procedure and bowel preparation requirements. PMID:27478818

  16. Medicare Under Age 65 and Medicaid Patients Have Poorer Bowel Preparations: Implications for Recommendations for an Early Repeat Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brimhall, Bryan B.; Hankins, Sam C.; Kankanala, Vineel; Austin, Gregory L.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Colonoscopy is performed on patients across a broad spectrum of demographic characteristics. These characteristics may aggregate by patient insurance provider and influence bowel preparation quality and the prevalence of adenomas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of insurance status and suboptimal bowel preparation, recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy due to suboptimal bowel preparation, adenoma detection rate (ADR), and advanced ADR (AADR). Methods This is a cohort study of outpatient colonoscopies (n = 3113) at a single academic medical center. Patient insurance status was categorized into five groups: 1) Medicare < 65y; 2) Medicare ≥ 65y; 3) Tricare/VA; 4) Medicaid/Colorado Indigent Care Program (CICP); and 5) commercial insurance. We used multivariable logistic or linear regression modeling to estimate the risks for the association between patient insurance and suboptimal bowel preparation, recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy due to suboptimal bowel preparation, ADR, and AADR. Models were adjusted for appropriate covariates. Results Medicare patients < 65y (OR 4.91; 95% CI: 3.25–7.43) and Medicaid/CICP patients (OR 4.23; 95% CI: 2.65–7.65) were more likely to have a suboptimal preparation compared to commercial insurance patients. Medicare patients < 65y (OR 5.58; 95% CI: 2.85–10.92) and Medicaid/CICP patients (OR 3.64; CI: 1.60–8.28) were more likely to receive a recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy compared to commercial insurance patients. Medicare patients < 65y had a significantly higher adjusted ADR (OR 1.50; 95% CI: 1.03–2.18) and adjusted AADR (OR 1.99; 95% CI: 1.15–3.44) compared to commercial insurance patients. Conclusions Understanding the reasons for the higher rate of a suboptimal bowel preparation in Medicare < 65y and Medicaid/CICP patients and reducing this rate is critical to improving colonoscopy outcomes and reducing healthcare costs in these populations

  17. A comparison of the efficacy, adverse effects, and patient compliance of the sena-graph®syrup and castor oil regimens for bowel preparation.

    PubMed

    Ghazikhanlou Sani, Karim; Jafari, Mahmood-Reza; Shams, Safar

    2010-01-01

    Sena-Graph syrup has recently been formulated by an Iranian pharmaceutical company for being used in bowel evacuation before radiography, colonoscopy and surgery. This study compares the efficacy, adverse effects and patient compliance of two bowel preparation regimens with castor oil and Sena-Graph syrup in of outpatients for Intravenous Urography (IVU). One hundred and fourteen consecutive outpatients were randomized to receive either the standard bowel preparation with 60 mL of castor oil or the test method with 60 mL of Sena-Graph syrup before IVU examination. Demographic data of patients and their prior bowel preparation experience were collected before the examination. Two radiologists, blinded to the method of bowel preparation, reviewed the radiographs and graded the bowel preparation. The compliance and acceptability of both regimens were assessed by using structured questionnaires filled by the patients. The Numbers, ages, weights and gender distribution of patients and their prior bowel preparation experience in the two groups did not differ significantly. The cleanliness scores for the castor oil and Sena-Graph group were 3.97 ± 0.971 and 4.87 ± 0.917, respectively. The results indicated that Sena-Graph syrup causes a better bowel cleansing compared castor oil. Adverse effects in Sena-Graph groups were significantly lower than the castor oil group. Acceptability of the regimen in patients who used Sena-Graph was higher than the other group. The Sena-Graph regimen is significantly more effective and better tolerated than of Castor oil regimen in bowel cleansing. The incidence and severity of the adverse effects from Castor oil was higher than Sena-Graph.

  18. A Comparison of the Efficacy, Adverse Effects, and Patient Compliance of the Sena-Graph®Syrup and Castor Oil Regimens for Bowel Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Ghazikhanlou Sani, Karim; Jafari, Mahmood-Reza; Shams, Safar

    2010-01-01

    Sena-Graph syrup has recently been formulated by an Iranian pharmaceutical company for being used in bowel evacuation before radiography, colonoscopy and surgery. This study compares the efficacy, adverse effects and patient compliance of two bowel preparation regimens with castor oil and Sena-Graph syrup in of outpatients for Intravenous Urography (IVU). One hundred and fourteen consecutive outpatients were randomized to receive either the standard bowel preparation with 60 mL of castor oil or the test method with 60 mL of Sena-Graph syrup before IVU examination. Demographic data of patients and their prior bowel preparation experience were collected before the examination. Two radiologists, blinded to the method of bowel preparation, reviewed the radiographs and graded the bowel preparation. The compliance and acceptability of both regimens were assessed by using structured questionnaires filled by the patients. The Numbers, ages, weights and gender distribution of patients and their prior bowel preparation experience in the two groups did not differ significantly. The cleanliness scores for the castor oil and Sena-Graph group were 3.97 ± 0.971 and 4.87 ± 0.917, respectively. The results indicated that Sena-Graph syrup causes a better bowel cleansing compared castor oil. Adverse effects in Sena-Graph groups were significantly lower than the castor oil group. Acceptability of the regimen in patients who used Sena-Graph was higher than the other group. The Sena-Graph regimen is significantly more effective and better tolerated than of Castor oil regimen in bowel cleansing. The incidence and severity of the adverse effects from Castor oil was higher than Sena-Graph. PMID:24363727

  19. Effects of a proprietary Bacillus coagulans preparation on symptoms of diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dolin, B J

    2009-12-01

    Symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have a profound impact on quality of life for many patients and current treatments are sometimes unsatisfactory. This controlled pilot study was conducted to evaluate effects of the proprietary GanedenBC(30) (Bacillus coagulans GBI-30, 6086) probiotic on IBS symptoms, in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial including patients with diarrhea-predominant IBS (IBS-D). Patients were randomized to receive either B. coagulans GBI-30, 6086 or placebo once a day for 8 weeks. Patients filled out a quality-of-life questionnaire, and self-assessment diaries were provided to record stool count and consistency, symptom severity, and medication consumption. Of the 61 patients enrolled, six did not meet the inclusion criteria and three were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining 52 patients with IBS-D, the average number of bowel movements per day was significantly reduced for patients treated with B. coagulans GBI-30, 6086 when compared to placebo (P = 0.042). Large variability in baseline scores prevented the assessment of severity scores and quality of life. This small pilot study provides evidence that the proprietary B. coagulans GBI-30, 6086 probiotic is safe and effective for reducing daily bowel movements in patients with IBS-D.

  20. Are we adequately preparing the next generation of physicians to prescribe exercise as prevention and treatment? Residents express the desire for more training in exercise prescription

    PubMed Central

    Solmundson, Kara; Koehle, Michael; McKenzie, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is a key intervention for chronic disease, yet few physicians provide exercise prescription (EP). EP is an important component in larger strategies of reducing non-communicable disease (NCD). Our objective was to assess Family Medicine Residents (FMR) knowledge, competence, and perspectives of EP to help inform future curriculum development. Methods A 49-item cross-sectional survey was administered to 396 University of British Columbia FMR. Residents’ EP knowledge, competence, attitudes/beliefs, current practices, personal physical activity levels, and perspectives of training were assessed using, primarily, a 7-point Likert scale. Results The response rate was 80.6% (319/396). After eliminating 25 that failed to meet the inclusion criteria, 294 were included in the final analysis. The majority 95.6% of FMR reported EP as important in their future practice, despite having low knowledge of the Canadian PA Guidelines (mean score 1.77/4), low self-reported competence prescribing exercise as prevention (mean score 13.35/21), and rating themselves “somewhat incompetent” prescribing exercise to patients with chronic disease (mean score 11.26/21). FMR believe PA is integral to their patients’ health (98.0%), sedentary behaviour is harmful (97.9%), and feel a responsibility to discuss PA with patients (99.7%). Few FMR (14.9%) perceived their training in EP as adequate and 91.0% desire more. Conclusions FMR report EP is important, yet do not perceive they are sufficiently prepared to provide EP. In future curricular development, medical educators should consider residents’ low knowledge, competence, perceived program support, and their expressed desire for more training in exercise prescription. PMID:28344695

  1. Comparison between pulsed irrigation enhanced evacuation and polyethylene glycol-electrolyte lavage solution for bowel preparation prior to elective colonoscopy in veterans with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Korsten, Mark A.; Spungen, Ann M.; Radulovic, Miroslav; Rosman, Alan S.; Hunt, Kristel; Galea, Marinella D.; Kornfeld, Stephen D.; Yen, Christina; Bauman, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Poor preparation for elective colonoscopy is common in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). This unsatisfactory outcome is likely due to long-standing difficulty with evacuation and decreased colonic motility. Our objective was to determine the most effective preparation for elective colonoscopy applying a novel and traditional approach to bowel cleansing. Methods Twenty-four subjects with SCI were consented and scheduled to receive one of the two possible arms: pulsed irrigation enhanced evacuation (PIEE) or polyethylene glycol-electrolyte lavage solution (PEG; CoLyte®). The quality of the preparation was scored during the colonoscopy by applying the Ottawa scoring system. Results Patients with SCI who received PIEE tended to have lower Ottawa scores and a higher percentage of acceptable preparations than did those who received PEG; however, the results were not statistically different. Conclusion In this preliminary study in subjects with SCI, neither PIEE nor PEG produced acceptable bowel preparation for elective colonoscopy. Future studies should confirm our findings and consider studying alternative, more efficacious approaches to bowel cleansing prior to colonoscopic procedures in patients with SCI, which should provide better outcomes. Registration number for clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00745095. PMID:25096918

  2. Regime for Bowel Preparation in Patients Scheduled to Colonoscopy: Low-Residue Diet or Clear Liquid Diet? Evidence From Systematic Review With Power Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Min; Tian, Xu; Ma, Li; Yi, Li-Juan; Shuai, Ting; Zeng, Zi; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Clear liquid diet (CLD) is used to perform bowel preparation before colonoscopy traditionally, but several clinical studies indicated that low-residue diet (LRD) generates equal effects to CLD and a conclusive conclusion has not yet been yielded. The systematic review was performed to address this conflict and facilitate informed decision-making eventually. To capture randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LRD with CLD in terms of bowel preparation, a search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Science Direct, recent conference abstracts, Google Scholar, and Clinicaltrials.gov through May 2015. We performed all meta-analyses based on fixed- or random-effects model, which is generated from clinical characteristics and methodology. Moreover, the G∗Power software was adopted to achieve statistical power for each outcome. In total, we captured 109 potential citations at initial search stage and 2 topic-related articles were included through other sources. After critical appraisal, 7 RCTs were eligible for our inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses generated similar effects in bowel preparation quality, efficacy of colon cleansing, and compliance with recommended dietary regime when LRD versus CLD regime, but patients who were prescribed to receive LRD have slightly better tolerance (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02–1.11) and tended to repeat the same preparation regime in future (RR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.09–1.26) relative to patients in CLD. Importantly, both regimes resulted in similar adverse events (AEs). With the best available evidence, LRD could be recommended to be as standard regime for bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy. PMID:26735547

  3. Understanding Bowel Preparation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week ® GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Practice Management Quality & Safety STAR Certificate Programs Trifecta DDW Videos International ... Outlook 2017 (GO): The Practice Management Conference Practice Management Courses Quality & Safety ... Registry MACRA Resource Center Practice Accreditation ...

  4. Bowel Incontinence

    MedlinePlus

    ... the anus and rectum Diarrhea Pelvic support problems Treatments include changes in diet, medicines, bowel training, or surgery. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

  5. Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gore, Richard M; Silvers, Robert I; Thakrar, Kiran H; Wenzke, Daniel R; Mehta, Uday K; Newmark, Geraldine M; Berlin, Jonathan W

    2015-11-01

    Small bowel obstruction and large bowel obstruction account for approximately 20% of cases of acute abdominal surgical conditions. The role of the radiologist is to answer several key questions: Is obstruction present? What is the level of the obstruction? What is the cause of the obstruction? What is the severity of the obstruction? Is the obstruction simple or closed loop? Is strangulation, ischemia, or perforation present? In this presentation, the radiologic approach to and imaging findings of patients with known or suspected bowel obstruction are presented.

  6. [Irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kocián, J

    1994-04-01

    Irritable bowel is a functional gastrointestinal disorder with chronic or relapsing symptoms of abdominal pain and impaired frequency and consistency of the faeces caused by obscure structural or biochemical deviations. The frequency of the condition in civilized countries is estimated to amount to 15-20% of the population and it accounts for 25-50% of all patients in gastroenterological ambulatory departments. From the clinical aspect the type with dominant diarrhoea, typically in the morning and very compelling, and the type with pain and constipation are known but even combinations of the two types are encountered. A psychosomatic disorder of the motility of the large bowel and its tonus is involved associated with enhanced pain perception. Despite great efforts to find aetiopathogenetic factors, knowledge still is at the level of obscure theories. The diagnosis is still established per exclusion after all organic causes are ruled out, i.e. we always have to differentiate between an irritable bowel from an irritated one. In therapy the patient's confidence in his doctor is most important and it is essential to gain the patient's active cooperation. In case of diarrhoea a low-residue diet is used, calcium carbonate, codeine, loperamide, conversely in constipation adequate dietary fibre, intake metoclopramide or cisapride. Pain is relieved by spasmolytics or Ca channel blockers in the smooth musculature of the large bowel. The associated dysbiosis is transformed into eubiosis by Lactobacillus or other bacterial products.

  7. Bowel Movement

    MedlinePlus

    A bowel movement is the last stop in the movement of food through your digestive tract. Your stool passes out ... rectum and anus. Another name for stool is feces. It is made of what is left after ...

  8. Bowel retraining

    MedlinePlus

    ... can. Some people find that reading while sitting on the toilet helps them relax. If you DO NOT have a bowel movement within 20 minutes, repeat the process. Try to contract the muscles of the abdomen and bear down ...

  9. Bowel Retraining: Strategies for Establishing Bowel Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jump to Topic Biofeedback Bowel Retraining Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Laxatives Tips on Finding a Doctor Bowel training ... Treatment Treatment Overview Biofeedback Bowel Retraining Dietary Fiber Fruit Juice Hirschsprung's Disease Laxatives Stool Form Guide Tips on ...

  10. Bowel Obstruction: Sonographic Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hollerweger, A; Wüstner, M; Dirks, K

    2015-06-01

    Learning objectives: Sonographic examination concept in the case of suspicion of bowel obstruction. Recognition of the sonographic criteria of a bowel obstruction. Ability to detect the level of a bowel obstruction. Sonographic detection of typical causes of bowel obstruction. Detection of sonographic signs of complicated bowel obstruction. Ability to sonographically define important differential diagnoses. Further diagnostic procedures in unclear situations.

  11. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... work? How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? Who gets inflammatory bowel disease? How is inflammatory ... top How does inflammatory bowel disease interfere with digestion? When the small intestine becomes inflamed, as in ...

  12. Comparison of the Efficacy and Safety of Sodium Phosphate Tablets and Polyethylene Glycol Solution for Bowel Cleansing in Healthy Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Min; Seo, Sang-Wook; Kang, Joon-Koo; Lee, Eun-Hye; Lee, Dong-Ryul

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Bowel cleansing is generally regarded as time-consuming and unpleasant among patients. Patients commonly state that bowel preparation provokes more discomfort than the actual colonoscopic examination. The purpose of this study was to compare two regimens of sodium phosphate (NaP) tablets versus polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution for bowel preparation in healthy Korean adults. Materials and Methods This was a single center, prospective, open-label, investigator-blinded, randomized, controlled-pilot study. A total of 62 healthy Korean subjects were randomly assigned to two groups (NaP vs. PEG). Efficacy, safety, and patient-related outcomes, as well as procedural parameters, were evaluated. Results Although there were no significant differences in total Ottawa bowel quality score, fluid scores and the rate of adequate bowel preparation were significantly better in the NaP group than the PEG group. Additionally, the NaP group showed better results regarding patient tolerance, satisfaction, preference, and rate of adverse events than the PEG group. Significant fluctuations in specific serum electrolytes were common and of a greater magnitude in the NaP group than the PEG group. However, these abnormalities were transient and did not result in serious complications and side effects. Conclusion In this study, NaP tablets were shown to be an effective, well-tolerated, and acceptable regimen for bowel preparation. Also, our study suggests that NaP tablets may be safe and can be used as a bowel cleansing agent in healthy adults undergoing elective colonoscopy. Further multicenter, large scale studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:25323890

  13. Where are we at with short bowel syndrome and small bowel transplant

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Baris Dogu

    2012-01-01

    Intestinal failure can be defined as the critical reduction of functional gut mass below the minimal amount necessary for adequate digestion and absorption to satisfy body nutrient and fluid requirements in adults or children. Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by a state of malabsorption following extensive resection of the small bowel. SBS may occur after resection of more than 50% and is certain after resection of more than 70% of the small intestine, or if less than 100 cm of small bowel is left. Several treatment modalities other than total parenteral nutrition, including hormones (recombinant human growth hormone, glucagon-like peptide-2) and tailoring surgeries (Bianchi procedure, serial transverse enteroplasty), had been proposed, however these were either experimental or inefficient. Small bowel transplant is a rather new approach for SBS. The once feared field of solid organ transplantation is nowadays becoming more and more popular, even in developing countries. This is partially secondary to the developments in immunosuppressive strategy. In this regard, alemtuzumab deserves special attention. There are more complex surgeries, such as multivisceral transplantation, for multi-organ involvement including small bowel. This latter technique is relatively new when compared to small bowel transplant, and is performed in certain centers worldwide. In this review, an attempt is made to give an insight into small bowel syndrome, small bowel transplantation, and related issues. PMID:24175201

  14. A Customized Mobile Application in Colonoscopy Preparation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharara, Ala I; Chalhoub, Jean M; Beydoun, Maya; Shayto, Rani H; Chehab, Hamed; Harb, Ali H; Mourad, Fadi H; Sarkis, Fayez S

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Adherence with diet and prescribed purgative is essential for proper cleansing with low-volume bowel preparations. The aim of this work was to assess the effect of a customized mobile application (App) on adherence and quality of bowel preparation. Methods: One hundred and sixty (160) eligible patients scheduled for elective colonoscopy were randomly assigned to paper (control) or App-based instructions. The preparation consisted of low-fiber diet for 2 days, clear fluids for one day and split-dose sodium picosulfate/magnesium citrate (SPS). Before colonoscopy, information was collected regarding adherence with, and utility of the provided instructions. The colonoscopists, blinded to assignment, graded bowel preparation using the Aronchick, Ottawa, and Chicago preparation scales. The primary endpoint was adherence with instructions. Quality of preparation was a secondary endpoint. Results: No difference in overall adherence or bowel cleanliness was observed between the study arms. Adherence was reported in 82.4% of App vs. 73.4% of controls (P=0.40). An adequate bowel preparation on the Aronchick scale was noted in 77.2 vs. 82.5%, respectively (P=0.68). Mean scores on the Ottawa and Chicago scales were also similar. Gender, age, time of colonoscopy, and BMI did not influence preparation or adherence. Compliance with the clear fluid diet component was noted in 94% of patients with BMI<30 vs. 77% with BMI≥30 (P<0.01). SPS was well tolerated by 81.9% of patients. The App was user-friendly and received higher overall rating in this respect than paper instructions (P<0.01). Conclusions: SPS is well tolerated and effective for bowel cleansing regardless of instruction method. Customized smartphone applications are effective, well-accepted and could replace standard paper instructions for bowel preparation. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02410720 PMID:28055031

  15. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... have sensitive bowels — a common problem doctors call irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). IBS is also called spastic colon, mucous colitis, or ... Tummy pain is the most common problem of IBS. Also, people with IBS can have diarrhea, constipation, ...

  16. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a problem that affects the large intestine. It can cause abdominal cramping, bloating, and a change in bowel ... go back and forth between the two. Although IBS can cause a great deal of discomfort, it ...

  17. Managing Pain in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R. Carter W.; Wallace, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Pain is a common complaint in inflammatory bowel disease, and it has significant consequences for patients' quality of life. A thorough evaluation to determine the source of patients' pain should include clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and endoscopic assessments as indicated. Differentiating among active inflammation, secondary complications, and functional pain can be complicated. Even when all active disease is adequately treated, clinicians are often left with the difficulty of managing chronic pain. This paper will review the benefits and limitations of several commonly used treatments and promising future therapies. A suggested treatment algorithm will provide some guidance in this challenging area of inflammatory bowel disease management. PMID:22298998

  18. Short bowel syndrome: epidemiology and etiology.

    PubMed

    Wales, Paul W; Christison-Lagay, Emily R

    2010-02-01

    Pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) is most commonly caused by congenital or acquired conditions of the newborn. SBS is associated with an inability of the bowel to adequately absorb water and nutrients in sufficient quantities to meet caloric, fluid, and electrolyte demands, thus necessitating dependence on parenteral nutrition (PN). It is this dependence on PN, that is responsible for the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with SBS, including central venous catheter infections and PN-induced cholestatic liver dysfunction. There are very few estimates of SBS incidence and mortality in the literature. The epidemiology of SBS is reviewed and the limitations of the published literature are discussed.

  19. Polyethylene glycol plus an oral sulfate solution as a bowel cleansing regimen for colon capsule endoscopy: a prospective, single-arm study in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Peled, Ravit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: As with colonoscopy, adequate bowel cleansing is essential prior to colon capsule endoscopy (CCE). Because CCE requires that the capsule traverse the entire gastrointestinal tract during the examination, laxative ‘boosters’ are used. The objective of this prospective, single-center, single-arm study was to evaluate the safety of a bowel preparation consisting of polyethylene glycol (PEG) plus an oral sulfate solution. Methods: Subjects were healthy volunteers aged 50–75 years old with normal baseline serum chemistry. The bowel preparation consisted of 4 Senna tablets, 4 liters of PEG (split dose), 10 mg metoclopramide, 2 oral sulfate solution boosters (6 oz. and 3 oz.), and 10 mg bisacodyl. Serum chemistry was performed at baseline, following PEG intake, 24 hours after bisacodyl administration, and at 7 days post procedure (in subjects with abnormal 24 hour results). The primary endpoints were the percentage of subjects with a clinically significant change in serum chemistry at the last test and the adverse event (AE) rate. Results: A total of 25 subjects were enrolled. The serum chemistry was normal in all subjects at the final evaluation. One subject showed a slight elevation in creatinine (1.08 mg/dl 7 days post procedure from 0.84 mg/dl at baseline), deemed not clinically significant. Another subject had a transient elevation in serum creatinine (from 1.01 mg/dl at baseline to 1.45 mg/dl at 24 hours after the bowel preparation); values returned to near baseline at 7 days post procedure (1.06 mg/dl). There were no serious AEs, three moderate AEs related to the bowel preparation (nausea, headache, elevated creatinine) and two mild unrelated AEs (chills, abdominal cramping). Conclusions: A bowel cleansing regimen of PEG plus an oral sulfate solution can be used in healthy volunteers. These data provide support for the continued study of this regimen in future CCE clinical trials and in medical practice. PMID:26327914

  20. Bowel Prep Quality in Patients of Low Socioeconomic Status Undergoing Screening Colonoscopy with Patient Navigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Sarah Johanna; Itzkowitz, Steven H.; Shah, Brijen; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of colonoscopy is directly affected by the quality of the patient's bowel preparation. Patients with lower socioeconomic status (SES) are at increased risk of having suboptimal bowel prep quality. Patient navigators can play a key role in clarifying bowel prep instructions. The aim of the present study was to examine the quality…

  1. Large bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... colectomy; Right hemicolectomy; Left hemicolectomy; Hand assisted bowel surgery; Low anterior resection; Sigmoid colectomy; Subtotal colectomy; Proctocolectomy; Colon resection; Laparoscopic colectomy; Colectomy - partial; Abdominal perineal resection

  2. [Histopathological differential diagnosis in inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Fociani, P; Carsana, L; Zerbi, P; Ferri, A; Sampietro, G M; Vago, G

    2003-01-01

    In front of the suspicious diagnosis of an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the pathologist must have adequate and complete clinical, anamnestic, instrumental informations and, if possible, the previous histopathologic examinations. This is necessary because: the diagnosis of IBD is made with exclusion criteria, different pathologic entities may have similar macroscopic and microscopic findings and the characteristic lesions are often present in little number. The authors consider in this paper the problem of the differential diagnosis of IBD.

  3. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  4. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  5. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... your belly area), constipation (when you can't poop), and diarrhea (when you poop too much). If you have irritable bowel syndrome, ... food particles are also known as stool, a bowel movement, or poop. Here's why an intestine gets "irritable." ...

  6. The use of effervescent agents in the small bowel meal examination.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P D; Hufton, A P; Martin, D F

    1993-10-01

    Some perceived disadvantages of the small bowel meal examination are failure of adequate distension, lack of a double contrast effect and the duration of the procedure. A new use for effervescent granules during the small bowel meal is described which reduces the examination time by 70% and reduces the radiation dose to the patient.

  7. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists.

    PubMed

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E

    2016-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  8. New and emerging therapies for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome: an update for gastroenterologists

    PubMed Central

    Foxx-Orenstein, Amy E.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a functional bowel disorder with gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g. abdominal pain, straining, urgency, incomplete evacuation, nausea, and bloating) that occur alongside bowel function alterations (i.e. constipation, diarrhea, or both). Patients with irritable bowel syndrome may also experience comorbid anxiety and depression. Irritable bowel syndrome is common, with a prevalence estimated between 3% and 28%, affecting patient health and quality of life. Patients with moderate or severe irritable bowel syndrome generally seek medical care, whereas those with milder symptoms may choose self-management. Most patients with irritable bowel syndrome receive outpatient care, but irritable bowel syndrome-related hospitalizations do occur. The pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome is multifactorial (i.e. genetics, immune components, changes in the gut microbiota, disturbances in physiologic stress response systems, and psychosocial factors). Management of irritable bowel syndrome can include lifestyle changes, dietary interventions, counseling, psychologic medication, and agents that affect gastrointestinal motility. A number of therapies have emerged in recent years with clinical trial data demonstrating efficacy and safety for patients with irritable bowel syndrome, including agents that target gastrointestinal motility (i.e. linaclotide), gastrointestinal opioid receptors (i.e. asimadoline, eluxadoline), and gut microbiota (i.e. rifaximin). Linaclotide has been shown to significantly improve stool frequency and abdominal pain compared with placebo in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (number needed to treat, 5.1). Asimadoline shows efficacy in patients with moderate-to-severe irritable bowel syndrome-related pain. Rifaximin provided adequate relief of global irritable bowel syndrome symptoms versus placebo for a significantly greater percentage of patients with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (p < 0

  9. Short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilmore, D W; Robinson, M K

    2000-12-01

    The short bowel syndrome is a symptom complex that occurs in adults who have less than 200 cm of jejunum-ileum remaining after intestinal resection. Similar symptoms are observed in infants and children following massive bowel resection or congenital anomalies and in individuals with longer segments of intestine with severe mucosal disease. Initial care should focus on a thorough excision of nonviable bowel, an exact measurement of the remaining viable bowel, placing all intestine in continuity at the initial or subsequent operation, and controlling initial food intake. With time, adaptation of the remnant intestine occurs, and absorptive function may be maximized by enhancing the enteral diet and minimizing parenteral nutrition. Growth factors and specialized nutrients may also enhance this process. Intestinal transplantation should be considered in selected individuals with the short bowel syndrome who fail intestinal rehabilitation protocols.

  10. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  11. Small bowel and colon perforation.

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R

    2014-04-01

    For patients with small bowel and colonic perforations, a definitive diagnosis of the cause of perforation is not necessary before operation. Bowel obstruction and inflammatory bowel disease are the most common causes of nontraumatic intestinal perforations in industrialized countries, whereas infectious causes of intestinal perforations are more common in developing countries. Treatment of small bowel and colonic perforations generally includes intravenous antibiotics and fluid resuscitation, but the specific management of the bowel depends on the underlying cause of the perforation.

  12. Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Zaanan, Aziz; Mary, Florence; Afchain, Pauline; Manfredi, Sylvain; Evans, Thomas Ronald Jeffry

    2016-09-01

    Small bowel adenocarcinomas (SBAs) are rare tumors, but their incidence is increasing. The most common primary location is the duodenum. Even though SBAs are more often sporadic, some diseases are risk factors. Early diagnosis of small bowel adenocarcinoma remains difficult, despite significant radiologic and endoscopic progress. After R0 surgical resection, the main prognostic factor is lymph node invasion. An international randomized trial (BALLAD [Benefit of Adjuvant Chemotherapy For Small Bowel Adenocarcinoma] study) will evaluate the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. For metastatic disease, retrospectives studies suggest that platinum-based chemotherapy is the most effective treatment. Phase II studies are ongoing to evaluate targeted therapy in metastatic SBA.

  13. MR enterographic manifestations of small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Tolan, Damian J M; Greenhalgh, Rebecca; Zealley, Ian A; Halligan, Steve; Taylor, Stuart A

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography is a clinically useful technique for the evaluation of both intraluminal and extraluminal small bowel disease, particularly in younger patients with Crohn disease. MR enterography offers the advantages of multiplanar capability and lack of ionizing radiation. It allows evaluation of bowel wall contrast enhancement, wall thickening, and edema, findings useful for the assessment of Crohn disease activity. MR enterography can also depict other pathologic findings such as lymphadenopathy, fistula and sinus formation, abscesses, and abnormal fold patterns. Even subtle disease manifestations may be detected when adequate distention of the small bowel is achieved, although endoscopic and double-contrast barium small bowel techniques remain superior in the depiction of changes in early Crohn disease (eg, aphthoid ulceration). Further research will be needed to determine whether MR imaging enhancement patterns may reliably help discriminate between active and inactive disease.

  14. Caring for an Ageing Population: Are Physiotherapy Graduates Adequately Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramklass, Serela S.; Butau, Anne; Ntinga, Nomusa; Cele, Nozipho

    2010-01-01

    In view of South African policy developments related to the care of older persons, it was necessary to examine the nature of the geriatrics content within physiotherapy curricula. A survey was conducted amongst final-year student physiotherapists at South African universities, together with content analysis of physiotherapy curricula. Very little…

  15. Partnering With Parents and Communities Are Preservice Teachers Adequately Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanigan, Carolyn B.

    2005-01-01

    School, parent and community partnerships have become an educational priority at both the state and federal levels. If teacher education programs are to meet the goals of the Illinois Professional Standards, the objectives of the federal Goals 2000, and the accreditation standards of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education…

  16. Intravenous iron in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-10-07

    The prevalence of anemia across studies on patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is high (30%). Both iron deficiency (ID) and anemia of chronic disease contribute most to the development of anemia in IBD. The prevalence of ID is even higher (45%). Anemia and ID negatively impact the patient's quality of life. Therefore, together with an adequate control of disease activity, iron replacement therapy should start as soon as anemia or ID is detected to attain a normal hemoglobin (Hb) and iron status. Many patients will respond to oral iron, but compliance may be poor, whereas intravenous (i.v.) compounds are safe, provide a faster Hb increase and iron store repletion, and presents a lower rate of treatment discontinuation. Absolute indications for i.v. iron treatment should include severe anemia, intolerance or inappropriate response to oral iron, severe intestinal disease activity, or use of an erythropoietic stimulating agent. Four different products are principally used in clinical practice, which differ in their pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles: iron gluconate and iron sucrose (lower single doses), and iron dextran and ferric carboxymaltose (higher single doses). After the initial resolution of anemia and the repletion of iron stores, the patient's hematological and iron parameters should be carefully and periodically monitored, and maintenance iron treatment should be provided as required. New i.v. preparations that allow for giving 1000-1500 mg in a single session, thus facilitating patient management, provide an excellent tool to prevent or treat anemia and ID in this patient population, which in turn avoids allogeneic blood transfusion and improves their quality of life.

  17. 5 CFR 919.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate evidence. 919.900 Section 919.900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.900 Adequate...

  18. Quantitative Risk-Benefit Analysis of Probiotic Use for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bennett, William E

    2016-04-01

    Probiotics have seen widespread use for a variety of gastrointestinal problems, especially in two common disorders: irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Since a wide variety of probiotic preparations has been used, and despite a large number of studies performed, a great deal of heterogeneity exists among them. Straightforward evidence-based recommendations for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease have thus been difficult to formulate. In an effort to improve understanding of the risk-benefit balance of probiotics in these conditions, this study (1) queried the US FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database for all reported adverse drug events related to probiotics in 2013, and (2) constructed risk-benefit planes for both irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease using a geometric approximation of the confidence region between risk and benefit. The results show that adverse events from probiotics vary widely by disease, and when they occur, they are mild and may be difficult to distinguish from the natural history of the underlying disorders they are used to treat. The risk-benefit plane for irritable bowel syndrome straddles the risk-benefit threshold, so patients can expect a balance between a low chance of risk and also a low chance of benefit. The risk-benefit plane for inflammatory bowel disease largely lies above the risk-benefit threshold, so patients may expect more benefit than risk in most cases. More standardized and high-quality research is needed to improve our understanding of risk and benefit for these complex biopharmaceuticals.

  19. Short bowel syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine insufficiency; Short gut syndrome; Necrotizing enterocolitis - short bowel ... The small intestine absorbs much of the nutrients found in foods we eat. When one half or more of our small ...

  20. Are Your Bowels Moving?

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to prevent accidents in the future. continue Diarrhea Diarrhea means you have to move your bowels often, ... eat or if you're taking certain medicines. Diarrhea also can happen when you don't wash ...

  1. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chocolate, some dairy products, and foods that contain gluten. Some people find that adding fiber — eating more ... ON THIS TOPIC Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Lactose Intolerance Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcers Digestive System Eating Well ...

  2. Large bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... 26. Read More Colon cancer Colostomy Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Large bowel resection Ulcerative colitis Patient Instructions Bland ... Diseases Colonic Polyps Colorectal Cancer Diverticulosis and Diverticulitis Intestinal Obstruction Ulcerative Colitis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A. ...

  3. Small bowel resection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... chap 26. Read More Colon cancer Crohn disease Intestinal obstruction Small bowel resection Patient Instructions Bland diet Crohn ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Cancer Intestinal Obstruction Small Intestine Disorders Browse the Encyclopedia A.D. ...

  4. Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause inflammation that can alter function of the gastrointestinal system. Stress can also play a part in IBS. ... Disease (GERD) Lactose Intolerance Inflammatory Bowel Disease Ulcers Digestive System Eating Well While Eating Out Constipation Celiac Disease ...

  5. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  6. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    NasirKhan, Mohammad U; Abir, Farshad; Longo, Walter; Kozol, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial. Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique, some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are paramount. PMID:16688793

  7. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  8. Can Probiotics Cure Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    PubMed

    Korada, Siva Kumar; Yarla, Nagendra Sastry; Bishayee, Anupam; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Aruna Lakshmi, K; Arunasree, M K; Dananajaya, B L; Mishra, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, especially microbial dysbiosis play role in several GI ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel diseases, and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea. Role of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is multifactorial as it involves loss of maintaining intestinal epithelial barrier integrity, increased release of pro-inflammatory molecules, and microbial dysbiosis in gut microflora. Some specific pathogens also play a key role in the IBD development. The origin and causation are still in unfathomable condition and the exact root cause is unknown. Recently probiotic studies have been gaining importance because of their positive responses in their IBD experimental results. According to joint Food and Agricultural Organisation/World Health Organisation working group, probiotics are defined as live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amount confer health benefit on the host. These live beneficial microorganisms are considered helpful in improving gut colonization and perseverance thereby improves prophylactic effect. In the direction of IBD research, a number of studies are needed to standardize its methodology and its applicability on human usage. The particular review presents an overview of gut microflora and its impact on host health, types of IBD and existing therapies to treat this disorder, mechanism of several probiotic actions, role of probiotics in IBD prevention with their supporting evidences.

  9. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  10. Frequent Bowel Movements

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sanjoaquin MA, et al. Nutrition and lifestyle in relation to bowel movement frequency: A cross-sectional study of 20,630 men and women in EPIC-Oxford. Public Health Nutrition. 2004;7:77. Evaluation of the GI patient. The Merck Manual Professional ...

  11. Small bowel obstruction- a surprise.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jeffrey Daniel; Cp, Ganesh Babu; M, Balachandar; M, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Trans - omental hernia is very rare, accounting to 1-4% of all internal hernias which is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. Here we present a case report of a small bowel obstruction in a female due to trans - omental hernia presenting with central abdominal pain, distension and bilious vomiting. She had no previous history of trauma, surgery. Plain X-ray abdomen erect showed multiple air fluid levels with dilated small bowel loops. Emergency laparotomy revealed a segment of congested small bowel loop (ileum) through a defect in greater omentum. On table the herniated bowel loop was reduced and the defect in greater omentum was closed primarily. There was no necessity for bowel resection as it regained normal colour after reduction. Postoperative period was uneventful with complete resolution of symptoms. This case is presented for its rarity and its importance in clinical differential diagnosis of acute abdomen due to small bowel obstruction.

  12. Small Bowel Transplant

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Objective The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of small bowel transplant in the treatment of intestinal failure. Small Bowel Transplantation Intestinal failure is the loss of absorptive capacity of the small intestine that results in an inability to meet the nutrient and fluid requirements of the body via the enteral route. Patients with intestinal failure usually receive nutrients intravenously, a procedure known as parenteral nutrition. However, long-term parenteral nutrition is associated with complications including liver failure and loss of venous access due to recurrent infections. Small bowel transplant is the transplantation of a cadaveric intestinal allograft for the purpose of restoring intestinal function in patients with irreversible intestinal failure. The transplant may involve the small intestine alone (isolated small bowel ISB), the small intestine and the liver (SB-L) when there is irreversible liver failure, or multiple organs including the small bowel (multivisceral MV or cluster). Although living related donor transplant is being investigated at a limited number of centres, cadaveric donors have been used in most small bowel transplants. The actual transplant procedure takes approximately 12-18 hours. After intestinal transplant, the patient is generally placed on prophylactic antibiotic medication and immunosuppressive regimen that, in the majority of cases, would include tacrolimus, corticosteroids and an induction agent. Close monitoring for infection and rejection are essential for early treatment. Medical Advisory Secretariat Review The Medical Advisory Secretariat undertook a review of 35 reports from 9 case series and 1 international registry. Sample size of the individual studies ranged from 9 to 155. As of May 2001, 651 patients had received small bowel transplant procedures worldwide. According to information from the Canadian Organ Replacement

  13. Torsion of Meckel's diverticulum as a cause of small bowel obstruction: A case report.

    PubMed

    Murruste, Marko; Rajaste, Geidi; Kase, Karri

    2014-10-27

    Axial torsion and necrosis of Meckel's diverticulum causing simultaneous mechanical small bowel obstruction are the rarest complications of this congenital anomaly. This kind of pathology has been reported only eleven times. Our case report presents this very unusual case of Meckel's diverticulum. A 41-year-old man presented at the emergency department with complaints of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and retention of stool and gases. Clinical diagnosis was small bowel obstruction. Because the origin of obstruction was unknown, computer tomography was indicated. Computed tomography (CT)-scan revealed dilated small bowel loops with multiple air-fluid levels; the oral contrast medium had reached the jejunum and proximal parts of the ileum but not the distal small bowel loops or the large bowel; in the right mid-abdomen there was a 11 cm × 6.4 cm × 7.8 cm fluid containing cavity with thickened wall, which was considered a dilated bowel-loop or cyst or diverticulum. Initially the patient was treated conservatively. Because of persistent abdominal pain emergency laparotomy was indicated. Abdominal exploration revealed distended small bowel loops proximal to the obstruction, and a large (12 cm × 14 cm) Meckel's diverticulum at the site of obstruction. Meckel's diverticulum was axially rotated by 720°, which caused small bowel obstruction and diverticular necrosis. About 20 cm of the small bowel with Meckel's diverticulum was resected. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on the fifth postoperative day. We recommend CT-scan as the most useful diagnostic tool in bowel obstruction of unknown origin. In cases of Meckel's diverticulum causing small bowel obstruction, prompt surgical treatment is indicated; delay in diagnosis and in adequate treatment may lead to bowel necrosis and peritonitis.

  14. Small Bowel Hamartoma: A Huge Diverticulum of Small Bowel

    PubMed Central

    Eltweri, Amar M.; Salama, Yahya; Gorgees, Neshtman; Naidu, Leena; Bowrey, David J.

    2013-01-01

    A-20-year old male, with no significant medical history, presented with clinical features mimicking a perforated acute appendicitis. Because of features of peritonitis, a laparotomy was performed which showed a segment of small bowel with multiple large diverticula and mesenteric cysts. A segmental small bowel resection was performed. The patient made an uneventful recovery from surgery. Histology revealed features of a small bowel hamartoma. PMID:24454405

  15. [Irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Truninger, K

    2007-04-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorders. The main symptoms are abdominal pain associated with a change in bowel habit. Headache and psychiatric disorders such as mood or anxiety disorders are often associated with IBS. Genetic predisposition, sensomotoric dysfunction, altered enteric inflammation and immune activation and disturbance of the brain-gut interaction are the most important pathogenetic factors. The diagnosis requires the new symptom-based Rome-III-criteria. Diagnostic testing primarily depends on the patients complaints, clinical and laboratory features and is then guided by the patient's age, symptom's severity and duration, alarm symptoms, psychosocial factors, and the family history for tumors. Treatment of IBS is based on an individualized evaluation and depends on disease severity, predominant symptoms and associated disorders. Treatment options include lifestyle modifications, drug therapy aimed at predominant symptoms and various forms of psychological treatments.

  16. Short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Claire L; Reynolds, John V

    2010-10-01

    The short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a state of malabsorption following intestinal resection where there is less than 200 cm of intestinal length. The management of short bowel syndrome can be challenging and is best managed by a specialised multidisciplinary team. A good understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of resection of different portions of the small intestine is necessary to anticipate and prevent, where possible, consequences of SBS. Nutrient absorption and fluid and electrolyte management in the initial stages are critical to stabilisation of the patient and to facilitate the process of adaptation. Pharmacological adjuncts to promote adaptation are in the early stages of development. Primary restoration of bowel continuity, if possible, is the principle mode of surgical treatment. Surgical procedures to increase the surface area of the small intestine or improve its function may be of benefit in experienced hands, particularly in the paediatric population. Intestinal transplant is indicated at present for patients who have failed to tolerate long-term parenteral nutrition but with increasing experience, there may be a potentially expanded role for its use in the future.

