Science.gov

Sample records for adequate experimental conditions

  1. Aedes aegypti disregard humidity-related conditions with adequate nutrition.

    PubMed

    Canyon, D V; Muller, R; Hii J, L K

    2013-03-01

    Weather variations have clear associations with the epidemiology of dengue fever and populations of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. Data on humidity associations, however, lags with respect to its effect on host-biting, nectar-seeking and survival. This experimental study on Ae. aegypti, sourced from the arid tropics, investigated the effect of low and high relative humidity and diet in relation to host-biting, temporal variations in feeding frequency, and mosquito mortality. In each environmental setting, 10 replicates, containing one male and five female mosquitoes, were challenged with different nutritional sources every six hours over 12 days. Results showed that host-biting did not diminish in low humidity and was six times higher than expected. Sucrose feeding was observed to significantly moderate host-biting and water alone was inadequate for survival. The high host-biting rates help to explain the intensity of dengue epidemics, while the ability of the mosquito to disregard adverse humidity-related conditions helps to explain how dengue epidemics in arid tropical regions can be just as devastating as those in the wet tropics.

  2. Anatomical features for the adequate choice of experimental animal models in biomedicine: I. Fishes.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Livia; Lossi, Laura; Merighi, Adalberto; de Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Fish constitute the oldest and most diverse class of vertebrates, and are widely used in basic research due to a number of advantages (e.g., rapid development ex-utero, large-scale genetic screening of human disease). They represent excellent experimental models for addressing studies on development, morphology, physiology and behavior function in other related species, as well as informative analysis of conservation and diversity. Although less complex, fish share many anatomical and physiological features with mammals, including humans, which make them an important complement to research in mammalian models. In this review we describe and compare the most relevant anatomical features of the most used teleostean species in research, to be taken into consideration when selecting an animal model: zebrafish (Danio rerio), medaka (Oryzias latypes), the turquoise killifish (Nothobranchius furzeri), and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Zebrafish and medaka are the mainstream models for genetic manipulability and studies on developmental biology; the turquoise killifish is an excellent model for aging research; goldfish has been largely employed for neuroendocrine studies. PMID:26925824

  3. Anatomical features for the adequate choice of experimental animal models in biomedicine: I. Fishes.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Livia; Lossi, Laura; Merighi, Adalberto; de Girolamo, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Fish constitute the oldest and most diverse class of vertebrates, and are widely used in basic research due to a number of advantages (e.g., rapid development ex-utero, large-scale genetic screening of human disease). They represent excellent experimental models for addressing studies on development, morphology, physiology and behavior function in other related species, as well as informative analysis of conservation and diversity. Although less complex, fish share many anatomical and physiological features with mammals, including humans, which make them an important complement to research in mammalian models. In this review we describe and compare the most relevant anatomical features of the most used teleostean species in research, to be taken into consideration when selecting an animal model: zebrafish (Danio rerio), medaka (Oryzias latypes), the turquoise killifish (Nothobranchius furzeri), and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Zebrafish and medaka are the mainstream models for genetic manipulability and studies on developmental biology; the turquoise killifish is an excellent model for aging research; goldfish has been largely employed for neuroendocrine studies.

  4. Electrographic correlates of adequate and erroneous responses evoked by conditioned signals of different functional signs during operant learning in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dumenko, V N; Kozlov, M K

    2006-01-01

    Power spectra over the frequency range 1-225 Hz in short-term (less than 1 sec) EEG reactions arising in different areas of the cerebral cortex in response to presentation of differential signals were investigated in dogs during operant feeding behavior in conditions of both adequate and erroneous responses. The energy levels of these reactions decreased several-fold as compared with responses to positive signals, mainly because of frequencies in the high-frequency range (90-225 Hz), where power was greater than not only the traditional range of 1-30 Hz, but also the gamma range of 30-80 Hz. The frequency composition of EEG reactions in adequate responses was determined by a series of discrete frequency subgroups belonging predominantly to the high-frequency band. In erroneous reactions, the discrete structure of the corresponding EEG reactions was lost.

  5. Assessment of medical students' proficiency in dermatology: Are medical students adequately prepared to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions in the United States?

    PubMed

    Ulman, Catherine A; Binder, Stephen Bruce; Borges, Nicole J

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed whether a current medical school curriculum is adequately preparing medical students to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. A 15-item anonymous multiple choice quiz covering fifteen diseases was developed to test students' ability to diagnose and treat common dermatologic conditions. The quiz also contained five items that assessed students' confidence in their ability to diagnose common dermatologic conditions, their perception of whether they were receiving adequate training in dermatology, and their preferences for additional training in dermatology. The survey was performed in 2014, and was completed by 85 students (79.4%). Many students (87.6%) felt that they received inadequate training in dermatology during medical school. On average, students scored 46.6% on the 15-item quiz. Proficiency at the medical school where the study was performed is considered an overall score of greater than or equal to 70.0%. Students received an average score of 49.9% on the diagnostic items and an average score of 43.2% on the treatment items. The findings of this study suggest that United States medical schools should consider testing their students and assessing whether they are being adequately trained in dermatology. Then schools can decide if they need to re-evaluate the timing and delivery of their current dermatology curriculum, or whether additional curriculum hours or clinical rotations should be assigned for dermatologic training. PMID:25989840

  6. Conditioned reinforcement: Experimental and theoretical issues.

    PubMed

    Williams, B A

    1994-01-01

    The concept of conditioned reinforcement has received decreased attention in learning textbooks over the past decade, in part because of criticisms of its validity by major behavior theorists and in part because its explanatory function in a variety of different conditioning procedures has become uncertain. Critical data from the major procedures that have been used to investigate the concept (second-order schedules, chain schedules, concurrent chains, observing responses, delay-of-reinforcement procedures) are reviewed, along with the major issues of interpretation. Although the role played by conditioned reinforcement in some procedures remains unresolved, the results taken together leave little doubt that the underlying idea of conditioned value is a critical component of behavior theory that is necessary to explain many different types of data. Other processes (marking, bridging) may also operate to produce effects similar to those of conditioned reinforcement, but these clearly cannot explain the full domain of experimental effects ascribed to conditioned reinforcement and should be regarded as complements to the concept rather than theoretical competitors. Examples of practical and theoretical applications of the concept of conditioned reinforcement are also considered.

  7. Conditioned reinforcement: Experimental and theoretical issues

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ben A.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of conditioned reinforcement has received decreased attention in learning textbooks over the past decade, in part because of criticisms of its validity by major behavior theorists and in part because its explanatory function in a variety of different conditioning procedures has become uncertain. Critical data from the major procedures that have been used to investigate the concept (second-order schedules, chain schedules, concurrent chains, observing responses, delay-of-reinforcement procedures) are reviewed, along with the major issues of interpretation. Although the role played by conditioned reinforcement in some procedures remains unresolved, the results taken together leave little doubt that the underlying idea of conditioned value is a critical component of behavior theory that is necessary to explain many different types of data. Other processes (marking, bridging) may also operate to produce effects similar to those of conditioned reinforcement, but these clearly cannot explain the full domain of experimental effects ascribed to conditioned reinforcement and should be regarded as complements to the concept rather than theoretical competitors. Examples of practical and theoretical applications of the concept of conditioned reinforcement are also considered. PMID:22478192

  8. Subjects' Hypotheses, Experimental Instructions and Autonomic "Conditioning".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eriksen, Charles W.

    Research on learning and conditioning suggests that verbal response modification does not occur in the absence of the subject's ability to define verbally (1) the response-reinforcement relationships and (2) his intention to change his behavior in the direction of reinforcement. This seems to be true for operant conditioning of verbal behavior,…

  9. Counterbalancing for Serial Order Carryover Effects in Experimental Condition Orders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Reactions of neural, psychological, and social systems are rarely, if ever, independent of previous inputs and states. The potential for serial order carryover effects from one condition to the next in a sequence of experimental trials makes counterbalancing of condition order an essential part of experimental design. Here, a method is proposed…

  10. Vaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Nol, Pauline; Olsen, Steven C; Rhyan, Jack C; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; McCollum, Matthew P; Hennager, Steven G; Pavuk, Alana A; Sprino, Phillip J; Boyle, Stephen M; Berrier, Randall J; Salman, Mo D

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk. PMID:26904509

  11. Vaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge.

    PubMed

    Nol, Pauline; Olsen, Steven C; Rhyan, Jack C; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; McCollum, Matthew P; Hennager, Steven G; Pavuk, Alana A; Sprino, Phillip J; Boyle, Stephen M; Berrier, Randall J; Salman, Mo D

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk.

  12. Vaccination of Elk (Cervus canadensis) with Brucella abortus Strain RB51 Overexpressing Superoxide Dismutase and Glycosyltransferase Genes Does Not Induce Adequate Protection against Experimental Brucella abortus Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Nol, Pauline; Olsen, Steven C.; Rhyan, Jack C.; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; McCollum, Matthew P.; Hennager, Steven G.; Pavuk, Alana A.; Sprino, Phillip J.; Boyle, Stephen M.; Berrier, Randall J.; Salman, Mo D.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, elk (Cervus canadensis) have been implicated as the source of Brucella abortus infection for numerous cattle herds in the Greater Yellowstone Area. In the face of environmental and ecological changes on the landscape, the range of infected elk is expanding. Consequently, the development of effective disease management strategies for wild elk herds is of utmost importance, not only for the prevention of reintroduction of brucellosis to cattle, but also for the overall health of the Greater Yellowstone Area elk populations. In two studies, we evaluated the efficacy of B. abortus strain RB51 over-expressing superoxide dismutase and glycosyltransferase for protecting elk from infection and disease caused by B. abortus after experimental infection with a virulent B. abortus strain. Our data indicate that the recombinant vaccine does not protect elk against brucellosis. Further, work is needed for development of an effective brucellosis vaccine for use in elk. PMID:26904509

  13. Toward More Adequate Quantitative Instructional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Sets an agenda for improving instructional research conducted with classical quantitative experimental or quasi-experimental methodology. Includes guidelines regarding the role of a social perspective, adequate conceptual and operational definition, quality instrumentation, control of threats to internal and external validity, and the use of…

  14. Micromorphology of neurohypophysis of rats under experimental conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, E. R.; Proksova, E.

    1979-01-01

    The changes of the quantity of neurosecretory substance in neurohypophysis of rats under various experimental conditions are investigated. Comparing to the norm the quantity of neurosecretion after a long stay in the dark was larger. In animals subjected to immobilization stress the picture of neurohypophysis remained unchanged. It changed only in correlation with the administered water. Results indicate that the immobilization stress, in contradistinction to dolorose stress, has no substantial influence upon the quantity of neurosecretion in neurohypophysis.

  15. [Experimental Conditions and Reliability Analysis of Results of COD components].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-hua; Zhang, Yin; Han, Xing; Yu, Ke; Li, Ru-jia

    2015-10-01

    The present study attempts to use SF( OUR(max)/OUR(en)) instead of S(0)/X(0) as an index of optimal initial conditions for determination of COD components by means of respirometry, thereby simplifying the measuring process and the operation can be automated. Further, the ratio of COD consumed by the growth of biomass can be used for the reliability assessment of results. Experimental results show that, experimental conditions for obtaining good results as follows: (1) for samples that composed of a large amount of easily biodegradable components (e. g., synthetic wastewater made by sodium acetate), SF should be in the range of 2.8 to 5.3, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be less than 30%; (2) for samples that composed of both readily biodegradable and slowly biodegradable components (i. e., typical domestic wastewater), SF should be in the range of 5.8 to 6.4, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be less than 30%; (3) and for samples that composed of a large amount of slowly biodegradable industrial wastewater (i. e., landfill leachate), SF should be 15 or less, and the ratio of COD consumed by growth of biomass should be approximately 40%. Therefore, when respirometry is used for the determination of COD components, the optimal conditions in terms of SF increase with the complexity of carbon source.

  16. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2014-04-15

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  17. Condition-dependent movement and dispersal in experimental metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Klecka, Jan; Melián, Carlos J; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-09-01

    Dispersal and the underlying movement behaviour are processes of pivotal importance for understanding and predicting metapopulation and metacommunity dynamics. Generally, dispersal decisions are condition-dependent and rely on information in the broad sense, like the presence of conspecifics. However, studies on metacommunities that include interspecific interactions generally disregard condition-dependence. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and how dispersal in metacommunities is condition-dependent and whether rules derived from single-species contexts can be scaled up to (meta)communities. Using experimental protist metacommunities, we show how dispersal and movement depend on and are adjusted by the strength of interspecific interactions. We found that the predicting movement and dispersal in metacommunities requires knowledge on behavioural responses to intra- and interspecific interaction strengths. Consequently, metacommunity dynamics inferred directly from single-species metapopulations without taking interspecific interactions into account are likely flawed. Our work identifies the significance of condition-dependence for understanding metacommunity dynamics, stability and the coexistence and distribution of species. PMID:26206470

  18. Condition-dependent movement and dispersal in experimental metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Fronhofer, Emanuel A; Klecka, Jan; Melián, Carlos J; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-09-01

    Dispersal and the underlying movement behaviour are processes of pivotal importance for understanding and predicting metapopulation and metacommunity dynamics. Generally, dispersal decisions are condition-dependent and rely on information in the broad sense, like the presence of conspecifics. However, studies on metacommunities that include interspecific interactions generally disregard condition-dependence. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and how dispersal in metacommunities is condition-dependent and whether rules derived from single-species contexts can be scaled up to (meta)communities. Using experimental protist metacommunities, we show how dispersal and movement depend on and are adjusted by the strength of interspecific interactions. We found that the predicting movement and dispersal in metacommunities requires knowledge on behavioural responses to intra- and interspecific interaction strengths. Consequently, metacommunity dynamics inferred directly from single-species metapopulations without taking interspecific interactions into account are likely flawed. Our work identifies the significance of condition-dependence for understanding metacommunity dynamics, stability and the coexistence and distribution of species.

  19. Experimental and numerical analysis of rider motion in weave conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doria, A.; Formentini, M.; Tognazzo, M.

    2012-08-01

    Motorcycle dynamics is characterised by the presence of modes of vibration that may become unstable and lead to dangerous conditions. In particular, the weave mode shows large yaw and roll oscillations of the rear frame and out of phase oscillations of the front frame about the steer axis. The presence of the rider influences the modes of vibration, since the mass, stiffness and damping of limbs modify the dynamic properties of the system; moreover, at low frequency the rider can control oscillations. There are few experimental results dealing with the response of the rider in the presence of large oscillations of the motorcycle. This lack is due to the difficulty of carrying out measurements on the road and of reproducing the phenomena in the laboratory. This paper deals with a research programme aimed at measuring the oscillations of the rider's body on a running motorcycle in the presence of weave. First, testing equipment is presented. It includes a special measurement device that is able to measure the relative motion between the rider and the motorcycle. Then the road tests carried out at increasing speeds (from 160 to 210 km/h) are described and discussed. Best-fitting methods are used for identifying the main features of measured vibrations in terms of natural frequencies, damping ratios and modal shapes. The last section deals with the comparison between measured and simulated response of the motorcycle-rider system in weave conditions; good agreement was found.

  20. Experimental study of choking flow of water at supercritical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftuoglu, Altan

    Future nuclear reactors will operate at a coolant pressure close to 25 MPa and at outlet temperatures ranging from 500°C to 625°C. As a result, the outlet flow enthalpy in future Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactors (SCWR) will be much higher than those of actual ones which can increase overall nuclear plant efficiencies up to 48%. However, under such flow conditions, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of supercritical water is not fully known, e.g., pressure drop, forced convection and heat transfer deterioration, critical and blowdown flow rate, etc. Up to now, only a very limited number of studies have been performed under supercritical conditions. Moreover, these studies are conducted at conditions that are not representative of future SCWRs. In addition, existing choked flow data have been collected from experiments at atmospheric discharge pressure conditions and in most cases by using working fluids different than water which constrain researchers to analyze the data correctly. In particular, the knowledge of critical (choked) discharge of supercritical fluids is mandatory to perform nuclear reactor safety analyses and to design key mechanical components (e.g., control and safety relief valves, etc.). Hence, an experimental supercritical water facility has been built at Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal which allows researchers to perform choking flow experiments under supercritical conditions. The facility can also be used to carry out heat transfer and pressure drop experiments under supercritical conditions. In this thesis, we present the results obtained at this facility using a test section that contains a 1 mm inside diameter, 3.17 mm long orifice plate with sharp edges. Thus, 545 choking flow of water data points are obtained under supercritical conditions for flow pressures ranging from 22.1 MPa to 32.1 MPa, flow temperatures ranging from 50°C to 502°C and for discharge pressures from 0.1 MPa to 3.6 MPa. Obtained data are compared with the data given in

  1. Experimental study of infrared filaments under different initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirell, Daniel Joseph

    field that gives birth to multiphoton and avalanche ionization), (b) conical emission/supercontinuum generation, and (c) emitted THz radiation. The aim of all of this research is to gain a better understanding of filamentation so that we may learn how to control them for the applications of: (a) laser-induced lightning, (b) laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy, (c) LIDAR, (d) medical imaging and many more. In this dissertation we will focus on an experimental study of filamentation in air produced by 780 nm radiation, pulsewidths of 200 fs, and energies pulse of 9 mJ/pulse. We have used an aerodynamic window + vacuum system to study the difference between focusing filament forming pulses down initially in vacuum conditions to that where it is allowed to focus in atmosphere. Described herein is a new way to use an off-the-shelf, inexpensive and robust 1064 nm mirror to observe the beam profile and its evolution in the filament as well as the filaments spectral properties. In addition, experiments to test for the plasma have been conducted. The results of these experiments indicate filament sizes of 200mum, in contrast to the commonly reported value of 100pm. Filaments of this size exist over a length of approximately a meter which is 8 times longer than the associated Rayleigh range for such a spot size with a clear enhancement in filament persistence with the use of the aerodynamic window. In addition the appearance of newly generated "bluer" frequencies that is present under atmospheric focusing is ail but eliminated through an initial focusing of the beam in vacuum conditions. Plasma densities of 1016 e -/cm3 were measured using plasma interferometry.

  2. Experimentally constraining the boundary conditions for volcanic ash aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, U.; Auer, B.; Cimarelli, C.; Scolamacchia, T.; Guenthel, M.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic ash is the primary product of various volcanic processes. Due to its size, ash can remain in the atmosphere for a prolonged period of time. Aggregation processes are a first-order influence on the residence time of ash in the atmosphere and its dispersion from the vent. Due to their internal structure, ash aggregates have been classified as ash pellets or accretionary lapilli. Although several concomitant factors may play a role during aggregation, there is a broad consensus that both 1) particle collision and 2) humidity are required for particles to aggregate. However, direct observation of settling aggregates and record of the boundary conditions favourable to their formation are rare, therefore limiting our understanding of the key processes that determine ash aggregates formation. Here, we present the first results from experiments aimed at reproducing ash aggregation by constraining the required boundary conditions. We used a ProCell Lab System of Glatt Ingenieurtechnik GmbH that is conventionally used for food and chemical applications. We varied the following parameters: 1) air flow speed [40-120 m3/h], 2) air temperature [30-60°C], 3) relative humidity [20-50 %], and 4) liquid droplets composition [water and 25% water glass, Na2SiO3]. The starting material (125-90 μm) is obtained by milling natural basaltic lapilli (Etna, Italy). We found that the experimental duration and the chosen conditions were not favourable for the production of stable aggregates when using water as spraying liquid. Using a 25% water-glass solution as binder we could successfully generate and investigate aggregates of up to 2 mm size. Many aggregates are spherical and resemble ash pellets. In nature, ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are the product of complex processes taking place at very different conditions (temperature, humidity, ash concentration, degree of turbulence). These experiments shed some first light on the ash agglomeration process for which direct

  3. Formation of hydrocarbons under upper mantle conditions: experimental view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Anton; Kutcherov, Vladimir G.

    2010-05-01

    Main postulates of the theory of abiogenic abyssal origin of petroleum have been developed in the last 50 years in Russia and Ukraine. According to this theory, hydrocarbon compounds were generated in the mantle and migrated through the deep faults into the Earth's crust. There they formed oil and gas deposits in any kinds of rocks and in any kind of their structural positions. Until recently the main obstacle to accept the theory was the lack of reliable and reproducible experimental data confirming the possibility of the synthesis of complex hydrocarbon systems under the mantle conditions. The results received in the last decade by different groups of researchers from Russia, U.S.A. and China have confirmed the possibility of generation of hydrocarbons from inorganic materials, highly distributed in the Earth's mantle, under thermobaric conditions of 70-250 km: 2 - 5 GPa and 1000-1500 K. Experiments made in the CONAC chamber at pressures of 3-5 GPa and temperatures of 1000-1500 K by Kutcherov et al. [1, 2] have demonstrated that the mixtures of hydrocarbons with composition similar to natural hydrocarbon systems have been received as a result of chemical reactions between CaCO3, FeO and H2O. Methane formation from the same compounds was registered after heating up to 600-1500 K at pressures of 4-11 GPa in diamond anvil cells [4, 5, 6]. Influence of oxidation state of carbon donor and cooling rate of the fluid synthesized at high pressure were studied using different types of high pressure equipments. It was shown that composition of the final hydrocarbon mixture depends on these parameters. Experimental investigations of transformation of methane and ethane at 2-5 GPa and 1000-1500 K [3] confirmed thermodynamic stability of heavy hydrocarbons in the upper mantle and showed the possibility of hydrocarbon chain growth even at oxidative environment. For development of the theory of abiogenic abyssal origin of petroleum it is necessary to arrange a set of new

  4. Experimental Low Temperature Aqueous Alteration of Allende Under Reducing Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, C. L.; Brearley, A. J.

    1999-03-01

    This abstract presents the results of a series of low temperature hydrothermal alteration experiments that were carried out in an anoxic environment. The results are compared with the results of previous experiments run under oxidizing conditions.

  5. Phase Distribution Phenomena for Simulated Microgravity Conditions: Experimental Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Maneesh; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished at Rensselaer to study phase distribution phenomenon under simulated microgravity conditions. Our group at Rensselaer has been able to develop sophisticated analytical models to predict phase distribution in two-phase flows under a variety of conditions. These models are based on physics and data obtained from carefully controlled experiments that are being conducted here. These experiments also serve to verify the models developed.

  6. Phase Distribution Phenomena for Simulated Microgravity Conditions: Experimental Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Maneesh; Bonetto, Fabian J.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes the work accomplished at Rensselaer to study phase distribution phenomenon under simulated microgravity conditions. Our group at Rensselaer has been able to develop sophisticated analytical models to predict phase distribution in two-phase flows under variety of conditions. These models are based on physics and data obtained from carefully controlled experiments that are being conducted here. These experiments also serve to verify the models developed.

  7. 14 CFR 437.13 - Additional experimental permit terms and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Additional experimental permit terms and conditions. 437.13 Section 437.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION... Additional experimental permit terms and conditions. The FAA may modify an experimental permit at any time...

  8. Wall conditioning for ITER: Current experimental and modeling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Wauters, T.; Brezinsek, S.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Hong, S. H.; Lomas, P. J.; Lyssoivan, A.; Nunes, I.; Pitts, R. A.; Rohde, V.; de Vries, P. C.

    2015-08-01

    Wall conditioning will be required in ITER to control fuel and impurity recycling, as well as tritium (T) inventory. Analysis of conditioning cycle on the JET, with its ITER-Like Wall is presented, evidencing reduced need for wall cleaning in ITER compared to JET-CFC. Using a novel 2D multi-fluid model, current density during Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) on the in-vessel plasma-facing components (PFC) of ITER is predicted to approach the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area. Baking of the divertor to 350 °C should desorb the majority of the co-deposited T. ITER foresees the use of low temperature plasma based techniques compatible with the permanent toroidal magnetic field, such as Ion (ICWC) or Electron Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ECWC), for tritium removal between ITER plasma pulses. Extrapolation of JET ICWC results to ITER indicates removal comparable to estimated T-retention in nominal ITER D:T shots, whereas GDC may be unattractive for that purpose.

  9. Exploring the proper experimental conditions in 2D thermal cloaking demonstration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Run; Zhou, Shuling; Yu, Xingjian; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    Although thermal cloak has been studied extensively, the specific discussions on the proper experimental conditions to successfully observe the thermal cloaking effect are lacking. In this study, we focus on exploring the proper experimental conditions for 2D thermal cloaking demonstration. A mathematical model is established and detailed discussions are presented based on the model. The proper experimental conditions are suggested and verified with finite element simulations.

  10. Experimental characterization of hohlraum conditions by X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Hsieh, E.J.; Kauffman, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to measure the plasma parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasmas. For instance, the onset of spectral signals from multilayer targets have been used to determine ablation rate scalings. Temperature and density measurements in coronal plasmas have enabled the study of laser coupling efficiency as a function of the laser wavelengths. More recently, dopants have been successfully used to determine capsule conditions of ICF targets. However, few spectroscopic studies have been performed to diagnose plasma conditions of the hohlraum itself. Several laboratories have studied enclosed cavities, previously concentrating on measurements of the radiative heat wave, the x-ray conversion efficiency, and temporal evolution of Au x rays. Measurements of electron temperature T{sub e} and electron densities n{sub e} are difficult because many physical processes occur and each diagnostic`s line-of-sight is restricted by the hohlraum wall. However, they are worth pursuing because they can provide critical information on the target energetics and the evolution of plasma parameters important to achieving fusion. Here the authors discuss spectroscopic tracers to diagnose plasma conditions in the hohlraum, using time- and space-resolved measurements. The tracers are typically mid-Z elements which are placed on the hohlraum wall or supended in the hohlraum volume. To demonstrate the breadth of measurements that can be performed, three types of experiments are presented.

  11. Experimental folding and boudinage under pure constrictional conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobberger, Gustav

    1995-07-01

    Constrictional folds are characterized by true fold-axis parallel extension if the rock-volume does not vary during deformation. Studies of such folds in experiments, using plasticine layers of different apparent viscosity and power-law exponent, clearly indicate that fold-axis parallel stretch may be accompanied by plastic elongation as well as boudinage of the competent layer. Characteristic aspects of the experimentally folded competent layers are: (1) coeval development of folds and boudins; (2) layer thickness not changing during deformation; (3) layer-parallel shortening in sections perpendicular to the fold (stretching) axis; (4) enlargement of the initial thickness of the competent layer results in increasing fold wavelength and decreasing number of boudins. The ratio of dominant wavelength to layer thickness of the constrictional folds can be described mathematically approximately by the equation developed for plane strain folding of power-law materials

  12. Experimental characterization of materials subjected to combined loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrusca, L.; Goanta, V.; Barsanescu, P. D.; Savin, A.

    2016-08-01

    In real life experience, machine and structure elements are subjected to complex loading history. Combined loading testes facilitate the understanding of materials behavior subjected to multiaxial stress state. In this paper are presented experimental investigations used to evaluate the influence of an initial type of loading on material properties which will be subsequently tested through another load type. Initial tests are tension tests, by different elongations, and subsequent tests are torsion tests, until break. Circular cross section specimens will be used in these tests. Tension tests have been performed on a universal testing machine. Subsequently torsion tests have been conducted through an attachable device. It was found that the energy associated with plastic deformation obtained by subsequent torsional tests has the dominant influence on the material total plastic energy, although initial test was tension.

  13. Experimental study on neptunium migration under in situ geochemical conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumata, M.; Vandergraaf, T. T.

    1998-12-01

    Results are reported for migration experiments performed with Np under in situ geochemical conditions over a range of groundwater flow rates in columns of crushed rock in a specially designed facility at the 240-level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Pinawa, Manitoba, Canada. This laboratory is situated in an intrusive granitic rock formation, the Lac du Bonnet batholith. Highly altered granitic rock and groundwater were obtained from a major subhorizontal fracture zone at a depth of 250 m in the URL. The granite was wet-crushed and wet-sieved with groundwater from this fracture zone. The 180-850-μm size fraction was selected and packed in 20-cm long, 2.54-cm in diameter Teflon™-lined stainless steel columns. Approximately 30-ml vols of groundwater containing 3HHO and 237Np were injected into the columns at flow rates of 0.3, 1, and 3 ml/h, followed by elution with groundwater, obtained from the subhorizontal fracture, at the same flow rates, for a period of 95 days. Elution profiles for 3HHO were obtained, but no 237Np was detected in the eluted groundwater. After terminating the migration experiments, the columns were frozen, the column material was removed and cut into twenty 1-cm thick sections and each section was analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Profiles of 237Np were obtained for the three columns. A one-dimensional transport model was fitted to the 3HHO breakthrough curves to obtain flow parameters for this experiment. These flow parameters were in turn applied to the 237Np concentration profiles in the columns to produce sorption and dispersion coefficients for Np. The results show a strong dependence of retardation factors ( Rf) on flow rate. The decrease in the retarded velocity of the neptunium ( Vn) varied over one order of magnitude under the geochemical conditions for these experiments.

  14. Growth of juvenile Arctica islandica under experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witbaard, R.; Franken, R.; Visser, B.

    1998-02-01

    In two laboratory experiments, the effects of temperature and food availability on the growth of 10- to 23-mm high specimens of the bivalve Arctica islandica were estimated. Each experimental set-up consisted of 5 treatments in which either the food supply or the temperature differed. It was demonstrated that Arctica is able to grow at temperatures as low as 1°C. A tenfold increase of shell growth was observed at temperatures between 1° and 12°C. The greatest change in growth rate took place between 1° and 6°C. Average instantaneous shell growth varies between 0.0003 at 1°C to 0.0032/day at 12°C. The results suggest that temperature hardly affects the time spent in filtration, whereas particle density strongly influences that response. Starved animals at 9°C have their siphons open during only 12% of the time, whereas the siphons of optimally fed animals were open on average during 76% of the observations. Increased siphon activity corresponded to high shell and tissue growth. At 9°C, average shell growth at the optimum cell density of 20×106 cell/l was 3.1 mm corresponding to an instantaneous rate of 0.0026/day. An algal cell density ( Isochrysis galbana, Dunaliella marina) ranging between 5 and 7×106 cell/l is just enough to keep shells alive at 9°C. Carbon conversion efficiency at 9°C is estimated to vary between 11 and 14%.

  15. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate evidence. 85.900 Section 85.900 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support...

  16. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  17. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  18. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  19. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  20. Shock-driven mixing: Experimental design and initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gavin; Prestridge, Katherine; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo; Leftwich, Megan

    2012-03-01

    A new Vertical Shock Tube (VST) has been designed to study shock-induced mixing due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) developing on a 3-D multi-mode interface between two gases. These studies characterize how interface contours, gas density difference, and Mach No. affect the ensuing mixing by using simultaneous measurements of velocity/density fields. The VST allows for the formation of a single stably-stratified interface, removing complexities of the dual interface used in prior RMI work. The VST also features a new diaphragmless driver, making feasible larger ensembles of data by reducing intra-shot time, and a larger viewing window allowing new observations of late-time mixing. The initial condition (IC) is formed by a co-flow system, chosen to minimize diffusion at the gas interface. To ensure statistically stationary ICs, a contoured nozzle has been manufactured to form repeatable co-flowing jets that are manipulated by a flapping splitter plate to generate perturbations that span the VST. This talk focuses on the design of the IC flow system and shows initial results characterizing the interface.

  1. Shock-Driven Mixing: Experimental Design and Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Gavin; Prestridge, Kathy; Mejia-Alvarez, Ricardo; Leftwich, Megan

    2011-06-01

    A new Vertical Shock Tube (VST) has been designed to study shock-induced mixing due to the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability (RMI) developing on a 3-D multi-mode interface between two gases. These studies characterize how interface contours, gas density difference, and Mach No. affect the ensuing mixing by using simultaneous measurements of velocity/density fields. The VST allows for the formation of a single stably-stratified interface, removing complexities of the dual interface used in prior RMI work. The VST also features a new diaphragmless driver, making feasible larger ensembles of data by reducing intra-shot time, and a larger viewing window allowing new observations of late-time mixing. The initial condition (IC) is formed by a co-flow system, chosen to minimize diffusion at the gas interface. To ensure statistically stationary ICs, a contoured nozzle has been manufactured to form repeatable co-flowing jets that are manipulated by a flapping splitter plate to generate perturbations that span the VST. This talk focuses on the design of the IC flow system and shows initial results characterizing the interface.

  2. Invariance of Factors of Mouse Emotionality With Changed Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Royce, J R; Poley, W

    1975-10-01

    Six factors of mouse emotionality (autonomic balance, motor discharge, acrophobia, territoriality, tunneling-1, and tunneling-2) were compared across three separate studies. Each study included 19 measures from five tests of emotionality: open field, straightaway, pole, cell, and hole-in-wall. However, conditions of testing differed significantly in each study. In the first study, the measures taken were part of a large test battery. In the second study, a reduced test battery included only the 19 measures. In the third study, this reduced battery was used again, but subjects were injected with psychoactive drugs prior to testing. In addition to these changes, different genotypes were used across studies. Subjects in the first study were tested as part of a 6 × 6 diallel table. In the second and third studies, two emotionally contrasted strains (SWR and SJL) were tested. Each population was refactored by alpha factoring with varimax, followed by promax rotations. Factors obtained were compared by quantitative means using S-index and r[SUBc] coefficients of factor matching. Although support was obtained for the invariance of all six factors, the results indicate invariance as being strongest for motor discharge and acrophobia and weakest for tunneling-1 and tunneling-2 factors.

  3. 14 CFR 437.13 - Additional experimental permit terms and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Additional experimental permit terms and conditions. 437.13 Section 437.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.13 Additional experimental permit terms...

  4. 14 CFR 437.13 - Additional experimental permit terms and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional experimental permit terms and conditions. 437.13 Section 437.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.13 Additional experimental permit terms...

  5. 14 CFR 437.13 - Additional experimental permit terms and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Additional experimental permit terms and conditions. 437.13 Section 437.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information § 437.13 Additional experimental permit terms...

  6. The theoretical analysis and experimental research on the optimal condition of semiconductor refrigeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Y. F.

    2016-08-01

    The traditional limiting conditions have the biggest refrigeration quantity condition and the biggest refrigeration coefficient condition, there is a special operating mode during these conditions, enabling to both have the big refrigeration quantity and the small power loss, this operating mode is “Optimum condition”. This article first carried on the theoretical analysis to the semiconductor's optimum condition, inferred optimum electric current's theoretical formula; Carried on the experiment again to a semiconductor refrigeration box by regulating current changing operating mode, which had analyzed performance parameter's change situation under 8 kinds of condition experiments, carried on the regression analysis to the experimental data, obtained the regression equation thus discovered optimum electric current corresponding optimum condition. Carried on working under this condition, and then obtained the big refrigeration quantity and small power, which enhanced the refrigeration performance of semiconductor refrigerator. The experimental result and the theoretical analysis result tallied basically.

  7. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions - description of the principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, L.

    2012-08-01

    The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic materials. The so-called Gurson-Perrin model allows representing damage development with respect to strain-rate conditions. In order to fill a lack in current experimental procedures, we propose an experimental project able to test and validate the Gurson-Perrin model under various dynamic conditions and for different stress triaxiality levels.

  8. 14 CFR 437.13 - Additional experimental permit terms and conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Additional experimental permit terms and conditions. 437.13 Section 437.13 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS General Information §...

  9. Environmental parameters conditioning microbially induced mineralization under the experimental model conditions.

    PubMed

    Otlewska, Anna; Gutarowska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is one of the biomineralization types closely dependent on the parameters of the microenvironment. Minerals are precipitated as a product of environmental and bacterial cell interactions, however, this system has very little control via microorganisms. The aim of research was to determine the influence of abiotic factors (pH, temperature, agitation speed of bacterial culture and calcium ion source) on the mineralization induced by Arthrobacter sulfureus, Bacillus muralis and B. atrophaeus strains under the standard laboratory conditions. Because of the key role of urease in biomineralization, processes occurring in environments with and without the urea were compared. For this purpose, cultivation of bacteria (A. sulfureus, B. muralis and B. atrophaeus) was carried out in B4 liquid medium for 5 days with various environmental parameters (pH 6-9; temperature 25-44°C; speed of agitation 0-180 rpm, different calcium sources). It was noticed that the pH and the speed of agitation clearly affect the amount of the calcium carbonate that formed. Our observations suggest that the highest precipitation rate takes place in alkaline pH between 8-9, with shaking at 180 rpms. Among studied sources of calcium ions (calcium acetate, calcium chloride and calcium nitrate), calcium acetate demonstrated the strongest potential in the biomineralization process. Moreover, work presented here demonstrates that the correlation between cultivation temperature and biomineralization process cannot be clearly evaluated. The morphology and size of calcium carbonate minerals was strain-specific, although affected by the presence of urea in the surrounding solution. PMID:26894236

  10. Conditions for the validity of Faraday's law of induction and their experimental confirmation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ramos, A.; Menéndez, J. R.; Piqué, C.

    2008-09-01

    This paper, as its main didactic objective, shows the conditions needed for the validity of Faraday's law of induction. Inadequate comprehension of these conditions has given rise to several paradoxes about the issue; some are analysed and solved in this paper in the light of the theoretical deduction of the induction law. Furthermore, an experimental set-up, in which such conditions are experimentally tested, is included. The experiment is not complicated and the method we use, and similar methods used elsewhere, is widely considered as suitable laboratory practice for students of first university courses in physics and engineering.

  11. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - II: Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang; Axner, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Doppler-broadened (Db) noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectrometry (NICE-OHMS) is normally described by an expression, here termed the conventional (CONV) description, that is restricted to the conventional cavity-limited weak absorption condition (CCLWA), i.e. when the single pass absorbance is significantly smaller than the empty cavity losses, i.e. when α0 L < < π / F. To describe NICE-OHMS signals beyond this limit two simplified extended descriptions (termed the extended locking and extended transmission description, ELET, and the extended locking and full transmission description, ELFT), which are assumed to be valid under the relaxed cavity-limited weak absorption condition (RCLWA), i.e. when α0 L < π / F, and a full description (denoted FULL), presumed to be valid also when the α0 L < π / F condition does not hold, have recently been derived in an accompanying work (Ma W, et al. Doppler-broadened NICE-OHMS beyond the cavity-limited weak absorption condition - I. Theoretical Description. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jqsrt.2015.09.007). The present work constitutes an experimental verification and assessment of the validity of these, performed in the Doppler limit for a set of Fα0 L / π values (up to 3.5); it is shown under which conditions the various descriptions are valid. It is concluded that for samples with Fα0 L / π up to 0.01, all descriptions replicate the data well. It is shown that the CONV description is adequate and provides accurate assessments of the signal strength (and thereby the analyte concentration) up to Fα0 L / π of around 0.1, while the ELET is accurate for Fα0 L / π up to around 0.3. The ELFT description mimics the Db NICE-OHMS signal well for Fα0 L / π up to around unity, while the FULL description is adequate for all Fα0 L / π values investigated. Access to these descriptions both increases considerably the dynamic range of the technique and

  12. Discovery of wall-selective carbon nanotube growth conditions via automated experimentation.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Pavel; Hooper, Daylond; Perea-López, Nestor; Terrones, Mauricio; Maruyama, Benji

    2014-10-28

    Applications of carbon nanotubes continue to advance, with substantial progress in nanotube electronics, conductive wires, and transparent conductors to name a few. However, wider application remains impeded by a lack of control over production of nanotubes with the desired purity, perfection, chirality, and number of walls. This is partly due to the fact that growth experiments are time-consuming, taking about 1 day per run, thus making it challenging to adequately explore the many parameters involved in growth. We endeavored to speed up the research process by automating CVD growth experimentation. The adaptive rapid experimentation and in situ spectroscopy CVD system described in this contribution conducts over 100 experiments in a single day, with automated control and in situ Raman characterization. Linear regression modeling was used to map regions of selectivity toward single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotube growth in the complex parameter space of the water-assisted CVD synthesis. This development of the automated rapid serial experimentation is a significant progress toward an autonomous closed-loop learning system: a Robot Scientist. PMID:25299482

  13. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  14. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-02-15

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  15. Evaluation of new reference genes in papaya for accurate transcript normalization under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyang; Li, Xueping; Chen, Weixin; Chen, Jianye; Lu, Wangjin; Chen, Lei; Fu, Danwen

    2012-01-01

    Real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) is a preferred method for rapid and accurate quantification of gene expression studies. Appropriate application of RT-qPCR requires accurate normalization though the use of reference genes. As no single reference gene is universally suitable for all experiments, thus reference gene(s) validation under different experimental conditions is crucial for RT-qPCR analysis. To date, only a few studies on reference genes have been done in other plants but none in papaya. In the present work, we selected 21 candidate reference genes, and evaluated their expression stability in 246 papaya fruit samples using three algorithms, geNorm, NormFinder and RefFinder. The samples consisted of 13 sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, different storage temperatures, different cultivars, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, modified atmosphere packaging, 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment, hot water treatment, biotic stress and hormone treatment. Our results demonstrated that expression stability varied greatly between reference genes and that different suitable reference gene(s) or combination of reference genes for normalization should be validated according to the experimental conditions. In general, the internal reference genes EIF (Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A), TBP1 (TATA binding protein 1) and TBP2 (TATA binding protein 2) genes had a good performance under most experimental conditions, whereas the most widely present used reference genes, ACTIN (Actin 2), 18S rRNA (18S ribosomal RNA) and GAPDH (Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) were not suitable in many experimental conditions. In addition, two commonly used programs, geNorm and Normfinder, were proved sufficient for the validation. This work provides the first systematic analysis for the selection of superior reference genes for accurate transcript normalization in papaya under different experimental conditions.

