Science.gov

Sample records for adequate clean water

  1. Water-based cleaning fundamentals

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1991-12-01

    A basic description of water-based alkaline cleaning is presented, The nature of soils is described. The compositions of conventional cleaning compounds are given with descriptions of the functions of the ingredients. The mechanisms by which soil is removed are explained. The degrees of cleanliness required, along with the influence of the material being cleaned, are discussed. Tests for cleanliness are described.

  2. Clean Water State Revolving Fund

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    How the Clean Water State Revolving Fund works, how to obtain funding, program eligibility, innovative ways to use the funds to get the greatest water quality benefits and leverage financial resources of the program, and share success stories.

  3. Clean Water Act Analytical Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA publishes laboratory analytical methods (test procedures) that are used by industries and municipalities to analyze the chemical, physical and biological components of wastewater and other environmental samples required by the Clean Water Act.

  4. In Brief: Clean water strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Ofori, Leslie

    2010-09-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is inviting the public to comment on a draft strategy to protect and restore lakes, streams, and coastal waters. The document, “Coming together for clean water: EPA's strategy for achieving clean water,” outlines the agency's plans to address the United States' critical water stressors, sources, and threats. The document outlines several approaches the agency has identified, including systematically assessing the nation's waters to provide a baseline for tracking progress; increasing the focus on protecting healthy waters; enhancing EPA's ability to restore degraded waters and ecosystems; and reducing pollution. Specific EPA actions include completing national aquatic resource surveys; developing metrics to create a national list of healthy watersheds; strengthening the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System; and encouraging integrated water management approaches and green infrastructure. To review the draft strategy and to submit comments by the 17 September deadline, visit http://blog.epa.gov/waterforum.

  5. Clean water, clear choices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes new waste water treatment equipment used on offshore oil and gas rigs to remove hydrocarbons from production water. As effluent regulations are requiring more stringent control on decoiling, hydrocyclone, diffusion, and centrifuge technologies are competing for their percentage of market shares. This paper describes each of these technologies and the equipment used to obtain these effluent standards. Economics and performance of each type are described.

  6. Clean Water for Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Aniruddha B; Kumar, Jyoti Kishen

    2015-01-01

    Availability of safe drinking water, a vital natural resource, is still a distant dream to many around the world, especially in developing countries. Increasing human activity and industrialization have led to a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological pollutants entering water bodies and affecting human lives. Efforts to develop efficient, economical, and technologically sound methods to produce clean water for developing countries have increased worldwide. We focus on solar disinfection, filtration, hybrid filtration methods, treatment of harvested rainwater, herbal water disinfection, and arsenic removal technologies. Simple, yet innovative water treatment devices ranging from use of plant xylem as filters, terafilters, and hand pumps to tippy taps designed indigenously are methods mentioned here. By describing the technical aspects of major water disinfection methods relevant for developing countries on medium to small scales and emphasizing their merits, demerits, economics, and scalability, we highlight the current scenario and pave the way for further research and development and scaling up of these processes. This review focuses on clean drinking water, especially for rural populations in developing countries. It describes various water disinfection techniques that are not only economically viable and energy efficient but also employ simple methodologies that are effective in reducing the physical, chemical, and biological pollutants found in drinking water to acceptable limits.

  7. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    ScienceCinema

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2016-07-12

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  8. Cleaning Contaminated Water at Fukushima

    SciTech Connect

    Rende, Dean; Nenoff, Tina

    2013-11-21

    Crystalline Silico-Titanates (CSTs) are synthetic zeolites designed by Sandia National Laboratories scientists to selectively capture radioactive cesium and other group I metals. They are being used for cleanup of radiation-contaminated water at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. Quick action by Sandia and its corporate partner UOP, A Honeywell Company, led to rapid licensing and deployment of the technology in Japan, where it continues to be used to clean up cesium contaminated water at the Fukushima power plant.

  9. Cleaning Up Our Drinking Water

    SciTech Connect

    Manke, Kristin L.

    2007-08-01

    Imagine drinking water that you wring out of the sponge you’ve just used to wash your car. This is what is happening around the world. Rain and snow pass through soil polluted with pesticides, poisonous metals and radionuclides into the underground lakes and streams that supply our drinking water. “We need to understand this natural system better to protect our groundwater and, by extension, our drinking water,” said Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Applied Geology and Geochemistry Group Manager, Wayne Martin. Biologists, statisticians, hydrologists, geochemists, geologists and computer scientists at PNNL work together to clean up contaminated soils and groundwater. The teams begin by looking at the complexities of the whole environment, not just the soil or just the groundwater. PNNL researchers also perform work for private industries under a unique use agreement between the Department of Energy and Battelle, which operates the laboratory for DOE. This research leads to new remediation methods and technologies to tackle problems ranging from arsenic at old fertilizer plants to uranium at former nuclear sites. Our results help regulators, policy makers and the public make critical decisions on complex environmental issues.

  10. Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water State Revolving provides significant environmental benefits by maintaining and improving the nation's water quality. Reports on financial performance document CWSRF progress and account for the use of federal funds.

  11. Cleaning Animals' Cages With Little Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harman, Benjamin J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed freeze/thaw method for cleaning animals' cages requires little extra weight and consumes little power and water. Cleaning concept developed for maintaining experimental rat cages on extended space missions. Adaptable as well to similar use on Earth. Reduces cleaning time. Makes use of already available facilities such as refrigerator, glove box, and autoclave. Rat waste adheres to steel-wire-mesh floor of cage. Feces removed by loosening action of freezing-and-thawing process, followed by blast of air.

  12. [The global and national context regarding the challenges involved in ensuring adequate access to water for human consumption].

    PubMed

    Augusto, Lia Giraldo da Silva; Gurgel, Idê Gomes Dantas; Câmara Neto, Henrique Fernandes; de Melo, Carlos Henrique; Costa, André Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    The scope of this article is to analyze the challenges involved in ensuring access to water for human consumption taking the international and national context into consideration. Based on the UN declaration that access to safe and clean drinking water is a fundamental human right, vulnerabilities are identified that can consist in restrictions to access to adequate supplies. The distribution of water and the population across the planet, pollution, inadequate policies and management lead to environmental injustice. The iniquity of access to water constitutes the contemporary water crisis. From the 1980s onwards, the transnational water market emerged for private control that occurs at three main levels: surface and underground water sources; bottled water; and public water supply services. The conflicts of the multiple uses of water resources, the market and environmental problems have contributed to rendering the health of the population and ecosystems vulnerable. Adequate public policies are essential to ensure the basic human right to access to safe and clean drinking water.

  13. Technology: New Ways for Clean Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Amanda S.

    2012-01-01

    Water purification promotes healthy living. While the developing world is working to provide its citizens with future access to clean water sources, the demand for that water is a pressing need today. It should be understood that drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene are interwoven and are all necessary for the overall improved standard of…

  14. Clean Air Markets - Monitoring Surface Water Chemistry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn about how EPA uses Long Term Monitoring (LTM) and Temporily Integrated Monitoring of Ecosystems (TIME) to track the effect of the Clean Air Act Amendments on acidity of surface waters in the eastern U.S.

  15. Clean Water Indian Set-Aside Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water Indian Set-Aside Grant Program (CWISA) provides funding to Indian tribes and Alaska Native Villages for wastewater infrastructure. The CWISA program is administered in cooperation with the Indian Health Service (IHS).

  16. Vigorous cleaning and adequate ventilation are necessary to control an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Shimono, Nobuyuki; Hayashi, Jun; Matsumoto, Hiroko; Miyake, Noriko; Uchida, Yujiro; Shimoda, Shinji; Furusyo, Norihiro; Akashi, Koichi

    2012-06-01

    An outbreak of Bacillus cereus (B. cereus) bacteremia occurred in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in July 2005. Many strains of B. cereus were cultured from patient specimens, as well as from environmental samples such as the surfaces of instruments and air in the NICU. Some of these strains were analyzed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis, and several were confirmed to be identical. We speculated that the bacterial load in the environment had initially increased and then possibly spread throughout the NICU facility via the airflow of the ventilation system. For this reason, besides maintaining standard precautions, we performed a vigorous clean of the NICU, and covered the vents to prevent dust falling from them. These protective measures ended the outbreak. In the hospital environment, adequate ventilation is important, especially in single-occupancy isolation rooms and operating theaters. However, the criteria for the adequate ventilation of multioccupancy rooms for acute care environments such as the NICU have not yet been defined. We need to pay more attention to these environmental factors in order to avoid cross contamination and infectious outbreaks.

  17. Wetlands issue stalls Clean Water Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    Although reauthorization of the Clean Water Act was scheduled for 1992, action has stalled due to debate over the contentious wetland issue and is not likely to pick up again until after the first of the year. The subject of the debate, regulation of wetlands, is found in Section 404, which makes up only a small part of the Clean Water Act.At the meeting, “New Directions in Clean Water Policy,” held in Charlottesville, Va., July 28-31, Ralph Heimlich, an economist with the Office of Policy and Planning Evaluation at the Environmental Protection Agency, said “it is unfortunate that the Section 404 Dredge and Fill permit program, our only national wetland regulation, is part of the Clean Water Act.” The controversy over wetland reform, he added, “has delayed and threatens to poison action on Clean Water Act reauthorization, provisions that may be more directly significant in improving water quality.”

  18. Needed: Clean Water. Problems of Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet utilizes illustrations and captions to indicate the demands currently made on our water resources and the problems associated with that demand. Current and future solutions are described with suggestions for personal conservation efforts to help provide enough clean water for everyone in the future. (CS)

  19. Documents Related to the Clean Water Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers jointly released a proposed rule to clarify protection under the Clean Water Act for streams and wetlands that form the foundation of the nation's water resources.

  20. CLEAN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Newer green chemistry approach to accomplish chemical synthesis in water is summarized. Recent global developments pertaining to C-C bond forming reactions using metallic reagents and direct use of the renewable materials such as carbohydrates without derivatization are described...

  1. Clean Water for Remote Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center engineers are working on creating the Regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support System, a complex system of devices intended to sustain the astronauts living on the ISS and, in the future, sustain those who are blasting off to the Moon or Mars. The devices make use of the available resources, by turning wastewater from respiration, sweat, and urine into drinkable water. One of the devices that Marshall has been working on is the Water Recovery System (WRS). Marshall has teamed with long-time NASA contractor, Hamilton Sundstrand Space Systems International, Inc., of Windsor Locks, Connecticut. Hamilton Sundstrand, the original designer of the life support devices for the space suits, developed the Water Processor Assembly (WPA). It, along with the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) developed by Marshall, combines to make up the total system, which is about the size of two refrigerators, and will support up to a six-member crew. The system is currently undergoing final testing and verification. "The Water Processor Assembly can produce up to about 28 gallons of potable recycled water each day," said Bob Bagdigian, Marshall Regenerative Environmental Control and Life Support System project manager. After the new systems are installed, annual delivered water to the ISS should decrease by approximately 15,960 pounds, or about 1,600 gallons.

  2. Cleaning verification by air/water impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lisa L.; Littlefield, Maria D.; Melton, Gregory S.; Caimi, Raoul E. B.; Thaxton, Eric A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper will discuss how the Kennedy Space Center intends to perform precision cleaning verification by Air/Water Impingement in lieu of chlorofluorocarbon-113 gravimetric nonvolatile residue analysis (NVR). Test results will be given that demonstrate the effectiveness of the Air/Water system. A brief discussion of the Total Carbon method via the use of a high temperature combustion analyzer will also be given. The necessary equipment for impingement will be shown along with other possible applications of this technology.

  3. How Do We Clean Our Water and How Clean Does It Need to Be?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitburn, Niki

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, in the United Kingdom, citizens take for granted clean water pumped directly into their homes, but it was not always the case, and is still not so in many countries. Could people clean water themselves if they had to and what could they then use it for? Would it actually be "clean enough" to drink? The author presents children…

  4. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  5. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  6. 14 CFR § 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean air and water. § 1260.34 Section Â... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  7. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable... the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C....

  8. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clean Air and Water... Conditions and Certifications § 1316.5 Clean Air and Water Acts. When so indicated in TVA contract documents or actions, the following clause is included by reference in such documents or actions: Clean Air...

  9. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clean Air and Water... Conditions and Certifications § 1316.5 Clean Air and Water Acts. When so indicated in TVA contract documents or actions, the following clause is included by reference in such documents or actions: Clean Air...

  10. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260.34 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable only if the award exceeds $100,000, or a...

  11. 77 FR 54909 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... certain water quality limited waters and the associated pollutant to be listed pursuant to the Clean Water... technology-based pollution controls are not stringent enough to attain or maintain State water...

  12. Separations Technology for Clean Water and Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, Gordon D

    2012-06-22

    Providing clean water and energy for about nine billion people on the earth by midcentury is a daunting challenge. Major investments in efficiency of energy and water use and deployment of all economical energy sources will be needed. Separations technology has an important role to play in producing both clean energy and water. Some examples are carbon dioxide capture and sequestration from fossil energy power plants and advanced nuclear fuel cycle scemes. Membrane separations systems are under development to improve the economics of carbon capture that would be required at a huge scale. For nuclear fuel cycles, only the PUREX liquid-liquid extraction process has been deployed on a large scale to recover uranium and plutonium from used fuel. Most current R and D on separations technology for used nuclear fuel focuses on ehhancements to a PUREX-type plant to recover the minor actinides (neptunium, americiu, and curium) and more efficiently disposition the fission products. Are there more efficient routes to recycle the actinides on the horizon? Some new approaches and barriers to development will be briefly reviewed.

  13. 14 CFR 1260.34 - Clean air and water.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean air and water. 1260.34 Section 1260.34... Provisions § 1260.34 Clean air and water. Clean Air and Water October 2000 (Applicable only if the award... (42 U.S.C. 1857c-8(c)(1) or the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1319(c)), and is...

  14. Clean water bill wins house approval

    SciTech Connect

    Begley, R.

    1995-05-24

    Last week`s house passage of a Clean Water Act rewrite marks the biggest advance so far of the risk and cost-benefit agenda in an environmental law. It requires cost-benefit analyses of all major water regulations. {open_quotes}This is the first major environmental statute to incorporate those principles,{close_quotes} says a CMA-spokesperson. CMA praises the bill for encouraging pollution prevention and innovative technology by making it easier to obtain permit variances; eliminating overlapping federal and state pretreatment requirements; and making the Great Lakes Initiative a guidance document instead of a mandatory requirement. The bill`s future is uncertain, since the chairman of the Senate Environment Committee sees little wrong with the current law and is uninterested in pursuing a broad reauthorization, and President Clinton`s environmental aides are recommending a veto.

  15. Clean water provision in rural areas of less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Roundy, R W

    1985-01-01

    The decade of the 1980s is declared as a time to solve global domestic water supply problems. By 1990 international goals include the provision of adequate quantities of clean water to every person on earth. Such goals are justified on the basis of human health, economic well being, political development and equity and public safety. Drawing upon observations from Ethiopia, Malaysia and Liberia, cases where attempts to provide domestic water to villagers and rural town dwellers are presented. In all cited cases attempts to provide safe water have failed or are in jeopardy. Conclusions drawn from these cases include acknowledgement that global goals will best be achieved by approaching local problems one-by-one and recognizing the technical, environmental and human constraints upon safe water provision interact differently from one site to another. To properly plan, implement and maintain safe water systems the current technical solutions must be combined with the contributions of social and environmental scientists on a case-by-case basis.

  16. Clean hydrogen and power from impure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acar, Canan; Dincer, Ibrahim; Naterer, Greg F.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new photoelectrochemical (PEC) H2 production system which is capable of providing clean energy and water, and multi-generation of H2, electricity, heat and industrial chemicals from a single clean, abundant and renewable source: sun. This novel system maximizes solar spectrum utilization and increases system efficiencies by generating more outputs from solar energy alone. The hybrid PEC-chloralkali system, coupled with PV/T (Photovoltaic Thermal), is capable of producing H2, Cl2, electricity, and heat simultaneously. Incoming solar light is split into high-energy photons (with wavelengths lower than 400 nm) and low-energy photons. The high-energy portion is used to generate photocurrent in the reactor, and the remaining part is sent to the PV/T. This PV/T supports the electricity needs of the system and also provides electricity output for the end user. Moreover, the heat recovered from PV/T is a system output. The findings suggest that this system is capable of producing H2 and Cl2 as well as heat and electricity with higher efficiencies than the reported PV electrolysis and PEC-based H2 production efficiencies in the literature.

  17. Learn about the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water State Revolving Fund provides financial assistance for a range of water infrastructure projects. Learn how it works, project eligibility, and types of financial assistance it can provide for water quality projects.

  18. Videos about the Proposal to Protect Clean Water

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To have clean water downstream in our rivers and lakes we need healthy water upstream. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have proposed to strengthen protection for clean water that is vital to all of us.

  19. 78 FR 27233 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... identifying water quality limited segments and associated pollutants in Louisiana to be listed pursuant to Clean Water Act Section 303(d), and request for public comment. Section 303(d) requires that...

  20. 75 FR 11560 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Clean Air Act Notice is hereby given that... violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., and the Clean Air Act, 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq. at... of water effluent controls, the rerouting of air emissions through control devices, and...

  1. 78 FR 20912 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice and initial request for public input. SUMMARY: The Clean Water Act requires that States... existing technology-based pollution controls are not stringent enough to attain or maintain State...

  2. 77 FR 15368 - Clean Water Act; Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act; Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... availability of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed decision identifying water quality limited segments and associated pollutants in Oregon to be listed pursuant to section 303(d)(2) of the Clean...

  3. 78 FR 70960 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and the Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act On November 20, 2013, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed consent decree with... the United States and the State of Illinois under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, the...

  4. Tribal Grants under Section 106 of the Clean Water Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA provides technical assistance and funding under the Clean Water Act Section 106 program to assist tribes and intertribal consortia to understand, assess, and preserve water resources on their lands.

  5. Integrating Salmon Recovery, Clean Water Act Compliance ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    "The South Fork Nooksack River (SFNR) is an important tributary to the Nooksack River, Bellingham Bay, and the Salish Sea. The South Fork Nooksack River comprises one of the 22 independent populations of spring Chinook in the Puget Sound Chinook Evolutionarily Significant Unit (ESU), which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The population is considered essential for recovery of the ESU. The SFNR has suffered from legacy impacts, temperature exceedances and fine sediment, due to forestry, agriculture, flood control, and transportation facilities. The temperature exceedances threaten spring Chinook salmon survival and as such under the Clean Water Act, this pollution must be addressed through a total maximum daily load (TMDL) regulatory program. Further, climate change is projected to cumulatively add to the existing legacy impacts. Millions of dollars are spent on salmon habitat restoration in the SFNR that primarily addresses these legacy impacts, but few if any restoration actions take climate change into direct consideration. The Nooksack Indian Tribe and USEPA-ORD jointly completed a climate change pilot research project that addresses legacy impacts, ESA recovery actions, CWA regulatory compliance, and salmon habitat restoration in one comprehensive project. The project evaluates how land use impacts, including altered hydrology, stream temperature, sediment dynamics, and flooding of adjacent river floodplains, combined with pr

  6. Response to Comments for the Clean Water Rule: Definition of Waters of the United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Response to Comments document, together with the preamble to the final Clean Water Rule, presents the responses to public comments for the Clean Water Rule. It is presented in a number of different topical compendiums.

  7. 75 FR 42130 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ...''); Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311 to 1387 (``CWA''); Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (``RCRA''), 42... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; Clean Water Act; Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; Safe Drinking Water Act; Toxic Substances Control Act; and the Reporting Requirements of...

  8. Clean Water Act Section 404(q):Memorandum of Agreement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A memorandum of agreement between EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers to minimize, to the maximum extent practicable, duplication, needless paperwork and delays in the issuance of permits related to Section 404(q) of the Clean Water Act.

  9. 78 FR 17229 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Amendment Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Amendment Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; the Missouri Air Conservation Law; the Missouri Clean Water Law and the Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law On March 14, 2013, the Department of Justice and the...

  10. 75 FR 63506 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Conservation Law, Chapter 643, RSMo; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 6901-6992k; the Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Law, Sec. Sec. 260.350-260.434, RSMo; the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource...

  11. 40 CFR 463.20 - Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... cleaning water subcategory. 463.20 Section 463.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Cleaning Water Subcategory § 463.20 Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants from processes in the cleaning water subcategory to waters...

  12. 40 CFR 463.20 - Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... cleaning water subcategory. 463.20 Section 463.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Cleaning Water Subcategory § 463.20 Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges of pollutants from processes in the cleaning water subcategory to waters...

  13. Clean water and energy from hyacinths

    SciTech Connect

    Duffer, W.; Kellogg, J.

    1981-04-01

    Studies in 15 US cities and Japan on the water hyacinth show that the same characteristics which make it a nuisance - its ability to thrive in a variety of water systems - can make it a source of animal feed, soil mulch, energy, and water purification. The plant prefers slow-moving water enriched with the waste water from fields, factories, and residences. A water-hyacinth treatment facility is less expensive and uses less energy than conventional facilities. (DCK)

  14. Evaluation of pressurized water cleaning systems for hardware refurbishment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillard, Terry W.; Deweese, Charles D.; Hoppe, David T.; Vickers, John H.; Swenson, Gary J.; Hutchens, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    Historically, refurbishment processes for RSRM motor cases and components have employed environmentally harmful materials. Specifically, vapor degreasing processes consume and emit large amounts of ozone depleting compounds. This program evaluates the use of pressurized water cleaning systems as a replacement for the vapor degreasing process. Tests have been conducted to determine if high pressure water washing, without any form of additive cleaner, is a viable candidate for replacing vapor degreasing processes. This paper discusses the findings thus far of Engineering Test Plan - 1168 (ETP-1168), 'Evaluation of Pressurized Water Cleaning Systems for Hardware Refurbishment.'

  15. 78 FR 45925 - Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act: Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... waterbodies were added by EPA because the applicable numeric water quality standards marine criterion for... 303(d) List can be obtained at EPA Region 6's Web site at...

  16. Chapter A3. Cleaning of Equipment for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A3 describes procedures for cleaning the equipment used to collect and process samples of surface water and ground water and procedures for assessing the efficacy of the equipment-cleaning process. This chapter is designed for use with the other chapters of this field manual. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be posted on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed September 20, 2004).

  17. Definition of Waters of the United States Under the Clean Water Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers published the Clean Water Rule defining the scope of waters protected under the Clean Water Act (Docket No. EPA-HQ-OW- 2011-0880). This is a sample of the text at 40 CFR 230.3 under the final rule.

  18. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future

    SciTech Connect

    2013-04-12

    This document describes some of the accomplishments of the Department of Energy Water Power Program, and how those accomplishments are supporting the advancement of renewable energy generated using hydropower technologies and marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  19. Bioinspired Bifunctional Membrane for Efficient Clean Water Generation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Lou, Jinwei; Ni, Mengtian; Song, Chengyi; Wu, Jianbo; Dasgupta, Neil P; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-01-13

    Solving the problems of water pollution and water shortage is an urgent need for the sustainable development of modern society. Different approaches, including distillation, filtration, and photocatalytic degradation, have been developed for the purification of contaminated water and the generation of clean water. In this study, we explored a new approach that uses solar light for both water purification and clean water generation. A bifunctional membrane consisting of a top layer of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs), a middle layer of Au NPs, and a bottom layer of anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) was designed and fabricated through multiple filtration processes. Such a design enables both TiO2 NP-based photocatalytic function and Au NP-based solar-driven plasmonic evaporation. With the integration of these two functions into a single membrane, both the purification of contaminated water through photocatalytic degradation and the generation of clean water through evaporation were demonstrated using simulated solar illumination. Such a demonstration should also help open up a new strategy for maximizing solar energy conversion and utilization.

  20. Clean, Safe Water. For How Long?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenke, Pam

    The document presents research and project-oriented activities at the secondary school level for studying Illinois' streams, water pollution, and methods for controlling pollution. Social, economic, and political issues are examined as part of the planning for pollution prevention. Following six teaching objectives, background information traces…

  1. Clean Water Action Plan: Restoring and protecting America`s waters

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    On October 18, 1997, the 25th anniversary of the enactment of the Clean Water Act, the Vice President called for a renewed effort to restore and protect water quality. The Vice President asked that the Secretary of Agriculture and the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), working with other affected agencies, develop a Clean Water Action Plan that builds on clean water successes and addresses three major goals: (1) enhanced protection from public health threats posed by water pollution; (2) more effective control of polluted runoff; and (3) promotion of water quality protection on a watershed basis.

  2. Congressional Reporting for Section 404 of the Clean Water Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In accordance with EPA's fiscal years 2014 and 2015 appropriations, the Agency is required to submit regular reports to Congress regarding review of public notices issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for proposed Clean Water Act Section 404 standard

  3. WATER AS A REACTION MEDIUM FOR CLEAN CHEMICAL PROCESSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green chemistry is a rapid developing new field that provides us a pro-active avenue for the sustainable development of future science and technologies. When designed properly, clean chemical technology can be developed in water as a reaction media. The technologies generated f...

  4. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given rise... which gave rise to said conviction. If no such statement is submitted, submission of an offer... facilities which have given rise to a conviction under section 113(c)(1) of the Clean Air Act or section...

  5. 18 CFR 1316.5 - Clean Air and Water Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Water Acts (a) If performance of this contract would involve the use of facilities which have given rise... which gave rise to said conviction. If no such statement is submitted, submission of an offer... facilities which have given rise to a conviction under section 113(c)(1) of the Clean Air Act or section...

  6. Sunoco Pipeline, L.P. Clean Water Act Settlement - 2017

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA, and the U.S. Department of Justice announced that Sunoco Pipeline, L.P. (Sunoco) has agreed to pay a civil penalty for alleged violation of the Clean Water Act stemming from a 2012 gasoline discharge near Wellington, Ohio.

  7. An Innovation for Global Clean Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under contract to NASA, Umpqua Research developed the Microbial Check Valve (MCV) iodine-dispensing system for the Space Shuttle Orbiter, introduced in 1979 to purify astronauts' drinking water. In 1989, NASA awarded the company a new contract to develop a system for continuous iodine release over long periods for use in the International Space Station. In 1993, the company demonstrated the Regenerable Biocide Delivery Unit, and NASA granted it an exclusive license.

  8. In-Water Hull Cleaning & Filtration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Dan

    2015-04-01

    Dan George R & D Mining Technology LinkedIn GRD Franmarine have received the following prestigious awards in 2014 for their research & development of an in-water hull cleaning and filtration system "The Envirocart: Golden Gecko Award for Environmental Excellence; WA Innovator of the Year - Growth Sector; Department of Fisheries - Excellence in Marine Biosecurity Award - Innovation Category; Lloyd's List Asia Awards - Environmental Award; The Australian Innovation Challenge - Environment, Agriculture and Food Category; and Australian Shipping and Maritime Industry Award - Environmental Transport Award. The Envirocart developed and patented by GRD Franmarine is a revolutionary new fully enclosed capture and containment in-water hull cleaning technology. The Envirocart enables soft Silicon based antifouling paints and coatings containing pesticides such as Copper Oxide to be cleaned in situ using a contactless cleaning method. This fully containerised system is now capable of being deployed to remote locations or directly onto a Dive Support Vessel and is rated to offshore specifications. This is the only known method of in-water hull cleaning that complies with the Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) and Department of Fisheries WA (DoF) Guidelines. The primary underwater cleaning tool is a hydraulically powered hull cleaning unit fitted with rotating discs. The discs can be fitted with conventional brushes for glass or epoxy based coatings or a revolutionary new patented blade system which can remove marine biofouling without damaging the antifouling paint (silicone and copper oxide). Additionally there are a patented range of fully enclosed hand cleaning tools for difficult to access niche areas such as anodes and sea chests, providing an innovative total solution that enables in-water cleaning to be conducted in a manner that causes no biological risk to the environment. In full containment mode or when AIS are present, material is pumped

  9. De-gassed water is a better cleaning agent.

    PubMed

    Pashley, R M; Rzechowicz, M; Pashley, L R; Francis, M J

    2005-01-27

    It is demonstrated that de-gassed water is more effective at dispersing hydrophobic "dirt", such as liquid hydrocarbons or oils. This effect appears to be due to the reduction of natural cavitation, which would otherwise oppose the dispersion of hydrophobic liquid droplets into water. De-gassing of the oil enhances this effect still further, and this has led to a proposal for a novel cleaning process, based on using a combination of a de-gassed (hydrophobic) solvent followed by rinsing in de-gassed water. This method might be useful as an effective, detergent-free cleaning process. Also reported are some initial studies which suggest that the effect of "inert" dissolved gases on the electrical conductivity of water may need to be reconsidered.

  10. Food-Growing, Air- And Water-Cleaning Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sauer, R. L.; Scheld, H. W.; Mafnuson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus produces fresh vegetables and removes pollutants from air. Hydroponic apparatus performs dual function of growing fresh vegetables and purifying air and water. Leafy vegetables rooted in granular growth medium grow in light of fluorescent lamps. Air flowing over leaves supplies carbon dioxide and receives fresh oxygen from them. Adaptable to production of food and cleaning of air and water in closed environments as in underwater research stations and submarines.

  11. Dealing with the Clean Water Act pending reauthorization

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S.

    1994-09-01

    This report addresses probable changes in the Clean Water Act that may affect federal facilities such as those under the DOE. These changes will be included in a reauthorization of the act. The author draws upon the 1992 National Water Quality Inventory Report to Congress as a source to identify changes in the focus of the reauthorized act on non-point source issues, watershed management, new enforcement mechanisms and an assortment of smaller issues that will have indirect effects on federal facilities.

  12. Chicago Clean Air, Clean Water Project: Environmental Monitoring for a Healthy, Sustainable Urban Future

    SciTech Connect

    none, none; Tuchman, Nancy

    2015-11-11

    The U.S. Department of Energy awarded Loyola University Chicago and the Institute of Environmental Sustainability (IES) $486,000.00 for the proposal entitled “Chicago clean air, clean water project: Environmental monitoring for a healthy, sustainable urban future.” The project supported the purchase of analytical instruments for the development of an environmental analytical laboratory. The analytical laboratory is designed to support the testing of field water and soil samples for nutrients, industrial pollutants, heavy metals, and agricultural toxins, with special emphasis on testing Chicago regional soils and water affected by coal-based industry. Since the award was made in 2010, the IES has been launched (fall 2013), and the IES acquired a new state-of-the-art research and education facility on Loyola University Chicago’s Lakeshore campus. Two labs were included in the research and education facility. The second floor lab is the Ecology Laboratory where lab experiments and analyses are conducted on soil, plant, and water samples. The third floor lab is the Environmental Toxicology Lab where lab experiments on environmental toxins are conducted, as well as analytical tests conducted on water, soil, and plants. On the south end of the Environmental Toxicology Lab is the analytical instrumentation collection purchased from the present DOE grant, which is overseen by a full time Analytical Chemist (hired January 2016), who maintains the instruments, conducts analyses on samples, and helps to train faculty and undergraduate and graduate student researchers.

  13. Calif. Governor vetoes bill to furnish clean drinking water.

    PubMed

    1995-11-03

    Several water suppliers in California have detected cryptosporidium, a parasite, in the drinking water. This parasite causes a variety of medical problems for normally healthy people, but can prove fatal to those with compromised immune systems, such as AIDS patients. California legislators adopted A.B. 590, a bill which would have added bottled water and water filters to the list of medical benefits offered by Medi-Cal, the State's medical assistance program. When the legislation reached Governor Pete Wilson on October 12, 1995, it was vetoed. The governor stated that if a Medi-Cal beneficiary was unable to boil water or obtain boiled water from a family member, then that beneficiary was eligible for attendant services. AIDS advocates argued that it is more cost effective for the State to provide clean water and filters than attendant services.

  14. Plants Clean Air and Water for Indoor Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Wolverton Environmental Services Inc., founded by longtime government environmental scientist B.C. "Bill" Wolverton, is an environmental consulting firm that gives customers access to the results of his decades of cutting-edge bioremediation research. Findings about how to use plants to improve indoor air quality have been published in dozens of NASA technical papers and in the book, "How to Grow Fresh Air: 50 Houseplants That Purify Your Home or Office." The book has now been translated into 12 languages and has been on the shelves of bookstores for nearly 10 years. A companion book, "Growing Clean Water: Nature's Solution to Water Pollution," explains how plants can clean waste water. Other discoveries include that the more air that is allowed to circulate through the roots of the plants, the more effective they are at cleaning polluted air; and that plants play a psychological role in welfare in that people recover from illness faster in the presence of plants. Wolverton Environmental is also working in partnership with Syracuse University, to engineer systems consisting of modular wicking filters tied into duct work and water supplies, essentially tying plant-based filters into heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Also, the company has recently begun to assess the ability of the EcoPlanter to remove formaldehyde from interior environments. Wolverton Environmental is also in talks with designers of the new Stennis Visitor's Center, who are interested in using its designs for indoor air-quality filters

  15. 78 FR 15376 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Amendment Under the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... Resource Conservation and Recovery Act; the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act; and the... Clean Air Act, the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Clean Water Act, the Emergency Planning... Amendment to the Consent Decree in the lawsuit entitled United States v. The Doe Run Resources...

  16. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. 1274... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.926 Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative agreement or...

  17. 76 FR 709 - Guidelines for Awarding Clean Water Act Section 319 Base Grants to Indian Tribes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 35 Guidelines for Awarding Clean Water Act Section 319 Base Grants to Indian Tribes... national guidelines for the award of base grants under the Clean Water Act (CWA) section 319(h) nonpoint... Contents I. General Information II. Background III. Overview of Clean Water Act Section 319 Base Grants...

  18. 40 CFR 2.302 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Clean Water Act. 2.302 Section 2.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) Act means the Clean Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq. (2)(i) Effluent data...

  19. 40 CFR 2.302 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Clean Water Act. 2.302 Section 2.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) Act means the Clean Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq. (2)(i) Effluent data...

  20. 40 CFR 2.302 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information obtained under the Clean Water Act. 2.302 Section 2.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act. (a) Definitions. For the purposes of this section: (1) Act means the Clean Water Act, as amended, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq. (2)(i) Effluent data...

  1. Water Conservation and Reuse. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania State Univ., Middletown. Inst. of State and Regional Affairs.

    Described is a learning session on water conservation intended for citizen advisory groups interested in water quality planning. Topics addressed in this instructor's manual include water conservation needs, benefits, programs, technology, and problems. These materials are components of the Working for Clean Water Project. (Author/WB)

  2. Porous boron nitride nanosheets for effective water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Portehault, David; Liu, Dan; Qin, Si; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Effective removal of oils, organic solvents and dyes from water is of significant, global importance for environmental and water source protection. Advanced sorbent materials with excellent sorption capacity need to be developed. Here we report porous boron nitride nanosheets with very high specific surface area that exhibit excellent sorption performances for a wide range of oils, solvents and dyes. The nanostructured material absorbs up to 33 times its own weight in oils and organic solvents while repelling water. The saturated boron nitride nanosheets can be readily cleaned for reuse by burning or heating in air because of their strong resistance to oxidation. This easy recyclability further demonstrates the potential of porous boron nitride nanosheets for water purification and treatment.

  3. Waters Edge Land Company, LLC - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Waters Edge Land Company, LLC, a business located at 10800 Farley St. Overland Park, KS, for alleged violations located

  4. Clean Water Act. (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the United States Clean Water Act of 1974. Articles discuss the enforcement and impacts of these regulations on industrial facilities and municipalities, water quality improvements resulting from these regulations, state responses, impacts on wetlands, and pros and cons for the reauthorization of the Clean Water Act. Citations also discuss financial and economic considerations of water supply cleanup and preventive measures to ensure against future pollution of existing water supplies. (Contains a minimum of 249 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Does limited data availability prevent adequate water use estimates on farm scale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayatz, Benjamin; Kuster, Benjamin; Percy, Barbara; Hillier, Jonathan; Freese, Dirk; Wattenbach, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Increasing food production for a growing world population and at the same time mitigating climate change as well as adapting to its consequences is one of the key global challenges. Therefore producing crops with fewer resources such as water and fertilizers and less emissions of greenhouse gases is an important question that has to be answered on farm scale. The cool farm tool (CFT) is a farm scale emission calculator and was developed in 2010 to help farmers to reduce their carbon footprint. In order to adapt to future climate change an easy to use and at the same time robust water footprinting tool is needed for the CFT to take a more holistic approach on environmental sustainability. However data on farm level is often scarce. We investigated the effect of limited data on actual evapotranspiration using the FAO56 standard to assess the quality of farm water footprint estimates. Calculations are based on various agricultural sites from the Fluxnet database and estimates are compared to eddy covariance measurements. Results show that higher data availability is not directly linked to more accurate estimates of actual evapotranspiration. Estimates based only on temperature and relative humidity are still able to reproduce daily patterns. However cumulative values over one growing season show a considerable offset to eddy covariance observations for all data input levels. Finding the optimum between data requirements and an accuracy that fulfills farmer needs is crucial. Engagement of farmers and using a global network as the Fluxnet database will help to achieve this goal.

  6. Piped water consumption in Ghana: A case study of temporal and spatial patterns of clean water demand relative to alternative water sources in rural small towns.

    PubMed

    Kulinkina, Alexandra V; Kosinski, Karen C; Liss, Alexander; Adjei, Michael N; Ayamgah, Gilbert A; Webb, Patrick; Gute, David M; Plummer, Jeanine D; Naumova, Elena N

    2016-07-15

    Continuous access to adequate quantities of safe water is essential for human health and socioeconomic development. Piped water systems (PWSs) are an increasingly common type of water supply in rural African small towns. We assessed temporal and spatial patterns in water consumption from public standpipes of four PWSs in Ghana in order to assess clean water demand relative to other available water sources. Low water consumption was evident in all study towns, which manifested temporally and spatially. Temporal variability in water consumption that is negatively correlated with rainfall is an indicator of rainwater preference when it is available. Furthermore, our findings show that standpipes in close proximity to alternative water sources such as streams and hand-dug wells suffer further reductions in water consumption. Qualitative data suggest that consumer demand in the study towns appears to be driven more by water quantity, accessibility, and perceived aesthetic water quality, as compared to microbiological water quality or price. In settings with chronic under-utilization of improved water sources, increasing water demand through household connections, improving water quality with respect to taste and appropriateness for laundry, and educating residents about health benefits of using piped water should be prioritized. Continued consumer demand and sufficient revenue generation are important attributes of a water service that ensure its function over time. Our findings suggest that analyzing water consumption of existing metered PWSs in combination with qualitative approaches may enable more efficient planning of community-based water supplies and support sustainable development.