  17. Small Bowel Angioedema Secondary to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel angioedema induced by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors is a rare clinicopathologic entity. It frequently poses a diagnostic challenge and is often not recognized before surgical exploration. The present study illustrates that clinical awareness for this condition and adequate use of radiologic investigations can help make the correct diagnosis of ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema, thus avoiding the cost and morbidity associated with unnecessary interventions. PMID:28133581

  18. Small bowel imaging of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Casciani, Emanuele; Vincentiis, Chiara De; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    The study of the small bowel (SB) has always been challenging both for clinicians and radiologist. It is a long and tortuous tube that can be affected by various pathologies whose signs and symptoms are usually non specific and can mimic other acute abdominal disorders. For these reasons, imaging plays a central role in the diagnosis of the different pathological conditions that can occur. They are important also in the management and follow up of chronic diseases. We expose and evaluate all the radiological methods that are now available for the study of the SB with particular emphasis on the technological improvement of cross-sectional imaging, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques have, infact, highly improved in terms of execution times (fast acquisitions images), patients discomfort and radiation dose, for CT, with consequent reduced biological risks. Moreover, the new post-processing options with multiplanar reconstruction and isotropic images have made significant changes in the evaluation of the exams. Especially MRI scans have been improved by the advent of new sequences, such as diffusion weighted imaging and cine-MRI, parallel imaging and breath-hold sequences and can provide excellent soft-tissue contrast without the use of ionizing radiations. PMID:26339463

  19. Review of small-bowel cleansing scales in capsule endoscopy: A panoply of choices

    PubMed Central

    Ponte, Ana; Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Carvalho, João

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of small-bowel cleansing is required to assess the reliability of findings in capsule endoscopy (CE). Moreover, consensus regarding the need of intestinal preparation for CE remains to be achieved. The presence of multiple grading scales for small-bowel preparation in CE, which are time-consuming and complicated, adds difficulty to the comparison of different small-bowel cleansing regimens and their application in clinical practice. Nowadays, a validated scale universally accepted for grading small-bowel cleansing is lacking. In fact, there are numerous grading systems with very different technical characteristics, namely, the parameters and the portion of the CE video that are analyzed, the objectivity of the analysis, the lesser or greater dependency on the operator, and the validation of the score. The authors performed a review which aims to systematize and summarize currently available small-bowel grading scales in CE. PMID:27668070

  20. Definition and Facts for Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Reporters Calendar of Events Follow Us Home Health Information Digestive Diseases Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & Facts Related Topics Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Definition & ...

  1. DARHT -- an adequate EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    In April 1996 the US District Court in Albuquerque ruled that the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), prepared by the Los Alamos Area Office, US Department of Energy (DOE), was adequate. The DARHT EIS had been prepared in the face of a lawsuit in only 10 months, a third of the time usually allotted for a DOE EIS, and for only a small fraction of the cost of a typical DOE EIS, and for only a small fraction of the cost of a typical DOE EIS. It subject was the first major facility to be built in decades for the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. It was the first EIS to be prepared for a proposal at DOE`s Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1979, and the first ever prepared by the Los Alamos Area Office. Much of the subject matter was classified. The facility had been specially designed to minimize impacts to a nearby prehistoric Native American ruin, and extensive consultation with American Indian Pueblos was required. The week that the draft EIS was published Laboratory biologists identified a previously unknown pair of Mexican spotted owls in the immediate vicinity of the project, bringing into play the consultation requirements of the Endangered Species Act. In spite of these obstacles, the resultant DARHT EIS was reviewed by the court and found to meet all statutory and regulatory requirements; the court praised the treatment of the classified material which served as a basis for the environmental analysis.

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease unclassified

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Wei-xing; Chen, Shao-hua; Xu, Cheng-fu; Li, You-ming

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are idiopathic, chronic, and inflammatory intestinal disorders. The two main types, ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), sometimes mimic each other and are not readily distinguishable. The purpose of this study was to present a series of hospitalized cases, which could not initially be classified as a subtype of IBD, and to try to note roles of the terms indeterminate colitis (IC) and inflammatory bowel disease unclassified (IBDU) when such a dilemma arises. Methods: Medical records of 477 patients hospitalized due to IBD, during the period of January 2002 to April 2009, were retrospectively studied in the present paper. All available previous biopsies from endoscopies of these patients were reanalyzed. Results: Twenty-seven of 477 IBD patients (5.7%) had been initially diagnosed as having IBDU. Of them, 23 received colonoscopy and histological examinations in our hospital. A total of 90% (9/10) and 66.7% (4/6) of patients, respectively, had a positive finding via wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) and double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE). The barium-swallow or small bowel follow-through (SBFT) was performed on 11 patients. Positive changes were observed under computer tomographic (CT) scanning in 89.5% (17/19) of patients. Reasonable treatment strategies were employed for all patients. Conclusions: Our data indicate that IBDU accounts for 5.7% of initial diagnoses of IBD. The definition of IBDU is valuable in clinical practice. For those who had no clear clinical, endoscopic, histological, or other features affording a diagnosis of either UC or CD, IBDU could be used parenthetically. PMID:21462383

  3. Sensory characterization of bowel cleansing solutions

    PubMed Central

    Sharara, Ala I; Daroub, Hamza; Georges, Camille; Shayto, Rani; Nader, Ralph; Chalhoub, Jean; Olabi, Ammar

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the sensory characteristics of commercial bowel cleansing preparations. METHODS Samples of 4 commercially available bowel cleansing preparations, namely polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution (PEG), PEG + ascorbic acid (PEG-Asc), sodium picosulfate (SPS), and oral sodium sulfate (OSS) were prepared according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Descriptive analysis was conducted (n = 14) using a 15-cm line scale with the Compusense at-hand® sensory evaluation software. Acceptability testing (n = 80) was conducted using the 9-point hedonic scale. In addition, a Just-About-Right (JAR) scale was included for the four basic tastes to determine their intensity compatibility with acceptability levels in the products. RESULTS Samples were significantly different, in descriptive analysis, for all attributes (P < 0.05) except for sweetness. SPS received the highest ratings for turbidity, viscosity appearance, orange odor and orange flavor; PEG-Asc for citrus odor and citrus flavor; OSS for sweetener taste, sweet aftertaste, bitterness, astringency, mouthcoating, bitter aftertaste and throatburn, and along with PEG-Asc, the highest ratings for saltiness, sourness and adhesiveness. Acceptability results showed significant differences between the various samples (P < 0.05). SPS received significantly higher ratings for overall acceptability, acceptability of taste, odor and mouthfeel (P < 0.05). JAR ratings showed that PEG and PEG-Asc were perceived as slightly too salty; SPS and OSS were slightly too sweet, while SPS, PEG-Asc and OSS were slightly too sour and OSS slightly too bitter. While using small sample volumes was necessary to avoid unwanted purgative effects, acceptability ratings do not reflect the true effect of large volumes intake thus limiting the generalization of the results. CONCLUSION Further improvements are needed to enhance the sensory profile and to optimize the acceptability for better compliance with these bowel cleansing solutions

  4. [Preparation for colonoscopy: types of scales and cleaning products].

    PubMed

    Lorenzo-Zúñiga, Vicente; Moreno-de-Vega, Vicente; Boix, Jaume

    2012-08-01

    Adequate bowel preparation is essential before a colonoscopy, allowing us to make a proper examination of the entire mucosa. The ideal method of colon cleansing should be fast, safe, and get a proper cleaning with minimal discomfort for the patient. Today we have a wide variety of colon cleansing products, information sometimes becomes confused. A good colon preparation depends partly on correct choice of the same, but also upon dietary restriction. Knowledge of all these products, with their advantages and limitations, we can make a better selection for each patient, and although the efficacy is comparable, is the experience of the browser, patient preferences, and the degree of compliance with the instructions preparation, which greatly influence the results.

  5. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors.A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L.The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg.In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L.

  6. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors. A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L. The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg. In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L. PMID:27902589

  7. Small bowel ulcerative lesions are common in elderly NSAIDs users with peptic ulcer bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Tsibouris, Panagiotis; Kalantzis, Chissostomos; Apostolopoulos, Periklis; Zalonis, Antonios; Isaacs, Peter Edward Thomas; Hendrickse, Mark; Alexandrakis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of small bowel ulcerative lesions in patients with peptic ulcer and define the significance of those lesions. METHODS: In our prospective study, 60 consecutive elderly patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from a peptic ulceration (cases) and 60 matched patients with a non-bleeding peptic ulcer (controls) underwent small bowel capsule endoscopy, after a negative colonoscopy (compulsory in our institution). Controls were evaluated for non-bleeding indications. Known or suspected chronic inflammatory conditions and medication that could harm the gut were excluded. During capsule endoscopy, small bowel ulcerative lesions were counted thoroughly and classified according to Graham classification. Other small bowel lesions were also recorded. Peptic ulcer bleeding was controlled endoscopically, when adequate, proton pump inhibitors were started in both cases and controls, and Helicobacter pylori eradicated whenever present. Both cases and controls were followed up for a year. In case of bleeding recurrence upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was repeated and whenever it remained unexplained it was followed by repeat colonoscopy and capsule endoscopy. RESULTS: Forty (67%) cases and 18 (30%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P = 0.0001), while 22 (37%) cases and 4 (8%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Among non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) consumers, 39 (95%) cases and 17 (33%) controls presented small bowel erosions (P < 0.0001), while 22 (55%) cases and 4 (10%) controls presented small bowel ulcers (P < 0.0001). Small bowel ulcerative lesions were infrequent among patients not consuming NSAIDs. Mean entry hemoglobin was 9.3 (SD = 1.4) g/dL in cases with small bowel ulcerative lesions and 10.5 (SD = 1.3) g/dL in those without (P = 0.002). Cases with small bowel ulcers necessitate more units of packed red blood cells. During their hospitalization, 6 (27%) cases with small bowel ulcers presented

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Spiller, Robin C

    2004-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common 'functional' gastrointestinal disorders accounting for 3% of all primary care consultations, with a strong female predominance. Although most of the literature comes from Western industrialized societies, when it has been looked for, this disorder appears to be equally common in the Third World. It is characterized by chronic abdominal pain or discomfort associated with disordered bowel habit and visceral hypersensitivity. Anxiety and somatization are more common in IBS than in the general population and may encourage consultation; however, they correlate poorly with symptoms. Bacterial gastroenteritis may be followed by the development of IBS in 5-10% of patients, depending on the severity of initial illness and prior anxiety or depression. The Rome criteria allow reliable diagnosis provided that there are no 'alarm' features which mandate further investigation. Microscopic colitis and bile salt malabsorption can easily be mistaken for IBS, as can chronic infestations or infections which should be considered, while recognizing that these are extremely uncommon in westernized societies. Some patients respond to exclusion diets as lactose and wheat intolerance are common. Others with prominent anxiety and/or depression respond to psychotherapy or antidepressants. Diarrhoeal symptoms respond to loperamide and 5HT3 receptor antagonists, while constipation responds to 5HT4 agonists. Antispasmodics may have limited benefit in treating pain. Low-dose tricyclic antidepressants are also helpful in alleviating pain and anxiety, even in those without obvious psychiatric disorders. If diagnostic criteria are met, then once diagnosed, new diagnoses rarely appear.

  9. Irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Enck, Paul; Aziz, Qasim; Barbara, Giovanni; Farmer, Adam D.; Fukudo, Shin; Mayer, Emeran A.; Niesler, Beate; Quigley, Eamonn M. M.; Rajilić-Stojanović, Mirjana; Schemann, Michael; Schwille-Kiuntke, Juliane; Simren, Magnus; Zipfel, Stephan; Spiller, Robin C.

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal disease with a high population prevalence. The disorder can be debilitating in some patients, whereas others may have mild or moderate symptoms. The most important single risk factors are female sex, younger age and preceding gastrointestinal infections. Clinical symptoms of IBS include abdominal pain or discomfort, stool irregularities and bloating, as well as other somatic, visceral and psychiatric comorbidities. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based on symptoms and the exclusion of other organic diseases, and therapy includes drug treatment of the predominant symptoms, nutrition and psychotherapy. Although the underlying pathogenesis is far from understood, aetiological factors include increased epithelial hyperpermeability, dysbiosis, inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, epigenetics and genetics, and altered brain–gut interactions. IBS considerably affects quality of life and imposes a profound burden on patients, physicians and the health-care system. The past decade has seen remarkable progress in our understanding of functional bowel disorders such as IBS that will be summarized in this Primer. PMID:27159638

  10. Severe adhesive small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Di Saverio, Salomone; Catena, Fausto; Kelly, Michael D; Tugnoli, Gregorio; Ansaloni, Luca

    2012-12-01

    Adhesive small bowel obstruction is a frequent cause of hospital admission. Water soluble contrast studies may have diagnostic and therapeutic value and avoid challenging demanding surgical operations, but if bowel ischemia is suspected, prompt surgical intervention is mandatory. A 58-year-old patient was operated for extensive adhesive small bowel obstruction after having had two previous laparotomies for colorectal surgery, and had a complex clinical course with multiple operations and several complications. Different strategies of management have been adopted, including non-operative management with the use of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast medium, multiple surgical procedures, total parenteral nutrition (TPN) support, and finally use of antiadherences icodextrin solution. After 2 years follow-up the patient was doing well without presenting recurrent episodes of adhesive small bowel obstruction. For patients admitted several times for adhesive small bowel obstruction, the relative risk of recurring obstruction increases in relation to the number of prior episodes. Several strategies for non-operative conservative management of adhesive small bowel obstruction have already addressed diagnostic and therapeutic value of hyperosmolar water soluble contrast. According to the most recent evidence-based guidelines, open surgery is the preferred method for surgical treatment of strangulating adhesive small bowel obstruction as well as after failed conservative management. Research interest and clinical evidence are increasing in adhesions prevention. Hyaluronic acid-carboxycellulose membrane and icodextrin may reduce incidence of adhesions.

  11. Comparison of adequate relief with symptom, global, and responder endpoints in linaclotide phase 3 trials in IBS-C

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael; Lembo, Anthony J; Lavins, Bernard J; MacDougall, James E; Carson, Robyn T; Williams, Valerie SL; Nelson, Lauren M; Shiff, Steven J; Currie, Mark G; Kurtz, Caroline B

    2015-01-01

    Background Optimal clinical trial endpoints for irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C) are uncertain. Objective The objective of this article is to compare adequate relief (AR) to abdominal/bowel symptoms, global endpoints, and FDA and EMA responder criteria; and to use AR as an anchor to assess clinically meaningful change (CMC) in IBS-C symptoms. Methods Using pooled 12-week data from two phase 3 linaclotide clinical trials, daily abdominal/bowel symptoms and weekly global assessments were correlated with AR. Symptom CMC thresholds were estimated using AR as an anchor. Agreement between AR and FDA/EMA responder criteria was assessed. Results Correlations of AR with percentage change in abdominal symptoms, bowel symptoms, and global endpoints ranged from 0.48–0.54, 0.32–0.39, and 0.61–0.71, respectively. Using AR as an anchor, CMC thresholds were 29% improvement in abdominal pain, 29% improvement in abdominal discomfort, and 0.7/week increase in CSBMs, similar to thresholds for IBS-C responder endpoints recommended by the FDA and EMA. There was considerable agreement of weekly responder rates between AR and the FDA and EMA endpoints (on average, 70%–76% and 71%–82% of weeks with agreement, respectively). Conclusions AR bridges IBS-C clinical trials, putting into perspective the disparate primary endpoints recommended by professional societies and regulatory authorities, and allowing researchers, practitioners, and regulators to compare trial results. PMID:25653859

  12. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  13. Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri-Moghaddam, Siavosh

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is the term used for a group of diseases with yet unknown etiology, prevalence of which is increasing almost everywhere in the world. The disease was almost non-existent four decades ago in the east, including the middle-east, while now a days it is seen more and more. In addition to the increasing prevalence, our knowledge about its pathogenesis, clinical course, diagnosis, and treatment has changed dramatically over the past couple of decades. This has changed our concept of this group of diseases, their diagnosis, treatment, and treatment goals. Considering the vast literature on the subject, it is timely to review major topics in IBD with a look on the regional progress and knowledge as well. This essay is aimed to cover this task. PMID:24829639

  14. Comparable Efficacy of a 1-L PEG and Ascorbic Acid Solution Administered with Bisacodyl versus a 2-L PEG and Ascorbic Acid Solution for Colonoscopy Preparation: A Prospective, Randomized and Investigator-Blinded Trial

    PubMed Central

    Im, Jong Pil; Kim, Su Hwan; Koh, Seong-Joon; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Lee, Kook Lae; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Background Two liters of polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution administered with ascorbic acid (Asc) can provide efficacy similar to that of a 4-L PEG solution for colonoscopy preparation. In addition, oral bisacodyl (Bis) has been shown to reduce the volume of PEG needed for a bowel preparation with comparable efficacy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy, tolerability and safety of a 2-L PEG solution mixed with Asc versus the combination of Bis, Asc and a 1-L PEG solution. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, multi-centre, single-blind, non-inferiority trial. Participants who were scheduled for colonoscopy were included and randomized to receive either 2-L PEG and Asc (2L PEG/Asc group) or 1-L PEG, Asc and 20 mg Bis (1L PEG/Asc + Bis group). The quality of bowel preparation was assessed using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale. Data regarding tolerance, compliance and adverse events were also gathered. Results A total of 187 participants were analyzed; 96 were allocated to the 2L PEG/Asc group and 91 to the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group. Bowel preparation was adequate in 87.5% (84/96) of patients in the 2L PEG/Asc group and 94.5% of the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group (86/91, p = 0.10). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to compliance, tolerability or safety. The patients allocated to the 1L PEG/Asc + Bis group expressed more willingness to repeat the procedure than patients in the 2L PEG/Asc group (p = 0.01). Conclusions Bowel preparation with Bis and a 1-L PEG/Asc solution is as effective, well-tolerated, and safe as a 2-L PEG/Asc solution. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT 01745835; Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS) KCT0000708 PMID:27588943

  15. Low rate of large polyps (>9 mm) within 10 years after an adequate baseline colonoscopy with no polyps

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, David; Holub, Jennifer L.; Morris, Cynthia D.; Logan, Judith; Williams, J. Lucas; Carney, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Guidelines recommend a 10 year interval between screening colonoscopies with negative results for average-risk individuals. However, many patients are examined at shorter intervals. We investigated outcomes of individuals with no polyps who had repeat colonoscopy in less than 10 years. Methods Data were collected using the National Endoscopic Database, from 69 gastroenterology centers, on 264,184 asymptomatic subjects who underwent screening colonoscopies from 2000 through 2006, were found to have no polyps, and received another colonoscopy examination within less than 10 years. Results No polyps were found in 147,375 patients during a baseline colonoscopy; 17,525 patients (11.9%) had a follow-up colonoscopy within less than 10 years, including 1806 (10.3%) who received the follow-up colonoscopy within less than 1 year. The most common reason for repeating the examination within 1 year was that the first was compromised by inadequate bowel preparation or incomplete examination. Of these patients, 6.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3–7.6) had large polyp(s) >9 mm—a proportion similar to the prevalence in the average-risk screening population. Reasons that examinations were repeated within 1–5 years included average-risk screening (15.7%), family history of colon polyps or cancer (30.1%), bleeding (31.2%), gastrointestinal symptoms (11.8%), or a positive result from a fecal blood test (5.5%). If the baseline exam was adequate, the incidence of large polyps within 1–5 years after baseline colonoscopy was 3.1% (95% CI, 2.7–3.5) and within years 5–10 years was 3.7% (95% CI, 3.3–4.1). Conclusions Repeat colonoscopies within 10 years are of no benefit to patients who had adequate examinations and were found to have no polyps. Repeat colonoscopies are beneficial to patients when the baseline examination was compromised. PMID:24768680

  16. Capsule endoscopy of the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Yung, Diana; Sidhu, Reena; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a first line small bowel investigative modality which provides more sensitive mucosal imaging than comparators. It is a non-invasive, non-irradiating tool well tolerated by patients. The risk of retention of the capsule can be minimised by ensuring luminal patency using the Agile patency device. Research continues into how to minimise missed pathology and variability in the identification of pathology or interpretation of images. The consensus is that bowel preparation using laxatives improves visibility and diagnostic yield. Research includes the development of image recognition software, both to eliminate sequentially identical images to improve viewing speed and to select or enhance images likely to represent pathology. However, careful reading by experienced capsule endoscopists remains the benchmark. This should be performed at a speed comfortable to the viewer, probably at a maximum of 15 frames per second. Some prior experience of endoscopy appears to be helpful for novice capsule endoscopists and formal training on a hands-on training course seems to improve pathology recognition, for novices and for those with CE experience. PMID:27826572

  17. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Carter, D; Lang, A; Eliakim, R

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel imaging and endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) underwent a lot of change and advancement in the recent years. Modalities have shifted from gastroscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel follow through, to ileo-colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR), enteroscopy, wireless video capsule endoscopy and balloon assisted enteroscopy. Nowadays endoscopy has a major role in the diagnosis of IBD, assessing its extent, treating some of its complications (stricture, bleeding), assessing the success of various treatments (mucosal healing), and as a predictor of disease course. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new "toy" allowing direct, patient friendly, visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa. It has gained a substantial role in the evaluation of patients with suspected Chron's Disease (CD) and indeterminate colitis. WCE has a high positive predictive value in patients with suspected CD, when one uses more than two of the International Conference on Capsule Endoscopy (ICCE) criteria, and not less important, a very high negative predictive value in patients with suspected CD. Its role in patients with known CD, assessing their disease activity and extent, its role in assessing postsurgical small bowel recurrence and its role in the evaluation of mucosal healing are still unclear. Balloon assisted enteroscopy has established its role as a complementary tool in cases where there is need of biopsies or treatment (dilatation of strictures). The present review will summarize the role of endoscopy in the diagnosis of IBD, in assessing its activity, its management, interventional endoscopy and cancer surveillance.

  18. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Symptoms include abdominal ... become pregnant? Women with ulcerative colitis and inactive Crohn’s disease are as likely to become pregnant as women ...

  19. Recovery After Stroke: Bladder and Bowel Function

    MedlinePlus

    Recovery After Stroke: Bladder & Bowel Function Problems with bladder and bowel function are common but distressing for ... embarrassed by – these issues.  Get information on stroke recovery from National Stroke Association.  Visit www. stroke. org ...

  20. Inflammatory bowel diseases: a burden in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Mărginean, Cristina Oana; Meliţ, Lorena Elena; Mocanu, Simona; Mărginean, Maria Oana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic condition of the gastrointestinal tract, comprising mainly Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Both of them are frequently encountered in children, being multifactorial conditions, with an unclear etiology. Patients concerns: We present 4 cases of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children in order to underline the variable evolution depending on the patient's particularities. Diagnosis, interventions and outcomes: The first case, a 13-year-old male patient, with a history of Henoch–Schonlein purpura, was admitted for rectal bleeding and weight loss, with normal laboratory parameters. The colonoscopy and the histopathological examination established the diagnosis of UC. The evolution was initially favorable under corticosteroids and sulfasalazine, but with 3 relapses in 2 years. The second case, a 16-year-old male patient, with a history of lactose intolerance and constipation, was admitted for bloody, diarrheic stools, the laboratory tests pointing out only leukocytosis with neutrophilia. The colonoscopy and histopathological examination established the diagnosis of UC. The patient's evolution was slowly favorable. The third case, a 9-year old male patient, with emotional disorders and babbling, admitted for semiconsistent, bloody stools, with increased inflammatory tests, whose colonoscopy pointed out diffuse edema and hemorrhages, the histopathological examination establishing the diagnosis of CD. The evolution was initially favorable, but with 5 relapses in 3 years. The last case, a 12-year-old male patient, was admitted with diarrheic, bloody stools, refractory to antibiotics, and weight loss, with increased inflammatory tests. The colonoscopy pointed out ulcerations, hemorrhages, and disseminated puss deposits. The histopathological examination established the diagnosis of CD. The patient's evolution was favorable, with only 1 relapse in 3 years. Conclusions: The adequate

  1. Oral pathology in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Muhvić-Urek, Miranda; Tomac-Stojmenović, Marija; Mijandrušić-Sinčić, Brankica

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) - Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) - has been increasing on a global scale, and progressively, more gastroenterologists will be included in the diagnosis and treatment of IBD. Although IBD primarily affects the intestinal tract, extraintestinal manifestations of the disease are often apparent, including in the oral cavity, especially in CD. Specific oral manifestations in patients with CD are as follows: indurate mucosal tags, cobblestoning and mucogingivitis, deep linear ulcerations and lip swelling with vertical fissures. The most common non-specific manifestations, such as aphthous stomatitis and angular cheilitis, occur in both diseases, while pyostomatitis vegetans is more pronounced in patients with UC. Non-specific lesions in the oral cavity can also be the result of malnutrition and drugs. Malnutrition, followed by anemia and mineral and vitamin deficiency, affects the oral cavity and teeth. Furthermore, all of the drug classes that are applied to the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases can lead to alterations in the oral cavity due to the direct toxic effects of the drugs on oral tissues, as well as indirect immunosuppressive effects with a risk of developing opportunistic infections or bone marrow suppression. There is a higher occurrence of malignant diseases in patients with IBD, which is related to the disease itself and to the IBD-related therapy with a possible oral pathology. Treatment of oral lesions includes treatment of the alterations in the oral cavity according to the etiology together with treatment of the primary intestinal disease, which requires adequate knowledge and a strong cooperation between gastroenterologists and specialists in oral medicine. PMID:27433081

  2. Crohn disease of the small bowel: MR enteroclysis versus conventional enteroclysis.

    PubMed

    Masselli, G; Vecchioli, A; Gualdi, G F

    2006-01-01

    Enteroclysis has been suggested as the technique of choice for the evaluation of Crohn disease of the small intestine. Adequate distention of the entire small bowel with barium suspension allows the radiologic demonstration of mucosal abnormalities and provides functional information by defining distensibility or fixation of the small bowel loops. The principal disadvantage of conventional enteroclysis is the limited indirect information on the state of the bowel wall and extramural extension of Crohn disease, and its effectiveness may be hindered owing to overlapping bowel loops. Moreover, the radiation dose administered to patients, mostly at a young age, should be considered. Magnetic resonance (MR) enteroclysis is an emerging technique for small bowel imaging and was introduced to overcome the limitations of conventional enteroclysis and MR cross-sectional imaging by combining the advantages of both into one technique. MR enteroclysis has the potential to change how the small bowel is assessed because of the functional information, soft tissue contrast, direct multiplanar imaging capabilities, and lack of ionizing radiation.

  3. Gastric bezoar with small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Urgancı, Ayvaz Ulaş; Akıncılar, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    In the operation performed on a patient with a history of abdominal surgery, a gastric bezoar and a small bowel bezoar were detected. Adhesive bowel obstruction was suspected; however, the patient was diagnosed with mechanical intestinal obstruction. Small bowel bezoar has resulted in intestinal obstruction. This case was discussed in accordance with the literature. PMID:28149129

  4. Biomarkers of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengming, Yi; Jianbing, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease mostly involved with intestine with unknown etiology. Diagnosis, evaluation of severity, and prognosis are still present as challenges for physicians. An ideal biomarker with the characters such as simple, easy to perform, noninvasive or microinvasive, cheap, rapid, and reproducible is helpful for patients and clinicians. Currently biomarkers applied in clinic include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. However, they are far from ideal. Lots of studies are focused on seeking for ideal biomarker for IBD. Herein, the paper reviewed recent researches on biomarkers of IBD to get advances of biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24963213

  5. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth: a negative factor in gut adaptation in pediatric SBS.

    PubMed

    Cole, Conrad R; Ziegler, Thomas R

    2007-12-01

    Small bowel bacterial overgrowth (SBBO) is common in infants and children with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Its occurrence is due to alterations in anatomy, motility, and secretion, which promote the abnormal growth of bacteria. SBBO is associated with significant clinical problems, including prolonged dependence on parenteral nutrition, liver injury, and malabsorption. A major clinical challenge is in making the correct diagnosis of bacterial overgrowth. Management of this disorder is still poorly understood and should be evaluated adequately. This review addresses the current understanding of bacteria in the intestines and issues related to bacterial overgrowth in pediatric SBS.

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease and the microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Major, Giles; Spiller, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The review aims to update the reader on current developments in our understanding of how the gut microbiota impact on inflammatory bowel disease and the irritable bowel syndrome. It will also consider current efforts to modulate the microbiota for therapeutic effect. Recent findings Gene polymorphisms associated with inflammatory bowel disease increasingly suggest that interaction with the microbiota drives pathogenesis. This may be through modulation of the immune response, mucosal permeability or the products of microbial metabolism. Similar findings in irritable bowel syndrome have reinforced the role of gut-specific factors in this ‘functional’ disorder. Metagenomic analysis has identified alterations in pathways and interactions with the ecosystem of the microbiome that may not be recognized by taxonomic description alone, particularly in carbohydrate metabolism. Treatments targeted at the microbial stimulus with antibiotics, probiotics or prebiotics have all progressed in the past year. Studies on the long-term effects of treatment on the microbiome suggest that dietary intervention may be needed for prolonged efficacy. Summary The microbiome represents ‘the other genome’, and to appreciate its role in health and disease will be as challenging as with our own genome. Intestinal diseases occur at the front line of our interaction with the microbiome and their future treatment will be shaped as we unravel our relationship with it. PMID:24296462

  7. An unusual white blood cell scan in a child with inflammatory bowel disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Porn, U; Howman-Giles, R; O'Loughlin, E; Uren, R; Chaitow, J

    2000-10-01

    Technetium-99m-labeled leukocyte (WBC) imaging is a valuable screening method for inflammatory bowel disease, especially in children, because of its high rate of sensitivity, low cost, and ease of preparation. A 14-year-old girl is described who had juvenile arthritis and iritis complicated by inflammatory bowel disease. She was examined for recurrent abdominal pain. A Tc-99m stannous colloid WBC scan was performed, and tracer accumulation was seen in the small bowel in the region of the distal ileum on the initial 1-hour image. Delayed imaging at 3 hours also revealed tracer accumulation in the cecum and ascending colon, which was not seen on the early image. A biopsy of the colon during endoscopy showed no evidence of active inflammation in the colon. The small bowel was not seen. Computed tomography revealed changes suggestive of inflammatory bowel disease in the distal ileum. The appearance on the WBC study was most likely a result of inflammatory bowel disease involving the distal ileum, with transit of luminal activity into the large bowel.

  8. A multidisciplinary approach to short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Denegri, Andrea; Paparo, Francesco; Denegri, Roberto; Revelli, Matteo; Frascio, Marco; Rollandi, Gian Andrea; Fornaro, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a complex clinical picture, characterized by signs and symptoms of malabsorption and subsequent malnutrition, which often occurs after extensive bowel resections. Short bowel syndrome's treatment must begin together with the planning of the first surgery, especially for disease that may need multiple interventions. Patients with short bowel should be individually managed because they all are different in diagnosis, length of the remaining bowel and in psychosocial characteristics. For all these reasons, a multidisciplinary approach between the various specialists is therefore needed.

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by a defect in the body's immune system . continue What Are the Symptoms of IBD? Inflammatory bowel disease can cause symptoms that range from mild to severe. Symptoms can include: diarrhea that happens again and again, with or without ...

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Children)

    MedlinePlus

    ... bowel disease (or IBD ). IBD most often affects people between 15 and 35 years old, but has even been found in children as ... don't think that IBD is caused by emotional stress or specific foods. You ... in families. About 20% of people with the disease also have a relative who ...

  11. Radiological Evaluation of Bowel Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Dhatt, Harpreet S.; Behr, Spencer C; Miracle, Aaron; Wang, Zhen Jane; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel, is a potentially catastrophic entity that may require emergent intervention or surgery in the acute setting. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of intestinal ischemia are nonspecific, CT findings can be highly suggestive in the correct clinical setting. In this chapter we review the CT diagnosis of arterial, venous, and non-occlusive intestinal ischemia. We discuss the vascular anatomy, pathophysiology of intestinal ischemia, CT techniques for optimal imaging, key and ancillary radiological findings, and differential diagnosis. In the setting of an acute abdomen, rapid evaluation is necessary to identify intraabdominal processes that require emergent surgical intervention (1). While a wide-range of intraabdominal diseases may be present from trauma to inflammation, one of the most feared disorders is mesenteric ischemia, also known as intestinal ischemia, which refers to insufficient blood flow to the bowel (2). Initial imaging evaluation for intestinal ischemia is typically obtained with CT. Close attention to technique and search for key radiologic features with relation to the CT technique is required. Accurate diagnosis depends on understanding the vascular anatomy, epidemiology, and pathophysiology of various forms of mesenteric ischemia and their corresponding radiological findings on MDCT. At imaging, not only is inspection of the bowel itself important, but evaluation of the mesenteric fat, vasculature, and surrounding peritoneal cavity also helps improves accuracy in the diagnosis of bowel ischemia. PMID:26526436

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicines Used by Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cheifetz, Adam S; Gianotti, Robert; Luber, Raphael; Gibson, Peter R

    2017-02-01

    Patients and physicians often have many questions regarding the role of complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs), or nonallopathic therapies, for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CAMs of various forms are used by more than half of patients with IBD during some point in their disease course. We summarize the available evidence for the most commonly used and discussed CAMs. We discuss evidence for the effects of herbs (such as cannabis and curcumin), probiotics, acupuncture, exercise, and mind-body therapy. There have been few controlled studies of these therapies, which have been limited by their small sample sizes; most studies have been uncontrolled. In addition, there has been a lack of quality control for herbal preparations. It has been a challenge to design rigorous, randomized, placebo-controlled trials, in part owing to problems of adequate blinding for psychological interventions, acupuncture, and exercise. These barriers have limited the acceptance of CAMs by physicians. However, such therapies might be used to supplement conventional therapies and help ease patient symptoms. We conclude that physicians should understand the nature of and evidence for CAMs for IBD so that rational advice can be offered to patients who inquire about their use. CAMs have the potential to aid in the treatment of IBD, but further research is needed to validate these approaches.

  13. Iron deficiency anemia in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kaitha, Sindhu; Bashir, Muhammad; Ali, Tauseef

    2015-01-01

    Anemia is a common extraintestinal manifestation of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is frequently overlooked as a complication. Patients with IBD are commonly found to have iron deficiency anemia (IDA) secondary to chronic blood loss, and impaired iron absorption due to tissue inflammation. Patients with iron deficiency may not always manifest with signs and symptoms; so, hemoglobin levels in patients with IBD must be regularly monitored for earlier detection of anemia. IDA in IBD is associated with poor quality of life, necessitating prompt diagnosis and appropriate treatment. IDA is often associated with inflammation in patients with IBD. Thus, commonly used laboratory parameters are inadequate to diagnose IDA, and newer iron indices, such as reticulocyte hemoglobin content or percentage of hypochromic red cells or zinc protoporphyrin, are required to differentiate IDA from anemia of chronic disease. Oral iron preparations are available and are used in patients with mild disease activity. These preparations are inexpensive and convenient, but can produce gastrointestinal side effects, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, that limit their use and patient compliance. These preparations are partly absorbed due to inflammation. Non-absorbed iron can be toxic and worsen IBD disease activity. Although cost-effective intravenous iron formulations are widely available and have improved safety profiles, physicians are reluctant to use them. We present a review of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of IDA in IBD, improved diagnostic and therapeutic strategies, efficacy, and safety of iron replacement in IBD. PMID:26301120

  14. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  15. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  16. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo Ndebele's…

  17. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  18. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  19. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  20. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  1. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  2. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  3. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  4. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  5. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  6. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  7. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  8. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  9. Incidence, prevalence, and management of opioid bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pappagallo, M

    2001-11-01

    Opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) is a common adverse effect associated with opioid therapy. OBD is commonly described as constipation; however, it is a constellation of adverse gastrointestinal (GI) effects, which also includes abdominal cramping, bloating, and gastroesophageal reflux. The mechanism for these effects is mediated primarily by stimulation of opioid receptors in the GI tract. In patients with pain, uncontrolled symptoms of OBD can add to their discomfort and may serve as a barrier to effective pain management, limiting therapy, or prompting discontinuation. Patients with cancer may have disease-related constipation, which is usually worsened by opioid therapy. However, OBD is not limited to cancer patients. A recent survey of patients taking opioid therapy for pain of noncancer origin found that approximately 40% of patients experienced constipation related to opioid therapy (<3 complete bowel movements per week) compared with 7.6% in a control group. Of subjects who required laxative therapy, only 46% of opioid-treated patients (control subjects, 84%) reported achieving the desired treatment results >50% of the time. Laxatives prescribed prophylactically and throughout opioid therapy may improve bowel movements in many patients. Nevertheless, a substantial number of patients will not obtain adequate relief of OBD because of its refractory nature. Naloxone and other tertiary opioid receptor antagonists effectively reduce the symptoms of constipation in opioid-treated patients. However, because they also act centrally, they may provoke opioid withdrawal symptoms or reverse analgesia in some patients. There are 2 peripherally selective opioid receptor antagonists, methylnaltrexone and ADL 8-2698 (Adolor Corporation, Exton, PA, USA), that are currently under investigation for their use in treating OBD. Early studies confirm that they are effective at normalizing bowel function in opioid-treated patients without entering the central nervous system and

  10. The Social Construction of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Social Media Technologies.

    PubMed

    Frohlich, Dennis Owen

    2016-11-01

    Many people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), sometimes lacking adequate face-to-face sources of support, turn to online communities to meet others with the disease. These online communities are places of support and education, but through the use of social media communication technologies, people with IBD are redefining what it means to live with the disease. This ethnographic study followed 14 online communities to understand how people with IBD used social media technologies to construct their own meanings about living with the disease. The following redefinitions were observed: the refiguring of the body is beautiful; inflammatory bowel disease is serious and deadly; inflammatory bowel disease is humorous; the disease makes one stronger; and the disease is invisible, but needs to be made visible. This study will help health communication scholars understand how technology is appropriated by patients, and will help practitioners understand how their patients conceptualize their disease.

  11. Nutritional considerations in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Conklin, Laurie S; Oliva-Hemker, Maria

    2010-06-01

    Nutrition is a critical part of the management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and adults. Malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are common at the time of diagnosis and may persist throughout the course of the disease. There are a number of similarities with regards to the nutritional complications and the approach to nutritional management in IBD in both children and adults, but there are also important differences. Growth failure, pubertal delay and the need for corticosteroid-sparing regimens are of higher importance in pediatrics. In the pediatric population, exclusive enteral nutrition may be equivalent to corticosteroids in inducing remission in acute Crohn's disease, and may have benefits over corticosteroids in children. Adherence with exclusive enteral nutrition is better in children than in adults. Iron deficiency anemia is an important problem for adults and children with IBD. Intravenous iron administration may be superior to oral iron supplementation. Ensuring adequate bone health is another critical component of nutritional management in IBD, but guidelines for screening and therapeutic interventions for low bone mineral density are lacking in children.

  12. Epithelial Transport in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ghishan, Fayez K.; Kiela, Pawel R.

    2014-01-01

    The epithelium of the gastrointestinal tract is one of the most versatile tissues in the organism, responsible for providing a tight barrier between dietary and bacterial antigens and the mucosal and systemic immune system, while maintaining efficient digestive and absorptive processes to ensure adequate nutrient and energy supply. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD; Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis) are associated with a breakdown of both functions, which in some cases are clearly interrelated. In this updated literature review, we focus on the effects of intestinal inflammation and the associated immune mediators on selected aspects of the transepithelial transport of macro- and micronutrients. The mechanisms responsible for nutritional deficiencies are not always clear and could be related to decreased intake, malabsorption and excess losses. We summarize the known causes of nutrient deficiencies and the mechanism of IBD-associated diarrhea. We also overview the consequences of impaired epithelial transport, which infrequently transcend its primary purpose to affect the gut microbial ecology and epithelial integrity. While some of those regulatory mechanisms are relatively well established, more work needs to be done to determine how inflammatory cytokines can alter the transport process of nutrients across the gastrointestinal and renal epithelia. PMID:24691115

  13. Diagnostic difficulties in inflammatory bowel disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Yantiss, R K; Odze, R D

    2006-01-01

    This review summarizes some of the common diagnostic problems encountered by pathologists when evaluating patients with chronic colitis and in whom inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is either suspected or within the differential diagnosis. Both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) show characteristic, but non-specific, pathological features that may overlap and result in a diagnosis of 'indeterminate colitis' (IC). However, other reasons why pathologists may entertain a diagnosis of IC include failure to recognize or accept certain 'hardcore' histological features as indicative of CD, an attempt to classify cases of chronic colitis based on mucosal biopsy material or in the absence of adequate clinical and radiographic information, and the presence of other disease processes that mask, or mimic, IBD. In addition, some cases of UC may show unusual CD-like features, such as discontinuous or patchy disease, ileal inflammation, extracolonic inflammation, granulomatous inflammation in response to ruptured crypts, aphthous ulcers, or transmural inflammation. Furthermore, other forms of colitis, such as microscopic colitis, diverticulitis and diversion colitis may, on occasion, also show IBD-like changes. The clinical and pathological features that aid in the distinction between these entities, and others, are covered in detail in this review.

  14. Psychological Interventions for Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, Sarah; Keefer, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    Psychological interventions have been designed and implemented effectively in a wide range of medical conditions, including Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD). The psychological treatments for IBS and IBD with the strongest evidence base include: cognitive behavioral therapy, hypnosis, and mindfulness-based therapies. The evidence for each of these therapies is reviewed here for both IBS and IBD. In general, there is a stronger and larger evidence base to support the use of psychological interventions in IBS compared with IBD. This is likely due to the high level of psychiatric comorbidity associated with IBS and the involvement of the stress-response in symptom presentation of IBS. Further research in psychosocial interventions for IBD is necessary. Finally, the importance of conceptualizing both IBS and IBD in a biopsychosocial model is discussed and several resources for accessing Clinical Health Psychology materials and referrals are provided. PMID:28102860

  15. Irritable bowel syndrome in quiescent inflammatory bowel disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Burgell, R E; Asthana, A K; Gibson, P R

    2015-12-01

    Ongoing troublesome bowel symptoms despite quiescent inflammatory disease are a frequent management challenge when caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Even when active disease has been excluded the prevalence of residual gastrointestinal symptoms is surprisingly high and the cause often obscure. The presence of a concurrent functional disorder such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is associated with worse quality of life, worse physical functioning, higher prevalence of anxiety and greater health care utilization. Potential etiological mechanisms leading to the development of IBS like symptoms include the development of visceral hypersensitivity following the original inflammatory insult, alteration in cortical processing, dysbiosis and residual subacute inflammation. Therapeutic options for managing IBS in patients with IBD include dietary modification, interventions targeted at correction of visceral sensory dysfunction or cortical processing and modulation of the gut microbiota. As there are few studies specifically examining the treatment of IBS in patients with IBD, the majority of therapeutic interventions are extrapolated from the IBS literature. Given the frequency of residual functional symptoms in IBS, significantly more research is warranted in this field.