  16. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  17. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  18. Supervision of Student Teachers: How Adequate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ken

    This study attempted to ascertain how adequately student teachers are supervised by college supervisors and supervising teachers. Questions to be answered were as follows: a) How do student teachers rate the adequacy of supervision given them by college supervisors and supervising teachers? and b) Are there significant differences between ratings…

  19. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  20. An Adequate Education Defined. Fastback 476.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Donald; Davis, E. E. (Gene)

    Court decisions historically have dealt with educational equity; now they are helping to establish "adequacy" as a standard in education. Legislatures, however, have been slow to enact remedies. One debate over education adequacy, though, is settled: Schools are not financed at an adequate level. This fastback is divided into three sections.…

  1. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  2. Experimental and Theoretical Determination of Heavy Oil Viscosity Under Reservoir Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Barrufet, Maria

    2002-03-11

    The main objective of this research was to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes.

  3. QEEG Spectral and Coherence Assessment of Autistic Children in Three Different Experimental Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Calixto; Estévez, Mario; Leisman, Gerry; Melillo, Robert; Rodríguez, Rafael; DeFina, Phillip; Hernández, Adrián; Pérez-Nellar, Jesús; Naranjo, Rolando; Chinchilla, Mauricio; Garófalo, Nicolás; Vargas, José; Beltrán, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We studied autistics by quantitative EEG spectral and coherence analysis during three experimental conditions: basal, watching a cartoon with audio (V-A), and with muted audio band (VwA). Significant reductions were found for the absolute power spectral density (PSD) in the central region for delta and theta, and in the posterior region for sigma…

  4. Uncertain boundary condition Bayesian identification from experimental data: A case study on a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritto, T. G.; Sampaio, R.; Aguiar, R. R.

    2016-02-01

    In many mechanical applications (wind turbine tower, substructure joints, etc.), the stiffness of the boundary conditions is uncertain and might decrease with time, due to wear and/or looseness. In this paper, a torsional stiffness parameter is used to model the clamped side of a Timoshenko beam. The goal is to perform the identification with experimental data. To represent the decreasing stiffness of the clamped side, an experimental test rig is constructed, where several rubber layers are added to the clamped side, making it softer. Increasing the number of layers decreases the stiffness, thus representing a loss in the stiffness. The Bayesian approach is applied to update the probabilistic model related to the boundary condition (torsional stiffness parameter). The proposed Bayesian strategy worked well for the problem analyzed, where the experimental natural frequencies were within the 95% confidence limits of the computed natural frequencies probability density functions.

  5. Experimental investigation on performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Guiyin; Liu, Xu; Wu, Shuangmao

    2009-11-15

    An experimental study on operation performance of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is conducted in this paper. The experimental system of ice storage air-conditioning system with separate heat pipe is set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure and the condensation pressure of refrigeration system, the refrigeration capacity and the COP (coefficient of performance) of the system, the IPF (ice packing factor) and the cool storage capacity in the cool storage tank during charging period, and the cool discharge rate and the cool discharge capacity in the cool storage tank, the outlet water temperature in the cool storage tank and the outlet air temperature in room unit during discharging period are investigated. The experimental results show that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe can stably work during charging and discharging period. This indicates that the ice storage air-conditioning system with separate helical heat pipe is well adapted to cool storage air-conditioning systems in building. (author)

  6. Failure of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition for a lined duct: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Renou, Ygaäl; Aurégan, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with experimental investigation of the lined wall boundary condition in flow duct applications such as aircraft engine systems or automobile mufflers. A first experiment, based on a microphone array located in the liner test section, is carried out in order to extract the axial wavenumbers with the help of an "high-accurate" singular value decomposition Prony-like algorithm. The experimental axial wavenumbers are then used to provide the lined wall impedance for both downstream and upstream acoustic propagation by means of a straightforward impedance education method involving the classical Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The results show that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition fails to predict with accuracy the acoustic behavior in a lined duct with flow. An effective lined wall impedance, valid whatever the direction of acoustic propagation, can be suitably found from experimental axial wavenumbers and a modified version of the Ingard-Myers condition with the form inspired from a previous theoretical study [Aurégan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 59-64 (2001)]. In a second experiment, the scattering matrix of the liner test section is measured and is then compared to the predicted scattering matrix using the multimodal approach and the lined wall impedances previously deduced. A large discrepancy is observed between the measured and the predicted scattering coefficients that confirms the poor accuracy provided from the Ingard-Myers boundary condition widely used in lined duct applications. PMID:21786877

  7. Anatomic and Functional Connectivity Relationship in Autistic Children During Three Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Machado, Calixto; Rodríguez, Rafael; Estévez, Mario; Leisman, Gerry; Melillo, Robert; Chinchilla, Mauricio; Portela, Liana

    2015-10-01

    A group of 21 autistic children were studied for determining the relationship between the anatomic (AC) versus functional (FC) connectivity, considering short-range and long-range brain networks. AC was assessed by the DW-MRI technique and FC by EEG coherence calculation, in three experimental conditions: basal, watching a popular cartoon with audio (V-A), and with muted audio track (VwA). For short-range connections, basal records, statistical significant correlations were found for all EEG bands in the left hemisphere, but no significant correlations were found for fast EEG frequencies in the right hemisphere. For the V-A condition, significant correlations were mainly diminished for the left hemisphere; for the right hemisphere, no significant correlations were found for the fast EEG frequency bands. For the VwA condition, significant correlations for the rapid EEG frequencies mainly disappeared for the right hemisphere. For long-range connections, basal records showed similar correlations for both hemispheres. For the right hemisphere, significant correlations incremented to all EEG bands for the V-A condition, but these significant correlations disappeared for the fast EEG frequencies in the VwA condition. It appears that in a resting-state condition, AC is better associated with functional connectivity for short-range connections in the left hemisphere. The V-A experimental condition enriches the AC and FC association for long-range connections in the right hemisphere. This might be related to an effective connectivity improvement due to full video stimulation (visual and auditory). An impaired audiovisual interaction in the right hemisphere might explain why significant correlations disappeared for the fast EEG frequencies in the VwA experimental condition. PMID:26050707

  8. Experimental results for improving the matrix condition using a hybrid optical system.

    PubMed

    Klapp, Iftach; Mendlovic, David

    2012-03-01

    We present preliminary experimental results for implementing the "blurred trajectories" method on three parallel optics (PO) systems. The "main" system and "auxiliary" optics were simple laboratory graded lenses attached to an iris diaphragm. When applying the blurred trajectories method we first show an improvement in the matrix condition, as the matrix condition number decreased in a range of factors of 3 to 418 relative to the main system. Following that, image restoration by weak regularization was performed so that the system matrix condition dominated the restoration process. It was shown that the restoration results of the PO are better than those of the main system and the auxiliary optics separately. In addition, the quality of the restoration follows the system's matrix condition. The improvement in the matrix condition achieved by the PO system improved the immunity to detection noise. Finally, a comparison to Wiener filtering restoration shows that it is also generally inferior to the proposed method.

  9. Influence of body condition on influenza a virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, D.M.; Ip, H.S.; Owen, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ??5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl. ?? 2011 Arsnoe et al.

  10. Influence of body condition on influenza A virus infection in mallard ducks: Experimental infection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arsnoe, Dustin M.; Ip, Hon S.; Owen, Jennifer C.

    2011-01-01

    Migrating waterfowl are implicated in the global spread of influenza A viruses (IAVs), and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are considered a particularly important IAV reservoir. Prevalence of IAV infection in waterfowl peaks during autumn pre-migration staging and then declines as birds reach wintering areas. Migration is energetically costly and birds often experience declines in body condition that may suppress immune function. We assessed how body condition affects susceptibility to infection, viral shedding and antibody production in wild-caught and captive-bred juvenile mallards challenged with low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) H5N9. Wild mallards (n = 30) were separated into three experimental groups; each manipulated through food availability to a different condition level (-20%, -10%, and normal ±5% original body condition), and captive-bred mallards (n = 10) were maintained at normal condition. We found that wild mallards in normal condition were more susceptible to LPAIV infection, shed higher peak viral loads and shed viral RNA more frequently compared to birds in poor condition. Antibody production did not differ according to condition. We found that wild mallards did not differ from captive-bred mallards in viral intensity and duration of infection, but they did exhibit lower antibody titers and greater variation in viral load. Our findings suggest that reduced body condition negatively influences waterfowl host competence to LPAIV infection. This observation is contradictory to the recently proposed condition-dependent hypothesis, according to which birds in reduced condition would be more susceptible to IAV infection. The mechanisms responsible for reducing host competency among birds in poor condition remain unknown. Our research indicates body condition may influence the maintenance and spread of LPAIV by migrating waterfowl.

  11. Experimental study of ice lens formation using fine granular materials under terrestrial and martian conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saruya, T.; Rempel, A. W.; Kurita, K.

    2012-12-01

    Detailed exploration of Mars has yielded a range of direct and indirect evidence for the distribution of ice. Significantly, direct observations of segregated ice (i.e. sediment free) were obtained by Phoenix lander. This segregated ice most likely originated as an ice lens, which formed by the migration and solidification of unfrozen water. Unfrozen water that is adsorbed to particle surfaces and confined to capillary regions remains in the liquid state below the normal melting temperature. This water is known to migrate in frozen materials and form ice lenses. Zent et al. (2012) developed a numerical model for ice lens formation (Rempel et al. 2004) and demonstrated that the nucleation of ice lenses at the Phoenix landing site was possible in the recent past. However, many questions remain regarding the detailed conditions of ice lens nucleation and growth, even in the terrestrial environment. Further experimental checks of numerical models are especially needed. Here, we describe laboratory investigations of ice lens behavior under both terrestrial conditions and with experimental conditions approaching those in the martian environment. We have performed a series of step-freezing experiments in fine, granular materials to observe the initiation and growth of ice lenses. Our experiments reveal clear and systematic relationships between ice-lens behavior and the imposed cooling temperature and host particle size. We compared our experimental results to numerical predictions from a model of ice lens formation (Rempel et al. 2004) that was applied to our experimental conditions. We find that the trend is consistent between the experiment and model, however, there are important quantitative differences. Most notably, modeled ice-lens nucleation occurred more quickly and enabled ice lenses to grow larger than occurred during our experiments. We infer that some additional mechanisms must be responsible for restricting the formation and growth of ice lenses. Further

  12. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations on the Nanoscale Kinetic Friction in Ambient Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gueye, Birahima; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yujuan; Chen, Yunfei

    2015-07-01

    The liquid lubrication, thermolubricity and dynamic lubricity due to mechanical oscillations are investigated with an atomic force microscope in ambient environmental conditions with different relative humidity (RH) levels. Experimental results demonstrate that high humidity at low-temperature regime enhances the liquid lubricity while at high-temperature regime it hinders the effect of the thermolubricity due to the formation of liquid bridges. Friction response to the dynamic lubricity in both high- and low-temperature regimes keeps the same trends, namely the friction force decreases with increasing the amplitude of the applied vibration on the tip regardless of the RH levels. An interesting finding is that for the dynamic lubricity at high temperature, high-humidity condition leads to the friction forces higher than that at low-humidity condition while at low temperature the opposite trend is observed. An extended two-dimensional dynamic model accounting for the RH is proposed to interpret the frictional mechanism in ambient conditions.

  13. An experimental test of condition-dependent male and female mate choice in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Geberzahn, Nicole; Riebel, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    In mating systems with social monogamy and obligatory bi-parental care, such as found in many songbird species, male and female fitness depends on the combined parental investment. Hence, both sexes should gain from choosing mates in high rather than low condition. However, theory also predicts that an individual's phenotypic quality can constrain choice, if low condition individuals cannot afford prolonged search efforts and/or face higher risk of rejection. In systems with mutual mate choice, the interaction between male and female condition should thus be a better predictor of choice than either factor in isolation. To address this prediction experimentally, we manipulated male and female condition and subsequently tested male and female mating preferences in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, a songbird species with mutual mate choice and obligatory bi-parental care. We experimentally altered phenotypic quality by manipulating the brood size in which the birds were reared. Patterns of association for high- or low-condition individuals of the opposite sex differed for male and female focal birds when tested in an 8-way choice arena. Females showed repeatable condition-assortative preferences for males matching their own rearing background. Male preferences were also repeatable, but not predicted by their own or females' rearing background. In combination with a brief review of the literature on condition-dependent mate choice in the zebra finch we discuss whether the observed sex differences and between-studies differences arise because males and females differ in context sensitivity (e.g. male-male competition suppressing male mating preferences), sampling strategies or susceptibility to rearing conditions (e.g. sex-specific effect on physiology). While a picture emerges that juvenile and current state indeed affect preferences, the development and context-dependency of mutual state-dependent mate choice warrants further study. PMID:21901147

  14. An Experimental Test of Condition-Dependent Male and Female Mate Choice in Zebra Finches

    PubMed Central

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Geberzahn, Nicole; Riebel, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    In mating systems with social monogamy and obligatory bi-parental care, such as found in many songbird species, male and female fitness depends on the combined parental investment. Hence, both sexes should gain from choosing mates in high rather than low condition. However, theory also predicts that an individual's phenotypic quality can constrain choice, if low condition individuals cannot afford prolonged search efforts and/or face higher risk of rejection. In systems with mutual mate choice, the interaction between male and female condition should thus be a better predictor of choice than either factor in isolation. To address this prediction experimentally, we manipulated male and female condition and subsequently tested male and female mating preferences in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, a songbird species with mutual mate choice and obligatory bi-parental care. We experimentally altered phenotypic quality by manipulating the brood size in which the birds were reared. Patterns of association for high- or low-condition individuals of the opposite sex differed for male and female focal birds when tested in an 8-way choice arena. Females showed repeatable condition-assortative preferences for males matching their own rearing background. Male preferences were also repeatable, but not predicted by their own or females' rearing background. In combination with a brief review of the literature on condition-dependent mate choice in the zebra finch we discuss whether the observed sex differences and between-studies differences arise because males and females differ in context sensitivity (e.g. male-male competition suppressing male mating preferences), sampling strategies or susceptibility to rearing conditions (e.g. sex-specific effect on physiology). While a picture emerges that juvenile and current state indeed affect preferences, the development and context-dependency of mutual state-dependent mate choice warrants further study. PMID:21901147

  15. Experimental simulation of the condensation and metamorphism of seasonal CO2 condensates under martian conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisolle, F.; Schmitt, B.; Beck, P.; Philippe, S.; Brissaud, O.

    2014-04-01

    An experimental set-up, CARBON-IR, has been developed in order to perform the condensation and metamorphism of CO2 condensates in various controlled martian conditions at, or out of, equilibrium. The sample texture is monitored and near-infrared reflectance spectra are recorded. We present a first set of experiments aimed to simulate the formation of compact translucent slabs by condensation of CO2 gas, the metamorphism of CO2 snow, as well as their sublimation.

  16. In vivo screening of extracellular matrix components produced under multiple experimental conditions implanted in one animal.

    PubMed

    Higuera, Gustavo A; Hendriks, Jeanine A A; van Dalum, Joost; Wu, Ling; Schotel, Roka; Moreira-Teixeira, Liliana; van den Doel, Mirella; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Riesle, Jens; Karperien, Marcel; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2013-06-01

    Animal experiments help to progress and ensure safety of an increasing number of novel therapies, drug development and chemicals. Unfortunately, these also lead to major ethical concerns, costs and limited experimental capacity. We foresee a coercion of all these issues by implantation of well systems directly into vertebrate animals. Here, we used rapid prototyping to create wells with biomaterials to create a three-dimensional (3D) well-system that can be used in vitro and in vivo. First, the well sizes and numbers were adjusted for 3D cell culture and in vitro screening of molecules. Then, the functionality of the wells was evaluated in vivo under 36 conditions for tissue regeneration involving human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and bovine primary chondrocytes (bPCs) screened in one animal. Each biocompatible well was controlled to contain μl-size volumes of tissue, which led to tissue penetration from the host and tissue formation under implanted conditions. We quantified both physically and biologically the amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) components found in each well. Using this new concept the co-culture of hMSCs and bPCs was identified as a positive hit for cartilage tissue repair, which was a comparable result using conventional methods. The in vivo screening of candidate conditions opens an entirely new range of experimental possibilities, which significantly abates experimental animal use and increases the pace of discovery of medical treatments.

  17. Experimental challenges to theories of classical conditioning: application of an attentional model of storage and retrieval.

    PubMed

    Schmajuk, Nestor A; Larrauri, José A

    2006-01-01

    Several studies have recently challenged the accuracy of traditional models of classical conditioning that account for some experimental data in terms of a storage deficit. Among other results, it has been reported that extinction of the blocking or overshadowing stimulus results in the recovery of the response to the blocked or overshadowed stimulus, backward blocking shows spontaneous recovery, extinction of the training context results in the recovery from latent inhibition, interposing a delay between conditioning and testing in latent inhibition increases latent inhibition, and latent inhibition antagonizes overshadowing. An existing neural network model of classical conditioning (N. A. Schmajuk, Y. Lam, & J. A. Gray, 1996), which includes an attentional mechanism controlling both storage and retrieval of associations, is able to quantitatively describe these results.

  18. Quantum versus classical foundation of statistical mechanics under experimentally realistic conditions.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Peter; Evstigneev, Mykhaylo

    2013-11-01

    Focusing on isolated macroscopic systems, described in terms of either a quantum mechanical or a classical model, our two key questions are how far does an initial ensemble (usually far from equilibrium and largely unknown in detail) evolve towards a stationary long-time behavior (equilibration) and how far is this steady state in agreement with the microcanonical ensemble as predicted by statistical mechanics (thermalization). A recently developed quantum mechanical treatment of the problem is briefly summarized, putting particular emphasis on the realistic modeling of experimental measurements and nonequilibrium initial conditions. Within this framework, equilibration can be proven under very weak assumptions about those measurements and initial conditions, while thermalization still requires quite strong additional hypotheses. An analogous approach within the framework of classical mechanics is developed and compared with the quantum case. In particular, the assumptions to guarantee classical equilibration are now rather strong, while thermalization then follows under relatively weak additional conditions.

  19. Experimental observation of dynamic ductile damage development under various triaxiality conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillon, Laurianne; Adolf, Lise-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Fracture in ductile materials finds its origin in microscopic mechanisms: the nucleation of voids that grow and coalesce in order to form a crack. The most popular of these models, proposed by Gurson, aims at describing the damage development with respect to the plastic behavior of porous material. The Gurson model has been extended by Perrin to describe damage evolution in ductile viscoplastic porous materials. The Gurson-Perrin model (GPm) allows representing damage development with respect to the stress triaxiality and strain-rate conditions. We propose a new experimental design able to test and validate the GPm under various dynamic conditions and for different triaxiality levels. The experimental project will be detailed. A notch is drawn in the Cu cylindrical target where damage develops and the local failure occurs. A variation of the notch radius enables a variation in the triaxiality level. Three notch radii have been tested. Observations with numerical cameras allow following the shape of the notch, a characteristic of damage development. Several PDV measurements have been performed around the target. A first analysis of this experimental process will be shown and comparisons with numerical simulations will be presented.

  20. Reproductive biology of Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar) (Diptera: Psychodidae) under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, E; Ferro, C; Corredor, D; Martínez, O; Munstermann, L E

    1999-12-01

    Baseline biological growth data of Lutzomyia shannoni (Dyar) were compared under two experimental conditions within insulated styrofoam chests and in standard laboratory incubators. The developmental time from egg to adult was 67 and 52 days, respectively. Based on cohorts of 100 females in each experiment, horizontal life tables were constructed. The following predictive parameters were obtained under each of the two conditions: net rate of reproduction (23.5 and 18.0 females per cohort female), generation time (11.4 and 9.4 weeks), intrinsic rate of population increase (0.27 and 0.30), and finite rate of population increment (1.31 and 1.36). The reproductive value for each class age of the cohort females was calculated. The observed parameters were obtained under each experimental condition: net rate of reproduction (1.9 and 2.5 females per cohort female), generation time (11.7 and 9.6 weeks), intrinsic rate of population increase (0.05 and 0.09), and finite rate of population increment (1.06 and 1.10). Vertical life tables were elaborated and mortality was described for every generation in each cohort. In addition, for two successive generations, additive variance and heritability for fecundity were estimated.

  1. Application of Response Surface Methodology to Evaluation of Bioconversion Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cheynier, Véronique; Feinberg, Max; Chararas, Constantin; Ducauze, Christian

    1983-01-01

    Using Candida tenuis, a yeast isolated from the digestive tube of the larva of Phoracantha semipunctata (Cerambycidae, Coleoptera), we were able to demonstrate the bioconversion of citronellal to citronellol. Response surface methodology was used to achieve the optimization of the experimental conditions for that bioconversion process. To study the proposed second-order polynomial model, we used a central composite experimental design with multiple linear regression to estimate the model coefficients of the five selected factors believed to influence the bioconversion process. Only four were demonstrated to be predominant: the incubation pH, temperature, time, and the amount of substrate. The best reduction yields (close to 90%) were obtained with alkaline pH conditions (pH 7.5), a low temperature (25°C), a small amount of substrate (15 μl), and short incubation time (16 h). This methodology was very efficient: only 36 experiments were necessary to assess these conditions, and model adequacy was very satisfactory as the coefficient of determination was 0.9411. PMID:16346211

  2. Fuel performance under normal PWR conditions: A review of relevant experimental results and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, M.; Lemaignan, C.

    1992-06-01

    Experiments conducted at Grenoble (CEA/DRN) over the past 20 years in the field of nuclear fuel behaviour are reviewed. Of particular concern is the need to achieve a comprehensive understanding of and subsequently overcome the limitations associated with high burnup and load-following conditions (pellet-cladding interaction (PCI), fission gas release (FGR), water-side corrosion). A general view is given of the organization of research work as well as some experimental details (irradiation, postirradiation examination — PIE). Based on various experimental programmes (Cyrano, Medicis, Anemone, Furet, Tango, Contact, Cansar, Hatac, Flog, Decor), the main contributions of the thermomechanical behaviour of a PWR fuel rod are described: thermal conductivity, in-pile densification, swelling, fission gas release in steady state and moderate transient conditions, gap thermal conductance, formation of primary and secondary ridges under PCI conditions. Specific programmes (Gdgrif, Thermox, Grimox) are devoted to the behaviour of particular fuels (gadolinia-bearing fuel, MOX fuel). Moreover, microstructure-based studies have been undertaken on fission gas release (fine analysis of the bubble population inside irradiated fuel samples), and on cladding behaviour (PCI related studies on stress-corrosion cracking (SCO, irradiation effects on zircaloy microstructure).

  3. Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP): Experimental Design and Boundary Conditions (Experiment 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haywood, A. M.; Dowsett, H. J.; Robinson, M. M.; Stoll, D. K.; Dolan, A. M.; Lunt, D. J.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Chandler, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project has expanded to include a model intercomparison for the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.29 to 2.97 million yr ago). This project is referred to as PlioMIP (the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project). Two experiments have been agreed upon and together compose the initial phase of PlioMIP. The first (Experiment 1) is being performed with atmosphere only climate models. The second (Experiment 2) utilizes fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Following on from the publication of the experimental design and boundary conditions for Experiment 1 in Geoscientific Model Development, this paper provides the necessary description of differences and/or additions to the experimental design for Experiment 2.

  4. Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project (PlioMIP): experimental design and boundary conditions (Experiment 2)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haywood, A.M.; Dowsett, H.J.; Robinson, M.M.; Stoll, D.K.; Dolan, A.M.; Lunt, D.J.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Chandler, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Palaeoclimate Modelling Intercomparison Project has expanded to include a model intercomparison for the mid-Pliocene warm period (3.29 to 2.97 million yr ago). This project is referred to as PlioMIP (the Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project). Two experiments have been agreed upon and together compose the initial phase of PlioMIP. The first (Experiment 1) is being performed with atmosphere-only climate models. The second (Experiment 2) utilises fully coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models. Following on from the publication of the experimental design and boundary conditions for Experiment 1 in Geoscientific Model Development, this paper provides the necessary description of differences and/or additions to the experimental design for Experiment 2.

  5. Degradation of caffeine by photo-Fenton process: optimization of treatment conditions using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Trovó, Alam G; Silva, Tatiane F S; Gomes, Oswaldo; Machado, Antonio E H; Neto, Waldomiro Borges; Muller, Paulo S; Daniel, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    The degradation of caffeine in different kind of effluents, via photo-Fenton process, was investigated in lab-scale and in a solar pilot plant. The treatment conditions (caffeine, Fe(2+) and H(2)O(2) concentrations) were defined by experimental design. The optimized conditions for each variable, obtained using the response factor (% mineralization), were: 52.0 mg L(-1)caffeine, 10.0 mg L(-1)Fe(2+) and 42.0 mg L(-1)H(2)O(2) (replaced in kinetic experiments). Under these conditions, in ultrapure water (UW), the caffeine concentration reached the quantitation limit (0.76 mg L(-1)) after 20 min, and 78% of mineralization was obtained respectively after 120 min of reaction. Using the same conditions, the matrix influence (surface water - SW and sewage treatment plant effluent - STP) on caffeine degradation was also evaluated. The total removal of caffeine in SW was reached at the same time in UW (after 20 min), while 40 min were necessary in STP. Although lower mineralization rates were verified for high organic load, under the same operational conditions, less H(2)O(2) was necessary to mineralize the dissolved organic carbon as the initial organic load increases. A high efficiency of the photo-Fenton process was also observed in caffeine degradation by solar photocatalysis using a CPC reactor, as well as intermediates of low toxicity, demonstrating that photo-Fenton process can be a viable alternative for caffeine removal in wastewater.

  6. Experimental Evidence of Classical Conditioning and Microscopic Engrams in an Electroconductive Material

    PubMed Central

    Karbowski, Lukasz M.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic experimental substrates are indispensable tools which can allow researchers to model biological processes non-invasively in three-dimensional space. In this study, we investigated the capacities of an electroconductive material whose properties converge upon those of the brain. An electrically conductive material composed of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, ions, water, and trace amounts of other organic compounds and minerals was classically conditioned as inferred by electrophysiological measurements. Spectral densities evoked during the display of a conditioned stimulus (CS) probe were strongly congruent with those displayed during the conditioned-unconditioned stimulus pairing (CS-UCS). The neutral stimulus consisted of the pulsed light from a LED. The unconditioned stimulus was an alternating current. Interstimulus intervals >130 ms did not result in conditioned responses. Microscopic analysis of the chemically-fixed substratum revealed 10–200 μm wide ‘vessel structures’ within samples exposed to a stimulus. Greater complexity (increased fractal dimensions) was clearly discernable by light microscopy for stained sections of fixed samples that had been conditioned compared to various controls. The denser pixels indicated greater concentration of stain and increased canalization. Implications for learning and memory formation are discussed. PMID:27764215

  7. Deep Boreholes Seals Subjected to High P,T conditions - Proposed Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caporuscio, F.

    2015-12-01

    Deep borehole experimental work will constrain the P,T conditions which "seal" material will experience in deep borehole crystalline rock repositories. The rocks of interest to this study include mafic (amphibolites) and silicic (granitic gneiss) end members. The experiments will systematically add components to capture discrete changes in both water and EBS component chemistries. Experiments in the system wall rock-clay-concrete-groundwater will evaluate interactions among components, including: mineral phase stability, metal corrosion rates and thermal limits. Based on engineered barrier studies, experimental investigations will move forward with three focusses. First, evaluation of interaction between "seal" materials and repository wall rock (crystalline) under fluid-saturated conditions over long-term (i.e., six-month) experiments; which reproduces the thermal pulse event of a repository. Second, perform experiments to determine the stability of zeolite minerals (analcime-wairakitess) under repository conditions. Both sets of experiments are critically important for understanding mineral paragenesis (zeolites and/or clay transformations) associated with "seals" in contact with wall rock at elevated temperatures. Third, mineral growth at the metal interface is a principal control on the survivability (i.e. corrosion) of waste canisters in a repository. The objective of this planned experimental work is to evaluate physio-chemical processes for 'seal' components and materials relevant to deep borehole disposal. These evaluations will encompass multi-laboratory efforts for the development of seals concepts and application of Thermal-Mechanical-Chemical (TMC) modeling work to assess barrier material interactions with subsurface fluids and other barrier materials, their stability at high temperatures, and the implications of these processes to the evaluation of thermal limits.

  8. Experimental study of the validity of quantitative conditions in the quantum adiabatic theorem.

    PubMed

    Du, Jiangfeng; Hu, Lingzhi; Wang, Ya; Wu, Jianda; Zhao, Meisheng; Suter, Dieter

    2008-08-01

    The quantum adiabatic theorem plays an important role in quantum mechanics. However, counter-examples were produced recently, indicating that their transition probabilities do not converge as predicted by the adiabatic theorem [K. P. Marzlin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 160408 (2004); D. M. Tong et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110407 (2005)]. For a special class of Hamiltonians, we examine the standard criterion for adiabatic evolution experimentally and theoretically, as well as three newly suggested adiabatic conditions. We show that the standard criterion is neither sufficient nor necessary.

  9. Limits and conditions of applicability of the experimental measurement methods of liquid flow rates through pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botezatu, N. P.

    1980-04-01

    Various flow measurement methods and their applications are reviewed in order to establish the best methods for rationalization and optimization of water consumption in a large industrial system. The methods discussed include volumetric and gravimetric techniques, Pitot and Venturi tubes, electromagnetic and ultrasonic flowmeters, counters, rotameters, and anemometers, as well as the use of classical and radioactive tracers. A comparative analysis of various methods and experimental results indicate that the method of radioactive tracers is the only universal method of measurement of fluid flows through pipes and channels for fluids of any physicochemical properties under any conditions.

  10. Experimental investigation of the noise emission of axial fans under distorted inflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenger, Florian J.; Renz, Andreas; Becher, Marcus; Becker, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the noise emission of axial fans under distorted inflow conditions was conducted. Three fans with forward-skewed fan blades and three fans with backward-skewed fan blades and a common operating point were designed with a 2D element blade method. Two approaches were adopted to modify the inflow conditions: first, the inflow turbulence intensity was increased by two different rectangular grids and second, the inflow velocity profile was changed to an asymmetric characteristic by two grids with a distinct bar stacking. An increase in the inflow turbulence intensity affects both tonal and broadband noise, whereas a non-uniform velocity profile at the inlet influences mainly tonal components. The magnitude of this effect is not the same for all fans but is dependent on the blade skew. The impact is greater for the forward-skewed fans than for the backward-skewed and thus directly linked to the fan blade geometry.

  11. Influence of Experimental Conditions on Electronic Tongue Results—Case of Valsartan Minitablets Dissolution

    PubMed Central

    Wesoły, Małgorzata; Kluk, Anna; Sznitowska, Małgorzata; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    A potentiometric electronic tongue was applied to study the release of valsartan from pharmaceutical formulations, i.e., minitablets uncoated and coated with Eudragit E. Special attention was paid to evaluate the influence of medium temperature and composition, as well as to compare the performances of the sensor arrays working in various hydrodynamic conditions. The drug dissolution profiles registered with the ion-sensitive electrodes were compared with standard dissolution tests performed with USP Apparatus 2 (paddle). Moreover, the signal changes of all sensors were processed by principal component analysis to visualize the release modifications, related to the presence of the coating agent. Finally, the importance and influence of the experimental conditions on the results obtained using potentiometric sensor arrays were discussed. PMID:27563904

  12. Experimental study on microscopic evolving process of boiling overheat liquor in boiler under microcracking condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sining; He, Xuechao; Sun, Jinhua

    2009-07-01

    Boilers are frequently used in agricultural engineering. After micro cracks appear on the wall of the boiler for high pressure saturated liquor, the containing liquid will be overheated, rapidly boiled and expanded, which may result in explosion of the whole container. The evolving processes differ greatly by cracking conditions. In the experiment conducted in the this article, we made a small sized experimental device and applied high speed photography technology observing the simulated fierce boiling process of the high temperature and high pressure saturated water under overheat condition when micro cracking appears on boiler wall. According to our study, lower depressurization rate will suppress the boiling intensity of the overheated liquid and slow the growth of bubbles, decelerating the expansion of the two-phase flow compared with the boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion. The magnitude of overpressure in the container is also relatively smaller than overpressure in BLEVE.

  13. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise.

  14. Simulation of VSPT Experimental Cascade Under High and Low Free-Stream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Giel, Paul W.; Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2014-01-01

    Variable-Speed Power Turbines (VSPT) for rotorcraft applications operate at low Reynolds number and over a wide range in incidence associated with shaft speed change. A comprehensive linear cascade data set obtained includes the effects of Reynolds number, free-stream turbulence and incidence is available and this paper concerns itself with the presentation and numerical simulation of conditions resulting in a selected set of those data. As such, post-dictions of blade pressure loading, total-pressure loss and exit flow angles under conditions of high and low turbulence intensity for a single Reynolds number are presented. Analyses are performed with the three-equation turbulence models of Walters-Leylek and Walters and Cokljat. Transition, loading, total-pressure loss and exit angle variations are presented and comparisons are made with experimental data as available. It is concluded that at the low freestream turbulence conditions the Walters-Cokljat model is better suited to predictions while for high freestream conditions the two models generate similar predications that are generally satisfactory.

  15. Simulation of VSPT Experimental Cascade Under High and Low Free-Stream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Giel, Paul W.; Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2015-01-01

    Variable-Speed Power Turbines (VSPT) for rotorcraft applications operate at low Reynolds number and over a wide range in incidence associated with shaft speed change. A comprehensive linear cascade data set obtained includes the effects of Reynolds number, free-stream turbulence and incidence is available and this paper concerns itself with the presentation and numerical simulation of conditions resulting in a selected set of those data. As such, post-dictions of blade pressure loading, total-pressure loss and exit flow angles under conditions of high and low turbulence intensity for a single Reynolds number are presented. Analyses are performed with the three-equation turbulence models of Walters- Leylek and Walters and Cokljat. Transition, loading, total-pressure loss and exit angle variations are presented and comparisons are made with experimental data as available. It is concluded that at the low freestream turbulence conditions the Walters-Cokljat model is better suited to predictions while for high freestream conditions the two models generate similar predications that are generally satisfactory.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER RESERVOIR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2003-05-01

    The USA deposits of heavy oils and tar sands contain significant energy reserves. Thermal methods, particularly steam drive and steam soak, are used to recover heavy oils and bitumen. Thermal methods rely on several displacement mechanisms to recover oil, but the most important is the reduction of crude viscosity with increasing temperature. The main objective of this research is to propose a simple procedure to predict heavy oil viscosity at reservoir conditions as a function of easily determined physical properties. This procedure will avoid costly experimental testing and reduce uncertainty in designing thermal recovery processes. First, we reviewed critically the existing literature choosing the most promising models for viscosity determination. Then, we modified an existing viscosity correlation, based on the corresponding states principle in order to fit more than two thousand commercial viscosity data. We collected data for compositional and black oil samples (absence of compositional data). The data were screened for inconsistencies resulting from experimental error. A procedure based on the monotonic increase or decrease of key variables was implemented to carry out the screening process. The modified equation was used to calculate the viscosity of several oil samples where compositional data were available. Finally, a simple procedure was proposed to calculate black oil viscosity from common experimental information such as, boiling point, API gravity and molecular weight.

  17. Experimental evaluation of automotive air-conditioning using HFC-134a and HC-134a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasution, Henry; Zainudin, Muhammad Amir; Aziz, Azhar Abdul; Latiff, Zulkarnain Abdul; Perang, Mohd Rozi Mohd; Rahman, Abd Halim Abdul

    2012-06-01

    An experimental study to evaluate the energy consumption of an automotive air conditioning is presented. In this study, these refrigerants will be tested using the experimental rig which simulated the actual cars as a cabin complete with a cooling system component of the actual car that is as the blower, evaporator, condenser, radiators, electric motor, which acts as a vehicle engine, and then the electric motor will operate the compressor using a belt and pulley system, as well as to the alternator will recharge the battery. The compressor working with the fluids HFC-134a and HC-134a and has been tested varying the speed in the range 1000, 1500, 2000 and 2500 rpm. The measurements taken during the one hour experimental periods at 2-minutes interval times for temperature setpoint of 20°C with internal heat loads 0, 500, 700 and 1000 W. The final results of this study show an overall better energy consumption of the HFC-134a compared with the HC-134a.

  18. Experimental evidence for the conditions necessary to sustain meandering in coarse-bedded rivers.

    PubMed

    Braudrick, Christian A; Dietrich, William E; Leverich, Glen T; Sklar, Leonard S

    2009-10-01

    Meandering rivers are common on Earth and other planetary surfaces, yet the conditions necessary to maintain meandering channels are unclear. As a consequence, self-maintaining meandering channels with cutoffs have not been reproduced in the laboratory. Such experimental channels are needed to explore mechanisms controlling migration rate, sinuosity, floodplain formation, and planform morphodynamics and to test theories for wavelength and bend propagation. Here we report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. We found that elevated bank strength (provided by alfalfa sprouts) relative to the cohesionless bed material and the blocking of troughs (chutes) in the lee of point bars via suspended sediment deposition were the necessary ingredients to successful meandering. Varying flood discharge was not necessary. Scaling analysis shows that the experimental meander migration was fast compared to most natural channels. This high migration rate caused nearly all of the bedload sediment to exchange laterally, such that bar growth was primarily dependent on bank sediment supplied from upstream lateral migration. The high migration rate may have contributed to the relatively low sinuosity of 1.19, and this suggests that to obtain much higher sinuosity experiments at this scale may have to be conducted for several years. Although patience is required to evolve them, these experimental channels offer the opportunity to explore several fundamental issues about river morphodynamics. Our results also suggest that sand supply may be an essential control in restoring self-maintaining, actively shifting gravel-bedded meanders.