  7. 40 CFR 463.20 - Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cleaning... the cleaning water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic product for... equipment, such as molds and mandrels, that contact the plastic material for the purpose of cleaning...

  8. 40 CFR 463.20 - Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Cleaning... the cleaning water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic product for... equipment, such as molds and mandrels, that contact the plastic material for the purpose of cleaning...

  9. Does Clean Water Make You Dirty? Water Supply and Sanitation in the Philippines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Water supply investments in developing countries may inadvertently worsen sanitation if clean water and sanitation are substitutes. This paper examines the negative correlation between the provision of piped water and household sanitary behavior in Cebu, the Philippines. In a model of household sanitation, a local externality leads to a sanitation…

  10. Involving regional expertise in nationwide modeling for adequate prediction of climate change effects on different demands for fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, W. J.

    2014-05-01

    Wim J. de Lange, Geert F. Prinsen, Jacco H. Hoogewoud, Ab A Veldhuizen, Joachim Hunink, Erik F.W. Ruijgh, Timo Kroon Nationwide modeling aims to produce a balanced distribution of climate change effects (e.g. harm on crops) and possible compensation (e.g. volume fresh water) based on consistent calculation. The present work is based on the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI, www.nhi.nu), which is a national, integrated, hydrological model that simulates distribution, flow and storage of all water in the surface water and groundwater systems. The instrument is developed to assess the impact on water use on land-surface (sprinkling crops, drinking water) and in surface water (navigation, cooling). The regional expertise involved in the development of NHI come from all parties involved in the use, production and management of water, such as waterboards, drinking water supply companies, provinces, ngo's, and so on. Adequate prediction implies that the model computes changes in the order of magnitude that is relevant to the effects. In scenarios related to drought, adequate prediction applies to the water demand and the hydrological effects during average, dry, very dry and extremely dry periods. The NHI acts as a part of the so-called Deltamodel (www.deltamodel.nl), which aims to predict effects and compensating measures of climate change both on safety against flooding and on water shortage during drought. To assess the effects, a limited number of well-defined scenarios is used within the Deltamodel. The effects on demand of fresh water consist of an increase of the demand e.g. for surface water level control to prevent dike burst, for flushing salt in ditches, for sprinkling of crops, for preserving wet nature and so on. Many of the effects are dealt with by regional and local parties. Therefore, these parties have large interest in the outcome of the scenario analyses. They are participating in the assessment of the NHI previous to the start of the analyses

  11. Involving regional expertise in nationwide modeling for adequate prediction of climate change effects on different demands for fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Wim; Prinsen, Geert.; Hoogewoud, Jacco; Veldhuizen, Ab; Ruijgh, Erik; Kroon, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Nationwide modeling aims to produce a balanced distribution of climate change effects (e.g. harm on crops) and possible compensation (e.g. volume fresh water) based on consistent calculation. The present work is based on the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI, www.nhi.nu), which is a national, integrated, hydrological model that simulates distribution, flow and storage of all water in the surface water and groundwater systems. The instrument is developed to assess the impact on water use on land-surface (sprinkling crops, drinking water) and in surface water (navigation, cooling). The regional expertise involved in the development of NHI come from all parties involved in the use, production and management of water, such as waterboards, drinking water supply companies, provinces, ngo's, and so on. Adequate prediction implies that the model computes changes in the order of magnitude that is relevant to the effects. In scenarios related to drought, adequate prediction applies to the water demand and the hydrological effects during average, dry, very dry and extremely dry periods. The NHI acts as a part of the so-called Deltamodel (www.deltamodel.nl), which aims to predict effects and compensating measures of climate change both on safety against flooding and on water shortage during drought. To assess the effects, a limited number of well-defined scenarios is used within the Deltamodel. The effects on demand of fresh water consist of an increase of the demand e.g. for surface water level control to prevent dike burst, for flushing salt in ditches, for sprinkling of crops, for preserving wet nature and so on. Many of the effects are dealt with? by regional and local parties. Therefore, these parties have large interest in the outcome of the scenario analyses. They are participating in the assessment of the NHI previous to the start of the analyses. Regional expertise is welcomed in the calibration phase of NHI. It aims to reduce uncertainties by improving the

  12. 76 FR 72973 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act Notice is hereby... ``Fort Gay'') for permanent injunctive relief and civil penalties under the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251-387; the Safe Drinking Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 300f-300j-26; the West Virginia Water...

  13. 75 FR 27580 - Notice of Lodging of the Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... with the Surface Water Treatment Rule (``SWTR''), at three Water Treatment Plants (``WTPs'') owned and... of Lodging of the Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on May 3, 2010... Rico. ] The proposed Consent Decree resolves PRASA's violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C....

  14. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  15. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  16. 14 CFR 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  17. 14 CFR § 1274.926 - Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts. Â...-Water Pollution Control Acts. Clean Air-Water Pollution Control Acts July 2002 If this cooperative... 91-604) and section 308 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (33 U.S.C. 1251 et...

  18. Watershed management: Clean water`s next act

    SciTech Connect

    Hite, R.W.

    1996-09-23

    14 articles related to watershed management comprise this special advertising section of the Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies. Subtopics include water quality, regulations, US Environmental Protection Agency activities, analysis tools, economics, flooding and erosions, and non-point source pollutions. Articles on arid and coastal are included. Several articles describe municipal watershed programs being planned or in place.

  19. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-03-01

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Water Power Program's water power research activities. Water power is the nation's largest source of clean, domestic, renewable energy. Harnessing energy from rivers, manmade waterways, and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses can help secure America's energy future. Water power technologies fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower facilities include run-of-the-river, storage, and pumped storage. Most conventional hydropower plants use a diversion structure, such as a dam, to capture water's potential energy via a turbine for electricity generation. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies obtain energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams and ocean thermal gradients to generate electricity. The United States has abundant water power resources, enough to meet a large portion of the nation's electricity demand. Conventional hydropower generated 257 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity in 2010 and provides 6-7% of all electricity in the United States. According to preliminary estimates from the Electric Power Resource Institute (EPRI), the United States has additional water power resource potential of more than 85,000 megawatts (MW). This resource potential includes making efficiency upgrades to existing hydroelectric facilities, developing new low-impact facilities, and using abundant marine and hydrokinetic energy resources. EPRI research suggests that ocean wave and in-stream tidal energy production potential is equal to about 10% of present U.S. electricity consumption (about 400 terrawatt-hours per year). The greatest of these resources is wave energy, with the most potential in Hawaii, Alaska, and the Pacific Northwest. The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Water Power Program works with industry, universities, other federal agencies, and DOE

  20. Optimisation of water-cannon cleaning for deposit removal on water walls inside waste incinerators.

    PubMed

    Graube, Franziska; Grahl, Sebastian; Rostkowski, Slawomir; Beckmann, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Deposits in municipal waste incinerators are very inhomogeneous in structure and constitution. They cause corrosion and reduce the efficiency, so they need to be removed frequently. Among other systems, operators use water cannons for the deposit removal. Two different removal mechanisms of water-cannon cleaning are suggested: A direct shattering of the deposit by the impact of the water jet, as well as the cracking caused by thermal stresses where droplets cool the deposits. As the contribution of each of the aforementioned mechanisms to the overall cleaning efficiency is unknown, we performed empirical investigations to determine the dominating effect. In a first experimental setup focusing on thermal stress, cold droplets were applied onto hot deposits taken from a waste incinerator. Results showed that the cleaning effect strongly depends on the deposit thickness and structure, so that the deposits could be categorised in three different groups. A second measurement campaign focused on the influence of deposit material, deposit temperature and water jet momentum. It could be shown that both deposit material and temperature have a significant effect on the cleaning efficiency, whereas an increase in water jet momentum only led to modest improvements. The combination of these two parameter studies implies that the influence of the thermal stress outweighs that of the momentum. This knowledge is applicable to the cleaning setup by increasing the temperature gradient.

  1. Clean option: Berkeley Pit water treatment and resource recovery strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, M.A.; Orth, R.J.; Elmore, M.R.; Monzyk, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development, established the Resource Recovery Project (RRP) in 1992 as a five-year effort to evaluate and demonstrate multiple technologies for recovering water, metals, and other industrial resources from contaminated surface and groundwater. Natural water resources located throughout the DOE complex and the and western states have been rendered unusable because of contamination from heavy metals. The Berkeley Pit, a large, inactive, open pit copper mine located in Butte, Montana, along with its associated groundwater system, has been selected by the RRP for use as a feedstock for a test bed facility located there. The test bed facility provides the infrastructure needed to evaluate promising technologies at the pilot plant scale. Data obtained from testing these technologies was used to assess their applicability for similar mine drainage water applications throughout the western states and at DOE. The objective of the Clean Option project is to develop strategies that provides a comprehensive and integrated approach to resource recovery using the Berkeley Pit water as a feedstock. The strategies not only consider the immediate problem of resource recovery from the contaminated water, but also manage the subsequent treatment of all resulting process streams. The strategies also employ the philosophy of waste minimization to optimize reduction of the waste volume requiring disposal, and the recovery and reuse of processing materials.

  2. Application of magnetic iron-based nanosorbents for water cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedeva, Irina; Bakhteeva, Iuliia; Revvo, Anastasya; Byzov, Ilya; Baerner, Klaus

    2014-05-01

    Iron-based magnetic nanopowders (Fe, γ-Fe2O3, γ-Fe3O4) are effective sorbents for the cleaning of water from heavy metal ions, radionuclides, organic and biological materials. The sorption capacity of the powder is defined by the specific surface which for particle diameter in nanosized range comes up to hundreds of m2/g. However, the small particle size creates difficulties to separate the solid phase from the water suspension using conventional mechanical filtration and sedimentation methods without additional reagents. If the nanoparticles have magnetic moments, their separation from aqueous solution can be enhanced in gradient magnetic fields. This will help to avoid a secondary water pollution by coagulants and flocculants. The sedimentation dynamics of the magnetite (Fe3O4) nanopowders with different particle sizes (10-100 nm) in water in gradient magnetic fields of different configurations ( radial and strip), with the strengths H = 0.5-6 kOe, and gradients up to dH/dz= 2 kOe/cm was studied by optical and by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) methods. . In the gravitation field the suspensions of the small particles (~ 10-20 nm) remain stable for over 20 hours. The sedimentation process can be greatly accelerated by the action of a vertical gradient magnetic field, and the sedimentation time is reduced down to several minutes. In a gradient magnetic field enhanced by a steel grid the sedimentation of the nanopowder (c0= 0.1 g/l) for 180 minutes resulted in the reduction of the iron concentration in water down to 0.4 mg/l. In the flowing water regime the residual iron concentration in water 0.3 mg/l is reached after 80 minutes. This corresponds to the hygienic and environmental standards for drinking water and fishery.

  3. Design of Simple Water Treatment System for Cleaning Dirty Water in the Rural Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Haristiani, N.

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce our simple home-made water treatment system for solving the clean water supply problem in rural area. We designed a water system using several materials: activated sand, activated carbon, manganese, and zeolite. As a model, we investigated the water treatment system on two wells that placed in one of the rural area (far from the main city) in West Java, Indonesia. Experimental results showed that our designed water treatment system succeeded to purify dirty water and the properties and the chemical composition of the purified water is fit with the minimum standard requirement of clean water. Analysis and discussion about the way for the cleaning water process were also presented in the paper. Finally, since the wells are installed in the elementary school and the water is typically used for daily life activity for the neighbour people, this water system can be used for educational purposes and the school can become a center of life in this rural area.

  4. Setting the Course for Clean Water: A Citizen's Guide to the Section 208 Water Quality Management Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donley, Diane L.; Albright, Catherine

    This is a citizen's guide to the section 208 water quality management program. Section 208 refers to that section of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 (the Clean Water Act) which calls for public participation in water quality management planning. Included in this guide are chapters on controlling pollution through the Clean Water…

  5. Grants for State and Interstate Agencies under Section 106 of the Clean Water Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Each state and territory has established programs to protect and restore fresh waters, coastal waters and wetlands as outlined in the Clean Water Act. Section 106 grants support the implementation of those programs.

  6. [Investigation of the cleanness of drinking water in public facilities].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Jun; Ikeda, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mariko

    2012-01-01

    The drinking facilities in some public spaces (such as parks, public baths, etc.) in Japan which many unspecified people often use are useful for taking moisture easily and rapidly. Sometimes it might be also accepted that it is good for the prevention of diseases and for the health. The cleaning of these facilities is sure to be done in regular. However, they have misgivings about dirt in more short time by using of many people. It would be necessary for the public health to research the safety of them. In the present study, the pollution of inorganic components, inorganic anions, general bacteria and total coliforms in the initial getting water to stay near by the faucets, on the knobs and the intakes were examined.

  7. 77 FR 38084 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... compliance with storm water requirements at Toll's current and future construction sites. The Department of... of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on June 20, 2012... (``NPDES'') permits which are federally-enforceable under Section 309 of the Clean Water Act (``CWA''),...

  8. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  9. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  10. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  11. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  12. 76 FR 51397 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-18

    ...., at its sewer system and water pollution control plant. To resolve the United States' claims, the... pollution control plant to eliminate violations of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Justice will... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on August 11,...

  13. 78 FR 23957 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... establish a Storm Water Pollution Protection Plan (``SWPPP'') addressing all elements specified in the CD... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act On April 4, 2013, the Department of...) and (d) of the Clean Water Act (``CWA'' or ``Act''), 33 U.S.C. 1319(b) and (d). The United...

  14. 77 FR 71633 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... Sections 301, 309, and 402 of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251, et seq. and under the Mississippi Air and Water Pollution Control Law (``MAWPCL'') (Miss. Code Ann. Sec. Sec. 49-17-1 through 49-17-45... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act On November 20, 2012, the...

  15. 45 CFR 2543.86 - Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution... Water Pollution Control Act. Contracts and subgrants of amounts in excess of $100,000 shall contain a... regulations issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and the Federal Water...

  16. 77 FR 1948 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-12

    ... violations of Sections 301, 308, and 402(p) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (the ``Clean Water Act'' or the ``Act''), 33 U.S.C. 1311, 1318 & 1342(p), and implementing regulations. See 40... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on December...

  17. 78 FR 35315 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under The Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Miami-Dade County on December 13, 2012 pursuant to Clean Water Act (``CWA'') Sections 309(b) and (d) and 504, 33 U.S.C. 1319(b) and (d) and 1364, and the Florida Air and Water Pollution Control Act, Fla... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under The Clean Water Act On June 6, 2013, the Department...

  18. 78 FR 44599 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act On July 18, 2013, the Department of... civil penalties under the Clean Water Act (``CWA''), 33 U.S.C. 1251-1387, resulting from unauthorized discharges of flowback fluid and produced fluid into waters of the United States from tanks and...

  19. 75 FR 8697 - Notice of Availability of Class Deviation; Disputes Resolution Procedures Related to Clean Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... AGENCY Notice of Availability of Class Deviation; Disputes Resolution Procedures Related to Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF and DWSRF, Respectively) Reallocation Under the... * * * for the Clean and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (Revolving Funds) where projects are not...

  20. UTILIZING INFORMATION COLLECTED UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT FOR PUBLIC HEALTH ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Water Act was established to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation's waters". Under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act, the U.S.Environmental Protection Agency collects information from each state regarding the intended ...

  1. 77 FR 24515 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on April 16... claims against the City of Memphis under ] Section 301, 309, and 402 of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C... through 138 of the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act (``TWQCA''). Under this settlement between...

  2. 75 FR 82072 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on December 22, 2010, a proposed Consent Decree in United... Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., in connection with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District's... discharges from its combined sewer overflows (``CSOs'') violate the Clean Water Act because the discharge...

  3. 75 FR 43206 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on July 20, 2010... National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit issued under the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251, et.... The Consent Decree requires Cardi, among other things, to: (1) Eliminate process water discharge;...

  4. 75 FR 52735 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... EPA's decision identifying 12 water quality limited waterbodies and associated pollutants in South Dakota to be listed pursuant to the Clean Water Act Section 303(d)(2), and requests public...

  5. Development of a cleaning process for uranium chips machined with a glycol-water-borax coolant

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.A.

    1984-12-01

    A chip-cleaning process has been developed to remove the new glycol-water-borax coolant from oralloy chips. The process involves storing the freshly cut chips in Freon-TDF until they are cleaned, washing with water, and displacing the water with Freon-TDF. The wash water can be reused many times and still yield clean chips and then be added to the coolant to make up for evaporative losses. The Freon-TDF will be cycled by evaporation. The cleaning facility is currently being designed and should be operational by April 1985.

  6. Financing CHP Projects at Wastewater Treatment Facilities with Clean Water State Revolving Funds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This factsheet provides information about CHP at wastewater treatment facilities, including applications, financial challenges, and financial opportunities, such as the Clean Water State Revolving Fund.

  7. Clean water action plan: Restoring and protecting America`s waters

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The authors submit this Clean Water Action Plan on behalf of the Department of Agriculture, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the other federal agencies that assisted in its development. Over the past 25 years, America has made outstanding progress in reducing water pollution and restoring rivers, lakes and coastal waters. In communities across the country, restoration of water quality has had dramatic environmental, recreational, and economic benefits. Despite this progress, serious water pollution problems persist. States report that about 40 percent of the waters they assessed do not meet water quality goals. About half of the nation`s over 2,000 major watersheds have serious or moderate water quality problems. This Clean Water Action Plan provides a blueprint for restoring and protecting the nation`s precious water resources. A key element in the Action Plan is a new cooperative approach to watershed protection in which state, tribal, federal, and local governments, and the public first identify the watersheds with the most critical water quality problems and then work together to focus resources and implement effective strategies to solve those problems. The Action Plan also includes a new initiatives to reduce public health threats, improve the stewardship of natural resources, strengthen polluted runoff controls, and make water quality information more accessible to the public.

  8. Criterion values for urine-specific gravity and urine color representing adequate water intake in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Perrier, E T; Bottin, J H; Vecchio, M; Lemetais, G

    2017-02-01

    Growing evidence suggests a distinction between water intake necessary for maintaining a euhydrated state, and water intake considered to be adequate from a perspective of long-term health. Previously, we have proposed that maintaining a 24-h urine osmolality (UOsm) of ⩽500 mOsm/kg is a desirable target for urine concentration to ensure sufficient urinary output to reduce renal health risk and circulating vasopressin. In clinical practice and field monitoring, the measurement of UOsm is not practical. In this analysis, we calculate criterion values for urine-specific gravity (USG) and urine color (UCol), two measures which have broad applicability in clinical and field settings. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis performed on 817 urine samples demonstrates that a USG ⩾1.013 detects UOsm>500 mOsm/kg with very high accuracy (AUC 0.984), whereas a subject-assessed UCol⩾4 offers high sensitivity and moderate specificity (AUC 0.831) for detecting UOsm >500 m Osm/kg.European Journal of Clinical Nutrition advance online publication, 1 February 2017; doi:10.1038/ejcn.2016.269.

  9. 40 CFR 23.2 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. 23.2 Section 23.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.2 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. Unless the Administrator...

  10. 40 CFR 23.2 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. 23.2 Section 23.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.2 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. Unless the Administrator...

  11. 40 CFR 23.2 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. 23.2 Section 23.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.2 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. Unless the Administrator...

  12. 78 FR 18629 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Partial Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-27

    ... the sewer system by September 2016, and implement an improved Storm Water Management Plan for the... of Lodging of Proposed Partial Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act On March 21, 2013, the... Kansas City, Kansas, et al., Civil Action No. 13-02141-EFM-KGG. The United States filed this Clean...

  13. 77 FR 25750 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on April 19, 2012... the Clean Water Act and Kansas state law. The proposed Consent Decree settles these claims in exchange... a copy from the Consent Decree Library by mail, please enclose a check in the amount of $6 (25...

  14. 76 FR 27350 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-11

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on April 27, 2011... National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit issued under the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251, et... check in the amount of $13.50 (25 cents per page reproduction costs of Consent Decree and...

  15. 77 FR 809 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on December 29... injunctive relief for violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq., Title 13 of the Indiana Code... check in the amount of $21.00 (25 cents per page reproduction cost) payable to the U.S. Treasury or,...

  16. 77 FR 51826 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on August 22, 2012, a proposed Consent Decree in United States v. Sterling Suffolk Racecourse, LLC, Civil Action No. 12... Consent Decree resolves the United States' claims under Section 301 of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C....

  17. Comparing Clean Water Act Section 316(b) policy options.

    PubMed

    Kadvany, John

    2002-05-02

    This paper develops a comparative framework for policy proposals involving fish protection and Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Section 316(b) addresses the impingement and entrainment of fish by cooling-water intake structures used principally by steam electric power plants. The framework is motivated by examining the role of adverse environmental impacts (AEIs) in the context of Section 316(b) decision making. AEI is mentioned in Section 316(b), but not defined. While various AEI options have been proposed over the years, none has been formalized through environmental regulations nor universally accepted. Using a multiple values approach from decision analysis, AEIs are characterized as measurement criteria for ecological impacts. Criteria for evaluating AEI options are identified, including modeling and assessment issues, the characterization of ecological value, regulatory implementation, and the treatment of uncertainty. Motivated by the difficulties in defining AEI once and for all, a framework is introduced to compare options for 316(b) decision making. Three simplified policy options are considered, each with a different implicit or explicit AEI approach: (1) a technology-driven rule based on a strict reading of the 316(b) regulatory text, and for which any impingement and entrainment count as AEI, (2) a complementary, open-ended risk-assessment process for estimating population effects with AEI characterized on a site-specific basis, and (3) an intermediate position based on proxy measures such as specially constructed definitions of littoral zone, sensitive habitat, or water body type. The first two proposals correspond roughly to responses provided, respectively, by the Riverkeeper environmental organization and the Utility Water Act Group to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s proposed 316(b) new facilities rule of August 2000; the third example is a simplified form of the EPA's proposed August 2000 new facilities rule itself

  18. Greenhouses that grow clean water: Solar aquatic treatment of waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, D. )

    1990-09-01

    John Todd, an aquatic biologist who has found a way to use Mother Nature's secrets to turn toxic sludge into water pure enough to drink--cleaner, in fact, than many municipal water supplies. Todd, formerly a research scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute in Massachusetts, U.S.A., has taken the developments of the last twenty years in rock marsh and wetland natural treatment of sewage one step further by putting the whole system under a greenhouse. Because of the quality of water his solar aquatic system produces, Todd prefers to call the ecologically engineered sewage treatment system he invented a waste water restoration system. With the diminution of sources of unpolluted water and, with rising population, an increasing demand for clean water, Todd's invention could be a godsend to urban centers. 1 ref.

  19. 40 CFR 23.2 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. 23.2 Section 23.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.2 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean...

  20. 40 CFR 23.2 - Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Clean Water Act. 23.2 Section 23.2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL JUDICIAL REVIEW UNDER EPA-ADMINISTERED STATUTES § 23.2 Timing of Administrator's action under Clean...

  1. 78 FR 1251 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1301 et seq.; and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act On December 31, 2012, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed Consent...

  2. 76 FR 68788 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Water Pollution Control Act, also known as the Clean Water Act, 42 U.S.C. 1311(a), 1319(b) and (d), and...., and Delaware's Regulations Governing the Control of Water Pollution, 7 Del. Admin. Code Sec. 7201. The... Water Act Notice is hereby given that on October 31, 2011, a proposed Consent Decree in United States...

  3. Village of Pender, Nebraska Wastewater Treatment Facility, Pender, Nebraska - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Village of Pender, Nebraska Wastewater Treatment Facility (“Respondent”) for alleged violations of Sections 301 and/or 404 of the Clean Water Act

  4. Consent Decree D.G. Yuengling and Son, Inc. Clean Water Act Settlement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Yuengling owns and operates two beer breweries (the New Brewery and the Old Brewery) in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, which have been in significant non-compliance with the Clean Water Act because of persistent violations of application industrial wastewater.

  5. Letters initiating Clean Water Act 404(c) review of mining at Pebble deposit

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Correspondence between EPA and the Pebble Limited Partnership and the State of Alaska initiating review under section 404(c) of the Clean Water Act of potential adverse environmental effects associated with mining the Pebble deposit in southwest Alaska.

  6. Proposed Penalty Against Wood Brothers Trucking & Construction and Jason Carnahan for Clean Water Act Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Public notice of EPA's proposed penalty against Wood Brothers Trucking & Construction and Jason Carnahan for violations of the Clean Water Act at their construction site located outside of Boise, Idaho.

  7. Climate Change and Coastal Watersheds: Adaptation to Attain Clean Water Goals and Sustainable Coasts

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water Act contains a mandate to control pollution, to improve estuary habitat, to ensure healthy plant and animal communities, and to maintain human uses. This document highlights ways to meet these goals while adapting to climate impacts.

  8. Reference News Release: United States Announces Settlement of Clean Water Act Violations at Aqueduct Racetrack

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The complaint alleges that NYRA, which operates the Aqueduct Racetrack where horse racing, training, and boarding of horses occur, and where up to 450 horses are housed on site during the horse racing season, violated the Clean Water Act

  9. Bioinspired Multifunctional Paper-Based rGO Composites for Solar-Driven Clean Water Generation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jinwei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Zhongyong; Zhao, Dengwu; Song, Chengyi; Wu, Jianbo; Dasgupta, Neil; Zhang, Wang; Zhang, Di; Tao, Peng; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2016-06-15

    Reusing polluted water through various decontamination techniques has appeared as one of the most practical approaches to address the global shortage of clean water. Rather than relying on single decontamination mechanism, herein we report the preparation and utilization of paper-based composites for multifunctional solar-driven clean water generation that is inspired by the multiple water purification approaches in biological systems. The reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets within such composites can efficiently remove organic contaminants through physical adsorption mechanism. Under solar irradiation, the floating rGO composites can instantly generate localized heating, which not only can directly generate clean water through distillation mechanism but also significantly enhance adsorption removal performance with the assistance of upward vapor flow. Such porous-structured paper-based composites allow for facile incorporation of photocatalysts to regenerate clean water out of contaminated water with combined adsorption, photodegradation, and interfacial heat-assisted distillation mechanisms. Within a homemade all-in-one water treatment device, the practical applicability of the composites for multifunctional clean water generation has been demonstrated.

  10. 77 FR 61027 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act at mobile home parks operated by defendants in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Virginia. The defendants treat sewage and provide drinking water at a number of its mobile... about drinking water problems. The Consent Decree requires payment of a civil penalty of...

  11. 75 FR 43554 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (“Clean Water...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (``Clean Water Act... Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311 and 1318, at thirteen of its facilities in Massachusetts by discharging pollutants in storm water associated with construction activity without a permit, failing to timely ]...

  12. Keeping clean water clean in a Malawi refugee camp: a randomized intervention trial.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, L.; Chartier, Y.; Chartier, O.; Malenga, G.; Toole, M.; Rodka, H.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to assess the ability of a water container with a cover and a spout to prevent household contamination of water in a Malawian refugee camp. METHODS: A randomized trial was conducted in a refugee population that had experienced repeated outbreaks of cholera and diarrhoea and where contamination of water in the home was found to be a significant cause of cholera. Four hundred Mozambican refugee households were systematically identified and followed over a 4-month period, one fourth of the households were randomly assigned to exclusively use the improved container for water collection. FINDINGS: Water flowing from the source wells had little or no microbial contamination although the water collectors quickly contaminated their water, primarily through contact with their hands. Analysis of water samples demonstrated that there was a 69% reduction in the geometric mean of faecal coliform levels in household water and 31% less diarrhoeal disease (P = 0.06) in children under 5 years of age among the group using the improved bucket. Regression models examining diarrhoea among under 5-year-olds confirmed the protective effect of the bucket and found that visible faeces in the family latrine and the presence of animals were significantly associated with an increased diarrhoeal incidence in children. CONCLUSION: Household contamination of drinking-water significantly contributed to diarrhoea in this population. Proper chlorination is a less expensive and more effective means of water quality protection in comparison with the improved bucket, but was unpopular and rarely utilized by the camp inhabitants. PMID:11357205

  13. Water wash apparatus for cleaning radioactively contaminated garments

    SciTech Connect

    Sewter, B.R.; Jarvis, T.A.; Kirchner, M.A.; Prisco, A.J. Jr.; Bonneau, A.M.; Trendler, K.E.; Briggs, W.E.; Godfrey, L.E.

    1990-03-20

    This patent describes an apparatus for water washing fabrics and removing radioactive contaminants therefrom without the generation of liquid effluents. It comprises: a washing machine means for washing the fabrics having a wash water inlet, a rinse water inlet, and an outlet, and a hydraulically closed wash water system which includes a reservoir means of polished water connected to the wash water inlet of the machine means, a particulate filtration means connected to the outlet for removing particulate impurities from the wash water discharged from the outlet, and a water polishing means connected between the particulate filtration means and the wash water inlet for supplying the reservoir means with filtered and polished water.

  14. 75 FR 26275 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ..., reporting and training program to improve compliance with storm water requirements at Hovnanian's future... of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on April... proposed Complaint alleges three types of storm water violations--discharges without a permit, failure...

  15. AN INTEGRATED MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK FOR ADDRESSING NEEDS OF THE CLEAN WATER ACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Clean Water Act (CWA) requires each state to develop a program to monitor and report on the quality of its surface and ground waters and prepare a report every two years describing the status of its water quality. A framework has been developed which provides an integrated p...

  16. 76 FR 62061 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... added by EPA because the applicable numeric water quality standards marine criterion for dissolved....epa.gov/region6/water/npdes/tmdl/index.htm#303dlists , or by writing or calling Ms. Diane Smith...

  17. Clean Water Act (CWA) Action Plan Implementation Priorities: Changes to Improve Water Quality, Increase Compliance and Expand Transparency

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Water Act (CWA) Action Plan Implementation Priorities describes the new approaches to revamp the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting, compliance and enforcement program.Issued May 11, 2011

  18. Assessment of adequate quality and collocation of reference measurements with space borne hyperspectral infrared instruments to validate retrievals of temperature and water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, X.

    2015-06-01

    A method is presented to assess whether a given reference ground based point observation, typically a radiosonde measurement, is adequately collocated and sufficiently representative of space borne hyperspectral infrared instrument measurements. Once this assessment is made, the ground based data can be used to validate and potentially calibrate, with a high degree of accuracy, the hyperspectral retrievals of temperature and water vapour.

  19. The Clean Air and Clean Water Acts: The "Fifth" and "Eighth" Most Significant Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Laurel A.

    1991-01-01

    The history and impact of this federal legislation are discussed. An assessment of the progress of federal legislation in these areas is presented. Key issues for federal legislation regarding water and air quality are identified. (CW)

  20. A self-cleaning underwater superoleophobic mesh for oil-water separation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lianbin; Zhong, Yujiang; Cha, Dongkyu; Wang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Oil–water separation has recently become a global challenging task because of the frequent occurrence of oil spill accidents due to the offshore oil production and transportation, and there is an increasing demand for the development of effective and inexpensive approaches for the cleaning-up of the oily pollution in water system. In this study, a self-cleaning underwater superoleophobic mesh that can be used for oil-water separation is prepared by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of sodium silicate and TiO2 nanoparticles on the stainless steel mesh. The integration of the self-cleaning property into the all-inorganic separation mesh by using TiO2 enables the convenient removal of the contaminants by ultraviolet (UV) illumination, and allows for the facile recovery of the separation ability of the contaminated mesh, making it promising for practial oil-water separation applications. PMID:23900109

  1. A self-cleaning underwater superoleophobic mesh for oil-water separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianbin; Zhong, Yujiang; Cha, Dongkyu; Wang, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Oil-water separation has recently become a global challenging task because of the frequent occurrence of oil spill accidents due to the offshore oil production and transportation, and there is an increasing demand for the development of effective and inexpensive approaches for the cleaning-up of the oily pollution in water system. In this study, a self-cleaning underwater superoleophobic mesh that can be used for oil-water separation is prepared by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of sodium silicate and TiO2 nanoparticles on the stainless steel mesh. The integration of the self-cleaning property into the all-inorganic separation mesh by using TiO2 enables the convenient removal of the contaminants by ultraviolet (UV) illumination, and allows for the facile recovery of the separation ability of the contaminated mesh, making it promising for practial oil-water separation applications.

  2. A self-cleaning underwater superoleophobic mesh for oil-water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lianbin; Zhong, Yujiang; Cha, Dongkyu; Wang, Peng

    2013-07-01

    Oil-water separation has recently become a global challenging task because of the frequent occurrence of oil spill accidents due to the offshore oil production and transportation, and there is an increasing demand for the development of effective and inexpensive approaches for the cleaning-up of the oily pollution in water system. In this study, a self-cleaning underwater superoleophobic mesh that can be used for oil-water separation is prepared by the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of sodium silicate and TiO2 nanoparticles on the stainless steel mesh. The integration of the self-cleaning property into the all-inorganic separation mesh by using TiO2 enables the convenient removal of the contaminants by ultraviolet (UV) illumination, and allows for the facile recovery of the separation ability of the contaminated mesh, making it promising for practial oil-water separation applications.

  3. Re-establishing clean water in a disaster.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Chris

    2011-09-01

    When a disaster occurs, water systems can be overwhelmed with sediment, chemicals, microbes, and other harmful organisms. Dialysis clinics need to have disaster management plans and protocols in place to meet the demands of any situation. During emergency events, such as large widespread natural disasters, it is necessary to have the support of outside resources to keep the clinic operating or to aid in returning it to service as quickly and as safely as possible. Before proceeding with any medical treatments that use water, such as dialysis, facilities should address five different response actions to establish the safety and effectiveness of their water system. Test the water quality prior to treating patients. Make sure the system is working properly by performing critical water tests. Compare all results with pre-disaster data to help spot any warning signs. Inspect the water system, including all connections, timers, and settings. Consider contacting your water treatment vendor for additional verification and support. Be sure to closely monitor the water system equipment; make sure it is not overwhelmed by staying in touch with local water authorities. They may "shock" their distribution system to regain compliance. Make every effort to conserve water during this time. Change the water system. If the central water system has been compromised, consider using portable RO units or portable exchange DI tanks. Finally, moving your patients to another facility may be the only alternative, so work with other local facilities unaffected by the disaster.

  4. Contextual and sociopsychological factors in predicting habitual cleaning of water storage containers in rural Benin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Andrea; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Recontamination of drinking water occurring between water collection at the source and the point of consumption is a current problem in developing countries. The household drinking water storage container is one source of contamination and should therefore be cleaned regularly. First, the present study investigated contextual factors that stimulate or inhibit the development of habitual cleaning of drinking water storage containers with soap and water. Second, based on the Risk, Attitudes, Norms, Abilities, and Self-regulation (RANAS) Model of behavior, the study aimed to determine which sociopsychological factors should be influenced by an intervention to promote habitual cleaning. In a cross-sectional study, 905 households in rural Benin were interviewed by structured face-to-face interviews. A forced-entry regression analysis was used to determine potential contextual factors related to habitual cleaning. Subsequently, a hierarchical regression was conducted with the only relevant contextual factor entered in the first step (R2 = 6.7%) and the sociopsychological factors added in the second step (R2 = 62.5%). Results showed that households using a clay container for drinking water storage had a significantly weaker habit of cleaning their water storage containers with soap and water than did households using other types of containers (β = -0.10). The most important sociopsychological predictors of habitual cleaning were commitment (β = 0.35), forgetting (β = -0.22), and self-efficacy (β = 0.14). The combined investigation of contextual and sociopsychological factors proved beneficial in terms of developing intervention strategies. Possible interventions based on these findings are recommended.

  5. A NOVEL USE FOR DATA COLLECTED UNDER THE CLEAN WATER ACT FOR PUBLIC HEALTH ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collects information on intended stream use and impairment. We hypothesized that counties with impaired drinking water environments will also have higher rates of gastrointestinal infections (01) and gastr...

  6. CORAL REEF BIOLOGICAL CRITERIA: USING THE CLEAN WATER ACT TO PROTECT A NATIONAL TREASURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coral reefs are declining at unprecedented rates worldwide due to multiple interactive stressors including climate change and land-based sources of pollution. The Clean Water Act (CWA) can be a powerful legal instrument for protecting water resources, including the biological inh...

  7. 40 CFR 463.20 - Applicability; description of the cleaning water subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) EFFLUENT GUIDELINES AND STANDARDS (CONTINUED) PLASTICS MOLDING AND FORMING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY.... Processes in the cleaning water subcategory are processes where water comes in contact with the plastic... shaping equipment, such as molds and mandrels, that contact the plastic material for the purpose...

  8. 77 FR 52060 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... Massachusetts in Conservation Law Foundation, Inc. and United States v. Boston Water and Sewer Commission, et al... Conservation Law Foundation's claims of violations under Section 301 of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311..., DC 20044-7611. The comments should refer to Conservation Law Foundation, Inc. and United States...

  9. 75 FR 5807 - Notice of Lodging of a Modified Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of a Modified Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on January 27, 2010, a proposed Modified Consent Decree in United States v. Sewerage & Water Board of New Orleans et al., Civil Action No. 93-3213,...

  10. 75 FR 26098 - Safety Zone; Under Water Clean Up of Copper Canyon, Lake Havasu, AZ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Under Water Clean Up of Copper Canyon, Lake... establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of Lake Havasu in the Copper Canyon in support of the underwater cleanup of Copper Canyon. This temporary safety zone is necessary to provide for...

  11. Water Power for a Clean Energy Future (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    Water power technologies harness energy from rivers and oceans to generate electricity for the nation's homes and businesses, and can help the United States meet its pressing energy, environmental, and economic challenges. Water power technologies; fall into two broad categories: conventional hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic technologies. Conventional hydropower uses dams or impoundments to store river water in a reservoir. Marine and hydrokinetic technologies capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, free-flowing rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients.