  16. Region 9: Arizona Adequate Letter (10/14/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Jack P. Broadben,. Director, to Nancy Wrona and Dennis Smith informing them that Maricopa County's motor vehicle emissions budgets in the 2003 MAGCO Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  17. Region 6: Texas Adequate Letter (4/16/2010)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality determined 2021 motor vehicle emission budgets for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for Beaumont/Port Arthur area adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  18. Region 2: New Jersey Adequate Letter (5/23/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This April 22, 2002 letter from EPA to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection determined 2007 and 2014 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mobile Source Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal

  19. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (10/29/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  20. Region 1: New Hampshire Adequate Letter (8/12/2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This July 9, 2008 letter from EPA to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, determined the 2009 Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets (MVEBs) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal Register (FR).

  1. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (1/20/2004)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Greeleys' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the FR.

  2. Region 8: Utah Adequate Letter (6/10/2005)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Utah Department of Environmental Quality determined Salt Lake Citys' and Ogdens' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  3. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  4. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  5. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  6. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  7. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  8. Region 6: New Mexico Adequate Letter (8/21/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Carl Edlund, Director, to Alfredo Santistevan regarding MVEB's contained in the latest revision to the Albuquerque Carbon Monoxide State Implementation Plan (SIP) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  9. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  10. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  11. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  12. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  13. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  14. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  15. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  16. Region 9: Nevada Adequate Letter (3/30/2006)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Deborah Jordan, Director, to Leo M. Drozdoff regarding Nevada's motor vehicle emissions budgets in the 2005 Truckee Meadows CO Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity decisions.

  17. Functional bowel symptoms and diet.

    PubMed

    Gibson, P R; Barrett, J S; Muir, J G

    2013-10-01

    It is well recognised that ingestion of food is a trigger for functional bowel symptoms, particularly those associated with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Patients often use manipulation of diet as a means of controlling symptoms. Despite description of multiple dietary methods, few have scientific backing or quality evidence of efficacy. One approach is to define how specific food components influence the pathophysiology of IBS and then rationally design dietary approaches. For example, short-chain poorly absorbed carbohydrates (fermentable oligo-, di- and mono-saccharides and polyols (FODMAP)) cause luminal distension, which is a major stimulus for the development of symptoms in patients with visceral hypersensitivity. By determining food content of FODMAP, a diet in which foods low in FODMAP are favoured over those high in FODMAP can be designed. Observational, comparative and randomised controlled treatment and rechallenge studies have shown that such an approach is efficacious in the majority of patients with IBS. The low FODMAP diet is now the primary dietary therapy for such patients. Similar approaches can be applied to other food components, including proteins (such as gluten), fats and natural bioactive food chemicals. Such approaches have suggestions of efficacy, but the evidence base remains underdeveloped. An additional and important consideration for any dietary therapy is its nutritional adequacy and potential adverse health effects. Dietary manipulation is now a key management strategy in patients with functional bowel symptoms. Future well-designed interventional studies will lead to refinement of dietary approaches taken and to a better understanding of their long-term safety.

  18. Abdominal CT findings in small bowel perforation.

    PubMed

    Zissin, R; Osadchy, A; Gayer, G

    2009-02-01

    Small bowel perforation is an emergent medical condition for which the diagnosis is usually not made clinically but by CT, a common imaging modality used for the diagnosis of acute abdomen. Direct CT features that suggest perforation include extraluminal air and oral contrast, which are often associated with secondary CT signs of bowel pathology. This pictorial review illustrates the CT findings of small bowel perforation caused by various clinical entities.

  19. Regulatory requirements for providing adequate veterinary care to research animals.

    PubMed

    Pinson, David M

    2013-09-01

    Provision of adequate veterinary care is a required component of animal care and use programs in the United States. Program participants other than veterinarians, including non-medically trained research personnel and technicians, also provide veterinary care to animals, and administrators are responsible for assuring compliance with federal mandates regarding adequate veterinary care. All program participants therefore should understand the regulatory requirements for providing such care. The author provides a training primer on the US regulatory requirements for the provision of veterinary care to research animals. Understanding the legal basis and conditions of a program of veterinary care will help program participants to meet the requirements advanced in the laws and policies.

  20. Bowel perforation detection using metabolic fluorescent chlorophylls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jung Hyun; Jo, Young Goun; Kim, Jung Chul; Choi, Sujeong; Kang, Hoonsoo; Kim, Yong-Chul; Hwang, In-Wook

    2016-03-01

    Thus far, there have been tries of detection of disease using fluorescent materials. We introduce the chlorophyll derivatives from food plants, which have longer-wavelength emissions (at >650 nm) than those of fluorescence of tissues and organs, for detection of bowel perforation. To figure out the possibility of fluorescence spectroscopy as a monitoring sensor of bowel perforation, fluorescence from organs of rodent models, intestinal and peritoneal fluids of rodent models and human were analyzed. In IVIS fluorescence image of rodent abdominal organ, visualization of perforated area only was possible when threshold of image is extremely finely controlled. Generally, both perforated area of bowel and normal bowel which filled with large amount of chlorophyll derivatives were visualized with fluorescence. The fluorescence from chlorophyll derivatives penetrated through the normal bowel wall makes difficult to distinguish perforation area from normal bowel with direct visualization of fluorescence. However, intestinal fluids containing chlorophyll derivatives from food contents can leak from perforation sites in situation of bowel perforation. It may show brighter and longer-wavelength regime emissions of chlorophyll derivatives than those of pure peritoneal fluid or bioorgans. Peritoneal fluid mixed with intestinal fluids show much brighter emissions in longer wavelength (at>650 nm) than those of pure peritoneal fluid. In addition, irrigation fluid, which is used for the cleansing of organ and peritoneal cavity, made of mixed intestinal and peritoneal fluid diluted with physiologic saline also can be monitored bowel perforation during surgery.

  1. Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy of chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, D.A.; Jones, H.H.

    1982-12-01

    The case of a 14-year old girl with painful periostitis and ulcerative colitis is reported. The association of chronic inflammatory bowel disease with osteoarthropathy is rare and has previously been reported in eight patients. The periosteal reaction found in association with inflammatory bowel disease is apparently related to a chronic disease course and may cause extreme localized pain.

  2. Irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: interrelated diseases?

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2005-01-01

    In the past inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were regarded as completely separate disorders. Now, with the description of inflammation, albeit low-grade, in IBS, and of symptom overlap between IBS and celiac disease, this contention has come under question. Is there true overlap between these disorders? Despite the limitations of available data one cannot but be struck by some areas of apparent convergence: IBD and celiac disease in remission, lymphocytic colitis and microscopic inflammation in IBS, in general, and, especially, in the post-infectious IBS category. The convergence between latent celiac disease and sub-clinical IBD, on the one hand, and IBS, on the other, appears, based on available evidence, to be somewhat spurious and may largely relate to misdiagnosis, a phenomenon which may also explain the apparent evolution of IBS into IBD in some studies. Similarities between IBS and lymphocytic colitis are more striking and less readily dismissed; as for IBS, well documented instances of progression of lymphocytic colitis to full-blown IBD are infrequent, suggesting a true separation between this disorder and classical IBD. Do IBS and lymphocytic colitis represent different responses to similar triggers? Will some of the 'inflamed' IBS subgroup be reclassified as part of the spectrum of lymphocytic colitis in the future? Will inflammation emerge as a common underlying factor in the pathogenesis of IBS? The answer to these and many questions must await further study of this fascinating area.

  3. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Abreu, Maria T

    2015-08-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets-such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet-have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data.

  4. Epidemiology and inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Tawil, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2013-03-14

    The role of alcohol in causing or aggravating the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. For finding a conclusive answer for this valuable question we conducted this review. Only two studies were identified that successfully fulfilled our inclusive criteria. Usual consumption of alcohol reduced the risk compared with less frequent use (odds ratio = 0.57, 95%CI: 0.37-0.86). Light alcoholic drinking has protective effects against development of ulcerative colitis. But this inverse association disappeared when smoking was included.

  5. Diet in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mazen; Saeian, Kia

    2011-04-01

    The past few years have seen a great expansion of our understanding of the pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Much of the progress has been on the genetic basis of disease as well as the role of microbiota. These findings have magnified the role of the environmental component of this rather complex process. Recent advances have emanated from more in-depth, comprehensive, and at times nontraditional inquiry into the potential role of diet through its anti-inflammatory properties and modulation of microbiota. This concise review focuses on the novel aspects of research related to the potential role of diet in IBD.

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: contemporary nutrition management strategies.

    PubMed

    Mullin, Gerard E; Shepherd, Sue J; Chander Roland, Bani; Ireton-Jones, Carol; Matarese, Laura E

    2014-09-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a complex disorder whose pathophysiology involves alterations in the enteric microbiota, visceral hypersensitivity, gut immune/barrier function, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, neurotransmitters, stress response, psychological factors, and more. The importance of diet in the management of irritable bowel syndrome has taken center stage in recent times as the literature validates the relationship of certain foods with the provocation of symptoms. Likewise, a number of elimination dietary programs have been successful in alleviating irritable bowel syndrome symptoms. Knowledge of the dietary management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome will help guide nutritionists and healthcare practitioners to deliver optimal outcomes. This tutorial reviews the nutrition management strategies for irritable bowel syndrome.

  7. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  8. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  9. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  10. Is the Stock of VET Skills Adequate? Assessment Methodologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Richard; Freeland, Brett

    In Australia and elsewhere, four approaches have been used to determine whether stocks of vocational education and training (VET) skills are adequate to meet industry needs. The four methods are as follows: (1) the manpower requirements approach; (2) the international, national, and industry comparisons approach; (3) the labor market analysis…

  11. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  12. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  13. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  14. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  15. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  16. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  17. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation…

  18. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  19. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  20. Region 9: Arizona Adequate Letter (11/1/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Jack P. Broadbent, Director, Air Division to Nancy Wrona and James Bourney informing them of the adequacy of Revised MAG 1999 Serious Area Carbon Monoxide Plan and that the MAG CO Plan is adequate for Maricopa County.

  1. [Short bowel syndrome in children: a diagnosis and management update].

    PubMed

    Valdovinos, D; Cadena, J; Montijo, E; Zárate, F; Cazares, M; Toro, E; Cervantes, R; Ramírez-Mayans, J

    2012-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) refers to the sum of the functional alterations that are the result of a critical reduction in the length of the intestine, which in the absence of adequate treatment, presents as chronic diarrhea, chronic dehydration, malnutrition, weight loss, nutriment and electrolyte deficiency, along with a failure to grow that is present with greater frequency during the neonatal period. The aim was to carry out a review of the literature encompassing the definition and the most frequent causes of SBS, together with an understanding of its physiopathology, prognostic factors, and treatment. An Internet search of PubMed articles was carried out for the existing information published over the last 20 years on SBS in children, using the keywords "short bowel syndrome". From a total of 784 potential articles, 82 articles were chosen for the literature review. The treatment of patients presenting with SBS is quite a challenge and therefore it is necessary to establish multidisciplinary management with a focus on maintaining optimal nutritional support that covers the necessities of growth and development and at the same time provides a maximum reduction of short, medium, and long-term complications. The diagnosis and treatment of a child with SBS require a team of professionals that are experts in gastroenterologic, pediatric, and nutritional management. The outcome for the child will be directly related to opportune management, as well as to the length of the intestinal resection and the presence or absence of the ileocecal valve.

  2. Small bowel obstruction caused by dried apple

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Sally; Hong, Khiem

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Small bowel obstruction in a virgin abdomen is an uncommon surgical condition. While malignancy, inflammatory bowel disease and foreign body are the main reported causes, undigested food bezoar causing bowel obstruction is a rare entity. We report a case of small bowel obstruction secondary to dried preserved apple having re-expanded within the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case A 69 year old male presented with severe abdominal distension, generalized abdominal tenderness and obstipation for 1 week. Small bowel obstruction (SBO) was confirmed on plain abdominal X-ray and CT imaging. An emergency explorative laparatomy identified a sausage-shaped intra-luminal foreign body obstructing the distal ileum. An enterotomy was performed which revealed a rehydrated, donut-shaped piece of dried apple. Discussion Swallowed items that pass through the pylorus rarely cause obstruction as they are usually small enough to pass through the rest of the bowel without difficulty. We postulate that in our patient that the dried apple was originally small enough to pass through the pylorus. However during small bowel, its’ highly absorbable nature resulted in an increase in size that prevented its’ passage through the ileocecal valve. A simple in-vitro experiment discovered that dried apple has a potential to reabsorb fluid and expand up to 35% of its initial size within 72 h. Conclusion This report illustrates the potential for dried food substances to cause intra-luminal SBO after significant expansion with rehydration. PMID:25841159

  3. Surgical management of short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Kishore R

    2014-05-01

    For patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS), surgery can play an important role in preventing, mitigating, and, in some cases, reversing intestinal failure (IF). During intestinal resection, bowel length should be conserved to the fullest extent possible to avoid dependence on parenteral nutrition (PN). Bowel salvage may be improved by initially preserving tissue of questionable viability and later reevaluating during "second-look" procedures. Once the patient is stabilized, ostomy reversal and recruitment of distal unused bowel should be prioritized whenever feasible. Following progression to IF, surgical management of SBS depends on the symptoms and anatomical characteristics of the individual patient. For carefully selected patients with rapid intestinal transit and dilated bowel, longitudinal intestinal lengthening and tailoring (LILT) and serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) procedures may provide benefit. Outcomes following STEP and LILT are generally similar, and the choice between these procedures may rest on surgeon preference. For patients with rapid intestinal transit in the absence of bowel dilation, segmental reversal of the small bowel may reduce PN requirements. Intestinal transplantation is the standard of care for patients in whom intestinal rehabilitation attempts have failed and who are at risk of life-threatening complications of PN. Because patients awaiting isolated intestine transplant show increased survival compared with patients awaiting combined intestine-liver transplant, early referral of appropriate patients, before the development of advanced liver disease, is critical to enhancing patient outcomes.

  4. Closed gastroschisis, vanishing midgut and extreme short bowel syndrome: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dennison, F A

    2016-08-01

    Gastroschisis alone has excellent survival rates. Occasionally reported is closed gastroschisis, leading to vanishing small bowel and extreme short bowel syndrome. It is believed that the abdominal wall defect can contract or close in utero, which leads to strangulation of the eviscerated bowel and the rare "vanishing gut syndrome." This has a very poor prognosis with mortality as high as 70%. An 18-year-old primigravid patient's 13 week scan diagnosed a large gastroschisis affecting the fetus. After counselling, she decided to continue with the pregnancy. Between 20 and 22 weeks, the gastroschisis disappeared, and the bowel within the abdomen became markedly dilated. Spontaneous labour occurred at 33 + 3 weeks gestation. There was no abdominal wall defect seen at delivery. Imaging and an exploratory laparotomy demonstrated absence of most of the midgut. Because available options for treatment would be very aggressive and risky, palliative care was thought to be the most feasible and practical option. He died at home on day 29 after birth. Extreme short gut syndrome (less than 25 cm of remaining small bowel) is rare. There are 13 reported cases in the literature from year 2000 to 2013. Treatment is aggressive and involves a bowel lengthening procedure or small bowel transplant. All require total parenteral nutrition and liver failure, and liver transplant is a common complication. Of these cases, 12 were born alive and 7 had aggressive treatment. Only two cases were confirmed to still be alive in infancy. If gastroschisis is seen to be reducing and "disappearing" antenatally, parents should be made aware of this rare complication so that they might be prepared if a poor outcome is anticipated.

  5. [Volvulus of the small bowel due to ascaris lumbricoides package: about a case].

    PubMed

    Diouf, Cheikh; Kane, Ahmed; Ndoye, Ndeye Aby; Ndour, Oumar; Faye-Fall, Aimé Lakh; Fall, Mbaye; Alumeti, Désiré Munyali; Ngom, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We report an exceptional case of a 7 year-old patient with necrotic small bowel volvulus due to adult ascaris lumbricoides. At the admission, the child had intestinal obstruction evolving since two days with alteration of general state. Abdominal radiography without preparation showed small bowel air-fluid levels and tiger-stripe appearance evoking the diagnosis of acute intestinal obstruction associated with abdominal mass. After resuscitation, the surgical treatment consisted of laparotomy which showed necrotic volvulus of the terminal ileum containing adult ascaris lumbricoides. The patient underwent small bowel resection, approximately one meter of affected section was removed and then an ileostomy was performed. The evolution was favorable. The patient underwent ileorectal anastomosis four weeks later. After a 2 year follow-up period the child had no symptoms.

  6. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-26

    statements were unreliable and lacked an adequate audit trail. Furthermore, DoD and Army managers could not rely on the data in their accounting...risk that AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army will not achieve audit readiness by the congressionally mandated...and $6.5 trillion in yearend adjustments made to Army General Fund data during FY 2015 financial statement compilation. We conducted this audit in

  7. Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome in an adolescent with short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ester; Estanqueiro, Paula; Almeida, Susana; Ferreira, Ricardo; Tellechea, Oscar; Salgado, Manuel

    2014-09-01

    Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome (BADAS) is a neutrophilic dermatosis, characterized by the occurrence of arthritis and skin lesions related to bowel disease with or without bowel bypass. We report an unusual case of BADAS in a 15-year-old white male with congenital aganglionosis of the colon and hypoganglionosis of the small intestine and multiple bowel surgeries in childhood complicated by short bowel syndrome. He presented with recurrent peripheral polyarthritis, tenosynovitis, and painful erythematous subcutaneous nodules located on the dorsolateral regions of the legs and on the dorsa of the feet. Histological examination disclosed a neutrophilic dermatosis confirming the diagnosis of BADAS.Although an uncommon disease, especially at pediatric age, it is important to evoke the diagnosis of BADAS in children and adolescents with bowel disease, because treatment options and prognosis are distinct from other rheumatologic conditions.

  8. Small bowel imaging in managing Crohn's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jörg G

    2012-01-01

    The small bowel is essential to sustain alimentation and small bowel Crohn's disease (CD) may severely limit its function. Small bowel imaging is a crucial element in diagnosing small bowel CD, and treatment control with imaging is increasingly used to optimize the patients outcome. Thereby, capsule endoscopy, Balloon-assisted enteroscopy, and Magnetic resonance imaging have become key players to manage CD patients. In this review, role of small bowel imaging is detailed discussed for use in diagnosing and managing Crohn's disease patients.

  9. Management of short bowel syndrome in infancy.

    PubMed

    Batra, A; Beattie, R M

    2013-11-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a reduction in functioning bowel length which is most often a result of surgical resection. Risk factors in the neonatal period include necrotising enterocolitis, small bowel atresia and gastroschisis. With increasing survival of preterm infants there is an increase in incidence. Management is dependent on the use of parenteral nutrition to maintain fluid and electrolyte homeostasis and promote growth and development with the longer term aim being to promote intestinal adaptation to achieve partial or complete enteral autonomy. In this review we discuss the incidence, aetiology, pathophysiology, medical and surgical treatments and outcome.

  10. THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA AND THE ROLE OF PROBIOTICS IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: a review.

    PubMed

    Moraes-Filho, Joaquim Prado; Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2015-12-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a common, chronic relapsing gastrointestinal disorder that affects 7%-22% of the population worldwide. According to Rome III Criteria, the disorder is defined by the coexistence of abdominal discomfort or pain associated with an alteration in bowel habits. Its pathophysiology is not completely understood but, in addition to some important abnormalities, the disturbed intestinal microbiota has also been described supported by several strands of evidence. The treatment of irritable bowel syndrome is based upon several therapeutic approaches but few have been successful or without adverse events and more recently the gut microbiota and the use of probiotics have emerged as a factor to be considered. Probiotics are live micro-organisms which when consumed in adequate amounts confer a health benefit to the host, such as Lactic bacteria among others. An important scientific rationale has emerged for the use of probiotics in irritable bowel syndrome, although the data regarding different species are still limited. Not all probiotics are beneficial: it is important to select the specific strain which should be supported by good evidence base. The mechanisms of action of probiotics are described and the main strains are quoted.

  11. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS. PMID:24106397

  12. Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dai, Cong; Zheng, Chang-Qing; Jiang, Min; Ma, Xiao-Yu; Jiang, Li-Juan

    2013-09-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common gastrointestinal problems. It is characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort, and is associated with changes in stool frequency and/or consistency. The etiopathogenesis of IBS may be multifactorial, as is the pathophysiology, which is attributed to alterations in gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, intestinal microbiota, gut epithelium and immune function, dysfunction of the brain-gut axis or certain psychosocial factors. Current therapeutic strategies are often unsatisfactory. There is now increasing evidence linking alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota and IBS. Probiotics are living organisms which, when ingested in certain numbers, exert health benefits beyond inherent basic nutrition. Probiotics have numerous positive effects in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, many studies have suggested that probiotics are effective in the treatment of IBS. The mechanisms of probiotics in IBS are very complex. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence and mechanisms for the use of probiotics in the treatment of IBS.

  13. Diet and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight-Sepulveda, Karina; Kais, Susan; Santaolalla, Rebeca

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are increasingly becoming interested in nonpharmacologic approaches to managing their disease. One of the most frequently asked questions of IBD patients is what they should eat. The role of diet has become very important in the prevention and treatment of IBD. Although there is a general lack of rigorous scientific evidence that demonstrates which diet is best for certain patients, several diets—such as the low-fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide, and polyol diet; the specific carbohydrate diet; the anti-inflammatory diet; and the Paleolithic diet—have become popular. This article discusses the diets commonly recommended to IBD patients and reviews the supporting data. PMID:27118948

  14. Does Current Army Physical Fitness Training Doctrine Adequately Prepare Soldiers for War?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-11

    These divisions were supported by heavy artillery that continuously shelled the American positions previously held by German infantry. Background E...spine region: Stacked Foot/Staggered Hand Push-Up, Banana Roll, Leaning Crescent, Squat Run, Sphinx Push-Up, Bow to Boat, Low Lateral Skaters...Lunge and Reach, Prison Cell Push-Up, Side Hip Raise, Squat X-Press, Plank to Chaturanga, Walking Push-Up, Superman Banana , Lunge Kickback Curl Press

  15. Does Military Culture Adequately Prepare Senior Leaders to Provide Clear Objective, and Useful Strategic Advice?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-17

    complete success is often not an option. This is because the implied and explicit connotations of phases II and III require a fairly rigid definition of... definitions of success. For phase II, JP 5-0, states that the conditions for success include “forcing the adversary to offensive culmination… and gain[ing...they lend themselves to binary definitions of success. Either the enemy has or has not culminated; either friendly forces have or have not gained

  16. Accounting Students: Do Their Professors Perceive Them as Being Adequately Prepared?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, John R.; Carruth, Paul J.

    1985-01-01

    Research was conducted to determine accounting professors' perceptions of the abilities of their accounting majors, particularly the communications and quantitative skills of these majors, as well as their motivation and study habits. Findings and implications are presented, and recommendations and conclusions are discussed. (CT)

  17. Are primary care residents adequately prepared to care for women of reproductive age?

    PubMed

    Conway, T; Hu, T C; Mason, E; Mueller, C

    1995-01-01

    A 1991 study of 115 internal medicine and 28 family practice residents at a large inner-city public hospital finds that both groups would perform poorly in providing preconception counseling to women of reproductive age. More than 40% of residents failed to indicate that they would provide a healthy woman with information on rubella immunization and family planning or counseling on sexually transmitted diseases and safer sex. When counseling a diabetic woman seeking pregnancy, 74% would not have discussed congenital anomalies with her and 45% would not have considered discontinuing oral hypoglycemics if she became pregnant. Furthermore, 58% would have neglected to review or change hypertension medications in a newly diagnosed pregnant woman. Although both internal medicine and family practice residents had positive attitudes toward offering preconception care, family practice residents had significantly higher attitude scores. No clear improvement was found in patient management, attitude or knowledge scores as residents progressed from their first to their third year of training.

  18. Diet in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, Magdy; Gundersen, Doris

    2015-04-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common chronic gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by intermittent abdominal pain/discomfort, altered bowel habits and abdominal bloating/distension. This review aimed at presenting the recent developments concerning the role of diet in the pathophysiology and management of IBS. There is no convincing evidence that IBS patients suffer from food allergy/intolerance, and there is no evidence that gluten causes the debated new diagnosis of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The component in wheat that triggers symptoms in NCGS appears to be the carbohydrates. Patients with NCGS appear to be IBS patients who are self-diagnosed and self-treated with a gluten-free diet. IBS symptoms are triggered by the consumption of the poorly absorbed fermentable oligo-, di-, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and insoluble fibre. On reaching the distal small intestine and colon, FODMAPS and insoluble fibre increase the osmotic pressure in the large-intestine lumen and provide a substrate for bacterial fermentation, with consequent gas production, abdominal distension and abdominal pain or discomfort. Poor FODMAPS and insoluble fibres diet reduces the symptom and improve the quality of life in IBS patients. Moreover, it changes favourably the intestinal microbiota and restores the abnormalities in the gastrointestinal endocrine cells. Five gastrointestinal endocrine cell types that produce hormones regulating appetite and food intake are abnormal in IBS patients. Based on these hormonal abnormalities, one would expect that IBS patients to have increased food intake and body weight gain. However, the link between obesity and IBS is not fully studied. Individual dietary guidance for intake of poor FODMAPs and insoluble fibres diet in combination with probiotics intake and regular exercise is to be recommended for IBS patients.

  19. Mucins and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, T.; Longman, R.; Corfield, A.; Probert, C.

    2000-01-01

    There is a layer of mucus lining the gastrointestinal tract, which acts as both a lubricant and as a physical barrier between luminal contents and the mucosal surface. The mucins that make up this layer consist of a protein backbone with oligosaccharides attached to specific areas of the protein core. These areas are called the variable number tandem repeat regions. The degree of glycosylation of the mucins is central to their role in the mucus barrier. The oligosaccharides are variable and complex. It has been demonstrated that the degree of sulphation and sialylation and the length of the oligosaccharide chains all vary in inflammatory bowel disease. These changes can alter the function of the mucins. Mucins are broadly divided into two groups, those that are secreted and those that are membrane bound. The major mucins present in the colorectum are MUC1, MUC2, MUC3, and MUC4.
Trefoils are a group of small peptides that have an important role in the mucus layer. Three trefoils have been demonstrated so far. They seem to play a part in mucosal protection and in mucosal repair. They may help to stabilise the mucus layer by cross linking with mucins to aid formation of stable gels. Trefoils can be expressed in the ulcer associated cell lineage, a glandular structure that can occur in the inflamed mucosa. There seem to be differences in the expression of trefoils in the colon and the small bowel, which may imply different method of mucosal repair.


Keywords: mucins; trefoil; Crohn's disease; colitis PMID:10908374

  20. Endoscopic Evaluation of Surgically Altered Bowel in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sinh, Preetika

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Patients with inflammatory bowel diseases often undergo surgical procedures for medically refractory disease or colitis associated dysplasia. Endoscopic evaluation of the surgically altered bowel is often needed to assess for disease recurrence, its severity, and for therapy. It is important to obtain and review the operative report and abdominal imaging before performing the endoscopy. Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can be safely performed in most patients with inflammatory bowel disease with altered bowel anatomy under conscious sedation without fluoroscopy. Carefully planned stricture therapy with balloon dilation or needle knife stricturotomy can be performed for simple, short, and fibrotic strictures. A multidisciplinary approach involving a team of endoscopist, endoscopy nurse, colorectal surgeon, gastrointestinal pathologist, and gastrointestinal radiologist is important for a safe and effective endoscopy. We attempt to review the aspects that need consideration before the endoscopy, the technique of endoscopy, and briefly the therapies that can be performed during endoscopy of the bowel through an ileostomy, a colostomy, in the diverted large bowel or ileal pouch, and small bowel after stricturoplasty and bowel bypass surgery in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25806847

  1. Mushroom Bezoar Causing Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Hamzah, Azhar Amir; Keow, Chin Kim; Syazri, Azreen; Mallhi, Tauqeer Hussain; Khan, Amer Hayat; Khan, Yusra Habib; Adnan

    2017-03-01

    A bezoar is a concretion of foreign or indigestible matter in the alimentary canal and is usual cause of gastric obstruction. Bezoars can become fragmented and migrate downward leading to intestinal obstruction. Diagnosis of phytobezoar has become challenging in clinical practice due to lack of patient history and inability of patient to correlate preceding events with the episode of bowel obstruction. Bezoar associated small bowel obstruction rarely occurs and is usually found in patients with history of gastrointestinal surgery. Very few cases are reported of small bowel obstruction due to bezoar in healthy population without prior illness or surgery. We present a case of small bowel obstruction due to mushroom bezoar in a 62-year patient with no past history of medical illness or gastric surgery. Enterotomy was performed and a whole piece of undigested mushroom measuring 5 x 3 cm was successfully removed.

  2. A test for adequate wastewater treatment based on glutathione S transferase isoenzyme profile.

    PubMed

    Grammou, A; Samaras, P; Papadimitriou, C; Papadopoulos, A I

    2013-04-01

    Discharge to the environment of treated or non-treated municipal wastewater imposes several threats to coastal and estuarine ecosystems which are difficult to assess. In our study we evaluate the use of the isoenzyme profile of glutathione S transferase (GST) in combination with the kinetic characteristics of the whole enzyme and of heme peroxidase, as a test of adequate treatment of municipal wastewater. For this reason, Artemia nauplii were incubated in artificial seawater prepared by wastewater samples, such as secondary municipal effluents produced by a conventional activated sludge unit and advanced treated effluents produced by the employment of coagulation, activated carbon adsorption and chlorination as single processes or as combined ones. Characteristic changes of the isoenzyme pattern and the enzymes' kinetic properties were caused by chlorinated secondary municipal effluent or by secondary non-chlorinated effluent. Advanced treatment by combination of coagulation and/or carbon adsorption resulted to less prominent changes, suggesting more adequate treatment. Our results suggest that GST isoenzyme profile in combination with the kinetic properties of the total enzyme family is a sensitive test for the evaluation of the adequateness of the treatment of reclaimed wastewater and the reduction of potentially harmful compounds. Potentially, it may offer a 'fingerprint' characteristic of a particular effluent and probably of the treatment level it has been subjected.

  3. Sexual dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ghazi, Leyla J; Patil, Seema A; Cross, Raymond K

    2015-04-01

    Sexual health is a broad term that encompasses a variety of functions including sexual thoughts, desire, arousal, intercourse, orgasm, and the impact of body image. Sexual dysfunction in individuals with inflammatory bowel disease is multifactorial including the impact of psychosocial factors, disease activity, medical therapies, surgical interventions, body image perceptions and changes, hypogonadism, and pelvic floor disorders. Providers caring for patients with inflammatory bowel disease should be cognizant of these concerns and develop management plans and techniques for earlier diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Systemic complications of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Baillie, J; Soltis, R D

    1985-02-01

    Radiologic assessment of the sacroiliac joints should be part of every inflammatory bowel disease patient's workup; ankylosing spondylitis is 10 to 20 times more common in ulcerative colitis patients than in normal persons. Iritis, which occurs in 10 to 20% of ulcerative colitis patients, often precedes bowel symptoms. It may be necessary to use long-term, low-dose steroid therapy to control frequently recurring iritis.

  5. Genetic modification of preimplantation embryos: toward adequate human research policies.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects.

  6. Elements for adequate informed consent in the surgical context.

    PubMed

    Abaunza, Hernando; Romero, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    Given a history of atrocities and violations of ethical principles, several documents and regulations have been issued by a wide variety of organizations. They aim at ensuring that health care and clinical research adhere to defined ethical principles. A fundamental component was devised to ensure that the individual has been provided the necessary information to make an informed decision regarding health care or participation in clinical research. This article summarizes the history and regulations for informed consent and discusses suggested components for adequate consent forms for daily clinical practice in surgery as well as clinical research.

  7. Colonic stent placement as a bridge to surgery in patients with left-sided malignant large bowel obstruction. An observational study

    PubMed Central

    OCCHIONORELLI, S.; TARTARINI, D.; CAPPELLARI, L.; STANO, R.; VASQUEZ, G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute left-sided malignant colonic obstruction is common in elderly patients, in which emergency surgery is related with high morbidity and mortality rates, and often necessitates a two-step resection. Although the use of self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) in elderly patients has not been adequately described yet, there are almost two international important trials which are still in progress, the stenting technique is established to be, by the international literature, an useful treatment with low morbidity and mortality. It’s also a bridge to surgery, since the insertion of a SEMS can decompress the obstruction, making bowel and patient preparation possible and facilitating single-stage surgical resection. Palliative stenting can improve quality of life when compared to surgery in patients with metastasis or high co-morbidity. The aim of this study is to analyze mortality, avoidance of stoma, short- and long-term survival in patient with malignant left-sided large bowel obstruction who underwent to stent placement in our Emergency Surgery Unit, which is operative since November 2010 in our city Hospital in Ferrara. Patients and methods Between November 2010 and December 2012 a total of 15 patients with acute left-sided malignant large bowel obstruction suitable for colonic stent application were admitted to Emergency Surgery Unit. Among these patients, 9 underwent to self-expanding metallic stent placement (group A), the other (group B) 6 patient underwent to emergency surgery. In this observational not-randomized study we analyzed the efficacy and safety of SEMS placement for patients either as a bridge to surgery or as a palliation, beside the short term and long term outcomes, versus those patients operated straight. Results Self-expanding metallic stents were successfully implanted in 9 of the 15 patients with acute left-sided malignant large bowel obstruction. No acute procedure-related complication was observed. All the patients in group A

  8. Acute small bowel ischemia: CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Enrica; Mortelé, Koenraad J; Ji, Hoon; Wiesner, Walter; Ros, Pablo R

    2003-10-01

    Small bowel ischemia is a disorder related to a variety of conditions resulting in interruption or reduction of the blood supply of the small intestine. It may present with various clinical and radiologic manifestations, and ranges pathologically from localized transient ischemia to catastrophic necrosis of the intestinal tract. The primary causes of insufficient blood flow to the small intestine are various and include thromboembolism (50% of cases), nonocclusive causes, bowel obstruction, neoplasms, vasculitis, abdominal inflammatory conditions, trauma, chemotherapy, radiation, and corrosive injury. Computed tomography (CT) can demonstrate changes because of ischemic bowel accurately, may be helpful in determining the primary cause of ischemia, and can demonstrate important coexistent findings or complications. However, common CT findings in acute small bowel ischemia are not specific and, therefore, it is often a combination of clinical, laboratory and radiologic signs that may lead to a correct diagnosis. Understanding the pathogenesis of various conditions leading to mesenteric ischemia and being familiar with the spectrum of diagnostic CT signs may help the radiologist recognize ischemic small bowel disease and avoid delayed diagnosis. The aim of this article is to provide a review of the pathogenesis and various causes of acute small bowel ischemia and to demonstrate the contribution of CT in the diagnosis of this complex disease.

  9. Nutritional modulation of the inflammatory bowel response.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, Orestis; Varnalidis, Ioannis; Paraskevas, George; Botsios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis represent distinct phenotypic forms of inflammatory bowel disease and continue to be a common cause of morbidity. The corticosteroids and the immunomodulatory drugs, which are the basis of treatment for the inflammatory bowel diseases, do not assure always satisfactory outcomes. Nutrition has been used in order to modify the inflammatory response of various chronic inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases, the intestinal microflora and the intestinal mucosal disorders play a crucial role. Also, the release of reactive oxygen species is a significant factor of initiation and preservation of the inflammatory reaction in these diseases. The advantages of the nutritional treatment derive from the sequestration of intraluminal agents which may promote the inflammatory bowel response or, alternatively, nutrition is able to modify the immune response, reducing the uncontrolled inflammatory reaction. Furthermore, nutrition can enhance the mucosal barrier function and consists a significant source of antioxidants. This review focuses on certain nutritional components that modulate the inflammatory response of the bowel and aims to present a rational thesis regarding the use of nutritional agents in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

  10. Outcomes of Bowel Resection in Patients with Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven D; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    There is limited data regarding outcomes of bowel resection in patients with Crohn's disease. We sought to investigate complications of such patients after bowel resection. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample databases were used to examine the clinical data of Crohn's patients who underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to investigate outcomes of such patients. We sampled a total of 443,950 patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. Of these, 20.5 per cent had bowel resection. Among patients who had bowel resection, 51 per cent had small bowel Crohn's disease, 19.4 per cent had large bowel Crohn's disease, and 29.6 per cent had both large and small bowel Crohn's disease. Patients with large bowel disease had higher mortality risk compared with small bowel disease [1.8% vs 1%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 2.42, P < 0.01]. Risks of postoperative renal failure (AOR: 1.56, P < 0.01) and respiratory failure (AOR: 1.77, P < 0.01) were higher in colonic disease compared with small bowel disease but postoperative enteric fistula was significantly higher in patients with small bowel Crohn's disease (AOR: 1.90, P < 0.01). Of the patients admitted with the diagnosis of Crohn's disease, 20.5 per cent underwent bowel resection during 2002 to 2012. Although colonic disease has a higher mortality risk, small bowel disease has a higher risk of postoperative fistula.

  11. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  12. Bowel, Urinary, and Sexual Problems Among Long-Term Prostate Cancer Survivors: A Population-Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Mols, Floortje Korfage, Ida J.; Vingerhoets, Ad J.J.M.; Kil, Paul J.M.; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain insight into the long-term (5- to 10-year) effects of prostate cancer and treatment on bowel, urinary, and sexual function, we performed a population-based study. Prostate-specific function was compared with an age-matched normative population without prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Through the population-based Eindhoven Cancer Registry, we selected all men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 1994 and 1998 in the southern Netherlands. In total, 964 patients, alive in November 2004, received questionnaire; 780 (81%) responded. Results: Urinary problems were most common after a prostatectomy; bowel problems were most common after radiotherapy. Compared with an age-matched normative population both urinary and bowel functioning and bother were significantly worse among survivors. Urinary incontinence was reported by 23-48% of survivors compared with 4% of the normative population. Bowel leakage occurred in 5-14% of patients compared with 2% of norms. Erection problems occurred in 40-74% of patients compared with 18% of norms. Conclusions: These results form an important contribution to the limited information available on prostate-specific problems in the growing group of long-term prostate cancer survivors. Bowel, urinary, and sexual problems occur more often among long-term survivors compared with a reference group and cannot be explained merely by age. Because these problems persist for many years, urologists should provide patients with adequate information before treatment. After treatment, there should be an appropriate focus on these problems.

  13. Effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating intestinal hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Long, Yanqin; Liu, Ying; Tong, Jingjing; Qian, Wei; Hou, Xiaohua

    2010-06-25

    Trimebutine maleate, which modulates the calcium and potassium channels, relieves abdominal pain in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. However, its effect on postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome is not clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of trimebutine maleate on modulating colonic hypercontractility in a mouse model of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome. Mice infected up to 8 weeks with T. spiralis underwent abdominal withdrawal reflex to colorectal distention to evaluate the visceral sensitivity at different time points. Tissues were examined for histopathology scores. Colonic longitudinal muscle strips were prepared in the organ bath under basal condition or to be stimulated by acetylcholine and potassium chloride, and consecutive concentrations of trimebutine maleate were added to the bath to record the strip responses. Significant inflammation was observed in the intestines of the mice infected 2 weeks, and it resolved in 8 weeks after infection. Visceral hyperalgesia and colonic muscle hypercontractility emerged after infection, and trimebutine maleate could effectively reduce the colonic hyperreactivity. Hypercontractility of the colonic muscle stimulated by acetylcholine and high K(+) could be inhibited by trimebutine maleate in solution with Ca(2+), but not in Ca(2+) free solution. Compared with 8-week postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome group, 2-week acute infected strips were much more sensitive to the stimulators and the drug trimebutine maleate. Trimebutine maleate was effective in reducing the colonic muscle hypercontractility of postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome mice. The findings may provide evidence for trimebutine maleate to treat postinfectious irritable bowel syndrome patients effectively.