  19. Lipid peroxidation. Definition of experimental conditions for selective study of the propagation and termination phases.

    PubMed

    Tadolini, B; Fiorentini, D; Landi, L; Cabrini, L

    1989-01-01

    To find experimental conditions to selectively study the propagation phase of lipoperoxidation we studied the lipoperoxidation, catalyzed by FeCl2, of liposomes in a buffering condition where Fe2+ autoxidation and oxygen active species generation does not occur. Liposomes from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, prepared by vortex mixing, do not oxidize Fe2+; on the contrary they oxidize Fe2+ when prepared by ultrasonic irradiation. Dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine liposomes prepared by ultrasonic irradiation do not oxidize Fe2+. During sonication polyunsaturated fatty acid residues autoxidize and lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) are generated. Only when LOOH are present in the liposomes Fe2+ oxidizes and its rate of oxidation depends on the amount of LOOH in the assay. The reaction results in the generation of both LOOH and thiobarbituric acid reactive material (TBAR); it is inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and has a acidic pH optimum; it is not inhibited by catalase and OH scavengers. The reaction studied, thus, appears to be the chain branching and propagation phase of lipoperoxidation. When we studied the dependence of Fe2+ oxidation, LOOH and TBAR generation on FeCl2 concentration, we observed that at high FeCl2 concentrations the termination phase of lipoperoxidation was prevalent. Thus, by selecting the appropriate FeCl2 concentration the proposed experimental system allows study of either the propagation or the termination phase of lipoperoxidation.

  20. Experimental cooling during incubation leads to reduced innate immunity and body condition in nestling tree swallows.

    PubMed

    Ardia, Daniel R; Pérez, Jonathan H; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2010-06-22

    Nest microclimate can have strong effects that can carry over to later life-history stages. We experimentally cooled the nests of tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor). Females incubating in cooled nests reduced incubation time and allowed egg temperatures to drop, leading to extended incubation periods. We partially cross-fostered nestlings to test carry-over effects of cooling during incubation on nestling innate constitutive immunity, assessed through bacteria killing ability (BKA) of blood. Nestlings that had been cooled as eggs showed a lower ability to kill bacteria than control nestlings, regardless of the treatment of their foster mother. However, there was no effect of treatment of rearing females on nestling BKA in control nestlings, even though cooled females made significantly fewer feeding visits than did control females. This suggests that the effect of cooling occurred during incubation and was not due to carry-over effects on nestling condition. Nestlings that were exposed to experimental cooling as embryos had lower residual body mass and absolute body mass at all four ages measured. Our results indicate that environmental conditions and trade-offs experienced during one stage of development can have important carry-over effects on later life-history stages.

  1. Experimental investigation of transient thermal behavior of an airship under different solar radiation and airflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, De-Fu; Xia, Xin-Lin; Sun, Chuang

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of the thermal behavior of airships is crucial to the development of airship technology. An experiment apparatus is constructed to investigate the thermal response characteristics of airships, and the transient temperature distributions of both hull and inner gas are obtained under the irradiation of a solar simulator and various airflow conditions. In the course of the research, the transient temperature change of the experimental airship is measured for four airflow speeds of 0 m/s (natural convection), 3.26 m/s, 5.5 m/s and 7.0 m/s, and two incident solar radiation values of 842.4 W/m2 and 972.0 W/m2. The results show that solar irradiation has significant influence on the airship hull and inner gas temperatures even if the airship stays in a ground airflow environment where the heat transfer is dominated by radiation and convection. The airflow around the airship is conducive to reduce the hull temperature and temperature nonuniformity. Transient thermal response of airships rapidly varies with time under solar radiation conditions and the hull temperature remains approximately constant in ˜5-10 min. Finally, a transient thermal model of airship is developed and the model is validated through comparison with the experimental data.

  2. Development of an Experimental Setup for the Measurement of the Coefficient of Restitution under Vacuum Conditions.

    PubMed

    Drücker, Sven; Krautstrunk, Isabell; Paulick, Maria; Saleh, Khashayar; Morgeneyer, Martin; Kwade, Arno

    2016-01-01

    The Discrete Element Method is used for the simulation of particulate systems to describe and analyze them, to predict and afterwards optimize their behavior for single stages of a process or even an entire process. For the simulation with occurring particle-particle and particle-wall contacts, the value of the coefficient of restitution is required. It can be determined experimentally. The coefficient of restitution depends on several parameters like the impact velocity. Especially for fine particles the impact velocity depends on the air pressure and under atmospheric pressure high impact velocities cannot be reached. For this, a new experimental setup for free-fall tests under vacuum conditions is developed. The coefficient of restitution is determined with the impact and rebound velocity which are detected by a high-speed camera. To not hinder the view, the vacuum chamber is made of glass. Also a new release mechanism to drop one single particle under vacuum conditions is constructed. Due to that, all properties of the particle can be characterized beforehand. PMID:27077671

  3. Computational ecotoxicology: simultaneous prediction of ecotoxic effects of nanoparticles under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M; Melo, André; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2014-12-01

    Nanotechnology has brought great advances to many fields of modern science. A manifold of applications of nanoparticles have been found due to their interesting optical, electrical, and biological/chemical properties. However, the potential toxic effects of nanoparticles to different ecosystems are of special concern nowadays. Despite the efforts of the scientific community, the mechanisms of toxicity of nanoparticles are still poorly understood. Quantitative-structure activity/toxicity relationships (QSAR/QSTR) models have just started being useful computational tools for the assessment of toxic effects of nanomaterials. But most QSAR/QSTR models have been applied so far to predict ecotoxicity against only one organism/bio-indicator such as Daphnia magna. This prevents having a deeper knowledge about the real ecotoxic effects of nanoparticles, and consequently, there is no possibility to establish an efficient risk assessment of nanomaterials in the environment. In this work, a perturbation model for nano-QSAR problems is introduced with the aim of simultaneously predicting the ecotoxicity of different nanoparticles against several assay organisms (bio-indicators), by considering also multiple measures of ecotoxicity, as well as the chemical compositions, sizes, conditions under which the sizes were measured, shapes, and the time during which the diverse assay organisms were exposed to nanoparticles. The QSAR-perturbation model was derived from a database containing 5520 cases (nanoparticle-nanoparticle pairs), and it was shown to exhibit accuracies of ca. 99% in both training and prediction sets. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of our model, three different nickel-based nanoparticles (Ni) with experimental values reported in the literature were predicted. The predictions were found to be in very good agreement with the experimental evidences, confirming that Ni-nanoparticles are not ecotoxic when compared with other nanoparticles. The results

  4. Isometric force production parameters during normal and experimental low back pain conditions

    PubMed Central

    Descarreaux, Martin; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Teasdale, Normand

    2005-01-01

    Background The control of force and its between-trial variability are often taken as critical determinants of motor performance. Subjects performed isometric trunk flexion and extension forces without and with experiment pain to examine if pain yields changes in the control of trunk forces. The objective of this study is to determine if experimental low back pain modifies trunk isometric force production. Methods Ten control subjects participated in this study. They were required to exert 50 and 75% of their isometric maximal trunk flexion and extension torque. In a learning phase preceding the non painful and painful trials, visual and verbal feedbacks were provided. Then, subjects were asked to perform 10 trials without any feedback. Time to peak torque, time to peak torque variability, peak torque variability as well as constant and absolute error in peak torque were calculated. Time to peak and peak dF/dt were computed to determine if the first peak of dF/dt could predict the peak torque achieved. Results Absolute and constant errors were higher in the presence of a painful electrical stimulation. Furthermore, peak torque variability for the higher level of force was increased with in the presence of experimental pain. The linear regressions between peak dF/dt, time to peak dF/dt and peak torque were similar for both conditions. Experimental low back pain yielded increased absolute and constant errors as well as a greater peak torque variability for the higher levels of force. The control strategy, however, remained the same between the non painful and painful condition. Cutaneous pain affects some isometric force production parameters but modifications of motor control strategies are not implemented spontaneously. Conclusions It is hypothesized that adaptation of motor strategies to low back pain is implemented gradually over time. This would enable LBP patients to perform their daily tasks with presumably less pain and more accuracy. PMID:15703067

  5. Ion exchange chromatography of proteins-predictions of elution curves and operating conditions. II. Experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Nakanishi, K; Matsuno, R; Kamijubo, T

    1983-05-01

    The applicability and validity of the model developed in Part I were confirmed experimentally. In this article, various proteins were eluted both by stepwise and linear gradient elution on DEAE ion exchangers under a variety of experimental conditions. Adsorption isotherms were measured as a function of ionic strength in batch experiments. The moment method was employed for the determination of various parameters such as the gel-phase diffusion coefficient and the longitudinal dispersion coefficient. By use of these parameters and the experimentally measured ionic strength of the peak position, the number of plates was determined according to the method described in Part I. Theoretical elution curves were calculated with the experimentally measured adsorption equilibria and the number of plates. Good agreement was observed between theory an experiments. Various factors affecting the separation were investigated. It was found that the effect of the number of plates for salts, N'(p), was negligible except the case of stepwise elution of high ionic strength buffer. When elution curves were symmetrical, the widths of the elution curves were inversely proportional to the square root of the number of plates of proteins, N(p), as in other chromatographic techniques. A simple graphical method for prediction of the peak position in linear gradient elution described in Part I was found applicable when the elution curves were symmetrical. A useful correlation of prediction of the peak width in a linear gradient elution was proposed on the basis of the approximate solution derived in Part I of this study. This graphical method and correlation permit easy prediction of the peak position and peak width in linear gradient elution in the case of symmetrical elution curves.

  6. Establishment and performance of an experimental green roof under extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Petra M; Coffman, Reid

    2015-04-15

    Green roofs alter the surface energy balance and can help in mitigating urban heat islands. However, the cooling of green roofs due to evapotranspiration strongly depends on the climatic conditions, and vegetation type and density. In the Southern Central Plains of the United States, extreme weather events, such as high winds, heat waves and drought conditions pose challenges for successful implementation of green roofs, and likely alter their standard performance. The National Weather Center Experimental Green Roof, an interdisciplinary research site established in 2010 in Norman, OK, aimed to investigate the ecological performance and surface energy balance of green roof systems. Starting in May 2010, 26 months of vegetation studies were conducted and the radiation balance, air temperature, relative humidity, and buoyancy fluxes were monitored at two meteorological stations during April-October 2011. The establishment of a vegetative community trended towards prairie plant dominance. High mortality of succulents and low germination of grasses and herbaceous plants contributed to low vegetative coverage. In this condition succulent diversity declined. Bouteloua gracilis and Delosperma cooperi showed typological dominance in harsh climatic conditions, while Sedum species experienced high mortality. The plant community diversified through volunteers such as Euphorbia maculate and Portulaca maculate. Net radiation measured at a green-roof meteorological station was higher than at a control station over the original, light-colored roofing material. These findings indicate that the albedo of the green roof was lower than the albedo of the original roofing material. The low vegetative coverage during the heat and drought conditions in 2011, which resulted in the dark substrate used in the green roof containers being exposed, likely contributed to the low albedo values. Nevertheless, air temperatures and buoyancy fluxes were often lower over the green roof indicating

  7. Establishment and performance of an experimental green roof under extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Klein, Petra M; Coffman, Reid

    2015-04-15

    Green roofs alter the surface energy balance and can help in mitigating urban heat islands. However, the cooling of green roofs due to evapotranspiration strongly depends on the climatic conditions, and vegetation type and density. In the Southern Central Plains of the United States, extreme weather events, such as high winds, heat waves and drought conditions pose challenges for successful implementation of green roofs, and likely alter their standard performance. The National Weather Center Experimental Green Roof, an interdisciplinary research site established in 2010 in Norman, OK, aimed to investigate the ecological performance and surface energy balance of green roof systems. Starting in May 2010, 26 months of vegetation studies were conducted and the radiation balance, air temperature, relative humidity, and buoyancy fluxes were monitored at two meteorological stations during April-October 2011. The establishment of a vegetative community trended towards prairie plant dominance. High mortality of succulents and low germination of grasses and herbaceous plants contributed to low vegetative coverage. In this condition succulent diversity declined. Bouteloua gracilis and Delosperma cooperi showed typological dominance in harsh climatic conditions, while Sedum species experienced high mortality. The plant community diversified through volunteers such as Euphorbia maculate and Portulaca maculate. Net radiation measured at a green-roof meteorological station was higher than at a control station over the original, light-colored roofing material. These findings indicate that the albedo of the green roof was lower than the albedo of the original roofing material. The low vegetative coverage during the heat and drought conditions in 2011, which resulted in the dark substrate used in the green roof containers being exposed, likely contributed to the low albedo values. Nevertheless, air temperatures and buoyancy fluxes were often lower over the green roof indicating

  8. A thermodynamic and experimental study of the conditions of thaumasite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Thomas Lothenbach, Barbara; Romer, Michael; Scrivener, Karen; Rentsch, Daniel; Figi, Renato

    2008-03-15

    The formation of thaumasite was investigated with the progressive equilibrium approach (PEA). This approach experimentally simulates the conditions of various levels of sulfate addition in hardened cement pastes. The influence of limestone, time, C{sub 3}A content, temperature and leaching on thaumasite formation was investigated. The results show that thaumasite formation is favoured at lower temperatures (8 deg. C) independently of the type of cement clinker (high or low C{sub 3}A content) used. Thaumasite was found to form only in systems where limestone was present and where sufficient sulfate had been added. Thaumasite precipitated only in systems where the Al present has already been consumed to form ettringite and the molar SO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio exceeded 3. In leached samples (reduction of portlandite and alkalis) slightly less thaumasite was formed whereas gypsum and ettringite are favoured under these conditions. The PEA, used to investigate the chemical aspects of sulfate attack was found to be a good tool for simulating external sulfate attack. Generally, thaumasite was detected were it was modelled to be stable in significant amounts. However, in this study equilibrium conditions were not reached after 9 months.

  9. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pressure-volume-Temperature Mass Gauging Method Under Microgravity Condition by Parabolic Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Mansu; Park, Hana; Yoo, DonGyu; Jung, Youngsuk; Jeong, Sangkwon

    Gauging the volume or mass of liquid propellant of a rocket vehicle in space is an important issue for its economic feasibility and optimized design of loading mass. Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) gauging method is one of the most suitable measuring techniques in space due to its simplicity and reliability. This paper presents unique experimental results and analyses of PVT gauging method using liquid nitrogen under microgravity condition by parabolic flight. A vacuum-insulated and cylindrical-shaped liquid nitrogen storage tank with 9.2 L volume is manufactured by observing regulation of parabolic flight. PVT gauging experiments are conducted under low liquid fraction condition from 26% to 32%. Pressure, temperature, and the injected helium mass into the storage tank are measured to obtain the ullage volume by gas state equation. Liquid volume is finally derived by the measured ullage volume and the known total tank volume. Two sets of parabolic flights are conducted and each set is composed of approximately 10 parabolic flights. In the first set of flights, the short initial waiting time (3 ∼ 5 seconds) cannot achieve sufficient thermal equilibrium condition at the beginning. It causes inaccurate gauging results due to insufficient information of the initial helium partial pressure in the tank. The helium injection after 12 second waiting time at microgravity condition with high mass flow rate in the second set of flights achieves successful initial thermal equilibrium states and accurate measurement results of initial helium partial pressure. Liquid volume measurement errors in the second set are within 11%.

  11. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite serpentinite at subduction zone conditions determined from experimentally and naturally deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, Anne-Line; Escartin, Javier; Walte, Nicolas P.; Guillot, Stéphane; Hirth, Greg; Frost, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    We performed deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite at pressures of 1-3.5 GPa and temperatures of between 400 and 650 °C, bracketing the stability of antigorite under subduction zone conditions. For each set of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, we conducted two runs at strain rates of 5 ×10-5 and 1 ×10-4 s-1. We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400 °C (Chernak and Hirth, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Optical and transmission electron microscopies were used for microstructural characterization and determination of deformation mechanisms. Our observations on experimentally deformed antigorite prior to breakdown show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow with observable but minor contribution of plastic deformation (microkinking and (001) gliding mainly expressed by stacking disorder mainly). In contrast, in naturally deformed samples, plastic deformation structures are dominant (stacking disorder, kinking, pressure solution), with minor but also perceptible contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases and is coupled to local embrittlement that we attribute to antigorite dehydration. In dehydrating samples collected in the Alps, embrittlement is also observed suggesting that dehydration may contribute to intermediate-depth seismicity. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. However, the plastic deformation recorded by naturally deformed samples was likely acquired at low strain rates. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite controls the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter- and intra-grain cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. We also show that antigorite rheology in subduction zones is partly controlled

  12. Experimental study on ignition characteristics of pulverized coal under high-temperature oxygen condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. W.; Liu, Y. H.; Dong, P.

    2016-08-01

    The high-temperature oxygen ignition technology of pulverized coal, which can replace the oil gun and achieve oil-free pulverized coal ignition by mixing the high- temperature oxygen and the pulverized coal stream directly, was proposed and a relevant ignition experimental system was built. The ignition characteristics of pulverized coal under high-temperature oxygen condition were investigated: the ignition process was described and analyzed, the influence of relevant parameters on the pulverized coal stream ignition were obtained and analyzed. The results showed: when the oxygen heating temperature is over 750 °C, the pulverized coal stream could be ignited successfully by high-temperature oxygen; increasing the pulverized coal concentration, primary air temperature and oxygen volume flow rate or decreasing the primary air velocity is helpful for the ignition and combustion of the pulverized coal stream.

  13. Experimental study of horizontal annular channels under non-developed conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Delgadino, G.; Balino, J.; Carrica, P.

    1995-09-01

    In this work an experimental study of the two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal annular channel under non-developed conditions is presented. A conductive local probe was placed at the end of the channel to measure the local phase indication function under a wide range of gas and water flow rates. The signal was processed to obtain the void fraction and statistical distributions of liquid and gas residence times. From these data the topology of the flow could be inferred. A laser intermittence detector was also located close to the channel exit, in order to measure statistical parameters for intermittent flows by means of a two-probe method.

  14. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-01-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear. PMID:26979092

  15. Experimental study of an acoustic communication system in shallow-water conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovskii, I. V.; Yagotinets, V. P.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of an acoustic communication system containing parallel transmission digital information channels, which came about from applying the principles of orthogonal frequency division of individual information channels, resulting in an increased information rate. Received signals were processed by two separate receivers differing in the method by which the pulse response parameters of the medium were estimated during signal propagation. It is shown that to increase the reliability of received digital information for coherent separated reception of a multipath signal, it is necessary to estimate the parameters of this signal's components in frequency bands corresponding to individual information channels. When such estimates were taken into account, the acoustic communication system provided error-less reception of digital information in all experiments conducted under conditions of the shallow Volgograd Reservoir and Lake Ladoga.

  16. Relationship between nine haloacetic acids with total organic halogens in different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Pourmoghadas, Hossein; Kinman, Riley N

    2013-04-03

    The effects of pH and bromide ion concentration on the formation of nine haloacetic acids (HAAs) and total organic halogens (TOX) in chlorinated drinking water have been evaluated. In an extensive study, the relationships of nine HAAs with TOX have been investigated. Honesty Significant Differences test (HSD) and ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analyses. The study determined the concentration range of nine HAAs as of a percentage of TOX at varying experimental conditions. Statistical analyses showed that the parameters pH and Br had significant effects on the formation of nine HAAs and TOX. This study also showed that brominated and mixed species of HAAs would be dominant in the presence of high bromide ion concentration which contributes a high percentage of the TOX. The results of this study could be used to set up a maximum contaminant level of TOX as a water quality standard for chlorination by-products.

  17. Exergo-Economic Analysis of an Experimental Aircraft Turboprop Engine Under Low Torque Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atilgan, Ramazan; Turan, Onder; Aydin, Hakan

    Exergo-economic analysis is an unique combination of exergy analysis and cost analysis conducted at the component level. In exergo-economic analysis, cost of each exergy stream is determined. Inlet and outlet exergy streams of the each component are associated to a monetary cost. This is essential to detect cost-ineffective processes and identify technical options which could improve the cost effectiveness of the overall energy system. In this study, exergo-economic analysis is applied to an aircraft turboprop engine. Analysis is based on experimental values at low torque condition (240 N m). Main components of investigated turboprop engine are the compressor, the combustor, the gas generator turbine, the free power turbine and the exhaust. Cost balance equations have been formed for all components individually and exergo-economic parameters including cost rates and unit exergy costs have been calculated for each component.

  18. Experimental simulations of oxidizing conditions and organic decomposition on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    One important scientific objective of a Mars Rover Sample Return mission would be to look for traces of living and extinct life on Mars. An instrument to search for organic carbon may be the simplest instrument that could screen samples which are interesting from a biological point of view. An experimental program is described which would help to understand the nature of the oxidizing soil on Mars and the mechanism responsible for organic degradation on the Martian surface. This is approached by lab simulations of the actual conditions that occur on Mars, particularly the oxidant production by atmospheric photochemistry, and the combined effects of UV light and oxidants in decomposing organic compounds. The results will be used to formulate models of the photochemistry of the atmospheric, the atmosphere-soil interaction, and the diffusion of reactive compounds into the soils. This information will provide insights and constraints on the design of a sampling strategy to search for organic compounds on Mars.

  19. Experimental Study and Modeling of the Photocatalytic Oxidation of No in Indoor Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Q. L.; Brouwers, H. J. H.; Ballari, M. M.

    Heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) has shown to be a promising air purifying technology. Nitrogen monoxide (NO) is one common indoor air pollutant. The present paper addresses the PCO reaction in indoor conditions using NO as target pollutant with the gypsum plasterboard as a special substrate and carbon-doped TiO2 as photocatalyst. A photocatalytic reaction setup is introduced for the assessment of the indoor air quality. The PCO effect of the carbon-doped TiO2 is evaluated using different light wavelengths. Furthermore, the influence of the reactor volume on the PCO rate is studied. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood model is applied to describe the photocatalytic reaction mechanism. Experimental results show the validity of the L-H model in the present research. Using this model, a mathematical expression is proposed to describe the concentration change in the reactor.

  20. Universal limiting shape of worn profile under multiple-mode fretting conditions: theory and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Andrey I.; Voll, Lars B.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Popov, Valentin L.

    2016-03-01

    We consider multiple-mode fretting wear in a frictional contact of elastic bodies subjected to a small-amplitude oscillation, which may include in-plane and out-of-plane translation, torsion and tilting (“periodic rolling”). While the detailed kinetics of wear depends on the particular loading history and wear mechanism, the final worn shape, under some additional conditions, occurs to be universal for all types and loading and wear mechanisms. This universal form is determined solely by the radius of the permanent stick region and the maximum indentation depth during the loading cycle. We provide experimental evidence for the correctness of the theoretically predicted limiting shape. The existence of the universal limiting shape can be used for designing joints which are resistant to fretting wear.

  1. Experimental evidence for the conditions necessary to sustain meandering in coarse-bedded rivers

    PubMed Central

    Braudrick, Christian A.; Dietrich, William E.; Leverich, Glen T.; Sklar, Leonard S.

    2009-01-01

    Meandering rivers are common on Earth and other planetary surfaces, yet the conditions necessary to maintain meandering channels are unclear. As a consequence, self-maintaining meandering channels with cutoffs have not been reproduced in the laboratory. Such experimental channels are needed to explore mechanisms controlling migration rate, sinuosity, floodplain formation, and planform morphodynamics and to test theories for wavelength and bend propagation. Here we report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. We found that elevated bank strength (provided by alfalfa sprouts) relative to the cohesionless bed material and the blocking of troughs (chutes) in the lee of point bars via suspended sediment deposition were the necessary ingredients to successful meandering. Varying flood discharge was not necessary. Scaling analysis shows that the experimental meander migration was fast compared to most natural channels. This high migration rate caused nearly all of the bedload sediment to exchange laterally, such that bar growth was primarily dependent on bank sediment supplied from upstream lateral migration. The high migration rate may have contributed to the relatively low sinuosity of 1.19, and this suggests that to obtain much higher sinuosity experiments at this scale may have to be conducted for several years. Although patience is required to evolve them, these experimental channels offer the opportunity to explore several fundamental issues about river morphodynamics. Our results also suggest that sand supply may be an essential control in restoring self-maintaining, actively shifting gravel-bedded meanders. PMID:19805077

  2. Experimental evidence for the conditions necessary to sustain meandering in coarse-bedded rivers.

    PubMed

    Braudrick, Christian A; Dietrich, William E; Leverich, Glen T; Sklar, Leonard S

    2009-10-01

    Meandering rivers are common on Earth and other planetary surfaces, yet the conditions necessary to maintain meandering channels are unclear. As a consequence, self-maintaining meandering channels with cutoffs have not been reproduced in the laboratory. Such experimental channels are needed to explore mechanisms controlling migration rate, sinuosity, floodplain formation, and planform morphodynamics and to test theories for wavelength and bend propagation. Here we report an experiment in which meandering with near-constant width was maintained during repeated cutoff and regeneration of meander bends. We found that elevated bank strength (provided by alfalfa sprouts) relative to the cohesionless bed material and the blocking of troughs (chutes) in the lee of point bars via suspended sediment deposition were the necessary ingredients to successful meandering. Varying flood discharge was not necessary. Scaling analysis shows that the experimental meander migration was fast compared to most natural channels. This high migration rate caused nearly all of the bedload sediment to exchange laterally, such that bar growth was primarily dependent on bank sediment supplied from upstream lateral migration. The high migration rate may have contributed to the relatively low sinuosity of 1.19, and this suggests that to obtain much higher sinuosity experiments at this scale may have to be conducted for several years. Although patience is required to evolve them, these experimental channels offer the opportunity to explore several fundamental issues about river morphodynamics. Our results also suggest that sand supply may be an essential control in restoring self-maintaining, actively shifting gravel-bedded meanders. PMID:19805077

  3. COMPUTATIONAL MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES ON NOx REDUCTION UNDER PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Subha K. Kumpaty; Kannikeswaran Subramanian; Victor P. Nokku; Tyrus L. Hodges; Adel Hassouneh; Ansumana Darboe; Sravan K. Kumpati

    1998-06-01

    In this work, both computer simulation and experimental studies were conducted to investigate several strategies for NO{sub x} reduction under pulverized coal combustion conditions with an aim to meet the stringent environmental standards for NO{sub x} control. Both computer predictions and reburning experiments yielded favorable results in terms of NO{sub x} control by reburning with a combination of methane and acetylene as well as non-selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with ammonia following reburning with methane. The greatest reduction was achieved at the reburning stoichiometric ratio of 0.9; the reduction was very significant, as clearly shown in Chapters III and V. Both the experimental and computational results favored mixing gases: methane and acetylene (90% and 10% respectively) and methane and ammonia (98% and 2%) in order to get optimum reduction levels which can not be achieved by individual gases at any amounts. Also, the above gaseous compositions as reburning fuels seemed to have a larger window of stoichiometric ratio (SR2 < 0.9) as opposed to just methane (SR2=0.9) so as to reduce and keep NO{sub x} at low ppm levels. From the various computational runs, it has been observed that although there are several pathways that contribute to NO{sub x} reduction, the key pathway is NO {r_arrow} HCN {r_arrow} NH{sub 3} {r_arrow} N{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. With the trends established in this work, it is possible to scale the experimental results to real time industrial applications using computational calculations.

  4. Impact of the experimental conditions on drug release from parenteral depot systems: From negligible to significant.

    PubMed

    Delplace, C; Kreye, F; Klose, D; Danède, F; Descamps, M; Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the experimental conditions on drug release measurements from parenteral depot systems. Frequently applied setups were used, including agitated and "non-agitated" flasks and tubes, flow-though cells as well as agarose gels. The bulk fluid volumes and flow rates were varied. Lipid implants (prepared by direct compression or melting & casting) as well as PLGA-based microparticles (prepared by O/W or W/O/W or S/O/W solvent extraction/evaporation methods) were studied. Theophylline, lidocaine, prilocaine, propranolol HCl, dexamethasone and ibuprofen were used as model drugs at different initial loadings. In all cases, the release medium was phosphate buffer pH 7.4, kept constant at 37°C. Particle size analysis, SEM, X-ray diffraction, DSC analysis and mathematical modeling were applied to better understand the observed phenomena. Interestingly, the importance of the impact of the experimental conditions ranged from negligible to significant, depending on the specific type of drug delivery system and setup. Both, lipid implants as well as PLGA-based microparticles can exhibit more or less sensitive/robust drug release patterns. The observed differences in sensitivity could partially be explained in a mechanistic way, but in many cases they are not yet fully understood. A thorough understanding of the underlying drug release mechanisms can be very helpful. If the devices are poorly characterized and treated as "black boxes", great care must be taken when drawing conclusions from in vitro drug release measurements.

  5. Experimental tests and predictive model of an adsorptive air conditioning unit

    SciTech Connect

    Poyelle, F.; Guilleminot, J.J.; Meunier, F.

    1999-01-01

    An adsorption air conditioning unit has been built operating with a heat nd mass recovery cycle and a zeolite-water pair. A new consolidated adsorbent composite with good heat transfer properties has been developed and implemented in the adsorber. At an evaporating temperature of 4 C, the experimental specific cooling power (SCP) of 97 W/kg achieved represents a real improvement in comparison with those measured with a packed bed technology. At this evaporating pressure, the mass transfer resistance controls the process. Therefore, at higher evaporating temperature a COP of 0.68 and a SCP of 135 W/kg were experimentally achieved. A new model has been developed to take into account the mass transfer limitations. The model has been validated and can predict the average pressure inside the adsorber and the components temperature of the unit. A new high conductive material with enhanced mass transfer properties has been developed. The predictive model shows that a SCP of 600 W/kg and a COP of 0.74 could be achieved with this new material.

  6. Experimental results and modeling tests of an adsorptive air-conditioning unit

    SciTech Connect

    Guilleminot, J.J.; Poyelle, F.; Meunier, F.

    1998-10-01

    Experimental tests have been performed on a zeolite-water adsorptive system suitable for air conditioning and consisting of two adsorbers filled with a consolidated composite made of zeolite mixed with a highly conductive matrix. This paper describes the experimental results of such a heat pump unit operating with a heat and mass recovery cycle. An important enhancement of the specific cooling power (SCP) has been achieved. At evaporating temperature T = 4 C, mass transfer resistance controls the process and limits the expected COP. Tests carried out at higher evaporating pressure make it possible to achieve the predicted COP and SCP. A predictive model developed and validated elsewhere in order to describe the temperature evolution of components and the heat and mass transfer in the adsorbers explains the mass transfer resistance in the adsorbent. Last, a new highly conductive adsorbent composite with good mass transfer properties is developed. The model is used to predict the performances of this new material. Very good SCP and COP can be achieved.

  7. Experimental Testing of Water Disinfection Models under Varying Hydraulic and Kinetic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Edmilson C; Rauen, William B; Fonseca, Ismênia; Figueiredo, Iene

    2016-06-01

    The concomitant effects of hydraulics and reaction kinetics on the disinfection efficiency (DE) of Chlorine Contact Tank (CCT) setups were experimentally assessed, to test the predictive-ability of first order kinetics models: Chick-Watson (C-W), C-t rule and Wehner-Wilhelm (W-W). Prototype tests were conducted using river water characterised for quality parameters, chlorine demand and inactivation rates of total and thermotolerant coliform. Poor, average and superior CCT baffling conditions were assessed by tracer experimentation and for their DE under three chlorine dosages. The models' DE predictive-ability was comparable and high for superior baffling, but decreased differently with the hydraulic efficiency (maximum errors of +15.3% with W-W, +26.0% with C-W and -36.6% with C-t). The positive bias shown by W-W renders it unsafe for CCT design, so the results favoured the C-t rule as the preferred analytical tool of comparable complexity. Potential refinements to these models that could lead to operational savings are identified. PMID:26773311

  8. Experimental evidence of population differences in reproductive investment conditional on environmental stochasticity.

    PubMed

    Gauthey, Zoé; Panserat, Stéphane; Elosegi, Arturo; Herman, Alexandre; Tentelier, Cédric; Labonne, Jacques

    2016-01-15

    Environmental stochasticity is expected to shape life histories of species, wherein organisms subjected to strong environmental variation should display adaptive response by being able to tune their reproductive investment. For riverine ecosystems, climate models forecast an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme events such as floods and droughts. The speed and the mechanisms by which organisms may adapt their reproductive investment are therefore of primary importance to understand how species will cope with such radical environmental changes. In the present study, we sampled spawners from two different populations of wild brown trout, originating from two environments with contrasting levels of flow stochasticity. We placed them in sympatry within an experimental channel during reproductive season. In one modality, water flow was maintained constant, whereas in another modality, water flow was highly variable. Reproductive investment of all individuals was monitored using weight and energetic plasma metabolite variation throughout the reproductive season. Only the populations originating from the most variable environment showed a plastic response to experimental manipulation of water flow, the females being able to reduce their weight variation (from 19.2% to 13.1%) and metabolites variations (from 84.2% to 18.6% for triglycerides for instance) under variable flow conditions. These results imply that mechanisms to cope with environmental stochasticity can differ between populations of the same species, where some populations can be plastic whereas other cannot.

  9. Importance of defining experimental conditions in a mouse excisional wound model.

    PubMed

    Park, Shin Ae; Covert, Jill; Teixeira, Leandro; Motta, Monica J; DeRemer, Sara L; Abbott, Nicholas L; Dubielzig, Richard; Schurr, Michael; Isseroff, Roslyn Rivkah; McAnulty, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The murine dorsum dermal excisional wound model has been widely utilized with or without splint application. However, variations in experimental methods create challenges for direct comparison of results provided in the literature and for design of new wound healing studies. Here, we investigated the effects of wound location and size, number of wounds, type of adhesive used for splint fixation on wound healing using splinted or unsplinted dorsum excisional full thickness wound models. One or two 6- or 8-mm full thickness wounds were made with or without splinting in genetically diabetic but heterozygous mice (Dock7(m)  + / + Lepr(db) ). Two different adhesives: tissue adhesive and an over the counter cyanoacrylate adhesive (OTCA) "Krazy glue" were used to fix splints. Wound contraction, wound closure, and histopathological parameters including reepithelialization, collagen deposition and inflammation were compared between groups. No significant effect of wound number (1 vs. 2), side (left vs. right and cranial vs. caudal) or size on wound healing was observed. The OTCA group had a significantly higher splint success compared to the tissue adhesive group that resulted in significantly higher reepithelialization and collagen deposition in the OTCA group. Understanding the outcomes and effects of the variables will help investigators choose appropriate experimental conditions for the study purpose and interpret data.

  10. Experimental performance study of a proposed desiccant based air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Bassuoni, M M

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance of a proposed hybrid desiccant based air conditioning system referred as HDBAC is introduced in this paper. HDBAC is mainly consisted of a liquid desiccant dehumidification unit integrated with a vapor compression system (VCS). The VCS unit has a cooling capacity of 5.27 kW and uses 134a as refrigerant. Calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution is used as the working desiccant material. HDBAC system is used to serve low sensible heat factor applications. The effect of different parameters such as, process air flow rate, desiccant solution flow rate, evaporator box and condenser box solution temperatures, strong solution concentration and regeneration temperature on the performance of the system is studied. The performance of the system is evaluated using some parameters such as: the coefficient of performance (COPa), specific moisture removal and energy saving percentage. A remarkable increase of about 54% in the coefficient of performance of the proposed system over VCS with reheat is achieved. A maximum overall energy saving of about 46% is observed which emphasizes the use of the proposed system as an energy efficient air conditioning system. PMID:25685475

  11. Experimental performance study of a proposed desiccant based air conditioning system.

    PubMed

    Bassuoni, M M

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance of a proposed hybrid desiccant based air conditioning system referred as HDBAC is introduced in this paper. HDBAC is mainly consisted of a liquid desiccant dehumidification unit integrated with a vapor compression system (VCS). The VCS unit has a cooling capacity of 5.27 kW and uses 134a as refrigerant. Calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution is used as the working desiccant material. HDBAC system is used to serve low sensible heat factor applications. The effect of different parameters such as, process air flow rate, desiccant solution flow rate, evaporator box and condenser box solution temperatures, strong solution concentration and regeneration temperature on the performance of the system is studied. The performance of the system is evaluated using some parameters such as: the coefficient of performance (COPa), specific moisture removal and energy saving percentage. A remarkable increase of about 54% in the coefficient of performance of the proposed system over VCS with reheat is achieved. A maximum overall energy saving of about 46% is observed which emphasizes the use of the proposed system as an energy efficient air conditioning system.

  12. Cross-Protection by Infectious Bronchitis Viruses Under Controlled Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Toro, H; van Santen, V L; Ghetas, A M; Joiner, K S

    2015-12-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) cross-protection trials were performed in healthy chickens maintained under controlled environmental conditions. Chickens primed or primed and boosted with a Massachusetts (Mass)-type attenuated vaccine were subsequently challenged with either IBV Arkansas (Ark) or GA13-type virulent strains. In addition, Ark-vaccinated chickens were challenged with IBV GA13. Spike protein 1 (S1) amino acid identities between IBV vaccine and challenge strains varied from 76.0% to 77.3%. Contrary to expectations, assessments of clinical signs, viral load, and histopathology indicated a significant level of cross-protection among these antigenically distant IBV strains. Moreover, prime and booster vaccination with Mass protected against GA13 and improved protection against Ark when compared with Mass single vaccination. These results emphasize the need to include both single vaccination control groups and control groups primed and boosted with a single serotype when testing the efficacy of IBV protectotypes and/or novel IBV vaccine combinations against heterologous serotypes under controlled experimental conditions. Such controls are of distinct importance in experiments supporting the introduction of attenuated IBV vaccine strains exotic to regions, since these exotic strains may provide new genetic material for recombination and emergence of novel IBV strains. PMID:26629628

  13. Experimental impedance investigation of an ultracapacitor at different conditions for electric vehicle applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Hu, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhenpo; Sun, Fengchun; Dorrell, David G.

    2015-08-01

    Ultracapacitors (UCs) are being increasingly deployed as a short-term energy storage device in various energy systems including uninterruptable power supplies, electrified vehicles, renewable energy systems, and wireless communication. They exhibit excellent power density and energy efficiency. The dynamic behavior of a UC, however, strongly depends on its impedance characteristics. In this paper, the impedance characteristics of a commercial UC are experimentally investigated through the well-adopted Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) technique. The implications of the UC operating conditions (i.e., temperature and state of charge (SOC)) to the impedance are systematically examined. The results show that the impedance is highly sensitive to the temperature and SOC; and the temperature effect is more significant. In particular, the coupling effect between the temperature and SOC is illustrated, as well as the high-efficiency SOC window, which is highlighted. To further verify the reliability of the EIS-based investigation and to probe the sensitivity of UC parameters to the operating conditions, a dynamic model is characterized by fitting the collected impedance data. The interdependence of UC parameters (i.e., capacitance and resistance elements) on the temperature and SOC is quantitatively revealed. The impedance-based model is demonstrated to be accurate in two driving-cycle tests.