  12. Assessment of adequate quality and collocation of reference measurements with space-borne hyperspectral infrared instruments to validate retrievals of temperature and water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, X.

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to assess whether a given reference ground-based point observation, typically a radiosonde measurement, is adequately collocated and sufficiently representative of space-borne hyperspectral infrared instrument measurements. Once this assessment is made, the ground-based data can be used to validate and potentially calibrate, with a high degree of accuracy, the hyperspectral retrievals of temperature and water vapour.

  13. EPA Provides Puerto Rico $27 Million for Clean Water Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has allotted $27 million to Puerto Rico to help finance improvements to water projects that are essential to protecting public health and the environment. The funds will be used to finance water qua

  14. EPA Provides New Jersey $74 Million for Clean Water Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has allotted $74 million to New Jersey to help finance improvements to water projects that are essential to protecting public health and the environment. The funds will be used to finance water qual

  15. Toward Clean Water: A Guide to Citizen Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Outen, Ronald, Ed.; Lawson, Simpson, Ed.

    This guide identifies the major opportunities for participation under the 1976 Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments for citizens concerned with the improvement of water quality. The book is aimed primarily at fulfilling the direct needs of citizens at all levels. In addition to an explanation of the law and implementing regulations, this…

  16. Clean Water for the 1970's, A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC. Federal Water Quality Administration.

    This report describes the past activities and future plans of the Federal Water Quality Administration (FWQA). The first of the four sections in the report provides general discussion about these forms of water pollution: municipal wastes, industrial wastes, thermal pollution, oil and hazardous substances, mine drainage, sedimentation and erosion,…

  17. 77 FR 7182 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act (“CWA”)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Colorado, Utah and Wyoming, and the failure to comply with CWA storm water discharge permits for railyards... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act (``CWA'') Notice is hereby given that on... and civil penalties under the Clean Water Act (``CWA''), 33 U.S.C. 1251-1387, resulting...

  18. Clean and Green: Saving Water in the Operating Theatre

    PubMed Central

    Jehle, Karlheinz; Jarrett, Nick; Matthews, Shaun

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION There is a growing trend to use alcohol-based hand disinfectants in clinical practice. In addition to their antibacterial efficacy, these disinfectants offer an alternative to traditional surgical hand disinfection agents that can save water in the operating theatre. MATERIALS AND METHODS The amounts of water and soap used during traditional surgical hand disinfection with antiseptic soap preparations were measured and water usage over a 1-year period was estimated. Costs of traditional disinfection agents were compared with alcohol-based agents. RESULTS One surgical hand disinfection episode with traditional agents used 18.5 l of water. During 15,500 procedures performed at our institution over a 1-year period, 931,938 l of water were used which could have been saved had alcohol-based agents been used. Cost per episode of hand disinfection depends on the amounts used and is not higher compared to traditional agents. CONCLUSIONS The benefits of using an alcohol-based surgical hand disinfectant may include significant water savings, in addition to previously published advantages of improved efficacy. When deciding on the method of surgical hand disinfection, careful thought should be given to the use of water as a resource. Surgeons should be aware of the environmental impact of their profession. PMID:18201493

  19. Glufosinate ammonium clean-up procedure from water samples using SPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayeb M., A.; Ismail B., S.; Mardiana-Jansar, K.; Ta, Goh Choo; Agustar, Hani Kartini

    2015-09-01

    For the determination of glufosinate ammonium residue in soil and water samples, different solid phase extraction (SPE) sorbent efficiency was studied. Four different SPE sorbents i.e.: CROMABOND PS-H+, CROMABOND PS-OH-, ISOLUTE ENV+, Water Sep-Pak and OASIS HLB were used. Sample clean-up performance was evaluated using high performance liquid chromatography (Agilent 1220 infinity LC) with fluorescence detector. Detection of FMO-derivatives was done at λ ex = 260 nm and λ em= 310 nm. OASIS HLB column was the most suitable for the clean-up in view of the overall feasibility of the analysis.

  20. Interim Significant Noncompliance Policy for Clean Water Act Violations Associated with CSOs, SSOs, CAFOs, and Storm Water Point Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This policy addresses significant noncompliance (SNC) violations associated with combined sewer overflows (CSOs), sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), and storm water point source discharges covered by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) program under the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  1. Country Club Estates, LLC - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Country Club Estates, LLC, a business located at 3415 Mulberry Dr., Marion, Iowa, for alleged violations at Tower Tenac

  2. Quality control for federal clean water act and safe drinking water act regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Askew, Ed

    2013-01-01

    QC sample results are required in order to have confidence in the results from analytical tests. Some of the AOAC water methods include specific QC procedures, frequencies, and acceptance criteria. These are considered to be the minimum controls needed to perform the method successfully. Some regulatory programs, such as those in 40 CFR Part 136.7, require additional QC or have alternative acceptance limits. Essential QC measures include method calibration, reagent standardization, assessment of each analyst's capabilities, analysis of blind check samples, determination of the method's sensitivity (method detection level or quantification limit), and daily evaluation of bias, precision, and the presence of laboratory contamination or other analytical interference. The details of these procedures, their performance frequency, and expected ranges of results are set out in this manuscript. The specific regulatory requirements of 40 CFR Part 136.7 for the Clean Water Act, the laboratory certification requirements of 40 CFR Part 141 for the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the ISO 17025 accreditation requirements under The NELAC Institute are listed.

  3. Are the defined substrate-based methods adequate to determine the microbiological quality of natural recreational waters?

    PubMed

    Valente, Marta Sofia; Pedro, Paulo; Alonso, M Carmen; Borrego, Juan J; Dionísio, Lídia

    2010-03-01

    Monitoring the microbiological quality of water used for recreational activities is very important to human public health. Although the sanitary quality of recreational marine waters could be evaluated by standard methods, they are time-consuming and need confirmation. For these reasons, faster and more sensitive methods, such as the defined substrate-based technology, have been developed. In the present work, we have compared the standard method of membrane filtration using Tergitol-TTC agar for total coliforms and Escherichia coli, and Slanetz and Bartley agar for enterococci, and the IDEXX defined substrate technology for these faecal pollution indicators to determine the microbiological quality of natural recreational waters. ISO 17994:2004 standard was used to compare these methods. The IDEXX for total coliforms and E. coli, Colilert, showed higher values than those obtained by the standard method. Enterolert test, for the enumeration of enterococci, showed lower values when compared with the standard method. It may be concluded that more studies to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the rapid tests are required in order to apply them for routine monitoring of marine and freshwater recreational bathing areas. The main advantages of these methods are that they are more specific, feasible and simpler than the standard methodology.

  4. Impact of cleaning regimes on dental water unit contamination.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Soad A; Khalil, Ahmed I

    2011-12-01

    Microorganisms that have been identified in dental unit waterlines (DUWLs) are of concern because they can cause infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. This study aimed to assess the incidence of microbial contamination in DUWLs before and after intervention to reduce contamination, and to investigate the presence of coliforms, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Water samples were collected aseptically from the waterlines. The high-speed hand-piece and dental chair units were served by one distillation apparatus, which was fed by the potable tap water of four dental clinics. Different interventions were used: chlorination, flushing before clinics and between patients, draining at the end of the day, and freshly distilled water on a daily basis. There was a significant difference between the level of contamination in the high-speed hand-piece (1.5-2.7 log CFU/ml) and dental chair unit water (2.0-3.5 log CFU/ml). Coliforms (0.9%) E. coli (0.9%) and Pseudomonas (1.8%) were detected during 2008. This study indicates the need to monitor water quality regularly and prevent stagnation in DUWLs to reduce the number of viable bacteria to <100 CFU/ml. We recommend flushing the DUWL for 2 min before the first patient and for 10-20 s between patients, flushing the dental unit at the end of the day and draining it overnight to reduce the development of biofilms, and chlorination of the DUWLs.

  5. Acanthamoeba keratitis associated with tap water use during contact lens cleaning: manufacturer guidelines need to change.

    PubMed

    Legarreta, John E; Nau, Amy C; Dhaliwal, Deepinder K

    2013-03-01

    Contact lens-associated Acanthamoeba keratitis continues to be a significant cause of visual morbidity in the United States. Although exposure to water sources while wearing lenses has been a known risk factor for infection for decades, this behavior in several contact lens hygiene protocols continues to prevail. In this review, we surveyed the currently available contact lens cleaning solutions for both soft and rigid gas-permeable contact lenses and reviewed the cleaning instructions of the available solutions. Discrepancies between clinician recommendations and written instructions on a solution packages continues to persist, and we advocate a revision in current manufacturer guidelines to include explicit warnings against use of tap or distilled water sources for cleaning contact lenses or their storage cases.

  6. Underwater self-cleaning scaly fabric membrane for oily water separation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi; Guo, Zhenyan; Tian, Dongliang; Zhang, Xiaofang; Li, Wenxian; Jiang, Lei

    2015-02-25

    Oily wastewater is always a threat to biological and human safety, and it is a worldwide challenge to solve the problem of disposing of it. The development of interface science brings hope of solving this serious problem, however. Inspired by the capacity for capturing water of natural fabrics and by the underwater superoleophobic self-cleaning property of fish scales, a strategy is proposed to design and fabricate micro/nanoscale hierarchical-structured fabric membranes with superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity, by coating scaly titanium oxide nanostructures onto fabric microstructures, which can separate oil/water mixtures efficiently. The microstructures of the fabrics are beneficial for achieving high water-holding capacity of the membranes. More importantly, the special scaly titanium oxide nanostructures are critical for achieving the desired superwetting property toward water of the membranes, which means that air bubbles cannot exist on them in water and there is ultralow underwater-oil adhesion. The cooperative effects of the microscale and nanoscale structures result in the formation of a stable oil/water/solid triphase interface with a robust underwater superoleophobic self-cleaning property. Furthermore, the fabrics are common, commercially cheap, and environmentally friendly materials with flexible but robust mechanical properties, which make the fabric membranes a good candidate for oil/water separation even under strong water flow. This work would also be helpful for developing new underwater superoleophobic self-cleaning materials and related devices.

  7. Clean Reliable Water for the 21st Century (Paper#69880)

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, A F B; Hudson, G B; Maxwell, R M

    2003-02-25

    It is well recognized that half the countries in the world will face significant fresh water shortages in the next 20 years, due largely to growing populations and increased agricultural and industrial demands. These shortages will significantly limit economic growth, decrease the quality of life and human health for billions of people, and could potentially lead to violence and conflict over securing scarce supplies of water. These concerns are not limited to the water-poor countries, of course, as many parts of China and the US face similar problems. Such problems can be exacerbated by fluctuating imbalances between need and supply, poor management practices, and pollution. The future is one that will require significant scientific and technological advances in conservation, preservation, and movement of fresh water, as well as in the development of new or alternative supplies. As an example, these issues are discussed in terms of California, and a case study related to the scientific issues associated with a groundwater banking project in Southern California is provided.

  8. Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Environmental Benefits Report

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report is a snapshot of the CWSRF’s positive role in improving our nation’s waters to support the goals of the CWA. The report also highlights ongoing CWSRF efforts to improve infrastructure resiliency against extreme weather events.

  9. Cleaning of conveyor belt materials using ultrasound in a thin layer of water.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, L; Holck, A; Rud, I; Samah, D; Tierce, P; Favre, M; Kure, C F

    2013-08-01

    Cleaning of conveyor belts in the food industry is imperative for preventing the buildup of microorganisms that can contaminate food. New technologies for decreasing water and energy consumption of cleaning systems are desired. Ultrasound can be used for cleaning a wide range of materials. Most commonly, baths containing fairly large amounts of water are used. One possibility to reduce water consumption is to use ultrasonic cavitation in a thin water film on a flat surface, like a conveyor belt. In order to test this possibility, a model system was set up, consisting of an ultrasound transducer/probe with a 70-mm-diameter flat bottom, operating at 19.8 kHz, and contaminated conveyor belt materials in the form of coupons covered with a thin layer of water or water with detergent. Ultrasound was then applied on the water surface at different power levels (from 46 to 260 W), exposure times (10 and 20 s), and distances (2 to 20 mm). The model was used to test two different belt materials with various contamination types, such as biofilms formed by bacteria in carbohydrate- or protein-fat-based soils, dried microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts, and mold spores), and allergens. Ultrasound treatment increased the reduction of bacteria and yeast by 1 to 2 log CFU under the most favorable conditions compared with water or water-detergent controls. The effect was dependent on the type of belt material, the power applied, the exposure time, and the distance between the probe and the belt coupon. Generally, dried microorganisms were more easily removed than biofilms. The effect on mold spores was variable and appeared to be species and material dependent. Spiked allergens were also efficiently removed by using ultrasound. The results in this study pave the way for new cleaning designs for flat conveyor belts, with possibilities for savings of water, detergent, and energy consumption.

  10. Lynden, Washington Landowner to Restore Wetlands to Settle Clean Water Act Violation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle-September 16, 2015) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Department of Justice have reached an agreement with Suellyn Rader Blymyer and Uptrail Group, LLC, for violations of the Clean Water Act in Whatcom County, Washington.

  11. Cape Cod Owner Agrees to Restore and Preserve Wetlands to Resolve Clean Water Act Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice have reached an agreement with Idlewild Acres, LLC, and Peter M. Wild, its owner and manager, resolving violations of the federal Clean Water Act related to wetlands.

  12. 78 FR 62931 - Pacific Clean Water Technologies, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Pacific Clean Water Technologies, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading October 11, 2013. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Pacific...

  13. 77 FR 42332 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Modification Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Modification Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on July 2, 2012, a proposed Consent Decree Modification (``Modification'') in United States and State of New Hampshire v. City of Portsmouth,...

  14. 40 CFR 2.302 - Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special rules governing certain information obtained under the Clean Water Act. 2.302 Section 2.302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION Confidentiality of Business Information § 2.302 Special rules governing certain information...

  15. 76 FR 61384 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on September 28, 2011, a proposed Consent Decree (the ``Consent Decree'') in United States of America v. Trident Seafoods Corporation, Civil Action No. 11-1616,...

  16. 75 FR 53342 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on August 25, 2010, a proposed Consent Decree (``Consent Decree'') in United States v. City of Revere, Massachusetts, Civil Action No. 1:10-cv-11460...

  17. 77 FR 40084 - Notice of Lodging of Modification of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Modification of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on June 29, 2012, a proposed Modification of Consent Decree (``Modification'') in United States of America v. Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer...

  18. 75 FR 60452 - Clean Water Act; Contractor Access to Confidential Business Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Clean Water Act; Contractor Access to Confidential Business Information AGENCY: Environmental... plans to transfer CBI collected from the steam electric industry to a new subcontractor of a contractor... CWA. Transfer of the information will allow the contractors and subcontractors to access...

  19. 76 FR 36577 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ..., a proposed Consent Decree in United States and the State of Nebraska v. Swift Beef Company, Civil... violations of the Clean Water Act (``CWA'') by Swift Beef Company (``Swift'') at a beef processing plant it..., Washington, DC 20044-7611, and should refer to United States v. Swift Beef Company, Civil Action No....

  20. Sioux City Foundry Company, South Sioux City, Nebraska - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of a proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against the Sioux City Foundry Company, an industry located at 2400 G Street, South Sioux City, NE, for alleged violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. § 1319(g) for discharge

  1. 77 FR 37439 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ..., 2012, a proposed Consent Decree in United States of America v. The City of Perth Amboy, New Jersey a... City of Perth Amboy's (Perth Amboy) Clean Water Act (CWA) violations stemming from its failure to properly operate and maintain its combined sewer system. Under the terms of the Consent Decree, Perth...

  2. 75 FR 4106 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on January 20, 2010, a proposed Consent Decree (``Decree'') in United States v. Pacific Pipeline Systems, LLC, Civil Action No. CV08-5768 DSF (Ssx) (C.D. Cal.)...

  3. 75 FR 35087 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on June 2, 2010, a proposed Consent Decree (the ``Decree'') in United States v. State of Alaska, Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Civil Case No....

  4. 76 FR 56223 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on September 6, 2011, a proposed Consent Decree in United States and State of Indiana v. City of Elkhart, Indiana, Civil Action No. 2:11CV328 was lodged with...

  5. 76 FR 50757 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on August 10, 2011 a proposed Consent Decree in United States and the State of West Virginia v. City of Elkins, Civil Action No. 2:11cv61, was lodged with...

  6. 78 FR 4168 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... in the lawsuit entitled United States v. Granite Construction Company, No. 3:13-cv-00012-ST. The...' claims against Granite for civil penalties and injunctive relief pursuant to the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1319. Under the terms of the Consent Decree, Granite will pay the United States a civil...

  7. 78 FR 79484 - Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act On December 24, 2013, the Department of Justice lodged a proposed Consent Decree with the United States District Court for the Southern District of Indiana in the lawsuit...

  8. 76 FR 46325 - Notice of Lodging of Stipulated Order Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... of Lodging of Stipulated Order Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on July 22, 2011... as a result of the failure of the Figtree Pump Station located on St. Croix, and (b) implement repairs at the Figtree Pump Station, the Barren Spot Pump Station, also located on St. Croix, and...

  9. 77 FR 43860 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... of Lodging of a Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that a proposed Consent Decree in United States of America and the State of Tennessee v. City of Chattanooga, Tennessee... Eastern District of Tennessee, Chattanooga Division. The proposed Consent Decree would resolve...

  10. 76 FR 15999 - Notice of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act, the Comprehensive Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... of Proposed Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act, the Comprehensive Environmental Response... given that on March 9, 2011, a proposed Consent Decree in United States of American and State of Alaska... District Court for the District of Alaska. The proposed Consent Decree will settle the United...

  11. 75 FR 49949 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under The Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under The Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on August 10, 2010, a proposed Consent Decree in United States v. Plains All American Pipeline, L.P., et al., (Civil No... proposed Consent Decree, Plains will perform injunctive relief on approximately 10,000 miles of crude...

  12. 77 FR 43860 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Pursuant to the Clean Water Act In accordance with 28 CFR 50.7, 38 FR 19029, notice is hereby given that on July 2, 2012, a Consent Decree was lodged with the United States... lodging of the Consent Decree. In the complaint the United States, on behalf of the U.S....

  13. 76 FR 12369 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act Notice is hereby given that on March 1, 2011, a proposed consent decree in United States, et al. v. Arch Coal, Inc., et al., Civil Action No. 2:11.... The proposed Consent Decree will resolve claims alleged in this action by the United States, the...

  14. A numerical study on high-pressure water-spray cleaning for CSP reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglani, Francesco; Barry, John; Dekkers, Willem

    2016-05-01

    Mirror cleaning for concentrated solar thermal (CST) systems is an important aspect of operation and maintenance (O&M), which affects solar field efficiency. The cleaning process involves soil removal by erosion, resulting from droplet impingement on the surface. Several studies have been conducted on dust accumulation and CSP plant reflectivity restoration, demonstrating that parameters such as nozzle diameter, jet impingement angle, interaxial distance between nozzles, standoff distance, water velocity, nozzle pressure and others factors influence the extent of reflectance restoration. In this paper we aim at identifying optimized cleaning strategies suitable for CST plants, able to restore mirror reflectance by high-pressure water-spray systems through the enhancement of shear stress over reflectors' surface. In order to evaluate the forces generated by water-spray jet impingement during the cleaning process, fluid dynamics simulations have been undertaken with ANSYS CFX software. In this analysis, shear forces represent the "critical phenomena" within the soil removal process. Enhancing shear forces on a particular area of the target surface, varying the angle of impingement in combination with the variation of standoff distances, and managing the interaxial distance of nozzles can increase cleaning efficiency. This procedure intends to improve the cleaning operation for CST mirrors reducing spotted surface and increasing particles removal efficiency. However, turbulence developed by adjacent flows decrease the shear stress generated on the reflectors surface. The presence of turbulence is identified by the formation of "fountain regions" which are mostly responsible of cleaning inefficiency. By numerical analysis using ANSYS CFX, we have modelled a stationary water-spray system with an array of three nozzles in line, with two angles of impingement: θ = 90° and θ = 75°. Several numerical tests have been carried out, varying the interaxial distance of

  15. Self-Propelled Micromotors for Cleaning Polluted Water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We describe the use of catalytically self-propelled microjets (dubbed micromotors) for degrading organic pollutants in water via the Fenton oxidation process. The tubular micromotors are composed of rolled-up functional nanomembranes consisting of Fe/Pt bilayers. The micromotors contain double functionality within their architecture, i.e., the inner Pt for the self-propulsion and the outer Fe for the in situ generation of ferrous ions boosting the remediation of contaminated water.The degradation of organic pollutants takes place in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which acts as a reagent for the Fenton reaction and as main fuel to propel the micromotors. Factors influencing the efficiency of the Fenton oxidation process, including thickness of the Fe layer, pH, and concentration of hydrogen peroxide, are investigated. The ability of these catalytically self-propelled micromotors to improve intermixing in liquids results in the removal of organic pollutants ca. 12 times faster than when the Fenton oxidation process is carried out without catalytically active micromotors. The enhanced reaction–diffusion provided by micromotors has been theoretically modeled. The synergy between the internal and external functionalities of the micromotors, without the need of further functionalization, results into an enhanced degradation of nonbiodegradable and dangerous organic pollutants at small-scale environments and holds considerable promise for the remediation of contaminated water. PMID:24180623

  16. Purification of contaminated paddy fields by clean water irrigation over two decades.

    PubMed

    Tai, Yiping; Lu, Huanping; Li, Zhian; Zhuang, Ping; Zou, Bi; Xia, Hanping; Wang, Faming; Wang, Gang; Duan, Jun; Zhang, Jianxia

    2013-10-01

    Paddy fields near a mining site in north part of Guangdong Province, PR China, were severely contaminated by heavy metals as a result of wastewater irrigation from the tailing pond. The following clean water irrigation for 2 decades produced marked rinsing effect, especially on Pb and Zn. Paddy fields continuously irrigated with wastewater ever since mining started (50 years) had 1,050.0 mg kg−1 of Pb and 810.3 mg kg−1 of Zn for upper 20 cm soil, in comparison with 215.9 mg kg−1 of Pb and 525.4 mg kg−1 of Zn, respectively, with clean water irrigation for 20 years. Rinsing effect mainly occurred to a depth of upper 40 cm, of which the soil contained highest metals. Copper and Cd in the farmlands were also reduced due to clean water irrigation. Higher availability of Pb might partly account for more Pb transferred from the tailing pond to the farmland and also more Pb removal from the farmland as a result of clean water irrigation. Neither rice in the paddy field nor dense weeds in the uncultivated field largely took up the metals. However, they might contribute to activate metals differently, leading to a different purification extent. Rotation of rice and weed reduced metal retention in the farmland soil, in comparison with sole rice growth. Harvesting of rice grain (and partially rice stalk) only contributed small fraction of total amount of removed metal. In summary, heavy metal in paddy field resulting from irrigation of mining wastewater could be largely removed by clean water irrigation for sufficient time.

  17. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal...

  18. 78 FR 47411 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act, Emergency Planning and Community...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, and Oil Pollution Act Notice is hereby given that on July 31, 2013, a proposed Consent Decree...'') alleging violations of Sections 311(c) and (j) of the Clean Water Act (``CWA''), 33 U.S.C. 1321(c) and...

  19. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal...

  20. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal...

  1. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal...

  2. 23 CFR 633.211 - Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Water Pollution Control Act. 633.211 Section 633.211 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...) implementing requirements with respect to the Clean Air Act and the Federal Water Pollution Control Act are... Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) § 633.211 Implementation of the Clean Air Act and the Federal...

  3. An Outbreak of Vibrio cholerae O1 infections on Ebeye Island, Republic of the Marshall Islands, associated with use of an adequately chlorinated water source.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Mark E; Jack, Tom; Sivapalasingam, Sumathi; Yao, Sandra S; Paul, Irene; Bibb, Bill; Greene, Kathy D; Kubota, Kristy; Mintz, Eric D; Brooks, John T

    2004-01-01

    In December 2000, physicians in the Republic of the Marshall Islands reported the first known outbreak of Vibrio cholerae O1 infection (biotype El Tor, serotype Ogawa) from this country. In a matched case-control study on Ebeye Island, patients with cholera (n=53) had greater odds than persons without cholera (n=104) to have drunk adequately chlorinated water collected from a US military installation on neighboring Kwajalein Island and transported back to Ebeye (matched odds ratio [MOR], 8.0; P=.01). Transporting or storing drinking water in a water cooler with a spout and a tight-fitting lid was associated with reduced odds of illness (MOR, 0.24; P<.01), as was drinking bottled water (MOR, 0.08; P<.01), boiled water (MOR, 0.47; P=.02), or water flavored with powdered drink mixes (MOR, 0.18; P<.01). No cases of cholera were reported among Kwajalein residents. This outbreak highlights the critical importance of handling and storing drinking water safely, especially during outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness.

  4. Interaction of water vapor with clean and oxygen-covered uranium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winer, K.; Colmenares, C. A.; Smith, R. L.; Wooten, F.

    1987-04-01

    The interaction of water vapor with clean and oxygen-covered high-purity polycrystalline uranium surfaces was studied between 85 and 298 K with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Saturation of the uranium surface with oxygen or water vapor produced an asymmetric O1s photoelectron peak that consisted of a main oxide contribution and a small component assigned to strongly chemisorbed oxygen or hydroxyl ions, respectively. Saturation of the clean or oxygen-covered surface with water vapor at 85 K produced multilayer ice that was converted to oxide and adsorbed hydroxyl ions after warming to room temperature. A significant difference in binding energies was observed in the O1s spectra between water vapor adsorption on clean and oxygen-covered surfaces that lends support to the oxygen inhibition of the water vapor-uranium reaction by a surface mechanism. The initial oxidation mechanisms of uranium with oxygen and water vapor are discussed.

  5. Cleaning Genesis Solar Wind Collectors with Ultrapure Water: Residual Contaminant Particle Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Wentworth, S. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Calaway, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Additional experience has been gained in removing contaminant particles from the surface of Genesis solar wind collectors fragments by using megasonically activated ultrapure water (UPW)[1]. The curatorial facility has cleaned six of the eight array collector material types to date: silicon (Si), sapphire (SAP), silicon-on-sapphire (SOS), diamond-like carbon-on-silicon (DOS), gold-on-sapphire (AuOS), and germanium (Ge). Here we make estimates of cleaning effectiveness using image analysis of particle size distributions and an SEM/EDS reconnaissance of particle chemistry on the surface of UPW-cleaned silicon fragments (Fig. 1). Other particle removal techniques are reported by [2] and initial assessment of molecular film removal is reported by [3].

  6. Cold water cleaning of brain proteins, biofilm and bone - harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream.

    PubMed

    Birkin, P R; Offin, D G; Vian, C J B; Howlin, R P; Dawson, J I; Secker, T J; Hervé, R C; Stoodley, P; Oreffo, R O C; Keevil, C W; Leighton, T G

    2015-08-28

    In the absence of sufficient cleaning of medical instruments, contamination and infection can result in serious consequences for the health sector and remains a significant unmet challenge. In this paper we describe a novel cleaning system reliant on cavitation action created in a free flowing fluid stream where ultrasonic transmission to a surface, through the stream, is achieved using careful design and control of the device architecture, sound field and the materials employed. Cleaning was achieved with purified water at room temperature, moderate fluid flow rates and without the need for chemical additives or the high power consumption associated with conventional strategies. This study illustrates the potential in harnessing an ultrasonically activated stream to remove biological contamination including brain tissue from surgical stainless steel substrates, S. epidermidis biofilms from glass, and fat/soft tissue matter from bone structures with considerable basic and clinical applications.

  7. Clean subglacial access: prospects for future deep hot-water drilling.

    PubMed

    Makinson, Keith; Pearce, David; Hodgson, Dominic A; Bentley, Michael J; Smith, Andrew M; Tranter, Martyn; Rose, Mike; Ross, Neil; Mowlem, Matt; Parnell, John; Siegert, Martin J

    2016-01-28

    Accessing and sampling subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, drilling down to this environment must conform to international agreements on environmental stewardship and protection, making clean hot-water drilling the most viable option. Such a drill, and its water recovery system, must be capable of accessing significantly greater ice depths than previous hot-water drills, and remain fully operational after connecting with the basal hydrological system. The Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) project developed a comprehensive plan for deep (greater than 3000 m) subglacial lake research, involving the design and development of a clean deep-ice hot-water drill. However, during fieldwork in December 2012 drilling was halted after a succession of equipment issues culminated in a failure to link with a subsurface cavity and abandonment of the access holes. The lessons learned from this experience are presented here. Combining knowledge gained from these lessons with experience from other hot-water drilling programmes, and recent field testing, we describe the most viable technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into SLE and other deep subglacial access targets.

  8. Clean subglacial access: prospects for future deep hot-water drilling

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, David; Hodgson, Dominic A.; Smith, Andrew M.; Rose, Mike; Ross, Neil; Mowlem, Matt; Parnell, John

    2016-01-01

    Accessing and sampling subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, drilling down to this environment must conform to international agreements on environmental stewardship and protection, making clean hot-water drilling the most viable option. Such a drill, and its water recovery system, must be capable of accessing significantly greater ice depths than previous hot-water drills, and remain fully operational after connecting with the basal hydrological system. The Subglacial Lake Ellsworth (SLE) project developed a comprehensive plan for deep (greater than 3000 m) subglacial lake research, involving the design and development of a clean deep-ice hot-water drill. However, during fieldwork in December 2012 drilling was halted after a succession of equipment issues culminated in a failure to link with a subsurface cavity and abandonment of the access holes. The lessons learned from this experience are presented here. Combining knowledge gained from these lessons with experience from other hot-water drilling programmes, and recent field testing, we describe the most viable technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into SLE and other deep subglacial access targets. PMID:26667913

  9. Cleaning conveyor belts in the chicken-cutting area of a poultry processing plant with 45°c water.

    PubMed

    Soares, V M; Pereira, J G; Zanette, C M; Nero, L A; Pinto, J P A N; Barcellos, V C; Bersot, L S

    2014-03-01

    Conveyor belts are widely used in food handling areas, especially in poultry processing plants. Because they are in direct contact with food and it is a requirement of the Brazilian health authority, conveyor belts are required to be continuously cleaned with hot water under pressure. The use of water in this procedure has been questioned based on the hypothesis that water may further disseminate microorganisms but not effectively reduce the organic material on the surface. Moreover, reducing the use of water in processing may contribute to a reduction in costs and emission of effluents. However, no consistent evidence in support of removing water during conveyor belt cleaning has been reported. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to compare the bacterial counts on conveyor belts that were or were not continuously cleaned with hot water under pressure. Superficial samples from conveyor belts (cleaned or not cleaned) were collected at three different times during operation (T1, after the preoperational cleaning [5 a.m.]; T2, after the first work shift [4 p.m.]; and T3, after the second work shift [1:30 a.m.]) in a poultry meat processing facility, and the samples were subjected to mesophilic and enterobacterial counts. For Enterobacteriaceae, no significant differences were observed between the conveyor belts, independent of the time of sampling or the cleaning process. No significant differences were observed between the counts of mesophilic bacteria at the distinct times of sampling on the conveyor belt that had not been subjected to continuous cleaning with water at 45°C. When comparing similar periods of sampling, no significant differences were observed between the mesophilic counts obtained from the conveyor belts that were or were not subjected to continuous cleaning with water at 45°C. Continuous cleaning with water did not significantly reduce microorganism counts, suggesting the possibility of discarding this procedure in chicken processing.

  10. 76 FR 26768 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under The Clean Water Act, The Clean Air Act, and The...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... Safety Laws Notice is hereby given that on May 3, 2011, a proposed Consent Decree in United States v. BP... relief for violations of the Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. 1311, 1319, 1321, as amended by the Oil Pollution... Pipeline Safety Laws, 49 U.S.C. 60101 et seq., in connection with BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc....

  11. 78 FR 62629 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; Clean Water Act Section 404 State...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency is planning to submit an information collection request (ICR), ``Clean Water Act Section 404 State-Assumed Programs'' (EPA ICR No. 0220.12, OMB Control No. 2040- 0168) to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review and approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. 3501 et seq.). Before doing so, EPA is soliciting public comments......

  12. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  13. Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) recently entered into a nonexclusive license agreement with Applied Cryogenic Solutions (ACS), Inc. (Galveston, TX) to commercialize its Gas-Liquid Supersonic Cleaning and Cleaning Verification Spray System technology. This technology, developed by KSC, is a critical component of processes being developed and commercialized by ACS to replace current mechanical and chemical cleaning and descaling methods used by numerous industries. Pilot trials on heat exchanger tubing components have shown that the ACS technology provides for: Superior cleaning in a much shorter period of time. Lower energy and labor requirements for cleaning and de-scaling uper.ninih. Significant reductions in waste volumes by not using water, acidic or basic solutions, organic solvents, or nonvolatile solid abrasives as components in the cleaning process. Improved energy efficiency in post-cleaning heat exchanger operations. The ACS process consists of a spray head containing supersonic converging/diverging nozzles, a source of liquid gas; a novel, proprietary pumping system that permits pumping liquid nitrogen, liquid air, or supercritical carbon dioxide to pressures in the range of 20,000 to 60,000 psi; and various hoses, fittings, valves, and gauges. The size and number of nozzles can be varied so the system can be built in configurations ranging from small hand-held spray heads to large multinozzle cleaners. The system also can be used to verify if a part has been adequately cleaned.

  14. Precision cleaning verification of fluid components by air/water impingement and total carbon analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 sq m. Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging/diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg/sq ft of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVRs impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 sq m.

  15. Precision Cleaning Verification of Fluid Components by Air/Water Impingement and Total Carbon Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barile, Ronald G.; Fogarty, Chris; Cantrell, Chris; Melton, Gregory S.

    1995-01-01

    NASA personnel at Kennedy Space Center's Material Science Laboratory have developed new environmentally sound precision cleaning and verification techniques for systems and components found at the center. This technology is required to replace existing methods traditionally employing CFC-113. The new patent-pending technique of precision cleaning verification is for large components of cryogenic fluid systems. These are stainless steel, sand cast valve bodies with internal surface areas ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 m(exp 2). Extrapolation of this technique to components of even larger sizes (by orders of magnitude) is planned. Currently, the verification process is completely manual. In the new technique, a high velocity, low volume water stream impacts the part to be verified. This process is referred to as Breathing Air/Water Impingement and forms the basis for the Impingement Verification System (IVS). The system is unique in that a gas stream is used to accelerate the water droplets to high speeds. Water is injected into the gas stream in a small, continuous amount. The air/water mixture is then passed through a converging-diverging nozzle where the gas is accelerated to supersonic velocities. These droplets impart sufficient energy to the precision cleaned surface to place non-volatile residue (NVR) contaminants into suspension in the water. The sample water is collected and its NVR level is determined by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis at 880 C. The TOC, in ppm carbon, is used to establish the NVR level. A correlation between the present gravimetric CFC-113 NVR and the IVS NVR is found from experimental sensitivity factors measured for various contaminants. The sensitivity has the units of ppm of carbon per mg-ft(exp 2) of contaminant. In this paper, the equipment is described and data are presented showing the development of the sensitivity factors from a test set including four NVR's impinged from witness plates of 0.05 to 0.75 m(exp 2).

  16. Precision cleaning verification of nonvolatile residues by using water, ultrasonics, and turbidity analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1991-11-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) in the atmosphere are believed to present a major environmental problem because they are able to interact with and deplete the ozone layer. NASA has been mandated to replace chlorinated solvents in precision cleaning, cleanliness verification, and degreasing of aerospace fluid systems hardware and ground support equipment. KSC has a CFC phase-out plan which provides for the elimination of over 90 percent of the CFC and halon use by 1995. The Materials Science Laboratory and KSC is evaluating four analytical methods for the determination of nonvolatile residues removal by water: (1) infrared analyses using an attenuated total reflectance; (2) surface tension analyses, (3) total organic content analyses, and (4) turbidity analyses. This research project examined the ultrasonic-turbidity responses for 22 hydrocarbons in an effect to determine: (1) if ultrasonics in heated water (70 C) will clean hydrocarbons (oils, greases, gels, and fluids) from aerospace hardware; (2) if the cleaning process by ultrasonics will simultaneously emulsify the removed hydrocarbons in the water; and (3) if a turbidimeter can be used successfully as an analytical instrument for quantifying the removal of hydrocarbons. Sixteen of the 22 hydrocarbons tested showed that ultrasonics would remove it at least 90 percent of the contaminated hydrocarbon from the hardware in 10 minutes or less giving a good ultrasonic-turbidity response. Six hydrocarbons had a lower percentage removal, a slower removal rate, and a marginal ultrasonic-turbidity response.

  17. Precision Cleaning Verification of Nonvolatile Residues by Using Water, Ultrasonics, and Turbidity Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1991-01-01

    Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC's) in the atmosphere are believed to present a major environmental problem because they are able to interact with and deplete the ozone layer. NASA has been mandated to replace chlorinated solvents in precision cleaning, cleanliness verification, and degreasing of aerospace fluid systems hardware and ground support equipment. KSC has a CFC phase-out plan which provides for the elimination of over 90 percent of the CFC and halon use by 1995. The Materials Science Laboratory and KSC is evaluating four analytical methods for the determination of nonvolatile residues removal by water: (1) infrared analyses using an attenuated total reflectance; (2) surface tension analyses, (3) total organic content analyses, and (4) turbidity analyses. This research project examined the ultrasonic-turbidity responses for 22 hydrocarbons in an effect to determine: (1) if ultrasonics in heated water (70 C) will clean hydrocarbons (oils, greases, gels, and fluids) from aerospace hardware; (2) if the cleaning process by ultrasonics will simultaneously emulsify the removed hydrocarbons in the water; and (3) if a turbidimeter can be used successfully as an analytical instrument for quantifying the removal of hydrocarbons. Sixteen of the 22 hydrocarbons tested showed that ultrasonics would remove it at least 90 percent of the contaminated hydrocarbon from the hardware in 10 minutes or less giving a good ultrasonic-turbidity response. Six hydrocarbons had a lower percentage removal, a slower removal rate, and a marginal ultrasonic-turbidity response.