  14. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yang, H; Rotter, J I

    2000-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that genetic factors are essential in providing the susceptibility to the majority of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease occurring in man. It is also clear that the genetic susceptibility to these diseases is complex, and that more than one gene may predispose (the concept of multilocus/oligogenic inheritance), and likely in different etiologic combinations (the concept of genetic heterogeneity). Paradigms are now available that should lead to the identification of a number of these predisposing genes. These paradigms include the candidate gene approach, systematic genome wide scans, and mouse human synteny. While genome wide scans are currently limited to multiplex family linkage studies, both candidate genes and mouse human synteny can be approached in either linkage or association paradigms. Eventually whole genome association studies will be available as well. Identification of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing genes should lead to their incorporation in studies of natural history, investigation of environmental risk factors, and especially utilization of genetic markers in clinical trials. This will allow us to identify the best therapy available for the individual patient based on their unique genetic constitution. With advances in molecular technology, the search for genes influencing traits and diseases with a complex genetic background, such as the inflammatory bowel diseases, has become a realistic task. Although exogenous or infectious agents may contribute to the pathogenesis or may trigger the onset of disease, and the immune system almost certainly mediates the tissue damage, it is clear from available data that genetic factors determine the susceptibility of a given individual to inflammatory bowel disease (reviewed below). Thus, genetic studies are essential for the delineation of the basic etiologies of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease and thus can aid in the development of radically

  15. MR imaging of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Masselli, Gabriele; Gualdi, Gianfranco

    2012-08-01

    Small-bowel radiology has undergone dramatic changes in the past 2 decades. Despite important recent advances in small-bowel endoscopy, radiologic imaging remains important for patients suspected of having or with established small-bowel disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques (computed tomography and magnetic resonance [MR] imaging), used to investigate both extraluminal abnormalities and intraluminal changes, have gradually replaced barium contrast examinations, which are, however, still used to examine early mucosal disease. MR imaging techniques clearly highlight endoluminal, mural and extramural enteric details and provide vascular and functional information, thereby enhancing the diagnostic value of these techniques in small-bowel diseases. Two MR imaging based techniques are currently utilized: MR enteroclysis and MR enterography. In enteroclysis, enteric contrast material is administered through a nasoenteric tube, whereas in enterography, large volumes of enteric contrast material are administered orally. MR enteroclysis ensures consistently better luminal distention than does MR enterography in both the jejunum and the ileum and more accurately depicts endoluminal abnormalities and early disease, particularly at the level of the jejunal loops. Moreover, MR enteroclysis provides a high level of accuracy in the diagnosis and exclusion of small-bowel inflammatory and neoplastic diseases and can be used for the first radiologic evaluation, while MR enterography may effectively be used to follow up both Crohn disease patients without jejunal disease and in pediatric patients where nasogastric intubation might be a problem. MR enteroclysis may also reveal subtle transition points or an obstruction in the lower small bowel, which may escape detection when more routine methods, including enterography, are used. MR imaging offers detailed morphologic information and functional data of small-bowel diseases and provides reliable evidence of normalcy, thereby

  16. Immunopathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Ardid, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a group of idiopathic, chronic and relapsing inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal tract. Familial and epidemiological studies have stressed the involvement of genetic factors and have also shown the critical role of environmental factors such as sanitation and hygiene in the development of IBD. However, the molecular mechanisms of intestinal inflammation in IBD have long remained unknown. In recent years, the study of susceptibility genes involved in the detection of bacterial components and in the regulation of the host immune response has shed light onto the potential role of intestinal pathogens and gut flora in IBD immunobiology. This review presents current knowledge on intestinal epithelial barrier alterations and on dysfunction of mucosal innate and acquired immune responses in IBD. The data support the etiological hypothesis which argues that pathogenic intestinal bacteria and/or infectious agents initiate and perpetuate the inflammation of the gut through disruption of tolerance towards the commensal microbiota in an individual with genetic vulnerability. PMID:21487504

  17. Inflammatory bowel disease and thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Zezos, Petros; Kouklakis, Georgios; Saibil, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have an increased risk of vascular complications. Thromboembolic complications, both venous and arterial, are serious extraintestinal manifestations complicating the course of IBD and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Patients with IBD are more prone to thromboembolic complications and IBD per se is a risk factor for thromboembolic disease. Data suggest that thrombosis is a specific feature of IBD that can be involved in both the occurrence of thromboembolic events and the pathogenesis of the disease. The exact etiology for this special association between IBD and thromboembolism is as yet unknown, but it is thought that multiple acquired and inherited factors are interacting and producing the increased tendency for thrombosis in the local intestinal microvasculature, as well as in the systemic circulation. Clinicians’ awareness of the risks, and their ability to promptly diagnose and manage tromboembolic complications are of vital importance. In this review we discuss how thromboembolic disease is related to IBD, specifically focusing on: (1) the epidemiology and clinical features of thromboembolic complications in IBD; (2) the pathophysiology of thrombosis in IBD; and (3) strategies for the prevention and management of thromboembolic complications in IBD patients. PMID:25320522

  18. Biomarkers of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hak; Lin, Eugenia; Pimentel, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has not been regarded as an organic disease, and the pathophysiology of IBS is heterogeneous. Currently, the diagnosis of IBS is based upon the Rome diagnostic criteria. The performance of these criteria is only modest in predicting IBS, and moreover their validation is lacking. Additionally, as functional symptoms are common in the general population, healthy controls or volunteers are difficult to define and there is currently no definition of “normal” in the Rome criteria. Due to the weaknesses of the current diagnostic criteria, patients and doctors expect new gold standard diagnostic tools. Various etiologic mechanisms result in potential biomarkers. The focus of this research has been to find non-invasive biomarkers from serum, breath gas, and fecal materials. Though biomarkers should be based on biological and pathogenic processes, most biomarkers for IBS have been developed to identify organic diseases and therefore eliminate IBS. To date, these types of biomarkers for IBS have been disappointing. The purposes of developing biomarkers include improvement of diagnosis, differentiation from other organic diseases, and discrimination of IBS subtypes. A true mechanistic biomarker would make it possible to rule in IBS, rather than to rule out other organic diseases. New serologic biomarkers for diarrhea-predominant IBS have been introduced based on the pathophysiologic findings from a rat model and validation in a large-scale clinical trial. Further investigations of abnormal organic findings from each subtype of IBS would enable the development of new, simple subtype-specific biomarkers. PMID:27817184

  19. [Parasitosis and irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ibarra, Catalina; Herrera, Valentina; Pérez de Arce, Edith; Gil, Luis Carlos; Madrid, Ana María; Valenzuela, Lucía; Beltrán, Caroll J

    2016-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract characterised by multi-factorial aetiology. In IBS physiopathology are involved diverse factors between them biological, psychosocial, and environmental components which affect the immune activation status of gut mucosa. Among these factors is recognized the intestinal parasitosis. Post-infection IBS (PI-IBS) is recognised as a subgroup of functional disorders whose symptoms onset appear after a symptomatic intestinal infection caused by microbial agents. There are few studies regarding of relationship between IBS and intestinal parasitosis in Chile. However, is has been well described a positive association between IBS and Blastocystis hominis infections, one of prevalent parasites in Chile. In other countries, is also described a relationship between IBS and amebiasis and giardiasis. Both, characterized by a common mode of transmission through water as well as contaminated food. Because the high prevalence of parasitosis in our country it is necessary to expand the association studies to clarify the strength of the parasites ethiology in IBS.

  20. Anemia in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Giannini, S; Martes, C

    2006-09-01

    Anemia is a frequent extraenteric complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis). A systematic review of the literature shows that the overall prevalence of anemia ranges from 8.8% to 73.7% but differs whether in a setting of Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. A disabling complication of IBD, anemia worsens the patient's general condition and quality of life, and increases hospitalization rates. Different factors, including vitamin B12 and folic acid deficiency, bone marrow suppression secondary to drug therapy, autoimmune hemolytic anemia and the coexistence of myelodysplastic syndromes are involved in the pathogenesis of anemia in IBD. The main types of anemia in IBD are iron deficiency anemia and anemia accompanying chronic diseases. Correct diagnostic definition of anemia is a fundamental step in guiding the choice of therapeutic options, since the co-presence of different pathogenetic factors may sometimes require a more complex treatment plan. A review of anemia in IBD, its pathogenetic features, epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy based on evidence from recent studies is the focus of this article.

  1. Irritable bowel syndrome in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Grubić, Petra; Jurcić, Dragan; Ebling, Barbara; Gmajnić, Rudika; Nikolić, Bojana; Pribić, Sanda; Bilić, Ante; Levak, Maja Tolusić

    2014-06-01

    There are three epidemiological studies of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) that were conducted in Croatia (in the area of Zagreb in 2002, Bjelovarsko-bilogorska County in 2008, and finally in Osjecko-baranjska County in 2011). The aim of this study is to analyze the anthropometric, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of IBS in Croatia comparing these three studies. The studies included a questionnaire based on Rome criteria. Study population matched the adult population of Croatia according last available census (1991, 2001 resp.). Studies showed a high prevalence of IBS and some common factors relevant for development of IBS were determined such as gender, body mass index and lower level of education. There is a need for further investigations in coastal Croatia applying a uniform questionnaire on anthropometric, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of IBS and Rome III criteria, diagnostic questionnaires and scoring algorithm for functional gastrointestinal disorders developed by Rome Foundation applicable in clinical practice and population studies, regarding the significant high prevalence of IBS in our country.

  2. Prostate cancer between prognosis and adequate/proper therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grozescu, T; Popa, F

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the indolent, non-invasive nature of most types of prostate cancer, as well as the simple fact that the disease seems more likely to be associated with age rather than with other factors (50% of men at the age of 50 and 80% at the age of 80 have it [1], with or without presenting any symptom), the big challenge of this clinical entity was to determine severity indicators (so far insufficient) to guide the physician towards an adequate attitude in the clinical setting. The risk of over-diagnosing and over-treating many prostate cancer cases (indicated by all the major European and American studies) is real and poses many question marks. The present paper was meant to deliver new research data and to reset the clinical approach in prostate cancer cases. PMID:28255369

  3. The cerebellopontine angle: does the translabyrinthine approach give adequate access?

    PubMed

    Fagan, P A; Sheehy, J P; Chang, P; Doust, B D; Coakley, D; Atlas, M D

    1998-05-01

    A long-standing but unfounded criticism of the translabyrinthine approach is the misperception that this approach does not give adequate access to the cerebellopontine angle. Because of what is perceived as limited visualization and operating space within the cerebellopontine angle, some surgeons still believe that the translabyrinthine approach is inappropriate for large acoustic tumors. In this study, the surgical access to the cerebellopontine angle by virtue of the translabyrinthine approach is measured and analyzed. The parameters are compared with those measured for the retrosigmoid approach. This series objectively confirms that the translabyrinthine approach offers the neurotologic surgeon a shorter operative depth to the tumor, via a similar-sized craniotomy. This permits superior visualization by virtue of a wider angle of surgical access. Such access is achieved with the merit of minimal cerebellar retraction.

  4. Barriers to adequate prenatal care utilization in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Nicola L; Brown, Carolyn; Nu’usolia, Ofeira; Ah-Ching, John; Muasau-Howard, Bethel; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the utilization of prenatal care in American Samoan women and to identify socio-demographic predictors of inadequate prenatal care utilization. Methods Using data from prenatal clinic records, women (n=692) were categorized according to the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index as having received adequate plus, adequate, intermediate or inadequate prenatal care during their pregnancy. Categorical socio-demographic predictors of the timing of initiation of prenatal care (week of gestation) and the adequacy of received services were identified using one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and independent samples t-tests. Results Between 2001 and 2008 85.4% of women received inadequate prenatal care. Parity (P=0.02), maternal unemployment (P=0.03), and both parents being unemployed (P=0.03) were negatively associated with the timing of prenatal care initation. Giving birth in 2007–2008, after a prenatal care incentive scheme had been introduced in the major hospital, was associated with earlier initiation of prenatal care (20.75 versus 25.12 weeks; P<0.01) and improved adequacy of received services (95.04% versus 83.8%; P=0.02). Conclusion The poor prenatal care utilization in American Samoa is a major concern. Improving healthcare accessibility will be key in encouraging women to attend prenatal care. The significant improvements in the adequacy of prenatal care seen in 2007–2008 suggest that the prenatal care incentive program implemented in 2006 may be a very positive step toward addressing issues of prenatal care utilization in this population. PMID:24045912

  5. Peripolesis followed by cytotoxicity in chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wilders, M M; Drexhage, H A; Kokjé, M; Verspaget, H W; Meuwissen, S G

    1984-01-01

    Antigen presenting veiled cells have recently been described in cell suspensions prepared from the gut wall of patients with chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD). The normal gut wall is virtually devoid of these cells. In this report we describe a phenomenon known as peripolesis studied by phase contrast cinematography. This is a process in which lymphocytes are seen to wander around larger target cells. These could be identified ultrastructurally as Ia positive veiled cells. In most cases peripolesis was followed by lysis of the target cell. Peripolesis was recorded in cell suspensions of three out of seven patients with ulcerative colitis and in three out of nine patients with Crohn's disease; furthermore peripolesis was observed in one out of two patients with non-classifiable CIBD. In four cell suspensions showing peripolesis, cell lysis could be recorded and was especially striking in ulcerative colitis. Peripolesis involving veiled cells was previously described in delayed hypersensitivity reactions. This study lends support to the concept that delayed allergic reactivity plays a part in chronic inflammatory bowel disease. The antigens involved are, however, completely unknown. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6380839

  6. [Chronic inflammatory bowel diseases and nutrition].

    PubMed

    Meier, R

    1996-01-01

    The etiology of inflammatory bowel disease is still unknown. Several potential mechanisms are discussed. The etiological and therapeutic importance of nutrition is controversial. Though changes in dietary habits and incidence of inflammatory bowel disease during the last century were in parallel, no specific nutritional factor has been isolated. No dietary prophylaxis of inflammatory bowel disease is yet known; all dietary therapies in inflammatory bowel disease aim to improve nutritional support and to diminish inflammation by bowel rest. Children and adolescents gain in weight and height. Total parenteral nutrition will not substantially reduce disease activity and operation rates. Total parenteral nutrition can only be recommended in ulcerative colitis patients with severe disease in the initial phase and in Crohn's patients with severe malnutrition and intestinal complications. Enteral nutrition support is less effective in ulcerative colitis than in Crohn's disease. Reported remission rates on enteral nutrition are 25% for ulcerative colitis and up to 80% for Crohn. However, in active Crohn's disease enteral nutrition is less effective than standard therapy with methylprednisolone and sulfasalizine. It is generally believed that nutrition therapy in combination with drugs is the best treatment modality. There is no evidence to support the importance of any combination of the formula diets such as elemental, oligopeptide, or polymeric formulations. Administration of formula diets by nasogastric tubes all show similar remission rates. Whether newer diets supplemented with arginine, glutamine, omega-3-fatty acids or short chain fatty acids increase remission rates is not known. Further studies in this field are warranted.

  7. Functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, W; Longstreth, G; Drossman, D; Heaton, K; Irvine, E; Muller-Lissner, S

    1999-01-01

    The Rome diagnostic criteria for the functional bowel disorders and functional abdominal pain are used widely in research and practice. A committee consensus approach, including criticism from multinational expert reviewers, was used to revise the diagnostic criteria and update diagnosis and treatment recommendations, based on research results. The terminology was clarified and the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations were revised. A functional bowel disorder (FBD) is diagnosed by characteristic symptoms for at least 12 weeks during the preceding 12 months in the absence of a structural or biochemical explanation. The irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal bloating, functional constipation, and functional diarrhea are distinguished by symptom-based diagnostic criteria. Unspecified FBD lacks criteria for the other FBDs. Diagnostic testing is individualized, depending on patient age, primary symptom characteristics, and other clinical and laboratory features. Functional abdominal pain (FAP) is defined as either the FAP syndrome, which requires at least six months of pain with poor relation to gut function and loss of daily activities, or unspecified FAP, which lacks criteria for the FAP syndrome. An organic cause for the pain must be excluded, but aspects of the patient's pain behavior are of primary importance. Treatment of the FBDs relies upon confident diagnosis, explanation, and reassurance. Diet alteration, drug treatment, and psychotherapy may be beneficial, depending on the symptoms and psychological features.


Keywords: functional bowel disorder; functional constipation; functional diarrhea; irritable bowel syndrome; functional abdominal pain; functional abdominal bloating; Rome II PMID:10457044

  8. Small-bowel resection for metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheneber, Ibrahim F.; Meterissian, Sarkis H.; Loutfi, Antoine; Watters, A. Kevin; Shibata, Henry R.

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine whether complete resection of small-bowel metastases from melanoma improves patient survival. Design A computer-aided chart review. Setting Hospitals associated with McGill University. Patients Twenty patients (17 men, 3 women), identified from 1524 patients with melanoma, who underwent surgery to the small bowel for metastases. Patient age and clinical presentation, tumour site and stage were recorded. Intervention Exploratory laparotomy with complete or partial resection of involved small bowel. Main Outcome Measures Operative morbidity, mortality and length of survival related to the extent of small-bowel resection. Results Eleven patients had complete resection, 8 patients had partial resection and 1 patient had a palliative bypass only. Long-term survival (ranging from 2 to 10 years) was 36% in those who had complete resection and 0% in those who had partial resection; operative morbidity and mortality were 20% and 15% respectively. Conclusion Complete resection of small-bowel metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma can result in long-term survival. PMID:8640618

  9. Genetics of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Dermot P B; Kugathasan, Subra; Cho, Judy H

    2015-10-01

    In this review, we provide an update on genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In addition, we summarize progress in defining the functional consequences of associated alleles for coding and noncoding genetic variation. In the small minority of loci where major association signals correspond to nonsynonymous variation, we summarize studies defining their functional effects and implications for therapeutic targeting. Importantly, the large majority of GWAS-associated loci involve noncoding variation, many of which modulate levels of gene expression. Recent expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established that the expression of most human genes is regulated by noncoding genetic variations. Significant advances in defining the epigenetic landscape have demonstrated that IBD GWAS signals are highly enriched within cell-specific active enhancer marks. Studies in European ancestry populations have dominated the landscape of IBD genetics studies, but increasingly, studies in Asian and African-American populations are being reported. Common variation accounts for only a modest fraction of the predicted heritability and the role of rare genetic variation of higher effects (ie, odds ratios markedly deviating from 1) is increasingly being identified through sequencing efforts. These sequencing studies have been particularly productive in more severe very early onset cases. A major challenge in IBD genetics will be harnessing the vast array of genetic discovery for clinical utility through emerging precision medical initiatives. In this article, we discuss the rapidly evolving area of direct-to-consumer genetic testing and the current utility of clinical exome sequencing, especially in very early onset, severe IBD cases. We summarize recent progress in the pharmacogenetics of IBD with respect to partitioning patient responses to anti-TNF and thiopurine therapies. Highly collaborative studies across research centers and

  10. Cannabis for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Naftali, Timna; Mechulam, Raphael; Lev, Lihi Bar; Konikoff, Fred M

    2014-01-01

    The marijuana plant Cannabis sativa has been used for centuries as a treatment for a variety of ailments. It contains over 60 different cannabinoid compounds. Studies have revealed that the endocannabinoid system is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids may, therefore, be beneficial in inflammatory disorders. In murine colitis, cannabinoids decrease histologic and microscopic inflammation. In humans, cannabis has been used to treat a plethora of gastrointestinal problems, including anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and diabetic gastroparesis. Despite anecdotal reports on medical cannabis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), there are few controlled studies. In an observational study in 30 patients with Crohn's disease (CD), we found that medical cannabis was associated with improvement in disease activity and reduction in the use of other medications. In a more recent placebo-controlled study in 21 chronic CD patients, we showed a decrease in the CD activity index >100 in 10 of 11 subjects on cannabis compared to 4 of 10 on placebo. Complete remission was achieved in 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group and 1 of 10 in the placebo group. Yet, in an additional study, low-dose cannabidiol did not have an effect on CD activity. In summary, evidence is gathering that manipulating the endocannabinoid system can have beneficial effects in IBD, but further research is required to declare cannabinoids a medicine. We need to establish the specific cannabinoids, as well as appropriate medical conditions, optimal dose, and mode of administration, to maximize the beneficial effects while avoiding any potential harmful effects of cannabinoid use.

  11. Small bowel endometriosis masquerading as regional enteritis.

    PubMed

    Minocha, A; Davis, M S; Wright, R A

    1994-05-01

    A 35-year-old female presented with recurrent right lower quadrant pain, nausea, and vomiting. She was afebrile with diffuse abdominal tenderness. Plain x-ray of abdomen revealed small bowel obstruction. A barium x-ray of the small bowel showed stricture of the terminal ileum. A CT scan of the abdomen showed a 6-cm mass in right lower quadrant. She was empirically managed as having Crohn's disease. She underwent laparotomy after failure of medical management with high-dose steroids. There was ulceration and narrowing of terminal ileum. Frozen sections revealed endometriosis. Ileocecectomy was performed. Histopathology of resected specimen confirmed the diagnosis of endometriosis, and there was no evidence of chronic inflammatory bowel disease or neoplasia. Ileal endometriosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of Crohn's disease in menstruating females presenting with perimenstrual symptoms.

  12. [Short bowel: from resection to transplantation].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio

    2014-09-17

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is characterized by a significant reduction in the effective intestinal surface by an anatomical or functional loss of the small intestine. It mainly occurs after extensive bowel resection, intestinal intrinsic disease or surgical bypass. The main complications are malabsorption, maldigestion, malnutrition, dehydratation and, potentially, lethal metabolic lesions. The treatment is based on appropiate, individualized nutritional support; however, the most recent outcomes on bowel transplantation (BT) and a great rate of survivors achieving complete digestive autonomy and able to carry out activities according to their age allow for considering BT as the first choice therapy in patients with irreversible intestinal failure in whom poor prognosis with parenteral nutrition is foreseen. In this paper the most outstanding aspects of SBS are revised.

  13. Laparoscopic Management of Adhesive Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Konjic, Ferid; Idrizovic, Enes; Hasukic, Ismar; Jahic, Alen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Adhesions are the reason for bowel obstruction in 80% of the cases. In well selected patients the adhesive ileus laparoscopic treatment has multiple advantages which include the shorter hospitalization period, earlier food taking, and less postoperative morbidity rate. Case report: Here we have a patient in the age of 35 hospitalized at the clinic due to occlusive symptoms. Two years before an opened appendectomy had been performed on him. He underwent the treatment of exploration laparoscopy and laparoscopic adhesiolysis. Dilated small bowel loops connected with the anterior abdominal wall in the ileocecal region by adhesions were found intraoperatively and then resected harmonically with scalpel. One strangulation around which a small bowel loop was wrapped around was found and dissected. Postoperative course was normal. PMID:27041815

  14. Delayed puberty associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, Anne B; Savage, Martin O; Sanderson, Ian R

    2003-02-01

    Delayed puberty frequently complicates the clinical course of young patients with inflammatory bowel disease, more often in Crohn's disease than ulcerative colitis. Undernutrition has been thought to be the main reason for delayed puberty in these patients. However, puberty may be delayed despite a normal nutritional status. Observations in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and in rats with experimental colitis suggest that inflammatory mediators may have a direct adverse influence, independent of undernutrition, on the onset and progression of puberty. Serum androgens are consistently reported to be reduced in patients with delayed puberty and inflammatory bowel disease. This reduction is not necessarily secondary to a reduction in gonadotrophins as serum concentrations of gonadotrophins have been reported to be normal or even increased in some studies. Management of delayed puberty involves calorie supplements to correct undernutrition and treatment of inflammation. Observations in boys with delayed puberty and controlled studies in experimental models of intestinal inflammation suggest that testosterone therapy can accelerate puberty.

  15. Cytoprotective agents in experimental small bowel volvulus.

    PubMed

    Goldman, C D; Rudloff, M A; Ternberg, J L

    1987-03-01

    An accepted experimental model for midgut volvulus was used to produce small bowel strangulation obstruction of 48 hours duration in Sprague-Dawley rats. A 93% perioperative mortality rate resulted after release of the volvulus. Treatment with three cytoprotective agents at the time of volvulus release resulted in the following mortality rates: superoxide dismutase, 89%; ibuprofen, 50%; prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 11%. The predominant cause of death in all treatment groups was bowel infarction, with a smaller number succumbing to either sepsis or circulatory collapse. Concomitant administration of ephedrine or indomethacin to suppress prostaglandin E1's splanchnic vasodilatory activity did not cause any increase in mortality. A trial of aspirin, to simulate PGE's antiplatelet actions, showed no reduction in mortality when compared with detorsion alone. Prostaglandin E1 and, to a lesser extent, ibuprofen, appear to have cytoprotective effects during reperfusion of bowel compromised by volvulus, independent of their influence on the mesenteric vasculature and thrombogenesis.

  16. Systemic Crisis of Civilization: In Search for Adequate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozin, Grigori

    In December 1972 a jumbo jet crashed in the Florida Everglades with the loss of 101 lives. The pilot, distracted by a minor malfunction, failed to note until too late the warning signal that - correctly - indicated an impending disaster. His sudden, astonished cry of Hey, what happening here? were his last words 1. Three decades after this tragic episode, as the Humankind approaches the threshold of the third Millennium, the problem of adequate reaction to warning signals of different nature and of distinguishing minor malfunctions in everyday life of society, in economy and technology as well as in evolution of biosphere from grave threats to the world community and the phenomenon of life on our planet remains crucial to human survival and the future of Civilization. Rational use of knowledge and technology available to the world community remains in this context the corner stone of discussions on the destiny of the intelligent life both on the planet Earth and in the Universe (the fact of intelligent life in the Universe is to be detected by the Humankind)…

  17. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  18. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  19. Multidetector CT Findings of Bowel Transection in Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun Suk; Hong, Hye-Suk; Park, Mee Hyun; Ha, Hong Il; Yang, Ik; Lee, Yul; Jung, Ah Young; Hwang, Ji-Young

    2013-01-01

    Objective Though a number of CT findings of bowel and mesenteric injuries in blunt abdominal trauma are described in literature, no studies on the specific CT signs of a transected bowel have been published. In the present study we describe the incidence and new CT signs of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma. Materials and Methods We investigated the incidence of bowel transection in 513 patients admitted for blunt abdominal trauma who underwent multidetector CT (MDCT). The MDCT findings of 8 patients with a surgically proven complete bowel transection were assessed retrospectively. We report novel CT signs that are unique for transection, such as complete cutoff sign (transection of bowel loop), Janus sign (abnormal dual bowel wall enhancement, both increased and decreased), and fecal spillage. Results The incidence of bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma was 1.56%. In eight cases of bowel transection, percentage of CT signs unique for bowel transection were as follows: complete cutoff in 8 (100%), Janus sign in 6 (100%, excluding duodenal injury), and fecal spillage in 2 (25%). The combination of complete cutoff and Janus sign were highly specific findings in patients with bowel transection. Conclusion Complete cut off and Janus sign are the unique CT findings to help detect bowel transection in blunt abdominal trauma and recognition of these findings enables an accurate and prompt diagnosis for emergency laparotomy leading to reduced mortality and morbidity. PMID:23901318

  20. Fecal biomarkers in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Robert N; Leach, Steven T; Lemberg, Daniel A; Duvoisin, Gilles; Gearry, Richard B; Day, Andrew S

    2017-03-01

    Over the last two decades, knowledge on fecal biomarkers has substantially increased. Nowadays, these non-invasive markers of inflammation have significant clinical utility in the management of inflammatory bowel disease. Their use informs the decision to perform endoscopy before diagnosis is made right through to influencing therapeutic choices and the need for interval endoscopic assessment. In this review, the roles of two S100 proteins, calprotectin, and S100A12 are described along with that of lactoferrin, in the context of inflammatory bowel disease.

  1. The Gut Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Sheehan, Donal; Shanahan, Fergus

    2017-03-01

    Genes, bacteria, and immunity contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. Most genetic risk relates to defective sensing of microbes and their metabolites or defective regulation of the host response to the microbiota. Because the composition of the microbiota shapes the developing immune system and is determined in early life, the prospect of therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota in adulthood after the onset of disease is questionable. However, the microbiota may be a marker of risk and a modifier of disease activity and a contributor to extraintestinal manifestations and associations in some patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

  2. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sunkara, Tagore; Etienne, Denzil; Caughey, Megan E.; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-01-01

    While an uncommon occurrence, it is possible for patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis to develop colonic ileus, obstruction, or perforation. By extension, it is also possible to develop a small bowel obstruction following an episode of acute pancreatitis. Here, we present the case of a 44-year-old male, who after repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis, came to the emergency department with continuous, non-bloody vomiting. This patient also complained of both left upper quadrant and epigastric pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction involving the proximal jejunum. PMID:28270876

  3. Small Bowel Obstruction Secondary to Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Tagore; Etienne, Denzil; Caughey, Megan E; Gaduputi, Vinaya

    2017-02-01

    While an uncommon occurrence, it is possible for patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis to develop colonic ileus, obstruction, or perforation. By extension, it is also possible to develop a small bowel obstruction following an episode of acute pancreatitis. Here, we present the case of a 44-year-old male, who after repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis, came to the emergency department with continuous, non-bloody vomiting. This patient also complained of both left upper quadrant and epigastric pain, and was subsequently diagnosed with a small bowel obstruction involving the proximal jejunum.

  4. Inferior Vena Cava Repair Using Serosal Patch of Small Bowel: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hodjati, Hossein; Hoseinzadeh, Ahmad; Mousavi, Seyed Masoud; Dehghani Nazhavi, Seifollah; Kumar, Viginda; Sehhatpour, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and results of using serosal patch of small bowel for repair and replacement of inferior vena cava (IVC) after resection of a part of infra-renal IVC in an animal model, as it may be encountered in extensive tumors of retroperitoneal and trauma patients. Methods: Five healthy sheep of both sexes were prepared. After general anesthesia and laparotomy, a defect with 1 cm width and 4cm length was made on anterior aspect of infra-renal IVC, and then an adjacent loop of small bowel was brought and sutured continuously to cover the defect of IVC as a patch graft. The observation period was two months. Results: Three of five IVCs were macroscopically patent without stenosis and thrombosis. Pathologic assay revealed complete endothelialization of serosal surface of the patch of small bowel loop. One of IVCs was completely occluded in gross evaluation and fibrous formation in pathologist review. The sheep had no sign of venous hypertension and edema of limbs. One sheep died at the night of first operation due to internal bleeding.   Conclusion: Serosal patch of small bowel is an accessible and feasible alternative in repair and reconstruction of IVC especially when there is restriction for use of prosthetic material in a contaminated space of abdomen. PMID:28246620

  5. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  6. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  7. Are Vancomycin Trough Concentrations Adequate for Optimal Dosing?

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Gilmer; Jones, Brenda; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Drusano, George L.; Rodvold, Keith A.; Lodise, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The current vancomycin therapeutic guidelines recommend the use of only trough concentrations to manage the dosing of adults with Staphylococcus aureus infections. Both vancomycin efficacy and toxicity are likely to be related to the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). We assembled richly sampled vancomycin pharmacokinetic data from three studies comprising 47 adults with various levels of renal function. With Pmetrics, the nonparametric population modeling package for R, we compared AUCs estimated from models derived from trough-only and peak-trough depleted versions of the full data set and characterized the relationship between the vancomycin trough concentration and AUC. The trough-only and peak-trough depleted data sets underestimated the true AUCs compared to the full model by a mean (95% confidence interval) of 23% (11 to 33%; P = 0.0001) and 14% (7 to 19%; P < 0.0001), respectively. In contrast, using the full model as a Bayesian prior with trough-only data allowed 97% (93 to 102%; P = 0.23) accurate AUC estimation. On the basis of 5,000 profiles simulated from the full model, among adults with normal renal function and a therapeutic AUC of ≥400 mg · h/liter for an organism for which the vancomycin MIC is 1 mg/liter, approximately 60% are expected to have a trough concentration below the suggested minimum target of 15 mg/liter for serious infections, which could result in needlessly increased doses and a risk of toxicity. Our data indicate that adjustment of vancomycin doses on the basis of trough concentrations without a Bayesian tool results in poor achievement of maximally safe and effective drug exposures in plasma and that many adults can have an adequate vancomycin AUC with a trough concentration of <15 mg/liter. PMID:24165176

  8. Is clinical measurement of anatomic axis of the femur adequate?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2017-03-23

    Background and purpose - The accuracy of using clinical measurement from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the knee to determine an anatomic axis of the femur has rarely been studied. A radiographic technique with a full-length standing scanogram (FLSS) was used to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement. Patients and methods - 100 consecutive young adult patients (mean age 34 (20-40) years) with chronic unilateral lower extremity injuries were studied. The pelvis and intact contralateral lower extremity images in the FLSS were selected for study. The angles between the tibial axis and the femoral shaft anatomic axis (S-AA), the piriformis anatomic axis (P-AA), the clinical anatomic axis (C-AA), and the mechanical axis (MA) were compared between sexes. Results - Only the S-AA and C-AA angles were statistically significantly different in the 100 patients (3.6° vs. 2.8°; p = 0.03). There was a strong correlation between S-AA, P-AA, and C-AA angles (r > 0.9). The average intersecting angle between MA and S-AA in the femur in the 100 patients was 5.5°, and it was 4.8° between MA and C-AA. Interpretation - Clinical measurement of an anatomic axis from the ASIS to the center of the knee may be an adequate and acceptable method to determine lower extremity alignment. The optimal inlet for antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing may be the lateral edge of the piriformis fossa.

  9. The Bowel Book Levitt Michael The Bowel Book 120 pp Oxford University Press 9780198508588 0198508581.

    PubMed

    2002-05-01

    This book is, as it claims, 'frank and entertaining' without being derogatory to people with bowel conditions. The author has great understanding of each condition and shows real empathy towards patients.

  10. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  11. Small bowel review: normal physiology part 1.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A B; Keelan, M; Thiesen, A; Clandinin, M T; Ropeleski, M; Wild, G E

    2001-12-01

    In the past year there have been many advances in the area of small bowel physiology and pathology and therapy. In preparation for this review, over 1500 papers were assessed. The focus is on presenting clinically useful information for the practising gastroenterologist. Selected important clinical learning points include the following: (1) glucose absorption mediated by SGLT1 is controlled by mRNA abundance, as well as by posttranscriptional processes including protein trafficking; (2) inducers of cytochrome P-450 decrease glucose and fructose absorption and increase glucose consumption in the intestine; (3) the regulated release of nutrients from the stomach into the upper intestine ensures that the modest intestinal transport reserve capacity is not exceeded; (4) hepatocyte growth factor and short-chain fatty acids may enhance intestinal adaptation and prevent the atrophy seen when total parenteral nutrition is infused; (5) inhibitors of pancreatic lipase and phospholipase H2 may be useful clinically to reduce absorption as part of a treatment program for obesity and hyperlipidemia; (6) several membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins have been identified in the enterocyte as well as in the hepatocyte and may be the target for the future therapeutic manipulation of bile acid metabolism and control of hyperlipidemia; (7) suspect bile acid malabsorption in the patient with otherwise unexplained chronic diarrhea; (8) a proportion of lipid absorption is protein-mediated, and this opens the way to targeting these proteins and thereby therapeutically modifying lipid absorption; (9) a high protein diet may be useful to increase the intestinal absorption of drugs transported by the H+/dipeptide cotransporter; (10) a metal transporter DCT1 has been identified, and this may open the way to a better understanding of disorders of, for example, iron and zinc metabolism; (11) the nutrient transporters such as SGLT1 are responsible for a portion of the intestinal absorption of

  12. Phytobezoar: a rare cause of small bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Pujar K, Anupama; Pai A, Sreekar; Hiremath V, Bharati

    2013-10-01

    Phytobezoar is an unusual cause of small bowel obstruction. It accounts for about 0.4%-4% of all mechanical bowel obstruction. However, the symptoms are not very different from those caused by usual aetiologies of small bowel obstruction. The commonest site of obstruction is terminal ileum. Treatment of small bowel obstruction due to Phytobezoar is surgery. Prevention includes avoidance of high fibre diet, prokinetics particularly in patients who have undergone gastric surgery. A 57-year-old male presented with symptoms and signs of small bowel obstruction. On exploratory laparotomy Phytobezoar in the ileum was found to be the cause of obstruction. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology.

  13. Bowel Ischemia from Heat Stroke: A Rare Presentation of an Uncommon Complication

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anuj; Syed, Wajihuddin; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    A healthy 27-year-old female presented to the hospital after she collapsed an hour into her first marathon run on a hot humid day. On presentation, she was hyperthermic, encephalopathic, tachycardic, and hypotensive. On admission, she was found to have lactic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, and acute kidney injury and was treated with cold normal saline and cooling blankets. She subsequently started having abdominal pain and bloody bowel movements. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed ascending colon thickening. Furthermore, her lab findings showed transaminitis and elevated coagulation parameters. Due to the acute hypotensive state from the heat stroke, patient had developed bowel ischemia, ischemic hepatitis, and disseminated intravascular coagulation, all of which are uncommon complications of heat stroke. She was managed aggressively with intravenous fluid hydration with resolution of her symptoms over the course of 4 days. In addition to the uncommon complications, early presentation of this bowel ischemia despite adequate hydration in such a healthy individual is another unique aspect of the case. PMID:27840645

  14. How Prepared is Prepared Enough?

    PubMed

    Porter-Levy; Macleod; Rickert

    1996-10-01

    A 17-year-old female was in the final stage in treatment of right unilateral cleft lip and palate. She had undergone a number of previous surgeries. Hearing and speech were good on evaluation, and her social and family situation were deemed excellent. After preparatory orthodontics she underwent a Lefort I maxillary advancement. Surgery was successful and she was admitted into postoperative recovery. However, the lack of adequate preoperative preparation caused traumatic reaction from the patient and her parents: anxiety over appearance, crying, refusal of oral fluids and oral care, refusal of analgesia, and refusal to mobilize. The patience and persistence of hospital staff slowly overcame all adversities and the patient moved on to full and successful recovery, but this case prompted changes in preoperative procedures and involvement of patients and their families in postoperative meal selection, planing, and preparation.

  15. Knotted bowel: small-bowel obstruction from coiled peritoneal shunt catheters. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Sanan, A; Haines, S J; Nyberg, S L; Leonard, A S

    1995-06-01

    Knotting of a peritoneal catheter around a loop of bowel is a rare occurrence, which may lead to bowel obstruction. The incomplete removal of two ventriculoperitoneal shunts resulted in two cases of iatrogenically knotted peritoneal catheters. One patient underwent a laparotomy for relief of obstruction and the other was successfully treated by uncoiling the catheter by means of a wire passed into its lumen. A plan for management of a knotted peritoneal catheter is outlined.

  16. Teachers' self-assessed level of preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Susan

    2013-03-01

    We asked high school physics teachers to assess their level of preparation across a number of domains. Almost all (98%) reported feeling adequately or well prepared in terms of their basic physics knowledge. The chart presents teachers' responses to their self-assessed level of preparation in six different areas. Almost all feel at least adequately prepared with respect to their science knowledge in other areas and the applications of physics to everyday experience. However, only two-thirds feel adequately or well prepared in recent developments in physics.

  17. Genetic epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Makker, Jasbir; Chilimuri, Sridhar; Bella, Jonathan N

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by presence of abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits. It has three main subtypes - constipation predominant IBS (C-IBS), diarrhea predominant IBS (D-IBS) and IBS with mixed features of both diarrhea as well as constipation (M-IBS). Its pathophysiology and underlying mechanisms remain elusive. It is traditionally believed that IBS is a result of multiple factors including hypersensitivity of the bowel, altered bowel motility, inflammation and stress. Initial studies have shown familial aggregation of IBS suggesting shared genetic or environmental factors. Twin studies of IBS from different parts of world have shown higher concordance rates among monozygotic twins than dizygotic twins, and thus suggesting a genetic component to this disorder. Multiple studies have tried to link single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to IBS but there is little evidence that these SNPs are functional. Various molecules have been studied and investigated by the researchers. Serotonin, a known neurotransmitter and a local hormone in the enteric nervous system, has been most extensively explored. At this time, the underlying gene pathways, genes and functional variants linked with IBS remain unknown and the promise of genetically-determined risk prediction and personalize medicine remain unfulfilled. However, molecular biological technologies continue to evolve rapidly and genetic investigations offer much promise in the intervention, treatment and prevention of IBS. PMID:26525775

  18. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Misunderstood Psychophysiological Affliction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Rosemarie Scolaro

    1986-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is benign, chronic, gastrointestinal disorder that affects much of the general population. Misunderstanding and lack of patient education often result in increased anxiety and physical distress. Counselors can be instrumental in recognizing the condition in afflicted clients and providing emotional support and stress…

  19. Cognitive Therapy for Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Barbara; Blanchard, Edward B.

    1994-01-01

    Randomly assigned 20 patients with irritable bowel syndrome to intensive, individualized cognitive therapy or to daily gastrointestinal symptom monitoring. Pre- to posttreatment evaluations showed significantly greater gastrointestinal symptom reduction for those receiving cognitive therapy than for those in symptom monitoring. At posttreatment,…

  20. New pharmaceuticals in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Łodyga, Michał; Eder, Piotr; Bartnik, Witold; Gonciarz, Maciej; Kłopocka, Maria; Linke, Krzysztof; Małecka-Panas, Ewa; Radwan, Piotr; Rydzewska, Grażyna

    2015-01-01

    This paper complements the previously published Guidelines of the Working Group of the Polish Society of Gastroenterology and former National Consultant in Gastroenterology regarding the management of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Attention was focused on the new pharmaceutical recently registered for inflammatory bowel disease treatment.

  1. Managing irritable bowel syndrome in primary care.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Maura; Whorwell, Peter J

    2015-06-01

    The classic symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are abdominal pain, bloating and some form of bowel dysfunction. The pain is typically colicky in nature and can occur at any site although most commonly it is on the left side. The abdomen feels flat in the morning and then gradually becomes more bloated as the day progresses reaching a peak by late afternoon or evening. It then subsides again over night. Traditionally IBS is divided into diarrhoea, constipation or alternating subtypes. IBS patients frequently complain of one or more non-colonic symptoms, these include constant lethargy, low backache, nausea, bladder symptoms suggestive of an irritable bladder, chest pain and dyspareunia in women. The traditional view that IBS is a largely psychological condition is no longer tenable. Rectal bleeding, a family history of malignancy and a short history in IBS should always be treated with suspicion. Both pain and bowel dysfunction are often made worse by eating. It is recommended that a coeliac screening test is undertaken to rule out this condition. Other routine tests should include inflammatory markers such as CRP or ESR. Calprotectin is a marker for leukocytes in the stools and detects gastrointestinal inflammation. A negative test almost certainly rules out inflammatory bowel disease, especially in conjunction with a normal CRP. Fermentable carbohydrates can have a detrimental effect on IBS and this has led to the introduction of the low FODMAP diet.

  2. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Burakoff, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease are prevalent in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The most common manifestations involve the musculoskeletal and dermatologic systems. Other manifestations involve the hepatopan-creatobiliary system (eg, primary sclerosing cholangitis) as well as the ocular, renal, and pulmonary systems. A multidisciplinary team approach is often needed for effective management, and emergency situations require prompt evaluation. PMID:21857821

  3. Microbiota biodiversity in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota plays a significant role in human health and energy balance, and provides protection against disease states. An altered balance between microbiota and its host (dysbiosis) would appear to contribute to the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease (CD) and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). CD and UC are chronic inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tes. PMID:24684926

  4. Adult Bochdalek hernia with bowel incarceration.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yeh-Huang; Chien, Yu-Hon; Yan, Sheng-Lei; Chen, Ming-Feng

    2008-10-01

    Bochdalek hernias are rare in adults. We report 2 cases of Bochdalek hernia with bowel obstruction. The first case was a 74-year-old male patient who suffered from abdominal pain and chest tightness for 1 day. Chest radiography indicated a mass-like lesion above the left diaphragm. The pain could not be relieved by nasogastric tube decompression for 12 hours. We arranged computed tomography, which revealed a dilated bowel above the diaphragm and intestinal obstruction with gangrenous change. The patient received emergency laparotomy, and a Bochdalek hernia was detected during the operation. The second case was a 75-year-old female patient who suffered from chest tightness and dyspnea for about 1 week. Chest X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging revealed herniation of small and large bowels at the right posterior aspect of the thoracic cavity. She received transthoracic repair of diaphragmatic hernia, recovered, and was discharged 15 days later. We recommend that adult Bochdalek hernia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bowel obstruction.

  5. Anatomy and Physiology of the Small Bowel.

    PubMed

    Volk, Neil; Lacy, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Comprehension of small intestine physiology and function provides a framework for the understanding of several important disease pathways of the gastrointestinal system. This article reviews the development, anatomy and histology of the small bowel in addition to physiology and digestion of key nutrients.

  6. Genetic epidemiology of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makker, Jasbir; Chilimuri, Sridhar; Bella, Jonathan N

    2015-10-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by presence of abdominal pain or discomfort associated with altered bowel habits. It has three main subtypes - constipation predominant IBS (C-IBS), diarrhea predominant IBS (D-IBS) and IBS with mixed features of both diarrhea as well as constipation (M-IBS). Its pathophysiology and underlying mechanisms remain elusive. It is traditionally believed that IBS is a result of multiple factors including hypersensitivity of the bowel, altered bowel motility, inflammation and stress. Initial studies have shown familial aggregation of IBS suggesting shared genetic or environmental factors. Twin studies of IBS from different parts of world have shown higher concordance rates among monozygotic twins than dizygotic twins, and thus suggesting a genetic component to this disorder. Multiple studies have tried to link single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to IBS but there is little evidence that these SNPs are functional. Various molecules have been studied and investigated by the researchers. Serotonin, a known neurotransmitter and a local hormone in the enteric nervous system, has been most extensively explored. At this time, the underlying gene pathways, genes and functional variants linked with IBS remain unknown and the promise of genetically-determined risk prediction and personalize medicine remain unfulfilled. However, molecular biological technologies continue to evolve rapidly and genetic investigations offer much promise in the intervention, treatment and prevention of IBS.