  14. Experimental performance study of a proposed desiccant based air conditioning system

    PubMed Central

    Bassuoni, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance of a proposed hybrid desiccant based air conditioning system referred as HDBAC is introduced in this paper. HDBAC is mainly consisted of a liquid desiccant dehumidification unit integrated with a vapor compression system (VCS). The VCS unit has a cooling capacity of 5.27 kW and uses 134a as refrigerant. Calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution is used as the working desiccant material. HDBAC system is used to serve low sensible heat factor applications. The effect of different parameters such as, process air flow rate, desiccant solution flow rate, evaporator box and condenser box solution temperatures, strong solution concentration and regeneration temperature on the performance of the system is studied. The performance of the system is evaluated using some parameters such as: the coefficient of performance (COPa), specific moisture removal and energy saving percentage. A remarkable increase of about 54% in the coefficient of performance of the proposed system over VCS with reheat is achieved. A maximum overall energy saving of about 46% is observed which emphasizes the use of the proposed system as an energy efficient air conditioning system. PMID:25685475

  15. Experimental fault tolerant universal quantum gates with solid-state spins under ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Xing

    Quantum computation provides great speedup over classical counterpart for certain problems, such as quantum simulations, prime factoring and database searching. One of the challenges for realizing quantum computation is to execute precise control of the quantum system in the presence of noise. Recently, high fidelity control of spin-qubits has been achieved in several quantum systems. However, control of the spin-qubits with the accuracy required by the fault tolerant quantum computation under ambient conditions remains exclusive. Here we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in nitrogen-vacancy centers with an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 0.99995 and two qubit gate fidelity of 0.992. These high control fidelities have been achieved in the C naturally abundant diamonds at room temperature via composite pulses and optimal control method. This experimental implementation of quantum gates with fault tolerant control fidelity sets an important step towards the fault-tolerant quantum computation under ambient conditions. National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB921800).

  16. Quantum Hall resistance standard in graphene devices under relaxed experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopfer, F.; Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Lafont, F.; Brun-Picard, J.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Cheynis, F.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Jouault, B.; Poirier, W.

    Large-area and high-quality graphene devices synthesized by CVD on SiC are used to develop reliable electrical resistance standards, based on the quantum Hall effect (QHE), with state-of-the-art accuracy of 1x10-9 and under an extended range of experimental conditions of magnetic field (down to 3.5 T), temperature (up to 10 K) or current (up to 0.5 mA). These conditions are much relaxed as compared to what is required by GaAs/AlGaAs standards and will enable to broaden the use of the primary quantum electrical standards to the benefit of Science and Industry for electrical measurements. Furthermore, by comparison of these graphene devices with GaAs/AlGaAs standards, we demonstrate the universality of the QHE within an ultimate uncertainty of 8.2x10-11. This suggests the exact relation of the quantized Hall resistance with the Planck constant and the electron charge, which is crucial for the new SI to be based on fixing such fundamental constants. These results show that graphene realizes its promises and demonstrates its superiority over other materials for a demanding application. Nature Nanotech. 10, 965-971, 2015, Nature Commun. 6, 6806, 2015

  17. Measurement capability of field portable organic vapor monitoring instruments under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Christopher C; Pearce, Terri A; Lawrence, Robert B; Hudnall, Judith B; Slaven, James E; Martin, Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    The performance of field portable direct-reading organic vapor monitors (DROVMs) was evaluated under a variety of experimental conditions. Four of the DROVMs had photoionization detectors (ppbRAE, IAQRAE, MultiRAE, and Century Toxic Vapor Analyzer), one had a flame ionization detector (Century Toxic Vapor Analyzer), and one was a single-beam infrared spectrophotometer (SapphIRe). Four of each DROVM (two Century Toxic Vapor Analyzers and SapphIRes) were tested. The DROVMs were evaluated at three temperatures (4 degrees C, 21 degrees C, and 38 degrees C), three relative humidities (30%, 60%, and 90%), and two hexane concentrations (5 ppm and 100 ppm). These conditions were selected to provide a range within the operational parameters of all the instruments. At least four replicate trials were performed across the 18 experimental conditions (3 temperatures x 3 relative humidities x 2 concentrations). To evaluate performance, the 4-hr time-weighted average readings from the DROVMs in a given trial were compared with the average of two charcoal tube concentrations using pairwise comparison. The pairwise comparison criterion was +/-25% measurement agreement between each individual DROVM and the DROVMs as a group and the average charcoal tube concentration. The ppbRAE group performed the best with 40% of all readings meeting the comparison criterion followed by the SapphIRe group at 39%. Among individual DROVMs, the best performer was a SapphIRe, with 57% of its readings meeting the criterion. The data was further analyzed by temperature, humidity, and concentration. The results indicated the performance of some DROVMs may be affected by temperature, humidity, and/or concentration. The ppbRAE group performed best at 21 degrees C with the percentage of readings meeting the criterion increasing to 63%. At the 5 ppm concentration, 44% of the ppbRAE group readings met the criterion, while at 100 ppm, only 35% did. The results indicate that monitors can be used as survey tools

  18. Measurement capability of field portable organic vapor monitoring instruments under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Christopher C; Pearce, Terri A; Lawrence, Robert B; Hudnall, Judith B; Slaven, James E; Martin, Stephen B

    2009-01-01

    The performance of field portable direct-reading organic vapor monitors (DROVMs) was evaluated under a variety of experimental conditions. Four of the DROVMs had photoionization detectors (ppbRAE, IAQRAE, MultiRAE, and Century Toxic Vapor Analyzer), one had a flame ionization detector (Century Toxic Vapor Analyzer), and one was a single-beam infrared spectrophotometer (SapphIRe). Four of each DROVM (two Century Toxic Vapor Analyzers and SapphIRes) were tested. The DROVMs were evaluated at three temperatures (4 degrees C, 21 degrees C, and 38 degrees C), three relative humidities (30%, 60%, and 90%), and two hexane concentrations (5 ppm and 100 ppm). These conditions were selected to provide a range within the operational parameters of all the instruments. At least four replicate trials were performed across the 18 experimental conditions (3 temperatures x 3 relative humidities x 2 concentrations). To evaluate performance, the 4-hr time-weighted average readings from the DROVMs in a given trial were compared with the average of two charcoal tube concentrations using pairwise comparison. The pairwise comparison criterion was +/-25% measurement agreement between each individual DROVM and the DROVMs as a group and the average charcoal tube concentration. The ppbRAE group performed the best with 40% of all readings meeting the comparison criterion followed by the SapphIRe group at 39%. Among individual DROVMs, the best performer was a SapphIRe, with 57% of its readings meeting the criterion. The data was further analyzed by temperature, humidity, and concentration. The results indicated the performance of some DROVMs may be affected by temperature, humidity, and/or concentration. The ppbRAE group performed best at 21 degrees C with the percentage of readings meeting the criterion increasing to 63%. At the 5 ppm concentration, 44% of the ppbRAE group readings met the criterion, while at 100 ppm, only 35% did. The results indicate that monitors can be used as survey tools

  19. Deformation Mechanisms of Antigorite Serpentinite at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from Experimentally and Naturally Deformed Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, A. L.; Escartin, J.; Walte, N.; Guillot, S.; Hirth, G.; Frost, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology of serpentinite, and particularly that of antigorite-bearing rocks, is of prime importance for understanding subduction zone proceses, including decoupling between the downwelling slab and the overriding plate, exhumation of high-pressure rocks, fluids pathways and, more generally, mantle wedge dynamics. We present results from deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite performed under conditions relevant of subduction zones (1-3.5 GPa ; 400-650°C). We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400°C (Chernak and Hirth, EPSL, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Our observations on experimental samples of antigorite deformed within its stability field show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow; we can only document a minor contribution of plastic deformation. In naturally deformed samples, deformation-related plastic structures largely dominate strain accommodation, but we also document a minor contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases, and is coupled to local embrittlement attributed to hydraulic fracturating due to the migration of dehydration fluids. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite has a control on the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter and intra-cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. Deformation dominated by brittle processes, as observed in experiments, may occur during deformation at elevated (seismic?) strain rates, while plastic deformation, as observed in naturally deformed rocks, may correspond instead to low strain rates instead (aseismic creep?). We also discuss the role of antigorite rheology and mode of deformation on fluid transport.

  20. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions: Results from bellows tested in corroded conditions. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1995-10-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of nineteen bellows have been tested. Thirteen bellows were tested in ``like-new`` condition (results reported in Volume 1), and six were tested in a corroded condition. The tests showed that bellows in ``like-new`` condition are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage, while those in a corroded condition did not perform as well, depending on the amount of corrosion. The corroded bellows test program and results are presented in this report.

  1. Flow Control Under Low-Pressure Turbine Conditions Using Pulsed Jets: Experimental Data Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the final report of research performed under an NRA/Cooperative Interagency Agreement, and includes a supplemental CD-ROM with detailed data. It is complemented by NASA/CR-2012-217416 and NASA/CR-2012-217417 which include a Ph.D. Dissertation and an M.S. thesis respectively, performed under this contract. In this study the effects of unsteady wakes and flow control using vortex generator jets (VGJs) were studied experimentally and computationally on the flow over the L1A low pressure turbine (LPT) airfoil. The experimental facility was a six passage linear cascade in a low speed wind tunnel at the U.S. Naval Academy. In parallel, computational work using the commercial code FLUENT (ANSYS, Inc.) was performed at Cleveland State University, using Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (URANS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) methods. In the first phase of the work, the baseline flow was documented under steady inflow conditions without flow control. URANS calculations were done using a variety of turbulence models. In the second phase of the work, flow control was added using steady and pulsed vortex generator jets. The VGJs successfully suppressed separation and reduced aerodynamic losses. Pulsed operation was more effective and mass flow requirements are very low. Numerical simulations of the VGJs cases showed that URANS failed to capture the effect of the jets. LES results were generally better. In the third phase, effects of unsteady wakes were studied. Computations with URANS and LES captured the wake effect and generally predicted separation and reattachment to match the experiments. Quantitatively the results were mixed. In the final phase of the study, wakes and VGJs were combined and synchronized using various timing schemes. The timing of the jets with respect to the wakes had some effect, but in general once the disturbance frequency was high enough to control separation, the timing was not very important. This is the supplemental CD-ROM

  2. Competitive and Predacious Interactions Among Three Phytoseiid Species Under Experimental Conditions (Acari: Phytoseiidae).

    PubMed

    Ji, J; Zhang, Y-X; Saito, Y; Takada, T; Tsuji, N

    2016-02-01

    The effect of competition on species that coexist with similar ecological niches is an important theme in ecology. Furthermore, species displacement by introduced or invaded species is also an important environmental problem for biological control and conservation ecology. We tested whether two species of phytoseiids could coexist in closed cages with ample quantities of the extraguild prey species Carpoglyphus lactis (L.). Three species of phytoseiid mites-Amblyseius eharai Amitai & Swirski (a species native to China), Amblyseius swirskii (Athias-Henriot) and Neoseiulus cucumeris (Oudemans) (both species were introduced from outside of China)-were tested under experimental conditions (25 ± 1°C, 90 ± 5% relative humidity, and a photoperiod of 14:10 [L:D] h). With extraguild prey, we found that the numbers of a single population of each phytoseiid species (initial density of 10 females per cage) reached a plateau between 18 and 25 d after introduction into the experimental cages, suggesting that density-dependent factors were operating. In closed environments, one of these density-dependent factors might be cannibalism by these species. With regression analyses, Lotka-Volterra equations estimated the rate of population increase (r) and the carrying capacity (K) of each species with the data from observations on population dynamics. We next observed the interactions of two phytoseiid species with abundant extraguild prey. In all species combinations, one species went extinct and the other increased in population size, despite the availability of sufficient extraguild prey, suggesting some type of competition must have caused the extinctions. We suggested that intraguild predation is the most plausible hypothesis to explain the results. PMID:26496951

  3. Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation in different muscles and various experimental conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown previously that direct stimulation of oxidative-phosphorylation complexes in parallel with the stimulation of ATP usage is able to explain the stability of intermediate metabolite (ATP/ADP, phosphocreatine/creatine, NADH/NAD+, protonmotive force) concentrations accompanied by a large increase in oxygen consumption and ATP turnover during transition from rest to intensive exercise in skeletal muscle. It has been also postulated that intensification of parallel activation in the ATP supply-demand system is one of the mechanisms of training-induced adaptation of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle. In the present paper, it is demonstrated, using the computer model of oxidative phosphorylation in intact skeletal muscle developed previously, that the direct activation of oxidative phosphorylation during muscle contraction can account for the following kinetic properties of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle encountered in different experimental studies: (i) increase in the respiration rate per mg of mitochondrial protein at a given ADP concentration as a result of muscle training and decrease in this parameter in hypothyroidism; (ii) asymmetry (different half-transition time, t(1/2)) in phosphocreatine concentration time course between on-transient (rest-->work transition) and off-transient (recovery after exercise); (iii) overshoot in phosphocreatine concentration during recovery after exercise; (iv) variability in the kinetic properties of oxidative phosphorylation in different kinds of muscle under different experimental conditions. No other postulated mechanism is able to explain all these phenomena at the same time and therefore the present paper strongly supports the idea of the parallel activation of ATP usage and different oxidative-phosphorylation complexes during muscle contraction. PMID:12901719

  4. Quantum Hall resistance standard in graphene devices under relaxed experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Palau, R.; Lafont, F.; Brun-Picard, J.; Kazazis, D.; Michon, A.; Cheynis, F.; Couturaud, O.; Consejo, C.; Jouault, B.; Poirier, W.; Schopfer, F.

    2015-11-01

    The quantum Hall effect provides a universal standard for electrical resistance that is theoretically based on only the Planck constant h and the electron charge e. Currently, this standard is implemented in GaAs/AlGaAs, but graphene's electronic properties have given hope for a more practical device. Here, we demonstrate that the experimental conditions necessary for the operation of devices made of high-quality graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition on silicon carbide can be extended and significantly relaxed compared with those for state-of-the-art GaAs/AlGaAs devices. In particular, the Hall resistance can be accurately quantized to within 1 × 10-9 over a 10 T wide range of magnetic flux density, down to 3.5 T, at a temperature of up to 10 K or with a current of up to 0.5 mA. This experimental simplification highlights the great potential of graphene in the development of user-friendly and versatile quantum standards that are compatible with broader industrial uses beyond those in national metrology institutes. Furthermore, the measured agreement of the quantized Hall resistance in graphene and GaAs/AlGaAs, with an ultimate uncertainty of 8.2 × 10-11, supports the universality of the quantum Hall effect. This also provides evidence of the relation of the quantized Hall resistance with h and e, which is crucial for the new Système International d'unités to be based on fixing such fundamental constants of nature.

  5. Validation of Perceptual Strain Index to Evaluate the Thermal Strain in Experimental Hot Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Ghanbary Sartang, Ayoub

    2015-01-01

    Background: The incidence of heat stress is one of the most common problems in workplaces and industries. Many heat stress indices have been developed, and these indices have some disadvantages. The purpose of this study is to validate the perceptual strain index (PeSI) in experimental hot conditions. Methods: This study is of cross-sectional carried out on 15 men at five different thermal conditions (35°C, 30°C, 27°C, 24°C, and 21°C) in a climate chamber and on a treadmill at three levels of light (2.4 kph), medium (4.8 kph) and heavy activity (6.3 kph). Heart rate and oral temperature were respectively measured to calculate the physiological strain index. Also, thermal sensation and rate perceive exertion were respectively measured to calculate the PeSI. Finally, the correlation between the indices was analyzed using Pearson correlation test and regression analysis. Results: Pearson correlation test showed a high correlation (r = 0.94) between the PeSI and physiological strain index (P = 0/001). It was also observed a high correlation between the PeSI and the oral temperature (r = 0.78, P = 0/001) and the heart rate (r = 0.90, P = 0/001). In addition, there was found a moderate correlation (r = 0.71) between the PeSI and the wet bulb glob temperature (P = 0/001). However, there was no correlation between the PeSI and the body mass index (r = 0.0009, P = 0.79). Conclusions: The research findings showed when there is no access to other forms of methods to evaluate the heat stress, it can be used the PeSI in evaluating the strain because of its favorable correlation with the thermal strain. PMID:26425333

  6. Experimental Study on Fluid Distribution at Ultra-High Metamorphic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mönicke, K.; Burchard, M.; Duyster, J.; Maresch, W. V.; Röller, K.; Stöckhert, B.

    2001-12-01

    Ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks record deep subduction of continental crust. Insight into their rheological behavior at UHP metamorphic conditions is important for the understanding of the mechanical state and the kinematics within subduction zones. Amazingly, many exhumed UHP metamorphic rocks do not show evidence of significant deformation. Thus, it has been proposed that deformation is localized in low-strength zones controlled by partially wetting interstitial fluids [1]. Experimental results [2] show that at UHP metamorphic conditions only one homogenous fluid phase with variable composition exists, whose density and viscosity should be intermediate between those of conventional aqueous solutions and hydrous melts. Inclusions of such supercritical fluid have been recently described from a natural UHP metamorphic rock [3]. Motivated by these findings, experiments using a piston-cylinder apparatus were performed to study the fluid distribution in various rock types at pressures of 3.5 GPa and temperatures between 900 ° C and 600 ° C. Starting materials were natural UHP metamorphic specimens of (1) S-type granitic biotite-phengite-gneiss and (2) pyrope-quartzite, both from the Dora Maira Massif (Western Alps, Italy) and (3) a diamond-bearing garnet-mica-gneiss with granodioritic bulk composition from the Saxonian Erzgebirge (Germany), all with 2 wt.% water added. The supercritical fluids formed in these experiments can be quenched to form a silicic glass with demixing of an aqueous solution without changing the UHP fluid topology significantly. The shape of the fluid-filled interstices is irregular and complex, resulting in a low volume/interface area ratio and a potential of high stress concentration at the edges of wedge-shaped offshoots. We propose that the distribution of supercritical fluids has a pronounced effect on the strength of cool subducted crust, allowing deformation by grain boundary sliding and dissolution precipitation creep, or

  7. Ischemic conditioning protects the rat retina in an experimental model of early type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Salido, Ezequiel M; Dorfman, Damián; Bordone, Melina; Chianelli, Mónica S; Sarmiento, María Inés Keller; Aranda, Marcos; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2013-02-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of acquired blindness in adults, mostly affected by type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). We have developed an experimental model of early T2DM in adult rats which mimics some features of human T2DM at its initial stages, and provokes significant retinal alterations. We investigated the effect of ischemic conditioning on retinal changes induced by the moderate metabolic derangement. For this purpose, adult male Wistar rats received a control diet or 30% sucrose in the drinking water, and 3 weeks after this treatment, animals were injected with vehicle or streptozotocin (STZ, 25mg/kg). Retinal ischemia was induced by increasing intraocular pressure to 120 mm Hg for 5 min; this maneuver started 3 weeks after vehicle or STZ injection and was weekly repeated in one eye, while control eyes were submitted to a sham procedure. Fasting and postprandial glycemia, and glucose, and insulin tolerance tests were analyzed. At 12 weeks of treatment, animals which received a sucrose-enriched diet and STZ showed significant differences in metabolic tests, as compared with control groups. Brief ischemia pulses in one eye and a sham procedure in the contralateral eye did not affect glucose metabolism in control or diabetic rats. Ischemic pulses reduced the decrease in the electroretinogram a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential amplitude, and the increase in retinal lipid peroxidation, NOS activity, TNFα, Müller cells glial fibrillary acidic protein, and vascular endothelial growth factor levels observed in diabetic animals. In addition, ischemic conditioning prevented the decrease in retinal catalase activity induced by T2DM. These results indicate that induction of ischemic tolerance could constitute a fertile avenue for the development of new therapeutic strategies to treat diabetic retinopathy associated with T2DM. PMID:23153579

  8. Experimental demonstration of quantitation errors in MR spectroscopy resulting from saturation corrections under changing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbán, Craig J.; Ellis, Scott J.; Spencer, Richard G. S.

    2003-04-01

    Metabolite concentration measurements in in vivo NMR are generally performed under partially saturated conditions, with correction for partial saturation performed after data collection using a measured saturation factor. Here, we present an experimental test of the hypothesis that quantitation errors can occur due to application of such saturation factor corrections in changing systems. Thus, this extends our previous theoretical work on quantitation errors due to varying saturation factors. We obtained results for two systems frequently studied by 31P NMR, the ischemic rat heart and the electrically stimulated rat gastrocnemius muscle. The results are interpreted in light of previous theoretical work which defined the degree of saturation occurring in a one-pulse experiment for a system with given spin-lattice relaxation times, T1s, equilibrium magnetizations, M0s, and reaction rates. We found that (i) the assumption of constancy of saturation factors leads to quantitation errors on the order of 40% in inorganic phosphate; (ii) the dominant contributor to the quantitation errors in inorganic phosphate is most likely changes in T1; (iii) T1 and M0 changes between control and intervention periods, and chemical exchange contribute to different extents to quantitation errors in phosphocreatine and γ-ATP; (iv) relatively small increases in interpulse delay substantially decreased quantitation errors for metabolites in ischemic rat hearts; (v) random error due to finite SNR led to approximately 4% error in quantitation, and hence was a substantially smaller contributor than were changes in saturation factors.

  9. Evolution of fracture permeability of ultramafic rocks undergoing serpentinization at hydrothermal conditions: An experimental study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farough, Aida; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Lowell, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    We performed flow-through laboratory experiments on five cylindrically cored samples of ultramafic rocks, in which we generated a well-mated through-going tensile fracture, to investigate evolution of fracture permeability during serpentinization. The samples were tested in a triaxial loading machine at a confining pressure of 50 MPa, pore pressure of 20 MPa, and temperature of 260°C, simulating a depth of 2 km under hydrostatic conditions. A pore pressure difference of up to 2 MPa was imposed across the ends of the sample. Fracture permeability decreased by 1–2 orders of magnitude during the 200–330 h experiments. Electron microprobe and SEM data indicated the formation of needle-shaped crystals of serpentine composition along the walls of the fracture, and chemical analyses of sampled pore fluids were consistent with dissolution of ferro-magnesian minerals. By comparing the difference between fracture permeability and matrix permeability measured on intact samples of the same rock types, we concluded that the contribution of the low matrix permeability to flow is negligible and essentially all of the flow is focused in the tensile fracture. The experimental results suggest that the fracture network in long-lived hydrothermal circulation systems can be sealed rapidly as a result of mineral precipitation, and generation of new permeability resulting from a combination of tectonic and crystallization-induced stresses is required to maintain fluid circulation.

  10. Daily regulation of body temperature rhythm in the camel (Camelus dromedarius) exposed to experimental desert conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bouâouda, Hanan; Achâaban, Mohamed R.; Ouassat, Mohammed; Oukassou, Mohammed; Piro, Mohamed; Challet, Etienne; El Allali, Khalid; Pévet, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In the present work, we have studied daily rhythmicity of body temperature (Tb) in Arabian camels challenged with daily heat, combined or not with dehydration. We confirm that Arabian camels use heterothermy to reduce heat gain coupled with evaporative heat loss during the day. Here, we also demonstrate that this mechanism is more complex than previously reported, because it is characterized by a daily alternation (probably of circadian origin) of two periods of poikilothermy and homeothermy. We also show that dehydration induced a decrease in food intake plays a role in this process. Together, these findings highlight that adaptive heterothermy in the Arabian camel varies across the diurnal light–dark cycle and is modulated by timing of daily heat and degrees of water restriction and associated reduction of food intake. The changed phase relationship between the light–dark cycle and the Tb rhythm observed during the dehydration process points to a possible mechanism of internal desynchronization during the process of adaptation to desert environment. During these experimental conditions mimicking the desert environment, it will be possible in the future to determine if induced high‐amplitude ambient temperature (Ta) rhythms are able to compete with the zeitgeber effect of the light–dark cycle. PMID:25263204

  11. Luteinizing hormone secretion in hemidecorticate female rats under several experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, G A; Antunes-Rodrigues, J; Covian, M R

    1978-01-01

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion by the anterior pituitary gland was investigated in hemidecorticate (HD) rats under several conditions. Higher plasma and lower pituitary LH levels were observed in HD rats in the afternoon of proestrus, after unilateral ovariectomy, and at the 7th and 14th days after bilateral castration. The ovarian hypertrophy observed in HD rats did not differ from control. When hormonal substitutive therapy was started 3 days after bilateral ovariectomy, larger doses of estradiol benzoate (EB) were required to reduce plasma LH levels in control than in HD animals. The increase in pituitary weight was, however, significantly higher in the HD castrated group. When substitutive therapy started at the 7th and 14th days after castration no significant differences between the 2 experimental groups were observed. The results of substitutive therapy suggest that hemidecortication induces an increase in the sensitivity of hypothalamic-pituitary axis to estrogen negative feedback. This change in sensitivity is clearly seen in HD rats during the first few days after castration. These results suggest that hemidecortication may release the hypothalamus from inhibitory influences coming from rhinencephalic or cortical structures, thus rendering the preoptic-suprachiasmatic complex (POA-SCH) more sensitive to LH-releasing mechanisms.

  12. Daily regulation of body temperature rhythm in the camel (Camelus dromedarius) exposed to experimental desert conditions.

    PubMed

    Bouâouda, Hanan; Achâaban, Mohamed R; Ouassat, Mohammed; Oukassou, Mohammed; Piro, Mohamed; Challet, Etienne; El Allali, Khalid; Pévet, Paul

    2014-09-01

    In the present work, we have studied daily rhythmicity of body temperature (Tb) in Arabian camels challenged with daily heat, combined or not with dehydration. We confirm that Arabian camels use heterothermy to reduce heat gain coupled with evaporative heat loss during the day. Here, we also demonstrate that this mechanism is more complex than previously reported, because it is characterized by a daily alternation (probably of circadian origin) of two periods of poikilothermy and homeothermy. We also show that dehydration induced a decrease in food intake plays a role in this process. Together, these findings highlight that adaptive heterothermy in the Arabian camel varies across the diurnal light-dark cycle and is modulated by timing of daily heat and degrees of water restriction and associated reduction of food intake. The changed phase relationship between the light-dark cycle and the Tb rhythm observed during the dehydration process points to a possible mechanism of internal desynchronization during the process of adaptation to desert environment. During these experimental conditions mimicking the desert environment, it will be possible in the future to determine if induced high-amplitude ambient temperature (Ta) rhythms are able to compete with the zeitgeber effect of the light-dark cycle.

  13. Carbon isotope fractionation during experimental crystallisation of diamond from carbonate fluid at mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutsky, Vadim; Borzdov, Yuri; Palyanov, Yuri; Sokol, Alexander; Izokh, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We report first results of a systematic study of carbon isotope fractionation in a carbonate fluid system under mantle PT conditions. The system models a diamond-forming alkaline carbonate fluid using pure sodium oxalate (Na2C2O4) as the starting material, which decomposes to carbonate, CO2 and elementary carbon (graphite and diamond) involving a single source of carbon following the reaction 2Na2C2O4 → 2Na2CO3 + CO2 + C. Near-liquidus behaviour of carbonate was observed at 1300 °C and 6.3 GPa. The experimentally determined isotope fractionation between the components of the system in the temperature range from 1300 to 1700 °C at 6.3 and 7.5 GPa fit the theoretical expectations well. Carbon isotope fractionation associated with diamond crystallisation from the carbonate fluid at 7.5 GPa decreases with an increase in temperature from 2.7 to 1.6 ‰. This trend corresponds to the function ΔCarbonate fluid-Diamond = 7.38 × 106 T-2.

  14. Evolution of fracture permeability of ultramafic rocks undergoing serpentinization at hydrothermal conditions: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.; Lowell, R. P.

    2016-01-01

    We performed flow-through laboratory experiments on five cylindrically cored samples of ultramafic rocks, in which we generated a well-mated through-going tensile fracture, to investigate evolution of fracture permeability during serpentinization. The samples were tested in a triaxial loading machine at a confining pressure of 50 MPa, pore pressure of 20 MPa, and temperature of 260°C, simulating a depth of 2 km under hydrostatic conditions. A pore pressure difference of up to 2 MPa was imposed across the ends of the sample. Fracture permeability decreased by 1-2 orders of magnitude during the 200-330 h experiments. Electron microprobe and SEM data indicated the formation of needle-shaped crystals of serpentine composition along the walls of the fracture, and chemical analyses of sampled pore fluids were consistent with dissolution of ferro-magnesian minerals. By comparing the difference between fracture permeability and matrix permeability measured on intact samples of the same rock types, we concluded that the contribution of the low matrix permeability to flow is negligible and essentially all of the flow is focused in the tensile fracture. The experimental results suggest that the fracture network in long-lived hydrothermal circulation systems can be sealed rapidly as a result of mineral precipitation, and generation of new permeability resulting from a combination of tectonic and crystallization-induced stresses is required to maintain fluid circulation.

  15. Experimental study of the reaction of methane with petroleum hydrocarbons in geological conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, T.; Gordon, B.E.; Streett, W.; Bilson, E.; Patnaik, P.

    1986-11-01

    In order to assess the possible role of methane in petroleum formation, they studied the reaction of methane with liquid hydrocarbons representing the three main classes of compounds dominant in crude oil. The experimental reaction conditions simulated those of a geological setting for petroleum formations, at 1000 atm and 150-250/sup 0/C in the presence of montmorillonite, a natural clay catalyst. Since they expected very slow reaction rates and thus low yields, we used /sup 14/C labeled methane to trace the reaction products. They report here the detection of ethylbenzene and ethyltoluene formed by the interaction of methane with benzene and toluene, respectively. Instead of methylation of benzene, predominantly C/sub 2/ addition occurred, although very small amounts of products corresponding to C/sub 1/ addition were also detected. They propose that catalytic dissociation of methane occurred, forming ethylene which participated in a Friedel-Crafts type alkylation process of the aromatic ring on the catalyst surface. In addition to ring alkylation, side reactions such as polymerization of unsaturates (ethylene, acetylene) appeared to have occurred on the catalyst surface. The nature of these polymers is yet to be determined.

  16. Experimental study of the reaction of methane with petroleum hydrocarbons in geological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Thomas; Gordon, Benjamin E.; Streett, William; Bilson, Elizabeth; Patnaik, Pradyot

    1986-11-01

    In order to assess the possible role of methane in petroleum formation, we studied the reaction of methane with liquid hydrocarbons representing the three main classes of compounds dominant in crude oil. The experimental reaction conditions simulated those of a geological setting for petroleum formations, at 1000 atm and 150-250°C in the presence of montmorillonite, a natural clay catalyst. Since we expected very slow reaction rates and thus low yields, we used 14C labeled methane to trace the reaction products. We report here the detection of ethylbenzene and ethyltoluene formed by the interaction of methane with benzene and toluene, respectively. Instead of methylation of benzene, predominantly C 2 addition occurred, although very small amounts of products corresponding to C 1 addition were also detected. We propose that catalytic dissociation of methane occurred, forming ethylene which participated in a Friedel-Crafts type alkylation process of the aromatic ring on the catalyst surface. In addition to ring alkylation, side reactions such as polymerization of unsaturates (ethylene, acetylene) appeared to have occurred on the catalyst surface. The nature of these polymers is yet to be determined.

  17. Influence of experimental conditions on data variability in the liver comet assay.

    PubMed

    Guérard, M; Marchand, C; Plappert-Helbig, U

    2014-03-01

    The in vivo comet assay has increasingly been used for regulatory genotoxicity testing in recent years. While it has been demonstrated that the experimental execution of the assay, for example, electrophoresis or scoring, can have a strong impact on the results; little is known on how initial steps, that is, from tissue sampling during necropsy up to slide preparation, can influence the comet assay results. Therefore, we investigated which of the multitude of steps in processing the liver for the comet assay are most critical. All together eight parameters were assessed by using liver samples of untreated animals. In addition, two of those parameters (temperature and storage time of liver before embedding into agarose) were further investigated in animals given a single oral dose of ethyl methanesulfonate at dose levels of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, 3 hr prior to necropsy. The results showed that sample cooling emerged as the predominant influence factor, whereas variations in other elements of the procedure (e.g., size of the liver piece sampled, time needed to process the liver tissue post-mortem, agarose temperature, or time of lysis) seem to be of little relevance. Storing of liver samples of up to 6 hr under cooled conditions did not cause an increase in tail intensity. In contrast, storing the tissue at room temperature, resulted in a considerable time-dependent increase in comet parameters.

  18. An experimental investigation of copper-Zircaloy interactions under possible tuff repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H D

    1990-05-01

    As part of its evaluation of copper and copper alloys for use as a container material for spent fuel, the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project sponsored this experimental study to determine if the presence of copper would influence the corrosion rate of Zircaloy spent fuel cladding under possible tuff repository conditions. The experiment consisted of exposing copper/Zircaloy clad spent fuel packages to two different environments for up to 9 months. Detailed evaluation of the cladding via metallography, electron probe microanalysis, scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis, and Auger electron spectroscopy/ion milling to chemically profile the surface film failed to provide an evidence of copper-enhanced corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding. The difference in thickness of the oxide films between the 2-month and 5-month experiments, and the 2-month and 9-month experiments as indicated by the time to ion mill through the films, was on the order of 50 {angstrom}, and 100 {angstrom}, respectively, indicating a very low rate of film growth during the experiments. 20 refs., 21 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Effect of varying experimental conditions on the viscosity of α-pinene derived secondary organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, James W.; Zhang, Yue; Mutzel, Anke; Renbaum-Wolff, Lindsay; Boge, Olaf; Kamal, Saeid; Herrmann, Hartmut; Martin, Scot T.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2016-05-01

    Knowledge of the viscosity of particles containing secondary organic material (SOM) is useful for predicting reaction rates and diffusion in SOM particles. In this study we investigate the viscosity of SOM particles as a function of relative humidity and SOM particle mass concentration, during SOM synthesis. The SOM was generated via the ozonolysis of α-pinene at < 5 % relative humidity (RH). Experiments were carried out using the poke-and-flow technique, which measures the experimental flow time (τexp, flow) of SOM after poking the material with a needle. In the first set of experiments, we show that τexp, flow increased by a factor of 3600 as the RH increased from < 0.5 RH to 50 % RH, for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. Based on simulations, the viscosities of the particles were between 6 x 105 and 5 x 107 Pa s at < 0.5 % RH and between 3 x 102 and 9 x 103 Pa s at 50 % RH. In the second set of experiments we show that under dry conditions τexp, flow decreased by a factor of 45 as the production mass concentration increased from 121 to 14 000 μg m-3. From simulations of the poke-and-flow experiments, the viscosity of SOM with a production mass concentration of 14 000 μg m-3 was determined to be between 4 x 104 and 1.5 x 106 Pa s compared to between 6 x 105 and 5 x 107 Pa s for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. The results can be rationalized by a dependence of the chemical composition of SOM on production conditions. These results emphasize the shifting characteristics of SOM, not just with RH and precursor type, but also with the production conditions, and suggest that production mass concentration and the RH at which the viscosity was determined should be considered both when comparing laboratory results and when extrapolating these results to the atmosphere.

  20. Effect of varying experimental conditions on the viscosity of α-pinene derived secondary organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grayson, J. W.; Zhang, Y.; Mutzel, A.; Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Böge, O.; Kamal, S.; Herrmann, H.; Martin, S. T.; Bertram, A. K.

    2015-11-01

    To predict the role of secondary organic material (SOM) particles in climate, visibility, and health, information on the viscosity of particles containing SOM is required. In this study we investigate the viscosity of SOM particles as a function of relative humidity and SOM particle mass concentration during SOM synthesis. The SOM was generated via the ozonolysis of α-pinene at < 5 % relative humidity (RH). Experiments were carried out using the poke-and-flow technique, which measures the experimental flow time (τexp, flow) of SOM after poking the material with a needle. In the first set of experiments, we show that τexp, flow increased by a factor of 3600 as the RH increased from < 0.5 to 50 % RH, for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. Based on simulations, the viscosities of the particles were between 6 × 105 and 5 × 107 Pa s at < 0.5 % RH and between 3 × 102 and 9 × 103 Pa s at 50 % RH. In the second set of experiments we show that under dry conditions τexp, flow decreased by a factor of 45 as the production mass concentration increased from 121 to 14 000 μg m-3. From simulations of the poke-and-flow experiments, the viscosity of SOM with a production mass concentration of 14 000 μg m-3 was determined to be between 4 × 104 and 1.5 × 106 Pa s compared to between 6 × 105 and 5 × 107 Pa s for SOM with a production mass concentration of 121 μg m-3. The results can be rationalised by a dependence of the chemical composition of SOM on production conditions. These results emphasise the shifting characteristics of SOM, not just with RH and precursor type, but also with the production conditions, and suggest that production mass concentration and the RH at which the viscosity was determined should be considered both when comparing laboratory results and when extrapolating these results to the atmosphere.

  1. The National Ignition Facility: an experimental platform for studying behavior of matter under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Edward

    2011-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As the world's largest and most energetic laser system, NIF serves as the national center for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration to achieve thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and to explore the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from all of its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm3-sized target, NIF can reach the conditions required to initiate fusion reactions. NIF can also provide access to extreme scientific environments: temperatures about 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure. These conditions have never been created before in a laboratory and exist naturally only in interiors of the planetary and stellar environments as well as in nuclear weapons. Since August 2009, the NIF team has been conducting experiments in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)—a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, General Atomics, the University of Rochester, Sandia National Laboratories, as well as a number of universities and international collaborators. The results from these initial experiments show promise for the relatively near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.2 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 10%. Cryogenic target capability and additional diagnostics are being installed in preparation for layered target deuterium-tritium implosions to be conducted later in 2010. Important national security and basic science experiments have

  2. Influence of large-scale motion on turbulent transport for confined coaxial jets. Volume 1: Analytical analysis of the experimental data using conditional sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brondum, D. C.; Bennett, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of large scale coherent structures in turbulent shear flows has been well documented. Discrepancies between experimental and computational data suggest a necessity to understand the roles they play in mass and momentum transport. Using conditional sampling and averaging on coincident two component velocity and concentration velocity experimental data for swirling and nonswirling coaxial jets, triggers for identifying the structures were examined. Concentration fluctuation was found to be an adequate trigger or indicator for the concentration-velocity data, but no suitable detector was located for the two component velocity data. The large scale structures are found in the region where the largest discrepancies exist between model and experiment. The traditional gradient transport model does not fit in this region as a result of these structures. The large scale motion was found to be responsible for a large percentage downstream at approximately the mean velocity of the overall flow in the axial direction. The radial mean velocity of the structures was found to be substantially greater than that of the overall flow.