  18. 75 FR 70664 - Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-18

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 136, 260, 423, 430, and 435 Guidelines Establishing Test Procedures for the Analysis of Pollutants Under the Clean Water Act; Analysis and Sampling Procedures; Extension of Comment... community and laboratories in their selection of analytical methods (test procedures) for use in Clean...

  19. Potential Implications of Approaches to Climate Change on the Clean Water Rule Definition of "Waters of the United States".

    PubMed

    Faust, Derek R; Moore, Matthew T; Emison, Gerald Andrews; Rush, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    The 1972 Clean Water Act was passed to protect chemical, physical, and biological integrity of United States' waters. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers codified a new "waters of the United States" rule on June 29, 2015, because several Supreme Court case decisions caused confusion with the existing rule. Climate change could affect this rule through connectivity between groundwater and surface waters; floodplain waters and the 100-year floodplain; changes in jurisdictional status; and sea level rise on coastal ecosystems. Four approaches are discussed for handling these implications: (1) "Wait and see"; (2) changes to the rule; (3) use guidance documents; (4) Congress statutorily defining "waters of the United States." The approach chosen should be legally defensible and achieved in a timely fashion to provide protection to "waters of the United States" in proactive consideration of scientifically documented effects of climate change on aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Microbiological water methods: quality control measures for Federal Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Root, Patsy; Hunt, Margo; Fjeld, Karla; Kundrat, Laurie

    2014-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) data are required in order to have confidence in the results from analytical tests and the equipment used to produce those results. Some AOAC water methods include specific QA/QC procedures, frequencies, and acceptance criteria, but these are considered to be the minimum controls needed to perform a microbiological method successfully. Some regulatory programs, such as those at Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 136.7 for chemistry methods, require additional QA/QC measures beyond those listed in the method, which can also apply to microbiological methods. Essential QA/QC measures include sterility checks, reagent specificity and sensitivity checks, assessment of each analyst's capabilities, analysis of blind check samples, and evaluation of the presence of laboratory contamination and instrument calibration and checks. The details of these procedures, their performance frequency, and expected results are set out in this report as they apply to microbiological methods. The specific regulatory requirements of CFR Title 40 Part 136.7 for the Clean Water Act, the laboratory certification requirements of CFR Title 40 Part 141 for the Safe Drinking Water Act, and the International Organization for Standardization 17025 accreditation requirements under The NELAC Institute are also discussed.

  1. The acoustic bubble: Ocean, cetacean and extraterrestrial acoustics, and cold water cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighton, T. G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the content of a plenary lecture on the author’s personal research into the interactions between bubbles and sound fields, covering particular topics involving the climatically important gas exchange between atmosphere and ocean, the implications of bubbly ocean water to marine mammals that use sound, and the opportunities afforded by incorporating acoustical sensors onto probes launched to investigate other worlds in our solar system. It closes with recent data on the opportunities of bubble acoustics to investigate methods of cold water cleaning.

  2. Polluter-financed environmentally beneficial expenditures: Effective use or improper abuse of citizen suits under the Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, D.S. )

    1991-01-01

    In 1970, recognizing the cumbersome and often ineffective enforcement mechanisms in existing federal water and air pollution statutes, Congress passed the first citizen suit provision. This provision of the Clean Water Act was the subject of intense debate and underwent several transitions before it was finally adopted. With the advent of citizen suits in environmental legislation, Congress opened the courts to the public. Citizen suit provisions allowed private citizens to serve as watch-dogs of both industry and government, creating an additional check in the enforcement schemes established by Congress. But the provisions allowed only for enforcement, not for the right to sue for damages. The remedies available to citizen-plaintiffs were injunctive relief and, in the case of the Clean Water Act, civil penalties payable to the US Treasury. Focusing on the Clean Water Act, this Comment explores the use of alternative payments as settlement of Clean Water Act citizen suits: polluter-financed environmentally beneficial expenditures. As established through consent decrees, these expenditures go to local cleanup, research, and educational projects in the area of Clean Water Act violations, in lieu of or in addition to civil penalties. While the US Department of Justice has objected to the use of such settlements, one apellate court has ratified their use. This essay postulates that environmentally beneficial expenditures established through consent decrees are an important and effective use of the Clean Water Act's citizen suit provision, serving the dual goals of deterring polluters and mitigating the effects of past violations.

  3. National Corn Growers Association Clean Water Act and TMDL Program: An Introduction and Basic Desk Reference for Corn Growers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The primer from the National Corn Growers Association includes information on the Clean Water Act, TMDLs, a hypothetical TMDL case study and opportunities for the agricultural community's involvement in development and implementation of TMDLs.

  4. Notification: Notification of Preliminary Research to Evaluate the Clean Water State Revolving Fund Green Project Reserve Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY15-0009, November 12, 2014. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s efforts to effectively manage the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) Green Project Reserve (GPR) Program.

  5. Report: New Hampshire Clean Water State Revolving Fund Program Financial Statements with Independent Auditor’s Report, June 30, 2002

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2003-1-00086, March 26, 2003. The audit contains reports on the financial statements, internal controls, and compliance requirements applicable to the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program in New Hampshire for the year ended June 30, 2002.

  6. Flush or blow lines adequately

    SciTech Connect

    Junique, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    During the commissioning of new plants, before initial startup, an important step is to clean debris from pipes and equipment. This is usually done by flushing with water or blowing with steam or air. It is not the intention of this article to give recommendation about how to proceed, but rather to give a general method to estimate the effectiveness of this operation. The method is based on the general theory of particle dynamics and the concept of drag force - the force needed to displace particles and move them along through the system. We want to make sure the degree of cleanliness obtained at the end of flushing or blowing is such that, later, in the most critical case during operation or operational upset, the particles which are left in the pipework or equipment will not move further. Therefore, the notion of drag force is useful to make comparisons between normal operation and cleaning operation. The concept can also be used to compare the efficiency of different cleaning media; for example, whether to use air blowing or water flushing.

  7. Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinney, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas-Liquid Cleaning System Research Project consisted mainly of a feasibility study, including theoretical and engineering analysis, of a proof-of-concept prototype of this particular cleaning system developed by NASA-KSC. The cleaning system utilizes gas-liquid supersonic nozzles to generate high impingement velocities at the surface of the device to be cleaned. The cleaning fluid being accelerated to these high velocities may consist of any solvent or liquid, including water. Compressed air or any inert gas is used to provide the conveying medium for the liquid, as well as substantially reduce the total amount of liquid needed to perform adequate surface cleaning and cleanliness verification. This type of aqueous cleaning system is considered to be an excellent way of conducting cleaning and cleanliness verification operations as replacements for the use of CFC 113 which must be discontinued by 1995. To utilize this particular cleaning system in various cleaning applications for both the Space Program and the commercial market, it is essential that the cleaning system, especially the supersonic nozzle, be characterized for such applications. This characterization consisted of performing theoretical and engineering analysis, identifying desirable modifications/extensions to the basic concept, evaluating effects of variations in operating parameters, and optimizing hardware design for specific applications.

  8. Evaluating exposure of pedestrians to airborne contaminants associated with non-potable water use for pavement cleaning.

    PubMed

    Seidl, M; Da, G; Ausset, P; Haenn, S; Géhin, E; Moulin, L

    2016-04-01

    Climate change and increasing demography press local authorities to look after affordable water resources and replacement of drinking water for city necessities like street and pavement cleaning by more available raw water. Though, the substitution of drinking by non-drinking resources demands the evaluation of sanitary hazards. This article aims therefore to evaluate the contribution of cleaning water to the overall exposure of city dwellers in case of wet pavement cleaning using crossed physical, chemical and biological approaches. The result of tracer experiments with fluorescein show that liquid water content of the cleaning aerosol produced is about 0.24 g m(-3), rending possible a fast estimation of exposure levels. In situ analysis of the aerosol particles indicates a significant increase in particle number concentration and particle diameter, though without change in particle composition. The conventional bacterial analysis using total coliforms as tracer suggests that an important part of the contamination is issued from the pavement. The qPCR results show a more than 20-fold increase of background genome concentration for Escherichia coli and 10-fold increase for Enterococcus but a negligible contribution of the cleaning water. The fluorescence analysis of the cleaning aerosol confirms the above findings identifying pavement surface as the major contributor to aerosol organic load. The physical, chemical and microbiological approaches used make it possible to describe accurately the cleaning bioaerosol and to identify the existence of significantly higher levels of all parameters studied during the wet pavement cleaning. Though, the low level of contamination and the very short time of passage of pedestrian in the zone do not suggest a significant risk for the city dwellers. As the cleaning workers remain much longer in the impacted area, more attention should be paid to their chronic exposure.

  9. Clean Water Act assessment processes in relation to changing U.S. Environmental Protection Agency management strategies.

    PubMed

    Cooter, William S

    2004-10-15

    During the 1970s the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) devised a multiscale system of basin planning and regional implementation that encouraged a balanced mixture of monitoring and modeling-based assessments. By the 1980s, this goal had not been achieved. Modeling and monitoring assessment approaches became largely decoupled. To a significant degree, modeling was viewed as too inaccurate to handle issues such as setting permit limits involving toxics. During the 1980s, EPA also encouraged the idea that monitoring approaches were adequate to document water quality problems, guide the development of management plans, and demonstrate the achievement of management goals. By the late 1990s, large numbers of waters listed under the Clean Water Act's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) provisions showed the widespread nature of pollutant concerns, but the uneven nature of the listing information also revealed fundamental problems in the ability of state monitoring programs to achieve credible and comprehensive assessments. Statistics are presented from the 1998 and the most current publicly available 2000 baseline periods showing the limitations in the scope of state assessments. There are significant opportunities for the increased use of relatively simple modeling systems that can be flexibly implemented over a variety of spatial scales. In addition to conventional modeling frameworks, the value of bioassessment monitoring techniques is stressed. Bioassessment indicators can often be combined with landscape modeling methods, as well as analyses from conventional modeling outputs, to help target small area monitoring by use of tiered approaches. These findings underscore the value of integrated monitoring and modeling approaches to build properly balanced assessment systems.

  10. Ultra Pure Water Cleaning Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Burkett, P. J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.

    2013-01-01

    Future sample return missions will require strict protocols and procedures for reducing inorganic and organic contamination in isolation containment systems. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs [1, 2]. As part of this in-depth organic study, the current curatorial technical support procedure (TSP) 23 was used for cleaning the gloveboxes with ultra pure water (UPW) [3-5]. Particle counts and identification were obtained that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs that require glovebox decontamination. The UPW baseline study demonstrates that TSP 23 works well for gloveboxes that have been thoroughly degreased. However, TSP 23 could be augmented to provide even better glovebox decontamination. JSC 03243 could be used as a starting point for further investigating optimal cleaning techniques and procedures. DuPont Vertrel XF or other chemical substitutes to replace Freon- 113, mechanical scrubbing, and newer technology could be used to enhance glovebox cleanliness in addition to high purity UPW final rinsing. Future sample return missions will significantly benefit from further cleaning studies to reduce inorganic and organic contamination.

  11. Biological approaches for addressing the grand challenge of providing access to clean drinking water

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) recently published a document presenting "Grand Challenges for Engineering". This list was proposed by leading engineers and scientists from around the world at the request of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). Fourteen topics were selected for these grand challenges, and at least seven can be addressed using the tools and methods of biological engineering. Here we describe how biological engineers can address the challenge of providing access to clean drinking water. This issue must be addressed in part by removing or inactivating microbial and chemical contaminants in order to properly deliver water safe for human consumption. Despite many advances in technologies this challenge is expanding due to increased pressure on fresh water supplies and to new opportunities for growth of potentially pathogenic organisms. PMID:21453515

  12. Biological approaches for addressing the grand challenge of providing access to clean drinking water.

    PubMed

    Riley, Mark R; Gerba, Charles P; Elimelech, Menachem

    2011-03-31

    The U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) recently published a document presenting "Grand Challenges for Engineering". This list was proposed by leading engineers and scientists from around the world at the request of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). Fourteen topics were selected for these grand challenges, and at least seven can be addressed using the tools and methods of biological engineering. Here we describe how biological engineers can address the challenge of providing access to clean drinking water. This issue must be addressed in part by removing or inactivating microbial and chemical contaminants in order to properly deliver water safe for human consumption. Despite many advances in technologies this challenge is expanding due to increased pressure on fresh water supplies and to new opportunities for growth of potentially pathogenic organisms.

  13. Clean Water Act's Section 404 permit program enters its adolescence: an institutional and programmatic perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Blumm, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    Section 404 of the Clean Water Act deals with permit requirements and has become a major Federal regulatory program. The program's scope and procedures are reviewed, with emphasis given to the responsibilities of the agencies involved and the opportunities for discharging these duties with the maximum efficiency. Interagency and intergovernmental cooperation are crucial to the effectiveness of the broad ranging 404 program. The Environmental Protection Agency's role is seen as one of oversight and guidance, as well as issuing criteria and monitoring enforcement. The appropriate roles for other Federal and state agencies, state governments, Congress, and the public are outlined and also depend on cooperation for effective implementation. 333 references. (DCK)

  14. Clean Watersheds Needs Survey

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Watershed Needs Survey is a national assessment of the future capital cost for publicly owned wastewater collection and treatment facilities to meet the Clean Water Act's water quality goals.

  15. Effect of Pattern Layout and Dissolved Oxygen in CO2 Rinse Water on Cu Corrosion during Post-Etch Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuri, Kentaro; Yamashita, Yukinari; Shiohara, Morio; Oda, Noriaki; Kondo, Seiichi; Saito, Shuichi

    2010-05-01

    When post-etch cleaning was carried out in Cu dual-damascene process, Cu at the bottom of isolated via was etched out especially in the wafer edge, and this would become a critical issue as device scale is shrunk. The corrosion was caused in the rinse step rather than chemical cleaning step because dissolved oxygen in rinse water from the air increased oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and CO2 included in the rinse water for preventing wafer electrification decreased pH. The corrosion was found to be suppressed by increasing dummy pattern density and by controlling atmosphere and pH of the rinse water.

  16. Putting Regulatory Data to Work at the Service of Public Health: Utilizing Data Collected Under the Clean Water Act

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under the Clean Water Act, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collects information from states on intended use and impairment of each water body. We explore the feasibility of using these data, collected for regulatory purposes, for public health analyses. Combining E...

  17. Towards a better hydraulic cleaning strategy for ultrafiltration membrane fouling by humic acid: Effect of backwash water composition.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haiqing; Liang, Heng; Qu, Fangshu; Ma, Jun; Ren, Nanqi; Li, Guibai

    2016-05-01

    As a routine measurement to alleviate membrane fouling, hydraulic cleaning is of great significance for the steady operation of ultrafiltration (UF) systems in water treatment processes. In this work, a comparative study was performed to investigate the effects of the composition of backwash water on the hydraulic cleaning performance of UF membranes fouled by humic acid (HA). Various types of backwash water, including UF permeate, Milli-Q water, NaCl solution, CaCl2 solution and HA solution, were compared in terms of hydraulically irreversible fouling index, total surface tension and residual HA. The results indicated that Milli-Q water backwash was superior to UF permeate backwash in cleaning HA-fouled membranes, and the backwash water containing Na(+) or HA outperformed Milli-Q water in alleviating HA fouling. On the contrary, the presence of Ca(2+) in backwash water significantly decreased the backwash efficiency. Moreover, Ca(2+) played an important role in foulant removal, and the residual HA content closely related to the residual Ca(2+) content. Mechanism analysis suggested that the backwash process may involve fouling layer swelling, ion exchange, electric double layer release and competitive complexation. Ion exchange and competitive complexation played significant roles in the efficient hydraulic cleaning associated with Na(+) and HA, respectively.

  18. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources: clean land, water, and air for healthy people and communities.

    PubMed

    Riegel, Lisa Diaz; Wakild, Charles; Boothe, Laura; Hildebrandt, Heather J; Nicholson, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources works with communities and other agencies to sustain clean air, water, and land. Sustainability efforts include protecting air quality through community design, community enhancement through brownfields revitalization, community development strategies to protect water resources, and the integration of natural resource conservation.

  19. Recreational demand for clean water: Evidence from geotagged photographs by visitors to lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, B.; Wood, S.; Polasky, S.; Kling, C.; Filstrup, C.; Downing, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    More than 41,000 waters are listed as impaired by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Clean Water Act. Regulations designed to address these impairments can be costly, raising questions about the value of the public benefits that would result from additional investments in improving surface water quality. Benefit studies often rely on costly surveys or other detailed data collection, limiting the ability to apply nonmarket valuation methods to address policy needs. We assessed the recreational value of changes in water quality using freely-available geotagged photographs as a proxy for recreational visits to lakes. We find that improved water clarity is associated with greater lake photo-visitation and that lake users are willing to travel further to visit clearer lakes. We estimate a one-meter increase in lake clarity in Minnesota and Iowa lakes is associated with $22 in increased willingness-to-pay per trip and generates 1,400 additional annual visits per lake, holding all other lake attributes constant. Our approach demonstrates the potential of data from social media to inform human responses to environmental change.

  20. Achieving Clean Air and Clean Water: The Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Blue Ribbon Panel's report consists of five issue summaries: water contamination; air quality benefits; prevention; treatment and remediation; fuel supply and cost; and comparing the fuel additives.

  1. Clean hot water drilling for exploration of the Antarctic deep subglacial environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makinson, K.; Pearce, D.; Hodgson, D.; Bentley, M.; Smith, A.; Tranter, M.; Rose, M. C.; Ross, N.; Mowlem, M. C.; Parnell, J.; Siegert, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Overlain by several kilometres of ice, the subglacial environments deep beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet are regarded as extreme habitats for microbial life and repositories of important paleoclimate records. Of significant scientific interest, yet remaining largely unexplored, accessing and sampling these environments presents several challenges to existing drilling technologies. With over half of the ice sheet believed to be resting on a wet bed, much of it part of a hydrological drainage network, accessing of this environment must conform to international environmental contamination protocols. This makes hot water drilling the most viable option for clean, fast, access through thick ice. After two decades of planning, involving the development of drilling techniques for subglacial access, instrument design and logistics set up, significant progress has been made in attempts to directly access, measure, and sample subglacial lakes and sediments. Combining the experiences from the notable setbacks and successes, as well as recent field testing for this drilling technique, the most practical technical options and operational procedures for future clean entry into Subglacial Lake Ellsworth and other deep (>3000 m) access targets will be presented.

  2. A comparison of ultrasonically activated water stream and ultrasonic bath immersion cleaning of railhead leaf-film contaminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodes, L. R.; Harvey, T. J.; Symonds, N.; Leighton, T. G.

    2016-09-01

    Leaf-film adhered to the railway track is a major issue during the autumn/fall season, as leaves fall onto the track and are entrained into the wheel-rail interface. This results in the development of a smooth, black layer. Presently, pressure washers must be used to clean the residue to prevent loss of traction, which can cause crashes or delays by forcing a reduced speed. These pressure washers consume large amounts of water and energy. In this study, use of an ultrasonic cleaning apparatus equipped with a 100 W transducer is investigated, using a low volume of water in the order of 1 l min-1. This was applied to leaf-film samples generated in the laboratory, whose surface properties and thickness were confirmed with optical and stylus profilometry methods. Cleaning achieved by an ultrasonically activated water stream was compared to (a) non-activated water and (b) an ultrasonic bath with comparable power consumption. Cleaning efficacy was found to be much greater than that afforded by the ultrasonic bath; a rate of 14.3 mm2 s-1 compared to 0.37 mm2 s-1, and the ultrasonic bath only cleaned off around 20% of the leaf-film coverage even after 3 min of exposure.

  3. ASRM process development in aqueous cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swisher, Bill

    1992-12-01

    Viewgraphs are included on process development in aqueous cleaning which is taking place at the Aerojet Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Division under a NASA Marshall Space and Flight Center contract for design, development, test, and evaluation of the ASRM including new production facilities. The ASRM will utilize aqueous cleaning in several manufacturing process steps to clean case segments, nozzle metal components, and igniter closures. ASRM manufacturing process development is underway, including agent selection, agent characterization, subscale process optimization, bonding verification, and scale-up validation. Process parameters are currently being tested for optimization utilizing a Taguci Matrix, including agent concentration, cleaning solution temperature, agitation and immersion time, rinse water amount and temperature, and use/non-use of drying air. Based on results of process development testing to date, several observations are offered: aqueous cleaning appears effective for steels and SermeTel-coated metals in ASRM processing; aqueous cleaning agents may stain and/or attack bare aluminum metals to various extents; aqueous cleaning appears unsuitable for thermal sprayed aluminum-coated steel; aqueous cleaning appears to adequately remove a wide range of contaminants from flat metal surfaces, but supplementary assistance may be needed to remove clumps of tenacious contaminants embedded in holes, etc.; and hot rinse water appears to be beneficial to aid in drying of bare steel and retarding oxidation rate.

  4. Cathodic ARC surface cleaning prior to brazing

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, V. R.; Hollis, K. J.; Castro, R. G.; Smith, F. M.; Javernick, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Surface cleanliness is one the critical process variables in vacuum furnace brazing operations. For a large number of metallic components, cleaning is usually accomplished either by water-based alkali cleaning, but may also involve acid etching or solvent cleaning / rinsing. Nickel plating may also be necessary to ensure proper wetting. All of these cleaning or plating technologies have associated waste disposal issues, and this article explores an alternative cleaning process that generates minimal waste. Cathodic arc, or reserve polarity, is well known for welding of materials with tenacious oxide layers such as aluminum alloys. In this work the reverse polarity effect is used to clean austenitic stainless steel substrates prior to brazing with Ag-28%Cu. This cleaning process is compared to acid pickling and is shown to produce similar wetting behavior as measured by dynamic contact angle experiments. Additionally, dynamic contact angle measurements with water drops are conducted to show that cathodic arc cleaning can remove organic contaminants as well. The process does have its limitations however, and alloys with high titanium and aluminum content such as nickel-based superalloys may still require plating to ensure adequate wetting.

  5. ASRM process development in aqueous cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swisher, Bill

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs are included on process development in aqueous cleaning which is taking place at the Aerojet Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Division under a NASA Marshall Space and Flight Center contract for design, development, test, and evaluation of the ASRM including new production facilities. The ASRM will utilize aqueous cleaning in several manufacturing process steps to clean case segments, nozzle metal components, and igniter closures. ASRM manufacturing process development is underway, including agent selection, agent characterization, subscale process optimization, bonding verification, and scale-up validation. Process parameters are currently being tested for optimization utilizing a Taguci Matrix, including agent concentration, cleaning solution temperature, agitation and immersion time, rinse water amount and temperature, and use/non-use of drying air. Based on results of process development testing to date, several observations are offered: aqueous cleaning appears effective for steels and SermeTel-coated metals in ASRM processing; aqueous cleaning agents may stain and/or attack bare aluminum metals to various extents; aqueous cleaning appears unsuitable for thermal sprayed aluminum-coated steel; aqueous cleaning appears to adequately remove a wide range of contaminants from flat metal surfaces, but supplementary assistance may be needed to remove clumps of tenacious contaminants embedded in holes, etc.; and hot rinse water appears to be beneficial to aid in drying of bare steel and retarding oxidation rate.

  6. Consecutive chemical cleaning of fouled PVC membrane using NaOH and ethanol during ultrafiltration of river water.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia-yu; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yang, Yan-ling; Liang, Heng; Nan, Jun; Li, Gui-bai

    2010-01-01

    Chemical cleaning of fouled hollow-fiber polyvinyl chloride (PVC) membrane with the consecutive use of NaOH and ethanol during ultrafiltration of river water was investigated in the study. Results showed that through the chemical cleaning with 1% NaOH for 30min, a negative cleaning efficiency of -14.6% was observed for the PVC membrane. This might be due to the increase of membrane hydrophobicity, which was reflected by the increase of contact angle from 69.7 degrees to 87.6 degrees . On the other hand, the cleaning efficiency of 85.1% was obtained by the consecutive cleaning with 30min of 1% NaOH and 30min of ethanol. Individual ethanol cleaning could remove 48.5% of the irreversible resistance, indicating that NaOH cleaning also made its contribution (36.6%) to the removal of membrane foulants. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses demonstrated that both NaOH and ethanol were not only able to eliminate the foulants on membrane surface, but also able to remove the in-pore fouling of the PVC membrane. The synergetic effects for removing membrane foulants were observed between the NaOH and ethanol. Furthermore, ethanol could also restore the hydrophilicity of the membrane by decreasing the contact angle from 87.6 degrees to 71.4 degrees . Considering that ethanol is easy to be used and reclaimed, the consecutive chemical cleaning by alkali and ethanol is recommended for PVC membrane in filtration of surface water.

  7. Cleaning Surface Particle Contamination with Ultrapure Water (UPW) Megasonic Flow on Genesis Array Collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Calaway, Michael J.; Hittle, J. D.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.; McNamara, K. M.

    2006-01-01

    The hard landing experienced by the Genesis sample return capsule breached the science canister containing the solar wind collectors. This impact into the damp lakebed contaminated collector surfaces with pulverized collector and spacecraft materials and Utah sediment and brine residue. The gold foil, polished aluminum, and bulk metallic glass remained intact, but the solar wind bulk and regime-specific array collectors were jarred loose from their frames and fractured into greater than 10,000 specimens. After a year of investigation and cleaning experimentation, the Genesis Science Team determined that array collectors had 4 classes of contaminants: particles, molecular film, submicron inorganic particulate ("aerosol"), and pre-launch surface contamination. We discuss here use of megasonically energized ultrapure water (UPW) for removing particulate debris from array collector fragments.

  8. 40 CFR 131.41 - Bacteriological criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... promulgation of the Clean Water Act section 304(a) criteria for bacteria. This section also contains a... discharger. (c) EPA's section 304(a) ambient water quality criteria for bacteria. (1) Freshwaters: AIndicator... states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A). 131.41 Section 131.41 Protection...

  9. 40 CFR 131.41 - Bacteriological criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... promulgation of the Clean Water Act section 304(a) criteria for bacteria. This section also contains a... discharger. (c) EPA's section 304(a) ambient water quality criteria for bacteria. (1) Freshwaters: AIndicator... states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A). 131.41 Section 131.41 Protection...

  10. 40 CFR 131.41 - Bacteriological criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... promulgation of the Clean Water Act section 304(a) criteria for bacteria. This section also contains a... discharger. (c) EPA's section 304(a) ambient water quality criteria for bacteria. (1) Freshwaters: AIndicator... states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A). 131.41 Section 131.41 Protection...

  11. 40 CFR 131.41 - Bacteriological criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... promulgation of the Clean Water Act section 304(a) criteria for bacteria. This section also contains a... discharger. (c) EPA's section 304(a) ambient water quality criteria for bacteria. (1) Freshwaters: AIndicator... states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A). 131.41 Section 131.41 Protection...

  12. 40 CFR 131.41 - Bacteriological criteria for those states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... promulgation of the Clean Water Act section 304(a) criteria for bacteria. This section also contains a... discharger. (c) EPA's section 304(a) ambient water quality criteria for bacteria. (1) Freshwaters: AIndicator... states not complying with Clean Water Act section 303(i)(1)(A). 131.41 Section 131.41 Protection...

  13. July 2011 Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Memorandum: Improving EPA Review of Appalachian Surface Coal Mining Operations Under the Clean Water Act, National Environmental Policy Act, and the Environmental Justice Executive Order, July 21, 2011

  14. Chemical dynamics of acidity and heavy metals in a mine water-polluted soil during decontamination using clean water.

    PubMed

    Chen, A; Lin, C; Lu, W; Ma, Y; Bai, Y; Chen, H; Li, J

    2010-03-15

    A column leaching experiment was conducted to investigate the chemical dynamics of the percolating water and washed soil during decontamination of an acidic mine water-polluted soil. The results show that leaching of the contaminated soil with clean water rapidly reduced soluble acidity and ion concentrations in the soils. However, only <20% of the total actual acidity in the soil column was eliminated after 30 leaching cycles. It is likely that the stored acidity continues to be released to the percolating water over a long period of time. During the column leaching, dissolved Cu and Pb were rapidly leached out, followed by mobilization of colloidal Cu and Pb from the exchangeable and the oxide-bound fractions as a result of reduced ionic strength in the soil solution. The soluble Fe contained in the soil was rare, probably because the soil pH was not sufficiently low; marked mobility of colloidal Fe took place after the ionic strength of the percolating water was weakened and the mobilized Fe was mainly derived from iron oxides. In contrast with Cu, Pb and Fe, the concentration of leachate Zn and Mn showed a continuously decreasing trend during the entire period of the experiment.

  15. Finding clean water habitats in urban landscapes: professional researcher vs citizen science approaches.

    PubMed

    McGoff, Elaine; Dunn, Francesca; Cachazo, Luis Moliner; Williams, Penny; Biggs, Jeremy; Nicolet, Pascale; Ewald, Naomi C

    2017-03-01

    This study investigated patterns of nutrient pollution in waterbody types across Greater London. Nitrate and phosphate data were collected by both citizen scientists and professional ecologists and their results were compared. The professional survey comprised 495 randomly selected pond, lake, river, stream and ditch sites. Citizen science survey sites were self-selected and comprised 76 ponds, lakes, rivers and streams. At each site, nutrient concentrations were assessed using field chemistry kits to measure nitrate-N and phosphate-P. The professional and the citizen science datasets both showed that standing waterbodies had significantly lower average nutrient concentrations than running waters. In the professional datasets 46% of ponds and lakes had nutrient levels below the threshold at which biological impairment is likely, whereas only 3% of running waters were unimpaired by nutrients. The citizen science dataset showed the same broad pattern, but there was a trend towards selection of higher quality waterbodies with 77% standing waters and 14% of rivers and streams unimpaired. Waterbody nutrient levels in the professional dataset were broadly correlated with landuse intensity. Rivers and streams had a significantly higher proportion of urban and suburban land cover than other waterbody types. Ponds had higher percentage of semi-natural vegetation within their much smaller catchments. Relationships with land cover and water quality were less apparent in the citizen-collected dataset probably because the areas visited by citizens were less representative of the landscape as whole. The results suggest that standing waterbodies, especially ponds, may represent an important clean water resource within urban areas. Small waterbodies, including ponds, small lakes<50ha and ditches, are rarely part of the statutory water quality monitoring programmes and are frequently overlooked. Citizen scientist data have the potential to partly fill this gap if they are co

  16. Cleaning of Oil Fouling with Water Enabled by Zwitterionic Polyelectrolyte Coatings: Overcoming the Imperative Challenge of Oil-Water Separation Membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Ke; Duan, Haoran; Chen, George Y; Liu, Xiaokong; Yang, Wensheng; Wang, Dayang

    2015-09-22

    Herein we report a self-cleaning coating derived from zwitterionic poly(2-methacryloyloxylethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) brushes grafted on a solid substrate. The PMPC surface not only exhibits complete oil repellency in a water-wetted state (i.e., underwater superoleophobicity), but also allows effective cleaning of oil fouled on dry surfaces by water alone. The PMPC surface was compared with typical underwater superoleophobic surfaces realized with the aid of surface roughening by applying hydrophilic nanostructures and those realized by applying smooth hydrophilic polyelectrolyte multilayers. We show that underwater superoleophobicity of a surface is not sufficient to enable water to clean up oil fouling on a dry surface, because the latter circumstance demands the surface to be able to strongly bond water not only in its pristine state but also in an oil-wetted state. The PMPC surface is unique with its described self-cleaning performance because the zwitterionic phosphorylcholine groups exhibit exceptional binding affinity to water even when they are already wetted by oil. Further, we show that applying this PMPC coating onto steel meshes produces oil-water separation membranes that are resilient to oil contamination with simply water rinsing. Consequently, we provide an effective solution to the oil contamination issue on the oil-water separation membranes, which is an imperative challenge in this field. Thanks to the self-cleaning effect of the PMPC surface, PMPC-coated steel meshes can not only separate oil from oil-water mixtures in a water-wetted state, but also can lift oil out from oil-water mixtures even in a dry state, which is a very promising technology for practical oil-spill remediation. In contrast, we show that oil contamination on conventional hydrophilic oil-water separation membranes would permanently induce the loss of oil-water separation function, and thus they have to be always used in a completely water-wetted state, which significantly

  17. Decade of clean water. [Declaration of 1980s as International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, A.

    1980-11-06

    A 10-year United Nations program will attempt to improve drinking water quality for 1.8 billion people and sanitation facilities for 2.4 billion people who represent an increasing share of Third World populations that lacks these necessities. The International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (IDWSSD) addresses issues of both moral and economic implications if it succeeds in developing a social framework in which population growth can be controlled. Obstacles to this massive undertaking include its high cost, a stubborn adherence to expensive sewerage systems, poor understanding of how a community organizes to maintain and operate water-supply and sanitation systems, difficulty in linking the two programs, and the lack of institutions and skilled labor to carry out the program. A strategy adaptable to urban areas can use existing institutions to develop the system on a paid basis, while a free or easy-access concept should be adopted for rural areas. (DCK)

  18. The cleaning method selected for new PEX pipe installation can affect short-term drinking water quality.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Keven M; Stenson, Alexandra C; Cooley, Racheal; Dey, Rajarashi; Whelton, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    The influence of four different cleaning methods used for newly installed polyethylene (PEX) pipes on chemical and odor quality was determined. Bench-scale testing of two PEX (type b) pipe brands showed that the California Plumbing Code PEX installation method does not maximize total organic carbon (TOC) removal. TOC concentration and threshold odor number values significantly varied between two pipe brands. Different cleaning methods impacted carbon release, odor, as well the level of drinking water odorant ethyl tert-butyl ether. Both pipes caused odor values up to eight times greater than the US federal drinking water odor limit. Unique to this project was that organic chemicals released by PEX pipe were affected by pipe brand, fill/empty cycle frequency, and the pipe cleaning method selected by the installer.

  19. The Sequential Probability Ratio Test: An efficient alternative to exact binomial testing for Clean Water Act 303(d) evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Connie; Gribble, Matthew O; Bartroff, Jay; Bay, Steven M; Goldstein, Larry

    2017-05-01

    The United States's Clean Water Act stipulates in section 303(d) that states must identify impaired water bodies for which total maximum daily loads (TMDLs) of pollution inputs into water bodies are developed. Decision-making procedures about how to list, or delist, water bodies as impaired, or not, per Clean Water Act 303(d) differ across states. In states such as California, whether or not a particular monitoring sample suggests that water quality is impaired can be regarded as a binary outcome variable, and California's current regulatory framework invokes a version of the exact binomial test to consolidate evidence across samples and assess whether the overall water body complies with the Clean Water Act. Here, we contrast the performance of California's exact binomial test with one potential alternative, the Sequential Probability Ratio Test (SPRT). The SPRT uses a sequential testing framework, testing samples as they become available and evaluating evidence as it emerges, rather than measuring all the samples and calculating a test statistic at the end of the data collection process. Through simulations and theoretical derivations, we demonstrate that the SPRT on average requires fewer samples to be measured to have comparable Type I and Type II error rates as the current fixed-sample binomial test. Policymakers might consider efficient alternatives such as SPRT to current procedure.

  20. Feasibility, safety, and economic implications of whey-recovered water in cleaning-in-place systems: A case study on water conservation for the dairy industry.

    PubMed

    Meneses, Yulie E; Flores, Rolando A

    2016-05-01

    Water scarcity is threatening food security and business growth in the United States. In the dairy sector, most of the water is used in cleaning applications; therefore, any attempt to support water conservation in these processes will have a considerable effect on the water footprint of dairy products. This study demonstrates the viability for recovering good quality water from whey, a highly pollutant cheese-making by-product, to be reused in cleaning-in-place systems. The results obtained in this study indicate that by using a combined ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis system, 47% of water can be recovered. This system generates protein and lactose concentrates, by-products that once spray-dried fulfill commercial standards for protein and lactose powders. The physicochemical and microbiological quality of the recovered permeate was also analyzed, suggesting suitable properties to be reused in the cleaning-in-place system without affecting the quality and safety of the product manufactured on the cleaned equipment. A cost analysis was conducted for 3 cheese manufacturing levels, considering an annual production of 1, 20, and 225 million liters of whey. Results indicate the feasibility of this intervention in the dairy industry, generating revenues of $0.18, $3.05, and $33.4 million per year, respectively. The findings provide scientific evidence to promote the safety of reuse of reconditioned water in food processing plants, contributing to building a culture of water conservation and sustainable production throughout the food supply chain.

  1. Report: Congressionally Requested Report on Comments Related to Effects of Jurisdictional Uncertainty on Clean Water Act Implementation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #09-N-0149, April 30, 2009. This is in response to a request dated April 24, 2009, asking that the EPA OIG provide information we have collected on the impact of the Rapanos case on Clean Water Act (CWA) enforcement.

  2. Repsol Exploration and Production USA Inc. settles with EPA for Clean Water Act violations at North Slope Alaska Spill

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - September 3, 2015) Repsol E&P USA, Inc. agreed to pay a penalty for alleged Clean Water Act violations at an oil exploration well pad on the North Slope, Alaska. According to a settlement announced on August 26 by the U.S. Environmental Prot

  3. 76 FR 18548 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on Three Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... Louisiana's Mississippi River Basin, under Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Documents from the... examined by calling or writing Ms. Diane Smith at the address below. Please contact Ms. Smith to schedule an inspection. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Diane Smith, Environmental Protection...

  4. Water, moisture and ash content of mechanically cleaned greige cotton, naturally colored brown cotton, flax and rayon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This exploratory research evaluated the Karl Fischer Titration reference method (KFT, ASTM D7785) to accurately measure water content of mechanically cleaned greige cotton, a naturally colored brown cotton, flax and rayon at moisture equilibrium. Each sample was analyzed by KFT, standard oven dryin...

  5. 75 FR 11911 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and the Comprehensive Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (``CERCLA'') Notice is hereby given that on March 8, 2010, a proposed consent decree (``proposed Decree'') in...