  7. Proteomics and chronic inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Felley-Bosco, Emanuela; André, Muriel

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are relatively frequent in developed countries. Physiopathological events involved in the etiology of IBDs include activation of immune, mesenchymal and epithelial cells. This review gives an overview of the currently applied proteomics technologies. It describes metabolic changes and goes into the approaches using this methodology to understand the molecular mechanisms implicated in the development of the disease.

  8. [OBTURATIVE BOWEL OBSTRUCTION CAUSED BY GALLSTONES].

    PubMed

    Khasanov, A G; Nurtdinov, M A; Ibraev, A V

    2015-01-01

    The article discussed the results of surgical treatment of obturative bowel obstruction caused by gallstones. An analysis of results was made in two groups of patients. Ultrasonic tomography and laparoscopic diagnostics were used in the main group. An application of modem methods of diagnostics allowed reducing of lethality rate.

  9. Oral contrast agents for small bowel MRI: comparison of different additives to optimize bowel distension.

    PubMed

    Ajaj, Waleed; Goehde, Susanne C; Schneemann, Hubert; Ruehm, Stefan G; Debatin, Jörg F; Lauenstein, Thomas C

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two osmotic carbohydrate sugar alcohols (mannitol 2.5% and sorbitol 2.5%, 2.0%, and 1.5% watery solutions) in combination with 0.2% locust bean gum (LBG) for small bowel distension for MR imaging. Small bowel distension was quantified on coronal 2D TrueFISP images by measuring the diameters of 16 small bowel loops in each of 12 healthy subjects (age range 31-55 years). Additionally, the grade of small bowel distension was rated qualitatively. Patient acceptance concerning nausea, vomiting, flatulence, and diarrhea was noted for each solution, and all results were compared by a Wilcoxon test or t test, respectively. The ingestion of water combined with LBG and either 2.5% mannitol or 2.0% sorbitol showed the best distension of the small bowel. The lowest side effect rate was observed following ingestion of sorbitol in a concentration of 2.0 and 1.5%. Based on these data, we recommend a combination of LBG and 2% sorbitol use for optimal bowel distension and minimal side effects resulting in enhanced patient acceptance.

  10. The role of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome without constipation.

    PubMed

    Schey, Ron; Rao, Satish S C

    2011-08-01

    Alterations in gut flora may play an important role in the pathophysiology of bowel symptoms, especially in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). If so, antibiotics that affect gut flora may offer a novel approach for the management of patients with IBS. Here, we discuss the results of two identically designed, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials (TARGET 1 and TARGET 2) of a poorly absorbed antibiotic, rifaximin, in patients with IBS. In these studies, 1260 patients (females 76.1 and 72.1%, respectively) who had IBS without constipation were randomized to receive either rifaximin 550 mg or placebo, three-times daily for 2 weeks. Subsequently, daily symptoms were assessed and patients were followed up for 10 weeks. The primary outcome measure - adequate relief of global IBS symptoms during the first 4 weeks after treatment - was met in significantly more patients who received rifaximin than placebo (p < 0.001). In addition, more patients in the rifaximin group than in the placebo group (p < 0.001) reported an adequate relief of bloating, and an improvement in abdominal pain and stool consistency - secondary outcome measures. The incidence of adverse events with rifaximin was similar to placebo, and the drug was well tolerated. In summary, a 2-week course of rifaximin provided significant relief of IBS symptoms, as well as bloating and abdominal pain.

  11. Fecal microbiota transplantation in inflammatory bowel disease: beyond the excitement.

    PubMed

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Bibbò, Stefano; Scaldaferri, Franco; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to perform a systematic review of the literature on the use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).There is an increasing interest of both physicians and patients in assessing the possible role of the FMT in the treatment of IBD.Electronic and manual bibliographic searches were performed to identify original reports in which subjects with IBD were treated with FMT. Because of the scarcity of studies with adequate sample size, case series and case reports were also considered. A critical appraisal of the clinical research evidence on the effectiveness, safety, and other parameters related to FMT was made. Data extraction was independently performed by 2 reviewers.We found a total of 31 publications on the use of FMT in IBD. The majority were case reports or case series, whereas 8 publications reported data from open-label trials including a very less number of patients. A total of 133 patients with IBD were managed with FMT. Of these, 57 subjects (43%) had a Clostridium difficile infection. A resolution or reduction of symptoms was reported in 80 of 113 (71%) patients with evaluable IBD. Moreover, FMT does not seem to provide the same safety profile showed for non-IBD individuals with C difficile infection.The available evidence is limited and weak. FMT has the potential to be somehow of help in managing patients with IBD, but considerable further efforts are necessary to make this procedure a valid option for these subjects.

  12. Emerging Significance of NLRs in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Beckley K.; Philipson, Casandra; Hontecillas, Raquel; Eden, Kristin; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Allen, Irving C.

    2015-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors are essential mediators of host defense and inflammation in the gastrointestinal system. Recent data have revealed that toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat-containing proteins (NLRs) function to maintain homeostasis between the host microbiome and mucosal immunity. The NLR proteins are a diverse class of cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptors. In humans, only about half of the identified NLRs have been adequately characterized. The majority of well-characterized NLRs participate in the formation of a multiprotein complex, termed the inflammasome, which is responsible for the maturation of interleukin-1β and interleukin-18. However, recent observations have also uncovered the presence of a novel subgroup of NLRs that function as positive or negative regulators of inflammation through modulating critical signaling pathways, including NF-κB. Dysregulation of specific NLRs from both proinflammatory and inhibitory subgroups have been associated with the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in genetically susceptible human populations. Our own preliminary retrospective data mining efforts have identified a diverse range of NLRs that are significantly altered at the messenger RNA level in colons from patients with IBD. Likewise, studies using genetically modified mouse strains have revealed that multiple NLR family members have the potential to dramatically modulate the immune response during IBD. Targeting NLR signaling represents a promising and novel therapeutic strategy. However, significant effort is necessary to translate the current understanding of NLR biology into effective therapies. PMID:25153506

  13. Neuroimmunomodulation in the Gut: Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal immunity is finely regulated by several concomitant and overlapping mechanisms, in order to efficiently sense external stimuli and mount an adequate response of either tolerance or defense. In this context, a complex interplay between immune and nonimmune cells is responsible for the maintenance of normal homeostasis. However, in certain conditions, the disruption of such an intricate network may result in intestinal inflammation, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors acting in concert with an inappropriate immune response, which in turn interacts with nonimmune cells, including nervous system components. Currently, evidence shows that the interaction between the immune and the nervous system is bidirectional and plays a critical role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Recently, the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis has been shown to be under the reciprocal control of the microbiota by immune mechanisms, whereas intestinal microorganisms can modulate mucosal immunity. Therefore, in addition to presenting the mechanisms underlying the interaction between immune and nervous systems in the gut, here we discuss the role of the microbiota also in the regulation of neuroimmune crosstalk involved in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation, with potential implications to IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27471349

  14. Linking Vitamin D Deficiency to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Matthew T.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is associated with industrialization, and its incidence has increased markedly over time. The prospect of reversing these trends motivates the search for the agent(s) involved. Modernity entails several physical and behavioral modifications that compromise both the photosynthesis of cholecalciferol in the skin, and of its bioavailability. Although deficiency in this “vitamin” has therefore emerged as a leading candidate, and despite the publication of a randomized control trial that showed a trend towards statistically significant benefit in Crohn’s disease, its causal agency has yet to be demonstrated by an adequately powered study. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the case being made by epidemiologists, geneticists, clinicians and basic researchers, and consolidate their findings into a model that provides mechanistic plausibility to the claim. Specifically, converging data sets suggest that local activation of vitamin D coordinates the activity of the innate and adaptive arms of immunity, and of the intestinal epithelium, in a manner that promotes barrier integrity, facilitates the clearance of translocated flora and diverts CD4 T cell development away from inflammatory phenotypes. Since smoking is an important risk-altering exposure, we also discuss its newly established melanizing effect, as well as other emerging evidence linking tobacco use to immune function through vitamin D pathways. PMID:23591600

  15. Diagnosis and management of osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Reinshagen, M; Von Tirpitz, C

    2004-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a frequent finding in patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The prevalence of vertebral fractures in those patients with significantly reduced bone mineral density is up to 22%. Factors contributing to osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients are treatment with glucocorticoids, increased cytokine production by the inflammation itself, malabsorption and possibly hypogonadism. Therefore, consequent treatment of the underlying IBD and minimising therapy with systemic glucocorticoids, as well as the adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D, may be very important measures to prevent bone loss in IBD. In patients with osteoporosis associated with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, various treatment strategies, such as sodium fluoride and aminobisphosphonates, are discussed. Unfortunately, interventional studies in secondary osteoporosis are often limited by the small study population. The efficacy in prevention of vertebral fractures is not proven in any of the described treatment modalities in these patients. Therefore, guidelines are based on data using bone density as the most accepted surrogate marker and treatment guidelines are based on data from patients with postmenopausal and steroid-induced osteoporosis.

  16. Prolonged ambulant recordings of small bowel motility demonstrate abnormalities in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kellow, J E; Gill, R C; Wingate, D L

    1990-05-01

    Continuous 72-h recordings of duodenojejunal contractile activity were obtained from 20 freely ambulant subjects; pressure was detected by two strain-gauge sensors incorporated in a transnasal catheter attached to an encoder and a miniature tape recorder. The subjects were 12 patients with irritable bowel syndrome, 6 of whom were constipation predominant and 6 of whom were diarrhea predominant, and 8 healthy controls. The procedure was well tolerated by all subjects and did not interfere with sleep or normal activity. In all subjects, the diurnal migrating motor complex cycle was characterized by a brief phase 1 and a prolonged phase 2; this was reversed during sleep when phase 2 was virtually absent. All subjects showed a circadian variation in migrating motor complex propagation velocity, and there was no difference in the patterns of motor activity during sleep between any of the groups. During the day, the duration of postprandial motor activity was shorter in irritable bowel syndrome patients than in controls, and diurnal migrating motor complex intervals were shorter in diarrhea-predominant than in constipation-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. In 11 of 12 inflammatory bowel syndrome patients, episodes of clustered contractions recurring at 0.9-min intervals were noted; these episodes had a mean duration of 46 min and were often associated with transient abdominal pain and discomfort. In both groups of irritable bowel syndrome patients, defecation was significantly (p less than 0.01) prolonged with a greater number of voluntary abdominal contractions (p less than 0.01) than in controls. Prolonged ambulant monitoring of proximal bowel motor activity in subjects who are free to move, eat, and sleep as they choose has, for the first time, clearly defined the striking difference in motility between the sleeping and waking state and shown that abnormalities associated with irritable bowel syndrome are confined to the latter.

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome; update on pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Quigley, Eamonn M M; Craig, Orla F

    2012-08-01

    The description of the de novo development of irritable bowel syndrome following an episode of bacterial gastroenteritis (pos-infectious irritable bowel syndrome) illustrated the potential for a luminal factor (a bacterial pathogen) to cause this common gastrointestinal ailment. As a consequence of these and other observations, as well as results of experiments involving animal models, the enteric flora and the immune response that it generates in the host have, somewhat surprisingly, come centre-stage in irritable bowel syndrome research, given their potential to induce the pathophysiological changes that are associated with irritable bowel syndrome. While evidence for immune dysfunction both in the mucosa and systemically continues to accumulate, methodological limitations have hampered a full delineation of the nature of the microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome. The latter is eagerly awaited and may yet provide a firm rationale for the use of certain probiotics and antibiotics in irritable bowel syndrome, whose benefits have now been described with some consistency. Despite its prevalence, there is a striking lack of effective therapeutic options for irritable bowel syndrome. While there is reason for optimism in the management of irritable bowel syndrome with several promising new agents currently undergoing clinical trials, confirmation of the efficacy and safety of these agents in wider patient populations is awaited. A clearer understanding of the physiopathologic mechanisms underlying irritable bowel syndrome, as well as of interrelationships between irritable bowel syndrome and other gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal disorders, will likely be required before effective drug therapies can be found.

  18. Oral distension methods for small bowel MRI: comparison of different agents to optimize bowel distension.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stefan A; Baumann, Julia A; Stanescu-Siegmund, Nora; Froehlich, Eckhart; Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus S

    2016-12-01

    Background Different methods for bowel distension prior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were described in recent years. Purpose To compare orally administered psyllium or locust bean gum / mannitol (LBM) with tylose administered through a duodenal catheter for bowel distension in patients undergoing MRI examination of the small bowel. Material and Methods Three different methods of bowel distension prior to MRI were compared: tylose applied through a duodenal catheter and orally administered psyllium and LBM in three groups with 15 patients each. Datasets were blinded and reviewed independently by two experienced radiologists, who assessed the diagnostic value and the maximum luminal diameter. Results Tylose was superior to psyllium and LBM in the examination of the duodenum and proximal jejunum. LBM was superior to the other methods for distension of the ileum and terminal ileum. The greatest luminal diameter of the duodenum was achieved after tylose and distension of the terminal ileum was the best in patients receiving LBM. The psyllium group was inferior to the other two groups in all segments. Conclusion By using LBM as an oral method of bowel distension, many patients can avoid the unpleasant placement of a duodenal catheter without compromising the diagnostic value of the examination.

  19. Surgical strategies in paediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, Colin T; Smith, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises two distinct but related chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions affecting different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Crohn’s disease is characterised by a patchy transmural inflammation affecting both small and large bowel segments with several distinct phenotypic presentations. Ulcerative colitis classically presents as mucosal inflammation of the rectosigmoid (distal colitis), variably extending in a contiguous manner more proximally through the colon but not beyond the caecum (pancolitis). This article highlights aspects of the presentation, diagnosis, and management of IBD that have relevance for paediatric practice with particular emphasis on surgical considerations. Since 25% of IBD cases present in childhood or teenage years, the unique considerations and challenges of paediatric management should be widely appreciated. Conversely, we argue that the organizational separation of the paediatric and adult healthcare worlds has often resulted in late adoption of new approaches particularly in paediatric surgical practice. PMID:26034347

  20. [SHORT BOWEL SYNDROME AND NUTRITIONAL ENTERAL].

    PubMed

    Ariadel Cobo, Diana; Pereira Cunill, José Luis; Socas Macías, María; Serrano Aguayo, Pilar; Gómez Liébana, Eulalia; Morales Conde, Salvador; García Luna, Pedro Pablo

    2015-12-01

    The particularity of this case is the nutritional management that has managed to avoid the use of prolonged parenteral nutrition and possible complications by placing jejunal tube at the distal end in patients with short bowel. It is a 34-year-old colecistectomizado complicated with postoperative peritonitis and dehiscence; two years he studied with small bowel obstruction, he was made de-volvulus and was complicated with two leak at different times after the second escape took place jejunostomy side double barreled shotgun level dehiscence, presented high debits by afferent loop of the terminal jejunostomy; during admission, polyurethane probe enteral feeding was inserted by the efferent loop jejunostomy. He received jejunal tube feeding laundry in the efferent loop terminal with decreased weight gain and subsequent reconstruction of intestinal transit debit proximal jejunostomy.

  1. Important cutaneous manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Trost, L; McDonnell, J

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has many extraintestinal manifestations. Cutaneous manifestations are usually related to the activity of the bowel disease but may have an independent course. Anyone presenting with IBD should be examined for cutaneous manifestations. Pyoderma gangrenosum is a severe painful ulcerating disease that requires moist wound management and, in the absence of secondary infection, systemic corticosteroids, cyclosporine, or both. Infliximab may also be used. Erythema nodosum is a common cause of tender red nodules of the shins. Management includes leg elevation, NSAIDs, and potassium iodide. Oral manifestations of IBD include aphthous stomatitis, mucosal nodularity (cobblestoning), and pyostomatitis vegetans. Treatment should be directed both at the cutaneous lesions and at the underlying systemic condition. PMID:16143688

  2. Small bowel obstruction attributable to phytobezoar

    PubMed Central

    Razavianzadeh, Nasrin; Foroutan, Behzad; Honarvar, Farhad; Forozeshfard, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a common condition encountered in surgical practice. Literature shows divers and many different etiologies for intestinal obstruction. However, bezoars are rarely reported as an etiological factor. A bezoar happens most commonly in patients with impaired gastrointestinal motility. There are four types of bezoars: phytobezoars, trichobezoars, pharmacobezoars and lactobezoars. The most common type is phytobezoars, which are composed of undigested fiber from vegetables or fruits especially persimmons. They are mostly composed of cellulose, tannin and lignin. The commonest phytobezoar reported worldwide is related to the persimmon fruit ingestion. The most common symptom of bezoar-induced SBO is abdominal pain (96–100%). Other common symptoms include nausea and vomiting. Primary small bowel phytobezoars almost always present as SBO. We present an unusual case of SBO caused by a phytobezoar in a 35-year-old patient. Many types of bezoar can be removed endoscopically, but some will require operative intervention. PMID:28031856

  3. [Nutritional therapy in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Piquet, Marie-Astrid; Gloro, Romain; Justum, Anne-Marie; Reimund, Jean-Marie

    2006-02-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition and specific nutrient deficiencies are common in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), more particularly in Crohn's disease. In adults, the use of artificial nutrition is indicated in the event of malnutrition, short bowel syndrome, or IBD refractory to all other treatments. In children, enteral nutrition has a place as first-line treatment to avoid side effects of corticosteroids on growth. The use, as a therapeutic tool, of specific nutrients (n-3 fatty acids, glutamine, antioxydant vitamins and minerals, TGF-beta, probiotics...) seems interesting at the pathophysiological level. Nevertheless, these nutrients are still under evaluation and there are not enough available studies to recommend them in clinical routine. A very promising solution is the use of probiotics for the treatment of refractory pouchitis.

  4. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  5. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  6. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  7. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  8. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  9. Bowel injury associated with pelvic radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    François, Agnès; Milliat, Fabien; Vozenin-Brotons, Marie-Catherine

    2005-02-01

    Radiation therapists have to deal with the difficulty to give an efficient radiation dose to the tumor without generating unacceptable normal tissue injury. Acute reactions are experienced in most of the patients and are characterized by diarrhea resulting from intestinal mucosal injury. In some cases, intestinal wall fibrosis may develop, with hazard of occlusion syndrome. The only therapeutic recourse consists of surgical resection of the injured bowel.

  10. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  11. Abdominal apoplexy resulting in small bowel obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Le, Don; Guileyardo, Joseph; Casanova, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal apoplexy is a rare hemorrhagic condition involving the small arteries or veins within the abdominal cavity. A high degree of clinical suspicion, followed by appropriate diagnostic workup and therapeutic intervention, is critical, as nonoperative mortality approaches 100%. Contrary to most previously reported cases, which were associated with hemoperitoneum, we present a patient in which gastroduodenal artery dissection resulted in an organized retroperitoneal hematoma with local compression of the duodenum and subsequent bowel obstruction, resulting in vomiting, aspiration, and death. PMID:27695177

  12. Current management of the short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jon S; Weseman, Rebecca; Rochling, Fedja A; Mercer, David F

    2011-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a challenging clinical problem that benefits from a multidisciplinary approach. Much progress has recently been made in all aspects of management. Medical intestinal rehabilitation should be the initial treatment focus, and several new potential pharmacologic agents are being investigated. Surgical rehabilitation using nontransplant procedures in selected patients may further improve intestinal function. Intestinal lengthening procedures are particularly promising. Intestinal transplantation has increasingly been used with improving success in patients with life-threatening complications of intestinal failure.

  13. Gas Embolic Stroke Secondary to Bowel Infarction.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Dhruv; Leyon, Joe Joseph; Chavda, Swarupsinh

    2016-01-01

    A 69-year-old gentleman with metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma presented with acute abdominal pain to the emergency medicine department and subsequently developed an acute left hemiplegia while in the resuscitation unit. An unenhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the head showed right frontal cerebral gas emboli while an unenhanced CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed extensive portal venous gas and pneumatosis intestinalis, presumed secondary to bowel infarction.

  14. How Patients View Probiotics: Findings from a Multicenter Study of Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, MaryBeth; Brinich, Margaret A.; Geller, Gail; Harrison, Krista; Highland, Janelle; James, Katherine; Marshall, Patricia; McCormick, Jennifer B.; Tilburt, Jon; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Farrell, Ruth M.; Sharp, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have access to a growing number of probiotic products marketed to improve digestive health. It is unclear how patients make decisions about probiotics and what role they expect their gastroenterologists to play as they consider using probiotics. Understanding patients’ knowledge, attitudes and expectations of probiotics may help gastroenterologists engage patients in collaborative discussions about probiotics. Study Focus groups were conducted with patients with IBD and IBS at the Cleveland Clinic, Mayo Clinic and Johns Hopkins University. Inductive analytic methods were utilized to identify common themes and draw interpretations from focus group narratives. Results One hundred thirty-six patients participated in 22 focus groups between March and August 2009. Patients viewed probiotics as an appealing alternative to pharmaceutical drugs and understood probiotics as a more “natural,” low-risk therapeutic option. Many patients were hesitant to use them without consulting their gastroenterologists. Patients would weigh the risks and benefits of probiotics, their disease severity and satisfaction with current treatments when considering probiotic use. Conclusions Patients are interested in probiotics but have many unanswered questions about their use. Our findings suggest that patients with IBD and IBS will look to gastroenterologists and other clinicians as trustworthy advisors regarding the utility of probiotics as an alternative or supplement to pharmaceutical drugs. Gastroenterologists and other clinicians who care for patients with these diseases should be prepared to discuss the potential benefits and risks of probiotics and assist patients in making informed decisions about their use. PMID:21716123

  15. Pharmacological nutrition in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Campos, F G; Waitzberg, D L; Teixeira, M G; Mucerino, D R; Kiss, D R; Habr-Gama, A

    2003-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases--ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease--are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with a high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission of disease in adults and promoting growth in children. Recent research has focused on the use of specific nutrients as primary treatment agents. Although some reports have indicated that glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants and immunonutrition with omega-3 fatty acids are an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, the beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these nutrients still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  16. Primary malignant tumors of the small bowel.

    PubMed

    Mittal, V K; Bodzin, J H

    1980-09-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the small bowel are uncommon and are often diagnosed at an advanced stage. A 10 year survey (1967 to 1977) of the clinical records at one hospital revealed 39 cases of primary malignant tumors of the small bowel. The most common symptoms were abdominal pain (89.7 percent) and weight loss (77 percent). Six patients presented with complications of enterovesical fistula, bleeding and perforation. Preoperative diagnosis was suspected in 27 cases (69.2 percent). Adenocarcinoma was the most common tumor, followed by carcinoid tumor, lymphoma, leiomyosarcoma and melanoma. The treatment of choice was surgical resection whenever possible. Curative resection was attempted in 25 cases. Adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy was used in four patients with lymphoma. Twenty-seven patients (69.2 percent) are alive from 1 to 6 years after diagnosis and treatment. The 5 year survival rate is 35 percent. Earlier diagnosis is essential if the prognosis for patients with small bowel malignancy is to be improved.

  17. Decision Making in Bowel Obstruction: A Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Over the last century there have not been significant changes in the anatomical location of obstruction. The age of presentation has increased along with age related co-morbidity. Management has consequently been challenging as risks keep on increasing with advanced age. Hence, clear decision making has become essential in its management. A selective review of the literature pertaining to common age related aetiologies, diagnosis methods leading to standard decision making and treatment of acute intestinal obstruction was done. The same is obtained from randomized controlled studies, meta-analysis and other related evidence based publications. Predicting the conservative or operative management of Bowel Obstruction (BO) is difficult. BO in young age, in unscarred abdomen and Large Bowel Obstruction (LBO) needs early surgery. Decision on surgery should be taken in paediatric patient by second day and preferably between 3-5 days of admission in adults. Higher American Society of Anaesthesiologists (ASA) grade correlates well with the mortalities. In this article, the timing of surgery, methods to avoid bowel resection and type of surgery in various causes are stressfully analysed and discussed. PMID:28050445

  18. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased surgical morbidity in this high-risk population. However, to reduce the physical trauma of surgery, technologic advances and worldwide experience with minimally invasive surgery have allowed laparoscopic management of patients to become standard of care, with significant short- and long-term patient benefits compared with the open approach. In this review, we will describe the current state-of the-art for minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease and the caveats inherent with this practice in this complex patient population. Also, we will review the applicability of current and future trends in minimally invasive surgical technique, such as laparoscopic “incisionless,” single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), robotic-assisted, and other techniques for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease. There can be no doubt that minimally invasive surgery has been proven to decrease the short- and long-term burden of surgery of these chronic illnesses and represents high-value care for both patient and society. PMID:25989341

  19. Therapeutic Modulation of Gut Microbiota in Functional Bowel Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Jong Kyoung; Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kang, Eun Hee; Park, Kyung Sik; Min, Yang Won; Hong, Kyoung Sup

    2017-01-01

    Functional bowel disorders (FBDs) are functional gastrointestinal disorders with symptoms attributable to the middle or lower gastrointestinal tract. These include irritable bowel syndrome, functional bloating, functional constipation, functional diarrhea, and unspecified FBD. Increasing evidence has emerged of late that intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of FBDs. In this review, the therapeutic benefits and future perspectives of the currently available strategies for modifying the gut microbiota in FBDs are described, focusing primarily on irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation. PMID:28049862

  20. Therapeutic Modulation of Gut Microbiota in Functional Bowel Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo Jeong; Choi, Jong Kyoung; Ryu, Han Seung; Choi, Chang Hwan; Kang, Eun Hee; Park, Kyung Sik; Min, Yang Won; Hong, Kyoung Sup

    2017-01-30

    Functional bowel disorders (FBDs) are functional gastrointestinal disorders with symptoms attributable to the middle or lower gastrointestinal tract. These include irritable bowel syndrome, functional bloating, functional constipation, functional diarrhea, and unspecified FBD. Increasing evidence has emerged of late that intestinal microbiota is involved in the pathogenesis of FBDs. In this review, the therapeutic benefits and future perspectives of the currently available strategies for modifying the gut microbiota in FBDs are described, focusing primarily on irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation.

  1. From IBS to DBS: The Dysbiotic Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benno, Peter; Dahlgren, Atti-La; Befrits, Ragnar; Norin, Elisabeth; Hellström, Per M; Midtvedt, Tore

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of organic disease. We present 2 cases where diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome occurred in association with earlier intestinal infection or antibiotic treatment. Both were successfully treated with instillation of an anaerobic cultivated human intestinal microbiota. Thereafter, they were symptom free for at least 12 months. We now introduce the term dysbiotic bowel syndrome covering cases where a disturbed intestinal microbiota is assumed to be present. We recommend that restoration of the dysbiotic gut microbiota should be first-line treatment in these conditions.

  2. Harbinger of plague: a bad case of gay bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Scarce, M

    1997-01-01

    In 1976, a group of physicians in private proctologic practice in New York City coined the illness "Gay Bowel Syndrome" in reference to a constellation of gay male anorectal disorders. Through analysis of biomedical discourse and popular media, it is apparent that Gay Bowel Syndrome is an essentialized category of difference that is neither gay-specific, confined to the bowel, nor a syndrome. The use and diagnosis of Gay Bowel Syndrome must be abandoned before it further lends itself to the formation of social policies and governing practices that seek to force gay male bodies into positions of social, cultural, and political subordination.

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome: modern concepts and management options.

    PubMed

    Sayuk, Gregory S; Gyawali, C Prakash

    2015-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder, manifesting as abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel function. Despite affecting as many as 20% of adults, a lack of understanding of etiopathogenesis and evaluation strategies results in diagnostic uncertainty, and in turn frustration of both the physician and the patient. This review summarizes the current literature on the diagnosis and management of irritable bowel syndrome, with attention to evidence-based approaches. A 4-step treatment strategy that has been used successfully in our tertiary referral practice is presented and should lead to successful therapeutic outcomes in the majority of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  4. Serial transverse enteroplasty for short bowel syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heung Bae; Lee, Patricia W; Garza, Jennifer; Duggan, Christopher; Fauza, Dario; Jaksic, Tom

    2003-06-01

    The patient is a 2-year-old boy born with gastroschisis and midgut volvulus that left him dependent on total parenteral nutrition (TPN). At 11 months of age, a Bianchi procedure was performed increasing the total length of bowel from 72 cm to 130 cm. Although he appeared to have sufficient bowel length, he continued to have malabsorption and could only tolerate 10% of his caloric requirement enterally. A barium study found significant dilatation of the lengthened small bowel. At 23 months, we performed a novel bowel lengthening procedure that we have reported previously in an animal model. The serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) operation increased the 83 cm of dilated and previously lengthened bowel to 147 cm, making the total small bowel length 200 cm. The patient tolerated the procedure well and began to have semisolid bowel movements. Small intestinal absorptive capacity measured by D-xylose absorption showed a substantial increase from 5 to 12 mg/dL (normal range, >20), implying improved but not completely normal small bowel function. This case shows that the STEP procedure increases intestinal length, can be used after a prior Bianchi, and may result in improved intestinal absorptive capacity. The STEP procedure should be considered a surgical option for children with short bowel syndrome.

  5. Prevention of mother to child transmission lay counsellors: Are they adequately trained?

    PubMed

    Thurling, Catherine H; Harris, Candice

    2012-06-05

    South Africa's high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected women requires a comprehensive health care approach to pregnancy because of the added risk of their HIV status. As a result of the shortage of health care workers in South Africa, lay counsellors play important roles in the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). There is no standardization of training of lay counsellors in South Africa, and training varies in length depending on the training organisation. The study aimed to investigate the training of lay counsellors by analysing their training curricula and interviewing lay counsellors about their perceptions of their training. A two phase research method was applied. Phase one documented an analysis of the training curricula. Phase two was semi-structured interviews with the participants. Purposive sampling was undertaken for this study. The total sample size was 13 people, with a final sample of 9 participants, determined at the point of data saturation. The research was qualitative, descriptive and contextual in design. The curricula analysed had different styles of delivery, and the approaches to learning and courses varied, resulting in inconsistent training outcomes. A need for supervision and mentorship in the working environment was also noted. The training of lay counsellors needs to be adapted to meet the extended roles that they are playing in PMTCT. The standardization of training programmes, and the incorporation of a system of mentorship in the work environment, would ensure that the lay counsellors are adequately prepared for their role in PMTCT.

  6. Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas exhibit gastric differentiation.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Emma; Liu, Xiuli; Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2014-02-01

    Primary small bowel adenocarcinoma is rare. Although generally similar to colonic adenocarcinoma, some small bowel adenocarcinomas exhibit unique morphologic features, particularly those arising in association with Crohn disease. In this study, 15 sporadic small bowel adenocarcinomas and 11 Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas were examined for histology and immunohistochemical profile including cytokeratins (CK) 7 and 20, intestinal markers CDX2 and MUC2, and gastric epithelial markers MUC5AC and MUC6. We found that Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas frequently resemble gastric tubular adenocarcinoma histologically. In addition, when compared to sporadic small bowel adenocarcinoma, the former expressed MUC5AC and MUC6 with much higher frequency (82% vs. 7% and 73% vs. 0%, respectively). Ten of 11 Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinomas (91%) were positive for at least one gastric-type marker (MUC5AC or MUC6). Expression of CK7 was also more frequent in Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma (73% versus 27%) while expression of CK20 was less frequent (64% vs. 100%). There was no difference between sporadic and Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma in expression of CDX2 (100% vs. 91%) and MUC2 (93% vs. 73%). These observations suggest that there is a difference in the morphologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of sporadic versus Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma, particularly in their expression of gastric-type mucin. The findings also suggest that gastric differentiation in Crohn enteritis-associated small bowel adenocarcinoma is related to gastric metaplasia, a common phenomenon in Crohn disease.

  7. Subtypes of irritable bowel syndrome based on abdominal pain/discomfort severity and bowel pattern

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has traditionally been classified by stooling pattern (e.g., diarrhea-predominant). However, other patterns of symptoms have long been recognized, e.g., pain severity. Our objective was to examine the utility of subtyping women with IBS based on pain/discomfort severit...

  8. Symptomatology of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease during the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Shishira; Barber, Matthew D.; Graff, Lesley A.; Shen, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Gender-related physiological variations in gastrointestinal (GI) symptomatology have been observed in women of reproductive age. Many women experience cyclical changes in GI symptomatology during their menstrual cycle, particularly alteration in their bowel habits. Physiological studies of healthy women during the menstrual cycle showed a prolonged GI transit time during the luteal phase, either in the oro-cecum route or in the colon. Worsened GI symptoms, such as abdominal pain, bloating or diarrhea are observed in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) during menses. This may be due to elevated prostaglandin levels during menses, with an enhanced perception of viscera-somatic stimuli resulting in nausea, abdominal distension and pain. Also patients with IBS or IBD demonstrate a cyclical pattern more closely related to their bowel habits than healthy controls. Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) also have exacerbated symptoms during menses; however, it is unclear whether this relates to physiological variation or disease exacerbation in IBS or IBD. Studies examining the association of the menstrual cycle and GI symptomatology in patients with IBS or IBD, have not yet clarified the underlying mechanisms. Moreover medications—such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and oral contraceptive pills used for dysmenorrhea and menstrual migraine in those patients have not well been controlled for in the previous studies, which can contribute to further bias. Understanding changes in GI symptomatology during the menstrual cycle may help to determine the true extent of disease exacerbation and proper management strategy. PMID:25788484

  9. Inflammatory bowel diseases: principles of nutritional therapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Waitzberg, Dan L; Teixeira, Magaly Gemio; Mucerino, Donato Roberto; Habr-Gama, Angelita; Kiss, Desidério R

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease- are chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases of unknown etiology. Decreased oral intake, malabsorption, accelerated nutrient losses, increased requirements, and drug-nutrient interactions cause nutritional and functional deficiencies that require proper correction by nutritional therapy. The goals of the different forms of nutritional therapy are to correct nutritional disturbances and to modulate inflammatory response, thus influencing disease activity. Total parenteral nutrition has been used to correct and to prevent nutritional disturbances and to promote bowel rest during active disease, mainly in cases of digestive fistulae with high output. Its use should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Enteral nutrition is effective in inducing clinical remission in adults and promoting growth in children. Due to its low complication rate and lower costs, enteral nutrition should be preferred over total parenteral nutrition whenever possible. Both present equal effectiveness in primary therapy for remission of active Crohn's disease. Nutritional intervention may improve outcome in certain individuals; however, because of the costs and complications of such therapy, careful selection is warranted, especially in patients presumed to need total parenteral nutrition. Recent research has focused on the use of nutrients as primary treatment agents. Immunonutrition is an important therapeutic alternative in the management of inflammatory bowel diseases, modulating the inflammation and changing the eicosanoid synthesis profile. However, beneficial reported effects have yet to be translated into the clinical practice. The real efficacy of these and other nutrients (glutamine, short-chain fatty acids, antioxidants) still need further evaluation through prospective and randomized trials.

  10. Childhood Sexual Abuse and Psychosomatic Symptoms in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Colin A.

    2005-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by chronic gastrointestinal symptoms without a demonstrable physical cause. In a subgroup of patients, irritable bowel syndrome may be part of a cluster of psychosomatic symptoms related to childhood sexual abuse. To investigate this possibility, the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule (DDIS), the…

  11. Urinary proteome analysis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptom subgroups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain associated with alterations in bowel function. Given the heterogeneity of the symptoms, multiple pathophysiologic factors are suspected to play a role. We classified women with IBS i...

  12. CT enteroclysis in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kołodziej, Marian; Annabhani, Abdulhabib; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: The role of CT enteroclysis is gaining on importance in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. The aim of the study was to present own experiences in CT enteroclysis application, with the use of a 64-detector CT unit. Material/Methods: CT enteroclyses were performed in 60 patients: 53 with the suspicion of the Crohn’s disease, 2 suspected for carcinoid, 1 with suspicion of the fistula between the small bowel and the bladder, 2 suspected for the tumor of the ileo-caecal region, and in 1 case, the aim of examination was to carry out an evaluation of the postsurgical state of the bowel-bowel anastomosis. We used own endoscopic technique of catheter insertion into the bowel, which shortens the examination time and improves patient’s comfort. Results: The catheter was correctly introduced into the small bowel in 58 patients (endoscopy had to be repeated in 4 cases). Only 2 examinations failed, because patients refused repeated endoscopy. Radiological signs of the Crohn’s disease were found in 50 out of 53 patients. In the 3 remaining patients, the appearance of the small bowel was normal. In 5 non-Crohn’s disease patients, CT enteroclysis enabled a good visualization of the pathology (tumors, fistula). Conclusions: CT enteroclysis with the use of the 64-detector CT unit is a valuable method in the diagnostics of small bowel diseases. It could supplement or precede capsule endoscopy. PMID:22802779

  13. [Malabsorption is a leading clinical sign of small bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Parfenov, A I; Krums, L M

    The paper presents a variety of clinical manifestations of malabsorption syndrome (MAS) in celiac disease, collagenous sprue, Whipple's disease, Crohn's disease, intestinal lymphangiectasia, amyloidosis, common variable immune deficiency, and treatment of short bowel syndrome. It shows the specific features of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of MAS in small bowel diseases.

  14. An unusual case of small bowel obstruction post caesarean section

    PubMed Central

    Marchocki, Z; Brennan, DJ; Mak, C; O’Riordan, M; Greene, RA

    2011-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction (SBO) is a very rare complication post-caesarean section (CS). Herniation of small bowel through the rectus muscle with an intact sheath is extremely rare. We present a case of SBO after an uncomplicated c-section and an uneventful early postoperative course. PMID:24972397

  15. The dilated bowel: a liability and an asset.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A; Morabito, A

    2009-11-01

    The gastrointestinal tract responds to significant mechanical or functional obstruction by dilatation and hypertrophy of the segment proximal to the obstruction. Excessive dilatation compromises motility, and absorption and is associated with considerable morbidity (intraluminal stasis, sepsis) such that bowel dilatation represents a major liability that predisposes the patient to intestinal failure. The dilated bowel proximal to an obstruction provides valuable autologous material for reconstruction with "tissue appropriate to the part." Bowel elongation and dilatation are integral to the natural intestinal adaptation response to loss of small bowel and can also be induced through a structured "Bowel Expansion" program. The additional absorptive tissue that is progressively generated is essential for reconstruction of the bowel (tailoring and lengthening), to restore gastrointestinal dynamics (effective propulsion and absorption), and to reduce morbidity (intraluminal stasis, sepsis). In enhancing the prospects for enteral autonomy, dilatation and elongation of the residual autologous bowel are crucial to long-term survival and good quality life, and represent a most welcome asset. This paper reviews the impact and management of bowel dilatation along the gastrointestinal tract.

  16. Gut Microbiota in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier plays an important role in maintaining a delicate immune homeostasis. The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is considered to involve a defective mucosal immunity along with a genetic predisposition. Recent views have suggested an excessive response to components of the gut microbiota in IBD. A condition of "dysbiosis", with alterations of the gut microbial composition, has been observed in patients with IBD. In this article, the author review recent studies of gut microbiota in IBD, particularly the importance of the gut microbiota in the pathogenesis of pediatric IBD. PMID:24010101

  17. Pancreatic disorders in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Filippo; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Angelelli, Lucia; Macarri, Giampiero

    2016-01-01

    An increased incidence of pancreatic disorders either acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis has been recorded in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) compared to the general population. Although most of the pancreatitis in patients with IBD seem to be related to biliary lithiasis or drug induced, in some cases pancreatitis were defined as idiopathic, suggesting a direct pancreatic damage in IBD. Pancreatitis and IBD may have similar presentation therefore a pancreatic disease could not be recognized in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. This review will discuss the most common pancreatic diseases seen in patients with IBD. PMID:27574565

  18. Oxidative stress and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Almenier, Hazem A; Al Menshawy, Hazem H; Maher, Maha M; Al Gamal, Salah

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. The exact cause of IBD remains undetermined, the condition appears to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. While many gaps in our knowledge still exist, the last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented progress not only in the etiology ; but mainly in the mechanisms underlying the chronic inflammatory response, immunologic and genetic aspects. We review some recent points of research in pathogenesis with special stress on oxidative stress and its correlations with disease activity.

  19. Acute bowel ischemia after heart operations.

    PubMed

    Lorusso, Roberto; Mariscalco, Giovanni; Vizzardi, Enrico; Bonadei, Ivano; Renzulli, Attilio; Gelsomino, Sandro

    2014-06-01

    Acute bowel ischemia is a perioperative complication that is frequently unrecognized as a cause of death after cardiac surgical procedures, with an in-hospital mortality of 50% to 100%. In recent years, controversy regarding the most appropriate approach to resolve clinical or laboratory suspicion and the limited therapeutic options have led to very little improvement in patient prognosis. This article reviews the related literature examining the actual prevalence, pathophysiologic mechanisms, predisposing factors, diagnostic tests, and therapeutic approaches providing a glance at new promising tools in diagnostic workup.

  20. The Changing Phenotype of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Donal; Shanahan, Fergus

    2016-01-01

    It is widely known that there have been improvements in patient care and an increased incidence of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) worldwide in recent decades. However, less well known are the phenotypic changes that have occurred; these are discussed in this review. Namely, we discuss the emergence of obesity in patients with IBD, elderly onset disease, mortality rates, colorectal cancer risk, the burden of medications and comorbidities, and the improvement in surgical treatment with a decrease in surgical rates in recent decades. PMID:28050166

  1. MR colonography in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rimola, Jordi; Ordás, Ingrid

    2014-02-01

    MR colonography has a high diagnostic accuracy for detecting Crohn disease (CD) activity and determining the extent and severity of lesions. In the setting of stricturing CD, MR colonography can provide a detailed map of the lesions, which is useful for clinical decision making. MR colonography can be used as an alternative to conventional colonoscopy in the setting of CD, or as a complementary tool in selected patients with ulcerative colitis. This article reviews the spectrum of MR colonography findings in colonic inflammatory bowel disease and discusses the potential applications and limitations of MR colonography.