  3. Experimental study of bedrock channel alluviation under varied sediment supply and hydraulic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatanantavet, Phairot; Parker, Gary

    2008-12-01

    Channel incision into bedrock plays a critical role in mountain landscape evolution. A bed that is completely alluviated cannot undergo incision. As a result, incision driven by the collision of bedload grains and bedrock requires transport at below-capacity conditions (for example, where the bed is partially covered by alluvium). In a mechanistic model of bedrock incision, it is important to have a formula describing the relationship between the bedload transport rate and the degree to which the bed is covered by sediment. The purpose of this work is to understand the mechanisms underlying the degree of bed exposure in bedrock rivers by means of an experimental study. A number of experiments with various hydraulic and morphological bed conditions were performed in order to characterize this model. Here we focus on planar bedrock beds with some roughness. The results suggest that the sediment supply, channel slope, hydraulic bed roughness, the degree of areal coverage, and thickness of antecedent gravel in the channel, as well as the presence of boulders in the channel are major factors controlling bedrock exposure. For sufficiently low ratios of sediment supply to transport capacity, it was found that bedrock roughness can play a role in determining the degree of bedrock exposure. For higher sediment ratios, on the other hand, the composite roughness associated with grain roughness, bars, and/or antidunes dominates, so that the underlying bedrock roughness no longer affects the degree of exposure of the bed. For lower bed slopes (i.e., less than 0.015, based on our experimental setting), bedrock exposure decreases more or less linearly with increasing values of the ratio of sediment supply rate to capacity rate. For higher bed slopes (i.e., more than 0.015), there is a range of lower values of the ratio of sediment supply rate to capacity rate where a bedrock surface becomes fully exposed without any alluvial deposit. For a given bedrock roughness, this range

  4. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers

  5. Aerosol transmission of foot-and-mouth disease virus Asia-1 under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Colenutt, C; Gonzales, J L; Paton, D J; Gloster, J; Nelson, N; Sanders, C

    2016-06-30

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) control measures rely on understanding of virus transmission mechanisms. Direct contact between naïve and infected animals or spread by contaminated fomites is prevented by quarantines and rigorous decontamination procedures during outbreaks. Transmission of FMDV by aerosol may not be prevented by these control measures and this route of transmission may allow infection of animals at distance from the infection source. Understanding the potential for aerosol spread of specific FMDV strains is important for informing control strategies in an outbreak. Here, the potential for transmission of an FMDV Asia 1 strain between pigs and cattle by indirect aerosol exposure was evaluated in an experimental setting. Four naïve calves were exposed to aerosols emitted from three infected pigs in an adjacent room for a 10h period. Direct contact between pigs and cattle and fomite transfer between rooms was prevented. Viral titres in aerosols emitted by the infected pigs were measured to estimate the dose that calves were exposed to. One of the calves developed clinical signs of FMD, whilst there was serological evidence for spread to cattle by aerosol transmission in the remaining three calves. This highlights the possibility that this FMDV Asia 1 strain could be spread by aerosol transmission given appropriate environmental conditions should an outbreak occur in pigs. Our estimates suggest the exposure dose required for aerosol transmission was higher than has been previously quantified for other serotypes, implying that aerosols are less likely to play a significant role in transmission and spread of this FMDV strain. PMID:27259825

  6. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Capillary Imbibition in Fractured Sandstone under Controlled Fracture Flow Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Karpyn, Z. T.

    2010-12-01

    Fractures serve as primary conduits and have great impact on the migration of injected fluid into fractured permeable media. Appropriate transport properties such as relative permeability and capillary pressures are essential for successful simulation and prediction of multi-phase flow in such systems. However, the lack of thorough understanding of the dynamics governing immiscible displacement in fractured media, limit our ability to properly represent their macroscopic transport properties. The present work is one component of a multi-variable analysis of factors affecting fracture-matrix imbibition, including injection rates, fluid properties, and fracture orientation. We conduct laboratory experiments to monitor spatial and temporal evolution of saturation distributions in fractured sandstone samples. Air-brine, kerosene-brine and mixed oil-brine were used as three different fluid pairs in separate sets of experiments. Results were then mimicked using an automated history matching approach to obtain representative relative permeability and capillary pressure curves to further investigate the interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces, on predictive simulation tests. Sensitive analyses, in combination with direct experimental observation, allowed us to explore the relative importance of injection flow rate, gravity effect, and fluid properties on the evolving imbibition front. High fracture flow rates favor faster recovery from the matrix, at the expense of higher pore volume injected, and generate a sharp saturation transition at the edge of the imbibing front. Water saturation in the imbibed zone remains constant at around 0.5 to 0.6, suggesting a dynamic equilibrium in the mobility of the fluid phases. Liquid-liquid and gas-liquid imbibition results show significant differences in the shape of the imbibing front, breakthrough time, and saturation profiles. Results from this work also assist in the identification of favorable conditions for cocurrent

  7. Unsuitability of MALDI-TOF MS to discriminate Acinetobacter baumannii clones under routine experimental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Clara; Botelho, João; Grosso, Filipa; Silva, Liliana; Lopes, João; Peixe, Luísa

    2015-01-01

    MALDI-TOF MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry) is now in the forefront for routine bacterial species identification methodologies, being its value for clonality assessment controversial. In this work we evaluated the potential of MALDI-TOF MS for assisting infection control by depicting Acinetobacter baumannii clones. Mass spectra of 58 A. baumannii clinical isolates belonging to the worldwide spread lineages (ST98, ST103, ST208, and ST218) isolated in our country, were obtained and analyzed with several chemometric tools (pseudo gel views, peakfind function, and partial least squares discriminant analysis). The clonal lineages were obtained using the “Oxford” scheme, belonging ST98, ST208, and ST218 to the international clone II and ST103 to an epidemic clonal lineage (SG5). Additionally, mass spectra of a highly diverse international collection of 38 isolates belonging to 22 sequence types (STs) were obtained for further comparisons. Pseudo gel views and direct peak pattern analysis did not allow the discrimination of A. baumannii isolates belonging to ST98, ST103, ST208, or ST218. Moreover, a partial least square discriminant analysis of the mass spectra considering two spectral ranges (2–20 kDa and 4–10 kDa) revealed a poor degree of discrimination with only 64.6 and 65.8% of correct ST assignments, respectively. Also, mass spectra of the international isolates (n = 38, 22STs) revealed a very congruent peak pattern among them as well as among the four lineages included in this work. Despite the increasing interest of MALDI-TOF MS for bacterial typing at different taxonomical levels, we demonstrated, using routine experimental conditions, the unsuitability of this methodology for A. baumannii clonal discrimination. PMID:26042113

  8. Analysis Method and Experimental Conditions Affect Computed Circadian Phase from Melatonin Data

    PubMed Central

    Klerman, Hadassa; St. Hilaire, Melissa A.; Kronauer, Richard E.; Gooley, Joshua J.; Gronfier, Claude; Hull, Joseph T.; Lockley, Steven W.; Santhi, Nayantara; Wang, Wei; Klerman, Elizabeth B.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate determination of circadian phase is necessary for research and clinical purposes because of the influence of the master circadian pacemaker on multiple physiologic functions. Melatonin is presently the most accurate marker of the activity of the human circadian pacemaker. Current methods of analyzing the plasma melatonin rhythm can be grouped into three categories: curve-fitting, threshold-based and physiologically-based linear differential equations. To determine which method provides the most accurate assessment of circadian phase, we compared the ability to fit the data and the variability of phase estimates for seventeen different markers of melatonin phase derived from these methodological categories. We used data from three experimental conditions under which circadian rhythms - and therefore calculated melatonin phase - were expected to remain constant or progress uniformly. Melatonin profiles from older subjects and subjects with lower melatonin amplitude were less likely to be fit by all analysis methods. When circadian drift over multiple study days was algebraically removed, there were no significant differences between analysis methods of melatonin onsets (P = 0.57), but there were significant differences between those of melatonin offsets (P<0.0001). For a subset of phase assessment methods, we also examined the effects of data loss on variability of phase estimates by systematically removing data in 2-hour segments. Data loss near onset of melatonin secretion differentially affected phase estimates from the methods, with some methods incorrectly assigning phases too early while other methods assigning phases too late; missing data at other times did not affect analyses of the melatonin profile. We conclude that melatonin data set characteristics, including amplitude and completeness of data collection, differentially affect the results depending on the melatonin analysis method used. PMID:22511928

  9. SU-E-T-178: Experimental Study of Acceptable Movement Conditions for SBRT Lung Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Carrasco de Fez, P; Ruiz-Martinez, A; Jornet, N; Eudaldo, T; Latorre-Musoll, A; Ribas, Morales M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To experimentally study the acceptable movement conditions for SBRT lung treatments we quantified with film dosimetry the change in dose distributions due to periodic movements of 5 different amplitudes and 4 respiratory gating duty cycles on a SBRT treatment plan. Methods: We planned a SBRT treatment plan for the QUASAR™ (Modus Medical) phantom equipped with the respiratory motion device. We placed a 3 mm water-equivalent sphere simulating a tumour inside the lung-equivalent insert. This sphere is divided in two hemispheres that allow placing films in between. We used radiochromic EBT2™ (Ashland) films. We oriented the lung insert in such a way that sagittal dose distributions could be measured. We applied a sinusoidal movement with 3 s period for 5 different amplitudes of 0(static), 5, 7, 10, 15 and 20 mm without gating. For the 20 mm amplitude we studied the gating technique with 4 duty cycles of 20, 40, 60 and 80% of the respiratory cycle. Each situation was irradiated in a Clinac 2100 linac (Varian) equipped with the RPM™ system. FilmQA Pro™ (Ashland) software together with an Expression 10000XL scanner (EPSON) were used to analyze and compare the measured dose distributions with those planned by the Eclipse™ TPS v. 8.9 (Varian) by means of gamma analysis with 6 criteria: 5%/3mm, 5%/2mm, 5%/1mm, 3%/3mm, 3%/2mm and 2%/2mm (threshold of 10%). Results: Movements with amplitude of less than 7mm do not significantly modified the dosimetry. Gating duty cycles of less than 40% yielded also acceptable results for a 2 cm amplitude movement. Conclusion: To safely perform daily accurate SBRT treatments, movements have to be restricted to 7 mm amplitude (±3.5 mm). Otherwise, a gating strategy should be considered.

  10. Investigation of the compressive stiffness of spinal cages in various experimental conditions based on finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hyuk; Choi, Dae Kyung; Kim, Kyungsoo

    2012-04-01

    Recently, novel polymers, including polyetheretherketone and carbon fibre reinforced polymer, have been used for spinal implants. Because the in vitro experimental test uses metal blocks with different material properties from those of polymer cages in standard test protocols for prediction of the mechanical performance, it is necessary to analyse the influence of various experimental conditions, such as the material of the blocks. In this study, the compressive stiffness of spinal cages was investigated for different materials (polyetheretherketone, carbon fibre reinforced polymer, and titanium) under simulations of the mechanical experimental tests and the in vivo situation based on finite element analysis. The stiffness was affected by shapes of cage as well as experimental conditions, such as the load application method or fixation block. In the open cages, the polymer cages showed a greater dependence on the experimental situation than the metal cages. Hence, it may be necessary to consider the experimental conditions during in vitro mechanical tests for the stiffness evaluation of spinal cages made of novel polymers to obtain results relevant for an in vivo situation.

  11. Calibrated simulations of Z opacity experiments that reproduce the experimentally measured plasma conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.

    2016-02-05

    Recently, frequency-resolved iron opacity measurements at electron temperatures of 170–200 eV and electron densities of (0.7 – 4.0) × 1022 cm–3 revealed a 30–400% disagreement with the calculated opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature (London) 517, 56 (2015)]. The discrepancies have a high impact on astrophysics, atomic physics, and high-energy density physics, and it is important to verify our understanding of the experimental platform with simulations. Reliable simulations are challenging because the temporal and spatial evolution of the source radiation and of the sample plasma are both complex and incompletely diagnosed. In this article, we describe simulations that reproducemore » the measured temperature and density in recent iron opacity experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility. The time-dependent spectral irradiance at the sample is estimated using the measured time- and space-dependent source radiation distribution, in situ source-to-sample distance measurements, and a three-dimensional (3D) view-factor code. The inferred spectral irradiance is used to drive 1D sample radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The images recorded by slit-imaged space-resolved spectrometers are modeled by solving radiation transport of the source radiation through the sample. We find that the same drive radiation time history successfully reproduces the measured plasma conditions for eight different opacity experiments. These results provide a quantitative physical explanation for the observed dependence of both temperature and density on the sample configuration. Simulated spectral images for the experiments without the FeMg sample show quantitative agreement with the measured spectral images. The agreement in spectral profile, spatial profile, and brightness provides further confidence in our understanding of the backlight-radiation time history and image formation. Furthermore, these simulations bridge the static-uniform picture of the

  12. Experimental aqueous alteration of the Allende meteorite under oxidizing conditions: Constraints on asteroidal alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Catherine L.; Brearley, Adrian J.

    2006-02-01

    We have performed an experimental study of the aqueous alteration of the Allende CV3 carbonaceous chondrite under highly oxidizing conditions, in order to examine the alteration behavior of Allende's anhydrous mineralogy. The experiments were carried out at temperatures of 100, 150, and 200 °C, for time periods between 7 and 180 days, with water/rock ratios ranging from 1:1 to 9:1. Uncrushed cubes of Allende were used so that the spatial relationships between reactant and product phases could be examined in detail. Scanning electron microscope studies show that in all the experiments, even those of short duration (7 days), soluble salts of Ca and Mg (CaSO 4, CaCO 3, and MgSO 4) precipitated on the sample surface, indicating that these elements are rapidly mobilized during alteration. In addition, iron oxides and hydroxides formed on the sample surfaces. The sulfates, carbonates, and the majority of the iron-bearing secondary minerals are randomly distributed over the surface of samples. In some instances the iron oxides and hydroxides are constrained to the boundaries of altering mineral grains. Transmission electron microscope studies show that the FeO-rich olivine in the interior of the samples has altered to form interlayered serpentine/saponite and Fe-oxyhydroxides. The degree of alteration increases significantly with increasing water/rock ratio, and to a lesser extent with increasing duration of heating. The serpentine/saponite forms both by direct replacement of the olivine in crystallographically oriented intergrowths, and by recrystallization of an amorphous Si-rich phase that precipitates in pore space between the olivine grains. The alteration assemblage bears many similarities to those found in altered carbonaceous chondrites, although in detail there are important differences, which we attribute to (a) the relatively high temperatures of our experiments and (b) comparatively short reaction times compared with the natural examples. In terms of mineral

  13. Calibrated simulations of Z opacity experiments that reproduce the experimentally measured plasma conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Rochau, G. A.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, frequency-resolved iron opacity measurements at electron temperatures of 170-200 eV and electron densities of (0.7 - 4.0 )× 1022cm-3 revealed a 30 - 400 % disagreement with the calculated opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature (London) 517, 56 (2015), 10.1038/nature14048]. The discrepancies have a high impact on astrophysics, atomic physics, and high-energy density physics, and it is important to verify our understanding of the experimental platform with simulations. Reliable simulations are challenging because the temporal and spatial evolution of the source radiation and of the sample plasma are both complex and incompletely diagnosed. In this article, we describe simulations that reproduce the measured temperature and density in recent iron opacity experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility. The time-dependent spectral irradiance at the sample is estimated using the measured time- and space-dependent source radiation distribution, in situ source-to-sample distance measurements, and a three-dimensional (3D) view-factor code. The inferred spectral irradiance is used to drive 1D sample radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The images recorded by slit-imaged space-resolved spectrometers are modeled by solving radiation transport of the source radiation through the sample. We find that the same drive radiation time history successfully reproduces the measured plasma conditions for eight different opacity experiments. These results provide a quantitative physical explanation for the observed dependence of both temperature and density on the sample configuration. Simulated spectral images for the experiments without the FeMg sample show quantitative agreement with the measured spectral images. The agreement in spectral profile, spatial profile, and brightness provides further confidence in our understanding of the backlight-radiation time history and image formation. These simulations bridge the static-uniform picture of the data

  14. Experimental evaluation of connectivity influence on dispersivity under confined and unconfined radial convergent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, Silvia; Molinari, Antonio; Fallico, Carmine; Pedretti, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneity and connectivity have a significant impact on the fate and transport of contaminants due to the occurrence of formations with largest permeability than the surrounding geological materials, which can originate preferential pathways in groundwater system. These issues are usually addressed by tracer tests and a radial convergent (RC) flow setting is typically selected for convenience but more complicated for model interpretation than uniform flow transport. An experimental investigation was performed using RC tracer tests in a 3D intermediate scale physical model to illustrate the role of connected features on the estimation of dispersivity using the classical Sauty solution and the method of moments, under confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. The physical model consists of 26 piezometers located at difference distances from a constant-discharge central pumping well. The box is filled with gravel channels embedded in a sandy matrix and organized in different layers. Materials have been well characterized before and after the test. For the confined configuration, a silt layer was placed above the previous layers. Tracer tests were performed using potassium iodide solutions with concentration of 3•10-3 M and under a constant pumping flow rate of 0.05 L/s. To mimic a pulse injection in each piezometer we used syringes and pipes, whereas a probe allowed continuous measuring of tracer concentration. Average velocity and longitudinal dispersion coefficient were defined from the first and second central moment of the observed breakthrough curves for each piezometer (integrated over the outflow boundary of the domain) and using the classical curve matching from the Sauty's solution at different Péclet numbers. Results reveal in some cases that estimates of hydrodynamic parameters from the Sauty solution and the method of moments seem to be different. This is related to the different basic assumptions of the two methods applied, and especially because

  15. Calibrated simulations of Z opacity experiments that reproduce the experimentally measured plasma conditions.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Rochau, G A; MacFarlane, J J; Golovkin, I

    2016-02-01

    Recently, frequency-resolved iron opacity measurements at electron temperatures of 170-200 eV and electron densities of (0.7-4.0)×10(22)cm(-3) revealed a 30-400% disagreement with the calculated opacities [J. E. Bailey et al., Nature (London) 517, 56 (2015)]. The discrepancies have a high impact on astrophysics, atomic physics, and high-energy density physics, and it is important to verify our understanding of the experimental platform with simulations. Reliable simulations are challenging because the temporal and spatial evolution of the source radiation and of the sample plasma are both complex and incompletely diagnosed. In this article, we describe simulations that reproduce the measured temperature and density in recent iron opacity experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Z facility. The time-dependent spectral irradiance at the sample is estimated using the measured time- and space-dependent source radiation distribution, in situ source-to-sample distance measurements, and a three-dimensional (3D) view-factor code. The inferred spectral irradiance is used to drive 1D sample radiation hydrodynamics simulations. The images recorded by slit-imaged space-resolved spectrometers are modeled by solving radiation transport of the source radiation through the sample. We find that the same drive radiation time history successfully reproduces the measured plasma conditions for eight different opacity experiments. These results provide a quantitative physical explanation for the observed dependence of both temperature and density on the sample configuration. Simulated spectral images for the experiments without the FeMg sample show quantitative agreement with the measured spectral images. The agreement in spectral profile, spatial profile, and brightness provides further confidence in our understanding of the backlight-radiation time history and image formation. These simulations bridge the static-uniform picture of the data interpretation and the

  16. Experimental investigation on the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system on water-heating mode

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Guiyin; Hu, Hainan; Liu, Xu

    2010-09-15

    An experimental study on operation performance of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was conducted in this paper. The experimental system of photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system was set up. The performance parameters such as the evaporation pressure, the condensation pressure and the coefficient of performance (COP) of heat pump air-conditioning system, the water temperature and receiving heat capacity in water heater, the photovoltaic (PV) module temperature and the photovoltaic efficiency were investigated. The experimental results show that the mean photovoltaic efficiency of photovoltaic-thermal (PV/T) solar heat pump air-conditioning system reaches 10.4%, and can improve 23.8% in comparison with that of the conventional photovoltaic module, the mean COP of heat pump air-conditioning system may attain 2.88 and the water temperature in water heater can increase to 42 C. These results indicate that the photovoltaic-thermal solar heat pump air-conditioning system has better performances and can stably work. (author)

  17. Highlighting and trying to overcome a serious drawback with QSPR studies; data collection in different experimental conditions (mixed-QSPR).

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Abolghasem; Riahi, Siavash; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz

    2012-03-15

    The experimental conditions in quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies need to be the same for each dataset in case one wishes to relate the property, only to the structure. This major drawback limits QSPR studies due to two reasons: (1) Gathering of physicochemical data obtained under the same experimental condition is difficult. (2) The obtained model is just useful to predict the physicochemical properties under the specific experimental condition. In this article, we report an attempt to highlight the shortcoming of QSPR studies for a property that was measured under different experimental conditions. In addition, we reveal inadequacies that correlating the fluorescence properties and the descriptor of the solvent has. These defects are eventually removed by taking into account the solvent-solute interactions in descriptor calculations. Quantum chemical calculations (HF/6-31G*) were carried out to optimize geometry and calculate the structural descriptors. The genetic algorithm combined with multiple linear regression method was utilized to construct the linear QSPR models. Because of the better nonlinear relationship between the quantum yield of fluorescence and structural descriptors in comparison with those of a linear relationship, support vector machine was used to construct the nonlinear QSPR model. Result analyses demonstrated that the proposed models meet our goal.

  18. Validation of reference genes for RT-qPCR studies of gene expression in banana fruit under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Zhong, Hai-ying; Kuang, Jian-fei; Li, Jian-guo; Lu, Wang-jin; Chen, Jian-ye

    2011-08-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) is a sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression, but its success depends on the stability of the reference gene(s) used for data normalization. Only a few studies on validation of reference genes have been conducted in fruit trees and none in banana yet. In the present work, 20 candidate reference genes were selected, and their expression stability in 144 banana samples were evaluated and analyzed using two algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. The samples consisted of eight sample sets collected under different experimental conditions, including various tissues, developmental stages, postharvest ripening, stresses (chilling, high temperature, and pathogen), and hormone treatments. Our results showed that different suitable reference gene(s) or combination of reference genes for normalization should be selected depending on the experimental conditions. The RPS2 and UBQ2 genes were validated as the most suitable reference genes across all tested samples. More importantly, our data further showed that the widely used reference genes, ACT and GAPDH, were not the most suitable reference genes in many banana sample sets. In addition, the expression of MaEBF1, a gene of interest that plays an important role in regulating fruit ripening, under different experimental conditions was used to further confirm the validated reference genes. Taken together, our results provide guidelines for reference gene(s) selection under different experimental conditions and a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in banana. PMID:21505864

  19. Boundary conditions for creeping flow along periodic or random rough surfaces : experimental and theoretical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecoq, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions between particles and walls are relevant for the open problem of specifying boundary conditions for suspension flows. The Reynolds number around a small particle close to a wall is usually low and creeping flow equations apply. From the solution of these equations, the drag coefficient on a sphere becomes infinite when the gap between the sphere and a smooth wall vanishes, so that contact may not occur. Physically, the drag is finite because of various reasons, one of them being the particle and wall roughness. Then, for vanishing gap, even though some layers of fluid molecules may be left between the particle and wall roughness peaks, it may conventionally be said that contact occurs. In this paper, we are considering the example of a smooth sphere moving towards a rough wall. The roughness considered here consist of random rough planes or parallel periodic wedges, the characteristic length of which is small compared with the sphere radius. This problem is considered both experimentally and theoretically. The motion of a millimetre size bead settling towards a corrugated horizontal wall in a viscous oil is measured with laser interferometry giving an accuracy on the displacement of 0.2μm. Several random rough planes and wedge shaped walls were used, with various wavelengths and wedge angles. From the results, it is observed that the velocity of the sphere is, except for small gaps, similar to that towards a smooth plane that is shifted down from the top of corrugations. For the periodic wedges, the creeping flow is calculated as a series in the slope of the roughness grooves. The convergence of the series for the shift distance in term of the slope is accelerated by use of Euler transformation and of the existence of a limit for large slope. The cases of a flow along and across the grooves are considered separately. The shift is larger in the former case. Slightly flattened tops of the wedges used in experiments are also considered in

  20. Experimental dissolution vs. transformation of micas under acidic soil conditions: Clues from boron isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voinot, A.; Lemarchand, D.; Collignon, C.; Granet, M.; Chabaux, F.; Turpault, M.-P.

    2013-09-01

    Minerals in soils evolve through contact with water and other weathering agents (protons, organic acids and ligands) from the atmosphere or released by the surrounding vegetation and associated fauna. Determining the respective contribution of these agents to weathering budgets and the mechanisms by which they interact with soil minerals is a key step toward obtaining refined models of soil development, plant/mineral interactions and, ultimately, soil sustainability. To test the influence of different chemical agents on the processes of mica weathering (dissolution and transformation), we conducted a series of laboratory flow-through experiments on biotite using three chemical groups of reactants found in forest soils: protons (HCl), organic acids (citric acid) and ligands (siderophores). These experiments were performed at two different pH values (pH 3 and pH 4.5) for 37 days at 20 °C. Biotite was chosen as a test-mineral because it is reactive with acids and water and because it is commonly found in granite soils. To investigate the weathering reactions, the chemical and isotopic compositions of B (δ11B) and the concentrations of predominant cation (Si, Al, Mg, K and Fe) were monitored in the outflowing solutions. The choice of B as a proxy for weathering processes is based on the fact that B is located in different crystallographic sites in biotite (interlayers and structural sites, named I- and S-sites, respectively). We observed a large δ11B contrast between these sites (Δ11BS-I sites˜80‰), which allows for a precise quantification of the respective contribution of I- and S-sites to B released during biotite weathering. The individual reaction rates for these crystallographic sites were inferred from the B chemical and isotopic compositions of the outflowing solutions. A comparison with the major elements reveals that B is preferentially released to solution under all tested experimental conditions (up to 4 times more), particularly in the presence of

  1. Identification of key factors in Accelerated Low Water Corrosion through experimental simulation of tidal conditions: influence of stimulated indigenous microbiota.

    PubMed

    Marty, Florence; Gueuné, Hervé; Malard, Emilie; Sánchez-Amaya, José M; Sjögren, Lena; Abbas, Ben; Quillet, Laurent; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M; Muyzer, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors favoring Accelerated Low Water Corrosion (ALWC) on harbor steel structures remain unclear warranting their study under controlled experimental tidal conditions. Initial stimulation of marine microbial consortia by a pulse of organic matter resulted in localized corrosion and the highest corrosion rates (up to 12-times higher than non-stimulated conditions) in the low water zone, persisting after nine months exposure to natural seawater. Correlations between corrosion severity and the abundance and composition of metabolically active sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) indicated the importance and persistence of specific bacterial populations in accelerated corrosion. One phylotype related to the electrogenic SRB Desulfopila corrodens appeared as the major causative agent of the accelerated corrosion. The similarity of bacterial populations related to sulfur and iron cycles, mineral and tuberculation with those identified in ALWC support the relevance of experimental simulation of tidal conditions in the management of steel corrosion exposed to harbor environments.

  2. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  3. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  4. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  5. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  6. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order to... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for...

  7. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  8. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  9. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  10. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  11. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  12. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  13. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  14. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  15. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  16. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  17. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  18. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  19. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  20. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  1. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  2. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  3. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  4. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  5. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital...

  6. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  7. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  8. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  9. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  10. Conditions for the Validity of Faraday's Law of Induction and Their Experimental Confirmation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Ramos, A.; Menendez, J. R.; Pique, C.

    2008-01-01

    This paper, as its main didactic objective, shows the conditions needed for the validity of Faraday's law of induction. Inadequate comprehension of these conditions has given rise to several paradoxes about the issue; some are analysed and solved in this paper in the light of the theoretical deduction of the induction law. Furthermore, an…

  11. Computational modeling and experimental validation of odor detection behaviours of classically conditioned parasitic wasp, Microplitis croceipes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To further improve the sensitivity of odor¬ and odor concentration detection of the Wasp Hound, searching behaviors of a food-conditioned wasp in a confined area with the conditioning odor were recorded. The experiments were recorded using a video camera. First, the wasps are individually hand condi...

  12. Experimental evaluation of natural period of masonry and reinforced concrete structures during operative conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Auletta, Gianluca; Nigro, Antonella; Iacovino, Chiara; Salvatore Nigro, Domenico

    2016-04-01

    This work focuses on the experimental evaluation of the fundamental period of buildings of various types (masonry and reinforced concrete) using measurements of ambient vibrations on real buildings located in Basilicata (Italy) and numerical analyses. The results are compared with the simplified formula provided by the Seismic Italian Code (NTC2008), that is function of structural typology and height for both near collapse and limited damage limit states and experimental results provided by the recent scientific literature. With the intention of proposing simplified relationships to evaluate the fundamental period of buildings, several numerical and experimental campaigns, on different structures all around the world, have been carried out in the last years in order to calibrate different kind of formulas. Most of formulas retrieved from both numerical and experimental analyses provides vibration periods smaller than those suggested by the NTC2008. However, it is well known that the fundamental period of a structure play a key role in the correct evaluation of the spectral acceleration for seismic static analyses. Generally, simplified approaches impose the use of safety factors greater than those related to in depth nonlinear analyses with the aim to cover possible unexpected uncertainties. Using the simplified formula proposed by the Italian seismic code the fundamental period is quite higher than fundamental periods experimentally evaluated on real structures, with the consequence that the spectral acceleration adopted in the seismic static analysis may be significantly different than real spectral acceleration. This approach could produces a decreasing in safety factors obtained using linear seismic static analyses. Based on numerical and experimental evidences, the authors suggest a possible update of the seismic codes formula for the simplified estimation of the fundamental period of vibration of existing masonry and RC buildings. Acknowledgements This study

  13. The effects of scope condition-based participant exclusion on experimental outcomes in expectation states research: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Dippong, Joseph

    2012-03-01

    Expectation states theory employs several scope statements to specify the situational conditions that must be met for any test of the theory to be considered valid (Foschi, 1997). Collective orientation and task orientation are two scope conditions that researchers frequently implement as selection criteria for a participant's inclusion in an analytic sample. Although excluding participants who fail to meet scope conditions is theoretically consistent, researchers have yet to establish how this practice affects experimental outcomes. I employ meta-analysis to compare studies within the expectation states tradition in which participants are excluded for failure to meet scope conditions to studies in which no similar exclusions are made. Results suggest that studies that exclude participants for scope violations demonstrate a decreased baseline tendency to reject influence. I contend that adopting a more universal approach to the measurement and application of scope conditions would be methodologically and theoretically beneficial to expectation states research.

  14. Verbal Conditioning of Male and Female Schizophrenics as a Function of Experimenter Proximity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rierdan, Jill; Brooks, Robert

    1978-01-01

    Assess the effects of patient-experimenter proximity on schizophrenics' learning when the social class of the subjects, both schizophrenics and nonschizophrenics, and the verbal and nonverbal components of social reinforcement are controlled. Also tests males and females to determine whether sex of subjects moderates the responses of…

  15. Dy-IP characterization and its application for experimental neutron radiography tests under realistic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Masayoshi; Iida, Kazuhiro; Mori, Noriaki; Lehmann, Eberhard H.; Vontobel, Peter; Estermann, Mirko

    2005-04-01

    Imaging plates containing Dy for neutron radiography have been designed, fabricated and tested experimentally. Using the imaging plates combined with the developed NR system and the honeycomb collimator, quantitative neutron radiograph, which is free from scattered neutron and γ-ray, has been obtained. Application has been conducted for the post-irradiation examination for the nuclear fuel pin.

  16. Analytical and experimental studies of ventilation systems subjected to simulated tornado conditions: Verification of the TVENT computer code

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.A.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.; Littleton, P.E.; Talbott, D.V.

    1988-04-01

    Analytical and experimental studies of ventilation systems have been conducted to verify the Los Alamos National Laboratory TVENT accident analysis computer code for simulated tornado conditions. This code was developed to be a user-friendly analysis tool for designers and regulatory personnel and was designed to predict pressure and flow transients in arbitrary ventilation systems. The experimental studies used two relatively simple, yet sensitive, physical systems designed using similitude analysis. These physical models were instrumented end-to-end for pressure and volumetric flow rate and then subjected to the worst credible tornado conditions using a special blowdown apparatus. We verified TVENT by showing that it successfully predicted our experimental results. By comparing experimental results from both physical models with TVENT results, we showed that we have derived the proper similitude relations (governed by compressibility effects) for all sizes of ventilation systems. As a by-product of our studies, we determined the need for fan speed variation modeling in TVENT. This modification was made and resulted in a significant improvement in our comparisons of analytical and experimental results.

  17. The Appreciation of Humor By Males and Females During Conditions of Crowding Experimentally Induced.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prerost, Frank J.; Brewer, Robert E.

    1980-01-01

    Subjects rated the humor of jokes under conditions of high and low spatial density. Crowding was found to significantly diminish appreciation of three types of humor. Significant sex differences in reactivity to crowding were found. (Author/CS)

  18. Experimental verification of free-space singular boundary conditions in an invisibility cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiannan; Gao, Fei; Song, Zhengyong; Lin, Xiao; Zhang, Youming; Chen, Huanyang; Zhang, Baile

    2016-04-01

    A major issue in invisibility cloaking, which caused intense mathematical discussions in the past few years but still remains physically elusive, is the plausible singular boundary conditions associated with the singular metamaterials at the inner boundary of an invisibility cloak. The perfect cloaking phenomenon, as originally proposed by Pendry et al for electromagnetic waves, cannot be treated as physical before a realistic inner boundary of a cloak is demonstrated. Although a recent demonstration has been done in a waveguide environment, the exotic singular boundary conditions should apply to a general environment as in free space. Here we fabricate a metamaterial surface that exhibits the singular boundary conditions and demonstrate its performance in free space. Particularly, the phase information of waves reflected from this metamaterial surface is explicitly measured, confirming the singular responses of boundary conditions for an invisibility cloak.

  19. Analytic and experimental evaluation of flowing air test conditions for selected metallics in a shuttle TPS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, J. W.; Tong, H.; Clark, K. J.; Suchsland, K. E.; Neuner, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed experimental and analytical evaluation was performed to define the response of TD nickel chromium alloy (20 percent chromium) and coated columbium (R512E on CB-752 and VH-109 on WC129Y) to shuttle orbiter reentry heating. Flight conditions important to the response of these thermal protection system (TPS) materials were calculated, and test conditions appropriate to simulation of these flight conditions in flowing air ground test facilities were defined. The response characteristics of these metallics were then evaluated for the flight and representative ground test conditions by analytical techniques employing appropriate thermochemical and thermal response computer codes and by experimental techniques employing an arc heater flowing air test facility and flat face stagnation point and wedge test models. These results were analyzed to define the ground test requirements to obtain valid TPS response characteristics for application to flight. For both material types in the range of conditions appropriate to the shuttle application, the surface thermochemical response resulted in a small rate of change of mass and a negligible energy contribution. The thermal response in terms of surface temperature was controlled by the net heat flux to the surface; this net flux was influenced significantly by the surface catalycity and surface emissivity. The surface catalycity must be accounted for in defining simulation test conditions so that proper heat flux levels to, and therefore surface temperatures of, the test samples are achieved.

  20. Experimental investigations on the performance of a packed bed dehumidifier for various climatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Gandhidasan, P.; Kiris, I.; Anderson, E.E.; Dolan, M.

    1997-03-01

    To simulate space cooling or drying systems for various geographical regions (low, moderate, and high humidity regions) a liquid desiccant system consisting of a humidifier and dehumidifier has been designed and constructed. This system consists of two coupled humidifying and dehumidifying packed columns filled with plastic Intalox Snowflake packing material. Experimental measurements of the dehumidifier performance utilizing a new cost effective liquid desiccant mixture (CELD), total desiccant salt content 40%wt to 45%wt (salt comprised of equal portions by weight of lithium chloride and calcium chloride), have been carried out. The effect of different independent variables such as packing height, air inlet temperature and humidity ratio, and liquid desiccant inlet temperature, flow rate and concentration on the performance of the dehumidifier has been investigated. Experimental results demonstrate that the CELD is a promising desiccant for cooling and drying operations.

  1. A detailed experimental study of n-propylcyclohexane autoignition in lean conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Crochet, M.; Minetti, R.; Ribaucour, M.; Vanhove, G.

    2010-11-15

    The autoignition chemistry of lean n-propylcyclohexane/''air'' mixtures ({phi} = 0.3, 0.4, 0.5) was investigated in a rapid compression machine at compressed gas temperatures ranging from 620 to 930 K and pressures ranging from 0.45 to 1.34 MPa. Cool flame and ignition delay times were measured. Cool flame delay times were found to follow an Arrhenius behavior, and a correlation including pressure and equivalence ratio dependences was deduced. The present ignition delay data were compared with recent experimental results and simulations from the available thermokinetic models in the literature. Negative temperature coefficient zones were observed when plotting ignition delay times versus compressed gas temperature. The oxidation products were identified and quantified during the ignition delay period. Formation pathways for the C{sub 9} bicyclic ethers and conjugate alkenes are proposed. The experimental data provide an extensive database to test detailed thermokinetic oxidation models. (author)

  2. Evaluation of a chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide teat dip under experimental and natural exposure conditions.

    PubMed

    Drechsler, P A; Wildman, E E; Pankey, J W

    1990-08-01

    A postmilking teat dip containing chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide was evaluated by experimental challenge and in two herds under natural exposure. The test product had an efficacy of 78.9% against Staphylococcus aureus and 52.5% against Streptococcus agalactiae in the experimental challenge trial. The product was compared with a 1% iodine product in a 15-mo natural exposure study. Post-dipping with chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide reduced incidence of udder infection by major mastitis pathogens 36.1% when data were combined from the two herds. The 1% iodine and the chlorous acid-chlorine dioxide products were not equivalent for major mastitis pathogens; the test product was more effective. Incidence of udder infection by environmental mastitis pathogens was reduced 36.8% in both herds combined. Efficacy of the two teat dips was equivalent for environmental pathogens. PMID:2229601

  3. An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Mark S.; Hansman, R. John

    1988-01-01

    Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of + or - 0.5 mm; in addition, the ultrasonic signal characteristics may be used to detect the presence of liquid on the ice surface and hence discern wet and dry ice growth behavior. Ice growth was measured on the stagnation line of a cylinder exposed to artificial icing conditions in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT), and similarly for a cylinder exposed in flight to natural icing conditions. Ice thickness was observed to increase approximately linearly with exposure time during the initial icing period. The ice accretion rate was found to vary with cloud temperature during wet ice growth, and liquid runback from the stagnation region was inferred. A steady-state energy balance model for the icing surface was used to compare heat transfer characteristics for IRT and natural icing conditions. Ultrasonic measurements of wet and dry ice growth observed in the IRT and in flight were compared with icing regimes predicted by a series of heat transfer coefficients. The heat transfer magnitude was generally inferred to be higher for the IRT than for the natural icing conditions encountered in flight. An apparent variation in the heat transfer magnitude was also observed for flights conducted through different natural icing-cloud formations.

  4. Experimental Studies of Hydrogenation and Other Reactions on Surfaces Under Astrophysically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco

    1998-01-01

    The goal of our project is to study hydrogen recombination reactions on solid surfaces under conditions that are relevant in astrophysics. Laboratory experiments were conducted using low-flux, cold atomic H and D beams impinging on a sample kept under ultra high vacuum conditions. Realistic analogues of interstellar dust grains were used. Our results show that current models for hydrogen recombination reactions have to be modified to take into account the role of activated diffusion of H on surfaces even at low temperature.

  5. Experimental study of the effects of alternating fields on HTS coils according to the winding insulation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Y. J.; Ahn, M. C.; Lee, T. S.; Lee, W. S.; Ko, T. K.

    2013-08-01

    This paper examines the effects of alternating fields on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils according to the winding insulation condition. Alternating fields can occur in synchronous machines (armature reaction, faults) and other devices. In superconducting synchronous machines, alternating fields affect the operational characteristics of the machine and the superconducting field coil. Therefore, a method of reducing the effects of alternating fields is necessary in superconducting synchronous design. In this study, the effects of alternating fields on the HTS field coil according to the winding insulation condition were experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that HTS coils made using the no-insulation technique can be a solution for reducing the effects of the alternating field. These results are expected to suggest useful data for applications of HTS field coils in superconducting synchronous machines.