  6. Nonpoint Source Pollution: Agriculture, Forestry, and Mining. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buskirk, E. Drannon, Jr.

    Nonpoint sources of pollution have diffuse origins and are major contributors to water quality problems in both urban and rural areas. Addressed in this instructor's manual are the identification, assessment, and management of nonpoint source pollutants resulting from mining, agriculture, and forestry. The unit, part of the Working for Clean Water…

  7. 75 FR 43160 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Final Agency Action on One Arkansas Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of availability. SUMMARY: This...

  8. Fabrication of polydopamine-coated superhydrophobic fabrics for oil/water separation and self-cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhanglian; Miyazaki, Koji; Hori, Teruo

    2016-05-01

    We report a fabric coating method inspired the superhydrophobic properties of lotus leaves and the strong adhesion of the adhesive proteins in mussels. Dopamine, which mimics the single units of the adhesive mussel proteins, was polymerized in an alkaline aqueous solution to coat the surface of fabrics. The versatile reactivity of polydopamine allows subsequent Ag deposition to form a lotus-leaf-like rough structure on the fabric surface. The composite fabric exhibited high water repellence after fluorination. Because dopamine can adhere to all kinds of materials, this method can be applied to many fabrics regardless of their properties and chemical compositions using a universal process. The modified fabrics exhibited excellent anti-wetting and self-cleaning properties with contact angles of >150° and sliding angles lower than 9°. The fabrics also efficiently separated oil from oil/water mixtures under various conditions. Our method is versatile and simple compared with other hydrophobic treatment methods, which usually only work on one type of fabric.

  9. Nanosheet-structured boron nitride spheres with a versatile adsorption capacity for water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Yu, Jie; Ji, Xixi; Qian, Muqi

    2015-01-28

    Here, we report the synthesis of nanosheet-structured boron nitride spheres (NSBNSs) by a catalyzing thermal evaporation method from solid B powders. The NSBNSs consist of radially oriented ultrathin nanosheets with the sheet edges oriented on the surface. Formation of this unique structure occurs only at a certain reaction temperature. The diameter from 4 μm to 700 nm and the nanosheet thickness from 9.1 to 3.1 nm of the NSBNSs can be well-controlled by appropriately changing the mass ratio of boron powders and catalyst. The NSBNSs possess versatile adsorption capacity, exhibiting excellent adsorption performance for oil, dyes, and heavy metal ions from water. The oil uptake reaches 7.8 times its own weight. The adsorption capacities for malachite green and methylene blue are 324 and 233 mg/g, while those for Cu(2+), Pb(2+), and Cd(2+) are 678.7, 536.7, and 107.0 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption capacities of the NSBNSs for Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) are higher or much higher than those of the adsorbents reported previously. These results demonstrate the great potential of NSBNSs for water treatment and cleaning.

  10. Zebrafish and clean water technology: assessing soil bioretention as a protective treatment for toxic urban runoff.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J K; Davis, J W; Incardona, J P; Stark, J D; Anulacion, B F; Scholz, N L

    2014-12-01

    Urban stormwater contains a complex mixture of contaminants that can be acutely toxic to aquatic biota. Green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) is a set of evolving technologies intended to reduce impacts on natural systems by slowing and filtering runoff. The extent to which GSI methods work as intended is usually assessed in terms of water quantity (hydrology) and quality (chemistry). Biological indicators of GSI effectiveness have received less attention, despite an overarching goal of protecting the health of aquatic species. Here we use the zebrafish (Danio rerio) experimental model to evaluate bioinfiltration as a relatively inexpensive technology for treating runoff from an urban highway with dense motor vehicle traffic. Zebrafish embryos exposed to untreated runoff (48-96h; six storm events) displayed an array of developmental abnormalities, including delayed hatching, reduced growth, pericardial edema, microphthalmia (small eyes), and reduced swim bladder inflation. Three of the six storms were acutely lethal, and sublethal toxicity was evident across all storms, even when stormwater was diluted by as much as 95% in clean water. As anticipated from exposure to cardiotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), untreated runoff also caused heart failure, as indicated by circulatory stasis, pericardial edema, and looping defects. Bioretention treatment dramatically improved stormwater quality and reversed nearly all forms of developmental toxicity. The zebrafish model therefore provides a versatile experimental platform for rapidly assessing GSI effectiveness.

  11. Substrate cleaning for integrated optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Brandt, G B; Supertzi, E P; Henningsen, T

    1973-12-01

    Losses in integrated optical waveguides depend upon the homogeneity of the guiding layer. Successful production of acceptable guides by sputtering or solution deposition depends critically on the methods used to clean the substrate. Cleaning methods that produce films adequate for ordinary coatings have proved inadequate for integrated optical films. The extreme cleanliness required to produce low-loss waveguides can be achieved by a process described in this paper, which utilizes a precleaning step in an ultrasonically agitated detergent bath followed by careful rinsing in an ultrasonically agitated bath of heated, deionized, and filtered water. In addition to the cleaning method, we discuss the design of a cleaning station that combines the necessary apparatus in a portable unit.

  12. Knack for reticle cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Masumi; Handa, Hitoshi; Shirai, Hisatsugu

    2000-07-01

    Cleaning is one of the most important processes in mask making, because it decides final quality. In cleaning process, it is necessary for reticle cleanliness to not only remove particles from reticle but also prevent adsorption and re-deposition onto reticle. There is the knack for reticle cleaning, and we introduce three keys in this paper. The first key is the rinse after chemical treatment. By the rinse sequence modification, the cleaner was refined and the particle removal ability was improved. The second key is quality control to grasp the situation of cleaner. By the daily check, cleaner's abnormal condition is found at an early stage, quick action is taken, and then stable cleaning quality is kept every day. And the third key is proper choice of cleaners. We have adopted pre-cleaning process and selected the adequate cleaner for each cleaning level and improved cleaning yield and quality.

  13. A self-cleaning polybenzoxazine/TiO2 surface with superhydrophobicity and superoleophilicity for oil/water separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenfei; Lu, Xin; Xin, Zhong; Zhou, Changlu

    2015-11-01

    Two important properties--the low surface free energy of polybenzoxazine (PBZ) and the photocatalysis-induced self-cleaning property of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles--are combined to develop a promising approach for oil/water separation. They are integrated into a multifunctional superhydrophobic and superoleophilic material, PBZ/TiO2 modified polyester non-woven fabrics (PBZT), through a simple dip coating and subsequent thermal curing method. The resulting PBZT reveals excellent mechanical durability and strong resistance to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation as well as acid and alkali. This durable superhydrophobic and superoleophilic fabric is efficient for separating oil/water mixtures by gravity with high separation efficiency, and it can also purify wastewater that contains soluble dyes, which makes it more effective and promising in treating water pollution. Importantly, PBZT demonstrates an integrated self-cleaning performance on the removal of both oil and particle contamination. It is expected that this simple process can be readily adopted for the design of multifunctional PBZ/TiO2 based materials for oil/water separation.Two important properties--the low surface free energy of polybenzoxazine (PBZ) and the photocatalysis-induced self-cleaning property of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles--are combined to develop a promising approach for oil/water separation. They are integrated into a multifunctional superhydrophobic and superoleophilic material, PBZ/TiO2 modified polyester non-woven fabrics (PBZT), through a simple dip coating and subsequent thermal curing method. The resulting PBZT reveals excellent mechanical durability and strong resistance to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation as well as acid and alkali. This durable superhydrophobic and superoleophilic fabric is efficient for separating oil/water mixtures by gravity with high separation efficiency, and it can also purify wastewater that contains soluble dyes, which makes it more effective and

  14. An activated fluid stream--New techniques for cold water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Birkin, Peter R; Offin, Douglas G; Leighton, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Electrochemical, acoustic and imaging techniques are used to characterise surface cleaning with particular emphasis on the understanding of the key phenomena relevant to surface cleaning. A range of novel techniques designed to enhance and monitor the effective cleaning of a solid/liquid interface is presented. Among the techniques presented, mass transfer of material to a sensor embedded in a surface is demonstrated to be useful in the further exploration of ultrasonic cleaning of high aspect ratio micropores. In addition the effect of micropore size on the cleaning efficacy is demonstrated. The design and performance of a new cleaning system reliant on the activation of bubbles within a free flowing stream is presented. This device utilised acoustic activation of bubbles within the stream and at a variety of substrates. Finally, a controlled bubble swarm is generated in the stream using electrolysis, and its effect on both acoustic output and cleaning performance are compared to the case when no bubbles are added. This will demonstrate the active role that the electrochemically generated bubble swarm can have in extending the spatial zone over which cleaning is achieved.

  15. Plants + soil/wetland microbes: Food crop systems that also clean air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Wolverton, B. C.

    2011-02-01

    The limitations that will govern bioregenerative life support applications in space, especially volume and weight, make multi-purpose systems advantageous. This paper outlines two systems which utilize plants and associated microbial communities of root or growth medium to both produce food crops and clean air and water. Underlying these approaches are the large numbers and metabolic diversity of microbes associated with roots and found in either soil or other suitable growth media. Biogeochemical cycles have microbial links and the ability of microbes to metabolize virtually all trace gases, whether of technogenic or biogenic origin, has long been established. Wetland plants and the rootzone microbes of wetland soils/media also been extensively researched for their ability to purify wastewaters of a great number of potential water pollutants, from nutrients like N and P, to heavy metals and a range of complex industrial pollutants. There is a growing body of research on the ability of higher plants to purify air and water. Associated benefits of these approaches is that by utilizing natural ecological processes, the cleansing of air and water can be done with little or no energy inputs. Soil and rootzone microorganisms respond to changing pollutant types by an increase of the types of organisms with the capacity to use these compounds. Thus living systems have an adaptive capacity as long as the starting populations are sufficiently diverse. Tightly sealed environments, from office buildings to spacecraft, can have hundreds or even thousands of potential air pollutants, depending on the materials and equipment enclosed. Human waste products carry a plethora of microbes which are readily used in the process of converting its organic load to forms that can be utilized by green plants. Having endogenous means of responding to changing air and water quality conditions represents safety factors as these systems operate without the need for human intervention. We review

  16. Plants + microbes: Innovative food crop systems that also clean air and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Mark; Wolverton, B. C.

    The limitations that will govern bioregenerative life support applications in space, especially volume and weight, make multi-purpose systems advantageous. This paper outlines two systems which utilize plants and associated microbial communities of root or growth medium to both produce food crops and clean air and water. Underlying these approaches are the large numbers and metabolic diversity of microbes associated with roots and found in either soil or other suitable growth media. It is known that most biogeochemical cycles have a microbial link, and the ability of microbes to metabolize virtually all trace gases, whether of technogenic or biogenic origin, have long been established. Wetland plants and soil/media also been extensively researched for their ability to purify wastewaters of all kinds of potential water pollutants, from nutrients like N and P, to heavy metals and a range of complex industrial pollutants. There is a growing body of research on the ability of higher plants to purify air and water. Associated benefits of these approaches is that by utilizing natural ecological processes, the cleansing of air and water can be done with little or no energy inputs. Soil and root microorganisms respond to changing pollutant types by an increase of the types of organisms with the capacity to use these compounds. Thus living systems have an extraordinary adaptive capacity as long as the starting populations are sufficiently diverse. It is known that tightly sealed environments, from office buildings to spacecraft, can have hundreds or even thousands of potential air pollutants, depending on the materials and machines enclosed. Human waste products carry a plethora of microbes can are readily used in the process of converting its organic load to forms that can be utilized by green plants. Having endogenous means of responding to changing air and water quality conditions represents safety factors which operate without the need for human direction. We will

  17. Resistance of cyanobacterial fouling on architectural paint films to cleaning by water jet.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Marcia Aiko; Loh, Kai; John, Vanderley Moacir; Gaylarde, Christine Claire

    2012-04-01

    Mortar panels painted with three different white acrylic coatings were exposed to the environment in urban (São Paulo) and rural (Pirassununga) sites in Brazil for 7 years. After this time, all panels were almost equally discoloured, and paint detachment was observed to only a small degree. The biofilms were composed mainly of cyanobacteria and filamentous fungi, principal genera being Gloeocapsa and Chroococcidiopsis of the cyanobacteria, and Cladosporium and Alternaria of the fungi. Two of the three paints in Pirassununga became covered by a pink film that contained red-encapsulated Gloeocapsa and clay particles. The third, an 800% elastomeric matt formulation, became discoloured with a grey, only slightly pink, film, although the same cyanobacteria were present. The levels of paint detachments from all films in both locations were low, with rating range of 0-1 of a maximum 5 (100% detachment). After high-pressure water jetting, paint detachments increased at both locations, up to 2 in Pirassununga and 3 in São Paulo. Discoloration decreased; L*A*B* analysis of surface discoloration showed that ΔE (alteration in colour from the original paint film) changed from 28-39 before cleaning to 13-16 afterwards. The pink coloration was not entirely removed from Pirassununga samples, suggesting that cyanobacterial cells are difficult to detach, and microscopic analysis of the biofilms confirmed that Gloeocapsa was still present as the principal contaminant on all surfaces, with Chroococcidiopsis being present as the second most common. Almost no fungi were detected after water jet application.

  18. Clean Watersheds for a Clean Bay Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQPClean Watersheds for a Clean Bay Project: Implementing the PCB TMDL, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  19. Clean room wiping liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, W.B.

    1991-12-01

    A water-based liquid containing isopropyl alcohol, ammonium hydroxide, and surfactants was developed to replace 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane for the dampening of clean room wiping cloths used to wipe clean benches, clean room equipment, and latex finger cots and gloves.

  20. Surface Modification for Superhydrophilicity and Underwater Superoleophobicity: Applications in Antifog, Underwater Self-Cleaning, and Oil-Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kang-Ting; Yeh, Shiou-Bang; Huang, Chun-Jen

    2015-09-30

    A facile yet effective surface modification strategy for superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity was developed by silanization of zwitterionic sulfobetaine silane (SBSi) on oxidized surfaces. The coatings exhibit excellent wetting properties, as indicated by static contact angles of <5°, and long-term stability under exposure to heat and UV irradiation. The SBSi-modified surfaces were employed for applications in antifog, self-cleaning, and oil-water separation. The SBSi glasses retained their optical transmittance because of the rapid formation of coalesced water thin films on surfaces in contact with water vapor and moisture. In addition, the underwater-oil contact-angle measurements verified the underwater superoleophobicity of the zwitterionic SBSi coatings. The oil spills on the SBSi coating could be readily removed in contact with water to realize the self-cleaning property. Besides, we modified stainless steel wire meshes with SBSi for oil-water separation. The optimal oil recovery rate for the oil-water mixtures reached >99.5% when using the SBSi-coated meshes with a pore size of 17 μm. More importantly, the water flux with modified meshes achieved 6.5 × 10(7) L/m(2)·h·bar, enabling gravity-driven and energy-saving separation. Consequently, we demonstrated the superhydrophilicity and underwater superoleophobicity of SBSi, offering promise in solving technological problems of interfacial fog, oil spills, and oil-water separation and thereby showing great potential in large-scale commercial applications.

  1. 75 FR 49949 - Notice of Lodging of Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... system including: repair and replacement of sewer gravity mains, force mains, and pump stations... assessments and a systematic cleaning program for gravity mains; and development of a control program for...

  2. The use of polymers for on-line cleaning of building water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, K.A.; Hess, R.T.

    1996-10-01

    The cooling or heating piping systems in commercial or institutional buildings are frequently fouled by the accumulation of deposits containing organic material, silt and/or iron oxide. A conventional off-line chemical cleaning with an acid or other strong solvent is a very complex and expensive process in these facilities. They are not designed for such cleaning procedures, are typically occupied most of the time and the piping is enclosed within walls. A slow on-line cleaning over a long period of time has been found to be effective in several applications. Such a cleaning uses high molecular weight anionic polymers to slowly soften and disperse the fouling agent. This paper presents information on this process and some case histories where the process has been used.

  3. A Thermo-Physical Model Of Destruction Of Contaminants By Means Of A Water-Ice-Jet Cleaning Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Yu; Burnashov, M.; Stepanova, E.

    2017-01-01

    The reader will achieve a benchmark understanding of the essence of cleaning for the removal of contaminants from machine elements by means of cryo jet water-ice jet with particles prepared beforehand. This paper represents the classification of the most common contaminants appearing on the surfaces of machine elements after a long-term service. The conceptual contribution of the paper is to represent a thermo-physical model of contaminant removal by means of a water ice jet. In conclusion, it is evident that this study has shown the dependencies between the friction force of an ice particle with an obstacle (contamination), a dimensional change of an ice particle in the cleaning process and the quantity of heat transmitted to an ice particle.

  4. Evaluation of six aerator modules built on venturi air injectors using clean water test.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Zhu, J; Miller, C F

    2009-01-01

    Six aerator modules constructed using venturi air injectors connected in either series or parallel were evaluated and compared for their oxygen transfer coefficients (OTC), standard oxygen transfer rate (SOTR), and standard oxygenation efficiency (SOE) determined by clean water tests. Modules in series (module a, b, c) included one, two, and three venturi injectors, respectively. The aerator module with two (module d) and three (module e, f) venturi injectors in parallel were used, while module f had less friction and more even flow rate in each line compared with module e. The results showed that the OTC, SOTR, and SOE for the six different module configurations (module a, b, c, d, e, f) were 4.54, 3.79, 3.58, 8.37, 5.93 and 11.87 h(-1); 0.10, 0.09, 0.09, 0.18, 0.15, and 0.31 kgO(2)/h; and 0.07, 0.06, 0.06, 0.12, 0.10, and 0.21 kgO(2)/kWh, respectively. The observations indicate that a 3-fold increase in SOTR and 3.5-fold increase in SOE can be obtained by simply changing the way that venturi air injectors are connected, which suggests that it is possible to improve the aeration efficiency of a venturi type aeration system by innovative aerator module designs. In view of the situation that the venturi aeration systems currently used for swine manure lagoons need significant improvement in their performance in order to match the cost-effective requirement, more research in aerator module development is needed so that effective control of odor from liquid swine manure lagoons can be achieved at an affordable cost. The technology such developed can also be applied to other livestock species.

  5. Removal of 16 pesticide residues from strawberries by washing with tap and ozone water, ultrasonic cleaning and boiling.

    PubMed

    Lozowicka, Bozena; Jankowska, Magdalena; Hrynko, Izabela; Kaczynski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The effects of washing with tap and ozone water, ultrasonic cleaning and boiling on 16 pesticide (ten fungicides and six insecticides) residue levels in raw strawberries were investigated at different processing times (1, 2 and 5 min). An analysis of these pesticides was conducted using gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorous and electron capture detection (GC-NPD/ECD). The processing factor (PF) for each pesticide in each processing technique was determined. Washing with ozonated water was demonstrated to be more effective (reduction from 36.1 to 75.1 %) than washing with tap water (reduction from 19.8 to 68.1 %). Boiling decreased the residues of the most compounds, with reductions ranging from 42.8 to 92.9 %. Ultrasonic cleaning lowered residues for all analysed pesticides with removal of up to 91.2 %. The data indicated that ultrasonic cleaning and boiling were the most effective treatments for the reduction of 16 pesticide residues in raw strawberries, resulting in a lower health risk exposure. Calculated PFs for alpha-cypermethrin were used to perform an acute risk assessment of dietary exposure. To investigate the relationship between the levels of 16 pesticides in strawberry samples and their physicochemical properties, a principal component analysis (PCA) was performed. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  6. Enabling clean access into Subglacial Lake Whillans: development and use of the WISSARD hot water drill system.

    PubMed

    Rack, Frank R

    2016-01-28

    Clean hot water drill systems (CHWDSs) are used with clean access protocols for the exploration of subglacial lakes and other subglacial aquatic environments (e.g. ice-shelf cavities) in Antarctica. A CHWDS developed for the Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (WISSARD) project by the Science Management Office at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL-SMO), USA, was specifically designed for use in West Antarctica, where the US Antarctic Program's South Pole Traverse could assist with logistical support. The initial goal was to provide clean access holes through ice up to 1000 m thick following environmental stewardship guidelines; however, the existing design allows this CHWDS to be used for ice thicknesses up to 2000 m following modifications to accommodate longer hose lengths. In January 2013, the WISSARD CHWDS successfully provided for the first time a clean access borehole through 800 m of ice into Subglacial Lake Whillans beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet for the deployment of scientific instruments and sampling tools. The development and initial use of the WISSARD CHWDS required the project team to address a number of constraints while providing contingencies to meet the defined project scope, schedule and budget.

  7. Modeling complex dispersed energy and clean water systems for the United States/Mexico border

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Hugo Francisco Lopez

    and distribution of it in El Paso/Juarez region. More precisely, the goals were the conversion of brines and waste-waters to hydrogen via electrolysis, and the generation of electricity through fuel cells. Thereafter, the specific objectives were to (1) design a simulation model for hydrogen generation, (2) design and simulate a model of photovoltaic (PV) array capable to generate the required energy for the process, (3) simulate fuel cells in order to be used as electricity power supply in remote houses, and (4) simulate a complete remote house hybrid system. The results of this research gave us information about the feasibility of high-volume hydrogen generation with the diverse resources of the region. On the other hand, this research has shown the alternatives of local energy generation, and efficiency of a remote house hybrid system located in El Paso/Juarez area. Experiences obtained from this research will also provide information for future investigations in the field of alternate energy sources, in order to get a clean environment through sustainable development.

  8. Duke Energy Subsidiaries Plead Guilty and Sentenced for Clean Water Act Crimes/The companies will pay a fine and conduct community service and wetlands mitigation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Three subsidiaries of North Carolina-based Duke Energy Corporation, the largest utility in the United States, pleaded guilty today to nine criminal violations of the Clean Water Act at several of its North Carolina facilities and agreed

  9. Comprehensive Enforcement Action, Federal Court Filings Require R.I. State Government to Reduce Pollution and Resolve Longstanding Clean Water Act Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    US has taken comprehensive enforcement action to resolve several years of significant noncompliance by the RIDOT with its obligations under the federal Clean Water Act and the permit that governs day-to-day operations of its stormwater drainage systems.

  10. HAVE U.S. SURFACE WATERS RESPONDED TO THE 1990 CLEAN AIR ACT AMENDMENTS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) set target reductions for sulfur and nitrogen emissions from industrial sources as a means of reducing the acidity in deposition. One of the intended effects of the reductions was to decrease the acidity of low alkalinity wate...

  11. Impact of the Clean Water Act on the levels of toxic metals in urban estuaries: The Hudson River estuary revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Sanudo-Wilhelmy, S.A.; Gill, G.A.

    1999-10-15

    To establish the impact of the Clean Water Act on the water quality of urban estuaries, dissolved trace metals and phosphate concentrations were determined in surface waters collected along the Hudson River estuary between 1995 and 1997 and compared with samples collected in the mid-1970s by Klinkhammer and Bender. The median concentrations along the estuary have apparently declined 36--56% for Cu, 55--89% for Cd, 53--85% for Ni, and 53--90% for Zn over a period of 23 years. These reductions appear to reflect improvements in controlling discharges from municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants since the Clean Water Act was enacted in 1972. In contrast, levels of dissolved nutrients (PO{sub 4}) have remained relatively constant during the same period of time, suggesting that wastewater treatment plant improvements in the New York/New Jersey Metropolitan area have not been as effective at reducing nutrient levels within the estuary. While more advanced wastewater treatment could potentially reduce the levels of Ag and PO{sub 4} along the estuary, these improvements would have a more limited effect on the levels of other trace metals.

  12. Plasma Cleaning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hintze, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed two solvent-free precision cleaning techniques: plasma cleaning and supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2), that has equal performance, cost parity, and no environmental liability, as compared to existing solvent cleaning methods.

  13. Innovative hydrogels based on semi-interpenetrating p(HEMA)/PVP networks for the cleaning of water-sensitive cultural heritage artifacts.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Joana A L; Bonelli, Nicole; Giorgi, Rodorico; Fratini, Emiliano; Gorel, Florence; Baglioni, Piero

    2013-02-26

    Water-based detergent systems offer several advantages, over organic solvents, for the cleaning of cultural heritage artifacts in terms of selectivity and gentle removal of grime materials or aged varnish, which are known to alter the readability of the painting. Unfortunately, easel paintings present specific characteristics that make the usage of water-based systems invasive. The interaction of water with wood or canvas support favors mechanical stresses between the substrate and the paint layers leading to the detachment of the pictorial layer. In order to avoid painting loss and to ensure a fine control (layer by layer) of grime removal, water-based cleaning systems have been confined into innovative chemical hydrogels, specifically designed for cleaning water-sensitive cultural heritage artifacts. The synthesized hydrogels are based on semi-interpenetrating chemical poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)/poly(vinylpyrrolidone) networks with suitable hydrophilicity, water retention properties, and required mechanical strength to avoid residues after the cleaning treatment. Three different compositions were selected. Water retention and release properties have been studied by quantifying the amount of free and bound water (from differential scanning calorimetry); mesoporosity was obtained from scanning electron microscopy; microstructure from small angle X-ray scattering. To demonstrate both the efficiency and versatility of the selected hydrogels in confining and modulating the properties of cleaning systems, a representative case study is presented.

  14. Continuous circulation water wash apparatus and method for cleaning radioactively contaminated garments

    SciTech Connect

    Sewter, B.R.; Clemons, L. Jr.; Battaglia, J.A.; DeBarber, T.A.

    1992-02-25

    This patent describes an apparatus for water washing fabrics and removing particulate radioactive contaminants. It comprises: a washing machine means for washing and rinsing the fabrics having a wash-water inlet, rinse water inlet, a circulation inlet, and a water outlet; a particulate removal system connected between the circulation inlet and the water outlet for continuously circulating water introduced into the washing machine means through a particulate removal means while the machine means washes and rinses the fabric, and a hydraulically closed wash-water system and rinse water inlet and the rinse water inlet, respectively, for supplying polished wash-water and polished rinse water to the washing machine means, wherein each system includes it won separate water polisher.

  15. 76 FR 74057 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... because the applicable numeric water quality standards marine criterion for dissolved oxygen was not... numeric water quality standards marine criterion for dissolved oxygen was not attained in these...

  16. Fabrication of superhydrophobic copper surface on various substrates for roll-off, self-cleaning, and water/oil separation.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Anup Kumar; Mondal, Chanchal; Sinha, Arun Kumar; Gauri, Samiran Sona; Pal, Jaya; Aditya, Teresa; Ganguly, Mainak; Dey, Satyahari; Pal, Tarasankar

    2014-12-24

    Superhydrophobic surfaces prevent percolation of water droplets and thus render roll-off, self-cleaning, corrosion protection, etc., which find day-to-day and industrial applications. In this work, we developed a facile, cost-effective, and free-standing method for direct fabrication of copper nanoparticles to engender superhydrophobicity for various flat and irregular surfaces such as glass, transparency sheet (plastic), cotton wool, textile, and silicon substrates. The fabrication of as-prepared superhydrophobic surfaces was accomplished using a simple chemical reduction of copper acetate by hydrazine hydrate at room temperature. The surface morphological studies demonstrate that the as-prepared surfaces are rough and display superhydrophobic character on wetting due to generation of air pockets (The Cassie-Baxter state). Because of the low adhesion of water droplets on the as-prepared surfaces, the surfaces exhibited not only high water contact angle (164 ± 2°, 5 μL droplets) but also superb roll-off and self-cleaning properties. Superhydrophobic copper nanoparticle coated glass surface uniquely withstands water (10 min), mild alkali (5 min in saturated aqueous NaHCO3 of pH ≈ 9), acids (10 s in dilute HNO3, H2SO4 of pH ≈ 5) and thiol (10 s in neat 1-octanethiol) at room temperature (25-35 °C). Again as-prepared surface (cotton wool) was also found to be very effective for water-kerosene separation due to its superhydrophobic and oleophilic character. Additionally, the superhydrophobic copper nanoparticle (deposited on glass surface) was found to exhibit antibacterial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria.

  17. 77 FR 27770 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... identifying certain water quality limited waterbodies, and the associated pollutant, in Utah to be listed... pollution controls are not stringent enough to attain or maintain State water quality standards and for... applicable water quality criterion for total dissolved solids (TDS) for these waters is being exceeded....

  18. Cleaning Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John

    2002-01-01

    Offers strategies to make schools' cleaning operations run more smoothly. Discusses how to estimate the amount of space that needs cleaning and how long it should take, the benefits of team cleaning versus zone cleaning, and the importance of monitoring complaints and overtime to ensure staff is performing efficiently. (EV)

  19. Monitoring Initiative Grants under Section 106 of the Clean Water Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Each year, EPA provides funding to states, eligible interstate agencies, and eligible tribes to support ambient water quality monitoring programs and implement a multi-year survey of the condition of nation’s waters to track changes over time.

  20. 77 FR 20020 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... numeric water quality standards marine criterion for dissolved oxygen was not attained in these segments... waters for which existing technology-based pollution controls are not stringent enough to attain...

  1. EPA Science Matters Newsletter: Advancing Ways to Clean Up Drinking Water Systems (Published November 2013)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To advance the science and engineering of decontaminating pipe systems and safely disposing of high-volumes of contaminated water, Agency homeland security researchers are developing a Water Security Test Bed (WSTB).

  2. Acceptance Test Report for the high pressure water jet system canister cleaning fixture

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, J.R.

    1995-10-25

    This Acceptance Test confirmed the test results and recommendations, documented in WHC-SD-SNF-DTR-001, Rev. 0 Development Test Report for the High Pressure Water Jet System Nozzles, for decontaminating empty fuel canisters in KE-Basin. Optimum water pressure, water flow rate, nozzle size and overall configuration were tested

  3. 75 FR 68783 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    .... SUMMARY: This action announces the availability of EPA decisions identifying water quality limited... stringent enough to attain or maintain State water quality standards and for which total maximum daily loads... several water quality limited segments as impaired and additional associated pollutants for several...

  4. 75 FR 71431 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... decisions identifying water quality limited segments and associated pollutants in California to be listed... are not stringent enough to attain or maintain state water quality standards and for which total... not to list several water quality limited segments as impaired and additional associated...

  5. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carter, R.D.; Hand, T.E.; Powers, M.T.

    1996-05-07

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene or terpineol cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  6. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, G.W.; Carter, R.D.; Hand, T.E.; Powers, M.T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  7. Limonene and tetrahydrofurfurly alcohol cleaning agent

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Carter, Richard D.; Hand, Thomas E.; Powers, Michael T.

    1997-10-21

    The present invention is a tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol and limonene cleaning agent and method for formulating and/or using the cleaning agent. This cleaning agent effectively removes both polar and nonpolar contaminants from various electrical and mechanical parts and is readily used without surfactants, thereby reducing the need for additional cleaning operations. The cleaning agent is warm water rinsable without the use of surfactants. The cleaning agent can be azeotropic, enhancing ease of use in cleaning operations and ease of recycling.

  8. SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES FOR ENSURING CLEAN AND RELIABLE WATER FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

    SciTech Connect

    Tompson, A B

    2004-08-17

    Many areas in the world are experiencing significant fresh water shortages due to drought, growing populations, increased agricultural and industrial demands, and extensive forms of pollution or water quality degradation. Many more are expected to face similar predicaments in the next 20 years. Water shortages will significantly limit economic growth, decrease the quality of life and human health for billions of people, degrade the ecologic health of natural environments, and could potentially lead to violence and conflict over securing scarce supplies of water. These concerns are not limited to the economically poor countries, of course, as many parts of the United States face similar dilemmas. These problems can be exacerbated by fluctuating imbalances between need and supply, poor water management or land use practices, social, economic, political, and trans-boundary disputes, as well as factors related to climate change. The future is one that will require significant technological advances to support the conservation, preservation, and movement of fresh water, as well as in the development of new or alternative supplies. It is also one that will also require concomitant improvements in the use of practical solutions and the ways in which the broader scientific and technical community interacts with policy-makers, water-related agencies, the educational community, as well the public in the solution process. This presentation will review several aspects of these issues and proposed or implemented solutions for new and reliable water in the context of an example water situation in the US.

  9. 76 FR 20664 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of List Decisions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... because the applicable numeric water quality standards marine criterion for dissolved oxygen was not... quality standards marine criterion for dissolved oxygen was not attained in these segments. EPA...

  10. Addition of surfactants in ozonated water cleaning for the suppression of functional group formation and particle adhesion on the SiO2 surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jahyun; Im, Kyungtaek; Lim, Sangwoo

    2011-04-01

    Various kinds of surfactants were added to a cleaning solution and deionized (DI) water, and their effect on the suppression of organic function group formation and particle adhesion to a SiO2 surface was analyzed using multi-internal reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results implied that attached organic functional groups are affected by the chemical structure of a surfactant in DI water. Furthermore, the addition of anionic glycolic acid ethoxylate 4-tert-butylphenyl ether (GAE4E) is the most effective in terms of preventing organic group attachment and particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface, whether it was added to the cleaning solution or post-cleaning rinse water, with or without polystyrene latex particles. Moreover, it was possible to completely prevent particle adhesion to the SiO2 surface with the proper addition of GAE4E in DIO3 solution.

  11. Cleaning Water Contaminated with Heavy Metal Ions Using Pyrolyzed Biochar Adsorbents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extraction of pollutants from water using activated biochar materials is a low cost, sustainable approach for providing safe water in developing countries. The adsorption of copper ions, Cu (II), onto banana peels that were dried, pyrolyzed and activated was studied and compa...

  12. EPA Provides New York State $197 Million for Clean Water Projects

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has allotted $197 million to New York State to help finance improvements to water projects that are essential to protecting public health and the environment. The funds will be used to finance water

  13. Biological sand filters: low-cost bioremediation technique for production of clean drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Approximately 1.1 billion people in rural and peri-urban communities of developing countries do not have access to safe drinking water. The mortality from diarrheal-related diseases amounts to ∼2.2 million people each year from the consumption of unsafe water. Most of them are children under 5 years of age--250 deaths an hour from microbiologically contaminated water. There is conclusive evidence that one low-cost household bioremediation intervention, use of biological sand filters, is capable of dramatically improving the microbiological quality of drinking water. This unit will describe this relatively new and proven bioremediation technology's ability to empower at-risk populations to use naturally occurring biological principles and readily available materials as a sustainable way to achieve the health benefits of safe drinking water.

  14. Biological sand filters: low-cost bioremediation technique for production of clean drinking water.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Approximately 1.1 billion people in rural and peri-urban communities of developing countries do not have access to safe drinking water. The mortality from diarrheal-related diseases amounts to approximately 2.2 million people each year from the consumption of unsafe water. Most of them are children under 5 years of age-250 deaths an hour from microbiologically contaminated water. There is conclusive evidence that one low-cost household bioremediation intervention, biological sand filters, are capable of dramatically improving the microbiological quality of drinking water. This unit will describe this relatively new and proven bioremediation technology's ability to empower at-risk populations to use naturally occurring biology and readily available materials as a sustainable way to achieve the health benefits of safe drinking water.

  15. Sedimentation on the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa: cleaning efficiency from natural sediments and drill cuttings.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Ann I; Purser, Autun

    2011-06-01

    Anthropogenic threats to cold-water coral reefs are trawling and hydrocarbon drilling, with both activities causing increased levels of suspended particles. The efficiency of Lophelia pertusa in rejecting local sediments and drill cuttings from the coral surface was evaluated and found not to differ between sediment types. Further results showed that the coral efficiently removed deposited material even after repeated exposures, indicating an efficient cleaning mechanism. In an experiment focusing on burial, fine-fraction drill cuttings were deposited on corals over time. Drill cutting covered coral area increased with repeated depositions, with accumulation mainly occurring on and adjacent to regions of the coral skeleton lacking tissue cover. Tissue was smothered and polyp mortality occurred where polyps became wholly covered by material. Burial of coral by drill cuttings to the current threshold level used in environmental risk assessment models by the offshore industry (6.3mm) may result in damage to L. pertusa colonies.

  16. Clean TiO2 nanocuboid film tightly attached on a conductive substrate for highly efficient photoelectrochemical water splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ming; Liu, Kuili; Gan, Zhixing; Zhang, Xiantu; Zhang, Honghui; Sun, Xianke; Zhou, Xiaodong; Chen, Yuanyuan; Feng, Yamin

    2016-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 film consisting of nanocuboids with co-exposed {1 0 1}, {0 0 1} and {1 0 0} facets have been successfully synthesized via thermally annealing amorphous anodized TiO2 nanotube arrays in ambient fluorine. When employed as a photoanode material in photoelectrochemical water splitting, the film of the clean TiO2 nanocuoboids yields a photocurrent density of up to 0.65 mA cm-2 at 0.22 V versus the Ag/AgCl electrode with Faradic efficiency of 100% and exhibits excellent stability, which can be attributed to enhanced photogenerated charge separation and transport to the collecting electrode. This film could also potentially be used for other facet-related applications such as TiO2 based dye-sensitized solar cells, sensors and lithium batteries.

  17. Green Project Reserve Guidance for the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The American Recovery Act of 2009 (ARRA) requires all CWSRF programs to use a portion of their federal grant for projects that address green infrastructure, water and energy efficiency, or other environmentally innovative activities.

  18. 76 FR 3159 - Notice of Lodging of a Consent Decree Under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ...) discharging untreated sewage from the combined sewer collection system during dry weather into ``waters of the... wastewater treatment plants, known as the ``East Plant'' and the ``West Plant,'' during wet weather...

  19. Farmer Story: Clean Water is Key to My Family’s Farming Future

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    An Iowa farmer explains how water management on his farm is the most vital thing he can do to increase profits, protect his land and preserve the chance for his children and grandchildren to farm as well.

  20. Report: State Enforcement of Clean Water Act Dischargers Can Be More Effective

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2001-P-00013, August 14, 2001. We believe that state enforcement programs could be much more effective in deterring noncompliance with discharge permits and, ultimately, improving the quality of the nation’s water.