  2. Helping Patients Cope with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    Professional Developmen AFIT. Wright-Patterson AFB OH I6. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side it necessary and Identify by block number) 2). ABSTRAc r (Continue...on reverse lde if neceaary, and Identity by block numbei.) ATTACHED .... I I 7 1473 EDITION OF I NOV6 5sS OBSOLETE UNCLASS 84 09 13.03 1 SECURITY...IBD because of life threatening 4q .,.-"- 5 complications. Surgery may include bowel resection, colostomy or ileostomy. Tbough considered a cure for

  3. Short Bowel Syndrome in the Nicu

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Sachin C.; Pappas, Cleo; Iyengar, Hari

    2013-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is the most common cause of intestinal failure in infants. In neonates and young infants, necrotizing enterocolitis, gastroschisis, intestinal atresia and intestinal malrotation/volvulus are the leading causes of SBS. Following an acute post-surgical phase, the residual gastrointestinal tract adapts with reorganization of the crypt-villus histoarchitecture and functional changes in nutrient absorption and motility. A cohesive, multidisciplinary approach can allow most neonates with SBS to transition to full enteral feeds and achieve normal growth and development. In this article, we review the clinical features, management, complications, and prognostic factors in SBS. PMID:23415263

  4. Trefoil factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Aamann, Luise; Vestergaard, Else Marie; Grønbæk, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which comprises ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The trefoil factors 1, 2, and 3 (TFF1-3) are a family of peptides that play important roles in the protection and repair of epithelial surfaces, including the gastrointestinal tract. TFFs may be involved in IBD pathogenesis and are a potential treatment option. In the present review, we describe the TFF family and their potential role in IBD by summarizing the current knowledge of their expression, possible function and pharmacological role in IBD. PMID:24696606

  5. (Auto)antibodies in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Vermeire, Severine; Vermeulen, Nathalie; Van Assche, Gert; Bossuyt, Xavier; Rutgeerts, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Patients who have inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) express strong antibody responses to a variety of epitopes. A number of (auto)antibodies have been described in patients who have Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. These markers reflect a loss of tolerance toward bacterial and fungal flora and have been studied for their clinical value in IBD patients. However, currently, they have no place in the diagnostic work up. Their real promise may lie in their use as surrogate markers of complicated aggressive disease as shown in various retrospective studies, but prospective data are lacking.

  6. Venous thrombosis and prothrombotic factors in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Magro, Fernando; Soares, João-Bruno; Fernandes, Dália

    2014-05-07

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may have an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VTE). PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus were searched to identify studies investigating the risk of VTE and the prevalence of acquired and genetic VTE risk factors and prothrombotic abnormalities in IBD. Overall, IBD patients have a two- to fourfold increased risk of VTE compared with healthy controls, with an overall incidence rate of 1%-8%. The majority of studies did not show significant differences in the risk of VTE between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Several acquired factors are responsible for the increased risk of VTE in IBD: inflammatory activity, hospitalisation, surgery, pregnancy, disease phenotype (e.g., fistulising disease, colonic involvement and extensive involvement) and drug therapy (mainly steroids). There is also convincing evidence from basic science and from clinical and epidemiological studies that IBD is associated with several prothrombotic abnormalities, including initiation of the coagulation system, downregulation of natural anticoagulant mechanisms, impairment of fibrinolysis, increased platelet count and reactivity and dysfunction of the endothelium. Classical genetic alterations are not generally found more often in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients, suggesting that genetics does not explain the greater risk of VTE in these patients. IBD VTE may have clinical specificities, namely an earlier first episode of VTE in life, high recurrence rate, decreased efficacy of some drugs in preventing further episodes and poor prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of these risks, and adequate prophylactic actions should be taken in patients who have disease activity, are hospitalised, are submitted to surgery or are undergoing treatment.

  7. Venous thrombosis and prothrombotic factors in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Magro, Fernando; Soares, João-Bruno; Fernandes, Dália

    2014-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may have an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VTE). PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scopus were searched to identify studies investigating the risk of VTE and the prevalence of acquired and genetic VTE risk factors and prothrombotic abnormalities in IBD. Overall, IBD patients have a two- to fourfold increased risk of VTE compared with healthy controls, with an overall incidence rate of 1%-8%. The majority of studies did not show significant differences in the risk of VTE between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Several acquired factors are responsible for the increased risk of VTE in IBD: inflammatory activity, hospitalisation, surgery, pregnancy, disease phenotype (e.g., fistulising disease, colonic involvement and extensive involvement) and drug therapy (mainly steroids). There is also convincing evidence from basic science and from clinical and epidemiological studies that IBD is associated with several prothrombotic abnormalities, including initiation of the coagulation system, downregulation of natural anticoagulant mechanisms, impairment of fibrinolysis, increased platelet count and reactivity and dysfunction of the endothelium. Classical genetic alterations are not generally found more often in IBD patients than in non-IBD patients, suggesting that genetics does not explain the greater risk of VTE in these patients. IBD VTE may have clinical specificities, namely an earlier first episode of VTE in life, high recurrence rate, decreased efficacy of some drugs in preventing further episodes and poor prognosis. Clinicians should be aware of these risks, and adequate prophylactic actions should be taken in patients who have disease activity, are hospitalised, are submitted to surgery or are undergoing treatment. PMID:24803797

  8. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel: etiologies and CT findings.

    PubMed

    Hines, John; Rosenblat, Juliana; Duncan, Dameon R; Friedman, Barak; Katz, Douglas S

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate and discuss the various etiologies of perforation of the mesenteric small bowel and associated findings on abdominal CT. Perforation of the mesenteric small bowel is an uncommon cause of an acute abdomen and can be due to various etiologies. In underdeveloped countries, infection is probably the most common cause, while in industrialized nations, perforation may be due to Crohn disease, diverticulitis, foreign body, trauma, tumor, mechanical obstruction, primary ischemic event, or iatrogenic causes. CT is usually the initial imaging examination in patients with an acute abdomen and is sensitive in diagnosing small bowel perforation. CT findings in the setting of small bowel perforation are often subtle, but when present, may help the radiologist determine a specific cause of perforation. The aims of this pictorial essay are to review the various causes of mesenteric small bowel perforation and to discuss and illustrate the CT findings that can help arrive at the diagnosis.

  9. [Fecal calprotectin in the diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Lobatón, Triana; Rodríguez-Alonso, Lorena; Guardiola, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseases has classically been based on assessment of digestive symptoms. The development of these symptoms usually results in colonoscopy, which has a low diagnostic yield. Likewise, there is an increasing tendency to base treatment of inflammatory bowel disease on objective data, since the disappearance of signs of activity on colonoscopy (called « mucosal cure ») has been associated with sustained clinical remission and reduced rates of hospitalization and surgery. Consequently, there is a need for biomarkers that would aid the selection of those patients who would derive most benefit from an endoscopic examination. One substance that has been proposed as a biomarker of bowel inflammation is fecal calprotectin. This substance allows inflammatory bowel disease to be distinguished from irritable bowel syndrome and shows a better correlation with the degree of inflammation than clinical indicators and serological markers. In addition, it could also be useful to predict mucosal cure and the risk of recurrence.

  10. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction.

  11. Sclerosing Mesenteritis: A Rare Cause of Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Graham, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis falls within a spectrum of primary idiopathic inflammatory and fibrotic processes that affect the mesentery. The exact etiology has not been determined, although the following associations have been noted: abdominal surgery, trauma, autoimmunity, paraneoplastic syndrome, ischemia and infection. Progression of sclerosing mesentritis can lead to bowel obstruction, a rare complication of this uncommon condition. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with abdominal pain who was noted to have a small bowel obstruction requiring laparotomy and a partial small bowel resection. The pathology of the resected tissue was consistent with sclerosing mesenteritis, a rare cause of a small bowel obstruction. Sclerosing mesenteritis has variable rates of progression, and there is no consensus regarding the optimal treatment. Physicians should consider sclerosing mesenteritis in the differential diagnosis of a small bowel obstruction. PMID:27403104

  12. The Human Right to Adequate Housing: A Tool for Promoting and Protecting Individual and Community Health

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Bret

    2002-01-01

    The human right to adequate housing is enshrined in international law. The right to adequate housing can be traced to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was unanimously adopted by the world community in 1948. Since that time, the right to adequate housing has been reaffirmed on numerous occasions and further defined and elaborated. A key component of this right is habitability of housing, which should comply with health and safety standards. Therefore, the right to adequate housing provides an additional tool for advocates and others interested in promoting healthful housing and living conditions and thereby protecting individual and community health. PMID:11988432

  13. Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease in the elderly: an update.

    PubMed

    Pardi, Darrell S; Loftus, Edward V; Camilleri, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is most common in young adults, but it can also present in the elderly. Furthermore, with the aging of the population, the number of elderly patients with IBD is expected to grow. Other conditions, such as diverticulitis and ischaemic colitis, may be more common in the elderly and need to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Management of elderly patients with IBD follows the same principles as in younger patients, with a few exceptions. For patients with mild-to-moderate colitis, a 5-aminosalicylate drug is often used (sulfasalazine, olsalazine, mesalazine, balsalazide). Topical therapy may be sufficient for those with distal colitis, whereas an oral preparation is used for more extensive disease. In those with more severe or refractory symptoms, corticosteroids are used, although the elderly appear to be at increased risk for corticosteroid-associated complications. For patients with corticosteroid-dependent or corticosteroid-refractory disease, immunosuppression with azathioprine or mercaptopurine may help avoid surgery. In patients with Crohn's disease, a similar approach is followed, with the additional consideration that the formulation of drug used must ensure delivery of drug to the site of inflammation. In fistulising Crohn's disease, antibacterials, immunosuppressive drugs, infliximab and surgery are often used in combination. Controlled trials and clinical experience have shown that infliximab is a significant addition to the therapeutic armamentarium for patients with Crohn's disease.

  14. Preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-01-01

    We aim to review the literature and provide guidance on preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Structured searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library from January 1976 to June 2016 using the following keywords: (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn’s disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (health maintenance OR preventive health OR health promotion). Abstracts of the articles selected from each of these multiple searches were reviewed, and those meeting the inclusion criteria (that is, providing data regarding preventive health or health maintenance in IBD patients) were recorded. Reference lists from the selected articles were manually reviewed to identify further relevant studies. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of developing adverse events related to the disease course, therapeutic interventions, or non-adherence to medication. Recent studies have suggested that IBD patients do not receive preventive services with the same thoroughness as patients with other chronic diseases. Preventive health measures can avert morbidity and improve the quality of life of patients with IBD. Gastroenterologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) should have an up to date working knowledge of preventive health measures for IBD patients. A holistic approach and better communication between gastroenterologists and PCPs with explicit clarification of roles will prevent duplication of services and streamline care. PMID:27678347

  15. Emerging treatments for irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Joseph; Ehrenpreis, Eli D

    2002-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional GI disorder that is associated with abdominal discomfort and altered bowel habits. It accounts for up to 28% of patients presenting to a gastroenterology practice and poses a significant personal, societal and economic burden internationally. The Manning, Rome I and Rome II criteria were developed to identify appropriate IBS patients for entry into IBS studies in a consistent manner. Refinements in the understanding of the physiology of the enteric nervous system (ENS), which controls motility, secretion and sensation, provided the basis for our comprehension of the pathophysiology of IBS. Visceral hypersensitivity and neurotransmitter imbalance currently receive the most attention as possible mechanisms of IBS. This article outlines conventional treatments and reviews the data on emerging and experimental therapies for IBS. Emerging therapies for IBS using 5-HT mediation include 5-HT(3) antagonists, such as ondasetron, granisetron and alosetron, as well as 5-HT(4) agonists such as tegaserod and prucalopride. In addition to opioid agonists (e.g. fedotozine) several other drugs that act on other ENS receptors are being studied. In spite of significant progress in IBS research, these emerging therapies require more studies before they can be utilised as clinical treatments.

  16. Management of patients with a short bowel.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, J M

    2001-12-01

    There are two common types of adult patient with a short bowel, those with jejunum in continuity with a functioning colon and those with a jejunostomy. Both groups have potential problems of undernutrition, but this is a greater problem in those without a colon, as they do not derive energy from anaerobic bacterial fermentation of carbohydrate to short chain fatty acids in the colon. Patients with a jejunostomy have major problems of dehydration, sodium and magnesium depletion all due to a large volume of stomal output. Both types of patient have lost at least 60 cm of terminal ileum and so will become deficient of vitamin B(12). Both groups have a high prevalence of gallstones (45%) resulting from periods of biliary stasis. Patients with a retained colon have a 25% chance of developing calcium oxalate renal stones and they may have problems with D(-) lactic acidosis. The survival of patients with a short bowel, even if they need long-term parenteral nutrition, is good.

  17. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  18. The Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; De Lee, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a highly prevalent functional bowel disorder routinely encountered by healthcare providers. Although not life-threatening, this chronic disorder reduces patients’ quality of life and imposes a significant economic burden to the healthcare system. IBS is no longer considered a diagnosis of exclusion that can only be made after performing a battery of expensive diagnostic tests. Rather, IBS should be confidently diagnosed in the clinic at the time of the first visit using the Rome III criteria and a careful history and physical examination. Treatment options for IBS have increased in number in the past decade and clinicians should not be limited to using only fiber supplements and smooth muscle relaxants. Although all patients with IBS have symptoms of abdominal pain and disordered defecation, treatment needs to be individualized and should focus on the predominant symptom. This paper will review therapeutic options for the treatment of IBS using a tailored approach based on the predominant symptom. Abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and diarrhea are the four main symptoms that can be addressed using a combination of dietary interventions and medications. Treatment options include probiotics, antibiotics, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and agents that modulate chloride channels and serotonin. Each class of agent will be reviewed using the latest data from the literature. PMID:21180545

  19. Osteoporosis in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed Central

    Compston, J E; Judd, D; Crawley, E O; Evans, W D; Evans, C; Church, H A; Reid, E M; Rhodes, J

    1987-01-01

    Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular and peripheral cortical bone was measured in 75 unselected patients with small and/or large intestinal inflammatory bowel disease. Osteoporosis, defined as a bone mineral content greater than 2 SD below the age and sex matched normal mean value was present in 23 patients (30.6%). Three amenorrhoeic females aged 34, 38, and 42 years had severe clinical osteoporosis and a further three patients had one or more vertebral crush fractures. Eighteen of the 23 patients with osteoporosis had small intestinal disease with one or more resections and the mean lifetime steroid dose in those with osteoporosis was significantly higher than in those with normal bone mineral content. Bone mineral content in spinal trabecular bone showed significant negative correlations with lifetime steroid dose and serum alkaline phosphatase and a significant positive correlation with serum albumin. Peripheral cortical bone mineral content was positively correlated with body weight, height and body mass index. We conclude that the prevalence of osteoporosis is increased in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, severe clinical osteoporosis developing in some relatively young patients. The pathogenesis of this bone loss is probably multifactorial; steroid therapy is likely to be an important contributory factor. PMID:3583068

  20. Preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Abegunde, Ayokunle T; Muhammad, Bashir H; Ali, Tauseef

    2016-09-14

    We aim to review the literature and provide guidance on preventive health measures in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Structured searches were performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science and Cochrane Library from January 1976 to June 2016 using the following keywords: (inflammatory bowel disease OR Crohn's disease OR ulcerative colitis) AND (health maintenance OR preventive health OR health promotion). Abstracts of the articles selected from each of these multiple searches were reviewed, and those meeting the inclusion criteria (that is, providing data regarding preventive health or health maintenance in IBD patients) were recorded. Reference lists from the selected articles were manually reviewed to identify further relevant studies. Patients with IBD are at increased risk of developing adverse events related to the disease course, therapeutic interventions, or non-adherence to medication. Recent studies have suggested that IBD patients do not receive preventive services with the same thoroughness as patients with other chronic diseases. Preventive health measures can avert morbidity and improve the quality of life of patients with IBD. Gastroenterologists and primary care physicians (PCPs) should have an up to date working knowledge of preventive health measures for IBD patients. A holistic approach and better communication between gastroenterologists and PCPs with explicit clarification of roles will prevent duplication of services and streamline care.

  1. Small bowel bleeding: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Gunjan, Deepak; Sharma, Vishal; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2014-01-01

    The small intestine is an uncommon site of gastro-intestinal (GI) bleeding; however it is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding. It may require multiple blood transfusions, diagnostic procedures and repeated hospitalizations. Angiodysplasia is the commonest cause of obscure GI bleeding, particularly in the elderly. Inflammatory lesions and tumours are the usual causes of small intestinal bleeding in younger patients. Capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy have improved our ability to investigate small bowel bleeds. Deep enteroscopy has also an added advantage of therapeutic potential. Computed tomography is helpful in identifying extra-intestinal lesions. In cases of difficult diagnosis, surgery and intra-operative enteroscopy can help with diagnosis and management. The treatment is dependent upon the aetiology of the bleed. An overt bleed requires aggressive resuscitation and immediate localisation of the lesion for institution of appropriate therapy. Small bowel bleeding can be managed by conservative, radiological, pharmacological, endoscopic and surgical methods, depending upon indications, expertise and availability. Some patients, especially those with multiple vascular lesions, can re-bleed even after appropriate treatment and pose difficult challenge to the treating physician. PMID:24874805

  2. Home hyperalimentation for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bodzin, J H

    1992-04-01

    Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) has become a useful tool in the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). In the past, it was felt that TPN would have a therapeutic role in IBD, but experience has shown that it functions more as an adjunct to other therapeutic interventions. The specific roles of TPN in IBD include: (1) nutritional maintenance in the short bowel syndrome, (2) TPN as adjunctive therapy in jejunoileitis of Crohn's disease, (3) home TPN (HTPN) in Crohn's colitis, and (4) preoperative repletion of significantly depleted patients going to surgery. The adaptation of hospital techniques to the home situation has allowed patients to carry out long-term TPN therapy at home. Patients with IBD on HTPN are subject to the same mechanical and metabolic problems as are other patients on HTPN and, in addition, have a higher infection rate. When carried out appropriately, however, HTPN is a valuable technique in the management of patients with IBD and may provide an improved quality of life.

  3. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms. PMID:26819502

  4. Is irritable bowel syndrome an infectious disease?

    PubMed

    Thompson, John Richard

    2016-01-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common of all gastroenterological diseases. While many mechanisms have been postulated to explain its etiology, no single mechanism entirely explains the heterogeneity of symptoms seen with the various phenotypes of the disease. Recent data from both basic and clinical sciences suggest that underlying infectious disease may provide a unifying hypothesis that better explains the overall symptomatology. The presence of small intestinal bowel overgrowth (SIBO) has been documented in patients with IBS and reductions in SIBO as determined by breath testing correlate with IBS symptom improvement in clinical trials. The incidence of new onset IBS symptoms following acute infectious gastroenteritis also suggests an infectious cause. Alterations in microbiota-host interactions may compromise epithelial barrier integrity, immune function, and the development and function of both central and enteric nervous systems explaining alterations in the brain-gut axis. Clinical evidence from treatment trials with both probiotics and antibiotics also support this etiology. Probiotics appear to restore the imbalance in the microflora and improve IBS-specific quality of life. Antibiotic trials with both neomycin and rifaximin show improvement in global IBS symptoms that correlates with breath test normalization in diarrhea-predominant patients. The treatment response to two weeks of rifaximin is sustained for up to ten weeks and comparable results are seen in symptom reduction with retreatment in patients who develop recurrent symptoms.

  5. Rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana Sofía; Martínez-Reyes, Cynthia; Yamamoto-Furusho, Jesús Kazúo

    2009-11-28

    This article reviews the literature concerning rheumatic manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including common immune-mediated pathways, frequency, clinical course and therapy. Musculoskeletal complications are frequent and well-recognized manifestations in IBD, and affect up to 33% of patients with IBD. The strong link between the bowel and the osteo-articular system is suggested by many clinical and experimental observations, notably in HLA-B27 transgenic rats. The autoimmune pathogenic mechanisms shared by IBD and spondyloarthropathies include genetic susceptibility to abnormal antigen presentation, aberrant recognition of self, the presence of autoantibodies against specific antigens shared by the colon and other extra-colonic tissues, and increased intestinal permeability. The response against microorganisms may have an important role through molecular mimicry and other mechanisms. Rheumatic manifestations of IBD have been divided into peripheral arthritis, and axial involvement, including sacroiliitis, with or without spondylitis, similar to idiopathic ankylosing spondylitis. Other periarticular features can occur, including enthesopathy, tendonitis, clubbing, periostitis, and granulomatous lesions of joints and bones. Osteoporosis and osteomalacia secondary to IBD and iatrogenic complications can also occur. The management of the rheumatic manifestations of IBD consists of physical therapy in combination with local injection of corticosteroids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; caution is in order however, because of their possible harmful effects on intestinal integrity, permeability, and even on gut inflammation. Sulfasalazine, methotrexate, azathioprine, cyclosporine and leflunomide should be used for selected indications. In some cases, tumor necrosis factor-alpha blocking agents should be considered as first-line therapy.

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: emerging paradigm in pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoo Jin; Park, Kyung Sik

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders, characterized by abdominal pain, bloating, and changes in bowel habits. These symptoms cannot be explained by structural abnormalities and there is no specific laboratory test or biomarker for IBS. Therefore, IBS is classified as a functional disorder with diagnosis dependent on the history taking about manifested symptoms and careful physical examination. Although a great deal of research has been carried out in this area, the pathophysiology of IBS is complex and not completely understood. Multiple factors are thought to contribute to the symptoms in IBS patients; altered gastrointestinal motility, visceral hypersensitivity, and the brain-gut interaction are important classical concepts in IBS pathophysiology. New areas of research in this arena include inflammation, postinfectious low-grade inflammation, genetic and immunologic factors, an altered microbiota, dietary factors, and enteroendocrine cells. These emerging studies have not shown consistent results, provoking controversy in the IBS field. However, certain lines of evidence suggest that these mechanisms are important at least a subset of IBS patients, confirming that IBS symptoms cannot be explained by a single etiological mechanism. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that IBS requires a more holistic approach to determining effective treatment and understanding the underlying mechanisms.

  7. Current Outcomes of Emergency Large Bowel Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ng, HJ; Yule, M; Twoon, M; Binnie, NR

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Emergency large bowel surgery (ELBS) is known to carry an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Previous studies have reported morbidity and mortality rates up to 14.3%. However, there has not been a recent study to document the outcomes of ELBS following several major changes in surgical training and provision of emergency surgery. The aim of this study was therefore to explore the current outcomes of ELBS. Methods A retrospective review was performed of a prospectively maintained database of the clinical records of all patients who had ELBS between 2006 and 2013. Data pertaining to patient demographics, ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade, diagnosis, surgical procedure performed, grade of operating surgeon and assistant, length of hospital stay, postoperative complications and in-hospital mortality were analysed. Results A total of 202 patients underwent ELBS during the study period. The mean patient age was 62 years and the most common cause was colonic carcinoma (n=67, 33%). There were 32 patients (15.8%) who presented with obstruction and 64 (31.7%) had bowel perforation. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 14.8% (n=30). A consultant surgeon was involved in 187 cases (92.6%) as either first operator, assistant or available in theatre. Conclusions ELBS continues to carry a high risk despite several major changes in the provision of emergency surgery. Further developments are needed to improve postoperative outcomes in these patients. PMID:25723694

  8. Irritable bowel syndrome, gut microbiota and probiotics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom Jae; Bak, Young-Tae

    2011-07-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder characterized by abdominal symptoms including chronic abdominal pain or discomfort and altered bowel habits. The etiology of IBS is multifactorial, as abnormal gut motility, visceral hypersensitivity, disturbed neural function of the brain-gut axis and an abnormal autonomic nervous system are all implicated in disease progression. Based on recent experimental and clinical studies, it has been suggested that additional etiological factors including low-grade inflammation, altered gut microbiota and alteration in the gut immune system play important roles in the pathogenesis of IBS. Therefore, therapeutic restoration of altered intestinal microbiota may be an ideal treatment for IBS. Probiotics are live organisms that are believed to cause no harm and result in health benefits for the host. Clinical efficacy of probiotics has been shown in the treatment or prevention of some gastrointestinal inflammation-associated disorders including traveler's diarrhea, antibiotics-associated diarrhea, pouchitis of the restorative ileal pouch and necrotizing enterocolitis. The molecular mechanisms, as cause of IBS pathogenesis, affected by altered gut microbiota and gut inflammation-immunity are reviewed. The effect of probiotics on the gut inflammation-immune systems and the results from clinical trials of probiotics for the treatment of IBS are also summarized.

  9. Impact of general practice endorsement on the social gradient in uptake in bowel cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Rosalind; Duffy, Stephen W; Wardle, Jane; Solmi, Francesca; Morris, Stephen; Howe, Rosemary; Kralj-Hans, Ines; Snowball, Julia; Counsell, Nicholas; Moss, Sue; Hackshaw, Allan; von Wagner, Christian; Vart, Gemma; McGregor, Lesley M; Smith, Samuel G; Halloran, Stephen; Handley, Graham; Logan, Richard F; Rainbow, Sandra; Smith, Steve; Thomas, Mary C; Atkin, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a socioeconomic gradient in the uptake of screening in the English NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP), potentially leading to inequalities in outcomes. We tested whether endorsement of bowel cancer screening by an individual's general practice (GP endorsement; GPE) reduced this gradient. Methods: A cluster-randomised controlled trial. Over 20 days, individuals eligible for screening in England from 6480 participating general practices were randomly allocated to receive a GP-endorsed or the standard invitation letter. The primary outcome was the proportion of people adequately screened and its variation by quintile of Index of Multiple Deprivation. Results: We enrolled 265 434 individuals. Uptake was 58.2% in the intervention arm and 57.5% in the control arm. After adjusting for age, sex, hub and screening episode, GPE increased the overall odds of uptake (OR=1.07, 95% CI 1.04–1.10), but did not affect its socioeconomic gradient. We estimated that implementing GPE could result in up to 165 more people with high or intermediate risk colorectal adenomas and 61 cancers detected, and a small one-off cost to modify the standard invitation (£78 000). Conclusions: Although GPE did not improve its socioeconomic gradient, it offers a low-cost approach to enhancing overall screening uptake within the NHS BCSP. PMID:26742011

  10. Palliative care and pain: new strategies for managing opioid bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jay R; Cooney, Gail Austin; Slatkin, Neal E

    2008-09-01

    Opioid analgesics are a cornerstone of pain therapy in the hospice and palliative care population. However, opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OBD) is a commonly associated condition that frequently compromises the usefulness of these agents. Although its most common and debilitating symptom is constipation, the impact of OBD extends beyond constipation to encompass a myriad of gastrointestinal (GI) signs and symptoms, ranging from decreased gastric emptying and reflux to abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, nausea, and vomiting. Even after aggressive therapies to improve bowel function have been implemented, many patients continue to experience symptoms of OBD. To avoid these unwanted effects, some even choose to decrease or discontinue therapy with opioid analgesics, and experience inadequate pain control. The net result of OBD is a seriously negative impact on quality of life (QOL). For these reasons, it is important that palliative care practitioners have an adequate understanding of normal GI function and the underlying mechanisms responsible for OBD, the burden of OBD in the context of appropriate and effective pain management, and the benefits provided by effective pharmacotherapy. Several real-world cases are discussed to illustrate the application of optimal symptom management and the use of strategies that minimize the effects of OBD and improve patient QOL.

  11. CT imaging signs of surgically proven bowel trauma.

    PubMed

    LeBedis, Christina A; Anderson, Stephan W; Bates, David D B; Khalil, Ramy; Matherly, David; Wing, Heidi; Burke, Peter A; Soto, Jorge A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence and interobserver agreement of individual CT findings as well as the bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) in surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma. This HIPAA-compliant retrospective study was IRB approved and consent was waived. All patients 14 years or older who sustained surgically proven bowel injury after blunt abdominal trauma between 1/1/2004 and 6/30/2015 were included. Admission trauma MDCT scans were independently interpreted by two abdominal fellowship-trained radiologists who recorded the following CT findings: intraperitoneal fluid, mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding, bowel wall thickening/hematoma, active intravenous contrast extravasation, free intraperitoneal air, bowel wall discontinuity, and focal bowel hypoenhancement. Subsequently, the electronic medical records of the included patients, admission abdominal physical exam results, admission white blood cell count, and findings at exploratory laparotomy of the included patients were recorded. Thirty-three patients met the inclusion criteria. The incidence and interobserver agreement of the CT findings were as follows: intraperitoneal fluid 93.9 %, kappa = 0.784 (good); mesenteric hematoma/fat stranding 84.8 %, kappa = 0.718 (good); bowel wall thickening/hematoma 42.4 %, kappa = 0.491 (moderate); active IV contrast extravasation 36.3 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); free intraperitoneal air 21.2 %, kappa = 0.904 (very good), bowel wall discontinuity 6.1 %, kappa = 1.00 (perfect); and focal bowel hypoenhancement 6.1 %, kappa = 0.468 (moderate). An absence of the specified CT findings was encountered in 9.1 % with surgically proven bowel injuries (kappa = 1.00, perfect). In our study, 9/16 patients or 56.3 % had a bowel injury prediction score (BIPS) of 2 or more as defined by McNutt et al. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg 78(1):105-111, 2014). The presence of intraperitoneal fluid and

  12. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Modalities for the Treatment of Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Facts or Myths?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Due to unsatisfactory results from conventional treatment of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) modalities are increasingly popular treatment alternatives. Unfortunately, most CAM clinical trials have been of poor quality, and the efficacies of these therapies have not been adequately elucidated, even through systematic reviews or meta-analyses. There is also a general lack of understanding of their mechanisms of action. Currently, insufficient evidence exists to support the use of traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture, meditation, and reflexology for treatment of IBS. However, there is some evidence supporting the use of peppermint oil and gut-directed hypnotherapy for IBS treatment. Due to mounting evidence of the microbiologic and immunologic basis of IBS, probiotics and exclusion diets are also becoming promising treatment modalities. This paper will review the current literature on various CAM practices for IBS treatment and appraise their advantages and disadvantages in clinical practice. PMID:21437019

  13. Potential prospects of nanomedicine for targeted therapeutics in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Pichai, Madharasi V A; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2012-06-21

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) such as Crohn's disease are highly debilitating. There are inconsistencies in response to and side effects in the current conventional medications, failures in adequate drug delivery, and the lack of therapeutics to offer complete remission in the presently available treatments of IBD. This suggests the need to explore beyond the horizons of conventional approaches in IBD therapeutics. This review examines the arena of the evolving IBD nanomedicine, studied so far in animal and in vitro models, before comprehensive clinical testing in humans. The investigations carried out so far in IBD models have provided substantial evidence of the nanotherapeutic approach as having the potential to overcome some of the current drawbacks to conventional IBD therapy. We analyze the pros and cons of nanotechnology in IBD therapies studied in different models, aimed at different targets and mechanisms of IBD pathogenesis, in an attempt to predict its possible impact in humans.

  14. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... and Adequate Veterinary Care § 2.40 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and... veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section. (1) Each dealer and exhibitor shall employ...

  15. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  16. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  17. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  18. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  19. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  20. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  1. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  2. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  3. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  4. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  5. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  6. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  7. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  8. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  9. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  10. The Goal of Adequate Nutrition: Can It Be Made Affordable, Sustainable, and Universal?

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Ian

    2016-11-30

    Until about 1900, large proportions of the world population endured hunger and poverty. The 20th century saw world population increase from 1.6 to 6.1 billion, accompanied and to some extent made possible by rapid improvements in health standards and food supply, with associated advances in agricultural and nutrition sciences. In this paper, I use the application of linear programming (LP) in preparation of rations for farm animals to illustrate a method of calculating the lowest cost of a human diet selected from locally available food items, constrained to provide recommended levels of food energy and nutrients; then, to find a realistic minimum cost, I apply the further constraint that the main sources of food energy in the costed diet are weighted in proportion to the actual reported consumption of food items in that area. Worldwide variations in dietary preferences raise the issue as to the sustainability of popular dietary regimes, and the paper reviews the factors associated with satisfying requirements for adequate nutrition within those regimes. The ultimate physical constraints on food supply are described, together with the ways in which climate change may affect those constraints. During the 20th century, food supply increased sufficiently in most areas to keep pace with the rapid increase in world population. Many challenges will need to be overcome if food supply is to continue to meet demand, and those challenges are made more severe by rising expectations of quality of life in the developing world, as well as by the impacts of climate change on agriculture and aquaculture.

  11. The Goal of Adequate Nutrition: Can It Be Made Affordable, Sustainable, and Universal?

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Until about 1900, large proportions of the world population endured hunger and poverty. The 20th century saw world population increase from 1.6 to 6.1 billion, accompanied and to some extent made possible by rapid improvements in health standards and food supply, with associated advances in agricultural and nutrition sciences. In this paper, I use the application of linear programming (LP) in preparation of rations for farm animals to illustrate a method of calculating the lowest cost of a human diet selected from locally available food items, constrained to provide recommended levels of food energy and nutrients; then, to find a realistic minimum cost, I apply the further constraint that the main sources of food energy in the costed diet are weighted in proportion to the actual reported consumption of food items in that area. Worldwide variations in dietary preferences raise the issue as to the sustainability of popular dietary regimes, and the paper reviews the factors associated with satisfying requirements for adequate nutrition within those regimes. The ultimate physical constraints on food supply are described, together with the ways in which climate change may affect those constraints. During the 20th century, food supply increased sufficiently in most areas to keep pace with the rapid increase in world population. Many challenges will need to be overcome if food supply is to continue to meet demand, and those challenges are made more severe by rising expectations of quality of life in the developing world, as well as by the impacts of climate change on agriculture and aquaculture. PMID:28231177

  12. Systematic review: The placebo effect of psychological interventions in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Flik, Carla E; Bakker, Laura; Laan, Wijnand; van Rood, Yanda R; Smout, André J P M; de Wit, Niek J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the placebo response rate associated with different types of placebo interventions used in psychological intervention studies for irritable bowel syndrome. METHODS Randomized controlled trials comparing psychological interventions (stress management/relaxation therapy (cognitive) behavioral therapy, short-term psychodynamic therapy, and hypnotherapy) for the treatment of adult patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) diagnosed with the Manning or Rome criteria with an adequate placebo control treatment and reporting data on IBS symptom severity were identified by searching PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL and PsycINFO databases. Full-text articles that were written in English and published between 1966 and February 2016 in peer-reviewed journals were selected for the present review. Placebo interventions were considered to be adequate if the number of sessions and the amount of time spent with the therapist were the same as in the active treatment. The placebo response rate (PRR) was computed for IBS symptom severity (primary outcome measure) as well as for anxiety, depression and quality of life (secondary outcome measures). RESULTS Six studies, with a total of 555 patients met the inclusion criteria. Four studies used an educational intervention, whereas two studies used a form of supportive therapy as the placebo intervention. The PRR for IBS symptom severity ranged from 25% to 59%, with a pooled mean of 41.4%. The relative PRR for the secondary outcome measures ranged from 0% to 267% for anxiety, 6% to 52% for depression 20% to 125% for quality of life. The PRR associated with pharmacological treatments, treatment with dietary bran and complementary medicine ranged from 37.5% to 47%. Contrary to our expectations, the PRR in studies on psychological interventions was comparable to that in studies on pharmacological, dietary and alternative medical interventions. CONCLUSION The PRR is probably determined to a larger extent by

  13. Small bowel adenocarcinomas--existing evidence and evolving paradigms.

    PubMed

    Raghav, Kanwal; Overman, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel cancers account for 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies and small bowel adenocarcinomas represent a third of all small bowel cancers. Rarity of small bowel adenocarcinomas restricts molecular understanding and presents unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Better cross-sectional imaging techniques and development of enteroscopy and capsule endoscopy have facilitated earlier and more-accurate diagnosis. Surgical resection remains the mainstay of therapy for locoregional disease. In the metastatic setting, fluoropyrimidine and oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy has shown clinical benefit in prospective non-randomized trials. Although frequently grouped under the same therapeutic umbrella as large bowel adenocarcinomas, small bowel adenocarcinomas are distinct clinical and molecular entities. Recent progress in molecular characterization has aided our understanding of the pathogenesis of these tumours and holds potential for prospective development of novel targeted therapies. Multi-institutional collaborative efforts directed towards cogent understanding of tumour biology and designing sensible clinical trials are essential for developing improved therapeutic strategies. In this Review, we endeavour to outline an evidence-based approach to present-day management of small bowel adenocarcinoma, describe contemporary challenges and uncover evolving paradigms in the management of these rare 'orphan' neoplasias.

  14. Small bowel capsule endoscopy in 2007: indications, risks and limitations.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Mulder, Chris J J; Jacobs, Maarten A J M; de Franchis, Roberto

    2007-12-14

    Capsule endoscopy has revoluzionized the study of the small bowel by providing a reliable method to evaluate, endoscopically, the entire small bowel. In the last six years several papers have been published exploring the possible role of this examination in different clinical conditions. At the present time capsule endoscopy is generally recommended as a third examination, after negative bidirectional endoscopy, in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. A growing body of evidence suggests also an important role for this examination in other clinical conditions such as Crohn's disease, celiac disease, small bowel polyposis syndromes or small bowel tumors. The main complication of this examination is the retention of the device at the site of a previously unknown small bowel stricture. However there are also some other open issues mainly due to technical limitations of this tool (which is not driven from remote control, is unable to take biopsies, to insufflate air, to suck fluids or debris and sometimes to correctly size and locate lesions). The recently developed double balloon enteroscope, owing to its capability to explore a large part of the small bowel and to take targeted biopsies, although being invasive and time consuming, can overcome some limitations of capsule endoscopy. At the present time, in the majority of clinical conditions (i.e. obscure GI bleeding), the winning strategy seems to be to couple these two techniques to explore the small bowel in a painless, safe and complete way (with capsule endoscopy) and to define and treat the lesions identified (with double balloon enteroscopy).

  15. Large Bowel Obstruction, a Delayed Complication of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, John; Hejmadi, Rahul; Raman, Sudarsanam

    2016-01-01

    Colonic complications are rare after acute pancreatitis but are associated with a high mortality. Possible complications include mechanical obstruction, ischaemic necrosis, haemorrhage, and fistula. We report a case of large bowel obstruction in a 31-year-old postpartum female, secondary to severe gallstone pancreatitis. The patient required emergency laparotomy and segmental bowel resection, as well as cholecystectomy. Presentation of obstruction occurs during the acute episode or can be delayed for several weeks. The most common site is the splenic flexure owing to its proximity to the pancreas. Initial management may be conservative, stenting, or surgical. CT is an acceptable baseline investigation in all cases of new onset bowel obstruction. Although bowel obstruction is a rare complication of pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware of it due to its high mortality. Obstruction can occur after a significant delay following the resolution of pancreatitis. Those patients with evidence of colonic involvement on pancreatic imaging warrant further large bowel evaluation. Bowel resection may be required electively or acutely. Colonic stenting has an increasing role in the management of large bowel obstruction but is a modality of treatment that needs further evaluation in this setting. PMID:27847668

  16. Large Bowel Obstruction, a Delayed Complication of Severe Gallstone Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Lal, Neeraj; Whiting, John; Hejmadi, Rahul; Raman, Sudarsanam

    2016-01-01

    Colonic complications are rare after acute pancreatitis but are associated with a high mortality. Possible complications include mechanical obstruction, ischaemic necrosis, haemorrhage, and fistula. We report a case of large bowel obstruction in a 31-year-old postpartum female, secondary to severe gallstone pancreatitis. The patient required emergency laparotomy and segmental bowel resection, as well as cholecystectomy. Presentation of obstruction occurs during the acute episode or can be delayed for several weeks. The most common site is the splenic flexure owing to its proximity to the pancreas. Initial management may be conservative, stenting, or surgical. CT is an acceptable baseline investigation in all cases of new onset bowel obstruction. Although bowel obstruction is a rare complication of pancreatitis, clinicians should be aware of it due to its high mortality. Obstruction can occur after a significant delay following the resolution of pancreatitis. Those patients with evidence of colonic involvement on pancreatic imaging warrant further large bowel evaluation. Bowel resection may be required electively or acutely. Colonic stenting has an increasing role in the management of large bowel obstruction but is a modality of treatment that needs further evaluation in this setting.

  17. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  18. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  19. Elevated calprotectin levels reveal bowel inflammation in spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cypers, H; Varkas, G; Beeckman, S; Debusschere, K; Vogl, T; Roth, J; Drennan, M B; Lavric, M; Foell, D; Cuvelier, C A; De Vos, M; Delanghe, J; Van den Bosch, F; Elewaut, D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Microscopic bowel inflammation is present in up to 50% of patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) and is associated with more severe disease. Currently no reliable biomarkers exist to identify patients at risk. Calprotectin is a sensitive marker of neutrophilic inflammation, measurable in serum and stool. Objectives To assess whether serum and faecal calprotectin in addition to C-reactive protein (CRP) can be used to identify patients with SpA at risk of microscopic bowel inflammation. Methods Serum calprotectin and CRP were measured in 125 patients with SpA. In 44 of these patients, faecal samples were available for calprotectin measurement. All 125 patients underwent an ileocolonoscopy to assess the presence of microscopic bowel inflammation. Results Microscopic bowel inflammation was present in 53 (42.4%) patients with SpA. Elevated serum calprotectin and CRP were independently associated with microscopic bowel inflammation. Faecal calprotectin was also significantly higher in patients with microscopic bowel inflammation. Patients with CRP and serum calprotectin elevated had a frequency of bowel inflammation of 64% vs 25% in patients with low levels of both. When either CRP or serum calprotectin was elevated, the risk was intermediate (40%) and measuring faecal calprotectin provided further differentiation. Hence we suggest a screening approach where initially serum calprotectin and CRP are assessed and, if necessary, faecal calprotectin. The model using this scenario provided an area under the ROC curve of 74.4% for detection of bowel inflammation. Conclusions Calprotectin measurements in stool and serum, in addition to CRP, may provide a promising strategy to identify patients with SpA at risk of bowel inflammation and could play a role in overall patient stratification. PMID:26698844

  20. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Alan H

    2016-03-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use.

  1. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use.

  2. [Improved treatment options for a short bowel syndrome patient].

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Mikko

    2014-01-01

    Short bowel syndrome necessitates long-term parenteral nutrition, which exposes to decreased quality of life and increased morbidity. In recent years the understanding of short bowel pathophysiology and related complications has expanded, forming the basis for improved treatment options. In addition to evolving nutritional therapy, new pharmacological and surgical therapies have emerged, enhancing the patients' possibilities to achieve intestinal autonomy. Increasingly efficient prevention of intestinal failure-associated liver disease and central line-associated septic episodes improves patient survival. Bowel function can be restored by intestinal transplantation in those developing life-threatening complications.