  6. Agreement between Descriptive and Experimental Analyses of Behavior under Naturalistic Test Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Brian K.; Gertz, Lynne E.; Werder, Candace Susan de Lacy; Rymanowski, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the results of a contingency space analysis (CSA) of behavior-consequence recordings to the results of functional analysis (FA) test conditions involving antecedent stimuli and verbal statements that both differed from and mimicked those in the natural environment. Three preschool children with autism spectrum disorder participated.…

  7. Spontaneous Chronic Pain After Experimental Thoracotomy Revealed by Conditioned Place Preference: Morphine Differentiates Tactile Evoked Pain From Spontaneous Pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain after surgery limits social activity, interferes with work, and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is reported as resting or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1-hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40 mg/kg) gave equivalent 2- to 3-hour-long relief of tactile hypersensitivity when tested 12 to 14 days postoperatively. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by 1 conditioning session with morphine or gabapentin, both versus saline. The gabapentin-conditioned but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the equivalent effect of the 2 agents in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these 2 aspects of long-term postoperative pain. Perspective: Spontaneous pain, a hallmark of chronic postoperative pain, is demonstrated here in a rat model of experimental postthoracotomy pain, further validating the use of this model for the development of analgesics to treat such symptoms. Although stimulus-evoked pain was sensitive to systemic morphine, spontaneous pain was not, suggesting different mechanistic

  8. Spontaneous Chronic Pain After Experimental Thoracotomy Revealed by Conditioned Place Preference: Morphine Differentiates Tactile Evoked Pain From Spontaneous Pain.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary R

    2015-09-01

    Chronic pain after surgery limits social activity, interferes with work, and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is reported as resting or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1-hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40 mg/kg) gave equivalent 2- to 3-hour-long relief of tactile hypersensitivity when tested 12 to 14 days postoperatively. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by 1 conditioning session with morphine or gabapentin, both versus saline. The gabapentin-conditioned but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the equivalent effect of the 2 agents in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these 2 aspects of long-term postoperative pain. Perspective: Spontaneous pain, a hallmark of chronic postoperative pain, is demonstrated here in a rat model of experimental postthoracotomy pain, further validating the use of this model for the development of analgesics to treat such symptoms. Although stimulus-evoked pain was sensitive to systemic morphine, spontaneous pain was not, suggesting different mechanistic

  9. A Novel Experimental Technique for the Study of High-Speed Friction under Elastic Loading Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Paula; Rainey, Kevin; Rightley, Paul; Hammerberg, J. E.

    2004-07-01

    The role of friction in high strain-rate events is not well understood despite being an important constitutive relationship in modern modeling and simulation studies of explosive events. There is a lack of experimental data available for the validation ofmodels of dynamic sliding. The Rotating Barrel Gas Gun (RBGG) is a novel, small-scale experimental facility designed to investigate interfacial dynamics at high loads and sliding speeds. The RBGG utilizes a low-pressure gas gun to propel a rotating annular projectile towards an annular target rod. Upon striking the target, the projectile imparts both an axial and a torsional impulse into the target at a timescale relevant to explosively-driven events. Resulting elastic waves are measured using strain gages attached to the target rod. The coefficient of friction is obtained through an analysis of the resulting strain wave data. Initial experiments have been performed using dry copper/copper interfaces. We find that the measured coefficient of friction can evolve significantly over a 30 μs event.

  10. Performance of Roads In Seismic Conditions: A Theoretical And Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pratico, Filippo Giammaria

    2008-07-08

    As is well known, the role of the road network during and after an earthquake is of paramount relevance. In the light of the above, the main goal of the paper has been confined to the analyses of road performance in seismic conditions, as a result of intrinsic (structural and functional conditions, redundancy, etc.) and extrinsic (loads, flows, etc.) characteristics. Such interaction has been analysed for the area of Reggio Calabria and Messina Strait, through 28 equations and a number of models and simulations. Analyses proved that redundancy is a key-factor, able to affect the overall performance of the road network. Simulations demonstrated that in the long term road serviceability could be partly compromised, but accident risk, due to speed limitations, could result decreased.

  11. The role of operant conditioning in chronic pain: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Flor, Herta; Knost, Bärbel; Birbaumer, Niels

    2002-01-01

    The role of operant conditioning for the development and maintenance of chronic pain was examined in 30 chronic back pain patients (CBP) and 30 matched healthy controls. Half of each group was reinforced for increased, half for decreased pain reports while EEG, EOG, heart rate, skin conductance and muscle tension levels were recorded. Both groups showed similar learning rates, however, the CBP patients displayed slower extinction of both the verbal and the cortical (N150) pain response. In addition, the CBP group displayed prolonged elevated electromyogram levels to the task. These data suggest that CBP patients are more easily influenced by operant conditioning factors than healthy controls and this susceptibility may add to the maintenance of the chronic pain problem.

  12. Simulation of VSPT Experimental Cascade Under High and Low Free-Stream Turbulence Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ameri, Ali A.; Giel, Paul W.; Flegel, Ashlie

    2014-01-01

    Variable-Speed Power Turbines (VSPT) for rotorcraft applications operate in conditions of low Reynolds number and a wide range in incidence resulting from rotational speed variation. A comprehensive data set obtained in a linear cascade which includes the effects of Reynolds number, free-stream turbulence and incidence is now available and this paper concerns itself with the post-diction of boundary layer transitionseparation, blade pressure loading and total pressure loss pertaining to the conditions set for measurements in that data set. The distinction between the state of the measured data presented here and the earlier publications is the addition of high free-stream turbulence intensity. We will, for the purposes of the numerical post-diction, present some of the higher free stream turbulence data in this paper but defer a comprehensive presentation and treatment of the measured data will be done elsewhere.

  13. Effects of vegetation and sewage load on mangrove crab condition using experimental mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, Valter; Penha-Lopes, Gil; Paula, José

    2009-09-01

    Constructed wetlands, especially mangroves, have been studied for their usefulness in sewage treatment but the effects of mangrove vegetation and a sewage load on mangrove macrofauna have been given little attention. Ocypodid crabs are important components of mangrove forests and constitute good bioindicators of the functioning of the ecosystem as a whole. In constructed mangrove mesocosms, three vegetation treatments (bare substratum, and Avicennia marina and Rhizophora mucronata seedlings) were subjected to 0, 20, 60 and 100% sewage loads from a nearby hotel. The physiological condition of introduced Uca annulipes and Uca inversa was evaluated in terms of their RNA/DNA ratio after one, five and twelve months, and used as an indicator of ecological function in the system. Crab condition in 0% sewage load was similar to that of wild crabs throughout, suggesting no significant effects of the mesocosms on their RNA/DNA ratio. Overall, both species coped well with the administered sewage loads, suggesting good ecological function in the system. Both species manifested similar patterns in RNA/DNA ratio, being more affected by seasonal fluctuations than by sewage load and vegetation presence and type. Higher RNA/DNA ratios were recorded in the long compared to the short rainy season. Sewage enhanced crab condition in the bare substratum and R. mucronata treatments, especially after one year, probably as a result of enhanced food availability. Uca inversa may be more sensitive to sewage pollution than U. annulipes. In A. marina, no difference in crab condition was observed between sewage loads, and this mangrove yielded the best reduction in sewage impacts. Our results support the usefulness of constructed mangrove areas in sewage treatment, especially if planted with A. marina and inhabited by physiologically healthy ocypodid crabs to enhance the system's performance.

  14. Nuclear bodies in the rat adrenal glomerular zone in normal and experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Santibañez, G P; Lafarga, M

    1979-01-01

    The presence of nuclear bodies in the glomerular zone of the rat adrenal cortex has been shown both in normal conditions and after the stimulus of low sodium diets causing an increase in their number. These results indicate that these organelles are a normal nuclear component of the cells of this zone, and that they can experience significant increases in quantity and complexity due to various functional stimuli.

  15. Theoretical and experimental investigations of thermal conditions of household biogas plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelykh, Vasil; Furdas, Yura; Dzeryn, Oleksandra

    2016-06-01

    The construction of domestic continuous bioreactor is proposed. The modeling of thermal modes of household biogas plant using graph theory was done. The correction factor taking into account with the influence of variables on its value was determined. The system of balance equations for the desired thermal conditions in the bioreactor was presented. The graphical and analytical capabilities were represented that can be applied in the design of domestic biogas plants of organic waste recycling.

  16. Mineral-catalyzed dehydrogenation of C6 cyclic hydrocarbons: results from experimental studies under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, S.; Tassi, F.; Gould, I.; Shock, E.; Lorance, E. D.; Bockisch, C.; Fecteau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitously present in volcanic and hydrothermal gases. Their relative abundances have been demonstrated to be sensitive to physical and chemical parameters, suggesting VOCs as potential tools for evaluating deep reservoir conditions. Nevertheless, reaction pathways for VOC production at hydrothermal conditions are still poorly understood. Reversible catalytic reforming may be responsible for the high abundance of benzene observed in hydrothermal gases relative to saturated hydrocarbons. The dehydrogenation of n-hexane to benzene could proceed with C6 cyclic hydrocarbons as intermediates, as suggested by the relative enrichment in cyclic hydrocarbons observed in gases originating at T <150 °C. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the production of benzene from cyclic hydrocarbons at 300°C and 85 bar. At these conditions in pure water, negligible benzene is produced from cyclohexane after 10 days. The presence of a mineral phase, especially sphalerite, favored the formation of both benzene and cyclohexene. The efficiency of dehydroaromatization reaction increased at increasing mineral/cyclohexane ratio, pointing to a surface catalyzed reaction. The catalytic action of sphalerite on the C-H bonds was confirmed by the large abundance of deuterated cyclohexane resulted in D2O experiments. The same experiment carried out using cyclohexene in pure water mainly produced methyl-cyclopentenes (via isomerization) and cyclohexanol (via oxygenation). In presence of sphalerite, the production of significant amounts of benzene confirmed the critical role of this mineral for the aromatization of cyclic compounds under hydrothermal conditions. Contrarily, products from cyclohexene solution phase oxidation using Cu(II) mainly consisted of oxygenated VOCs.

  17. Observational fear conditioning in the acquisition and extinction of attentional bias for threat: an experimental evaluation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Megan M; Forsyth, John P

    2007-05-01

    Anxious persons show automatic and strategic attentional biases for threatening information. Yet, the mechanisms and processes that underlie such biases remain unclear. The central aim of the present study was to elucidate the relation between observational threat learning and the acquisition and extinction of biased threat processing by integrating emotional Stroop color naming tasks within an observational differential fear conditioning procedure. Forty-three healthy female participants underwent several consecutive observational fear conditioning phases. During acquisition, participants watched a confederate displaying mock panic attacks (UCS) paired with a verbal stimulus (CS+), but not with a second nonreinforced verbal stimulus (CS-). As expected, participants showed greater magnitude electrodermal and verbal-evaluative (e.g., distress, fear) conditioned responses to the CS+ over the CS- word. Participants also demonstrated slower color-naming latencies to CS+ compared to the CS- word following acquisition and showed attenuation of this preferential processing bias for threat following extinction. Findings are discussed broadly in the context of the interplay between fear learning and processing biases for threat as observed in persons suffering from anxiety disorders. PMID:17516811

  18. Boundary condition identification for a grid model by experimental and numerical dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Qiang; Devitis, John; Mazzotti, Matteo; Bartoli, Ivan; Moon, Franklin; Sjoblom, Kurt; Aktan, Emin

    2015-04-01

    There is a growing need to characterize unknown foundations and assess substructures in existing bridges. It is becoming an important issue for the serviceability and safety of bridges as well as for the possibility of partial reuse of existing infrastructures. Within this broader contest, this paper investigates the possibility of identifying, locating and quantifying changes of boundary conditions, by leveraging a simply supported grid structure with a composite deck. Multi-reference impact tests are operated for the grid model and modification of one supporting bearing is done by replacing a steel cylindrical roller with a roller of compliant material. Impact based modal analysis provide global modal parameters such as damped natural frequencies, mode shapes and flexibility matrix that are used as indicators of boundary condition changes. An updating process combining a hybrid optimization algorithm and the finite element software suit ABAQUS is presented in this paper. The updated ABAQUS model of the grid that simulates the supporting bearing with springs is used to detect and quantify the change of the boundary conditions.

  19. Effect of Clonal Selection on Daphnia Tolerance to Dark Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gitzen, Robert A.; Williamson, Craig E.; González, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated substantial effects of environmental stress that vary among clones. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) is an important abiotic stressor that is highly variable in aquatic ecosystems due to diel and seasonal variations in incident sunlight as well as to differences in the UV transparency of water among water bodies, the depth distribution of organisms, and the ability of organisms to detect and respond to UV. In contrast to the convention that all UV is damaging, evidence is accumulating for the beneficial effects of exposure to low levels of UV radiation. Whereas UV has been frequently observed as the primary light-related stressor, herein we present evidence that dark conditions may be similarly “stressful” (reduction of overall fitness), and stress responses vary among clones of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia parvula. We have identified a significant relationship between survivorship and reduced fecundity of clones maintained in dark conditions, but no correlation between tolerance of the clones to dark and UV radiation. Low tolerance to dark conditions can have negative effects not only on accumulated stresses in organisms (e.g. the repair of UV-induced damage in organisms with photolyase), but potentially on the overall physiology and fitness of organisms. Our results support recent evidence of the beneficial effects of low-level UV exposure for some organisms. PMID:27434210

  20. Effect of Clonal Selection on Daphnia Tolerance to Dark Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Connelly, Sandra J; Stoeckel, James A; Gitzen, Robert A; Williamson, Craig E; González, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated substantial effects of environmental stress that vary among clones. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV) is an important abiotic stressor that is highly variable in aquatic ecosystems due to diel and seasonal variations in incident sunlight as well as to differences in the UV transparency of water among water bodies, the depth distribution of organisms, and the ability of organisms to detect and respond to UV. In contrast to the convention that all UV is damaging, evidence is accumulating for the beneficial effects of exposure to low levels of UV radiation. Whereas UV has been frequently observed as the primary light-related stressor, herein we present evidence that dark conditions may be similarly "stressful" (reduction of overall fitness), and stress responses vary among clones of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia parvula. We have identified a significant relationship between survivorship and reduced fecundity of clones maintained in dark conditions, but no correlation between tolerance of the clones to dark and UV radiation. Low tolerance to dark conditions can have negative effects not only on accumulated stresses in organisms (e.g. the repair of UV-induced damage in organisms with photolyase), but potentially on the overall physiology and fitness of organisms. Our results support recent evidence of the beneficial effects of low-level UV exposure for some organisms. PMID:27434210

  1. Transport of spin qubits with donor chains under realistic experimental conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Morello, Andrea

    2016-07-25

    The ability to transport quantum information across some distance can facilitate the design and operation of a quantum processor. One-dimensional spin chains provide a compact platform to realize scalable spin transport for a solid-state quantum computer. Here, we model odd-sized donor chains in silicon under a range of experimental nonidealities, including variability of donor position within the chain. We show that the tolerance against donor placement inaccuracies is greatly improved by operating the spin chain in a mode where the electrons are confined at the Si-SiO2 interface. We then estimate the required time scales and exchange couplings, and the levelmore » of noise that can be tolerated to achieve high-fidelity transport. As a result, we also propose a protocol to calibrate and initialize the chain, thereby providing a complete guideline for realizing a functional donor chain and utilizing it for spin transport.« less

  2. Transport of spin qubits with donor chains under realistic experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Kalra, Rachpon; Laucht, Arne; Rahman, Rajib; Klimeck, Gerhard; Morello, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    The ability to transport quantum information across some distance can facilitate the design and operation of a quantum processor. One-dimensional spin chains provide a compact platform to realize scalable spin transport for a solid-state quantum computer. Here, we model odd-sized donor chains in silicon under a range of experimental nonidealities, including variability of donor position within the chain. We show that the tolerance against donor placement inaccuracies is greatly improved by operating the spin chain in a mode where the electrons are confined at the Si-SiO2 interface. We then estimate the required time scales and exchange couplings, and the level of noise that can be tolerated to achieve high-fidelity transport. We also propose a protocol to calibrate and initialize the chain, thereby providing a complete guideline for realizing a functional donor chain and utilizing it for spin transport.

  3. Experimental investigation on the effect of injection conditions on spray and atomization of a centrifugal nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wei; Song, Haoyi; Fan, Zhencen; Zhao, Lin

    2013-05-01

    The effects of injection parameters on atomization of aviation kerosene (RP-3) were studied using a laser diffraction particle size analyzing system. The test results indicated that Sauter mean diameter (SMD) decreased with the increase of injection temperature. There was a critical temperature for flash evaporation, at which SMD had a sharp decrease. The critical temperature fell at first and then rose with the increase of injection pressure; however, the diameter of a centrifugal nozzle had little influence on the critical temperature. Sauter mean diameter didn't follow the conventional law after flash evaporation. A simple and empirical correlation between critical temperature for flash evaporation and injection parameters was developed from the experimental data, which can be used to evaluate critical temperature for flash evaporation.

  4. A frost formation model and its validation under various experimental conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietenberger, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical model that was used to calculate the frost properties for all regimes of frost growth is described. In the first regime of frost growth, the initial frost density and thickness was modeled from the theories of crystal growth. The 'frost point' temperature was modeled as a linear interpolation between the dew point temperature and the fog point temperature, based upon the nucleating capability of the particular condensing surfaces. For a second regime of frost growth, the diffusion model was adopted with the following enhancements: the generalized correlation of the water frost thermal conductivity was applied to practically all water frost layers being careful to ensure that the calculated heat and mass transfer coefficients agreed with experimental measurements of the same coefficients.

  5. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower.

  6. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower. PMID:26457898

  7. Identification and Evaluation of Reference Genes for Accurate Transcription Normalization in Safflower under Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Hu, Bo; Wang, Qing; Liu, Hongchang; Pan, Feng; Wu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) has received a significant amount of attention as a medicinal plant and oilseed crop. Gene expression studies provide a theoretical molecular biology foundation for improving new traits and developing new cultivars. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) has become a crucial approach for gene expression analysis. In addition, appropriate reference genes (RGs) are essential for accurate and rapid relative quantification analysis of gene expression. In this study, fifteen candidate RGs involved in multiple metabolic pathways of plants were finally selected and validated under different experimental treatments, at different seed development stages and in different cultivars and tissues for real-time PCR experiments. These genes were ABCS, 60SRPL10, RANBP1, UBCL, MFC, UBCE2, EIF5A, COA, EF1-β, EF1, GAPDH, ATPS, MBF1, GTPB and GST. The suitability evaluation was executed by the geNorm and NormFinder programs. Overall, EF1, UBCE2, EIF5A, ATPS and 60SRPL10 were the most stable genes, and MBF1, as well as MFC, were the most unstable genes by geNorm and NormFinder software in all experimental samples. To verify the validation of RGs selected by the two programs, the expression analysis of 7 CtFAD2 genes in safflower seeds at different developmental stages under cold stress was executed using different RGs in RT-qPCR experiments for normalization. The results showed similar expression patterns when the most stable RGs selected by geNorm or NormFinder software were used. However, the differences were detected using the most unstable reference genes. The most stable combination of genes selected in this study will help to achieve more accurate and reliable results in a wide variety of samples in safflower. PMID:26457898

  8. Experimental investigation of static ice refrigeration air conditioning system driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y. F.; Li, M.; Luo, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Yu, Q. F.; Hassanien, R. H. E.

    2016-08-01

    The static ice refrigeration air conditioning system (SIRACS) driven by distributed photovoltaic energy system (DPES) was proposed and the test experiment have been investigated in this paper. Results revealed that system energy utilization efficiency is low because energy losses were high in ice making process of ice slide maker. So the immersed evaporator and co-integrated exchanger were suggested in system structure optimization analysis and the system COP was improved nearly 40%. At the same time, we have researched that ice thickness and ice super-cooled temperature changed along with time and the relationship between system COP and ice thickness was obtained.

  9. Experimental investigation of the influence of inlet conditions to a bluff body wake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallenius, Bengt; Fransson, Jens

    2010-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been performed in a bluff body wake with varying inlet conditions in order to enhance the physical understanding of the wake flow instability, which may lead to successful flow control and in turn reduced aerodynamic drag. The geometry consists of a rectangular-based forebody with permeable surfaces, an elliptic leading edge and a blunt trailing edge. Length, width and base height of the forebody is 2.3, 0.5 and 0.04 meters, respectively. Applying continuous suction or blowing, of different levels, through the permeable surfaces along the forebody, varies the wall-normal trailing edge velocity profile in a systematic way and hence the inlet condition to the wake. The streamwise velocity component has been measured both throughout the boundary layer and in the wake behind the body using hot-wire anemometry. High-speed stereo PIV has been used in the wake in order to collect statistics of vortical structures in the wake. The influence of boundary layer parameters on the wake flow characteristics, such as vortex shedding frequency and base pressure, will be presented.

  10. Acclimation of microorganisms to harsh soil crust conditions: Experimental and genomic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raanan, Hagai; Kaplan, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are formed by the adhesion of sand particles to cyanobacterial exo- polysaccharides and play an important role in stabilizing sandy desert. Its destruction promotes desertification. These organisms cope with extreme temperatures, excess light and frequent hydration/dehydration cycles; the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. With the genome of newly sequenced Leptolyngbya, isolated from Nizzana BSC, we conduct comparative genomics of three desiccation tolerant cyanobacteria. This yield 46 unique genes, some of them similar to genes involve in sporulation of the gram positive bacteria Bacillus. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms taking place during desiccation we built an environmental chamber capable of simulating dynamic changes of environmental conditions in the crust. This chamber allows us to perform repetitive and accurate desiccation/rehydration experiments and follow cyanobacterial physiological and molecular response to such environmental changes. When we compared fast desiccation (less than 5 min) of isolated cyanobacteria to simulation of natural desiccation, we observed a 60% lower fluorescence recovery rate. The extent of damage from desiccation depended on the stress conditions during the dry period. These results suggest that cyanobacteria activated protection mechanisms in response to desiccation stress but which were not activated in 5 min desiccation tests. Gene expression patterns during desiccation are being analyzed in order to provide a better understanding of desiccation stress protection mechanisms.

  11. Experimental and numerical studies on wave breaking characteristics over a fringing reef under monochromatic wave conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-In; Shin, Sungwon; Kim, Young-Taek

    2014-01-01

    Fringing reefs play an important role in protecting the coastal area by inducing wave breaking and wave energy dissipation. However, modeling of wave transformation and energy dissipation on this topography is still difficult due to the unique structure. In the present study, two-dimensional laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the cross-shore variations of wave transformation, setup, and breaking phenomena over an idealized fringing reef with the 1/40 reef slope and to verify the Boussinesq model under monochromatic wave conditions. One-layer and two-layer model configurations of the Boussinesq model were used to figure out the model capability. Both models predicted well (r (2) > 0.8) the cross-shore variation of the wave heights, crests, troughs, and setups when the nonlinearity is not too high (A 0/h 0 < 0.07 in this study). However, as the wave nonlinearity and steepness increase, the one-layer model showed problems in prediction and stability due to the error on the vertical profile of fluid velocity. The results in this study revealed that one-layer model is not suitable in the highly nonlinear wave condition over a fringing reef bathymetry. This data set can contribute to the numerical model verification. PMID:25276853

  12. Tethered Chains in Poor Solvent Conditions: An Experimental Study Involving Langmuir Diblock Copolymer Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, M.S.; Lee, L.T.; Majewski, J.; Satija, S.; Smith, G.S.

    1998-10-13

    We have employed Langmuir monolayer of highly asymmetric polydimethylsiloxane- polystyrene (PDMS-PS) diblock copolymers on dioctyl phthalate (DOP) at temperatures ranging from 22 "C to -35 `C as a model system for tethered chains in poor solvent conditions. The thicknesses of the tethered PS layers extending into the DOP subphase, measured by neutron reflection, decrease with decreasing temperature (T) over this entire r~ge. However, the v~iation with T becomes weak below -20 "C. At the ]owest T, the layer thicknesses are contracted 55 % -75 `% of their values at the theta condition (T8 = 22 "C), but are still quite swollen compared to the fully collapsed, nonsolvent limit. The contraction of the layer with decreasing T is determined as a function of surface density and molecular weight. These data are compared to universal scaling forms. The PS segments are depleted from the air surface over the entire T range, the thickness of the depletion layer increasing slightly with decreasing T. The free energy of the surface layer is probed by surface tension measurements. Negative surface pressures are observed at low coverages for both PDMS-PS and PDMS monolayer, indicating metastability toward lateral phase separation. Evidence for a trruisition from a dispersed phase to a condensed phase with decreasing T was observed in the reflectivity at very low PDMS-PS coverage.

  13. Experimental characterization of an industrial pulverized coal-fired furnace under deep staging conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, M.; Azevedo, J.L.T.

    2007-07-01

    Measurements have been performed in a 300 MWe, front-wall-fired, pulverized-coal, utility boiler. This boiler was retrofitted with boosted over fire air injectors that allowed the operation of the furnace under deeper staging conditions. New data are reported for local mean gas species concentration of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NOx, gas temperatures and char burnout measured at several ports in the boiler including those in the main combustion and staged air regions. Comparisons of the present data with our previous measurements in this boiler, prior to the retrofitting with the new over fire system, show lower O{sub 2} and higher CO concentrations for the new situation as a consequence of the lower stoichiometry in the main combustion zone associated with the present boiler operating condition. Consistently, the measured mean NOx concentrations in the main combustion zone are now lower than those obtained previously, yielding emissions below 500 mg/Nm{sup 3}at 6% O{sub 2}. Finally, the measured values of particle burnout at the furnace exit are acceptable being those measured in the main combustion zone comparable with those obtained with the conventional over fire system.

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of the formation conditions of stepped leaders in negative flashes

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Shijun; Zeng, Rong; Zhuang, Chijie; Li, Jianming

    2015-08-15

    Natural lightning flashes are stochastic and uncontrollable, and thus, it is difficult to observe the formation process of a downward negative stepped leader (NSL) directly and in detail. This situation has led to some dispute over the actual NSL formation mechanism, and thus has hindered improvements in the lightning shielding analysis model. In this paper, on the basis of controllable long air gap discharge experiments, the formation conditions required for NSLs in negative flashes have been studied. First, a series of simulation experiments on varying scales were designed and carried out. The NSL formation processes were observed, and several of the characteristic process parameters, including the scale, the propagation velocity, and the dark period, were obtained. By comparing the acquired formation processes and the characteristic parameters with those in natural lightning flashes, the similarity between the NSLs in the simulation experiments and those in natural flashes was proved. Then, based on the local thermodynamic equation and the space charge estimation method, the required NSL formation conditions were deduced, and the space background electric field (E{sub b}) was proposed as the primary parameter for NSL formation. Finally, the critical value of E{sub b} required for the formation of NSLs in natural flashes was determined to be approximately 75 kV/m by extrapolation of the results of the simulation experiments.

  15. Degradation of textile dyes using immobilized lignin peroxidase-like metalloporphines under mild experimental conditions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Synthetic dyes represent a broad and heterogeneous class of durable pollutants, that are released in large amounts by the textile industry. The ability of two immobilized metalloporphines (structurally emulating the ligninolytic peroxidases) to bleach six chosen dyes (alizarin red S, phenosafranine, xylenol orange, methylene blue, methyl green, and methyl orange) was compared to enzymatic catalysts. To achieve a green and sustainable process, very mild conditions were chosen. Results IPS/MnTSPP was the most promising biomimetic catalyst as it was able to effectively and quickly bleach all tested dyes. Biomimetic catalysis was fully characterized: maximum activity was centered at neutral pH, in the absence of any organic solvent, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant. The immobilized metalloporphine kept a large part of its activity during multi-cycle use; however, well-known redox mediators were not able to increase its catalytic activity. IPS/MnTSPP was also more promising for use in industrial applications than its enzymatic counterparts (lignin peroxidase, laccase, manganese peroxidase, and horseradish peroxidase). Conclusions On the whole, the conditions were very mild (standard pressure, room temperature and neutral pH, using no organic solvents, and the most environmental-friendly oxidant) and a significant bleaching and partial mineralization of the dyes was achieved in approximately 1 h. Therefore, the process was consistent with large-scale applications. The biomimetic catalyst also had more promising features than the enzymatic catalysts. PMID:23256784

  16. SPONTANEOUS CHRONIC PAIN AFTER EXPERIMENTAL THORACTOMY REVEALED BY CONDITIONED PLACE PREFERENCE: morphine differentiates tactile evoked pain from spontaneous pain

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ching-Hsia; Wang, Jeffrey Chi-Fei; Strichartz, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pain following surgery limits social activity, interferes with work and causes emotional suffering. A major component of such pain is is reported as “resting” or spontaneous pain with no apparent external stimulus. Although experimental animal models can simulate the stimulus-evoked chronic pain that occurs after surgery, there have been no studies of spontaneous chronic pain in such models. Here the Conditioned Place Preference (CPP) paradigm was used to reveal resting pain after experimental thoracotomy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a thoracotomy with 1 hour rib retraction, resulting in evoked tactile hypersensitivity, previously shown to last for at least 9 weeks. Intraperitoneal injections of morphine (2.5 mg/kg) or gabapentin (40mg/kg) gave equivalent 2-3h long relief of tactile hypersensitivity, when tested 12-14 days post-operative. In separate experiments, single trial CPP was conducted 1 week before thoracotomy and then 12 days (gabapentin) or 14 days (morphine) after surgery, followed the next day by one conditioning sesssion with morphine or gabapentin, both vs saline. The gabapentin-conditioned, but not the morphine-conditioned rats showed a significant preference for the analgesia-paired chamber, despite the two agents’ equivalent effect in relieving tactile allodynia. These results show that experimental thoracotomy in rats causes spontaneous pain, and that some analgesics, such as morphine, that reduce evoked pain do not also relieve resting pain, suggesting that pathophysiological mechanisms differ between these two aspects of long-term post-operative pain. PMID:26116369

  17. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution. Porous media were packed in angled stripes of materials with different grain sizes to create blocks with macroscopically anisotropic hydraulic conductivity, which caused helical flows. Steady-state transport experiments were carried out by continuously injecting dye tracers at different inlet ports. High-resolution measurements of concentration and flow rates were performed at 49 outlet ports. These measurements allowed quantifying the spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive transport. The simulation results were evaluated using metrics of reactive mixing such as the critical dilution index and the length of continuously injected steady-state plumes. The results show considerable reaction enhancement, quantified by the remarkable decrease of reactive plume lengths (up to four times) in helical flows compared to analogous scenarios in uniform flows. PMID:27575223

  18. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution. Porous media were packed in angled stripes of materials with different grain sizes to create blocks with macroscopically anisotropic hydraulic conductivity, which caused helical flows. Steady-state transport experiments were carried out by continuously injecting dye tracers at different inlet ports. High-resolution measurements of concentration and flow rates were performed at 49 outlet ports. These measurements allowed quantifying the spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive transport. The simulation results were evaluated using metrics of reactive mixing such as the critical dilution index and the length of continuously injected steady-state plumes. The results show considerable reaction enhancement, quantified by the remarkable decrease of reactive plume lengths (up to four times) in helical flows compared to analogous scenarios in uniform flows.

  19. Conditions and threshold for magma transfer in the layered upper crust: Insights from experimental models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Malte C.; Acocella, Valerio; Ruch, Joel; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2013-12-01

    transfer, i.e., dike propagation, is partly controlled by Young's modulus (elasticity) contrasts (ratio upper layer to lower layer modulus) in the host rock. Here we try to better constrain the elasticity contrasts controlling the propagation velocity of dikes and their arrest. We simulate dike propagation in layered elastic media with different elasticity contrasts. Salted gelatin and water represent host rock and magma, respectively. For common density ratios between magma and host rock (~1.1), velocity variations are observed and a critical threshold in the elasticity contrast between layers results in the Young's modulus ratio of 2.1 ± 0.6. Naturally occurring elasticity contrasts can be much higher than this experimental threshold, suggesting that dike arrest due to heterogeneous elastic host rock properties is more frequent than expected. Examples of recently deflected or stalled dikes inside volcanoes and the common presence of high-velocity bodies below volcanoes suggest that better defining elasticity contrasts below volcanoes helps in forecasting eruptions.

  20. Experimental study of ELM-like heat loading on beryllium under ITER operational conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, B.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental fusion reactor ITER, currently under construction in Cadarache, France, is transferring the nuclear fusion research to the power plant scale. ITER’s first wall (FW), armoured by beryllium, is subjected to high steady state and transient power loads. Transient events like edge localized modes not only deposit power densities of up to 1.0 GW m-2 for 0.2-0.5 ms in the divertor of the machine, but also affect the FW to a considerable extent. Therefore, a detailed study was performed, in which transient power loads with absorbed power densities of up to 1.0 GW m-2 were applied by the electron beam facility JUDITH 1 on beryllium specimens at base temperatures of up to 300 °C. The induced damage was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy and laser profilometry. As a result, the observed damage was highly dependent on the base temperatures and absorbed power densities. In addition, five different classes of damage, ranging from ‘no damage’ to ‘crack network plus melting’, were defined and used to locate the damage, cracking, and melting thresholds within the tested parameter space.

  1. Experimental investigation of transverse mixing in porous media under helical flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Yu; Chiogna, Gabriele; Cirpka, Olaf A.; Grathwohl, Peter; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Plume dilution and transverse mixing can be considerably enhanced by helical flow occurring in three-dimensional heterogeneous anisotropic porous media. In this study, we perform tracer experiments in a fully three-dimensional flow-through chamber to investigate the effects of helical flow on plume spiraling and deformation, as well as on its dilution. Porous media were packed in angled stripes of materials with different grain sizes to create blocks with macroscopically anisotropic hydraulic conductivity, which caused helical flows. Steady-state transport experiments were carried out by continuously injecting dye tracers at different inlet ports. High-resolution measurements of concentration and flow rates were performed at 49 outlet ports. These measurements allowed quantifying the spreading and dilution of the solute plumes at the outlet cross section. Direct evidence of plume spiraling and visual proof of helical flow was obtained by freezing and slicing the porous media at different cross sections and observing the dye-tracer distribution. We simulated flow and transport to interpret our experimental observations and investigate the effects of helical flow on mixing-controlled reactive transport. The simulation results were evaluated using metrics of reactive mixing such as the critical dilution index and the length of continuously injected steady-state plumes. The results show considerable reaction enhancement, quantified by the remarkable decrease of reactive plume lengths (up to four times) in helical flows compared to analogous scenarios in uniform flows.

  2. Fracturing of volcanic systems: Experimental insights into pre-eruptive conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Rosanna; Sammonds, Peter R.; Kilburn, Christopher R. J.

    2009-04-01

    Conditions for fracturing are a primary control on the behaviour of volcanic systems, especially during the approach to eruption. We here present the results of deformation experiments under simulated volcanic conditions on a porhyritic andesite from ancestral Mount Shasta. Andesite was chosen as a representative material because it is common at subduction-zone volcanoes, among both erupted products and country rock. We deformed the lava in tension and triaxial compression tests at strain rates of 10 - 5 s - 1 , confining pressures from 0 to 50 MPa and temperatures up to 900 °C. We also concurrently recorded acoustic emissions (AE), in order to monitor cracking activity. The results show that deformation behaviour changes significantly in the temperature range 600-750 °C. Thus, as temperatures increased across this interval, the tensile fracture toughness increased from 2.5 ± 0.5 MPa m 1/2 to 3.5 ± 1 MPa m 1/2, the compressive strength decreased from 110 ± 30 MPa to 55 ± 35 MPa (at 900 °C) and the corresponding Young's Modulus decreased from 20 ± 4 GPa to 6 ± 4 GPa. The changes occur when the deformation of the sample changes from elastic-brittle to brittle-ductile behaviour, which we attribute to the blunting of crack tips due to melting of the glass phase and enhanced crystal plasticity at high temperature. AE activity was observed in all experiments, indicating that earthquakes can be generated not only in country rock, but also in hot magma, such as may be found in lava domes and at the margins of magma conduits. In addition, the trends in accelerating AE event rates before sample failure were comparable to those seen in earthquakes before some volcanic eruptions and a minimum in the seismic b-value coincided with sample failure. Applied to volcanic systems, the results suggest that (1) andesite strength and elasticity will not be affected by temperature or pressure beyond ~ 10-100 m from active magma, (2) before eruptions, fractures propagate

  3. Experimental and numerical study of plastic shear instability under high-speed loading conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sokovikov, Mikhail E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Chudinov, Vasiliy E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Bilalov, Dmitry E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Oborin, Vladimir E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Uvarov, Sergey E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Plekhov, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Terekhina, Alena E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru; Naimark, Oleg E-mail: naimark@icmm.ru

    2014-11-14

    The behavior of specimens dynamically loaded during the split Hopkinson (Kolsky) bar tests in a regime close to simple shear conditions was studied. The lateral surface of the specimens was investigated in a real-time mode with the aid of a high-speed infra-red camera CEDIP Silver 450M. The temperature field distribution obtained at different time made it possible to trace the evolution of plastic strain localization. The process of target perforation involving plug formation and ejection was examined using a high-speed infra-red camera and a VISAR velocity measurement system. The microstructure of tested specimens was analyzed using an optical interferometer-profilometer and a scanning electron microscope. The development of plastic shear instability regions has been simulated numerically.

  4. Experimental fault-tolerant universal quantum gates with solid-state spins under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xing; Geng, Jianpei; Shi, Fazhan; Liu, Ying; Xu, Kebiao; Ma, Wenchao; Kong, Fei; Jiang, Zhen; Wu, Yang; Du, Jiangfeng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum computation provides great speedup over its classical counterpart for certain problems. One of the key challenges for quantum computation is to realize precise control of the quantum system in the presence of noise. Control of the spin-qubits in solids with the accuracy required by fault-tolerant quantum computation under ambient conditions remains elusive. Here, we quantitatively characterize the source of noise during quantum gate operation and demonstrate strategies to suppress the effect of these. A universal set of logic gates in a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond are reported with an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 0.999952 and two-qubit gate fidelity of 0.992. These high control fidelities have been achieved at room temperature in naturally abundant (13)C diamond via composite pulses and an optimized control method. PMID:26602456

  5. Hydrologic modification to improve habitat in riverine lakes: Management objectives, experimental approach, and initial conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Barry L.; Barko, John W.; Gerasimov, Yuri; James, William F.; Litvinov, Alexander; Naimo, Teresa J.; Wiener, James G.; Gaugush, Robert F.; Rogala, James T.; Rogers, Sara J.; Schoettger, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Finger Lakes habitat-rehabilitation project is intended to improve physical and chemical conditions for fish in six connected back water lakes in Navigation Pool 5 of the upper Missouri River. The primary management objective is to improve water temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration and current velocity during winter for bluegills, Lepomis macrochirus, and black crappies, Pomoxis nigromaculatus, two of the primary sport fishes in the lakes. The lakes will be hydrologically altered by Installing culverts to Introduce controlled flows of oxygenated water into four lakes, and an existing unregulated culvert on a fifth lake will be equipped with a control gate to regulate inflow. These habitat modifications constitute a manipulative field experiment that will compare pre-project (1991 to summer 1993) and post-project (fall 1993 to 1996) conditions in the lakes, including hydrology, chemistry, rooted vegetation, and fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Initial data indicate that the Finger Lakes differ in water chemistry, hydrology, and macrophyte abundance. Macroinvertebrate communities also differed among lakes: species diversity was highest in lakes with dense aquatic macrophytes. The system seems to support a single fish community, although some species concentrated in individual lakes at different times. The introduction of similar flows into five of the lakes will probably reduce the existing physical and chemical differences among lakes. However, our ability to predict the effects of hydrologic modification on fish populations is limited by uncertainties concerning both the interactions of temperature, oxygen and current in winter and the biological responses of primary and secondary producers. Results from this study should provide guidance for similar habitat-rehabilitation projects in large rivers.

  6. Shear zone nucleation and deformation transient: effect of heterogeneities and loading conditions in experimentally deformed calcite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, L. F. G.; Rybacki, E.; Dresen, G. H.; Kilian, R.