  1. Efficiency of Silver Impregnated Porous Pot (SIPP) filters for production of clean potable water.

    PubMed

    Mahlangu, Oranso; Mamba, Bhekie; Momba, Maggie

    2012-08-24

    The Silver Impregnated Porous Pot (SIPP) filter is a product of the Tshwane University of Technology manufactured for the production of safe drinking water at a household (home) level. Two SIPP devices were assessed for the reduction efficiency of chemical contaminants such as calcium, magnesium, iron, arsenic, fluorides and total organic carbon (TOC) as well as microbial contaminants from environmental samples. Turbidity change after filtration, together with correlation between chlorophyll a in the feed water and SIPP's flow rates were also evaluated in order to give comprehensive guidelines on the quality of intake water that could be filtered through the filter without causing a significant decrease in flow rate. The SIPP filters removed contaminants from environmental water samples as follows: 70% to 92% iron, 36% to 68% calcium, 42% to 82% arsenic, 39% to 98% magnesium, 39% to 95% fluorides, 12% to 35% TOC and 45% to 82% turbidity. The SIPP filters had initial flow rates of 1 L/h to 4 L/h but the flow rates dropped to 0.5 L/h with an increase in cumulative volume of intake water as the filter was used. Turbidity and chemical contaminant reduction rates decreased with accumulating volume of intake water but the filter removed Ca, Fe and Mg to levels that comply with the South African National Standards (SANS 241) and the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline values. However, the SIPP filters cannot produce enough water to satisfy the daily drinking water requirement of a typical household (25 L/p·d). Chlorophyll a was associated with a decrease in the flow rate through the SIPP filters.

  2. Efficiency of Silver Impregnated Porous Pot (SIPP) Filters for Production of Clean Potable Water

    PubMed Central

    Mahlangu, Oranso; Mamba, Bhekie; Momba, Maggie

    2012-01-01

    The Silver Impregnated Porous Pot (SIPP) filter is a product of the Tshwane University of Technology manufactured for the production of safe drinking water at a household (home) level. Two SIPP devices were assessed for the reduction efficiency of chemical contaminants such as calcium, magnesium, iron, arsenic, fluorides and total organic carbon (TOC) as well as microbial contaminants from environmental samples. Turbidity change after filtration, together with correlation between chlorophyll a in the feed water and SIPP’s flow rates were also evaluated in order to give comprehensive guidelines on the quality of intake water that could be filtered through the filter without causing a significant decrease in flow rate. The SIPP filters removed contaminants from environmental water samples as follows: 70% to 92% iron, 36% to 68% calcium, 42% to 82% arsenic, 39% to 98% magnesium, 39% to 95% fluorides, 12% to 35% TOC and 45% to 82% turbidity. The SIPP filters had initial flow rates of 1 L/h to 4 L/h but the flow rates dropped to 0.5 L/h with an increase in cumulative volume of intake water as the filter was used. Turbidity and chemical contaminant reduction rates decreased with accumulating volume of intake water but the filter removed Ca, Fe and Mg to levels that comply with the South African National Standards (SANS 241) and the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline values. However, the SIPP filters cannot produce enough water to satisfy the daily drinking water requirement of a typical household (25 L/p·d). Chlorophyll a was associated with a decrease in the flow rate through the SIPP filters. PMID:23202668

  3. An Evaluation of Common Cleaning Methods for the Removal of a Clinical Isolate of Escherichia coli in Personal Hydration System Water Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Helmus, Stephanie; Blythe, Jauchia; Guevara, Peter; Washington, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Waterborne infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Personal hydration packs have been used by military personnel since the Gulf War and are now a common issue item. Since military personnel tend to operate under austere conditions and may use a variety of water sources, preventing the acquisition of waterborne infections is extremely important. Further, since hydration pack water reservoir replacements may not be available during combat operations, the development of a reliable cleaning protocol for use in the field is essential. Several methods for cleaning have been described. In the current study, three common cleaning methodologies-bleach treatment, baking soda treatment, and proprietary CAMELBAK Cleaning Tabs™-were evaluated for the ability to remove Escherichia coli contamination from hydration pack water reservoirs. The study results suggest that the use of bleach and proprietary CAMELBAK tablets should be encouraged since they both operate by releasing bactericidal chlorine compounds into solution, which is more effective at reducing post-treatment bacterial burden. It should be noted that no method was 100% effective at completely eliminating bacteria from the reservoirs and that mechanical cleaning was not attempted.

  4. Expression of a plant-derived peptide harboring water-cleaning and antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Suarez, M; Entenza, J M; Doerries, C; Meyer, E; Bourquin, L; Sutherland, J; Marison, I; Moreillon, P; Mermod, N

    2003-01-05

    Drinking water is currently a scarce world resource, the preparation of which requires complex treatments that include clarification of suspended particles and disinfection. Seed extracts of Moringa oleifera Lam., a tropical tree, have been proposed as an environment-friendly alternative, due to their traditional use for the clarification of drinking water. However, the precise nature of the active components of the extract and whether they may be produced in recombinant form are unknown. Here we show that recombinant or synthetic forms of a cationic seed polypeptide mediate efficient sedimentation of suspended mineral particles and bacteria. Unexpectedly, the polypeptide was also found to possesses a bactericidal activity capable of disinfecting heavily contaminated water. Furthermore, the polypeptide has been shown to efficiently kill several pathogenic bacteria, including antibiotic-resistant isolates of Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Legionella species. Thus, this polypeptide displays the unprecedented feature of combining water purification and disinfectant properties. Identification of an active principle derived from the seed extracts points to a range of potential for drinking water treatment or skin and mucosal disinfection in clinical settings.

  5. 9 CFR 354.224 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Water supply. 354.224 Section 354.224....224 Water supply. The water supply shall be ample, clean, and potable with adequate facilities for its distribution in the plant and its protection against contamination and pollution. (a) Hot water at...

  6. 9 CFR 354.224 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Water supply. 354.224 Section 354.224....224 Water supply. The water supply shall be ample, clean, and potable with adequate facilities for its distribution in the plant and its protection against contamination and pollution. (a) Hot water at...

  7. 9 CFR 354.224 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Water supply. 354.224 Section 354.224....224 Water supply. The water supply shall be ample, clean, and potable with adequate facilities for its distribution in the plant and its protection against contamination and pollution. (a) Hot water at...

  8. 9 CFR 354.224 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Water supply. 354.224 Section 354.224....224 Water supply. The water supply shall be ample, clean, and potable with adequate facilities for its distribution in the plant and its protection against contamination and pollution. (a) Hot water at...

  9. 9 CFR 354.224 - Water supply.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Water supply. 354.224 Section 354.224....224 Water supply. The water supply shall be ample, clean, and potable with adequate facilities for its distribution in the plant and its protection against contamination and pollution. (a) Hot water at...

  10. A benchmark investigation on cleaning photomasks using wafer cleaning technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, Louis; Burnham, Jay; Marmillion, Pat

    2004-12-01

    As new technologies are developed for smaller linewidths, the specifications for mask cleanliness become much stricter. Not only must the particle removal efficiency increase, but the largest allowable particle size decreases. Specifications for film thickness and surface roughness are becoming tighter and consequently the integrity of these films must be maintained in order to preserve the functionality of the masks. Residual contamination remaining on the surface of the mask after cleaning processes can lead to subpellicle defect growth once the mask is exposed in a stepper environment. Only during the last several years, has an increased focus been put on improving mask cleaning. Over the years, considerably more effort has been put into developing advanced wafer cleaning technologies. However, because of the small market involved with mask cleaning, wafer cleaning equipment vendors have been reluctant to invest time and effort into developing cleaning processes and adapting their toolset to accommodate masks. With the advent of 300 mm processing, wafer cleaning tools are now more easily adapted to processing masks. These wafer cleaning technologies may offer a solution to the difficulties of mask cleaning and need to be investigated to determine whether or not they warrant continued investigation. This paper focuses on benchmarking advanced wafer cleaning technologies applied to mask cleaning. Ozonated water, hydrogenated water, super critical fluids, and cryogenic cleaning have been investigated with regards to stripping resist and cleaning particles from masks. Results that include film thickness changes, surface contamination, and particle removal efficiency will be discussed.

  11. Reaching Part Per Trillion Clean-Up Criteria for Mercury in Water

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K. T.; Kosny, K.; Drescher, S. R.; Southworth, G. R.; Hensley, J. F.

    2003-02-24

    In the last couple of years, emphasis on environmental mercury contamination and elimination of mercury use has increased. The U.S. Department of Energy has for many decades maintained a stockpile of elemental mercury for operations and, as a consequence of its routine use, spills have occurred. These historical spills have resulted in some contamination of water streams and soils. In this work we examine a newly developed technique for removal of mercury from contaminated groundwater. In this application the mercury concentration was approximately 2.3 parts per billion and the treatment criterion was 200 parts per trillion. Several forms of mercury species contributed to the contamination. The treatment technique developed for this water was to convert all forms of mercury, through a series of fast chemical reactions, to elemental mercury, which was air-stripped from the water. This paper presents preliminary laboratory work on the method.

  12. Cool water: demonstration of a clean and efficient new coal technology.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D F; Alpert, S B; Gilman, H H

    1986-05-02

    Cool Water, the world's first commercial-scale, integrated coal gasification combined cycle power plant, has been operating successfully since May 1984 near Barstow, California. The 100-megawatt plant, which was completed ahead of schedule and under budget, is probably the cleanest coal-fired power generating facility now in commercial operation. An ongoing demonstration program at Cool Water shows that future baseload power plants that use this technology can be built modularly in increments of a few hundred megawatts and compete economically with much larger, conventional coal-fired power plants equipped for flue gas desulfurization.

  13. Algal turf scrubbing: cleaning surface waters with solar energy while producing a biofuel

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Throughout the long period of human expansion across the earth, the atmosphere and the earth’s natural waters have been used as low cost sinks or dumps for our human, agricultural and industrial wastes. Despite significant investment, the methods employed for the last half century have largely fail...

  14. Working for Clean Water, 2: Citizen Handbooks. An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltzfus, Lorna Chr., Ed.

    Presented is material from an information program designed to help citizen advisory groups and local officials improve decision-making in water quality planning. This program is aimed at helping people focus on essential issues and questions by providing materials suitable for persons with non-technical backgrounds. The following chapters are…

  15. TOMORROW: EPA Administrator to Focus on Protecting Clean Water in Travel to Minnesota, Texas and Illinois

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Tomorrow, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy is hitting the road to focus on the important need to protect the critical streams and wetlands that provide 1 in 3 Americans their drinking water and that are currently vulnerable to pollution

  16. Urban Stormwater Runoff. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simko, Robert A.

    Urban stormwater runoff collects pollutants from many parts of a city and is an important consideration in water quality planning. Presented is an instructor's guide for a learning session covering various aspects of urban runoff including pollutant sources, management practices, and regulatory programs. Intended for citizen advisory groups, this…

  17. Cleaning up Water? Or Building Rural Community? Community Watershed Organizations in Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stedman, Richard; Lee, Brian; Brasier, Kathryn; Weigle, Jason L.; Higdon, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Recent initiatives from state and federal government agencies have helped foster the formation of community-based watershed organizations. Although there is a great deal of enthusiasm about the potential of these organizations to enhance water quality, relatively little attention has been paid to the impacts these organizations may have on the…

  18. Celebrity Homes, Inc. d/b/a Hanover Falls Residential Construction - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessent in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Celebrity Homes, Inc. d/b/a Hanover Falls Residential Construction, a business located at 14002 L Street, Omaha, NE, for

  19. Working for Clean Water, 3: Citizen Handbooks. An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoltzfus, Lorna Chr., Ed.

    Presented is material from an information program designed to help citizen advisory groups and local officials improve decision-making in water quality planning. The program is designed to help people focus on essential issues and questions by providing materials suitable for people with non-technical backgrounds. Chapter topics include: (1)…

  20. 77 FR 34064 - Notice of Lodging of the Consent Decree under the Clean Water Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... Decree and annual training for all employees that work at the pump station; comply with the Operation and Preventive Maintenance Plan recently approved by EPA; construct a New Pump Station and three storm water retention ponds; implement interim pump station operation procedures until the New Pump Station is...

  1. Groundwater Contamination. Instructor Guide. Working for Clean Water: An Information Program for Advisory Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Charles A.

    Described is a presentation and learning session on groundwater, which is intended to educate advisory groups interested in improving water quality decision making. Among the areas addressed are the importance of groundwater, sources of contamination, and groundwater pollution control programs. These materials are part of the Working for Clean…

  2. Effects of Water Hardness on Textile Detergency Performance in Aqueous Cleaning Systems.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Keiko; Horibe, Kaori; Mei, Yang; Tsujisaka, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water hardness on textile detergency in aqueous solutions were systematically investigated using four surfactants: sodium oleate (OLNa), linear dodecylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), sodium dodecyl sulfate (AS), and polyoxyethylene (10) dodecyl ether (AE). Water hardness was adjusted according to the standard procedure described in IEC 60734:2012. As expected, by adding hardness salts the surface tension of the OLNa solution increased. Surprisingly, the addition of hardness salts lowers the surface tension for the LAS and AS solutions. In the case of the AE solution, hardness salt did not affect the surface tension. A decrease in transmittance and foamability after adding hardness salts was observed for every anionic surfactant solution, indicating that anionic surfactants can combine with divalent ions to form insoluble precipitates. Detergency experiments were performed using cotton plain-woven and towel fabrics soiled with a carbon black and oleic acid mixture. One piece each of untreated and soiled fabric were stacked and placed horizontally in detergent solution with or without hardness salts. As a mechanical action of soil removal, the shaking of 190 spm was applied. Soil removal and redeposition due to washing were evaluated from changes in values of the Kubelka-Munk function for both fabrics. With increasing water hardness, soil removal decreased and redeposition increased. In order of decreasing detergency, the surfactants were as follows: LAS > OLNa ≈ AS > AE. The results indicate that precipitates, formed by reaction of LAS or AS with hardness salts, are strongly adsorbed on the water surface because of their hydrophobicity, but they have no detergency power. The field emission scanning electron microscopic observation and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis showed that Ca(LAS)2 precipitation clung to fiber surfaces, and remained on the surfaces after washing. Significant changes in the cotton fabric due to washing were observed in

  3. A Holistic Look at Minimizing Adverse Environmental Impact Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act

    DOE PAGES

    Veil, John A.; Puder, Markus G.; Littleton, Debra J.; ...

    2002-01-01

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that “the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact.” As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the coolingmore » water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase “minimizing adverse environmental impact” in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms “environmental” and “minimizing.” Congress chose “environmental” in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like “impingement and entrainment,” “water quality,” or “aquatic life.” In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional

  4. A holistic look at minimizing adverse environmental impact under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act.

    PubMed

    Veil, John A; Puder, Markus G; Littleton, Debra J; Johnson, Nancy

    2002-04-18

    Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) requires that "the location, design, construction, and capacity of cooling water intake structures reflect the best technology available for minimizing adverse environmental impact." As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) develops new regulations to implement Section 316(b), much of the debate has centered on adverse impingement and entrainment impacts of cooling-water intake structures. Depending on the specific location and intake layout, once-through cooling systems withdrawing many millions of gallons of water per day can, to a varying degree, harm fish and other aquatic organisms in the water bodies from which the cooling water is withdrawn. Therefore, opponents of once-through cooling systems have encouraged the EPA to require wet or dry cooling tower systems as the best technology available (BTA), without considering site-specific conditions. However, within the context of the broader scope of the CWA mandate, this focus seems too narrow. Therefore, this article examines the phrase "minimizing adverse environmental impact" in a holistic light. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of the terms "environmental" and "minimizing." Congress chose "environmental" in lieu of other more narrowly focused terms like "impingement and entrainment," "water quality," or "aquatic life." In this light, BTA for cooling-water intake structures must minimize the entire suite of environmental impacts, as opposed to just those associated with impingement and entrainment. Wet and dry cooling tower systems work well to minimize entrainment and impingement, but they introduce other equally important impacts because they impose an energy penalty on the power output of the generating unit. The energy penalty results from a reduction in plant operating efficiency and an increase in internal power consumption. As a consequence of the energy penalty, power companies must generate additional electricity to achieve the same net output

  5. Self-Cleaning Coatings and Materials for Decontaminating Field-Deployable Land and Water-Based Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert; Underwood, Lauren; Holekamp, Kara; May, George; Spiering, Bruce; Davis, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    This technology exploits the organic decomposition capability and hydrophilic properties of the photocatalytic material titanium dioxide (TiO2), a nontoxic and non-hazardous substance, to address contamination and biofouling issues in field-deployed optical sensor systems. Specifically, this technology incorporates TiO2 coatings and materials applied to, or integrated as a part of, the optical surfaces of sensors and calibration sources, including lenses, windows, and mirrors that are used in remote, unattended, ground-based (land or maritime) optical sensor systems. Current methods used to address contamination or biofouling of these optical surfaces in deployed systems are costly, toxic, labor intensive, and non-preventative. By implementing this novel technology, many of these negative aspects can be reduced. The functionality of this innovative self-cleaning solution to address the problem of contamination or biofouling depends on the availability of a sufficient light source with the appropriate spectral properties, which can be attained naturally via sunlight or supplemented using artificial illumination such as UV LEDs (light emitting diodes). In land-based or above-water systems, the TiO2 optical surface is exposed to sunlight, which catalyzes the photocatalytic reaction, facilitating both the decomposition of inorganic and organic compounds, and the activation of superhydrophilic properties. Since underwater optical surfaces are submerged and have limited sunlight exposure, supplementary UV light sources would be required to activate the TiO2 on these optical surfaces. Nighttime operation of land-based or above-water systems would require this addition as well. For most superhydrophilic self-cleaning purposes, a rainwater wash will suffice; however, for some applications an attached rainwater collector/ dispenser or other fresh water dispensing system may be required to wash the optical surface and initiate the removal of contaminates. Deployment of this

  6. Implementation results for automated gas-pulsed cleaning systems of TsKTI on petroleum-heating furnaces, heat-recovery boilers, and hot-water boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnyak, A. P.; Kokorev, V. L.; Kokorev, A. L.; Moiseenko, I. O.; Gul'Tyaev, A. V.; Efimova, N. N.

    2012-03-01

    A description is given on the long-term positive experience of implementation of gas-pulsed cleaning (GPC) systems of TsKTI, development for heating surfaces of heat-exchange apparatuses for various purposes (steam and hot-water boilers, processing furnaces of petroleum refineries, etc.) against external soot-dust, ash, and condensed deposits formed during solid and fluid combustion.

  7. MEDIA ADVISORY: EPA, Justice Department, and State of California to announce major San Francisco Bay Clean Water Act settlement on Apr. 29

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    SAN FRANCISCO - Tomorrow, April 29, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Justice, and the State of California will announce a major Clean Water Act settlement with Lehigh Southwest Cement Co. and Hanson Permanente Cement Inc.

  8. Dietary potassium diformate did not affect growth and survival but did reduce nutrient digestibility of Pacific white shrimp cultured under clean water conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the effect of a dietary supplement potassium diformate (PDF) on growth performance, survival and nutrient digestibility of Pacific white shrimp cultured under clean water conditions. We found that weight gain was not significantly (P>0.05) affected by the different levels of ...

  9. A Bibliography of Selected Literature on Indirect Impacts Associated with Clean Water Act Section 404 Permits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    Engineers (COE) to administer a regulatory program for permitting the discharge of dredged or fill material in “waters of the United States ...northeastern United States : Early-Successional Forests and Shrubland Habitats in the North Eastern United States :Critical Habitats dependent on...W. Coulston. 2005. Hot spots of perforated forest in the eastern United States . Environmental Management 35 (4):483-492. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007

  10. Environmental health in China: progress towards clean air and safe water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junfeng; Mauzerall, Denise L; Zhu, Tong; Liang, Song; Ezzati, Majid; Remais, Justin V

    2010-03-27

    Environmental risk factors, especially air and water pollution, are a major source of morbidity and mortality in China. Biomass fuel and coal are burned for cooking and heating in almost all rural and many urban households, resulting in severe indoor air pollution that contributes greatly to the burden of disease. Many communities lack access to safe drinking water and sanitation, and thus the risk of waterborne disease in many regions is high. At the same time, China is rapidly industrialising with associated increases in energy use and industrial waste. Although economic growth from industrialisation has improved health and quality of life indicators, it has also increased the release of chemical toxins into the environment and the rate of environmental disasters, with severe effects on health. Air quality in China's cities is among the worst in the world, and industrial water pollution has become a widespread health hazard. Moreover, emissions of climate-warming greenhouse gases from energy use are rapidly increasing. Global climate change will inevitably intensify China's environmental health troubles, with potentially catastrophic outcomes from major shifts in temperature and precipitation. Facing the overlap of traditional, modern, and emerging environmental dilemmas, China has committed substantial resources to environmental improvement. The country has the opportunity to address its national environmental health challenges and to assume a central role in the international effort to improve the global environment.

  11. Application of Clean Water (CWA) Section 404 compensatory wetland mitigation under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA)

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D.J.; Straub, C.A.

    1994-06-01

    Pursuant to Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), activities resulting in the discharge of dredge or fill material into waters of the US, including wetlands, require permit authorization from the US Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE). As part of the Section 404 permitting process, compensatory wetland mitigation in the form of wetland enhancement, restoration, or construction may be required to off-set impacts sustained under a Section 404 permit. Under normal circumstances, compensatory mitigation is a relatively straight forward process; however, issues associated with mitigation become more complex at sites undergoing remediation under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), because on-site response/remedial actions involving dredged and fill material are not subject to the formal Section 404 permitting process. These actions are conducted in accordance with the substantive permitting requirements of the ACOE`s Nationwide and individual permitting programs. Wetland mitigatory requirements are determined through application of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (USEPA`s) 040(b) (1) Guidelines promulgated in 40 CFR Part 230 and are implemented through compliance with substantive permitting requirements during the conduct of response/remedial actions. A programmatic approach for implementing wetland mitigatory requirements is being developed at a former US Department of Energy (DOE) uranium refinery undergoing CERCLA remediation in southwestern Ohio. The approach is designed to define the regulatory mechanism that will be used to integrate CWA driven wetland mitigatory requirements into the CERCLA process.

  12. Impact on the steam electric power industry of deleting Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act: Capital costs

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Many power plants discharge large volumes of cooling water. In some cases, the temperature of the discharge exceeds state thermal requirements. Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act (CWA) allows a thermal discharger to demonstrate that less stringent thermal effluent limitations would still protect aquatic life. About 32% of total US steam electric generating capacity operates under Section 316(a) variances. In 1991, the US Senate proposed legislation that would delete Section 316(a) from the CWA. This study, presented in two companion reports, examines how this legislation would affect the steam electric power industry. This report describes alternatives available to nuclear and coal-fired plants currently operating under variances. Data from 38 plants representing 14 companies are used to estimate the national cost of implementing such alternatives. Although there are other alternatives, most affected plants would be retrofitted with cooling towers. Assuming that all plants currently operating under variances would install cooling towers, the national capital cost estimate for these retrofits ranges from $22.7 billion to $24.4 billion (in 1992 dollars). The second report quantitatively and qualitatively evaluates the energy and environmental impacts of deleting the variance. Little justification has been found for removing the Section 316(a) variance from the CWA.

  13. Physicochemical regeneration of high silica zeolite Y used to clean-up water polluted with sulfonamide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Braschi, I; Blasioli, S; Buscaroli, E; Montecchio, D; Martucci, A

    2016-05-01

    High silica zeolite Y has been positively evaluated to clean-up water polluted with sulfonamides, an antibiotic family which is known to be involved in the antibiotic resistance evolution. To define possible strategies for the exhausted zeolite regeneration, the efficacy of some chemico-physical treatments on the zeolite loaded with four different sulfonamides was evaluated. The evolution of photolysis, Fenton-like reaction, thermal treatments, and solvent extractions and the occurrence in the zeolite pores of organic residues eventually entrapped was elucidated by a combined thermogravimetric (TGA-DTA), diffractometric (XRPD), and spectroscopic (FT-IR) approach. The chemical processes were not able to remove the organic guest from zeolite pores and a limited transformation on embedded molecules was observed. On the contrary, both thermal treatment and solvent extraction succeeded in the regeneration of the zeolite loaded from deionized and natural fresh water. The recyclability of regenerated zeolite was evaluated over several adsorption/regeneration cycles, due to the treatment efficacy and its stability as well as the ability to regain the structural features of the unloaded material.

  14. Field monitoring and evaluation of innovative solutions for cleaning storm water runoff.

    PubMed

    Papiri, S; Ciaponi, C; Capodaglio, A; Collivignarelli, C; Bertanza, G; Swartling, F; Crow, M; Fantozzi, M; Valcher, P

    2003-01-01

    Urbanization increases the variety and amount of pollutants transported to receiving waters. Sediment from development and new construction; oil, grease, and toxic chemicals from automobiles; nutrients and pesticides from turf management and gardening; viruses and bacteria from failing septic systems; road salts; and heavy metals are examples of pollutants generated in urban areas. Sediments and solids constitute the largest volume of pollutant loads to receiving waters in urban areas. When runoff enters storm drains, it carries many of these pollutants with it. In older cities, this polluted runoff is often released directly into open waterways without any treatment. Increased pollutant loads can harm fish and wildlife populations, kill native vegetation, foul drinking water supplies, and make recreational areas unsafe. The objective of the study, performed by University of Pavia (Italy), University of Brescia (Italy) and GreenTechTexas International (US), reported herein is to evaluate the use of an innovative stormwater technology (EcoDräin) to reduce pollution due to urban runoff in existing urban areas. The paper describes the methodology and the results achieved with tests conducted in laboratory in Pavia University in Italy and in two pilot areas in Italy and in Australia to investigate the EcoDräin's effectiveness for oil and heavy metals retention and sediment trapping. In the tests performed in a marina near Sydney in Australia a reduction has been achieved in oil and grease concentration higher than 95% and a reduction in metal concentration (particularly Copper, Lead and Zinc) close to 98%. The paper also describes the methodology of the analysis on the absorbing material after its use and the consequent determination of the most efficient and environmentally safe way to dispose of consummated absorbent.

  15. Nanotechnology: a clean and sustainable technology for the degradation of pharmaceuticals present in water and wastewater.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Rengaraj; Al Fahdi, Tharaya; Al-Wahaibi, Bushra; Al-Kindy, Salma M Z; Al-Nofli, Kholood; Al-Lawati, Haider

    2016-03-01

    Pharmaceuticals, newly recognized classes of environmental pollutants, are becoming increasingly problematic contaminants of either surface water or ground water around industrial and residential communities. Pharmaceuticals are constantly released into aquatic environments, mainly due to their widespread consumption and complicated removal in wastewater treatment plants. Heterogeneous photocatalysis appear to be one of the most destructive advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for organic contaminants and are possible to obtain complete mineralization of organic pollutants into eco-friendly end products under visible and solar light irradiation. In this study, flower-like In2S3 hierarchical nanostructures were successfully prepared via a facile solution-phase route, using thioacetamide as both sulfur source and capping agent. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) of the flowers revealed that the cubic structure of In2S3; morphological studies examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the synthesized In2S3 nanostructure was flower-like hierarchitecture assembled from nanoscale flakes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis confirmed the stoichiometry of In2S3 nanoflowers. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity studies revealed that the prepared indium(III) sulfide(In2S3) nanoflowers exhibit an excellent photocatalytic performance, degrading rapidly the aqueous pharmaceutical solution of Lisinopril under visible light irradiation. These results suggest that In2S3 nanoflowers will be a promising candidate of photocatalyst working in thevisible light range.

  16. A homogeneous transition metal complex for clean hydrogen production from methanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Lugo, Rafael E.; Trincado, Mónica; Vogt, Matthias; Tewes, Friederike; Santiso-Quinones, Gustavo; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2013-04-01

    The development of an efficient catalytic process that mimics the enzymatic function of alcohol dehydrogenase is critical for using biomass alcohols for both the production of H2 as a chemical energy carrier and fine chemicals under waste-free conditions. Dehydrogenation of alcohol-water mixtures into their corresponding acids with molecular hydrogen as the sole by-product from the reaction can be catalysed by a ruthenium complex with a chelating bis(olefin) diazadiene ligand. This complex, [K(dme)2][Ru(H)(trop2dad)], stores up to two equivalents of hydrogen intramolecularly, and catalyses the production of H2 from alcohols in the presence of water and a base under homogeneous conditions. The conversion of a MeOH-H2O mixture proceeds selectively to CO2/H2 gas formation under neutral conditions, thereby allowing the use of the entire hydrogen content (12% by weight). Isolation and characterization of the ruthenium complexes from these reactions suggested a mechanistic scenario in which the trop2dad ligand behaves as a chemically ‘non-innocent’ co-operative ligand.

  17. A homogeneous transition metal complex for clean hydrogen production from methanol-water mixtures.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lugo, Rafael E; Trincado, Mónica; Vogt, Matthias; Tewes, Friederike; Santiso-Quinones, Gustavo; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2013-04-01

    The development of an efficient catalytic process that mimics the enzymatic function of alcohol dehydrogenase is critical for using biomass alcohols for both the production of H2 as a chemical energy carrier and fine chemicals under waste-free conditions. Dehydrogenation of alcohol-water mixtures into their corresponding acids with molecular hydrogen as the sole by-product from the reaction can be catalysed by a ruthenium complex with a chelating bis(olefin) diazadiene ligand. This complex, [K(dme)2][Ru(H)(trop2dad)], stores up to two equivalents of hydrogen intramolecularly, and catalyses the production of H2 from alcohols in the presence of water and a base under homogeneous conditions. The conversion of a MeOH-H2O mixture proceeds selectively to CO2/H2 gas formation under neutral conditions, thereby allowing the use of the entire hydrogen content (12% by weight). Isolation and characterization of the ruthenium complexes from these reactions suggested a mechanistic scenario in which the trop2dad ligand behaves as a chemically 'non-innocent' co-operative ligand.

  18. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP.

  19. Effects of Varied Cleaning Methods on Ni-5% W Substrate for Dip-Coating of Water-based Buffer Layers: An X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Vyshnavi; Bruneel, Els; Hühne, Ruben; van Driessche, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    This work describes various combinations of cleaning methods involved in the preparation of Ni-5% W substrates for the deposition of buffer layers using water-based solvents. The substrate has been studied for its surface properties using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The contaminants in the substrates have been quantified and the appropriate cleaning method was chosen in terms of contaminants level and showing good surface crystallinity to further consider them for depositing chemical solution-based buffer layers for Y1Ba2Cu3Oy (YBCO) coated conductors.

  20. Data cleaning methodology for monthly water-to-oil and water-to-gas production ratios in continuous resource assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Varela, Brian A.; Haines, Seth S.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-19

    Petroleum production data are usually stored in a format that makes it easy to determine the year and month production started, if there are any breaks, and when production ends. However, in some cases, you may want to compare production runs where the start of production for all wells starts at month one regardless of the year the wells started producing. This report describes the JAVA program the U.S. Geological Survey developed to examine water-to-oil and water-to-gas ratios in the form of month 1, month 2, and so on with the objective of estimating quantities of water and proppant used in low-permeability petroleum production. The text covers the data used by the program, the challenges with production data, the program logic for checking the quality of the production data, and the program logic for checking the completeness of the data.

  1. Use of wetlands under USEPA's (Environmental Protection Agency's) Region 5 Clean Lakes Program. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Landers, J.C.

    1989-05-01

    The EPA's Region V Clean Lakes Program uses several wetlands for controlling degradation of publicly owned, freshwater lakes. The study seeks to determine if the objectives of the Clean Lakes Program are being met by this use of wetlands, and if appropriate institutional arrangements and management techniques are being implemented to manage the wetlands. Conclusions regarding Revion V's use and management of wetlands include: wetland projects are not being monitored adequately for effectiveness and potential negative impacts on ecosystems; other mechanisms which may help to protect wetlands are being employed; management of most wetland projects is decentralized appropriately; most of the wetland projects provide for adequate short-term mass balance studies, prior sedimentation, plant species diversity, water level, retention time, uniform flow of water, and upland pollutant management; and existing evidence suggests that the Clean Lakes wetland projects are instrumental in meeting Program goals and objectives. Based on these conclusions several recommendations for improving wetlands management are reviewed.

  2. Keeping condensers clean

    SciTech Connect

    Wicker, K.

    2006-04-15

    The humble condenser is among the biggest contributors to a steam power plant's efficiency. But although a clean condenser can provide great economic benefit, a dirty one can raise plant heat rate, resulting in large losses of generation revenue and/or unnecessarily high fuel bills. Conventional methods for cleaning fouled tubes range form chemicals to scrapers to brushes and hydro-blasters. This article compares the available options and describes how one power station, Omaha Public Power District's 600 MW North Omaha coal-fired power station, cleaned up its act. The makeup and cooling water of all its five units comes from the Missouri River. 6 figs.

  3. BEYOND WATER QUALITY: CAN THE CLEAN WATER ACT BE USED TO REDUCE THE QUANTITY OF STORMWATER RUNOFF?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Improving water quality by targeting stormwater runoff and the pollutants it carries has become an increasingly important and discussed issue in both environmental policy and urban management literature. Although this is certainly an important concern in both realms of policy, l...

  4. Hose- and Tube-Cleaning Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rollins, F. P.; Glass, J. S.

    1986-01-01

    Self-contained, single-use module enables hose or tube to be cleaned thoroughly in field, in one operation, using water of unknown or questionable quality. Previously, chemicals for flow cleaning had to be mixed, diluted and pumped through tubes and hoses in many successive steps; deionizers, water-treatment facilities, and chemical storage required. With proposed device cleaning performed safely, without special training. Ready to use, device packaged as cleaning kit with tube to be cleaned.

  5. Comparison of fish communities in a clean-water stream and an adjacent polluted stream

    SciTech Connect

    Reash, R.J.; Berra, T.M. )

    1987-10-01

    Fish populations were studied in two parallel tributaries of the Mohican River, Ohio: Clear Fork, relatively undisturbed; and Rocky Fork, which receives industrial discharges and sewage effluent. Water quality in Rocky Fork was significantly worse than the control stream with respect to heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, and Zn) and ammonia concentrations. Fish species richness and diversity increased downstream in Clear Fork but decreased downstream in Rocky Fork. Pollution-intolerant species were present in the headwaters of Rocky Fork and at all sites of Clear Fork. Fish community similarity of fish communities between corresponding headwater sites was significantly greater than similarity of corresponding downstream reaches, using polluted and unpolluted sites for comparison. Both headwater sites were dominated numerically by generalized invertebrate-feeding fish. At downstream sites in Clear Fork benthic insectivores became dominant in Rocky Fork, generalized invertebrate-feeding fish were present. Fish communities at polluted sites had comparatively lower variability of both trophic structure rank and relative abundance. The smaller populations of fish in these sites were dominated by a few pollution-tolerant species.

  6. 100% Clean, Renewable Wind, Water, and Solar Roadmaps for 139 Countries of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, M. Z.

    2015-12-01

    Significant prior research has focused on the health, climate, and other environmental and social impacts of gas and aerosol particle emissions from fossil fuel and biofuel combustion. Given the magnitude and costs of the impacts, large-scale conversions of these fuels to non-emitting sources of energy are warranted. This talk discusses technical and economic roadmaps to convert the energy infrastructures of each of 139 countries of the world to those powered by 100% non-emitting wind, water, and sunlight (WWS) for all purposes, namely electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, industry, and agriculture/forestry/fishing, after energy efficiency measures have been accounted for. These roadmaps are developed with a methodology similar to that recently derived for each of the 50 United States. Reliability of 100% WWS systems is crucial. To that end, results showing the ability of the United States to maintain a 100% reliable grid with a 100% WWS system are discussed as well. Please see http://web.stanford.edu/group/efmh/jacobson/Articles/I/WWS-50-USState-plans.html for more information.

  7. Assessing chemical cleaning of nanofiltration membranes in a drinking water production plant: a combination of chemical composition analysis and fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, P; Doumeche, B; Galas, L; Vaudry, H; Heim, V; Habarou, H

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of cleaning procedures to remove the fouling deposit from the surface of NF membranes operating in the drinking water plant of Méry sur Oise (Val d'Oise, France) was assessed by a combination of chemical analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The ATR-FTIR spectra of the fouled membranes revealed the presence of biological matter at the membrane surface, mainly composed of polysaccharides, nucleic acids and proteins. IR bands corresponding to the membrane material were detected for stage 1 but not for stage 3. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) observations confirmed the microbial origin of the fouling deposit. After chemical cleaning, the analysis of the inorganic foulants revealed a significant decrease of the inorganic content. Moreover, ATR-FTIR spectra of the fouled membranes were modified, mainly in a broad complex region corresponding to polysaccharides and nucleic acids. The amide bands were also altered for stage 1, and some peaks corresponding to the clean membrane appeared for stage 3 after cleaning. CLSM observations revealed a general decrease of the lectin staining for the two stages with some variations between lectins. A decrease of the DAPI staining indicative of the removal of some microbial cells was also observed for stage 1. In conclusion, cleaning of the NF fouled membranes decreased significantly the inorganic foulants but only partially removed the organic fouling deposit characteristic of a microbial biofilm.

  8. Taguchi versus Full Factorial Design to Determine the Influence of Process Parameters on the Impact Forces Produced by Water Jets Used in Sewer Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medan, N.; Banica, M.

    2016-11-01

    The regular cleaning of the materials deposed in sewer networks is realized, especially with equipment that uses high pressure water jets. The functioning of this equipment is dependent on certain process parameters that can vary, causing variations of the impact forces. The impact force directly affects the cleaning of sewer systems. In order to determine the influence of the process parameters on the impact forces produced by water jets the method of research used is the experiment. The research methods used is that Taguchi design and full factorial design. For the experimental determination of the impact forces a stand for generating water jets and a device for measuring the forces of impact are used. The processing of data is carried out using the Software Minitab 17.