  3. Large ovarian cystadenofibroma causing large bowel obstruction in a patient with Klippel–Feil syndrome—A case report

    PubMed Central

    Mechera, Robert; Menter, Thomas; Oertli, Daniel; Hoffmann, Henry

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ovarian cystadenofibromas (CAF) are epithelial tumors, which are fairly rare, mainly benign and asymptomatic. The Klippel–Feil syndrome (KFS) is a rare congenital anomaly which combines osseous and visceral development disorders. While bowel obstruction is a common complication in advanced ovarian cancer this condition is rarely described in cystic lesions such as CAF. We report the first case of large bowel obstruction due to a large benign ovarian CAF with an underlying KFS. Presentation of case A 60-year-old women with a KFS was admitted to the hospital with increasing abdominal girth and bowel obstruction. A CT scan revealed a massive intraabdominal cystic tumor of unclear origin, causing compression of the sigmoid colon with consecutive dilatation of the ascending colon and the small bowel. After successful conservative ileus treatment including nasogastric tube and iv fluids for a few days, we performed an explorative laparotomy, revealing a large cystic tumor originating from the left adnexe. After its removal including left adnexectomy, histological findings confirmed a benign cystadenofibroma. The hospital stay was uneventful and bowel obstruction symptoms resolved immediately. Discussion Beside careful history taking and physical examination, diagnostic imaging is important to identify CAF. However, the distinction between benign and malignant lesions remains difficult even using MRI. Considering optimal preparation of the patient with successful ileus treatment, laparoscopy may have been the surgical approach of choice. Though, direct laparotomy seemed to be the appropriate approach, considering the unclear origin and dignity of the lesion. Considering the KFS and its inherent malformations interdisciplinary cooperation seems important in such rare cases. Conclusion Preoperative MR imaging and intraoperative frozen-sections can be helpful to determine the dignity of the neoplasm and avoid fertility impairing adnexectomy in young woman

  4. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  5. Small bowel capsule endoscopy for the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: When we should do it and what should we expect.

    PubMed

    Viazis, N; Anastasiou, J; Karamanolis, D G

    2016-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs (i.e. recurrent or persistent iron deficiency anemia, fecal occult blood test positivity or visible bleeding) after a negative initial workout that necessarily includes gastroscopy and colonoscopy. In clinical practice, small bowel capsule endoscopy is recommended as a third stage examination in these patients, since it is a simple, safe, non-invasive and reliable test. To date there are three available small bowel capsule systems that have gained FDA approval and their diagnostic yield has shown to be superior to other diagnostic modalities for the investigation of the small bowel in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The test should be performed as close to the bleeding episode as possible and the administration of a purgative bowel preparation before the administration of capsule endoscopy is recommended by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). Issues that still remain to be solved are the definition of bleeding lesions and what really represents a positive finding, as well as the question of whether the outcome of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is altered after the test, i.e. to better define subgroups of patients that will mostly benefit from capsule endoscopy. In the future small bowel capsule endoscopy might be able to get guided, while tissue samples might be available as well. (Acta gastro-enterol. belg., 2016, 79, 355-362).

  6. Extraintestinal manifestations in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Silvio; Semeraro, Stefano; Papa, Alfredo; Roberto, Italia; Scaldaferri, Franco; Fedeli, Giuseppe; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) can be really considered to be systemic diseases since they are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations, complications, and other autoimmune disorders. Indeed, physicians who care for patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, the two major forms of IBD, face a new clinical challenge every day, worsened by the very frequent rate of extraintestinal complications. The goal of this review is to provide an overview and an update on the extraintestinal complications occurring in IBD. Indeed, this paper highlights how virtually almost every organ system can be involved, principally eyes, skin, joints, kidneys, liver and biliary tracts, and vasculature (or vascular system) are the most common sites of systemic IBD and their involvement is dependent on different mechanisms. PMID:16437620

  7. Pancreatic function in chronic inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Angelini, G; Cavallini, G; Bovo, P; Brocco, G; Castagnini, A; Lavarini, E; Merigo, F; Tallon, N; Scuro, L A

    1988-03-01

    This study was prospectively carried out to evaluate the frequency and clinical significance of pancreatic impairment in the course of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (CIBD). Twenty-seven patients affected by ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease were submitted to a secretin-cerulein test, oral glucose test (OGT) and to indirect immunofluorescence (IFL) for detection of autoantibodies against exocrine and endocrine tissue. A bicarbonate plus enzyme or only an enzyme insufficiency was found in 11/27 patients, whereas isolated lipase decrease was observed in 18 subjects. In the results of the OGT and the indirect IFL test there was no difference between patients and controls. These data demonstrate that pancreatic impairment is a far more frequent occurrence than generally recognized in clinical practice. The decrease of lipase secretion could worsen the consequences of malabsorption in Crohn's disease of the small intestine. Therefore we think that a pancreatic assessment is advisable, at least in Crohn's disease patients with steatorrhea.

  8. Food components and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Peter R; Varney, Jane; Malakar, Sreepurna; Muir, Jane G

    2015-05-01

    Ingestion of food has long been linked with gut symptoms, and there is increasing interest in using diet in the management of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The West has developed an intense interest in specialized, restrictive diets, such as those that target multiple food groups, avoid gluten, or reduce fermentable oligo-, di-, and mono-saccharides and polyols. However, most gastroenterologists are not well educated about diets or their effects on the gut. It is important to understand the various dietary approaches, their putative mechanisms, the evidence that supports their use, and the benefits or harm they might produce. The concepts behind, and delivery of, specialized diets differ from those of pharmacologic agents. High-quality research is needed to determine the efficacy of different dietary approaches and the place of specific strategies.

  9. Proteomics and metabolomics in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Yau, Yunki; Leong, Rupert W; Zeng, Ming; Wasinger, Valerie C

    2013-07-01

    Genome-wide studies in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have allowed us to understand Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis as forms of related autoinflammatory disorders that arise from a multitude of pathogenic origins. Proteomics and metabolomics are the offspring of genomics that possess unprecedented possibilities to characterize unknown pathogenic pathways. It has been about a decade since proteomics was first applied to IBD, and 5 years for metabolomics. These techniques have yielded novel and potentially important findings, but turning these results into beneficial patient outcomes remains challenging. This review recounts the history and context of clinical IBD developments before and after proteomics and metabolomics IBD in this field, discusses the challenges in consolidating high complexity data with physiological understanding, and provides an outlook on the emerging principles that will help interface the bioanalytical laboratory with IBD prognosis.

  10. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Arvind; Stroh, Thorsten; Siegmund, Britta

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature. Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease, but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets. PMID:21350706

  11. Vaccinating Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason; Wasan, Sharmeel

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not vaccinated at the same rate as general medical patients. IBD places patients at increased risk for developing vaccine-preventable illnesses, and this risk is further exacerbated by immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, gastroenterologists should familiarize themselves with health maintenance measures pertaining to patients with IBD. This article highlights the vaccinations required for patients with IBD, especially those who are immunosuppressed: influenza; pneumococcal pneumonia; hepatitis A and B viruses; human papilloma virus; meningococcal disease; tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis; measles, mumps, and rubella; varicella zoster; and herpes zoster. This article also discusses issues regarding patients with IBD who travel outside of the United States, as well as highlights and provides suggestions for areas of quality improvement that are needed in the field. PMID:27917091

  12. Microbiome, Metabolome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ishfaq; Roy, Badal C.; Khan, Salman A.; Septer, Seth; Umar, Shahid

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a multifactorial disorder that conceptually occurs as a result of altered immune responses to commensal and/or pathogenic gut microbes in individuals most susceptible to the disease. During Crohn’s Disease (CD) or Ulcerative Colitis (UC), two components of the human IBD, distinct stages define the disease onset, severity, progression and remission. Epigenetic, environmental (microbiome, metabolome) and nutritional factors are important in IBD pathogenesis. While the dysbiotic microbiota has been proposed to play a role in disease pathogenesis, the data on IBD and diet are still less convincing. Nonetheless, studies are ongoing to examine the effect of pre/probiotics and/or FODMAP reduced diets on both the gut microbiome and its metabolome in an effort to define the healthy diet in patients with IBD. Knowledge of a unique metabolomic fingerprint in IBD could be useful for diagnosis, treatment and detection of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27681914

  13. The Immunological Basis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Francesca A. R.; Rodrigues, Bruno L.; Ayrizono, Maria de Lourdes S.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic ailments, Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis being the most important. These diseases present an inflammatory profile and they differ according to pathophysiology, the affected area in the gastrointestinal tract, and the depth of the inflammation in the intestinal wall. The immune characteristics of IBD arise from abnormal responses of the innate and adaptive immune system. The number of Th17 cells increases in the peripheral blood of IBD patients, while Treg cells decrease, suggesting that the Th17/Treg proportion plays an important role in the development and maintenance of inflammation. The purpose of this review was to determine the current state of knowledge on the immunological basis of IBD. Many studies have shown the need for further explanation of the development and maintenance of the inflammatory process. PMID:28070181

  14. Newer treatments for inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Stotland, B R; Lichtenstein, G R

    1998-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease represents chronic idiopathic disorders which involve either the colon exclusively (ulcerative colitis) of any part of the gastrointestinal tract (Crohn's disease). The course of these entities is typified by periods of symptomatic exacerbation interspersed with clinical remissions. Management is based upon regimens which decrease mucosal inflammation. Colonic disease distal to the splenic flexure may be treated with topical therapy, but other regions generally necessitate oral therapy. Currently used medications include the aminosalicylates, glucocorticoids, antibiotics and immunomodulators. The immunomodulator class of medications includes azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, cyclosporine A and methotrexate. Newer agents include short-chain fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids and antibodies directed to tumor necrosis factor. Medical management also occasionally involves optimizing nutritional status with the addition of elemental diets or total parenteral nutrition. Management of specific clinical presentations is discussed.

  15. Management of inflammatory bowel disease in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M A; Sanderson, J D

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) affects body image, relationships, family planning, fertility and pregnancy outcomes. However, the common misconception that IBD is a contraindication, or serious concern, in pregnancy is essentially a myth. Most patients with IBD can expect to have uneventful pregnancies. We present an overview of the management of IBD during pregnancy, including management in those planning pregnancy, the suitability of relevant medication during pregnancy and breast feeding, investigation and monitoring of IBD during pregnancy, surgical management and considerations relating to delivery. While there are some definite alterations required in the management of IBD during pregnancy, management is essentially unchanged. With close attention to aspects such as nutrition and smoking cessation, and optimal disease control in the run-up to and during pregnancy, we have an opportunity to help our patients with IBD achieve good pregnancy outcomes. PMID:27582844

  16. [Enteric microflora in inflammatory bowel disease patients].

    PubMed

    Rahmouni, Oumaira; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Neut, Christel

    2016-11-01

    During the last years, the importance of a well equilibrated intestinal microbiota (eubiosis) has become more and more obvious in human health. Dysbiosis is now a well-recognized feature associated with IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). Rupture of the normal microbiota can occur through different mechanisms: (1) by a typical Western diet rich in fat and low in fiber, (2) by an acute disruption of the microbiota (by an acute gastroenteritis or by intake of antibiotics) or (3) by a combination of event in early childhood avoiding the establishment of eubiosis (the hygiene hypothesis). Risk factors for IBD are stated for each disruption mechanism. Dysbiosis can also induce colonization by several pathobionts able to aggravate inflammation. Among the potential candidates in IBD, most attention has been paid on AIEC during the last years.

  17. Flavonoids in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vezza, Teresa; Rodríguez-Nogales, Alba; Algieri, Francesca; Utrilla, Maria Pilar; Rodriguez-Cabezas, Maria Elena; Galvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the intestine that compromises the patients’ life quality and requires sustained pharmacological and surgical treatments. Since their etiology is not completely understood, non-fully-efficient drugs have been developed and those that have shown effectiveness are not devoid of quite important adverse effects that impair their long-term use. In this regard, a growing body of evidence confirms the health benefits of flavonoids. Flavonoids are compounds with low molecular weight that are widely distributed throughout the vegetable kingdom, including in edible plants. They may be of great utility in conditions of acute or chronic intestinal inflammation through different mechanisms including protection against oxidative stress, and preservation of epithelial barrier function and immunomodulatory properties in the gut. In this review we have revised the main flavonoid classes that have been assessed in different experimental models of colitis as well as the proposed mechanisms that support their beneficial effects. PMID:27070642

  18. Report: impact of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Sheila M

    2016-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), 2 conditions characterized by chronic inflammation. Approximately 1.17 million people in the United States are affected by these 2 conditions. It is theorized that a genetic susceptibility coupled with environmental factors, such as smoking, antibiotics, oral contraceptives, appendectomy, or diet, may influence the development of IBD. Patients with UC and CD may exhibit similar symptoms, and the conditions are often misclassified, as there is a lack of standard criteria for diagnosing IBD. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to rule out any diarrhea-related conditions for an accurate diagnosis. UC and CD typically manifest in early adulthood, and the chronic nature of these conditions greatly impacts a patient's perception, body image, and quality of life. The inability to participate in social activities due to UC and CD impacts not only patients, but also those with whom they have close relationships.

  19. Pulmonary manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary signs and symptoms are examples of variable extraintestinal manifestations of the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). These complications of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) seem to be underrecognized by both pulmonary physicians and gastroenterologists. The objective of the present review was to gather and summarize information on this particular matter, on the basis of available up-to-date literature. Tracheobronchial involvement is the most prevalent respiratory presentation, whereas IBD-related interstitial lung disease is less frequent. Latent and asymptomatic pulmonary involvement is not unusual. Differential diagnosis should always consider infections (mainly tuberculosis) and drug-induced lung pathology. The common link between intestinal disease and lung pathology is unknown, but many hypotheses have been proposed. It is speculated that environmental pollution, common immunological mechanisms and predisposing genetic factors may play a role. PMID:26788078

  20. Neurological disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Pastorelli, Luca; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Spina, Luisa; Baldini, Vittorio; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur in about one-third of patients living with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and may precede the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms by many years. Neurologic disorders associated with IBD are not frequent, being reported in 3% of patients, but they often represent an important cause of morbidity and a relevant diagnostic issue. In addition, the increasing use of immunosuppressant and biological therapies for IBD may also play a pivotal role in the development of neurological disorders of different type and pathogenesis. Hence, we provide a complete and profound review of the main features of neurological complications associated with IBD, with particular reference to those related to drugs and with a specific focus on their clinical presentation and possible pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25083051

  1. GENETICS AND PATHOGENESIS OF INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ta-Chiang; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S.

    2016-01-01

    We are currently in an exciting time where our understanding of genetic underpinnings of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has undergone a revolution, based in large part by novel genotyping and sequencing technologies. With >160 susceptible loci identified for IBD, the goals now are to understand at a fundamental level, the function of these susceptibility alleles. Clinical relevance of how these susceptible genes shape the development of IBD is also a high priority. The main challenge is to understand how the environment and microbiome play a role in triggering disease in genetically susceptible individual, as the interactions may be complex. To advance the field, novel in vitro and mouse models that are designed to interrogate complex genetics and be able to functionally test hypotheses are needed. Ultimately, the goal of genetics studies will be to translate genetics to the patients with IBD and improve their care. PMID:26907531

  2. [Importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Peña, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-05-01

    About two-thirds of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients associate their symptoms with certain foods. We reviewed food-related factors putatively associated with manifestations of IBS. Soluble fiber may improve constipation but frequently increases bloating and abdominal pain. Carbohydrate malabsorption seems to be more frequent in IBS. A low FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) diet significantly reduces IBS symptoms and has been suggested as a therapeutic option. Serological screening for celiac disease should be done in patients without constipation. Moreover, non-celiac disease gluten sensitivity, defined as gluten intolerance once celiac disease and wheat allergy have been ruled out, should be considered in these patients. There is no specific diet for IBS patients but small and frequent meals, avoiding greasy foods, dairy products, many carbohydrates, caffeine and alcohol, is recommended.

  3. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Yoga as Remedial Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Vijaya; Raghuram, Nagarathna; Malamud, Ariel; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a group of symptoms manifesting as a functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder in which patients experience abdominal pain, discomfort, and bloating that is often relieved with defecation. IBS is often associated with a host of secondary comorbidities such as anxiety, depression, headaches, and fatigue. In this review, we examined the basic principles of Pancha Kosha (five sheaths of human existence) concept from an Indian scripture Taittiriya Upanishad and the pathophysiology of a disease from the Yoga approach, Yoga Vasistha's Adhi (originated from mind) and Vyadhi (ailment/disease) concept. An analogy between the age old, the most profound concept of Adhi-Vyadhi, and modern scientific stress-induced dysregulation of brain-gut axis, as it relates to IBS that could pave way for impacting IBS, is emphasized. Based on these perspectives, a plausible Yoga module as a remedial therapy is provided to better manage the primary and secondary symptoms of IBS. PMID:26064164

  4. Ileal Fecaloma Presenting with Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ha Yeong; Park, Hye Won; Chang, Seong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    A fecaloma refers to a mass of accumulated feces that is much harder than a mass associated with fecal impaction. Fecalomas are usually found in the rectosigmoid area. A 10-year-old male with chronic constipation was admitted because of increasing abdominal pain. An abdominal computed tomography scan and a simple abdominal x-ray revealed rapidly evolving mechanical obstruction in the small intestine. Most of the fecalomas are successfully treated by conservative methods such as laxatives, enemas and rectal evacuation. When conservative treatments have failed, surgical intervention may be needed. In this case, an emergency operation was performed and a 4×3×2.5 cm fecaloma was found in the distal ileum. We thus report a case of ileal fecaloma inducing small bowel obstruction in a patient with chronic constipation, who required surgical intervention. When symptoms of acute small intestinal obstruction develop in a patient with chronic constipation, a fecaloma should be considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:26473140

  5. Mucosal cytokine network in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Andoh, Akira; Yagi, Yuhki; Shioya, Makoto; Nishida, Atsushi; Tsujikawa, Tomoyuki; Fujiyama, Yoshihide

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) are characterized by ongoing mucosal inflammation in which dysfunction of the host immunologic response against dietary factors and commensal bacteria is involved. The chronic inflammatory process leads to disruption of the epithelial barrier, and the formation of epithelial ulceration. This permits easy access for the luminal microbiota and dietary antigens to cells resident in the lamina propria, and stimulates further pathological immune cell responses. Cytokines are essential mediators of the interactions between activated immune cells and non-immune cells, including epithelial and mesenchymal cells. The clinical efficacy of targeting TNF-α clearly indicates that cytokines are the therapeutic targets in IBD patients. In this manuscript, we focus on the biological activities of recently-reported cytokines [Interleukin (IL)-17 cytokine family, IL-31 and IL-32], which might play a role through interaction with TNF-α in the pathophysiology of IBD. PMID:18777592

  6. Is the next generation of physicians adequately prepared to diagnose and treat eating disorders in children and adolescents?

    PubMed

    Girz, Laura; Robinson, Adele Lafrance; Tessier, Carole

    2014-01-01

    This study examined medical residents' comfort with and knowledge of eating disorder assessment and treatment practices for children and adolescents. Since entering medical school, the majority of respondents reported receiving fewer than 5 hours of training in this area. Participants reported feeling more comfortable with the assessment of eating disorders than with their medical management and treatment. Questions testing participants' knowledge in these domains reflected this finding; participants did well on the assessment questions, but quite poorly on the treatment questions. Intensity of training and self-reported comfort with these skills predicted residents' knowledge, suggesting that additional training opportunities are warranted.

  7. Do special constables in London feel that they are adequately prepared to meet their first aid responsibilities? A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study's aims were to explore the views of special constables in the London metropolitan police force concerning their obligations and skills as first aiders. Background The metropolitan police force provides police officers to act as first responders to emergency calls made by the public. Special constables act with the same powers and responsibility as police officers and are required to deal with incidents involving medical emergencies. Setting West London Police Station. Participants Fifteen special constables entered and completed the study. Methods and Outcome Measures A qualitative study involving semistructured interviews, participant observation, and reflective work. The outcome measures were the themes derived from the ‘thematic framework approach’ to analysis. Results Four main themes were identified. (1) ‘Our responsibility?’—Special constables felt they had a responsibility, but were unsure of the origin of this responsibility, with many feeling it stemmed from public expectation. (2) ‘Confidence’—Special constables had mixed feelings regarding their confidence in first aid scenarios and many felt that more could be done to improve their confidence. (3) ‘Training needs’—Many felt the current training system was lacking in several ways including regularity, teaching and content. (4) ‘Personal first aid knowledge’—Special constables were disappointed with their past performances. Conclusions Owing to the small size of this study, the conclusions are limited; however, if the findings are confirmed by larger studies, they suggest the need to improve the confidence of special constables in first aid situations. PMID:26826155

  8. The real world: BME graduates reflect on whether universities are providing adequate preparation for a career in industry.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Let's face it: In the United States, a college degree isn't what it used to be. These days, 46% of recent college graduates consider themselves underemployed and in jobs that do not require their college degrees--degrees that have already cost many of these grads and their families hundreds of thousands of dollars in student loans, with no promise of a job and salary to pay those loans back. But engineering majors are said to be outliers. Engineering as a field is widely considered one of, if not the most, lucrative academic paths for students seeking well-paid employment immediately following college. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that nearly 40% of the 45 most highly paid professions that require only a bachelor's degree are in engineering. Salaries for all biomedical engineers, entry level or not, are among the highest, with a median pay of US$86,960. And engineering departments at colleges are not shy to advertise these numbers: the Biomedical Engineering Department at the University of Texas, Austin, declares on its Web page that, "electing to graduate with a major in biomedical engineering opens the door to an ever-growing amount of job opportunities," citing a 72%, ten-year job growth forecast. Boston University's program cites U.S. News and World Report's claim that BME is the country's fastest-growing occupation.

  9. Predictors of Aggressive Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarur, Andres J.; Strobel, Sebastian G.; Deshpande, Amar R.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease comprises a group of conditions characterized by idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The natural course of disease can range from an indolent course with prolonged periods of remission to aggressive, incapacitating disease. Predicting which patients are more susceptible to developing severe disease is important, especially when choosing therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. This paper reviews current evidence on the main demographic, clinical, endoscopic, histologic, serologic, and genetic markers that predict aggressive inflammatory bowel disease. In ulcerative colitis, we considered disease to be aggressive when patients had a high relapse rate, need for admission and/or surgery, development of colon cancer, or extraintestinal manifestations. We defined aggressive Crohn's disease as having a high relapse rate, development of penetrating disease, need for repeat surgery, or multiple admissions for flares. In Crohn's disease, involvement of the upper gastrointestinal tract and ileum, penetrating disease, early age at diagnosis, smoking, extensive ulceration of the mucosa, high titers of serum antibodies, and mutations of the NOD2 gene are markers of aggressive disease. In ulcerative colitis, patients with more extensive involvement of the colon (pancolitis) have more symptomatology and are at higher risk for needing a colectomy and developing colon cancer. Also, plasmocytic infiltration of the colonic mucosa and crypt atrophy predict treatment failure. As with diagnosis, no single method can predict disease aggressiveness. Multiple serologic and genetic tests are being developed to refine the accuracy of prediction. Endoscopic findings can also predict the future course of disease. At present, clinical manifestations are the most useful way to make therapeutic decisions. PMID:22298958

  10. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David J.; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance (ANOVA) were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6–12 (n = 1203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in comprehension. Results suggest that there is considerable growth across the middle and high school years, particularly for adequate comprehenders in those text integration processes that maintain local coherence. Accuracy in text consistency judgments accounted for significant unique variance for passage-level, but not sentence-level comprehension, particularly for adequate comprehenders. PMID:26166946

  11. Using Multitheory Model of Health Behavior Change to Predict Adequate Sleep Behavior.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj; Nahar, Vinayak K

    The purpose of this article was to use the multitheory model of health behavior change in predicting adequate sleep behavior in college students. A valid and reliable survey was administered in a cross-sectional design (n = 151). For initiation of adequate sleep behavior, the construct of behavioral confidence (P < .001) was found to be significant and accounted for 24.4% of the variance. For sustenance of adequate sleep behavior, changes in social environment (P < .02), emotional transformation (P < .001), and practice for change (P < .001) were significant and accounted for 34.2% of the variance.

  12. Evaluation of the Irritable Bowel Syndrome Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) questionnaire in diarrheal-predominant irritable bowel syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-d) significantly diminishes the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients. Psychological and social impacts are common with many IBS-d patients reporting comorbid depression, anxiety, decreased intimacy, and lost working days. The Irritable Bowel Syndrome Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) questionnaire is a 34-item instrument developed and validated for measurement of HRQOL in non-subtyped IBS patients. The current paper assesses this previously-validated instrument employing data collected from 754 patients who participated in a randomized clinical trial of a novel treatment, eluxadoline, for IBS-d. Methods Psychometric methods common to HRQOL research were employed to evaluate the IBS-QOL. Many of the historical analyses of the IBS-QOL validations were used. Other techniques that extended the original methods were applied where more appropriate for the current dataset. In IBS-d patients, we analyzed the items and substructure of the IBS-QOL via item reduction, factor structure, internal consistency, reproducibility, construct validity, and ability to detect change. Results This study supports the IBS-QOL as a psychometrically valid measure. Factor analyses suggested that IBS-specific QOL as measured by the IBS-QOL is a unidimensional construct. Construct validity was further buttressed by significant correlations between IBS-QOL total scores and related measures of IBS-d severity including the historically-relevant Irritable Bowel Syndrome Adequate Relief (IBS-AR) item and the FDA’s Clinical Responder definition. The IBS-QOL also showed a significant ability to detect change as evidenced by analysis of treatment effects. A minority of the items, unrelated to the IBS-d, performed less well by the standards set by the original authors. Conclusions We established that the IBS-QOL total score is a psychometrically valid measure of HRQOL in IBS-d patients enrolled in this study. Our analyses suggest that

  13. Bowel dysfunction in young women with urinary retention.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, M C; Kamm, M A; Fowler, C J

    1993-01-01

    Urinary retention in young women is rare, but a syndrome has recently been described in which urinary retention is associated with abnormal periurethral electromyography. The incidence of bowel dysfunction in these women was investigated, in an attempt to determine whether this might be a more widespread disorder. Of 12 patients with this urological abnormality, eight were constipated. No consistent anorectal abnormality was identified on anorectal physiological testing. The electromyographic abnormality was not seen in the external anal sphincter. One patient had an abnormality of the internal anal sphincter smooth muscle, while another had a generalised disorder of the gastrointestinal tract and urinary bladder resembling a visceral myopathy. Bowel symptoms are common in this group of women with urinary retention, but abnormalities of bowel function are not specific. A common mechanism for bladder and bowel symptoms remains a possibility. PMID:8244109

  14. Taking Care of Your Bowels--The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... assist you in establishing a successful bowel program. University of Washington-operated SCI Clinics: Harborview Medical Center ... Spinal Cord Injury Clinic nurses: 206-744-5862 University of Washington Medical Center Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic 1959 ...

  15. Electroneurostimulation for the management of bladder bowel dysfunction in childhood.

    PubMed

    Wright, Anne J; Haddad, Mirna

    2017-01-01

    Both non-invasive and invasive electroneurostimulation (ENS) modalities for bladder bowel dysfunction have been studied and reported in children. A summary of the proposed mechanism of actions and the more commonly used and recently reported techniques and outcomes are described. This includes transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, functional electrical nerve stimulation, intravesical electrical nerve stimulation, percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation and sacral neuromodulation in conditions including overactive bladder, enuresis, dysfunctional voiding, constipation, combined bladder bowel dysfunction and neuropathic bladder and bowel dysfunction. There is a need for further high quality randomised trials as well as long-term outcomes to establish whether ENS is able to alter the long-term trajectory for an individual child with bladder bowel dysfunction.

  16. Unique Presentation of Intra-Abdominal Testis: Small Bowel Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Ibrahim E.; Abbas, Tariq O.; Alansari, Amani N.; Ali, Mansour A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe here a two-year-old male who required urgent laparotomy to relieve a strangulated small bowel caused by internal herniation around an intra-abdominal testis. This clinical presentation has not been reported previously. PMID:22084802

  17. Malignant Bowel Obstruction in Patients With Recurrent Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tran, Elizabeth; Spiceland, Clayton; Sandhu, Nicole P; Jatoi, Aminah

    2016-04-01

    We sought to report incidence, risk factors, and survival related to bowel obstruction in 311 ovarian cancer patients with recurrent disease. A total of 68 (22%) had a documented bowel obstruction during their cancer course, and 49 (16%) developed it after cancer recurrence. Surprisingly, 142 (45%) fit into an "unknown" category (3+ months of data lacking from last contact/death). No risk factors were identified; management included surgery (n = 21), conservative measures (n = 21), and other (n = 7). Documented bowel obstruction was not associated with a statistically significant reduction in survival after cancer recurrence. In conclusion, although bowel obstruction occurs in only a subgroup of patients with ovarian cancer and does not appear to detract from survival after cancer recurrence, limited end-of-life information may be resulting in an underestimation of incidence.

  18. Region 8: Colorado Lamar and Steamboat Springs Adequate Letter (11/12/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Lamar and Steamboat Springs particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  19. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency... floodplain management regulations meeting minimum requirements under the National Flood Insurance Program... they have brought their floodplain management regulations into compliance with the NFIP...

  20. Region 9: California Adequate / Inadequate Letter Attachment (5/30/2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a document that states that it has been found adequate for transportation conformitypurposes certain 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 motor vehicleemissions budgets in the 2007 South Coast StateImplementation Plan.

  1. Small bowel perforation: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement

    PubMed Central

    Bourm, Kelsey; Pfeifer, Cory; Zarchan, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel perforation is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. When seen, it most commonly affects the stomach or colon. We describe a case and image findings of an 8-year-old female who presented with sepsis and erosion of the VP shunt into the small bowel. The imaging findings were confirmed surgically. We also provide an overview of the current literature discussing previously reported cases, clinical features, and treatment. PMID:27761183

  2. Treatment of pain symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vishal; Moshiree, Baharak; Verne, G Nicholas

    2004-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome represents a common gastrointestinal disorder that significantly impacts patients' lives. It is defined by Rome II criteria and characterized by abdominal pain and bloating associated with changes in bowel habit. Visceral hypersensitivity is currently considered a biological marker for the disease. Current therapeutic treatments include the use of fiber supplements, antidiarrheal agents, laxatives, antispasmodics, tricyclic antidepressants and serotonergic agents. Through a proper understanding of the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology and treatment options, this disorder can be treated effectively in many patients.

  3. Comparison of methods to facilitate postoperative bowel function.

    PubMed

    Crainic, Christina; Erickson, Kathie; Gardner, Janet; Haberman, Sheri; Patten, Pam; Thomas, Pat; Hays, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Improving postoperative return of bowel function after abdominal surgery is an important nursing and medical goal. One promising intervention to achieve this goal is to have patients chew gum several times per day in the early postoperative period to stimulate the cephalic-vagal reflex and bowel peristalsis. A study to determine if return of gastrointestinal function after abdominal surgery could be hastened by the simple intervention of chewing gum or sucking on hard candy three times per day is described.

  4. Small bowel perforation: a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement.

    PubMed

    Bourm, Kelsey; Pfeifer, Cory; Zarchan, Adam

    2016-06-01

    Small bowel perforation is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement. When seen, it most commonly affects the stomach or colon. We describe a case and image findings of an 8-year-old female who presented with sepsis and erosion of the VP shunt into the small bowel. The imaging findings were confirmed surgically. We also provide an overview of the current literature discussing previously reported cases, clinical features, and treatment.

  5. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palla, Viktoria-Varvara; Karaolanis, Georgios; Pentazos, Panagiotis; Ladopoulos, Alexios; Papageorgiou, Evaggelos

    2015-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a clinical entity that includes loss of energy, fluid, electrolytes or micronutrient balance because of inadequate functional intestinal length. This case report demonstrates the case of a woman who compensated for short bowel syndrome through intestinal adaptation, which is a complex process worthy of further investigation for the avoidance of dependence on total parenteral nutrition and of intestinal transplantation in such patients.

  6. Individual and contextual determinants of adequate maternal health care services in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Achia, Thomas N O; Mageto, Lillian E

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine individual and community level factors associated with adequate use of maternal antenatal health services in Kenya. Individual and community level factors associated with adequate use of maternal health care (MHC) services were obtained from the 2008-09 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey data set. Multilevel partial-proportional odds logit models were fitted using STATA 13.0 to quantify the relations of the selected covariates to adequate MHC use, defined as a three-category ordinal variable. The sample consisted of 3,621 women who had at least one live birth in the five-year period preceding this survey. Only 18 percent of the women had adequate use of MHC services. Greater educational attainment by the woman or her partner, higher socioeconomic status, access to medical insurance coverage, and greater media exposure were the individual-level factors associated with adequate use of MHC services. Greater community ethnic diversity, higher community-level socioeconomic status, and greater community-level health facility deliveries were the contextual-level factors associated with adequate use of MHC. To improve the use of MHC services in Kenya, the government needs to design and implement programs that target underlying individual and community level factors, providing focused and sustained health education to promote the use of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care.

  7. Congenital microvillous inclusion disease presenting as antenatal bowel obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kennea, N; Norbury, R; Anderson, G; Tekay, A

    2001-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound has led to confidence in the antenatal diagnosis of intestinal obstruction allowing counseling and birth planning. We describe a male infant of a diabetic mother who had an antenatal diagnosis of distal bowel obstruction. This baby was subsequently found not to have bowel obstruction, but a congenital enteropathy - microvillous inclusion disease. The antenatal scans had demonstrated polyhydramnios as well as multiple fluid-filled dilated loops of bowel in the fetal abdomen. To our knowledge, similar prenatal ultrasound findings have not been previously described in this condition. The baby was delivered in a pediatric surgical center and postnatally there was no evidence of bowel obstruction either clinically or on abdominal X-ray. This baby initially fed well, but became collapsed and acidotic on his third day, having lost 26% of his birth weight due to excessive stool loss. The diagnosis of microvillous inclusion disease was made by electron microscopy of a small bowel biopsy. Congenital microvillous inclusion disease is a very rare inherited enteropathy with high mortality and morbidity. This condition, and other enteropathies, should be considered in cases in which antenatally diagnosed bowel obstruction is not confirmed after birth.

  8. Nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases on children and adolescents☆

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilton Marques; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues; Santana, Genoile Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To perform a sistematiy review of the literature about the nutritional impact of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. DATA SOURCES: A systematic review was performed using PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and SciELO databases, with inclusion of articles in Portuguese and in English with original data, that analyzed nutritional aspects of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents. The initial search used the terms "inflammatory bowel diseases" and "children" or "adolescents" and "nutritional evaluation" or "nutrition deficiency". The selection of studies was initially performed by reading the titles and abstracts. Review studies and those withouth data for pediatric patients were excluded. Subsequently, the full reading of the articles considered relevant was performed. RESULTS: 237 studies were identified, and 12 of them were selected according to the inclusion criteria. None of them was performed in South America. During the analysis of the studies, it was observed that nutritional characteristics of patients with inflammatory bowel disease may be altered; the main reports were related to malnutrition, growth stunting, delayed puberty and vitamin D deficiency. CONCLUSION: There are nutritional consequences of inflammatory bowel diseases in children and adolescents, mainly growth stunting, slower pubertal development, underweight and vitamin deficiencies. Nutritional impairments were more significant in patients with Crohn's disease; overweight and obesity were more common in patients with ulcerative rectocolitis. A detailed nutritional assessment should be performed periodically in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25511006

  9. Multidetector CT of Surgically Proven Blunt Bowel and Mesenteric Injury.

    PubMed

    Bates, David D B; Wasserman, Michael; Malek, Anita; Gorantla, Varun; Anderson, Stephan W; Soto, Jorge A; LeBedis, Christina A

    2017-01-01

    Blunt traumatic injury is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. Unintentional injury represents the leading cause of death in the United States for all persons between the ages of 1 and 44 years. In the setting of blunt abdominal trauma, the reported rate of occurrence of bowel and mesenteric injuries ranges from 1% to 5%. Despite the relatively low rate of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury in patients with abdominal and pelvic trauma, delays in diagnosis are associated with increased rates of sepsis, a prolonged course in the intensive care unit, and increased mortality. During the past 2 decades, as multidetector computed tomography (CT) has emerged as an essential tool in emergency radiology, several direct and indirect imaging features have been identified that are associated with blunt bowel and mesenteric injury. The imaging findings in cases of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury can be subtle and may be seen in the setting of multiple complex injuries, such as multiple solid-organ injuries and spinal fractures. Familiarity with the various imaging features of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury, as well as an understanding of their clinical importance with regard to the care of the patient, is essential to making a timely diagnosis. Once radiologists are familiar with the spectrum of findings of blunt bowel and mesenteric injury, they will be able to make timely diagnoses that will lead to improved patient outcomes. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  10. Short Bowel Syndrome and Intestinal Failure in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Limketkai, Berkeley N; Parian, Alyssa M; Shah, Neha D; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric

    2016-05-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite the availability of powerful immunosuppressants, many patients with Crohn's disease still require one or more intestinal resections throughout the course of their disease. Multiple resections and a progressive reduction in bowel length can lead to the development of short bowel syndrome, a form of intestinal failure that compromises fluid, electrolyte, and nutrient absorption. The pathophysiology of short bowel syndrome involves a reduction in intestinal surface area, alteration in the enteric hormonal feedback, dysmotility, and related comorbidities. Most patients will initially require parenteral nutrition as a primary or supplemental source of nutrition, although several patients may eventually wean off nutrition support depending on the residual gut anatomy and adherence to medical and nutritional interventions. Available surgical treatments focus on reducing motility, lengthening the native small bowel, or small bowel transplantation. Care of these complex patients with short bowel syndrome requires a multidisciplinary approach of physicians, dietitians, and nurses to provide optimal intestinal rehabilitation, nutritional support, and improvement in quality of life.

  11. Second serial transverse enteroplasty procedure in an infant with extreme short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Tak; Koh, Hong; Chang, Eun Young; Chang, Hye Kyung; Han, Seok Joo

    2012-06-01

    The serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) procedure is a novel technique to lengthen and taper the bowel in patients with short bowel syndrome. The advantages of STEP include not only technical ease and simplicity, but also the ability to repeat the procedure. Herein, we report a case of extreme short bowel syndrome that was successfully treated by the second STEP procedure. A 3-day old newborn girl underwent STEP because of jejunal atresia with the small bowel length of 15 cm, but her bowel elongation was not enough to escape from short bowel syndrome. At the age of 6 months, she underwent a second STEP procedure. The bowel lengthening by the second STEP made her tolerable to enteral feeding with body weight gain and rescued her from short bowel syndrome. This case showed that second STEP is very helpful in treatment of extreme short bowel syndrome.

  12. A Comparative Study of Quality of Life in Persons With Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Blagden, Sarah; Kingstone, Thomas; Soundy, Andrew; Lee, Rhonda; Singh, Sukhdev; Roberts, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common functional gastrointestinal disorder; however, it remains poorly understood. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, organic bowel disease characterized by young age of onset, debilitating symptoms, and invasive and toxic treatment options. This study aimed to determine the impact of IBS and IBD on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and the ways by which these conditions affect HRQoL, with the purpose of informing nurse specialists in gastroenterology who are best placed to support HRQoL improvements. Quality of life, symptom, and demographic data were collected from patients with IBS and IBD and tabulated and examined. Analysis of data demonstrated that HRQoL is significantly lower in IBS than in IBD. However, the ways by which these two conditions affect HRQoL differs, with greater impairments in social and emotional aspects of life in individuals with IBS. Bowel symptoms were the same or worse in IBD.

  13. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  14. Irritable bowel syndrome: methods, mechanisms, and pathophysiology. Methods to assess visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Keszthelyi, D; Troost, F J; Masclee, A A

    2012-07-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder, characterized by recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort in combination with disturbed bowel habits in the absence of identifiable organic cause. Visceral hypersensitivity has emerged as a key hypothesis in explaining the painful symptoms in IBS and has been proposed as a "biological hallmark" for the condition. Current techniques of assessing visceral perception include the computerized barostat using rectal distensions, registering responses induced by sensory stimuli including the flexor reflex and cerebral evoked potentials, as well as brain imaging modalities such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography. These methods have provided further insight into alterations in pain processing in IBS, although the most optimal method and condition remain to be established. In an attempt to give an overview of these methods, a literature search in the electronic databases PubMed and MEDLINE was executed using the search terms "assessment of visceral pain/visceral nociception/visceral hypersensitivity" and "irritable bowel syndrome." Both original articles and review articles were considered for data extraction. This review aims to discuss currently used modalities in assessing visceral perception, along with advantages and limitations, and aims also to define future directions for methodological aspects in visceral pain research. Although novel paradigms such as brain imaging and neurophysiological recordings have been introduced in the study of visceral pain, confirmative studies are warranted to establish their robustness and clinical relevance. Therefore, subjective verbal reporting following rectal distension currently remains the best-validated technique in assessing visceral perception in IBS.

  15. Essential role of small bowel capsule endoscopy in reclassification of colonic inflammatory bowel disease type unclassified

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Sara; Dias de Castro, Francisca; Boal Carvalho, Pedro; Rosa, Bruno; Moreira, Maria João; Pinho, Rolando; Saraiva, Miguel Mascarenhas; Cotter, José

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the role of small bowel capsule endoscopy (SBCE) on the reclassification of colonic inflammatory bowel disease type unclassified (IBDU). METHODS We performed a multicenter, retrospective study including patients with IBDU undergoing SBCE, between 2002 and 2014. SBCE studies were reviewed and the inflammatory activity was evaluated by determining the Lewis score (LS). Inflammatory activity was considered significant and consistent with Crohn’s disease (CD) when the LS ≥ 135. The definitive diagnosis during follow-up (minimum 12 mo following SBCE) was based on the combination of clinical, analytical, imaging, endoscopic and histological elements. RESULTS Thirty-six patients were included, 21 females (58%) with mean age at diagnosis of 33 ± 13 (15-64) years. The mean follow-up time after the SBCE was 52 ± 41 (12-156) mo. The SBCE revealed findings consistent with significant inflammatory activity in the small bowel (LS ≥ 135) in 9 patients (25%); in all of them the diagnosis of CD was confirmed during follow-up. In 27 patients (75%), the SBCE revealed no significant inflammatory activity (LS < 135); among these patients, the diagnosis of Ulcerative Colitis (UC) was established in 16 cases (59.3%), CD in 1 case (3.7%) and 10 patients (37%) maintained a diagnosis of IBDU during follow-up. A LS ≥ 135 at SBCE had a sensitivity = 90%, specificity = 100%, positive predictive value = 100% and negative predictive value = 94% for the diagnosis of CD. CONCLUSION SBCE proved to be fundamental in the reclassification of patients with IBDU. Absence of significant inflammatory activity in the small intestine allowed exclusion of CD in 94% of cases. PMID:28101306

  16. MR enterography for assessment and management of small bowel Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Allen, Brian C; Leyendecker, John R

    2014-07-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) utilization has increased for the evaluation of small bowel diseases over the last several years. In addition to performing similarly to computed tomography enterography (CTE) in the evaluation of inflammatory bowel disease, MRE lacks ionizing radiation, can image the small bowel dynamically, and provides excellent soft tissue contrast resolution. This article reviews imaging protocols for MRE, normal MR imaging appearance of small bowel, and the imaging findings of small bowel Crohn disease. The importance of imaging findings for directing management in patients with small bowel Crohn disease is emphasized throughout.