    2015-12-01

    In the Earth's middle to lower crust, strain is frequently localized along ductile shear zones, which commonly nucleate at structural and material heterogeneities. To investigate shear zone nucleation and development due to heterogeneities, we performed constant strain-rate (CSR) and constant stress (CS) simple shear (torsion) deformation experiments on Carrara marble samples containing weak (limestone) inclusions. The experiments were conducted in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900 °C temperature and 400 MPa confining pressure and maximum bulk shear strains of 3. Peak shear stress was about 20 MPa for all the samples, followed by smooth weakening and steady state behavior. The strain is predominantly localized in the host marble within the process zone in front of the inclusion, defined by a zone of intense grain size reduction due to dynamic recrystallization. In CS tests a narrow shear zone developed in front of the inclusion, whereas in CSR experiments the deformation is more heterogeneously distributed, up to g=3.. In the later, secondary foliations oblique to the process zone and alternating thin, high-strain layers are common. In samples deformed at the same shear strain (g=1), the average recrystallized grain size in the process zone is similar for CS and CSR conditions. Crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) measurements shows that different grain sizes have slightly different CPO patterns. CPO strength varies for different grain sizes, with a CPO strength peak between 40-50 μm, decreasing progressively within smaller grain size, but with secondary peaks for different coarse-grained sizes. Our observations suggest that the initial formation and transient deformation of shear zones is strongly affected by loading conditions.

  7. Experimental investigation on the flow-induced noise under variable conditions for centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shouqi; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Jianping; Luo, Yin; Pei, Ji

    2012-05-01

    With extensively using of centrifugal pumps, noise generation in these pumps is increasingly receiving research attention in recent years. The noise sources in centrifugal pumps are mainly composed of mechanical noise and flow-induced noise. And the study of flow-induced noise has become a hotspot and important domain in the field. The flow-induced noise closely related to the inner pressure pulses and vibration of volute in pumps, therefore, it is necessary to research the interaction and mechanism among them. To investigate the relationships, a test system is designed which includes a test loop and a measurement system. The hydrophones and pressure sensors are installed on the outlet of the pump and vibration acceleration sensors are disposed on the pump body. Via these instruments, the signals of noise, pressure pulses and vibration are collected and analyzed. The results show that the level of flow-induced noise becomes smaller as the flow increment during low flow rate operations, and it is steadily close to the design point, then it increases with the growing of flow rate in high flow rate conditions. Furthermore, there are some similar peak points in the power spectrum charts of noise, pressure pulses and vibration. The broadband noise at low flow rate is mostly focused on the region of 0-40 times shaft frequency, which is mostly made by rotating stall and vortex; while the noise at high flow rate conditions is focused on the region of 60-100 times shaft frequency, which may be mostly made by cavitations. The proposed research is of practical and academic significance to the study of noise reduction for centrifugal pumps.

  8. Towards Defining Adequate Lithium Trials for Individuals with Mental Retardation and Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of lithium with mentally retarded individuals with psychiatric conditions and/or behavior disturbances is discussed. The paper describes components of an adequate clinical trial and reviews case studies and double-blind cases. The paper concludes that aggression is the best indicator for lithium use, and reviews treatment parameters and…

  9. An experimental study of Li partitioning between olivine and diopside at mantle conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakob, J. L.; Feineman, M. D.; Penniston-Dorland, S. C.; Eggler, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    Measured 7Li/6Li of mineral separates from mantle xenoliths from diverse localities show unexpectedly large differences between olivines and pyroxenes, often with lighter Li found in the pyroxenes (Jeffcoate et al., 2007; Rudnick and Ionov, 2007; Ionov and Seitz, 2008). Although changes in isotopic fractionation with temperature could explain the differences, a kinetic isotope effect is as likely. Because 6Li diffuses faster than 7Li, bulk lithium exchange between two phases could result in dynamic isotopic fractionation, with the receiving phase becoming lighter and the donating phase becoming heavier. Thus if Li becomes more compatible in cpx upon cooling, that is, if DLiol/cpx is temperature-dependent, the diffusive exchange of Li will generate temporary 6Li enrichment in cpx and depletion in olivine. Experiments were conducted using a piston cylinder apparatus at 1100°C and 1.4 GPa (1-5 days) to determine DLiol/cpx. San Carlos olivine and Dekalb diopside were finely ground for starting materials. A mixture of olivine (52 wt%), diopside (34 wt%), albite (7 wt%), and quartz (7 wt%) powders (0.0145 g) was loaded into a Pt capsule inside of a Ni crucible. Milli-Q water with 100 ppm Li and 500 ppm Ba (obtained through dilution of stock solutions) was added (0.1100 g) to serve as the lithium source. Lithium concentrations in olivine and diopside from experiments held for 1, 3, and 5 days were determined by laser ablation ICP-MS. Partition coefficients DLiol/cpx from runs at 3 and 5 days are, within error, the same, 1.9 (0.3). These fall in the lower portion of the range, D = 2-7, of limited previous measurements (Brenan et al., 1998b, Blundy and Dalton, 2000; Caciagli-Warman 2010). Partitioning experiments at 700 and 900°C are ongoing. References Blundy, J. and Dalton, J. (2000) Experimental comparison of trace element partitioning between clinopyroxene and melt in carbonate and silicate systems, and implications for mantle metasomatism. Contrib. Mineral. Petrol

  10. Molecular alteration of marine dissolved organic matter under experimental hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, Jeffrey A.; Hansen, Christian T.; Goldhammer, Tobias; Bach, Wolfgang; Dittmar, Thorsten

    2016-02-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a large (660 Pg) pool of reduced carbon that is subject to thermal alteration in hydrothermal systems and sedimentary basins. In natural high-temperature hydrothermal systems, DOM is almost completely removed, but the mechanism and temperature dependence of this removal have not been studied to date. We investigated molecular-level changes to DOM that was solid-phase extracted (SPE-DOM) from the deep ocean of the North Pacific Ocean. This complex molecular mixture was experimentally exposed to temperatures between 100 and 380 °C over the course of two weeks in artificial seawater, and was then characterised on a molecular level via ultrahigh-resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Almost 93% of SPE-DOM was removed by the treatment at 380 °C, and this removal was accompanied by a consistent pattern of SPE-DOM alteration across the temperatures studied. Higher molecular weight and more oxygen rich compounds were preferentially removed, suggesting that decarboxylation and dehydration of carboxylic acid and alcohol groups are the most rapid degradation mechanisms. Nitrogen containing compounds followed the same overall trends as those containing just C, H and O up to 300 °C. Above this temperature, the most highly altered samples contained very little of the original character of marine DOM, instead being mainly composed of very low intensity N- and S- containing molecules with a high H/C ratio (>1.5). Our results suggest that abiotic hydrothermal alteration of SPE-DOM may already occur at temperatures above 68 °C. Our experiments were conducted without a sedimentary or mineral phase, and demonstrate that profound molecular alteration and almost complete removal of marine SPE-DOM requires nothing more than heating in a seawater matrix.

  11. Experimentally-controlled carbon and oxygen isotope exchange between bioapatites and water under inorganic and microbially-mediated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazzo, Antoine; Lécuyer, Christophe; Mariotti, André

    2004-01-01

    Modern bone and enamel powders have reacted at 301 K with 13C- and 18O-labelled waters under inorganic and microbial conditions. The aim of the study is to investigate the resistance of stable isotope compositions of bioapatite carbonate (δ 13C, δ 18Oc) and phosphate (δ 18Op) to isotopic alteration during early diagenesis. Rapid and significant carbon and oxygen isotope changes were observed in the carbonate and phosphate fractions of bone apatite before any detectable change occurred in the crystallinity or organic matter content. These observations indicate that chemical alterations of bone apatite are likely to start within days of death. Enamel crystallites are much more resistant than bone crystallites, but are not exempt of alteration. Non removable carbon and oxygen isotope enrichments were measured in the carbonate phase of bone (50-90%) and enamel (40%) after the acetic acid treatment. This result indicates that a significant part of 13C and 18O-labelled coming from the aqueous fluid has been durably incorporated into the apatite structure, probably through isotopic exchange or secondary carbonate apatite precipitation. As a result, acetic acid pre-treatments that are currently used to remove exogenous material by selective dissolution, are not adequate to restore pristine δ 13C and δ 18Oc values of fossil apatites. Under inorganic conditions, kinetics of oxygen isotope exchange are 10 times faster in carbonate than in phosphate. On the opposite, during biologically-mediated reactions, the kinetics of oxygen isotope exchange between phosphate and water is, at least, from 2 to 15 times faster than between carbonate and water. Enamel is a more suitable material than bone for paleoenvironmental or paleoclimatical reconstructions, but interpretations of δ 18Op or δ 13C values must be restricted to specimens for which no or very limited trace of microbial activity can be detected.

  12. Toward Obtaining the Experimental Constraints on the Role of Water on Melting Under the Lower Mantle Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amulele, G.; Lee, K. K.; Karato, S.

    2012-12-01

    Water and other volatile components (such as carbon dioxide) are known to have important influence on the melting behavior of silicates. The role of these components on the melting under the upper mantle conditions is now reasonably well understood. Recent experimental studies in our lab as well as some of the previous studies do show that water has an important influence on the melting relationship under the lower mantle conditions. The influence of water is not only to reduce the solidus but also to change the composition of the melt to (Mg,Fe)O rich. Quantifying these observations is essential in the understanding of chemical evolution of Earth and other planets. However, there are several challenges in performing these experimental studies. In this presentation, we discuss the issue of quantifying the water effects with special attention to the capability of preserving water content during the high pressure-temperature experiments. The issue of the preservation of water is important firstly because water could escape from a capsule during an experiment, and secondly because the melt is unquenchable in a commonly used processes under the lower mantle conditions. A commonly used practice is to identify the deficit of EPMA measurement from 100% to the water content, but there is no sound basis for this practice. In this presentation, we will show some preliminary results of our new approach to quantify the water content from the high-pressure run products containing melts.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigations of Cs-Ba vapor tacitron inverter for power conditioning in space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.; Murray, C.; Wernsman, B.

    1993-01-01

    The operation characteristics of the Cs-Ba tacitron as a switch are investigated experimentally in three modes: (a) breakdown mode, (b) I-V mode, and (c) current modulation mode. The switching frequency, grid potentials for ignition and extinguishing of discharge, and the Cs pressure and emission conditions (Ba pressure and emitter temperature) for stable current modulation are determined. The experimental data is also used to determine the off-time required for successful ignition, and the effects of the aforementioned operation parameters on the ignition duty cycle threshold for stable modulation. Operation parameters measured include switching frequency up to 20 kHz, hold-off voltage up to 180 V, current densities in excess of 15 A/cm[sup 2], switch power density of 1 kW/cm[sup 2]. and a switching efficiency in excess of 90% at collector C: realer than 30 V. The voltage drop strongly depends on the Cs pressure and to a lesser extent on the emission conditions. Increasing the Cs pressure and/or the emission current lowers the voltage drop, however, for the same initial Cs pressure and emission conditions, the voltage drop in the I-V mode is usually lower than that during current modulation. As long as the discharge current is kept lower that the.emission current, the voltage drop during stable current modulation could be as low as 3 V.

  14. Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz

    2012-11-01

    A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

  15. Experimental investigation of supersonic low pressure air plasma flows obtained with different arc-jet operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lago, Viviana; Ndiaye, Abdoul-Aziz

    2012-11-27

    A stationary arc-jet plasma flow at low pressure is used to simulate some properties of the gas flow surrounding a vehicle during its entry into celestial body's atmospheres. This paper presents an experimental study concerning plasmas simulating a re-entry into our planet. Optical measurements have been carried out for several operating plasma conditions in the free stream, and in the shock layer formed in front of a flat cylindrical plate, placed in the plasma jet. The analysis of the spectral radiation enabled the identification of the emitting species, the determination of the rotational and vibrational temperatures in the free-stream and in the shock layer and the determination of the distance of the shock to the flat plate face. Some plasma fluid parameters like, stagnation pressure, specific enthalpy and heat flux have been determined experimentally along the plasma-jet axis.

  16. Experimental and modeling investigation of CO2 dissociation in Mars entry condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xin; Chen, Lianzhong; Peng, Jinlong; Li, Jinping; Li, Fei; Yu, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    Shock tube experiments are carried out to study the physical and chemical processes during a vehicle entry into the Mars atmosphere. The facility to establish a strong shock wave is a shock tube which is driven by combustion of hydrogen and oxygen. Measurements of rotational and vibrational temperature behind the shock wave are realized thanks to optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In parallel, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is utilized to diagnose one absorption line of CO near 2.33 µm. Combined with these temperature results using OES, CO concentration in the thermal equilibrium region is derived, which is 2.91 × 1017 cm-3, corresponding to equilibrium temperature equals to 7000 ± 400 K. Moreover, a thermochemical code, based on Park's two-temperature theory, for studying chemical and physical processes is developed for Mars entry conditions. Some comparisons between experiments and calculations are presented. Such a two-temperature model fails to reproduce non-equilibrium temperatures and mole fractions but suitable for equilibrium temperature predictions.

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Mechanical Behavior in Unloading Conditions of Sandstone After High-Temperature Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qi-Le; Ju, Feng; Mao, Xian-Biao; Ma, Dan; Yu, Bang-Yong; Song, Shuai-Bing

    2016-07-01

    A detailed understanding of damage evolution in rock after high-temperature treatment in unloading conditions is extremely important in underground engineering applications, such as the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear waste, underground coal gasification, and post-disaster reconstruction. We have studied the effects of temperature (200, 400, 600 and 800 °C) and confining pressure (20, 30 and 40 MPa) on the mechanical properties of sandstone. Scanning electron microscopy studies revealed that at temperatures exceeding 400 °C, new cracks formed, and original cracks extended substantially. When the confining pressure was 20 MPa, a temperature increase from 400 to 800 °C resulted in a 75.2% increase in peak strain, a decrease in Young's modulus and peak strength of 62.5 and 35.8 %, respectively, and transition of the failure mechanism from brittleness to ductility. In the triaxial compression tests, the specimen deformed in a more obvious ductile failure manner at higher confining pressure, whereas in the unloading confining pressure experiments, brittle failure was more obvious when the initial confining pressure was higher. We focused on the effects of temperature and initial confining pressure on peak effective loading stress and peak ductile deformation during unloading. At temperatures of >400 °C, the peak ductile deformation increased rapidly with increases in the high temperature treatment or initial confining pressure. The peak effective loading stress decreased sharply with increased temperature but barely changed when the initial confining pressure was varied.

  18. [Viability of Vibrio cholerae O1 in different types of water under experimental conditions].

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Joseli Maria da Rocha; Rodrigues Dd, Dália dos Prazeres; Hofer, Ernesto

    2002-01-01

    The endemic and seasonal nature of cholera depends upon the survival of Vibrio cholerae O1 in a viable but not necessarily culturable state in ecological niches in aquatic environments during inter-epidemic periods, and investigation on the survival of this microorganism in such sites is therefore of the utmost importance. Weekly water aliquots were thus taken from 2 ponds and 2 rivers in the State of Rio de Janeiro. The samples were divided into two identical portions, one of which was autoclaved. A standardized dilution of V. cholerae O1 Inaba and of V. cholerae O1 Ogawa was inoculated in three aliquots of 100ml of these different water samples and maintained at different temperatures. Survival of the microorganisms in the aquatic environment under these different conditions was then analyzed. Regardless of the serotype, V. cholerae serogroup O1 survived in water with salinity below 0.5 per mil and at different temperatures for sufficient periods to spread through "bodies of water", demonstrating the need to constantly monitor areas of possible contamination, especially where the water is used for drinking, thus avoiding spread of the disease to surrounding populations.

  19. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth's core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth's core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth's core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core. PMID:27251282

  20. Damage of Elastomeric Matrix Composites (EMC-rubbers) Under Static Loading Conditions: Experimental and Numerical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ayari, F.

    2011-01-17

    Elastomeric matrix composites (EMC-rubbers) are considered as isotropic hyper elastic incompressible materials under static loading conditions. As a rubber material element cannot be extended to an infinite stretch ratio, a damage mechanism at large strain is considered. The phenomenon of cavitation plays an important role in the damage of EMCs and influences the toughening mechanism of rubber-modified plastics. Indeed, cavitation in elastomers is thought to be initiated from flaws, which grow primarily due to a hydrostatic tensile stress and ahead of the crack; there will not only be a high stress perpendicular to the plane of the crack but also significant stress components in the other direction. However, there exists historically much discussion on the evolution of the cavitation in elastomers under monotonic and/or static solicitation. Mainly, cavitation instability occurs when the stress levels are sufficiently high so that the void expansion rate becomes infinitely large. Many research works have been performed to understand the effects of rubber cavitation on toughening of plastics. In fact, the cavitation phenomenon is not well known in detail. The most popular idea states that the cavitation is related to the existence of the gas bubbles trapped in the material during the production stage and the growing of the cavities would then be the result of the growing gas bubbles. Further, instable failure mechanism at the end of the cavitation is not well known too.

  1. MODEL SYSTEMS AND EXPERIMENTAL CONDITIONS THAT LEAD TO EFFECTIVE REPOPULATION OF THE LIVER BY TRANSPLANTED CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Shafritz, David A.; Oertel, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, there has been substantial progress in transplanting cells into the liver with the ultimate goal of restoring liver mass and function in both inherited and acquired liver diseases. The basis for considering that this might be feasible is that the liver is a highly regenerative organ. After massive liver injury or surgical removal of two-thirds or more of the liver tissue, the organ can restore its mass with completely normal morphologic structure and function. It has also been found under highly selective conditions that transplanted hepatocytes can fully repopulate the liver and cure a metabolic disorder or deficiency state. Fetal liver cells can also substantially repopulate the normal liver, and it is hoped in the future that effective repopulation will be achievable with cultured cells or cell lines, pluripotent stem cells from other somatic tissues, embryonic stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells, which can now be generated in vitro by a variety of methods. The purpose of this review is to present the major systems that have been used for liver repopulation, the variables involved in obtaining successful repopulation and what has been achieved in these various systems to date with different cell types. PMID:20080205

  2. Experimental evidence for phase separation in hydrogen-helium mixtures at Jovian planet conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, G. W.; Brygoo, S.; Millot, M.; Rygg, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Eggert, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Jeanloz, R.; Loubeyre, P.

    2015-11-01

    Whether or not H-He mixtures phase separate in Jovian planets is important to our understanding of the structure and evolution of Jupiter and Saturn. Also integral to such planet models, as well as mechanisms for H-He phase separation, are the insulating-to-conducting and the molecular-to-atomic-hydrogen transitions in the H-He mixture. Coupling static and dynamic compression techniques has allowed us to make the first thermodynamic and transport measurements of H-He mixtures at deep Jovian planet conditions. These data provide evidence that the H-He fluid demixes at the high pressures and temperatures expected to exist deep inside Saturn and Jupiter. This phase separation may result in the differentiation of heavier helium clusters, leading to helium rain in the deep interior of Saturn and perhaps even in a significant outer layer of Jupiter. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in part under Contract W-7405-Eng-48 and in part under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Experimental Conditions for the Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Pipe Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanda, Hidesada

    2004-11-01

    A transition model has been constructed for determining a critical Reynolds number Rc between laminar and turbulent flows in circular pipes. (1) Transition occurs in the entrance region under the conditions of natural disturbances. (2) Entrance shape determines Rc with disturbances; Rc takes a minimum value when the contraction ratio at the inlet is minimum or in the case of a straight pipe. (3) In the entrance boundary layer, there exists a normal wall strength which decreases as Re increases; let its rate of doing work be NW. The velocity profile develops from a uniform distribution at the inlet to a parabolic one; KE is the constant required acceleration power. Thus, the occurrence of the transition is determined by RW and KE: when RW > KE, transition never occurs, and when RW < KE, transition occurs. To prove the model, color-dye experiments were carried out. Consequently, two different types of Rc existed: Rc1 from laminar to turbulent and Rc2 from turbulent to laminar. As the ratio of bellmouth diameter to pipe diameter increases, Rc2 increased. Both Rc1 and Rc2 took a minimum value of approximately 2000 in the case of a straight pipe.

  4. Ethanol preference, metabolism, blood pressure, and conditioned taste aversion in experimental cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Lane, J R; Starbuck, E M; Fitts, D A

    1997-08-01

    The effect of a ligation of the common bile duct (BDL) on the chronic free-selection intake of ethanol was investigated. Rats were given a choice between water and a solution of either 6% (v/v) ethanol, 0.06% (w/v) sodium saccharin, or a mixture of both ethanol and saccharin. In different experiments, solutions were first presented either 3 weeks before surgery, about the time of surgery, or 2 weeks after surgery. Reductions in ethanol or saccharin intake were observed in BDL rats whenever the solutions were first presented either 3 weeks before or shortly after the surgery. No differences attributable to BDL were seen when ethanol solutions were first presented 2 weeks after surgery. The contingent nature of the effect suggests that the reduction results from a conditioned taste aversion rather than from differences in ethanol metabolism, sensitivity, or neurohormones such as angiotensin. The findings urge caution in the monitoring of the dietary habits of patients with a rapidly developing biliary obstruction. PMID:9259003

  5. Experimental determination of the electrical resistivity of iron at Earth’s core conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Kenji; Kuwayama, Yasuhiro; Hirose, Kei; Shimizu, Katsuya; Ohishi, Yasuo

    2016-06-01

    Earth continuously generates a dipole magnetic field in its convecting liquid outer core by a self-sustained dynamo action. Metallic iron is a dominant component of the outer core, so its electrical and thermal conductivity controls the dynamics and thermal evolution of Earth’s core. However, in spite of extensive research, the transport properties of iron under core conditions are still controversial. Since free electrons are a primary carrier of both electric current and heat, the electron scattering mechanism in iron under high pressure and temperature holds the key to understanding the transport properties of planetary cores. Here we measure the electrical resistivity (the reciprocal of electrical conductivity) of iron at the high temperatures (up to 4,500 kelvin) and pressures (megabars) of Earth’s core in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The value measured for the resistivity of iron is even lower than the value extrapolated from high-pressure, low-temperature data using the Bloch-Grüneisen law, which considers only the electron-phonon scattering. This shows that the iron resistivity is strongly suppressed by the resistivity saturation effect at high temperatures. The low electrical resistivity of iron indicates the high thermal conductivity of Earth’s core, suggesting rapid core cooling and a young inner core less than 0.7 billion years old. Therefore, an abrupt increase in palaeomagnetic field intensity around 1.3 billion years ago may not be related to the birth of the inner core.

  6. Variability of human brain and muscle optical pathlength in different experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Marco; Wei, Qingnong; De Blasi, Roberto A.; Quaresima, Valentina; Zaccanti, Giovanni

    1993-09-01

    Pathlength can be evaluated by measuring the time taken from a picosecond (psec) near infrared (IR) laser pulse to cross tissue. Differential pathlength factor (DPF) is calculated by dividing the mean pathlength by the inter-fiber distance. Data on DPF variability on humans are scarce. We investigated the forehead and forearm DPF in resting conditions and dynamically during brain hypoxic hypoxia, muscle ischemia and voluntary isometric exercise. At 3 cm inter optode spacing DPF at 800 nm was 4.3 +/- 0.2 (n equals 14, mean +/- SD) on the forearm, and 6.5 +/- 0.5 (n equals 8) on the forehead. Brain, muscle, and breast DPF values were almost constant over the inter optode spacing 2.5 - 4 cm. DPF was roughly constant in the central region of forehead. DPF drastically decreased under the fronto- temporal junction for the presence of muscle in the optical field. DPF decreased 5 - 10% during forearm ischemia with and without maximal voluntary contraction and during brain hypoxic hypoxia.

  7. Experimental investigation on the causes for pellet fragmentation under LOCA conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, A.; Vitanza, C.; Seidl, M.; Wensauer, A.; Faber, W.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2015-10-01

    This paper addresses a separate effect experiment performed with irradiated fuel to study fuel fragmentation and fission gas release during a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). The paper presents a qualitative and quantitative investigation of the effects of the removal of the geometrical constraint provided by the cladding and the removal of the constraint given by the rod internal pressure in determining the extent of fuel fragmentation and fission gas release during a LOCA for fuel segments with a burnup of approximately 52 MWd/kgU. A review of previous LOCA tests was the starting point for the identification of these constraints and for the selection of the fuel rod burnup, the experiment's procedure and the boundary conditions. An out-of-pile test was considered representative for the scope, and the experiment was performed at the Halden Reactor Project hot cell in Kjeller (Norway) with heat provided by an electric oven. Three fuel rod segments were studied: 1) a fuel segment that experienced only ballooning without burst, 2) a fuel segment that experienced ballooning and burst and 3) a fuel segment that experienced neither ballooning nor burst. The neutron radiography and fuel fragment sifting showed that both cladding constraint and internal pressure play a role in the formation of fuel cracks and fragmentation, and the study of the fission gas release during the transient showed that removing the cladding constraint or the internal pressure increased the amount of fission gas release.

  8. Arsenic-induced phosphate limitation under experimental Early Proterozoic oceanic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi Fru, Ernest; Hemmingsson, Christoffer; Holm, Mikaela; Chiu, Beverly; Iñiguez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Comparison of phosphorus concentrations associated with modern hydrothermal Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides and ancient Fe(III) oxide-rich iron formations, is used to estimate bioavailable Precambrian marine phosphorus (P) concentrations. This led to the proposition of a low dissolved P budget of ˜10-25% of present-day levels, before ˜1.9 billion years ago. Estimates incorporating ancient marine Si levels ≥ 0.67 mM instead suggested global dissolved P levels greater than today. Here we unite current experimental models that have considered NaCl solutions containing elevated dissolved Fe(II), Si, Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions in the incorporation of P in Precambrian marine Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides, in addition to arsenic as a hydrothermal proxy. We show that the coprecipitation of dissolved P and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides from arsenic-rich marine waters produces an average P distribution coefficient of ˜0.072 (± 0.01) μM-1. This is comparable to the ˜ 0.07 μM-1 predicted for Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides in modern arsenic-rich, submarine hydrothermal settings, from which the lower Early Proterozoic dissolved marine P concentrations were predicted. As/P molar ratios below modern seawater ratios removed the negative feedback effect high Si impose on P scavenging by Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides. The binding of As(III) to Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides exhibits a lower competitive influence on P fixation. As(V) that likely became prominent in the surficially oxidized Early Proterozoic oceans induced dissolved P limitation because of preferential P sequestration at the expense of dissolved As(V) enrichment. The control of As on P scavenging by the precipitating Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides is strong regardless of common seawater cations (Mg2+ and Ca2+). The data suggest that the application of Si and Fe(III)(oxyhydr)oxides as an ancient seawater P proxy should consider chemical variability between depositional basins, taking into account the rather strong role hydrothermal arsenic has on the distribution of P in

  9. Experimental investigation and modeling of uranium (VI) transport under variable chemical conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.; Kent, D.B.; Davis, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The transport of adsorbing and complexing metal ions in porous media was investigated with a series of batch and column experiments and with reactive solute transport modeling. Pulses of solutions containing U(VI) were pumped through columns filled with quartz grains, and the breakthrough of U(VI) was studied as a function of variable solution composition (pH, total U(VI) concentration, total fluoride concentration, and pH-buffering capacity). Decreasing p H and the formation of nonadsorbing aqueous complexes with fluoride increased U(VI) mobility. A transport simulation with surface complexation model (SCM) parameters estimated from batch experiments was able to predict U(VI) retardation in the column experiments within 30%. SCM parameters were also estimated directly from transport data, using the results of three column experiments collected at different pH and U(VI) pulse concentrations. SCM formulations of varying complexity (multiple surface types and reaction stoichiometries) were tested to examine the trade-off between model simplicity and goodness of fit to breakthrough. A two-site model (weak- and strong-binding sites) with three surface complexation reactions fit these transport data well. With this reaction set the model was able to predict (1) the effects of fluoride complexation on U(VI) retardation at two different pH values and (2) the effects of temporal variability of pH on U(VI) transport caused by low p H buffering. The results illustrate the utility of the SCM approach in modeling the transport of adsorbing inorganic solutes under variable chemical conditions.

  10. The role of carboxylic acids in albite and quartz dissolution: An experimental study under diagenetic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, S.P. ); Hajash, A. Jr.; Tieh, T.T. ); Dewers, T.A. )

    1994-10-01

    Simple water soluble organic acids may promote secondary porosity development in sandstones during diagenesis by increasing feldspar solubility and dissolution rate. To test this hypothesis, Amelia albite and Brazilian hydrothermal quartz were reacted with 0.07 m acetate and 0.07 m acetate-0.005 m oxalate solutions at selected pH values, and distilled water. Pore fluid chemistry was monitored through time at various flow rates to obtain both solubility and dissolution rate data. The experiments were conducted in large volume, semi-static, flow-through systems at 100[degrees]C and 347 bars. These systems simulate subsurface flow rates, low mass water/rock, and high surface area/fluid mass. Acetate and acetate + oxalate solutions significantly increase albite solubility at temperatures, pressures, and pH values typical of diagenetic environments. Albite solubilities increased in acetate and acetate + oxalate solutions by factors of 2 and 3.4, respectively, compared to distilled water. In these same solutions, Al concentrations were [approx] 140 and [approx] 480 times higher than that calculated for kaolinite solubility at the same conditions without organic species. These enhanced solubilities occur at pH values (4.6-4.8) that may overlap with formation waters. In contrast to albite, quartz solubility was essentially identical in all solutions investigated. Dissolution rates in the acid region decreased with increasing pH in the acetate and acetate + oxalate solutions. Slopes of log rate vs. pH curves were [approx] 0.6 for acetate and [approx] 0.3 for acetate + oxalate. Although the effects of acetate on the dissolution rate are small, the effects of oxalate are significant. A rate law valid for albite dissolution at 100[degrees]C, oxalate concentrations to 0.01 m, and pH values ranging from 3.4 to 5.5 is given.

  11. Runoff and suspended sediment transport after plantation interventions in experimental catchments with contrasting rainfall conditions, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iroume, A.; Schuller, P.; Bronstert, A.; Carey, P.; Palacios, H.; Ulloa, H.

    2012-04-01

    Experimental catchments located in sites with contrasting annual rainfall (Nacimiento, 37° 28" S, 72° 42" W, long term mean annual rainfall ~ 1,200 mm, and Los Ulmos, 40° 02" S, 73° 06" W, long term mean annual rainfall ~ 2,500 mm) are been monitored to study the long term effects of different forest plantation practices on runoff and suspended sediment transport. In each site, one control and one treatment catchment (12.6 and 7.7 ha in Nacimiento and 19.8 and 7.7 ha in Los Ulmos) are monitored. All the catchments are controlled by purpose-built V-notch weir gauging stations equipped with continuous water level recorders and suspended sediment is quantified in these stations from automatically collected integrated water samples. After a calibration period the plantation of one paired catchment in each site was clearfelled. Treated and control catchments will be from now on identified as NT and LUT and NC and LUT respectively. The Pinus radiata plantation in NT was clearfelled during the first half of April 2010, while the Eucalyptus globulus plantation in LUT was partially clearfelled in November 2009 and then completed in April 2010. After clearfelling runoff increases were observed in both harvested catchments as compared with the pre-treatment runoff trend between treatment and control catchments. In the Nacimiento site, mean monthly values for suspended sediment loads registered for the pre, during and post-treatment periods are not much different for NT and NC. For the pre-treatment period (April 2008 to March 2010), mean monthly suspended sediment loads were 12.8 kg/ha in NC and 16.2 kg/ha in NT, and 0.9 kg/ha in NC and 2.7 kg/ha in NT during the harvesting operations (April 2010). Mean monthly suspended sediment loads during the first year of the post-harvesting period (May to December 2010) were 69.9 kg/ha in NC and 59 kg/ha in NT and 0.9 kg/ha in NC and 6.2 kg/ha in NT during the year after clearfelling (January to June 2011). Year 2010 was extremely

  12. Molecular interactions of SO2 with carbonate minerals under co-sequestration conditions: a combined experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; McGrail, B. Peter; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2012-09-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study investigating the reactivity between selected and morphologically important surfaces of carbonate minerals with supercritical CO2 with co-existing H2O and SO2. Trace amounts of SO2 cause formation of CaSO3 in the form of hannebachite in the initial stages of SO2 adsorption and transformation. Atomistic simulations of these initial steps indicate a somewhat catalytic activity of water, which is enhanced by the presence of Magnesium atoms in the mineral surface. Under co-sequestration conditions, traces of water are not likely to cause carbonate dissolution, however the presence of SO2 greatly stabilizes the sulfite product.

  13. Experimental investigation of a forced response condition in a multistage compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, William Louis, III

    The objective of this research is twofold. Firstly, the design, development, and construction of a test facility for a Honeywell APU-style centrifugal compressor was implemented, as well as the design and construction of an inlet flow experiment. Secondly, the aeromechanical response of an embedded stage in the Purdue 3-Stage axial research compressor was analyzed through a suite of different measurement techniques in the fulfillment of the end of the GUIde IV Consortium contract. The purpose of the first phase of Honeywell work was to comprehensively measure the flow field of an APU-style centrifugal compressor inlet through the use of Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A portion of a Honeywell supplied inlet was modified to provide optical access to the elbow, and a gas ejector system was designed and constructed to provide the same suction to the inlet that it would see during operation with the compressor. A performance and health monitoring electronics system was designed and purchased to support the testing of the Honeywell inlet ejector system and eventually it will be used for testing with a centrifugal compressor. Additionally, a secondary air and oil system has been designed and is currently being constructed in the test cell in preparation for the arrival of the Honeywell compressor this summer. An embedded rotor stage in the Purdue 3-stage compressor, with a Campbell diagram crossing of the 1T vibratory mode was analyzed with a suite of measurement systems. In addition to steady state compressor performance measurements, other types of measurements were used to characterize the aerodynamic forcing function for this forced response condition including: NSMS, high-frequency pressure transducers mounted in the casing and in a downstream stator, and cross-film thermal anemometry. Rotor geometry was measured by Aerodyne using an in-situ laser scanning technique. Vibrometry testing was performed at WPAFB to characterize safe operating speeds for stator

  14. Effects of experimental conditions on the morphologies, structures and growth modes of pulsed laser-deposited CdS nanoneedles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    CdS nanoneedles with different morphologies, structures, and growth modes have been grown on Ni-coated Si(100) surface under different experimental conditions by pulsed laser deposition method. The effects of catalyst layer, substrate temperature, and laser pulse energy on the growth of the CdS nanoneedles were studied in detail. It was confirmed that the formation of the molten catalyst spheres is the key to the nucleation of the CdS nanoneedles by observing the morphologies of the Ni catalyst thin films annealed at different substrate temperatures. Both the substrate temperature and laser pulse energy strongly affected the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles. The secondary growth of the smaller nanoneedles on the top of the main nanoneedles was found at appropriate conditions. A group of more completed pictures of the growth modes of the CdS nanoneedles were presented. PMID:24559455

  15. Experimental testing of total knee replacements with UHMW-PE inserts: impact of severe wear test conditions.

    PubMed

    Zietz, Carmen; Reinders, Joern; Schwiesau, Jens; Paulus, Alexander; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Grupp, Thomas; Utzschneider, Sandra; Bader, Rainer

    2015-03-01

    Aseptic implant loosening due to inflammatory reactions to wear debris is the main reason for the revision of total knee replacements (TKR). Hence, the decrease in polyethylene wear particle generation from the articulating surfaces is aimed at improving implant design and material. For preclinical testing of new TKR systems standardized wear tests are required. However, these wear tests do not reproduce the entire in vivo situation, since the pattern and amount of wear and subsequent implant failure are underestimated. Therefore, daily activity, kinematics, implant aging and position, third-body-wear and surface properties have to be considered to estimate the wear of implant components in vivo. Hence, severe test conditions are in demand for a better reproduction of the in vivo situation of TKR. In the present article an overview of different experimental wear test scenarios considering clinically relevant polyethylene wear situations using severe test conditions is presented. PMID:25716024

  16. SPINE: SParse eIgengene NEtwork linking gene expression clusters in Dehalococcoides mccartyi to perturbations in experimental conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Debs, Garrett E.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2015-02-25

    We present a statistical model designed to identify the effect of experimental perturbations on the aggregate behavior of the transcriptome expressed by the bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195. Strains of Dehalococcoides are used in sub-surface bioremediation applications because they organohalorespire tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene (common chlorinated solvents that contaminate the environment) to non-toxic ethene. However, the biochemical mechanism of this process remains incompletely described. Additionally, the response of Dehalococcoides to stress-inducing conditions that may be encountered at field-sites is not well understood. The constructed statistical model captured the aggregate behavior of gene expression phenotypes by modeling the distinct eigengenes of 100more » transcript clusters, determining stable relationships among these clusters of gene transcripts with a sparse network-inference algorithm, and directly modeling the effect of changes in experimental conditions by constructing networks conditioned on the experimental state. Based on the model predictions, we discovered new response mechanisms for DMC, notably when the bacterium is exposed to solvent toxicity. The network identified a cluster containing thirteen gene transcripts directly connected to the solvent toxicity condition. Transcripts in this cluster include an iron-dependent regulator (DET0096-97) and a methylglyoxal synthase (DET0137). To validate these predictions, additional experiments were performed. Continuously fed cultures were exposed to saturating levels of tetrachloethene, thereby causing solvent toxicity, and transcripts that were predicted to be linked to solvent toxicity were monitored by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Twelve hours after being shocked with saturating levels of tetrachloroethene, the control transcripts (encoding for a key hydrogenase and the 16S rRNA) did not significantly change. By contrast, transcripts

  17. SPINE: SParse eIgengene NEtwork Linking Gene Expression Clusters in Dehalococcoides mccartyi to Perturbations in Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Debs, Garrett E.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical model designed to identify the effect of experimental perturbations on the aggregate behavior of the transcriptome expressed by the bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195. Strains of Dehalococcoides are used in sub-surface bioremediation applications because they organohalorespire tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene (common chlorinated solvents that contaminate the environment) to non-toxic ethene. However, the biochemical mechanism of this process remains incompletely described. Additionally, the response of Dehalococcoides to stress-inducing conditions that may be encountered at field-sites is not well understood. The constructed statistical model captured the aggregate behavior of gene expression phenotypes by modeling the distinct eigengenes of 100 transcript clusters, determining stable relationships among these clusters of gene transcripts with a sparse network-inference algorithm, and directly modeling the effect of changes in experimental conditions by constructing networks conditioned on the experimental state. Based on the model predictions, we discovered new response mechanisms for DMC, notably when the bacterium is exposed to solvent toxicity. The network identified a cluster containing thirteen gene transcripts directly connected to the solvent toxicity condition. Transcripts in this cluster include an iron-dependent regulator (DET0096-97) and a methylglyoxal synthase (DET0137). To validate these predictions, additional experiments were performed. Continuously fed cultures were exposed to saturating levels of tetrachloethene, thereby causing solvent toxicity, and transcripts that were predicted to be linked to solvent toxicity were monitored by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Twelve hours after being shocked with saturating levels of tetrachloroethene, the control transcripts (encoding for a key hydrogenase and the 16S rRNA) did not significantly change. By contrast, transcripts for DET

  18. SPINE: SParse eIgengene NEtwork linking gene expression clusters in Dehalococcoides mccartyi to perturbations in experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Debs, Garrett E; Richardson, Ruth E

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical model designed to identify the effect of experimental perturbations on the aggregate behavior of the transcriptome expressed by the bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195. Strains of Dehalococcoides are used in sub-surface bioremediation applications because they organohalorespire tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene (common chlorinated solvents that contaminate the environment) to non-toxic ethene. However, the biochemical mechanism of this process remains incompletely described. Additionally, the response of Dehalococcoides to stress-inducing conditions that may be encountered at field-sites is not well understood. The constructed statistical model captured the aggregate behavior of gene expression phenotypes by modeling the distinct eigengenes of 100 transcript clusters, determining stable relationships among these clusters of gene transcripts with a sparse network-inference algorithm, and directly modeling the effect of changes in experimental conditions by constructing networks conditioned on the experimental state. Based on the model predictions, we discovered new response mechanisms for DMC, notably when the bacterium is exposed to solvent toxicity. The network identified a cluster containing thirteen gene transcripts directly connected to the solvent toxicity condition. Transcripts in this cluster include an iron-dependent regulator (DET0096-97) and a methylglyoxal synthase (DET0137). To validate these predictions, additional experiments were performed. Continuously fed cultures were exposed to saturating levels of tetrachloethene, thereby causing solvent toxicity, and transcripts that were predicted to be linked to solvent toxicity were monitored by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Twelve hours after being shocked with saturating levels of tetrachloroethene, the control transcripts (encoding for a key hydrogenase and the 16S rRNA) did not significantly change. By contrast, transcripts for DET

  19. Experimental observation and numerical simulation of permeability changes in dolomite at CO2 sequestration conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutolo, B. M.; Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    mineral, fluid, and aqueous species equations of state into its structure. Phase equilibria calculations indicate that fluids traveling away from the depressed temperature zone near the injection well may exsolve and precipitate up to 200 cc CO2, 1.45 cc dolomite, and 2.3 cc calcite, per kg, but we use the reactive transport simulator to place more realistic limits on these calculations. The simulations show that thermally-induced CO2 exsolution creates velocity gradients within the modeled domain, leading to increased velocities at lower pressure due to the increasingly gas-like density of CO2. Because dolomite precipitation kinetics strongly depend on temperature, modeled dolomite precipitation effectively concentrates within high temperature regions, while calcite precipitation is predicted to occur over a broader range. Additionally, because the molar volume of dolomite is almost double that of calcite, transporting a low temperature, dolomite-saturated fluid across a thermal gradient can lead to more substantial pore space clogging. We conclude that injecting cool CO2 into geothermally warm reservoirs may substantially alter formation porosity, permeability, and injectivity, and can result in favorable conditions for permanent storage of CO2 as a solid carbonate phase.