  9. Robust and Superhydrophobic Surface Modification by a "Paint + Adhesive" Method: Applications in Self-Cleaning after Oil Contamination and Oil-Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baiyi; Qiu, Jianhui; Sakai, Eiichi; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Liang, Ruilu; Feng, Huixia

    2016-07-13

    Conventional superhydrophobic surfaces have always depended on expensive, sophisticated, and fragile roughness structures. Therefore, poor robustness has turned into the bottleneck for large-scale industrial applications of the superhydrophobic surfaces. To handle this problem, a superhydrophobic surface with firm robustness urgently needs to be developed. In this work, we created a versatile strategy to fabricate robust, self-cleaning, and superhydrophobic surfaces for both soft and hard substrates. We created an ethanol based suspension of perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane-mdodified calcium carbonate nanoparticles which can be sprayed onto both hard and soft substrates to form superhydrophobic surfaces. For all kinds of substrates, spray adhesive was directly coated onto abluent substrate surfaces to promote the robustness. These superhydrophobic surfaces showed remarkable robustness against knife scratch and sandpaper abrasion, while retaining its superhydrophobicity even after 30 abrasion cycles with sandpaper. What is more, the superhydrophobic surfaces have shown promising potential applications in self-cleaning and oil-water separation. The surfaces retained their self-cleaning property even immersed in oil. In addition to oil-water separation, the water contents in oil after separation of various mixtures were all below 150 ppm, and for toluene even as low as 55 ppm. Furthermore, the as-prepared device for oil-water separation could be cycled 6 times and still retained excellent oil-water separation efficiency.

  10. Health and environmental policy issues in Canada: the role of watershed management in sustaining clean drinking water quality at surface sources.

    PubMed

    Davies, John-Mark; Mazumder, Asit

    2003-07-01

    Sustaining clean and safe drinking water sources is increasingly becoming a priority because of global pollution. The means of attaining and maintaining clean drinking water sources requires effective policies that identify, document, and reduce watershed risks. These risks are defined by their potential impact to human health. Health and risk are, therefore, indelibly linked because they are in part defined by each other. Understanding pathogen ecology and identifying watershed sources remains a priority because of the associated acute risks. Surface water quality changes resulting from inputs of human waste, nutrients and chemicals are associated with higher drinking water risks. Nutrient input can increase primary production and the resulting increase of organic matter results in greater disinfection by-product formation or requires greater treatment intensity. Many drinking water disease outbreaks have resulted from breaches in treatment facilities, therefore, even with greater treatment intensity poor source water quality intrinsically has greater associated health risks. Government and international agencies play a critical role in developing policy. The goal of maintaining water supplies whose availability is maximized and risks are minimized (i.e. sustainable) should be a vital part of such policy. Health risks are discussed in the context of a multi-barrier perspective and it is concluded that both passive (protection) and active (prescriptive management) management is necessary for sustainability. Canadian aboriginal water systems, British Columbian water policy and US EPA policies are given as examples. The basis for developing effective policies includes a strong reliance on sound science and effective instrumentation with careful consideration of stakeholders' interests. Only with such directed policies can the future availability of clean drinking water sources be ensured.

  11. 46 CFR 153.1106 - Cleaning agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cleaning agents. 153.1106 Section 153.1106 Shipping... Handling of Categories A, B, C, and D Cargo and Nls Residue § 153.1106 Cleaning agents. No tank cleaning agent other than water or steam may be used to clean an NLS residue from a cargo tank except...

  12. 46 CFR 153.1106 - Cleaning agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cleaning agents. 153.1106 Section 153.1106 Shipping... Handling of Categories A, B, C, and D Cargo and Nls Residue § 153.1106 Cleaning agents. No tank cleaning agent other than water or steam may be used to clean an NLS residue from a cargo tank except...

  13. 46 CFR 153.1106 - Cleaning agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cleaning agents. 153.1106 Section 153.1106 Shipping... Handling of Categories A, B, C, and D Cargo and Nls Residue § 153.1106 Cleaning agents. No tank cleaning agent other than water or steam may be used to clean an NLS residue from a cargo tank except...

  14. 46 CFR 153.1106 - Cleaning agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cleaning agents. 153.1106 Section 153.1106 Shipping... Handling of Categories A, B, C, and D Cargo and Nls Residue § 153.1106 Cleaning agents. No tank cleaning agent other than water or steam may be used to clean an NLS residue from a cargo tank except...

  15. 46 CFR 153.1106 - Cleaning agents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cleaning agents. 153.1106 Section 153.1106 Shipping... Handling of Categories A, B, C, and D Cargo and Nls Residue § 153.1106 Cleaning agents. No tank cleaning agent other than water or steam may be used to clean an NLS residue from a cargo tank except...

  16. Microbes and Water Quality in Developed Countries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Safe drinking water has been a concern for mankind through out the world for centuries. In the developed world, governments consider access to safe and clean drinking water to be a basic human right. Government regulations generally address the quality of the source water, adequ...

  17. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  18. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  19. Chemical cleaning of porous stainless steel cross-flow filter elements for nuclear waste applications

    SciTech Connect

    Billing, Justin M.; Daniel, Richard C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2011-05-10

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) currently under construction for treatment of High-Level Waste (HLW) at the Hanford Site will rely on cross-flow ultrafiltration to provide solids-liquid separation as a core part of the treatment process. To optimize process throughput, periodic chemical cleaning of the porous stainless steel filter elements has been incorporated into the design of the plant. It is currently specified that chemical cleaning with nitric acid will occur after significant irreversible membrane fouling is observed. Irreversible fouling is defined as fouling that cannot be removed by backpulsing the filter. PNNL has investigated chemical cleaning processes as part of integrated tests with HLW simulants and with actual Hanford tank wastes. To quantify the effectiveness of chemical cleaning, the residual membrane resistance after cleaning was compared against the initial membrane resistance for each test in a series of long-term fouling tests. The impact of the small amount of residual resistance in these tests could not be separated from other parameters and the historical benchmark of >1 GPM/ft2 for clean water flux was determined to be an adequate metric for chemical cleaning. Using the results from these tests, a process optimization strategy is presented suggesting that for the simulant material under test, the value of chemical cleaning may be suspect. The period of enhanced filtration may not be enough to offset the down time required for chemical cleaning, without respect to the other associated costs.

  20. Targeting of Watershed Management Practices for Water Quality Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ensuring a clean and adequate water supply implies conservative use of water and protecting water resources from pollution. Sediment, nutrient, and pesticide losses in runoff are major pollutants of surface waters in the Midwest. This publication addresses the targeting of best management practices ...

  1. Precision Cleaning Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

    2000-02-02

    Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

  2. Clean Diesel

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Diesel Program offers DERA funding in the form of grants and rebates as well as other support for projects that protect human health and improve air quality by reducing harmful emissions from diesel engines.

  3. Efficacy of 10 different cleaning processes in a washer-disinfector for flexible endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Zühlsdorf, B; Floss, H; Martiny, H

    2004-04-01

    Successful cleaning of medical devices, such as flexible endocopes, has been recognized to be of major importance for effective processing. Washer-disinfectors (WD) are considered to be an important step in this direction. The cleaning process in WD, however, has only been partially assessed regarding its effectiveness, and therefore to study this in more detail, tests were carried out, according prEN ISO 15883, using transparent teflon tubes as test pieces (length 2 m). For each experiment three test pieces were contaminated with the 'German test soil' containing Enterococcus faecium in blood, two for the test and one as a control (no automatic cleaning). Automatic cleaning was performed with a Wassenburg WD 440. Ten cleaning agents were used. In addition the process was carried out with water alone. After automated cleaning, test pieces were assessed visually (four categories, range: very poor to excellent visible cleanliness) and microbiologically [log(10) reduction factor (RF)]. Each experiment was repeated three times. Using the WD water gave excellent visible cleanliness with a mean RF of 1.1+/-0.6. The same excellent visible cleanliness was obtained with seven cleaning processes: deconex 23 Neutrazym, Helimatic Cleaner enzymatic, Korsolex-Endo-Cleaner, Labomat E, neodisher mediclean, Thermosept ER, and Thermoton NR. Worse visible cleanliness was found with three cleaning processes: Olympus ETD Cleaner and neodisher FE led to adequate visible cleanliness, and the cleaning process with neodisher medizym led to poor visible cleanliness. Six cleaning processes reduced the test organism by RF>or=3, i.e. the reduction was significantly higher than after cleaning with water alone. No significant difference between use of water alone and the cleaning process was found with three cleaning processes: Olympus ETD Cleaner, neodisher mediclean, and Thermosept ER (range RF: 0.8-1.8; P > 0.05). The cleaning process with neodisher medizym yielded a significantly lower mean

  4. Machine Cleans And Degreases Without Toxic Solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurguis, Kamal S.; Higginson, Gregory A.

    1993-01-01

    Appliance uses hot water and biodegradable chemicals to degrease and clean hardware. Spray chamber essentially industrial-scale dishwasher. Front door tilts open, and hardware to be cleaned placed on basket-like tray. During cleaning process, basket-like tray rotates as high-pressure "V" jets deliver steam, hot water, detergent solution, and rust inhibitor as required.

  5. Damage by radicals and photons during plasma cleaning of porous low-k SiOCH. II. Water uptake and change in dielectric constant

    SciTech Connect

    Shoeb, Juline; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-07-15

    Porous dielectric materials provide lower capacitances that reduce RC time delays in integrated circuits. Typical low-k materials include porous SiOCH-silicon dioxide with carbon groups, principally CH{sub 3}, lining the pores. With a high porosity, internally connected pores provide pathways for reactive species to enter into the material. Fluorocarbon plasmas are often used to etch SiOCH, a process that leaves a fluorocarbon polymer on the surface that must later be removed. During cleaning using Ar/O{sub 2} or He/H{sub 2} plasmas, reactions of radicals that diffuse into the SiOCH and photons that penetrate into the SiOCH can remove -CH{sub 3} groups. Due to its higher reactivity, cleaning with Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas removes more -CH{sub 3} groups than He/H{sub 2} plasmas, and so produce more free radical sites, such as -SiO{sub 2} Bullet (a -SiO{sub 2}-CH{sub 3} site with the -CH{sub 3} group removed).Upon exposure to humid air, these free radical sites can chemisorb H{sub 2}O to form hydrophilic Si-OH which can further physisorb H{sub 2}O through hydrogen bonding to form Si-OH(H{sub 2}O). With the high dielectric constant of water, even a small percentage of water uptake can significantly increase the effective dielectric constant of SiOCH. In this paper, we report on results from a computational investigation of the cleaning of SiOCH using Ar/O{sub 2} or He/H{sub 2} plasmas and subsequent exposure to humid air. The authors found that plasma cleaning with He/H{sub 2} mixtures produce less demethylation than cleaning with Ar/O{sub 2} plasmas, as so results in less water uptake, and a smaller increase in dielectric constant. The water that produces the increase in dielectric constant is roughly half chemisorbed and half physisorbed, the latter of which can be removed with mild heating. Sealing the pores with NH{sub 3} plasma treatment reduces water uptake and helps prevent the increase in dielectric constant.

  6. Minimizing sulfur contamination and rinse water volume required following a sulfuric acid/hydrogen peroxide clean by performing a chemically basic rinse

    SciTech Connect

    Clews, P.J.; Nelson, G.C.; Resnick, P.J.; Matlock, C.A.; Adkins, C.L.J.

    1997-08-01

    Sulfuric acid hydrogen peroxide mixtures (SPM) are commonly used in the semiconductor industry to remove organic contaminants from wafer surfaces. This viscous solution is very difficult to rinse off wafer surfaces. Various rinsing conditions were tested and the resulting residual contamination on the wafer surface was measured. The addition of small amounts of a chemical base such as ammonium hydroxide to the rinse water has been found to be effective in reducing the surface concentration of sulfur and also mitigates the particle growth that occurs on SPM cleaned wafers. The volume of room temperature water required to rinse these wafers is also significantly reduced.

  7. Cleaning devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Horst W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Cleaning devices are described which include a vacuum cleaner nozzle with a sharp rim for directing incoming air down against the floor; a vacuum cleaner wherein electrostatically charged brushes that brush dirt off a floor, are electrically grounded to remove charges that could tend to hold dirt to the brushes; a vacuum cleaner head having slots that form a pair of counter-rotating vortices, and that includes an outlet that blows a stream of air at the floor region which lies between the vortices; a cleaning device that sweeps a group of brushes against the ground along a first direction, and then sweeps them along the same ground area but in a second direction angled from the first by an amount such as 90.degree., to sweep up particles lying in crevices extending along any direction; a device that gently cleans a surface to remove bacteria for analysis, including an inclined wall along which cleaning fluid flows onto the surface, a vacuum chamber for drawing in the cleaning fluid, and a dividing wall spaced slightly from the surface to separate the fluid source from the vacuum cleaner chamber; and a device for providing pulses of pressured air including a chamber to which pressured air is supplied, a ball that circulates around the chamber to repeatedly close an outlet, and an air source that directs air circumferentially to move the ball around the chamber.

  8. 5 CFR 919.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate evidence. 919.900 Section 919.900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.900 Adequate...

  9. A review of polymer nanofibres by electrospinning and their application in oil-water separation for cleaning up marine oil spills.

    PubMed

    Sarbatly, Rosalam; Krishnaiah, Duduku; Kamin, Zykamilia

    2016-05-15

    The growths of oil and gas exploration and production activities have increased environmental problems, such as oil spillage and the resulting pollution. The study of the methods for cleaning up oil spills is a critical issue to protect the environment. Various techniques are available to contain oil spills, but they are typically time consuming, energy inefficient and create secondary pollution. The use of a sorbent, such as a nanofibre sorbent, is a technique for controlling oil spills because of its good physical and oil sorption properties. This review discusses about the application of nanofibre sorbent for oil removal from water and its current developments. With their unique physical and mechanical properties coupled with their very high surface area and small pore sizes, nanofibre sorbents are alternative materials for cleaning up oil spills.

  10. Rulemaking Petition to lower the threshold that qualifies animal feeding operations (“AFOs”) as concentrated animal feeding operations (“CAFOs”) and thereby “point sources” under section 402 of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rulemaking Petition submitted September 20, 2015 to lower the threshold that qualifies animal feeding operations (AFOs) as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and thereby point sources under§ 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  11. Cleaning of boiler heating surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Maidanik, M. N.; Vasil'ev, V. V.

    2006-09-15

    Basic methods and facilities for the external cleaning of the heating surfaces of boilers designed for the combustion of low-grade solid fuels are discussed. Water and steam blastings, which are the basic means of cleaning furnace shields, and semi-radiative and convective heating surfaces have the greatest range of application.

  12. Alternate cleaning methods for LCCAs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate DI water followed by isopropyl alcohol (IPA) cleaning and no cleaning of leadless chip carriers (LCCs). Both environmentally safe methods were to be tested against the current chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) material cleaning baseline. Several experiments were run to compare production and electrical yields of LCCs cleaned by all three methods. The critical process steps most affected by cleaning were wire bonding, sealing, particle induced noise detection (PIND), moisture content, and electrical. Yields for the experimental lots cleaned by CFC, DI water plus IPA, and no cleaning were 56%, 72%, and 75%, respectively. The overall results indicated that vapor degreasing/ultrasonic cleaning in CFCs could be replaced by the aqueous method. No cleaning could also be considered if an effective dry method of particle removal could be developed.

  13. Super Clean, Super Safe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Supersonic Gas/Liquid Cleaning System (SS-GLCS) has applications ranging from cleaning circuit boards to scouring building exteriors. The system does not abrade the surface of the hardware being cleaned, and it requires much lower levels of pressure while using very little water. An alternative to CFC-based solvents, the system mixes air and water from separate pressurized tanks, ejecting the gas- liquid mixture at supersonic speeds from a series of nozzles at the end of a hand-held wand. The water droplets have the kinetic energy to forcibly remove the contaminant material. The system leaves very little fluid that must be handled as contaminated waste. It can be applied in the aerospace, automotive, and medical industries, as well as to circuit boards, electronics, machinery, metals, plastics, and optics. With a nozzle that can be oriented in any direction, the system is adjustable to allow all sides of a part to be cleaned without reorientation. It requires minimal training and is easily moved on built-in casters

  14. Saltstone Clean Cap Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C

    2005-04-22

    The current operation strategy for using Saltstone Vault 4 to receive 0.2 Ci/gallon salt solution waste involves pouring a clean grout layer over the radioactive grout prior to initiating pour into another cell. This will minimize the radiating surface area and reduce the dose rate at the vault and surrounding area. The Clean Cap will be used to shield about four feet of Saltstone poured into a Z-Area vault cell prior to moving to another cell. The minimum thickness of the Clean Cap layer will be determined by the cesium concentration and resulting dose levels and it is expected to be about one foot thick based on current calculations for 0.1 Ci Saltstone that is produced in the Saltstone process by stabilization of 0.2 Ci salt solution. This report documents experiments performed to identify a formulation for the Clean Cap. Thermal transient calculations, adiabatic temperature rise measurements, pour height, time between pour calculations and shielding calculations were beyond the scope and time limitations of this study. However, data required for shielding calculations (composition and specific gravity) are provided for shielding calculations. The approach used to design a Clean Cap formulation was to produce a slurry from the reference premix (10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash) and domestic water that resembled as closely as possible the properties of the Saltstone slurry. In addition, options were investigated that may offer advantages such as less bleed water and less heat generation. The options with less bleed water required addition of dispersants. The options with lower heat contained more fly ash and less slag. A mix containing 10/45/45 weight percent cement/slag/fly ash with a water to premix ratio of 0.60 is recommended for the Clean Cap. Although this mix may generate more than 3 volume percent standing water (bleed water), it has rheological, mixing and flow properties that are similar to previously processed Saltstone. The recommended

  15. Air Cleaning Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    water molecules and form cluster ions which are attracted to airborne particles. The cluster ion surrounds the airborne particle, and the positive and negative ions react to form hydroxyls. These hydroxyls steal the airborne particle’s hydrogen atom, which creates a hole in the particle’s outer protein membrane, thereby rendering it inactive. Because influenza is primarily acquired by large droplets and direct and indirect contact with an infectious person, any in-room air cleaner will have little benefit in controlling and preventing its spread. Therefore, there is no role for the Plasmacluster ion air purifier or any other in-room air cleaner in the control of the spread of influenza. Accordingly, for purposes of this review, the Medical Advisory Secretariat presents no further analysis of the Plasmacluster. Review Strategy The objective of the systematic review was to determine the effectiveness of in-room air cleaners with built in UVGI lights and HEPA filtration compared with those using HEPA filtration only. The Medical Advisory Secretariat searched the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, INAHATA (International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment), Biosis Previews, Bacteriology Abstracts, Web of Science, Dissertation Abstracts, and NIOSHTIC 2. A meta-analysis was conducted if adequate data was available from 2 or more studies and where statistical and clinical heterogeneity among studies was not an issue. Otherwise, a qualitative review was completed. The GRADE system was used to summarize the quality of the body of evidence comprised of 1 or more studies. Summary of Findings There were no existing health technology assessments on air cleaning technology located during the literature review. The literature search yielded 59 citations of which none were retained. One study was retrieved from a reference list of a guidance document from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which

  16. Safe drinking water and clean air: an experimental study evaluating the concept of combining household water treatment and indoor air improvement using the Water Disinfection Stove (WADIS).

    PubMed

    Christen, Andri; Navarro, Carlos Morante; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2009-09-01

    Indoor air pollution and unsafe water remain two of the most important environmental risk factors for the global burden of infectious diseases. Improved stoves and household water treatment (HWT) methods represent two of the most effective interventions to fight respiratory and diarrhoeal illnesses at household level. Since new improved stoves are highly accepted and HWT methods have their drawbacks regarding sustained use, combining the two interventions in one technical solution could result in notable positive convenience and health benefits. A WAter DIsinfection Stove (WADIS) based on a Lorena-stove design with a simple flow-through boiling water-treatment system was developed and tested by a pilot experimental study in rural Bolivia. The results of a post-implementation evaluation of two WADIS and 27 Lorena-stoves indicate high social acceptance rather due to convenience gains of the stove than to perceived health improvements. The high efficacy of the WADIS-water treatment system, with a reduction of microbiological contamination load in the treated water from 87600 thermotolerant coliform colony forming units per 100mL (CFU/100mL) to zero is indicative. The WADIS concept unifies two interventions addressing two important global burdens of disease. WADIS' simple design, relying on locally available materials and low manufacturing costs (approx. 6 US) indicates potential for spontaneous diffusion and scaling up.

  17. Comparison of antibodies in marine fish from clean and polluted waters of the New York Bight: relative levels against 36 bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Robohm, R A; Brown, C; Murchelano, R A

    1979-01-01

    Fish from polluted waters are subject to increased prevalence of disease. Because they respond to bacterial pathogens by producing serum antibodies, it was possible to construct a seasonal serological record in three fish species from clean and polluted waters of the New York Bight. Antibody levels were determined by testing sera for agglutinating activity against 36 strains of bacteria. Evaluation of 5,100 antibody titrations showed the following. During warm months, summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) from the polluted area had significantly higher antibody levels and antibody to a greater diversity of bacteria than fish from the unpolluted area. Weakfish (Cynoscion regalis) from the same polluted area shared with summer flounder raised titers to many bacteria. The greatest proportion of raised titers was against Vibrio species, although prominent titers were also seen against Aeromonas salmonicida and Haemophilus piscium, bacteria usually associated with diseases in freshwater but not marine fish. Differences between polluted and clean waters were not as evident in winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus) during cold months. This could be due, in part, to reduced antibody production at colder temperatures. The data illustrate the usefulness of the serum antibody record in identifying environmental exposure to bacteria in marine fish and indicate that the polluted New York Bight apex has increased levels and diversity of bacteria during warm months. PMID:518084

  18. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  19. Clean catch urine sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... specimen; Urine collection - clean catch; UTI - clean catch; Urinary tract infection - clean catch; Cystitis - clean catch ... LE, Norrby SR. Approach to the patient with urinary tract infection. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  20. Ionic cleaning after wave solder and before conformal coat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguygen, Tochau N.; Sutherland, Thomas H.

    An account is given of efforts made by a military electronics manufacturer to upgrade product reliability in response to the printed writing board (PWB) ionic cleanliness requirements recently set out in MIL-P-28809 Rev. A. These requirements had to be met both after wave soldering, involving the immediate removal of ionically active RA flux, and immediately before conformal coating, in order to remove the less active RMA flux and bonding contaminants. Attention is given to the results of a test program which compared the effectiveness with which five different solvents and two (batch and conveyorized vapor degreasing) cleaning methods cleaned representative PWBs containing many components. Alcohol-containing fluorocarbon blends were adequate, but the most densely packed PWBs required a supplemental water rinse.

  1. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  2. Pipe Cleaning Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.; Wu, J.; /Fermilab

    1991-01-24

    This cleaning procedure outlines the steps involved in cleaning the high purity argon lines associated with the DO calorimeters. The procedure is broken down into 7 cycles: system setup, initial flush, wash, first rinse, second rinse, final rinse and drying. The system setup involves preparing the pump cart, line to be cleaned, distilled water, and interconnecting hoses and fittings. The initial flush is an off-line flush of the pump cart and its plumbing in order to preclude contaminating the line. The wash cycle circulates the detergent solution (Micro) at 180 degrees Fahrenheit through the line to be cleaned. The first rinse is then intended to rid the line of the majority of detergent and only needs to run for 30 minutes and at ambient temperature. The second rinse (if necessary) should eliminate the remaining soap residue. The final rinse is then intended to be a check that there is no remaining soap or other foreign particles in the line, particularly metal 'chips.' The final rinse should be run at 180 degrees Fahrenheit for at least 90 minutes. The filters should be changed after each cycle, paying particular attention to the wash cycle and the final rinse cycle return filters. These filters, which should be bagged and labeled, prove that the pipeline is clean. Only distilled water should be used for all cycles, especially rinsing. The level in the tank need not be excessive, merely enough to cover the heater float switch. The final rinse, however, may require a full 50 gallons. Note that most of the details of the procedure are included in the initial flush description. This section should be referred to if problems arise in the wash or rinse cycles.

  3. Final Guidance on Awards of Grants to Indian Tribes under Section 106 of the Clean Water Act

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Guidance to help tribal water quality program managers, staff, and other tribal environmental decision makers design and implement effective and successful water quality programs. Also assists EPA Regions to award and administer tribal grants.

  4. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  5. Floatable, Self-Cleaning, and Carbon-Black-Based Superhydrophobic Gauze for the Solar Evaporation Enhancement at the Air-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiming; Chen, Jingwei; Guo, Dawei; Cao, Moyuan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-06-24

    Efficient solar evaporation plays an indispensable role in nature as well as the industry process. However, the traditional evaporation process depends on the total temperature increase of bulk water. Recently, localized heating at the air-water interface has been demonstrated as a potential strategy for the improvement of solar evaporation. Here, we show that the carbon-black-based superhydrophobic gauze was able to float on the surface of water and selectively heat the surface water under irradiation, resulting in an enhanced evaporation rate. The fabrication process of the superhydrophobic black gauze was low-cost, scalable, and easy-to-prepare. Control experiments were conducted under different light intensities, and the results proved that the floating black gauze achieved an evaporation rate 2-3 times higher than that of the traditional process. A higher temperature of the surface water was observed in the floating gauze group, revealing a main reason for the evaporation enhancement. Furthermore, the self-cleaning ability of the superhydrophobic black gauze enabled a convenient recycling and reusing process toward practical application. The present material may open a new avenue for application of the superhydrophobic substrate and meet extensive requirements in the fields related to solar evaporation.

  6. Cleaning Genesis Mission Payload for Flight with Ultra-Pure Water and Assembly in ISO Class 4 Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2012-01-01

    Genesis mission to capture and return to Earth solar wind samples had very stringent contamination control requirements in order to distinguish the solar atoms from terrestrial ones. Genesis mission goals were to measure solar composition for most of the periodic table, so great care was taken to avoid particulate contamination. Since the number 1 and 2 science goals were to determine the oxygen and nitrogen isotopic composition, organic contamination was minimized by tightly controlling offgassing. The total amount of solar material captured in two years is about 400 micrograms spread across one sq m. The contamination limit requirement for each of C, N, and O was <1015 atoms/sq cm. For carbon, this is equivalent to 10 ng/cm2. Extreme vigilance was used in pre-paring Genesis collectors and cleaning hardware for flight. Surface contamination on polished silicon wafers, measured in Genesis laboratory is approximately 10 ng/sq cm.

  7. Microbiological Evaluation of the Efficacy of Soapy Water to Clean Hands: A Randomized, Non-Inferiority Field Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Nuhu; Pickering, Amy J.; Ram, Pavani K.; Unicomb, Leanne; Najnin, Nusrat; Homaira, Nusrat; Ashraf, Sania; Abedin, Jaynal; Islam, M. Sirajul; Luby, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a randomized, non-inferiority field trial in urban Dhaka, Bangladesh among mothers to compare microbial efficacy of soapy water (30 g powdered detergent in 1.5 L water) with bar soap and water alone. Fieldworkers collected hand rinse samples before and after the following washing regimens: scrubbing with soapy water for 15 and 30 seconds; scrubbing with bar soap for 15 and 30 seconds; and scrubbing with water alone for 15 seconds. Soapy water and bar soap removed thermotolerant coliforms similarly after washing for 15 seconds (mean log10 reduction = 0.7 colony-forming units [CFU], P < 0.001 for soapy water; mean log10 reduction = 0.6 CFU, P = 0.001 for bar soap). Increasing scrubbing time to 30 seconds did not improve removal (P > 0.05). Scrubbing hands with water alone also reduced thermotolerant coliforms (mean log10 reduction = 0.3 CFU, P = 0.046) but was less efficacious than scrubbing hands with soapy water. Soapy water is an inexpensive and microbiologically effective cleansing agent to improve handwashing among households with vulnerable children. PMID:24914003

  8. Low-level (PPB) determination of cisplatin in cleaning validation (rinse water) samples. II. A high-performance liquid chromatographic method.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, R; Burchett, M; Loffredo, D; Mulligan, J A

    2000-04-01

    sensitivity to UV absorption at 340 nm. Diethyldithiocarbamate forms complexes with the platinum in cisplatin to yield a platinum-DDTC (Pt-DDTC) complex with a high molar-extinction coefficient. The Pt(DDTC)2 complex thus formed was chromatographically separated and the quantitated by comparison of its detector response to that of a similarly derivatized standard preparation. DDTC also has application as a cleaning agent for cisplatin (e.g., for production equipment cleaning, spill cleanup). Destruction of cisplatin can be affected by the reaction of cisplatin with this cleaning agent. Derivatization of cisplatin will convert active cisplatin to platinum-DDTC on surfaces or in solution. Final cleaning can be accomplished using a water-for-injection rinse. After such a cleaning process, the rinse water, when collected and analyzed, showed levels of free cisplatin less than the detection concentration of 0.2 PPB and a total platinum concentration less than 10 PPB as Pt-DDTC complex.

  9. Novel-structured electrospun TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers for high efficient photocatalytic cogeneration of clean water and energy from dye wastewater.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siew Siang; Bai, Hongwei; Liu, Zhaoyang; Sun, Darren Delai

    2013-08-01

    It is still a challenge to photocatalytically cogenerate clean water and energy from dye wastewater owing to the relatively low photocatalytic efficiency of photocatalysts. In this study, novel-structured TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers were successfully fabricated via facile electrospinning. For the first time, the TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers demonstrated multifunctional ability for concurrent photocatalytic organic degradation and H2 generation from dye wastewater. The enhanced photocatalytic activity of TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers was ascribed to its excellent synergy of physicochemical properties: 1) mesoporosity and large specific surface area for efficient substrate adsorption, mass transfer and light harvesting; 2) red-shift of the absorbance spectra for enhanced light utilization; 3) long nanofibrous structure for efficient charge transfer and ease of recovery, 4) TiO2/CuO heterojunctions which enhance the separation of electrons and holes and 5) presence of CuO which serve as co-catalyst for the H2 production. The TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers also exhibited rapid settleability by gravity and uncompromised reusability. Thus, the as-synthesized TiO2/CuO composite nanofibers represent a promising candidate for highly efficient concurrent photocatalytic organic degradation and clean energy production from dye wastewater.

  10. Environmental Compliance Guide. Guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the Clean Water Act: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    This manual provides general guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) officials for complying with Sect. 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 and amendments. Section 402 authorizes the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or states with EPA approved programs to issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for the direct discharge of waste from a point source into waters of the United States. Although the nature of a project dictates the exact information requirements, every project has similar information requirements on the environmental setting, type of discharge(s), characterization of effluent, and description of operations and wastewater treatment. Additional information requirements for projects with ocean discharges, thermal discharges, and cooling water intakes are discussed. Guidance is provided in this manual on general methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting information for an NPDES permit application. The NPDES program interacts with many sections of the CWA; therefore, background material on pertinent areas such as effluent limitations, water quality standards, toxic substances, and nonpoint source pollutants is included in this manual. Modifications, variances, and extensions applicable to NPDES permits are also discussed.

  11. 75 FR 2860 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Call for Data for the Illinois River Watershed in Oklahoma and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... quality assurance and quality control documentation. All data submissions should be provided in an... water quality impairments. The results of this watershed model may be used to develop one or more total... water quality related data and information that may be relevant to the development of the Illinois...

  12. 49 CFR 230.53 - Time of cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.53 Time of cleaning. The spindles of all water glass valves and of... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time of cleaning. 230.53 Section 230.53... addition, the top and bottom passages of the water column shall be cleaned and inspected at each...

  13. 49 CFR 230.53 - Time of cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.53 Time of cleaning. The spindles of all water glass valves and of... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time of cleaning. 230.53 Section 230.53... addition, the top and bottom passages of the water column shall be cleaned and inspected at each...

  14. 49 CFR 230.53 - Time of cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.53 Time of cleaning. The spindles of all water glass valves and of... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time of cleaning. 230.53 Section 230.53... addition, the top and bottom passages of the water column shall be cleaned and inspected at each...

  15. 49 CFR 230.53 - Time of cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.53 Time of cleaning. The spindles of all water glass valves and of... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time of cleaning. 230.53 Section 230.53... addition, the top and bottom passages of the water column shall be cleaned and inspected at each...

  16. 49 CFR 230.53 - Time of cleaning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Water Glasses and Gauge Cocks § 230.53 Time of cleaning. The spindles of all water glass valves and of... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time of cleaning. 230.53 Section 230.53... addition, the top and bottom passages of the water column shall be cleaned and inspected at each...

  17. Steaming Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoverson, Rick

    2006-01-01

    Schools can provide a cleaner, more healthful school environment by simply combining heat and water. Steam vapor systems use only tap water with no chemicals added. Low-pressure (12 psi to 65 psi) steam vapor sanitizes and deodorizes. This process can then be used safely in many situations, but is especially suited for restrooms and food-service…

  18. Nonthermal Biological Treatments Using Discharge Plasma Produced by Pulsed Power 4. Cleaning of Lakes and Marshes by Pulsed Power Produced Streamer Discharges in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Hidenori; Katsuki, Sunao; Namihira, Takao; Ishibashi, Kazuo; Kiyosaki, Noriaki

    Pulsed power has been used to produce non-thermal plasmas in atmospheric pressure gases that generate a high electric field at the tips of streamer discharges, where high energy electrons, free radicals, ultraviolet rays, and ozone are produced. These manifestations of streamer discharges have been used in the treatment of exhaust gases, removal of volatile and toxic compounds such as dioxin, and the sterilization of microorganisms. Here, large volume streamer discharges in water are described. These streamer discharges in liquids are able to produce a high electric field, high energy electrons, ozone, chemically active species, ultraviolet rays, and shock waves, which readily sterilize microorganisms and decompose molecules and materials. An application of this phenomenon to the cleaning of lakes and marshes is also described.

  19. Turbine-Driven Pipe-Cleaning Brush

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy J.; Rowell, David E.

    1994-01-01

    Simple pipe-cleaning device includes small turbine wheel axially connected, by standoff, to circular brush. Turbine wheel turns on hub bearing attached to end of upstream cable. Turbine-and-brush assembly inserted in pipe with cable trailing upstream and brush facing downstream. Water or cleaning solution pumped through pipe. Cable held at upstream end, so it holds turbine and brush in pipe at location to be cleaned. Flow in pipe turns turbine, which turns wheel, producing desired cleaning action. In addition to brushing action, device provides even mixing of cleaning solution in pipe.

  20. Low-level (PPB) determination of cisplatin in cleaning validation (rinse water) samples. I. An atomic absorption spectrophotometric method.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, R; Mulligan, J A

    2000-04-01

    Suitable analytical methods are required for quantitative determination of trace levels of ingredients in samples obtained for purposes of cleaning validation. We describe below an atomic absorption method for the quantitation of cisplatin, an antineoplastic agent, in aqueous samples. Cisplatin was reacted with diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DDTC), sodium salt, to yield a platinum-DDTC (Pt-DDTC) complex. The Pt-DDTC chelate was extracted into methylene chloride, the extract was mixed with acetonitrile, and the platinum content was then determined using a Zeeman atomic absorption (AA) spectrophotometer. The extraction conditions and AA experimental conditions were set up such that the detection level could be extended to 0.5 ng/ml. Reproducible results were obtained at a quantitative working standard concentration of 5 PPB. The absorbance response was found to be a linear function of cisplatin concentration in the region between 0.5 PPB and 20 PPB, which is about 10% to 400% of the target analyte concentration of 5 PPB. The target analyte concentration was set at 5 PPB such that it was at least 10 times the detection limit of about 0.5 PPB.

  1. 33 CFR 157.220 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels Design and Equipment § 157.220 Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Standards. (a) Cargo tanks that are designated as dedicated clean ballast...

  2. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels General § 157.218 Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations. The dedicated clean ballast tanks or equipment on a tank vessel that has...

  3. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels General § 157.218 Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations. The dedicated clean ballast tanks or equipment on a tank vessel that has...

  4. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels General § 157.218 Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations. The dedicated clean ballast tanks or equipment on a tank vessel that has...

  5. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels General § 157.218 Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations. The dedicated clean ballast tanks or equipment on a tank vessel that has...

  6. 33 CFR 157.218 - Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dedicated clean ballast tanks... CARRYING OIL IN BULK Dedicated Clean Ballast Tanks on Tank Vessels General § 157.218 Dedicated clean ballast tanks: Alterations. The dedicated clean ballast tanks or equipment on a tank vessel that has...

  7. Proposed Determination Pursuant to Section 404c of the Clean Water Act for Pebble Deposit Area, Southwest Alaska

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA Region 10's proposed determination to restrict the use of certain waters in the Bristol Bay watershed for disposal of dredged or fill material associated with mining the Pebble deposit, a large ore body in southwest Alaska.

  8. Clean coal

    SciTech Connect

    Liang-Shih Fan; Fanxing Li

    2006-07-15

    The article describes the physics-based techniques that are helping in clean coal conversion processes. The major challenge is to find a cost- effective way to remove carbon dioxide from the flue gas of power plants. One industrially proven method is to dissolve CO{sub 2} in the solvent monoethanolamine (MEA) at a temperature of 38{sup o}C and then release it from the solvent in another unit when heated to 150{sup o}C. This produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. Research is in progress with alternative solvents that require less energy. Another technique is to use enriched oxygen in place of air in the combustion process which produces CO{sub 2} ready for sequestration. A process that is more attractive from an energy management viewpoint is to gasify coal so that it is partially oxidized, producing a fuel while consuming significantly less oxygen. Several IGCC schemes are in operation which produce syngas for use as a feedstock, in addition to electricity and hydrogen. These schemes are costly as they require an air separation unit. Novel approaches to coal gasification based on 'membrane separation' or chemical looping could reduce the costs significantly while effectively capturing carbon dioxide. 1 ref., 2 figs., 1 photo.