  17. Small bowel obstruction in the emergency department: MDCT features of common and uncommon causes.

    PubMed

    Tirumani, Harika; Vassa, Ravi; Fasih, Najla; Ojili, Vijayanadh

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel obstruction is a common condition encountered by the radiologist in the emergency department. Though intestinal adhesions and obstructed hernias are the most common causes of acute small bowel obstruction, a variety of uncommon and rare conditions can cause acute and subacute bowel obstruction. Imaging plays a key role in the workup of bowel obstruction by identifying the cause, level, and degree of bowel obstruction. In this article, we present a comprehensive review of the multi-detector computed tomography features of common and uncommon causes of acute and subacute small bowel obstruction.

  18. Irritable bowel syndrome: The evolution of multi-dimensional looking and multidisciplinary treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Full-Young

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common in the society. Among the putative pathogeneses, gut dysmotility results in pain and disturbed defecation. The latter is probably caused by the effect of abnormal gut water secretion. The interaction between abnormal gas accumulation, abdominal pain and bloating remains controversial. Visceral hypersensitivity and its modification along with the central transmission are the characteristics of IBS patients. The identification of biologic markers based on genetic polymorphisms is undetermined. Imbalanced gut microbiota may alter epithelial permeability to activate nociceptive sensory pathways which in turn lead to IBS. Certain food constituents may exacerbate bowel symptoms. The impact of adult and childhood abuses on IBS is underestimated. Using the concept of biopsychosocial dysfunction can integrate multidimensional pathogeneses. Antispasmodics plus stool consistency modifiers to treat the major symptoms and defecation are the first-line drug treatment. New drugs targeting receptors governing bowel motility, sensation and secretion can be considered, but clinicians must be aware of their potential serious side effects. Psychiatric drugs and modalities may be the final options for treating intractable subjects. Probiotics of multi-species preparations are safe and worth to be considered for the treatment. Antibiotics are promising but their long-term safety and effectiveness are unknown. Diet therapy including exclusion of certain food constituents is an economic measure. Using relatively safe complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) may be optional to those patients who failed classical treatment. In conclusion, IBS is a heterogeneous disorder with multidimensional pathogeneses. Personalized medicines with multidisciplinary approaches using different classes of drugs, psychiatric measures, probiotics and antibiotics, dietary therapy, and finally CAMs, can be considered. PMID:24627587

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: the evolution of multi-dimensional looking and multidisciplinary treatments.

    PubMed

    Chang, Full-Young

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common in the society. Among the putative pathogeneses, gut dysmotility results in pain and disturbed defecation. The latter is probably caused by the effect of abnormal gut water secretion. The interaction between abnormal gas accumulation, abdominal pain and bloating remains controversial. Visceral hypersensitivity and its modification along with the central transmission are the characteristics of IBS patients. The identification of biologic markers based on genetic polymorphisms is undetermined. Imbalanced gut microbiota may alter epithelial permeability to activate nociceptive sensory pathways which in turn lead to IBS. Certain food constituents may exacerbate bowel symptoms. The impact of adult and childhood abuses on IBS is underestimated. Using the concept of biopsychosocial dysfunction can integrate multidimensional pathogeneses. Antispasmodics plus stool consistency modifiers to treat the major symptoms and defecation are the first-line drug treatment. New drugs targeting receptors governing bowel motility, sensation and secretion can be considered, but clinicians must be aware of their potential serious side effects. Psychiatric drugs and modalities may be the final options for treating intractable subjects. Probiotics of multi-species preparations are safe and worth to be considered for the treatment. Antibiotics are promising but their long-term safety and effectiveness are unknown. Diet therapy including exclusion of certain food constituents is an economic measure. Using relatively safe complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) may be optional to those patients who failed classical treatment. In conclusion, IBS is a heterogeneous disorder with multidimensional pathogeneses. Personalized medicines with multidisciplinary approaches using different classes of drugs, psychiatric measures, probiotics and antibiotics, dietary therapy, and finally CAMs, can be considered.

  20. Irritable bowel syndrome in childhood: visceral hypersensitivity and psychosocial aspects.

    PubMed

    Iovino, P; Tremolaterra, F; Boccia, G; Miele, E; Ruju, F M; Staiano, A

    2009-09-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is often considered to play a major etiologic role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome in adults, and some authors argue that this increased sensitivity is mainly due to psychological factors. In contrast, there are no data in children with irritable bowel syndrome which confirm this relationship. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between psychosocial aspects and sensorymotor function in children affected by irritable bowel syndrome. Ten children fulfilling the Rome II criteria for irritable bowel syndrome and seven healthy controls were enrolled. We studied the thresholds and the perception of visceral stimuli in the rectum by means of an electronic barostat (isobaric phasic distentions, 3 mmHg/1 min, interval 1 min) and a validated questionnaire. Personality features were evaluated by means of the Big Five Questionnaire for Children. Sleep, mood disturbance, anxiety and individual performance (missed school days, school results and social activities) were also evaluated. Children with irritable bowel syndrome showed significantly lower thresholds for discomfort (14.8 +/- 3.5 vs 22.3 +/- 6.9 mmHg, P = 0.010) and a higher cumulative perception score (28.2 +/- 11.1 vs 12.3 +/- 8.0, P = 0.005) compared with healthy controls. A higher emotional instability (57.8 +/- 7.0 vs 48.7 +/- 10.1, P = 0.047), sleep disturbance (7.2 +/- 1.0 vs 9.3 +/- 0.5, P = 0.004) and anxiety (6.3 +/- 2.0 vs 2.3 +/- 1.7, P = 0.009) were observed in irritable bowel syndrome patients. Moreover, in a multivariate analysis, the cumulative perception score was significantly related to emotional instability (P = 0.042). In conclusion children with irritable bowel syndrome exhibit visceral hypersensitivity and psychosocial impairment. Emotional instability, as a personality feature in these children, seems to modulate the perception response to visceral stimulations.

  1. Teduglutide: A Review in Short Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kim, Esther S; Keam, Susan J

    2017-03-01

    Subcutaneous teduglutide (Revestive(®)), a glucagon-like peptide-2 analogue that increases intestinal absorption, is approved in the EU for the treatment of short bowel syndrome (SBS) in patients aged ≥1 year who are stable following a period of postsurgical intestinal adaptation. In a phase III trial in adults with SBS intestinal failure (IF) dependent on parenteral support (PS), a significantly greater proportion of teduglutide 0.05 mg/kg/day than placebo recipients achieved a ≥20% reduction in weekly PS volume from baseline to week 20 and maintained it to week 24. The proportion of patients who had a reduction in one or more days on PS was also significant with teduglutide compared with placebo. Improved intestinal absorption and reduced PS requirements were generally maintained in the longer term. Results from a phase III trial in paediatric patients with SBS-IF dependent on PS were consistent with those in adults. Adverse events were mostly of mild to moderate severity and generally consistent with the underlying condition or known mechanism of the drug (e.g. central line-related issues, gastrointestinal events). Teduglutide is therefore a useful treatment option in children (aged ≥1 year), adolescents and adults with SBS.

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Suares, Nicole C; Ford, Alexander C

    2011-05-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic functional disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. The exact cause is unknown. The diagnosis should be made on clinical grounds, using symptom-based criteria such as the Manning or Rome criteria, unless symptoms are thought to be atypical. Excluding celiac disease in all patients consulting with symptoms suggestive of IBS is worthwhile, but evidence for performing other investigations to exclude organic disease is not convincing. No medical therapy for IBS has been shown to alter the disease course, and treatment has traditionally been directed towards symptom relief. The aim should be to improve the predominant symptom reported by the patient. Fiber, peppermint oil, or antispasmodic agents are beneficial as first-line therapies in some patients. Where these fail, emerging data have confirmed the efficacy of antidepressants, drugs acting on the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor, and probiotics in the short-term treatment of IBS. There are a number of novel therapies under development that show promise, including non-absorbable antibiotics, lubiprostone, and linaclotide. This article will provide a summary of diagnostic criteria for IBS, evidence to support investigations to exclude organic disease, and current and emerging therapies in this field.

  3. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction.

    PubMed

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of IBS patients report the onset or the exacerbation of their symptoms after the meals. Recently, an increasing attention has been paid to the role of food in IBS. In this review we summarize the most recent evidences about the role of diet on IBS symptoms. A diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates and sugar alcohols has beneficial effects on IBS symptoms. More studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the relationship between food and IBS. However, in the foreseeable future, dietary strategies will represent one of the key tools in the therapeutic management of patients with IBS.

  4. Elderly patients and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Nimmons, Danielle; Limdi, Jimmy K

    2016-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is increasing globally. Coupled with an ageing population, the number of older patients with IBD is set to increase. The clinical features and therapeutic options in young and elderly patients are comparable but there are some significant differences. The wide differential diagnosis of IBD in elderly patients may result in a delay in diagnosis. The relative dearth of data specific to elderly IBD patients often resulting from their exclusion from pivotal clinical trials and the lack of consensus guidelines have made clinical decisions somewhat challenging. In addition, age specific concerns such as co-morbidity; loco-motor and cognitive function, poly-pharmacy and its consequences need to be taken into account. In applying modern treatment paradigms to the elderly, the clinician must consider the potential for more pronounced adverse effects in this vulnerable group and set appropriate boundaries maximising benefit and minimising harm. Meanwhile, clinicians need to make personalised decisions but as evidence based as possible in the holistic, considered and optimal management of IBD in elderly patients. In this review we will cover the clinical features and therapeutic options of IBD in the elderly; as well as addressing common questions and challenges posed by its management. PMID:26855812

  5. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic.

  6. Interaction of obesity and inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jason W; Zisman, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition of unknown etiology that is thought to result from a combination of genetic, immunologic and environmental factors. The incidence of IBD has been increasing in recent decades, especially in developing and developed nations, and this is hypothesized to be in part related to the change in dietary and lifestyle factors associated with modernization. The prevalence of obesity has risen in parallel with the rise in IBD, suggesting a possible shared environmental link between these two conditions. Studies have shown that obesity impacts disease development and response to therapy in patients with IBD and other autoimmune conditions. The observation that adipose tissue produces pro-inflammatory adipokines provides a potential mechanism for the observed epidemiologic links between obesity and IBD, and this has developed into an active area of investigative inquiry. Additionally, emerging evidence highlights a role for the intestinal microbiota in the development of both obesity and IBD, representing another potential mechanistic connection between the two conditions. In this review we discuss the epidemiology of obesity and IBD, possible pathophysiologic links, and the clinical impact of obesity on IBD disease course and implications for management. PMID:27672284

  7. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician’s tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients’ education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections. PMID:25110408

  8. Preventing infective complications in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Mill, Justine; Lawrance, Ian C

    2014-08-07

    Over the past decade there has been a dramatic change in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which comprise the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). This is due to the increasing use of immunosuppressives and in particular the biological agents, which are being used earlier in the course of disease, and for longer durations, as these therapies result in better clinical outcomes for patients. This, however, has the potential to increase the risk of opportunistic and serious infections in these patients, most of which are preventable. Much like the risk for potential malignancy resulting from the use of these therapies long-term, a balance needs to be struck between medication use to control the disease with minimization of the risk of an opportunistic infection. This outcome is achieved by the physician's tailored use of justified therapies, and the patients' education and actions to minimize infection risk. The purpose of this review is to explore the evidence and guidelines available to all physicians managing patients with IBD using immunomodulating agents and to aid in the prevention of opportunistic infections.

  9. Transitional Care in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transitional care is an organized effort to provide pediatric patients with the tools and resources they need to assume personal responsibility for their medical care while facilitating their transfer from a pediatrician to an adult practitioner. Since inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is usually chronic and up to 25% of IBD patients are diagnosed before the age of 18 years, transitional care is an important consideration for adolescent and young adult patients. The importance of transitional care for chronic diseases that begin in childhood has been recognized in a number of published recommendations. However, most of these recommendations arise from intuitive reasoning, as physicians lack information regarding the need for transitional care, optimal delivery protocols, and the efficacy of transition programs. Even fewer studies have been published regarding transitional care in IBD. Current guidelines stress the importance of providing patients with educational resources to help them develop the skills they need to manage their care as independent adults, introducing the concept of transfer to adult care in advance of the actual transfer, and developing routes of communication to facilitate the transfer from pediatric to adult care providers. Future studies should aim to elucidate which programs are effective and how they should be implemented. PMID:21346849

  10. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The gut bacterial microbiome, particularly its role in disease and inflammation, has gained international attention with the successful use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in the treatment of Clostridium difficile infection. This success has led to studies exploring the role of FMT in other conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis are chronic inflammatory conditions of the gastrointestinal system that have multifactorial etiologies. A shift in gut microbial composition in genetically susceptible individuals, an altered immune system, and environmental factors are all hypothesized to have a role in the pathogenesis of IBD. While numerous case reports and cohort studies have described the use of FMT in patients with IBD over the last 2 decades, the development of new sequencing techniques and results from 2 recent randomized, controlled trials have allowed for a better understanding of the relationship between the microbiome and the human host. However, despite these efforts, knowledge remains limited and the role of FMT in the management of IBD remains uncertain. Further investigation is necessary before FMT joins the current armamentarium of treatment options in clinical practice. PMID:27493597

  11. Innate immune dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Gersemann, M; Wehkamp, J; Stange, E F

    2012-05-01

    The pathogenetic mechanisms that cause the two types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), are still under investigation. Nevertheless, there is broad agreement that luminal microbes are of particular relevance in the development of these conditions. In recent years, increasing evidence has shown that defects in the innate immunity are at the centre of both types of IBD. The innate intestinal barrier is provided by the epithelium which secretes antimicrobial peptides (so-called defensins) that are retained in the mucus layer. In ileal CD, the alpha-defensins are lacking owing to several Paneth cell defects. In colonic CD, the expression of beta-defensins is inadequate. This may be related to downregulation of the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma and in some cohorts is associated with a reduced HBD2 gene copy number. In UC, the mucus layer, which protects the host from the enormous amounts of luminal microbes, is defective. This is accompanied by an insufficient differentiation from intestinal stem cells towards goblet cells. All these disturbances in the gut barrier shift the balance from epithelial defence towards bacterial offence. The current treatment for CD and UC is based on suppression of this secondary inflammatory process. In future, patients may benefit from new therapeutic approaches stimulating the protective innate immune system.

  12. Primary small bowel melanomas: fact or myth?

    PubMed Central

    Hadjittofi, Christopher; Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Shah, Rahul; Ala, Aftab A.

    2016-01-01

    Small bowel melanoma (SBM) is a rare entity, which often evades diagnosis and therefore presents late. Its origin, whether arising primarily or metastatically from an unidentified or regressed primary cutaneous melanoma, remains debatable. In this report, we present a rare case of primary SBM and review the current literature. A 60-year-old man presented with melena and microcytic anemia. A series of investigations including abdominal ultrasonography (US), esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) and colonoscopy were normal. Abdominal computed tomography revealed no specific pathology. Subsequent capsule endoscopy identified a jejunal mass, which was confirmed on laparotomy, was resected, and histologically diagnosed as melanoma. Extensive postoperative clinical examination revealed no cutaneous lesions. This report discusses gastrointestinal (GI) malignant melanoma, and examines the evidence both for and against the existence of true primary vs. metastatic disease. Furthermore, this case highlights the capabilities of capsule endoscopy in identifying an extremely rare GI tumor, which evaded other diagnostic modalities. Finally, the origins and pathophysiology of this rare cancer are evaluated, with the aim of promoting early diagnosis and treatment, and therefore improving current poor outcomes. PMID:27127766

  13. Murine Ileocolic Bowel Resection with Primary Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Troy; Borowiec, Anna; Dicken, Bryan; Fedorak, Richard; Madsen, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal resections are frequently required for treatment of diseases involving the gastrointestinal tract, with Crohn’s disease and colon cancer being two common examples. Despite the frequency of these procedures, a significant knowledge gap remains in describing the inherent effects of intestinal resection on host physiology and disease pathophysiology. This article provides detailed instructions for an ileocolic resection with primary end-to-end anastomosis in mice, as well as essential aspects of peri-operative care to maximize post-operative success. When followed closely, this procedure yields a 95% long-term survival rate, no failure to thrive, and minimizes post-operative complications of bowel obstruction and anastomotic leak. The technical challenges of performing the procedure in mice are a barrier to its wide spread use in research. The skills described in this article can be acquired without previous surgical experience. Once mastered, the murine ileocolic resection procedure will provide a reproducible tool for studying the effects of intestinal resection in models of human disease. PMID:25406841

  14. [Inflammatory bowel diseases--imaging diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Gil, Jerzy; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Stec-Michalska, Krystyna; Chojnacki, Cezary

    2004-01-01

    The basic diagnostic procedure in ulcerative colitis is an endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract. It allows the macroscopic evaluation as well as the specimen taking for histological assessment what is the basis for ultimate diagnosis. In case of Crohn's disease the radiological diagnostics is of equal importance as endoscope evaluation. The imaging of inflammatory changes in Crohn's disease still poses some difficulties, especially, that located in the small intestine. Lately, the range of accessible examinations has been wider. We have in disposal the ultrasonography, the computed tomography, the magnetic resonance imaging and the capsular endoscopy. All of them are of great use in the diagnosis of Crohn's disease. In case of microscopic colitis all the imaging diagnostics has no use. The only one mean to establish the diagnosis is a histological assessment. What is more, in the period of remission the colon tissue could be normal. In this paper we discussed the traditional and contemporary intestine imaging methods in inflammatory bowel diseases. The conclusion is that the further progress in science offers a better imaging and, what is even more important, the more efficient diagnostics and treatment of these diseases.

  15. [Artificial nutrition in inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Ansaldo, G L; Varaldo, E; Assalino, M; Borgonovo, G

    2004-01-01

    Malnutrition is often a major clinical problem in patients affected by IBD. Assessment of nutritional status should be routinely carried out in these patients and, in case of severe malnutrition, artificial nutrition should be used. In ulcerative colitis and in Crohn disease localized to colonic segments both Parenteral Nutrition (PN) and Enteral Nutrition (EN) have similar results as support treatments but they have no primary therapeutic effects and then they are indicated only in case of severe malnutrition and/or when a surgical procedure is planned. Some theoretical advantages derived from supplementation of short chain fatty acids and omega3-series is still debated. More evident are the advantages of nutritional support in Crohn enteritis. Both PN and EN have a role as a primary therapy capable to induce remission although these results are not prolonged in time when nutrition is not associated with pharmacological treatments. Experiments of pharmaco-nutrition with glutamine and fish fatty acid have to be validated in the clinical practice. In case of integrity of the small bowel and tolerance of the patient, EN is preferable to PN for its lower costs and reduced related complications. PN is still indicated in more severe cases or in acute phase when the need of restoring rapidly the hydroelectrolitic and nitrogen/caloric balance prevails.

  16. Skin Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brian L.; Chandra, Stephanie; Shih, David Quan

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a disease that affects the intestinal tract via an inflammatory process. Patients who suffer from IBD often have diseases that affect multiple other organ systems as well. These are called extraintestinal manifestations and can be just as, if not more debilitating than the intestinal inflammation itself. The skin is one of the most commonly affected organ systems in patients who suffer from IBD. The scientific literature suggests that a disturbance of the equilibrium between host defense and tolerance, and the subsequent over-activity of certain immune pathways are responsible for the cutaneous disorders seen so frequently in IBD patients. The purpose of this review article is to give an overview of the types of skin diseases that are typically seen with IBD and their respective pathogenesis, proposed mechanisms, and treatments. These cutaneous disorders can manifest as metastatic lesions, reactive processes to the intestinal inflammation, complications of IBD itself, or side effects from IBD treatments; these can be associated with IBD via genetic linkage, common autoimmune processes, or other mechanisms that will be discussed in this article. Ultimately, it is important for healthcare providers to understand that skin manifestations should always be checked and evaluated for in patients with IBD. Furthermore, skin disorders can predate gastrointestinal symptoms and thus may serve as important clinical indicators leading physicians to earlier diagnosis of IBD. PMID:22347192

  17. Irritable bowel syndrome and food interaction

    PubMed Central

    Cuomo, Rosario; Andreozzi, Paolo; Zito, Francesco Paolo; Passananti, Valentina; De Carlo, Giovanni; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western countries. Despite the high prevalence of this disorders, the therapeutic management of these patients is often unsatisfactory. A number of factors have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of IBS, including impaired motility and sensitivity, increased permeability, changes in the gut microbiome and alterations in the brain-gut axis. Also food seems to play a critical role: the most of IBS patients report the onset or the exacerbation of their symptoms after the meals. Recently, an increasing attention has been paid to the role of food in IBS. In this review we summarize the most recent evidences about the role of diet on IBS symptoms. A diet restricted in fermentable, poorly absorbed carbohydrates and sugar alcohols has beneficial effects on IBS symptoms. More studies are needed to improve our knowledge about the relationship between food and IBS. However, in the foreseeable future, dietary strategies will represent one of the key tools in the therapeutic management of patients with IBS. PMID:25083057

  18. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Elizabeth A.; Mollen, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) represents a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by chronic or recurring inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. While the exact etiology of disease is unknown, IBD is recognized to be a complex, multifactorial disease that results from an intricate interplay of genetic predisposition, an altered immune response, changes in the intestinal microbiota, and environmental factors. Together, these contribute to a destruction of the intestinal epithelial barrier, increased gut permeability, and an influx of immune cells. Given that most cellular functions as well as maintenance of the epithelial barrier is energy-dependent, it is logical to assume that mitochondrial dysfunction may play a key role in both the onset and recurrence of disease. Indeed several studies have demonstrated evidence of mitochondrial stress and alterations in mitochondrial function within the intestinal epithelium of patients with IBD and mice undergoing experimental colitis. Although the hallmarks of mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress and impaired ATP production are known to be evident in the intestines of patients with IBD, it is as yet unclear whether these processes occur as a cause of consequence of disease. We provide a current review of mitochondrial function in the setting of intestinal inflammation during IBD. PMID:26484345

  19. [Irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease and gluten].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Montoro, Miguel

    2014-08-04

    For many years irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and celiac disease (CD) have been considered 2 completely separate entities, with CD being clearly related to a permanent gluten intolerance and IBS having no relation with gluten ingestion. However IBS and CD symptoms may be indistinguishable, especially when diarrhea, bloating or abdominal pain predominate. In the last decade several studies have shown that the separation between CD and IBS is not so clear. Thus, some patients who have been diagnosed of IBS suffer in fact from CD. In addition, it seems that there is a group of patients who, without having CD, suffer gluten intolerance that cause them digestive symptoms similar to those of IBS. Gluten sensitivity is defined as the spectrum of morphological, immunological and functional abnormalities that respond to a gluten-free diet. This concept includes histological, immunological and clinical manifestations in the absence of evident morphological abnormalities. Therefore, it is mandatory to establish in a scientific way in which patients a gluten-free diet will be beneficial as well as when this is not justified.

  20. Disease monitoring in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shannon; Malter, Lisa; Hudesman, David

    2015-01-01

    The optimal method for monitoring quiescent disease in patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis is yet to be determined. Endoscopic evaluation with ileocolonoscopy is the gold standard but is invasive, costly, and time-consuming. There are many commercially available biomarkers that may be used in clinical practice to evaluate disease status in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but the most widely adopted biomarkers are C-reactive protein (CRP) and fecal calprotectin (FC). This review summarizes the evidence for utilizing CRP and FC for monitoring IBD during clinical remission and after surgical resection. Endoscopic correlation with CRP and FC is evaluated in each disease state. Advantages and drawbacks of each biomarker are discussed with special consideration of isolated ileal CD. Fecal immunochemical testing, traditionally used for colorectal cancer screening, is mentioned as a potential new alternative assay in the evaluation of IBD. Based on a mixture of information gleaned from biomarkers, clinical status, and endoscopic evaluation, the best treatment decisions can be made for the patient with IBD. PMID:26523100

  1. Faecal calprotectin: Management in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Benítez, José Manuel; García-Sánchez, Valle

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic and relapsing disorder which leads to an inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. A tailored therapy to achieve mucosal healing with the less adverse events has become a key issue in the management of IBD. In the past, the clinical remission was the most important factor to consider for adapting diagnostic procedures and therapeutic strategies. However, there is no a good correlation between symptoms and intestinal lesions, so currently the goals of treatment are to achieve not only the control of symptoms, but deep remission, which is related with a favourable prognosis. Thus, the determination of biological markers or biomarkers of intestinal inflammation play a crucial role. Many biomarkers have been extensively evaluated in IBD showing significant correlation with endoscopic lesions, risk of recurrence and response to treatment. One of the most important markers is faecal calprotectin (FC). Despite calprotectin limitations, this biomarker represents a reliable and noninvasive alternative to reduce the need for endoscopic procedures. FC has demonstrated its performance for regular monitoring of IBD patients, not only to the diagnosis for discriminating IBD from non-IBD diagnosis, but for assessing disease activity, relapse prediction and response to therapy. Although, FC provides better results than other biomarkers such as C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, these surrogate markers of intestinal inflammation should not be used isolation but in combination with other clinical, endoscopic, radiological or/and histological parameters enabling a comprehensive assessment of IBD patients. PMID:26600978

  2. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, “Crohn’s disease AND male infertility”, “ulcerative colitis AND male infertility”. References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  3. [Inflammatory bowel diseases: an immunological approach].

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Sofía E; Beltrán, Caroll J; Peralta, Alexis; Rivas, Paola; Rojas, Néstor; Figueroa, Carolina; Quera, Rodrigo; Hermoso, Marcela A

    2008-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are inflammatory diseases with a multifactorial component that involve the intestinal tract. The two relevant IBD syndromes are Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). One factor involved in IBD development is a genetic predisposition, associated to NOD2/CARD15 and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) polymorphisms that might favor infectious enterocolitis that is possibly associated to the development of IBD. The identification of specific immunologic alterations in IBD and their relationship to the etiology of the disease is a relevant research topic. The role of intra and extracellular molecules, such as transcription factors and cytokines that are involved in the inflammatory response, needs to be understood. The relevance of immunologic molecules that might drive the immune response to a T helper (Th) 1, Th 2 or the recently described Th 17 phenotype, has been demonstrated in animal models and clinical studies with IBD patients. CD and UC predominantly behave with a Th 1 and Th 2 immune phenotype, respectively. Recently, an association between CD and Th 17 has been reported. The knowledge acquired from immunologic and molecular research will help to develop accurate diagnostic methods and efficient therapies.

  4. Short bowel syndrome after laparoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    McBride, Corrigan L; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Sudan, Debra; Thompson, Jon S

    2014-04-01

    Short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a potential postoperative complication after intra-abdominal procedures. Whether the laparoscopic approach is as likely to result in SBS or the causative mechanisms are similar to open procedures is unknown. Our aim was to evaluate potential mechanisms of SBS after laparoscopic procedures. The records of 175 adult patients developing SBS as a postoperative complication were reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients had open procedures and 28 laparoscopic. Colectomy (39%), hysterectomy (11%), and appendectomy (11%) were the most common open procedures. SBS followed laparoscopic gastric bypass (46%) and cholecystectomy (32%) most frequently. The mechanisms of SBS were different: adhesive obstruction (57 vs 22%, P < 0.05) was more common in the open group, whereas volvulus (18 vs 46%, P < 0.05) was more common after laparoscopy. Overall, ischemia (25 vs 32%) was similar but significantly more laparoscopic patients had postoperative hypoperfusion (32 vs 67%, P < 0.05). Eleven of the 13 laparoscopic bariatric procedures had internal hernias and volvulus. Of the nine patients undergoing cholecystectomy, four developed ischemia early postoperatively presumably secondary to pneumoperitoneum. SBS is an increasingly recognized complication of laparoscopic procedures. The mechanisms of intestinal injury differ from open procedures with a higher incidence of volvulus and more frequent ischemia from hypoperfusion.

  5. The Intestinal Microbiota and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ringel, Yehuda; Ringel-Kulka, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent and the best studied functional gastrointestinal disorder. The etiology and the pathogenesis of IBS are still not clear; however, recent studies have implicated a role for alterations in the intestinal microbiota (dysbiosis) in the pathophysiology of the disorder. Epidemiological observations have demonstrated that the development of IBS symptoms is often preceded by a disruption of the individual's normal intestinal microbiota, and microbiological studies have demonstrated compositional differences in the intestinal microbiota between patients with IBS patients and healthy controls. In addition, animal studies and a few recent human clinical studies have demonstrated that compositional changes in the intestinal microbiota in IBS are associated with relevant abnormal gastrointestinal and brain-gut axis functions that are often observed in patients with IBS. This article discusses points of interest from the current research on the microbiota-gut-brain interactions in IBS and highlights the relevance of the emerging data to our understanding of the disorder and the clinical implications for patients' care.

  6. Extraintestinal Manifestations of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schoepfer, Alain; Scharl, Michael; Lakatos, Peter L.; Navarini, Alexander; Rogler, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Extraintestinal manifestations (EIM) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are frequent and may occur before or after IBD diagnosis. EIM may impact the quality of life for patients with IBD significantly requiring specific treatment depending on the affected organ(s). They most frequently affect joints, skin, or eyes, but can also less frequently involve other organs such as liver, lungs, or pancreas. Certain EIM, such as peripheral arthritis, oral aphthous ulcers, episcleritis, or erythema nodosum, are frequently associated with active intestinal inflammation and usually improve by treatment of the intestinal activity. Other EIM, such as uveitis or ankylosing spondylitis, usually occur independent of intestinal inflammatory activity. For other not so rare EIM, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and primary sclerosing cholangitis, the association with the activity of the underlying IBD is unclear. Successful therapy of EIM is essential for improving quality of life of patients with IBD. Besides other options, tumor necrosis factor antibody therapy is an important therapy for EIM in patients with IBD. PMID:26154136

  7. The aged gut in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Ardesia, M; Villanacci, V; Fries, W

    2015-12-01

    Senescence is accompanied by various anatomical and functional alterations starting from mastication and deglutition and consequent modifications of nutrition. In addition, the widespread use of proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in aged subjects weakens the gastric barrier, thus contributing to easier entry of microbes into the gastrointestinal tract. The microbiota of the elderly is less stable than that of younger adults, therefore, gut dysbiosis is more frequent. Dysbiosis represents a key factor for infections, e.g. Clostridium difficile, especially after antibiotic treatment, but also represents an important step for the development of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). IBD onset in the elderly needs careful evaluation in order to distinguish this entity from other pathologies that may affect the gut in senescence. Colitis associated with diverticula, drug-induced, ischemic, and microscopic colitides are among the possible diseases and, therefore, a careful macroscopic and histologic evaluation is mandatory. Finally, late onset IBD represents an important challenge for physicians since it occurs in subjects with frequent comorbidities and relative concomitant treatments. Although there is some evidence that disease course of elderly-onset IBD follows a milder course, overall morbidity, hospitalization rates and even mortality, the latter mostly due to comorbidities, are increased, especially in emergency settings.

  8. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-08-06

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms "IBD AND male infertility", "Crohn's disease AND male infertility", "ulcerative colitis AND male infertility". References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options.

  9. [Small bowel perforation caused by magnetic toys].

    PubMed

    Schroepfer, E; Siauw, C; Hoecht, B; Meyer, T

    2010-06-01

    Accidental ingestion of foreign bodies is a common problem in infants and childhood, but ingestion of magnetic construction toys is very rare. In the case of ingestion of multiple parts of these magnetic construction toys, they may attract each other through the intestinal walls, causing pressure necrosis, perforation, fistula formation or intestinal obstruction. A 20-month-old boy presented with a three-day history of abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. Physical examination revealed a slighted distended abdomen. The -white blood cell count was increased, but the C-reactive protein was normal. Ultrasound and X-ray of the abdomen showed a distended bowel loop in the right upper quadrant, a moderate amount of free intraperitoneal liquid and 4 foreign bodies. Emergency laparotomy was performed and 2 perforations in the ileum were detected. The perforations were caused by a magnetic construction toy and 2 iron globes. The fourth foreign body was a glass marble. The foreign bodies were removed, both perforations were primarily sutured. The child was discharged on postoperative day 10 after an uneventful recovery. Parents should be warned against the potential dangers of children's constructions toys that contain these kinds of magnets.

  10. Importance of adequate exercise in the detection of coronary heart disease by radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Lo, K.; Pitt, B.

    1980-12-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained on 77 symptomatic patients without prior documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease was present by angiograms in 48. Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was abnormal in 41 patients (overall sensitivity 85%). In 29 patients with normal coronary arteries, RNV was normal in 24 (specificity 83%). To determine if the exercise level affects sensitivity, the studies were graded for adequacy of exercise. It was considered adequate if patients developed (a) chest pain, or (b) ST segment depression of at least 1 mm, or (c) if they achieved a pressure rate product greater than 250. Among the 48 patients with coronary artery disease, 35 achieved adequate exercise. Thirty-three had an abnormal RNV (sensitivity 94%). In 13 patients who failed to achieve adequate exercise, RNV was abnormal in eight (sensitivity of only 62%). Some patients with coronary artery disease may have a normal ventricular response at inadequate levels of stress.

  11. [Prevention of ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus by adequate treatment with acyclovir].

    PubMed

    Borruat, F X; Buechi, E R; Piguet, B; Fitting, P; Zografos, L; Herbort, C P

    1991-05-01

    We compared the frequency of severe ocular complications secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (HZO) in 232 patients. They were divided into three groups: 1) patients without treatment (n = 164); 2) patients treated adequately (n = 48) with acyclovir (ACV; 5 x 800 mg/d orally and ophthalmic ointment 5 x /d for a minimum of 7 days, given within three days after skin eruption); and, 3) patients treated inadequately (n = 20) with ACV (only topical treatment, insufficient doses, interrupted treatment, delayed treatment). Patients with no treatment or with inadequate treatments showed the same frequency of severe ocular complications (21% (34/164) and 25% (5/20), respectively). In contrast, when adequate treatment of ACV was given complications occurred in only 4% (2/48) of cases. This study emphasizes the need for prompt (within three days after skin eruption) and adequate (5 x 800 mg/d for at least 7 days) treatment of ACV to prevent the severe complications of HZO.

  12. Meals served in Danish nursing homes and to Meals-on-Wheels clients may not offer nutritionally adequate choices.

    PubMed

    Beck, Anne Marie; Hansen, Kirsten S

    2010-01-01

    Underweight is a significant problem among older Danish nursing home residents and home-care clients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional composition of the meals prepared for older adults in nursing homes and receiving Meals-on-Wheels deliveries, focusing on the menus most commonly served, including the standard menu (most commonly prepared), the energy and protein dense menu, and two types of texture modified menus (chopped and blended). Also, one portion of a homemade energy and protein dense drink was collected and analyzed. For each of the participating kitchens (N = 10), extra portions of different menus were made (3 days in a row). The meal samples (total n = 389) were analyzed for content of energy, protein, fat and carbohydrate. The findings were compared with recommendations regarding the foods to be served in Danish institutions. The nutrient content of the meals-on-wheels and nursing home meals, as well as that of the homemade energy and protein dense drink, varied considerably. The nursing home menus seldom or never fulfilled the recommendations. Our findings support the conclusion that meals served in Danish nursing homes and to meals-on-wheels clients do not consistently offer adequate nutritional intakes.

  13. Metabolic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease: crosstalk between adipose tissue and bowel.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Pedro; Magro, Fernando; Martel, Fátima

    2015-02-01

    Epidemiological studies show that both the incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the proportion of people with obesity and/or obesity-associated metabolic syndrome increased markedly in developed countries during the past half century. Obesity is also associated with the development of more active IBD and requirement for hospitalization and with a decrease in the time span between diagnosis and surgery. Patients with IBD, especially Crohn's disease, present fat-wrapping or "creeping fat," which corresponds to ectopic adipose tissue extending from the mesenteric attachment and covering the majority of the small and large intestinal surface. Mesenteric adipose tissue in patients with IBD presents several morphological and functional alterations, e.g., it is more infiltrated with immune cells such as macrophages and T cells. All these lines of evidence clearly show an association between obesity, adipose tissue, and functional bowel disorders. In this review, we will show that the mesenteric adipose tissue and creeping fat are not innocent by standers but actively contribute to the intestinal and systemic inflammatory responses in patients with IBD. More specifically, we will review evidence showing that adipose tissue in IBD is associated with major alterations in the secretion of cytokines and adipokines involved in inflammatory process, in adipose tissue mesenchymal stem cells and adipogenesis, and in the interaction between adipose tissue and other intestinal components (immune, lymphatic, neuroendocrine, and intestinal epithelial systems). Collectively, these studies underline the importance of adipose tissue for the identification of novel therapeutic approaches for IBD.

  14. Diagnostic approach to small bowel involvement in inflammatory bowel disease: view of the endoscopist.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Konstantinos A

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in endoscopic small bowel (SB) techniques have revolutionalized the diagnostic approach of patients with suspected or known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has become an important diagnostic tool for the evaluation of suspected CD of the SB or in patients with known IBD to rule out SB involvement. The greatest utility of WCE has been observed in cases of suspected CD, where the initial evaluation with traditional radiographic and endoscopic studies has failed to establish the diagnosis. WCE can detect early SB lesions that can be overlooked by traditional radiological studies. The sensitivity of diagnosing SB CD by WCE is superior to other endoscopic or radiological methods such as push enteroscopy, computed tomography or magnetic resonance enteroclysis. The utility of WCE in patients with known CD, IBD unclassified (IBDU) and a select group of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) can better define the diagnosis and extent of the disease and may lead to reclassification of IBD from UC/IBDU to definitive CD. In addition, previously diagnosed patients with CD may be found to have more significant disease burden in the SB. This information may facilitate more targeted and effective therapies and potentially lead to better patient outcomes. A disadvantage of WCE is its low specificity and the risk of being retained in a strictured area of the SB. Balloon-assisted enteroscopy has essentially replaced push enteroscopy, and has been used to treat CD strictures, obtain biopsies from areas of SB involvement and even retrieving a retained capsule.

  15. Stigmatization toward irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease in an online cohort

    PubMed Central

    Taft, T. H.; Bedell, A.; Naftaly, J.; Keefer, L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Stigma is associated with many negative health outcomes. Research has examined perceived and internalized stigma in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but less has been done to evaluate levels of enacted stigma associated with these conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of enacted stigma toward IBS and IBD in the general population compared to an adult-onset asthma (AOA) control group. Methods Participants were recruited via social media and a research-dedicated website and completed all measures online. Participants were randomized to one of six clinical vignettes: (i) IBD male, (ii) IBD female, (iii) IBS male, (iv) IBS female, (v) AOA male, or (vi) AOA female. Participants read the assigned vignette and then completed measures of emotional empathy, level of familiarity, and enacted stigma. Key Results Participants reported higher levels of enacted stigma toward IBS compared to both IBD and AOA. No differences in stigma were found between IBD and AOA. Higher levels of familiarity were most strongly correlated with reduced IBD-related stigma, with weaker but still significant correlations between level of familiarity and IBS and AOA. Higher levels of emotional empathy were associated with reduced stigma for IBD, IBS, and AOA. Conclusions & Inferences Individuals with IBS experience greater levels of enacted stigma compared to IBD and AOA. This finding is consistent with previous research that has shown greater levels of perceived and internalized stigma in IBS compared to IBD. PMID:27501483

  16. State-of-the-art of irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease research in 2008

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Lynne V

    2008-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are two of the leading causes of chronic intestinal conditions in the world. This issue of World Journal of Gastroenterology (WJG) presents a series of papers from world experts who discuss the current knowledge and opinions on these important conditions. Although great strides have been made in the diagnosis, treatment and pathology of IBS and IBD; much has yet to be explained. The etiologies and risk factors of these multifactorial conditions remain elusive. Specific diagnostic biomarkers need to be developed and safer treatments developed. The burden of IBS and IBD on the healthcare system is felt with repeated medical care visits and high costs. IBS and IBD patients can account for 30%-50% of office visits at gastroenterology services/clinics. Over one million people have IBD in the United States, with 30 000 new cases being diagnosed every year. One-quarter million people in the UK are afflicted with IBD. The cost of medical care in the United States for IBD is estimated to be $1.8 billion/year. PMID:18461647

  17. Visceral hypersensitivity in inflammatory bowel diseases and irritable bowel syndrome: The role of proteases

    PubMed Central

    Ceuleers, Hannah; Van Spaendonk, Hanne; Hanning, Nikita; Heirbaut, Jelena; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Joossens, Jurgen; Augustyns, Koen; De Man, Joris G; De Meester, Ingrid; De Winter, Benedicte Y

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, enzymes catalyzing the hydrolysis of peptide bonds, are present at high concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract. Besides their well-known role in the digestive process, they also function as signaling molecules through the activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs). Based on their chemical mechanism for catalysis, proteases can be classified into several classes: serine, cysteine, aspartic, metallo- and threonine proteases represent the mammalian protease families. In particular, the class of serine proteases will play a significant role in this review. In the last decades, proteases have been suggested to play a key role in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity, which is a major factor contributing to abdominal pain in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and/or irritable bowel syndrome. So far, only a few preclinical animal studies have investigated the effect of protease inhibitors specifically on visceral sensitivity while their effect on inflammation is described in more detail. In our accompanying review we describe their effect on gastrointestinal permeability. On account of their promising results in the field of visceral hypersensitivity, further research is warranted. The aim of this review is to give an overview on the concept of visceral hypersensitivity as well as on the physiological and pathophysiological functions of proteases herein. PMID:28058009

  18. Broadband inversion of 1J(CC) responses in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra.

    PubMed

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Establishing the carbon skeleton of a molecule greatly facilitates the process of structure elucidation, both manual and computer-assisted. Recent advances in the family of ADEQUATE experiments demonstrated their potential in this regard. 1,1-ADEQUATE, which provides direct (13)C-(13)C correlation via (1)J(CC), and 1,n-ADEQUATE, which typically yields (3)J(CC) and (1)J(CC) correlations, are more sensitive and more widely applicable experiments than INADEQUATE and PANACEA. A recently reported modified pulse sequence that semi-selectively inverts (1)J(CC) correlations in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra provided a significant improvement, allowing (1)J(CC) and (n)J(CC) correlations to be discerned in the same spectrum. However, the reported experiment requires a careful matching of the amplitude transfer function with (1)J(CC) coupling constants in order to achieve the inversion, and even then some (1)J(CC) correlations could still have positive intensity due to the oscillatory nature of the transfer function. Both shortcomings limit the practicality of the method. We now report a new, dual-optimized inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment, which provides more uniform inversion of (1)J(CC) correlations across the range of 29-82 Hz. Unlike the original method, the dual optimization experiment does not require fine-tuning for the molecule's (1)J(CC) coupling constant values. Even more usefully, the dual-optimized version provides up to two-fold improvement in signal-to-noise for some long-range correlations. Using modern, cryogenically-cooled probes, the experiment can be successfully applied to samples of ~1 mg under favorable circumstances. The improvements afforded by dual optimization inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment make it a useful and practical tool for NMR structure elucidation and should facilitate the implementation and utilization of the experiment.

  19. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Melody S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2012-09-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent's race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth.

  20. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Darrell J.; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D.; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent’s race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth. PMID:22658579