  9. Long-range influence of steps on water adsorption on clean and D-covered Pt surfaces.

    PubMed

    den Dunnen, Angela; van der Niet, Maria J T C; Badan, Cansin; Koper, Marc T M; Juurlink, Ludo B F

    2015-04-07

    We have examined water desorption from Pt(111) terraces of varying width and its dependence on precoverage by deuterium (D) with temperature programmed desorption studies. We observe distinct water desorption from (100) steps and (111) terraces, with steps providing adsorption sites with a higher binding energy than terraces. Preadsorption of D at the steps causes annihilation of water stabilization at the steps, while it also causes an initial stabilization of water on the (111) terraces. When the (111) terraces also become precovered with D, this water stabilization trend reverses on all surfaces. Destabilization continues for stepped surfaces containing up to 8-atom wide (111) terraces with a (100) step type and these become hydrophobic, in contrast to surfaces with a (110) step type and with the infinite (111) terrace. Our results illustrate how surface defects and a delicate balance between intermolecular forces and the adsorption energy govern hydrophobic vs. hydrophilic behavior, and that the influence of steps on the adsorption of water on nano-structured platinum surfaces has a very long-ranged character.

  10. ETHOS CLEAN

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Technical product bulletin: this surface washing agent used in oil spill cleanups has a minimum 30 minutes recommended soak time. Can be used with salt or fresh water, on hard surfaces, shorelines, rocks, and beaches.

  11. A test for cleaning and disinfection processes in a washer-disinfector.

    PubMed

    Ransjö, U; Engström, L; Håkansson, P; Ledel, T; Lindgren, L; Lindqvist, A L; Marcusson, E; Rudbäck, K

    2001-04-01

    Disinfection processes such as heat, aldehydes or alcohols kill vegetative microorganisms but do not necessarily remove other organic contamination. Organic residues impair the result of low-temperature sterilisation processes. Heat-stable organic residues may give rise to clinical symptoms in the patient. Standards are available in Britain and in Sweden for the examination of cleaning processes in washer-disinfectors. The test substances are artificial soil or blood. These standards are based on visual inspection of instruments or equipment. They cannot be used for examination of tubular instruments, nor can they be quantified. For validation of cleaning procedures a simple quantifiable method, which can be performed in an infection control laboratory is needed. We have used suspensions in horse blood of Enterococcus faecalis bacteria and Bacillus subtilis spores to test disinfection and cleaning in a washer-disinfector. Instruments used for laparoscopic surgery were contaminated with a blood bacteria suspension containing 10(7) organisms/ml and then dried and processed in a washer-disinfector using a regular process. Remaining microbial contamination was cultured quantitatively. Nineteen objects were investigated in 10 experiments each. Cleaning, measured as log reduction >5-6 of B. subtilis, was achieved on surfaces that were adequately in contact with the water flow in the machine. Disinfection (and cleaning) measured as log reduction >5-6 of E. faecalis was successful at all points examined. The test method is simple and quantifiable, and can be used to evaluate and to improve cleaning and disinfection processes.

  12. Shewanella sp. O23S as a Driving Agent of a System Utilizing Dissimilatory Arsenate-Reducing Bacteria Responsible for Self-Cleaning of Water Contaminated with Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Drewniak, Lukasz; Stasiuk, Robert; Uhrynowski, Witold; Sklodowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was a detailed characterization of Shewanella sp. O23S, a strain involved in arsenic transformation in ancient gold mine waters contaminated with arsenic and other heavy metals. Physiological analysis of Shewanella sp. O23S showed that it is a facultative anaerobe, capable of growth using arsenate, thiosulfate, nitrate, iron or manganite as a terminal electron acceptor, and lactate or citrate as an electron donor. The strain can grow under anaerobic conditions and utilize arsenate in the respiratory process in a broad range of temperatures (10–37 °C), pH (4–8), salinity (0%–2%), and the presence of heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Se, V and Zn). Under reductive conditions this strain can simultaneously use arsenate and thiosulfate as electron acceptors and produce yellow arsenic (III) sulfide (As2S3) precipitate. Simulation of As-removal from water containing arsenate (2.5 mM) and thiosulfate (5 mM) showed 82.5% efficiency after 21 days of incubation at room temperature. Based on the obtained results, we have proposed a model of a microbially mediated system for self-cleaning of mine waters contaminated with arsenic, in which Shewanella sp. O23S is the main driving agent. PMID:26121297

  13. Denture Care: How Do I Clean Dentures?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the metal. Hot water. Avoid hot or boiling water that could warp your dentures. With Alan Carr, D.M.D. References Denture cleaning. British Dental Health Foundation. https://www.dentalhealth.org/ ...

  14. An experimental and computational study of the hydrodynamics of high-velocity water microdrops for interproximal tooth cleaning.

    PubMed

    Rmaile, A; Carugo, D; Capretto, L; Wharton, J A; Thurner, P J; Aspiras, M; Ward, M; De Jager, M; Stoodley, P

    2015-06-01

    The flow field and local hydrodynamics of high-velocity water microdrops impacting the interproximal (IP) space of typodont teeth were studied experimentally and computationally. Fourteen-day old Streptococcus mutans biofilms in the IP space were treated by a prototype AirFloss delivering 115 µL of water at a maximum exit-velocity of 60 ms(-1) in a 33-ms burst. Using high-speed imaging, footage was generated showing the details of the burst, and demonstrating the removal mechanism of the biofilms. Footage was also generated to characterize the viscoelastic behavior of the biofilms when impacted by an air-only burst, which was compared to the water burst. Image analysis demonstrated the importance of fluid forces on the removal pattern of interdental biofilms. X-ray micro-Computed Tomography (µ-CT) was used to obtain 3D images of the typodont and the IP spaces. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to study the effect of changing the nozzle position and design on the hydrodynamics within the IP space. Results confirmed our previous data regarding the wall shear stress generated by high-velocity water drops which dictated the efficacy of biofilm detachment. Finally, we showed how CFD models could be used to optimize water drop or burst design towards a more effective biofilm removal performance.

  15. Physico-chemical fracturing and cleaning of coal. [Treatment with CO/sub 2/ in water at high pressure

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    1983-09-30

    This invention relates to a method of producing a crushable coal and reducing the metallic values in coal represented by Si, Al, Ca, Na, K, and Mg, which comprises contacting a coal/water mix in a weight ratio of from about 4:1 to 1:6 in the presence of CO/sub 2/ at pressures of about 100 to 1400 psi and a minimum temperature of about 15/sup 0/C for a period of about one or more hours to produce a treated coal/water mix. In the process the treated coal/water mix has reduced values for Ca and Mg of up to 78% over the starting mix and the advantageous CO/sub 2/ concentration is in the range of about 3 to 30 g/L. Below 5 g/L CO/sub 2/ only small effects are observed and above 30 g/L no further special advantages are achieved. The coal/water ratios in the range 1:2 to 2:1 are particularly desirable and such ratios are compatible with coal water slurry applications.

  16. Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2004-01-01

    This fact sheet explains the Clean Cities Program and provides contact information for all coalitions and regional offices. It answers key questions such as: What is the Clean Cities Program? What are alternative fuels? How does the Clean Cities Program work? What sort of assistance does Clean Cities offer? What has Clean Cities accomplished? What is Clean Cities International? and Where can I find more information?

  17. 78 FR 63185 - Public Hearing and Request for Comments on Proposed Revisions to Michigan's Clean Water Act (CWA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-23

    ..., including wetlands, lakes and streams. In 1984, Michigan assumed Section 404 permitting authority for its inland waters and wetlands. PA 98 amended the wetlands and the inland lakes and streams provisions of the... the definition of contiguous wetlands regulated by Michigan's Section 404 program; (2) the addition...

  18. M&R Holdings, LLC d/b/a Brandon’s Reserve Residential Development - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against M&R Holdings, LLC d/b/a Brandon’s Reserve Residential Development, a business located at 15602 Wilden Drive, Urbandale,

  19. Heeding a Call to Action for U.S. Coral Reefs: the Untapped Potential of the Clean Water Act

    EPA Science Inventory

    A recently published call to action by Dodge et al. (2008) identifies nine actions needed to protect coral reefs. The authors identify several management goals that cannot be accomplished with MPAs alone, the traditional approach to coral reef protection. For U.S. waters, the Cle...

  20. 77 FR 30280 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Withdrawal of Nine Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... (see 76 FR 52947) which pertain to segments 08040203-010, 08040204-006, and 08040206-015, -016, -716...--El Dorado, El Dorado Water Utility, Great Lakes Chemical Corporation--Chemtura, and Lion Oil Company... comments on the draft TMDLs, was published on December 17, 2007 (see 72 FR 71409). Public comments...

  1. Silver Oak, Inc. d/b/a Alice Patrcia Homes Residential Development - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The EPA is providing notice of an Administrative Penalty Assessment in the form of an Expedited Storm Water Settlement Agreement against Silver Oak, Inc. d/b/a Alice Patricia Homes Residential Development, a business located at 10430 New York Ave, Suite C,

  2. 75 FR 8698 - Clean Water Act Section 303(d): Availability of Ten Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) in Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    .... Oxygen. 070203 Devil's Swamp Lake and Fecal Coliform. Bayou Baton Rouge. 070401 Mississippi River Fecal... Coliform. 070502 Thompson Creek........ Fecal Coliform. 070503 Capitol Lake Fecal Coliform. 070505 Tunica Bayou Fecal Coliform. 070601 Mississippi River Fecal Coliform. Basin Coastal Bays and Gulf Waters to...

  3. The National Shipbuilding Research Program. Document Technologies Available to Clean Brackish Waters to 50 PPT TBT Levels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    technology such as Dissolved Air Floatation, and Activated Carbon adsorption are the best candidate technologies. 3. While there are accepted and practical...nitrogen- or ester-containing ashless dispersant and (B) a bis-keto/thioketo compound. 57 5653883: Stirred Tank Biological Activated Carbon Adsorption ... Carbon Effluent treatment using activated carbon has been found to remove a wide range of organic pollutants from water. A search using key words

  4. Application of advanced oxidation processes for cleaning of industrial water generated in wet dedusting of shaft furnace gases.

    PubMed

    Czaplicka, Marianna; Kurowski, Ryszard; Jaworek, Katarzyna; Bratek, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies into advanced oxidation processes in 03 and 03/UV systems. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) was conducted to reduce the load of impurities in circulating waters from wet de-dusting of shaft furnace gases. Besides inorganic impurities, i.e. mainly arsenic compounds (16 g As L(-1) on average), lead, zinc, chlorides and sulphates, the waters also contain some organic material. The organic material is composed of a complex mixture that contains, amongst others, aliphatic compounds, phenol and its derivatives, pyridine bases, including pyridine, and its derivatives. The test results show degradation of organic and inorganic compounds during ozonation and photo-oxidation processes. Analysis of the solutions from the processes demonstrated that the complex organic material in the industrial water was oxidized in ozonation and in photo-oxidation, which resulted in formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Kinetic degradation of selected pollutants is presented. Obtained results indicated that the O3/UV process is more effective in degradation of organic matter than ozonation. Depending on the process type, precipitation of the solid phase was observed. The efficiency of solid-phase formation was higher in photo-oxidation with ozone. It was found that the precipitated solid phase is composed mainly of arsenic, iron and oxygen.

  5. A multi-residue method for the determination of 90 pesticides in matrices with a high water content by LC-MS/MS without clean-up.

    PubMed

    Madureira, Fernando Diniz; da Silva Oliveira, Fabiano Aurélio; de Souza, Wesley Robert; Pontelo, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Mauro Lúcio Gonçalves; Silva, Gilsara

    2012-01-01

    A method using QuEChERS extraction and LC-MS/MS in electrospray positive ionisation mode was developed and validated for the analysis of 90 pesticides in a high water content matrix (tomato) in a single chromatographic run. To assess the intra-laboratory reproducibility of the method, validation was conducted on four different days by two different analysts. The validation data was treated using a spreadsheet developed in-house, which sets the most appropriate model for linear fit by determining whether the residuals of the calibration curves are homocedastic or heterocedastic. A statistical test for the significance of regression was also carried out. Calibration was always matrix-matched and the curves were obtained over the range 0.0075-0.10 or 0.020-0.125 mg kg(-1). Identification of analytes was based on retention times and MRM ratios. Recoveries were assessed at four different levels for each analyte and were between 73 and 106%, with relative standard deviations under reproducibility conditions of <20%. The measurement uncertainties of the method for each pesticide analysed were below 50%. Previous validation of the same method, applied to papaya samples and satisfactory results obtained in various proficiency tests with different high water content matrices, demonstrated the applicability of the method to these classes of commodities, without clean-up. The validated method will be applied routinely in the pesticide residues monitoring programme that constitutes the National Residue and Contaminant Control Plan of Brazil.

  6. Methods for detecting residues of cleaning agents during cleaning validation.

    PubMed

    Westman, L; Karlsson, G

    2000-01-01

    Cleaning validation procedures are carried out in order to assure that residues of cleaning agents are within acceptable limits after the cleaning process. Cleaning agents often consist of a mixture of various surfactants which are in a highly diluted state after the water rinsing procedure has been completed. This makes it difficult to find appropriate analytical methods that are sensitive enough to detect the cleaning agents. In addition, it is advantageous for the analytical methods to be simple to perform and to give results quickly. In this study, four different analytical methods are compared: visual detection of foam, pH, conductivity measurements, and analysis of total organic carbon (TOC). TOC was used as a reference method when evaluating the other three potential methods. The analyses were performed on different dilutions of the cleaning agents Vips Neutral, RBS-25, Debisan and Perform. The results demonstrated that the most sensitive method for analysis of Vips Neutral, Debisan and Perform is visual detection of foam, by which it is possible to detect concentrations of cleaning agents down to 10 micrograms/mL. RBS-25 was not detected below 200 micrograms/mL, probably because it is formulated with low-foaming surfactants. TOC analysis is less sensitive but has the advantage of being a quantitative analysis, while visual detection of foam is a semi-quantitative method. Visual detection of foam is easy to perform, gives a quick result, and requires no expensive instrumentation. The sensitivity of each method was found to be dependent upon the type of cleaning agent that was analyzed.

  7. Controls on Water Storage, Mixing and Release in a Nested Catchment Set-up with Clean and Mixed Physiographic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, L.; McDonnell, J.; Hissler, C.; Martínez-Carreras, N.; Klaus, J.

    2015-12-01

    With catchment water storage being only rarely determined, storage dynamics remain largely unknown to date. However, storage bears considerable potential for catchment inter-comparison exercises, as well as it is likely to have an important role in regulating catchment functions. Catchment comparisons across a wide range of environments and scales will help to increase our understanding of relationships between storage dynamics and catchment processes. With respect to the potential of catchment storage for bringing new momentum to catchment classification and catchment processes understanding we currently investigate spatial and temporal variability of dynamic storage in a nested catchment set-up (16 catchments) of the Alzette River basin (Luxembourg, Europe), covering a wide range of geological settings, catchment areas, contrasted landuse, and hydro-meteorological and tracer series. We define catchment storage as the total amount of water stored in a control volume, delimited by the catchment's topographical boundaries and depth of saturated and unsaturated zones. Complementary storage assessments (via input-output dynamics of natural tracers, geographical sounding, groundwater level measurements, soil moisture measurements, hydrometry) are carried out for comparison purposes. In our nested catchment set-up we have (1) assessed dependencies between geology, catchment permeability and winter runoff coefficients, (2) calculated water balance derived catchment storage and mixing potential and quantified how dynamic storage differs between catchments and scales, and (3) examined how stream baseflow dD (as a proxy for baseflow transit time) and integrated flow measures (like the flow duration curve) relate to bedrock geology. Catchments with higher bedrock permeability exhibited larger storage capacities and eventually lower average winter runoff coefficients. Over a time-span of 11 years, all catchments re-produced the same winter runoff coefficients year after year

  8. Ab-initio modelling, polarity and energetics of clean rutile surfaces in vacuum and comparison with water environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, T. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.; Livi, K. J. T.; Seabourne, C. R.; Scott, A. J.

    2012-07-01

    All terminations of the (1x1) rutile (110), (101), (001), (100) and (111) surfaces are classified according to their electrostatic polarity. Six are found to be non-polar. The plane-wave density functional theory code CASTEP is used with a GGA-PBE exchange-correlation functional and a vacuum/material slab supercell method to calculate the surface energy density of symmetric thin rutile films with the six non-polar terminations in vacuum. The ratio of the surface energy densities of a rutile crystal with {111} and {110} facets in water is deduced using Lagrange multipliers and found to be consistent with the DFT vacuum results.

  9. LTA measurements on shuttle cleaning nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A laser transit anemometer was used to make flow field velocity measurements on a supersonic air/water cleaning nozzle used to clean liquid oxygen shuttle components at Kennedy Space Center. The velocity along the centerline of the nozzle was characterized by the LTA system and compared with CFD calculations to ascertain the optimum distance the nozzle should be placed from the liquid oxygen part for maximum cleaning..

  10. What is safe and clean water in rural Bolivian communities? A preliminary investigation of heavy metal contamination in rural community water systems in the Bolivian Altiplano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, M.; Guido, Z.; Borella, P.; Ketron, T.

    2009-12-01

    A proliferation of potable water systems utilizing groundwater is currently underway in the Lake Titicaca region of the Bolivian Altiplano. With the aid of national and international organizations, rural communities are developing groundwater sources because the region’s surface water is highly contaminated with waterborne pathogens—the primary factor contributing to high child mortality rates in developing nations. According to UNICEF, 86 percent of Bolivian families have access to “improved” water systems, which predominantly take the form of deep groundwater wells or contained natural springs. While the water systems have worked well to reduce pathogens in drinking water systems that cause illnesses such as dysentery, the water is rarely tested for heavy metal contamination, such as arsenic and lead. While bacteria analysis is essential, it is not the only component of healthy drinking water. Testing for heavy metals is especially important in the Bolivian Altiplano because abundant volcanic deposits and massive sulfide deposits suggest that in some areas it is likely that the water contains elevated concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, Terra Resource Development International, A California-based 502(c)3 nonprofit organization, partnered with Stanford University, the Technical University of Bolivia, and the Bolivian Geologic and Mining Survey to collect water samples in 36 rural community situated in four watersheds feeding into Lake Titicaca. Water was collected from shallow, hand dug wells, deep groundwater wells, springs, and small rivers in the Tiwanku, Laja, Batallas, Achacachi watersheds and were analyzed for inorganic contaminants. Samples were analyzed at Stanford’s Environmental Measurements Facility using the Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectrometer for major ions and heavy metals. Results will help determine which, if any, community water systems are at risk of heavy metal contamination, where more comprehensive sampling is

  11. Aqueous cleaning of flux residue from solder joints. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krska, C.M.

    1992-08-01

    Solder joints have traditionally been cleaned using chlorinated or fluorinated solvents. This study addressed alternate processing. One process involved using a saponifier/water solution to remove rosin flux residues; the other process involved using a water-soluble flux and water to remove the residues. Although both processes were satisfactory, the water-soluble flux with water cleaning proved to be the best.

  12. Aqueous cleaning of flux residue from solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Krska, C.M.

    1992-08-01

    Solder joints have traditionally been cleaned using chlorinated or fluorinated solvents. This study addressed alternate processing. One process involved using a saponifier/water solution to remove rosin flux residues; the other process involved using a water-soluble flux and water to remove the residues. Although both processes were satisfactory, the water-soluble flux with water cleaning proved to be the best.

  13. Replacement of hydrogen peroxide cleaning with oxygen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, B. E.

    1992-03-01

    Comparison between the standard peroxide cleaning method and an oxygen plasma modified version was run on thin film bond monitors. The plasma modified version substituted oxygen plasma for the peroxide cleaning step in the process and reduced the DI rinse water temperature from 75 C to 25 C. A direct surface cleanliness comparison was made between the two cleaning methods using Auger spectroscopy. A beam lead and ribbon bonding experiment was also run on plasma-cleaned networks. Results of both experiments indicate that plasma cleaning is superior to peroxide cleaning and that reliable bonding can be done on plasma-cleaned thin film networks.

  14. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors.A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L.The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg.In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L.

  15. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors. A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L. The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg. In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L. PMID:27902589

  16. Thermal chemistry of hydrazine on clean and oxygen- and water-predosed Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunxi; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    The chemistry of hydrazine on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces was probed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Survey TPD experiments identified molecular nitrogen and ammonia as the main desorbing products from thermal activation of the adsorbate, but small amounts of diazene and NH2· radicals were also detected. At saturation coverage, N2 production leads NH3 desorption by approximately 10 K (with TPD peaks at 350 K versus 360 K, respectively), indicating a preference for dehydrogenation over N-N bond scission steps, and additional nitrogen was seen at even lower temperatures (320 K) in experiments starting with even higher doses of hydrazine. On the other hand, the formation of NH3 and NH2·, which desorb in a wide range of temperatures between approximately 300 K and 700 K, dominates in experiments with low N2H4 doses, presumably because a stronger interaction of the N-N bond with the metal in the flat adsorption geometry expected at such low coverages. Dosing at room temperature seems to also facilitate the dissociative adsorption, albeit via dehydrogenation steps that lead to the subsequent production of more significant amounts of diazene and of molecular hydrogen (in addition to N2, NH3, and NH2·). Preadsorption of oxygen on the Cu(110) surface helps stabilize the hydrazine, increasing its desorption temperature and helping with the low-temperature (320 K) production of N2. Coadsorption of hydrazine with water leads to facile proton exchange, as indicated by the production of NH2D in TPD experiments with N2H4 + D2O. This isotope scrambling must occur at cryogenic temperatures because all water desorbs from the surface below 200 K and no other changes in surface chemistry are observed after that. The implications of all this chemistry to practical applications that may use hydrazine in surface reactions with copper, including its use as a reducing agent in atomic layer

  17. Coal desulfurization during the combustion of coal/oil/water emulsions: an economic alternative clean liquid fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report presents the Phase II results of a combustion program designed to assess the feasibility of utilizing coal/oil/water (COW) emulsions as a fuel for fire tube package boilers. Also examined was the effect of the addition of alkaline absorbents to the fuel for sulfur dioxide capture. Presented are the findings of testing involving optimizing sulfur dioxide removal while still maintaining a rheologically favorable fuel. Overall performance of COW as a boiler fuel was evaluated over long term operation. Emphasis was placed on burner design as well as coal characteristics. Three different bituminous coals were used during this program. Results indicate that COW emulsions may be a feasible alternative for oil in industrial fire tube boilers if the major problem, deposition buildup, can be resolved. This appears possible with a proper soot blower design. Soda ash is a viable means for obtaining at least 80% removal, using a 1:1 molar ratio. However, the deposition problem with soda ash indicated that stack injection may be a more feasible approach.

  18. Implementing AORN recommended practices for environmental cleaning.

    PubMed

    Allen, George

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have developed an increasing awareness of the role of the environment in the development of health care-associated infections. AORN's "Recommended practices for environmental cleaning" is an evidence-based document that provides specific guidance for cleaning processes, for the selection of appropriate cleaning equipment and supplies, and for ongoing education and quality improvement. This updated recommended practices document has an expanded focus on the need for health care personnel to work collaboratively to accomplish adequately thorough cleanliness in a culture of safety and mutual support. Perioperative nurses, as the primary advocates for patients while they are being cared for in the perioperative setting, should help ensure that a safe, clean environment is reestablished after each surgical procedure.

  19. Alternate cleaning methods for LCCAs. [LCC (Leadless Chip Carriers)

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate DI water followed by isopropyl alcohol (IPA) cleaning and no cleaning of leadless chip carriers (LCCs). Both environmentally safe methods were to be tested against the current chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) material cleaning baseline. Several experiments were run to compare production and electrical yields of LCCs cleaned by all three methods. The critical process steps most affected by cleaning were wire bonding, sealing, particle induced noise detection (PIND), moisture content, and electrical. Yields for the experimental lots cleaned by CFC, DI water plus IPA, and no cleaning were 56%, 72%, and 75%, respectively. The overall results indicated that vapor degreasing/ultrasonic cleaning in CFCs could be replaced by the aqueous method. No cleaning could also be considered if an effective dry method of particle removal could be developed.

  20. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    DOEpatents

    Weber, Frank J.; Spiller, Eberhard A.

    1999-01-01

    A cleaning process for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  1. Cleaning process for EUV optical substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, F.J.; Spiller, E.A.

    1999-09-28

    A cleaning process is disclosed for surfaces with very demanding cleanliness requirements, such as extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) optical substrates. Proper cleaning of optical substrates prior to applying reflective coatings thereon is very critical in the fabrication of the reflective optics used in EUV lithographic systems, for example. The cleaning process involves ultrasonic cleaning in acetone, methanol, and a pH neutral soap, such as FL-70, followed by rinsing in de-ionized water and drying with dry filtered nitrogen in conjunction with a spin-rinse.

  2. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  3. Flow-specific trends in river-water quality resulting from the effects of the clean air act in three mesoscale, forested river basins in the northeastern United States through 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdoch, Peter S.; Shanley, J.B.

    2006-01-01

    Two new methods for assessing temporal trends in stream-solute concentrations at specific streamflow ranges were applied to long (40 to 50-year) but sparse (bi-weekly to quarterly sampling) stream-water quality data collected at three forested mesoscale basins along an atmospheric deposition gradient in the northeastern United States (one in north-central Pennsylvania, one in southeastern New York, and one in eastern Maine). The three data sets span the period since the implementation of the Clean Air Act in 1970 and its subsequent amendments. Declining sulfate (SO2-4) trends since the mid 1960s were identified for all 3 rivers by one or more of the 4 methods of trend detection used. Flow-specific trends were assessed by segmenting the data sets into 3-year and 6-year blocks, then determining concentration-discharge relationships for each block. Declining sulfate (SO2-4) trends at median flow were similar to trends determined using a Seasonal Kendall Tau test and Sen slope estimator. The trend of declining SO2-4 concentrations differed at high, median and low flow since the mid 1980s at YWC and NR, and at high and low flow at WR, but the trends leveled or reversed at high flow from 1999 through 2002. Trends for the period of record at high flows were similar to medium- and low-flow trends for Ca2+ + Mg2+ concentrations at WR, non-significant at YWC, and were more negative at low flow than at high flow at NR; trends in nitrate (NO-3), and alkalinity (ALK) concentrations were different at different flow conditions, and in ways that are consistent with the hydrology and deposition history at each watershed. Quarterly sampling is adequate for assessing average-flow trends in the chemical parameters assessed over long time periods (???decades). However, with even a modest effort at sampling a range of flow conditions within each year, trends at specified flows for constituents with strong concentration-discharge relationships can be evaluated and may allow early

  4. Flow-specific trends in river-water quality resulting from the effects of the Clean Air Act in three mesoscale, forested river basins in the northeastern United States through 2002.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Peter S; Shanley, James B

    2006-09-01

    Two new methods for assessing temporal trends in stream-solute concentrations at specific streamflow ranges were applied to long (40 to 50-year) but sparse (bi-weekly to quarterly sampling) stream-water quality data collected at three forested mesoscale basins along an atmospheric deposition gradient in the northeastern United States (one in north-central Pennsylvania, one in southeastern New York, and one in eastern Maine). The three data sets span the period since the implementation of the Clean Air Act in 1970 and its subsequent amendments. Declining sulfate (O4(2-)) trends since the mid 1960s were identified for all 3 rivers by one or more of the 4 methods of trend detection used. Flow-specific trends were assessed by segmenting the data sets into 3-year and 6-year blocks, then determining concentration-discharge relationships for each block. Declining sulfate (O4(2-)) trends at median flow were similar to trends determined using a Seasonal Kendall Tau test and Sen slope estimator. The trend of declining O4(2-) concentrations differed at high, median and low flow since the mid 1980s at YWC and NR, and at high and low flow at WR, but the trends leveled or reversed at high flow from 1999 through 2002. Trends for the period of record at high flows were similar to medium- and low-flow trends for Ca2++ Mg2+ concentrations at WR, non-significant at YWC, and were more negative at low flow than at high flow at NR; trends in nitrate (NO3-), and alkalinity (ALK) concentrations were different at different flow conditions, and in ways that are consistent with the hydrology and deposition history at each watershed. Quarterly sampling is adequate for assessing average-flow trends in the chemical parameters assessed over long time periods (approximately decades). However, with even a modest effort at sampling a range of flow conditions within each year, trends at specified flows for constituents with strong concentration-discharge relationships can be evaluated and may allow

  5. California Clean Tech

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The CA Clean Air Technology Initiative is an EPA/state partnership to develop clean air technologies for the San Joaquin Valley and South Coast Air Basins through collaborative projects in technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment.

  6. What Is Clean Cities?

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-08-01

    This Clean Cities Program fact sheet describes the purpose and scope of this DOE program. Clean Cities facilitates the use of alternative and advanced fuels and vehicles to displace petroleum in the transportation sector.

  7. Cleaning supplies and equipment

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000443.htm Cleaning supplies and equipment To use the sharing features on this page, ... to clean supplies and equipment. Disinfecting Supplies and Equipment Start by wearing the right personal protective equipment ( ...

  8. Setting the Cleaning Standard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milshtein, Amy

    1998-01-01

    Explains how well-defined cleaning and maintenance standards helped a community school system resolve problems with custodial staff apportionments. Cleaning time, frequency, and cleanliness levels are combined to create a formula that helps economize custodial care. (GR)

  9. Effect of different premilking manual teat-cleaning methods on bacterial spores in milk.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, M; Christiansson, A; Svensson, B; Kolstrup, C

    2006-10-01

    Different teat-cleaning methods were evaluated to determine their effect on the presence of spores from anaerobic bacterial spore-formers in the milk. Artificial contamination was used to achieve uniform contamination of teats to reduce the number of cows and samples needed in the experiments and still obtain adequate power to detect differences among tested methods. Teats were contaminated experimentally with a large amount of Clostridium tyrobutyricum spores in a manure-water slurry. Various types of dry and moistened towels and different combinations of methods using soap or 2 types of towels, together with cleaning times of 10 or 20 s, were compared in 2 Latin square-designed experiments with 7 cows, 7 treatments, and 4 replications in each experiment. In comparison with control (no cleaning and no forestripping), cleaning teats with dry paper towels for 10 s reduced concentration of spores in milk by 45 to 50%. A 50 to 74% reduction was achieved using different types of moist towels for 10 s. Methods using 2 towels, soap, or a longer cleaning time reduced bacterial contamination by 85 to 91%. The most effective methods in reducing milk spore content (96% reduction) were use of a moist washable towel with or without soap followed by drying with a dry paper towel, for a total time of 20 s per cow. One of the best cleaning methods was studied in an additional experiment to determine the effect of different teat contamination mixtures. The Latin square-designed experiment with 8 cows, 8 treatments, and 2 replications showed that cleaning was independent of the tested contamination matrix (manure, soil, or sawdust), type of spores (Cl. tyrobutyricum and Bacillus cereus), or degree of contamination (manure or extra manure).

  10. A Green Clean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kravitz, Robert

    2006-01-01

    In the professional cleaning industry, green cleaning has been much discussed in the past few years. Usually, the information pertains to the many reasons why a green cleaning program should be started, the steps involved to get the program off the ground, and the potential benefits. However, although many facility managers and school…

  11. Brushless Cleaning of Solar Panels and Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, H. W.

    1982-01-01

    Machine proposed for cleaning solar panels and reflectors uses multiple vortexes of air, solvent, and water to remove dust and dirt. Uses no brushes that might abrade solar surfaces and thereby reduce efficiency. Machine can be readily automated and can be used on curved surfaces such as aparbolic reflectors as well as on flat ones. Cleaning fluids are recycled, so that large quantities of water and solvent are not needed.

  12. Greenville, Mississippi Clean Water Settlement

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The City of Greenville, MS (City) owns and operates the Greenville Wastewater Treatment Facility (WWTP), approximately 200 miles of sanitary sewer lines, and 100 sanitary sewer pump stations and associated appurtenances.

  13. Are shear force methods adequately reported?

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Fowler, Stephanie M; Hopkins, David L

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the detail to which shear force (SF) protocols and methods have been reported in the scientific literature between 2009 and 2015. Articles (n=734) published in peer-reviewed animal and food science journals and limited to only those testing the SF of unprocessed and non-fabricated mammal meats were evaluated. It was found that most of these SF articles originated in Europe (35.3%), investigated bovine species (49.0%), measured m. longissimus samples (55.2%), used tenderometers manufactured by Instron (31.2%), and equipped with Warner-Bratzler blades (68.8%). SF samples were also predominantly thawed prior to cooking (37.1%) and cooked sous vide, using a water bath (50.5%). Information pertaining to blade crosshead speed (47.5%), recorded SF resistance (56.7%), muscle fibre orientation when tested (49.2%), sub-section or core dimension (21.8%), end-point temperature (29.3%), and other factors contributing to SF variation were often omitted. This base failure diminishes repeatability and accurate SF interpretation, and must therefore be rectified.

  14. Ear cleaning: the UK and US perspective.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, Tim; Cole, Lynette K

    2004-04-01

    Ear cleaning helps maintain the normal otic environment and is important in the treatment of otitis. Over cleaning, however, may trigger otitis through maceration of the epidermal lining. Simple manual cleaning is useful for routine cleansing but doesn't remove tightly adherent debris. Bulb syringes are more vigorous but may damage the ear in inexperienced hands. Devices using mains water pressure or dental machines are also available. Thorough cleaning of the ear canals and middle ear cavity can only be achieved by retrograde flushing using specially adapted catheters, feeding tubes or video otoscopes under anaesthesia. Myringotomy, inspection and cleaning of the middle should be performed if the tympanic membrane appears abnormal. There are a wide variety of cleaning fluids available. Ceruminolytics soften and dissolve cerumen to facilitate cleaning. Surfactants emulsify debris, breaking it up and keeping it in solution. Astringents dry the ear canal surface, preventing maceration. Maintaining a low pH and incorporating antimicrobial agents can inhibit microbial proliferation and glucocorticoids can be used to reduce inflammation. Adverse effects and contraindications following ear cleaning can include maceration, contact reactions, otitis media, ear canal avulsion, vestibular syndrome, Horner's syndrome, facial nerve paralysis and deafness. Care should be exercised in selecting cleaning fluids if the tympanic membranes are ruptured.

  15. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting. 166.14... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.14 Cleaning and... material; clean all surfaces with water and detergent and saturate the entire surface of the...

  16. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting. 166.14... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.14 Cleaning and... material; clean all surfaces with water and detergent and saturate the entire surface of the...

  17. 9 CFR 166.14 - Cleaning and disinfecting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cleaning and disinfecting. 166.14... AGRICULTURE SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION SWINE HEALTH PROTECTION General Provisions § 166.14 Cleaning and... material; clean all surfaces with water and detergent and saturate the entire surface of the...

  18. Rudimentary Cleaning Compared to Level 300A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arpin, Christina Y. Pina; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2012-01-01

    A study was done to characterize the cleanliness level achievable when using a rudimentary cleaning process, and results were compared to JPR 5322.1G Level 300A. While it is not ideal to clean in a shop environment, some situations (e.g., field combat operations) require oxygen system hardware to be maintained and cleaned to prevent a fire hazard, even though it cannot be sent back to a precision cleaning facility. This study measured the effectiveness of basic shop cleaning. Initially, three items representing parts of an oxygen system were contaminated: a metal plate, valve body, and metal oxygen bottle. The contaminants chosen were those most likely to be introduced to the system during normal use: oil, lubricant, metal shavings/powder, sand, fingerprints, tape, lip balm, and hand lotion. The cleaning process used hot water, soap, various brushes, gaseous nitrogen, water nozzle, plastic trays, scouring pads, and a controlled shop environment. Test subjects were classified into three groups: technical professionals having an appreciation for oxygen hazards; professional precision cleaners; and a group with no previous professional knowledge of oxygen or precision cleaning. Three test subjects were in each group, and each was provided with standard cleaning equipment, a cleaning procedure, and one of each of the three test items to clean. The results indicated that the achievable cleanliness level was independent of the technical knowledge or proficiency of the personnel cleaning the items. Results also showed that achieving a Level 300 particle count was more difficult than achieving a Level A nonvolatile residue amount.

  19. Airing 'clean air' in Clean India Mission.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, T; Kumar, M; Mall, R K; Singh, R S

    2016-12-30

    The submission explores the possibility of a policy revision for considering clean air quality in recently launched nationwide campaign, Clean India Mission (CIM). Despite of several efforts for improving availability of clean household energy and sanitation facilities, situation remain still depressing as almost half of global population lacks access to clean energy and proper sanitation. Globally, at least 2.5 billion people do not have access to basic sanitation facilities. There are also evidences of 7 million premature deaths by air pollution in year 2012. The situation is even more disastrous for India especially in rural areas. Although, India has reasonably progressed in developing sanitary facilities and disseminating clean fuel to its urban households, the situation in rural areas is still miserable and needs to be reviewed. Several policy interventions and campaigns were made to improve the scenario but outcomes were remarkably poor. Indian census revealed a mere 31% sanitation coverage (in 2011) compared to 22% in 2001 while 60% of population (700 million) still use solid biofuels and traditional cook stoves for household cooking. Further, last decade (2001-2011) witnessed the progress decelerating down with rural households without sanitation facilities increased by 8.3 million while minimum progress has been made in conversion of conventional to modern fuels. To revamp the sanitation coverage, an overambitious nationwide campaign CIM was initiated in 2014 and present submission explores the possibility of including 'clean air' considerations within it. The article draws evidence from literatures on scenarios of rural sanitation, energy practises, pollution induced mortality and climatic impacts of air pollution. This subsequently hypothesised with possible modification in available technologies, dissemination modes, financing and implementation for integration of CIM with 'clean air' so that access to both sanitation and clean household energy may be

  20. Role of ultraviolet (UV) disinfection in infection control and environmental cleaning.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Zubair; Yassin, Mohamed H

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is capable of disinfecting surfaces, water and air. The UV technology was used for many years. However, safer and more effective delivery systems of UV radiation, make it a very useful option for disinfection. Effective disinfection of environmental surfaces is a key step in the prevention of spread of infectious agents. The traditional manual cleaning is essential in assuring adequate elimination of contamination. However, terminal cleaning is frequently suboptimal or unpredictable in many circumstances. UV-C radiation is an adjunctive disinfectant new technology that could kill a wide array of microorganisms including both vegetative and spore forming pathogens. The technology is getting more affordable and has produced consistent reproducible significant reduction of bacterial contamination.