  20. Nondestructive prediction of point source pyroshock response spectra based on experimental conditioning of laser-induced shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jae-Kyeong; Lee, Jung-Ryul

    2014-09-01

    Pyroshock can easily cause failures in electronic and optical components that are sensitive to high-frequency energy. Pyroshock is generated during explosive-based pyrotechnical events, such as the separation of boosters from a space shuttle and the separation of satellites from a space launcher. Therefore, the prediction of high-frequency structural response, particularly the shock response spectrum (SRS), is important for safe operation of pyrotechnical devices. In general, real explosive testing using distributed accelerometers is widely used. This paper proposes a technology to replace the expensive, dangerous, low-repeatability explosive test with a laser-induced shock test based on a laser beam and in-line filter conditioning. This method does not use any special numerical signal processing. Two different experiments based on explosive and laser excitation were performed with a 2-mm thick aluminum plate. The optimum laser-induced shock experimental conditions to predict real pyroshock were investigated while considering the size, energy, and fluence of the laser beam as parameters. The similarity of the SRS of the laser-induced shock to that of the real explosive pyroshock was evaluated based on the mean acceleration difference (MAD, %). The experimentally determined optimal conditions were also applied to four points on the path of a pyroshock propagation. To match the SRS at each point, the laser-induced shock was amplified, for which three different gain concepts are proposed: the initial gain, optimized gain, and constant gain. The proposed technology enables nondestructive pyro SRS prediction by conditioning the laser-induced shock to obtain an SRS with high similarity to the real pyroshock.

  1. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  2. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  3. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  4. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  5. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  6. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  7. Adequate Schools and Inadequate Education: An Anthropological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Harry F.

    To illustrate his claim that schools generally do a remarkably good job of schooling while the society makes inadequate use of other means to educate young people, the author presents a case history of a young American (identified pseudonymously as "Brad") whose schooling was adequate but whose education was not. Brad, jobless and homeless,…

  8. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  9. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan,...

  10. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  11. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... identifiable personal data and automated systems shall be adequately trained in the security and privacy of... records in which identifiable personal data are processed or maintained, including all reports and output... personal records or data; must minimize, to the extent practicable, the risk that skilled technicians...

  12. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  13. Joint source separation of simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording in two experimental conditions using common spatial patterns.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ao; Fu, Zening; Tu, Yiheng; Hung, Yeung Sam; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous collection of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data has become increasingly popular in neuroscientific studies, because it can provide neural information with both high spatial and temporal resolution. In order to maximally utilize the information contained in simultaneous EEG-fMRI recording, many sophisticated multimodal data-mining methods, such as joint ICA, have been developed. However, these methods normally deal with data recorded in one experimental condition, and they cannot effectively extract information on activities that are distinct in two conditions. In this paper, a new data decomposition method called joint common spatial pattern (jCSP) is proposed. Compared with previous methods, the jCSP method exploits inter-conditional difference in the strength of brain source activities to achieve source separation, and is able to uncover the source activities with the strongest discriminative power. A group analysis based on clustering is further proposed to reveal distinctive jCSP patterns at group level. We applied joint CSP to a simultaneous EEG-fMRI dataset collected from 21 subjects under two different resting-state conditions (eyes-closed and eyes-open). Results show a distinct dynamic pattern shared by EEG alpha power and fMRI signal during eyes-open resting-state. PMID:26736832

  14. Radionuclide release from spent fuel under geologic disposal conditions: An overview of experimental and theoretical work through 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Reimus, P.W.; Simonson, S.A.

    1988-04-01

    This report presents an overview of experimental and theoretical work on radionuclide release from spent fuel and uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) under geologic disposal conditions. The purpose of the report is to provide a source book of information that can be used to develop models that describe radionuclide release from spent fuel waste packages. Modeling activities of this nature will be conducted within the Waste Package Program (WPP) of the Department of Energy's Salt Repository Project (SRP). The topics discussed include experimental methods for investigating radionuclide release, how results have been reported from radionuclide release experiments, theoretical studies of UO/sub 2/ and actinide solubility, results of experimental studies of radionuclide release from spent fuel and UO/sub 2/ (i.e., the effects of different variables on radionuclide release), characteristics of spent fuel pertinent to radionuclide release, and status of modeling of radionuclide release from spent fuel. Appendix A presents tables of data from spent fuel radionuclide release experiments. These data have been digitized from graphs that appear in the literature. An annotated bibliography of literature on spent fuel characterization is provided in Appendix B.

  15. Virulence Differences among Melissococcus plutonius Strains with Different Genetic Backgrounds in Apis mellifera Larvae under an Improved Experimental Condition.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shiraishi, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Sota; Harada, Mariko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Osaki, Makoto; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    European foulbrood (EFB) caused by Melissococcus plutonius is an important bacterial disease of honeybee larvae. M. plutonius strains can be grouped into three genetically distinct groups (CC3, CC12 and CC13). Because EFB could not be reproduced in artificially reared honeybee larvae by fastidious strains of CC3 and CC13 previously, we investigated a method to improve experimental conditions using a CC3 strain and found that infection with a potassium-rich diet enhanced proliferation of the fastidious strain in larvae at the early stage of infection, leading to the appearance of clear clinical symptoms. Further comparison of M. plutonius virulence under the conditions revealed that the representative strain of CC12 was extremely virulent and killed all tested bees before pupation, whereas the CC3 strain was less virulent than the CC12 strain, and a part of the infected larvae pupated. In contrast, the tested CC13 strain was avirulent, and as with the non-infected control group, most of the infected brood became adult bees, suggesting differences in the insect-level virulence among M. plutonius strains with different genetic backgrounds. These strains and the improved experimental infection method to evaluate their virulence will be useful tools for further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of EFB. PMID:27625313

  16. Virulence Differences among Melissococcus plutonius Strains with Different Genetic Backgrounds in Apis mellifera Larvae under an Improved Experimental Condition

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shiraishi, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Sota; Harada, Mariko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Osaki, Makoto; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    European foulbrood (EFB) caused by Melissococcus plutonius is an important bacterial disease of honeybee larvae. M. plutonius strains can be grouped into three genetically distinct groups (CC3, CC12 and CC13). Because EFB could not be reproduced in artificially reared honeybee larvae by fastidious strains of CC3 and CC13 previously, we investigated a method to improve experimental conditions using a CC3 strain and found that infection with a potassium-rich diet enhanced proliferation of the fastidious strain in larvae at the early stage of infection, leading to the appearance of clear clinical symptoms. Further comparison of M. plutonius virulence under the conditions revealed that the representative strain of CC12 was extremely virulent and killed all tested bees before pupation, whereas the CC3 strain was less virulent than the CC12 strain, and a part of the infected larvae pupated. In contrast, the tested CC13 strain was avirulent, and as with the non-infected control group, most of the infected brood became adult bees, suggesting differences in the insect-level virulence among M. plutonius strains with different genetic backgrounds. These strains and the improved experimental infection method to evaluate their virulence will be useful tools for further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of EFB. PMID:27625313

  17. The influence of simulator input conditions on the wear of total knee replacements: An experimental and computational study

    PubMed Central

    Brockett, Claire L; Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Haythornthwaite, Tony; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-01-01

    Advancements in knee replacement design, material and sterilisation processes have provided improved clinical results. However, surface wear of the polyethylene leading to osteolysis is still considered the longer-term risk factor. Experimental wear simulation is an established method for evaluating the wear performance of total joint replacements. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulation input conditions, specifically input kinematic magnitudes, waveforms and directions of motion and position of the femoral centre of rotation, on the wear performance of a fixed-bearing total knee replacement through a combined experimental and computational approach. Studies were completed using conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene to determine whether the influence of these simulation input conditions varied with material. The position of the femoral centre of rotation and the input kinematics were shown to have a significant influence on the wear rates. Similar trends were shown for both the conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene materials, although lower wear rates were found for the moderately cross-linked polyethylene due to the higher level of cross-linking. The most important factor influencing the wear was the position of the relative contact point at the femoral component and tibial insert interface. This was dependent on the combination of input displacement magnitudes, waveforms, direction of motion and femoral centre of rotation. This study provides further evidence that in order to study variables such as design and material in total knee replacement, it is important to carefully control knee simulation conditions. This can be more effectively achieved through the use of displacement control simulation. PMID:27160561

  18. The influence of simulator input conditions on the wear of total knee replacements: An experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Brockett, Claire L; Abdelgaied, Abdellatif; Haythornthwaite, Tony; Hardaker, Catherine; Fisher, John; Jennings, Louise M

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in knee replacement design, material and sterilisation processes have provided improved clinical results. However, surface wear of the polyethylene leading to osteolysis is still considered the longer-term risk factor. Experimental wear simulation is an established method for evaluating the wear performance of total joint replacements. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of simulation input conditions, specifically input kinematic magnitudes, waveforms and directions of motion and position of the femoral centre of rotation, on the wear performance of a fixed-bearing total knee replacement through a combined experimental and computational approach. Studies were completed using conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene to determine whether the influence of these simulation input conditions varied with material. The position of the femoral centre of rotation and the input kinematics were shown to have a significant influence on the wear rates. Similar trends were shown for both the conventional and moderately cross-linked polyethylene materials, although lower wear rates were found for the moderately cross-linked polyethylene due to the higher level of cross-linking. The most important factor influencing the wear was the position of the relative contact point at the femoral component and tibial insert interface. This was dependent on the combination of input displacement magnitudes, waveforms, direction of motion and femoral centre of rotation. This study provides further evidence that in order to study variables such as design and material in total knee replacement, it is important to carefully control knee simulation conditions. This can be more effectively achieved through the use of displacement control simulation. PMID:27160561

  19. Development of a versatile experimental setup for the evaluation of the photocatalytic properties of construction materials under realistic outdoor conditions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, S; Portela, R; Hernández-Alonso, M D; Sánchez, B

    2014-10-01

    The interest on outdoor photocatalytic materials is growing in the last years. Nevertheless, most of the experimental devices designed for the assessment of their performance operate at controlled laboratory conditions, i.e., pollutant concentration, temperature, UV irradiation, and water vapor contents, far from those of real outdoor environments. The aim of the present study was the design and development of an experimental device for the continuous test of photocatalytic outdoor materials under sun irradiation using real outdoor air as feed, with the concomitant fluctuation of pollutant concentration, temperature, and water vapor content. A three-port measurement system based on two UV-transparent chambers was designed and built. A test chamber contained the photoactive element and a reference chamber to place the substrate without the photoactive element were employed. The third sampling point, placed outdoors, allowed the characterization of the surrounding air, which feeds the test chambers. Temperature, relative humidity (RH), and UV-A irradiance were monitored at each sampling point with specific sensors. NO x concentration was measured by a chemiluminescence NO x analyzer. Three automatic valves allowed the consecutive analysis of the concentration at the three points at fixed time intervals. The reliability of the analytical system was demonstrated by comparing the NO x concentration data with those obtained at the nearest weather station to the experimental device location. The use of a chamber-based reaction system leads to an attenuation of NO x and atmospheric parameter profiles, but maintaining the general trends. The air characterization results showed the wide operating window under which the photoactive materials should work outdoors, depending on the traffic intensity and the season, which are reproduced inside the test chambers. The designed system allows the measurement of the photoactivity of outdoor materials or the comparison of several

  20. Experimental reduction of winter food decreases body condition and delays migration in a long-distance migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nathan W; Sherry, Thomas W; Marra, Peter P

    2015-07-01

    Many tropical habitats experience pronounced dry seasons, during which arthropod food availability declines, potentially limiting resident and migratory animal populations. In response to declines in food, individuals may attempt to alter their space use to enhance access to food resources, but may be socially constrained from doing so by con- and heterospecifics. If social constraints exist, food declines should result in decreased body condition. In migratory birds, correlational evidence suggests a link between body condition and migration timing. Poor body condition and delayed migration may, in turn, impact fitness in subsequent seasons via carry-over effects. To determine if winter food availability affects space use, inter- and intraspecific competition, body composition (i.e., mass, fat, and pectoral muscle), and migration timing, we experimentally decreased food availability on individual American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) territories in high-quality mangrove habitat. Redstarts on control territories experienced -40% loss of food due to the seasonal nature of the environment. Redstarts on experimental territories experienced -80% declines in food, which closely mimicked natural declines in nearby, low-quality, scrub habitat. Individuals on food-reduced territories did not expand their territories locally, but instead either became non-territorial "floaters" or remained on territory. Regardless of territorial status, food-reduced American Redstarts all deposited fat compared to control birds. Fat deposits provide insurance against the risk of starvation, but, for American Redstarts, came at the expense of maintaining pectoral muscle. Subsequently, food-reduced American Redstarts experienced, on average, a one-week delay in departure on spring migration, likely due to the loss of pectoral muscle. Thus, our results demonstrate experimentally, for the first time, that declines in winter food availability can result in a fat-muscle trade-off, which, in

  1. Experimental reduction of winter food decreases body condition and delays migration in a long-distance migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Nathan W; Sherry, Thomas W; Marra, Peter P

    2015-07-01

    Many tropical habitats experience pronounced dry seasons, during which arthropod food availability declines, potentially limiting resident and migratory animal populations. In response to declines in food, individuals may attempt to alter their space use to enhance access to food resources, but may be socially constrained from doing so by con- and heterospecifics. If social constraints exist, food declines should result in decreased body condition. In migratory birds, correlational evidence suggests a link between body condition and migration timing. Poor body condition and delayed migration may, in turn, impact fitness in subsequent seasons via carry-over effects. To determine if winter food availability affects space use, inter- and intraspecific competition, body composition (i.e., mass, fat, and pectoral muscle), and migration timing, we experimentally decreased food availability on individual American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) territories in high-quality mangrove habitat. Redstarts on control territories experienced -40% loss of food due to the seasonal nature of the environment. Redstarts on experimental territories experienced -80% declines in food, which closely mimicked natural declines in nearby, low-quality, scrub habitat. Individuals on food-reduced territories did not expand their territories locally, but instead either became non-territorial "floaters" or remained on territory. Regardless of territorial status, food-reduced American Redstarts all deposited fat compared to control birds. Fat deposits provide insurance against the risk of starvation, but, for American Redstarts, came at the expense of maintaining pectoral muscle. Subsequently, food-reduced American Redstarts experienced, on average, a one-week delay in departure on spring migration, likely due to the loss of pectoral muscle. Thus, our results demonstrate experimentally, for the first time, that declines in winter food availability can result in a fat-muscle trade-off, which, in

  2. Plutonium chemistry under conditions relevant for WIPP performance assessment. Review of experimental results and recommendations for future work

    SciTech Connect

    Oversby, Virginia M.

    2000-09-30

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located at a depth of 650 m in bedded salt at a site approximately 40 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, was constructed by the US Department of Energy for the disposal of transuranic wastes arising from defense-related activities. The disposal site is regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). During the process leading to certification of the site for initial emplacement of waste, EEG and their contractors reviewed the DOE Compliance Certification Application (CCA) and raised a number of issues. This report reviews the issues related to the chemistry of plutonium as it will affect the potential for release of radioactivity under WIPP conditions. Emphasis is placed on conditions appropriate for the Human Intrusion scenario(s), since human intrusion has the largest potential for releasing radioactivity to the environment under WIPP conditions. The most significant issues that need to be addressed in relation to plutonium chemistry under WIPP conditions are (1) the effects of heterogeneity in the repository on Pu concentrations in brines introduced under the human intrusion scenario, (2) the redox state of Pu in solution and potential for plutonium in solid phases to have a different redox state from that in the solution phase, (3) the effect of organic ligands on the solubility of Pu in WIPP-relevant brines, and (4) the effects of TRU waste characteristics in determining the solubility of Pu. These issues are reviewed with respect to the treatment they received in the DOE CCA, DOE’s response to EEG’s comments on the CCA, and EPA’s response to those comments as reflected in the final EPA rule that led to the opening of the WIPP. Experimental results obtained in DOE’s Actinide Source-Term Test Program (STTP) during the last two years are reviewed and interpreted in the light of other developments in the field of Pu solution chemistry. This analysis is used as the basis for a conceptual model for Pu

  3. The performance of charcoal-based radon detection under time-varying radon conditions: Experimental and theoretical results

    SciTech Connect

    Sextro, R.G.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-10-01

    Radon adsorption by charcoal is a widely used technique for measuring indoor radon concentration, particularly when short-term results are desired. There are several different devices available, ranging from permeable envelopes filled with charcoal and open-face charcoal-filled canisters to devices incorporating diffusion limiting features to reduce losses of radon due to desorption. However, the integration characteristics of these samplers are not well understood, particularly under conditions of highly varying radon concentrations. A model for predicting the response of various types of charcoal based detectors to time-variant radon concentrations has been developed; the model predictions compare well with results from chamber experiments. Both the experimental and theoretical results have also been compared with integrated continuous-sampling measurements. The implications of these comparisons for use of charcoal for screening measurements is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. The Vienna comparative cognition technology (VCCT): an innovative operant conditioning system for various species and experimental procedures.

    PubMed

    Steurer, Michael Morten; Aust, Ulrike; Huber, Ludwig

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a laboratory system for running learning experiments in operant chambers with various species. It is based on a modern version of a classical learning chamber for operant conditioning, the so-called "Skinner box". Rather than constituting a stand-alone unit, as is usually the case, it is an integrated part of a comprehensive technical solution, thereby eliminating a number of practical problems that are frequently encountered in research on animal learning and behavior. The Vienna comparative cognition technology combines modern computer, stimulus presentation, and reinforcement technology with flexibility and user-friendliness, which allows for efficient, widely automatized across-species experimentation, and thus makes the system appropriate for use in a broad range of learning tasks.

  5. Experimental evidence for growth advantage and metabolic shift stimulated by photophosphorylation of proteorhodopsin expressed in Escherichia coli at anaerobic condition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Yan; Xu, Tuan; Shi, Zhenyu; Wu, Qiong

    2015-05-01

    Since solar light energy is the source of all renewable biological energy, the direct usage of light energy by bacterial cell factory has been a very attractive concept, especially using light energy to promote anaerobic fermentation growth and even recycle low-energy carbon source when energy is the limiting factor. Proteorhodopsin(PR), a light-driven proton pump proven to couple with ATP synthesis when expressed heterogeneously, is an interesting and simple option to enable light usage in engineered strains. However, although it was reported to influence fermentation in some cases, heterogeneous proteorhodopsin expression was never shown to support growth advantage or cause metabolic shift by photophosphorylation so far. Hereby, we presented the first experimental evidence that heterogeneously expressed proteorhodopsin can provide growth advantage and cause ATP-dependent metabolism shift of acetate and lactate changes in Escherichia coli at anaerobic condition. Those discoveries suggest further application potential of PR in anaerobic fermentation where energy is a limiting factor.

  6. Computer-aided nanotoxicology: assessing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles under diverse experimental conditions by using a novel QSTR-perturbation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Feng; Kleandrova, Valeria V.; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M.; Melo, André; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M. Natália D. S.

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, the interest in the search for new nanomaterials with improved electrical, optical, catalytic and biological properties has increased. Despite the potential benefits that can be gathered from the use of nanoparticles, only little attention has been paid to their possible toxic effects that may affect human health. In this context, several assays have been carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells. Owing to the cost in both resources and time involved in such toxicological assays, there has been a considerable increase in the interest towards alternative computational methods, like the application of quantitative structure-activity/toxicity relationship (QSAR/QSTR) models for risk assessment of nanoparticles. However, most QSAR/QSTR models developed so far have predicted cytotoxicity against only one cell line, and they did not provide information regarding the influence of important factors rather than composition or size. This work reports a QSTR-perturbation model aiming at simultaneously predicting the cytotoxicity of different nanoparticles against several mammalian cell lines, and also considering different times of exposure of the cell lines, as well as the chemical composition of nanoparticles, size, conditions under which the size was measured, and shape. The derived QSTR-perturbation model, using a dataset of 1681 cases (nanoparticle-nanoparticle pairs), exhibited an accuracy higher than 93% for both training and prediction sets. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of our model, the cytotoxicity of different silica (SiO2), nickel (Ni), and nickel(ii) oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were predicted and found to be in very good agreement with experimental reports. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to simultaneously predict the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles under multiple experimental conditions by applying a single unique QSTR model.Nowadays, the interest in the search for new

  7. Experimental investigation of grain-scale microstructure evolution during olivine-wadsleyite phase transformation under "dry" conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohiuddin, A.; Karato, S. I.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the evolution of grain-scale microstructure during the olivine to wadsleyite transformation through high pressure and temperature experiments. The grain-size evolution and the spatial distribution of newly formed fine grains during the phase transformation in the mantle transition zone have potentially large influence on the strength of a slab in the transition zone that has an important control on the slab deformation. However, most of previous experimental studies on the processes of phase transformations have focused on the kinetics of phase transformation and no experimental studies have been published on these microstructural issues. The key issues that we investigate include (i) the size of new grains and (ii) spatial distribution of new grains (critical conditions for percolation). We conduct high-pressure, temperature annealing experiments and investigate the grain-scale microstructure evolution. We find that olivine transforms to wadsleyite mainly via grain boundary nucleated transformation mechanism: New grains are formed on pre-existing olivine-olivine grain-boundaries in all cases. In some runs, we identified the time for site saturation on grain-boundaries and together with the grain-size at site saturation we calculated both nucleation and growth rate. During early stages of transformation a grain boundary percolated microstructure develops and this may be very crucial in decreasing the overall strength of composite during this step. The grain size at the site saturation seems to decrease with overpressure. We also find that inadequate annealing of defects may give rise to apparent kinetic parameters interpretation of which may not be straightforward. We report inferred functional forms of nucleation and growth rate and discuss possible implications of these experimental observations on the weakening of a slab in the mantle transition zone.

  8. Computer-aided nanotoxicology: assessing cytotoxicity of nanoparticles under diverse experimental conditions by using a novel QSTR-perturbation approach.

    PubMed

    Luan, Feng; Kleandrova, Valeria V; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M; Melo, André; Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2014-09-21

    Nowadays, the interest in the search for new nanomaterials with improved electrical, optical, catalytic and biological properties has increased. Despite the potential benefits that can be gathered from the use of nanoparticles, only little attention has been paid to their possible toxic effects that may affect human health. In this context, several assays have been carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles in mammalian cells. Owing to the cost in both resources and time involved in such toxicological assays, there has been a considerable increase in the interest towards alternative computational methods, like the application of quantitative structure-activity/toxicity relationship (QSAR/QSTR) models for risk assessment of nanoparticles. However, most QSAR/QSTR models developed so far have predicted cytotoxicity against only one cell line, and they did not provide information regarding the influence of important factors rather than composition or size. This work reports a QSTR-perturbation model aiming at simultaneously predicting the cytotoxicity of different nanoparticles against several mammalian cell lines, and also considering different times of exposure of the cell lines, as well as the chemical composition of nanoparticles, size, conditions under which the size was measured, and shape. The derived QSTR-perturbation model, using a dataset of 1681 cases (nanoparticle-nanoparticle pairs), exhibited an accuracy higher than 93% for both training and prediction sets. In order to demonstrate the practical applicability of our model, the cytotoxicity of different silica (SiO2), nickel (Ni), and nickel(ii) oxide (NiO) nanoparticles were predicted and found to be in very good agreement with experimental reports. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to simultaneously predict the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles under multiple experimental conditions by applying a single unique QSTR model.

  9. Validation of a blowby model using experimental results in motoring condition with the change of compression ratio and engine speed

    SciTech Connect

    Aghdam, E. Abdi; Kabir, M.M.

    2010-02-15

    Blowby and gas flow through the cylinder-piston-ring crevices are phenomena that affect the engine performance and exhaust emissions. Also these phenomena influence the cylinder pressure and temperature and the charge amount during a cycle. The study and validation of a sub-model for these phenomena in the absence of engine combustion deducts all effects arisen from the combustion event. During the current study, blowby sub-model and gas flow through crevices under motoring conditions has been noticed using a volume-orifice theory and the experimental results measured from a research engine. Blowby geometric parameters, consisting of a few critical cross-section areas (orifice areas) and volumes (top land and inter-ring crevice volumes), were measured in ambient temperature and corrected for hot running conditions. The cylinder pressure during cycle was measured by a piezoelectric pressure transducer and the low pressure parts of the cycle were measured using a piezoresistive pressure transducer for referencing purposes. The obtained results show a very good agreement between experimentally measured pressure data and model output for three compression ratios of 7.6, 10.2, 12.4 and three engine speeds of 750, 1500 and 2000 rpm, so that the maximum deviation was almost 5%. The model predicted that the maximum mass loss increased with increase of compression ratio and decreased with increase of engine speed. Also the peak mass loss position happened within the range of 3-9 CA after top dead center. After occurrence of the maximum loss, a reverse flow from the top land crevice into the cylinder was predicted in the model. (author)

  10. Experimental evidence of biomineralisation for three benthic foraminiferal species under different redox conditions: implications for paleo-redox proxies interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardelli, Maria Pia; Barras, Christine; Metzger, Edouard; Filipsson, Helena; Jorissen, Frans; Geslin, Emmanuelle

    2014-05-01

    Foraminifera are among the most used group of organisms for paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental reconstructions thanks to their ability to fossilize and the preservation potential in marine sediments. Calibrations of foraminiferal-based proxies are therefore of crucial importance for precise reconstructions together with uncertainty estimates of paleoenvironments; experimental approaches are increasingly used to deepen the understanding of biological and ecological aspects of biomineralization that can influence shell geochemistry. Some of the most important and still unanswered questions are: under which circumstances can foraminiferal biomineralization take place? Can their shells record different oxygenation levels and redox fronts migrations at the sediment-water interface? The hypothesis of their ability to biomineralise even in absence of oxygen was investigated in an experimental study. Calcein-labeled specimens of three benthic foraminiferal species, Ammonia tepida, Bulimina marginata and Cassidulina laevigata were introduced in different sediment layers of reconstituted cores (up to 10 cm depth). The sediment layers were separated by 100 µm mesh-size nets preventing specimen migrations. We could therefore evaluate the ability of the species to calcify at different redox fronts in the sediment. The results show that all species were able to calcify within 2 months in hypoxic. Two of them (Ammonia tepida and Bulimina marginata) are also able to calcify in completely anoxic conditions. The result suggests that foraminifera could register in their calcareous shells the migration of redox fronts associated to bottom-water oxygen depletions and anoxic events. With the help of microanalytical tools it will potentially be possible to reconstruct past oxygen levels with much higher accuracy and precision and to obtain proxies of completely anoxic conditions.

  11. An experimental and modeling study of iso-octane ignition delay times under homogeneous charge compression ignition conditions

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.; Donovan, M.T.; Zigler, B.T.; Palmer, T.R.; Walton, S.M.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Atreya, A.

    2005-08-01

    Autoignition of iso-octane was examined using a rapid compression facility (RCF) with iso-octane, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon mixtures. The effects of typical homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) conditions on the iso-octane ignition characteristics were studied. Experimental results for ignition delay times, t{sub ign}, were obtained from pressure time-histories. The experiments were conducted over a range of equivalence ratios (f=0.25-1.0), pressures (P=5.12-23 atm), temperatures (T=943-1027 K), and oxygen mole fractions ({chi}{sub O{sub 2}}=9-21%), and with the addition of trace amounts of combustion product gases (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). It was found that the ignition delay times were well represented by the expression t{sub ign}=1.3x10{sup -4}P{sup -1.05}f{sup -0.77}{chi}{sub O{sub 2}}{sup -1.41}exp(33,700/R{sub (c} {sub al/mol/K)}T), where P is pressure (atm), T is temperature (K), f is the equivalence ratio (based on iso-octane to O{sub 2} molar ratios), {chi}{sub O{sub 2}} is the oxygen mole percent (%), and t{sub ign} is the ignition delay time (ms). Carbon dioxide was found to have no chemical effect on t{sub ign}. Water was found to systematically decrease t{sub ign} by a small amount (less than 14% for the range of conditions studied). The maximum uncertainty in the measured t{sub ign} is +/-12% with an average uncertainty of +/-6%. The performance of several proposed chemical reaction mechanisms (including detailed, reduced, and skeletal mechanisms) was evaluated in the context of the current experimental results.

  12. Early results from an experimental program to determine the behavior of containment piping penetration bellows subjected to severe accident conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Containment piping penetration bellows are an integral part of the pressure boundary in steel containments in the United States (US). Their purpose is to minimize loading on the containment shell caused by differential movement between the piping and the containment. This differential movement is typically caused by thermal gradients generated during startup and shutdown of the reactor, but can be caused by earthquake, a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), or ``severe`` accidents. In the event of a severe accident, the bellows would be subjected to pressure, temperature, and deflection well beyond the design basis. Most bellows are installed such that they would be subjected to elevated internal pressure, elevated temperature, axial compression, and lateral deflection during a severe accident. A few bellows would be subjected to external pressure and axial elongation, as well as elevated temperature and lateral deflection. The purpose of this experimental program is to examine the potential for leakage of containment bellows during a severe accident. The test series subjects bellows to various levels and combinations of internal pressure, elevated temperature, axial compression or elongation, and lateral deformation. The experiments are being conducted in two parts. For Part 1, all bellows specimens are tested in ``like-new`` condition, without regard for the possible degrading effect of corrosion that has been observed in some containment piping bellows in the US Part I testing, which included 13 bellows tests, has been completed. The second part of the experimental program, in which bellows are subjected to simulated corrosive environments prior to testing, has just just begun. The Part I experiments have shown that bellows in ``like-new`` condition can withstand elevated temperatures and pressures along with large deformations before leaking. In most cases, the like-new bellows were fully compressed without developing any leakage.

  13. Remote ischemic conditioning: from experimental observation to clinical application: report from the 8th Biennial Hatter Cardiovascular Institute Workshop.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Jack M J; Bøtker, Hans Erik; Crimi, Gabriele; Davidson, Brian; Davidson, Sean M; Dutka, David; Ferdinandy, Peter; Ganske, Rocky; Garcia-Dorado, David; Giricz, Zoltan; Gourine, Alexander V; Heusch, Gerd; Kharbanda, Rajesh; Kleinbongard, Petra; MacAllister, Raymond; McIntyre, Christopher; Meybohm, Patrick; Prunier, Fabrice; Redington, Andrew; Robertson, Nicola J; Suleiman, M Saadeh; Vanezis, Andrew; Walsh, Stewart; Yellon, Derek M; Hausenloy, Derek J

    2015-01-01

    In 1993, Przyklenk and colleagues made the intriguing experimental observation that 'brief ischemia in one vascular bed also protects remote, virgin myocardium from subsequent sustained coronary artery occlusion' and that this effect'... may be mediated by factor(s) activated, produced, or transported throughout the heart during brief ischemia/reperfusion'. This seminal study laid the foundation for the discovery of 'remote ischemic conditioning' (RIC), a phenomenon in which the heart is protected from the detrimental effects of acute ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), by applying cycles of brief ischemia and reperfusion to an organ or tissue remote from the heart. The concept of RIC quickly evolved to extend beyond the heart, encompassing inter-organ protection against acute IRI. The crucial discovery that the protective RIC stimulus could be applied non-invasively, by simply inflating and deflating a blood pressure cuff placed on the upper arm to induce cycles of brief ischemia and reperfusion, has facilitated the translation of RIC into the clinical setting. Despite intensive investigation over the last 20 years, the underlying mechanisms continue to elude researchers. In the 8th Biennial Hatter Cardiovascular Institute Workshop, recent developments in the field of RIC were discussed with a focus on new insights into the underlying mechanisms, the diversity of non-cardiac protection, new clinical applications, and large outcome studies. The scientific advances made in this field of research highlight the journey that RIC has made from being an intriguing experimental observation to a clinical application with patient benefit.

  14. Interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms under the influence of high strain rate impact conditions: Numerical computations of experimental observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raoelison, R. N.; Sapanathan, T.; Padayodi, E.; Buiron, N.; Rachik, M.

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the complex interfacial kinematics and governing mechanisms during high speed impact conditions. A robust numerical modelling technique using Eulerian simulations are used to explain the material response of the interface subjected to a high strain rate collision during a magnetic pulse welding. The capability of this model is demonstrated using the predictions of interfacial kinematics and revealing the governing mechanical behaviours. Numerical predictions of wave formation resulted with the upward or downward jetting and complex interfacial mixing governed by wake and vortex instabilities corroborate the experimental observations. Moreover, the prediction of the material ejection during the simulation explains the experimentally observed deposited particles outside the welded region. Formations of internal cavities along the interface is also closely resemble the resulted confined heating at the vicinity of the interface appeared from those wake and vortex instabilities. These results are key features of this simulation that also explains the potential mechanisms in the defects formation at the interface. These results indicate that the Eulerian computation not only has the advantage of predicting the governing mechanisms, but also it offers a non-destructive approach to identify the interfacial defects in an impact welded joint.

  15. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2006-03-24

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  16. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    SciTech Connect

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  17. Experimental and numerical assessment of normal heat flux first wall qualification mock-ups under ITER relevant conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Bürger, A.; Pintsuk, G.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Bellin, B.; Zacchia, F.; Eaton, R.; Mitteau, R.; Raffray, R.

    2014-04-01

    The ITER first wall (FW) panel consists of beryllium in the form of tiles covering its surface, high strength copper alloy as the heat sink material and stainless steel as the structural material. Small-scale normal heat flux FW mock-ups, provided by Fusion for Energy, are tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH 2 at Forschungszentrum Jülich to determine the performance of this design under thermal fatigue. The mock-ups are loaded cyclically under a surface heat flux of 2 MW m-2 with ITER relevant water coolant conditions. In this study, three-dimensional finite element method thermo-mechanical analyses are performed with ANSYS to simulate the thermal fatigue behaviour of the mock-ups. The temperature results indicate that the beryllium surface temperature is below the maximum allowed temperature (600 °C) of beryllium to be tested. The thermal mechanical results indicate that copper rupture and debonding between Be and copper are the drivers of the failure of a mock-up. In addition, the experimental data, e.g. the surface temperature measured using an infrared camera and the bulk temperature measured using thermocouples, are reported. A comparative study between experimental and simulation results is performed.

  18. Experimental investigation of an ejector scramjet RBCC at Mach 4.0 and 6.5 simulated flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Karl William

    An ejector scramjet RBCC flowpath was tested at simulated Mach 4.0 and 6.5 flight conditions in a direct-connect scramjet test facility. The primary objective of this research was to investigate the effects of rocket operation on ramjet and scramjet mode performance. Benefits of rocket operation to fuel ignition and combustion were also of interest. A unique direct thrust measurement system was designed and installed for this test program. Ramjet operation was not achievable at the Mach 4.0 test conditions because of poor combustion performance due to inefficient fuel-air mixing from the axially oriented injectors in the rocket strut base. From the Mach 4.0 results, it was found that a more fuel rich rocket performed better than a leaner rocket with additional fuel injection. It appears that the fuel injected through the strut base was being entrained into the rocket exhaust and "carried" downstream before it was able to mix with the air and burn. At the Mach 6.5 test conditions, combustion of the hydrogen from the fuel injectors did not occur at low flow rates unless the rocket was in operation. This information substantiates the application of the rocket as a pilot/flameholder. Contrary to the Mach 4.0 results, at the Mach 6.5 conditions, a leaner rocket and additional fuel injection performed better than a more fuel rich rocket. At both test conditions, it was found that below a certain rocket chamber pressure the Isp began to increase. This additional Isp benefit was due an increase in strut base pressurization. For the configuration that was tested, the higher Mach number flight conditions appear to experience the greatest benefit from the rocket operation. The results of a shear layer growth rate analysis compared well with the experimental findings. An analysis was also performed based on the required ignition and reaction times for hydrogen. This analysis was also in good agreement. The low mixing and combustion performance of the parallel base injection at

  19. Impact of Experimental Conditions on the Evaluation of Interactions between Multidrug and Toxin Extrusion Proteins and Candidate Drugs.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Christian; Ishiguro, Naoki; Fukuhara, Ayano; Shimizu, Hidetada; Ohtsu, Naoko; Takatani, Masahito; Nishiyama, Kotaro; Washio, Ikumi; Yamamura, Norio; Kusuhara, Hiroyuki

    2016-08-01

    Multidrug and toxin extrusion transporters (MATEs) have a determining influence on the pharmacokinetic profiles of many drugs and are involved in several clinical drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Cellular uptake assays with recombinant cells expressing human MATE1 or MATE2-K are widely used to investigate MATE-mediated transport for DDI assessment; however, the experimental conditions and used test substrates vary among laboratories. We therefore initially examined the impact of three assay conditions that have been applied for MATE substrate and inhibitor profiling in the literature. One of the tested conditions resulted in significantly higher uptake rates of the three test substrates, [(14)C]metformin, [(3)H]thiamine, and [(3)H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), but IC50 values of four tested MATE inhibitors varied only slightly among the three conditions (<2.5-fold difference). Subsequently, we investigated the uptake characteristics of the five MATE substrates: [(14)C]metformin, [(3)H]thiamine, [(3)H]MPP(+), [(3)H]estrone-3-sulfate (E3S), and rhodamine 123, as well as the impact of the used test substrate on the inhibition profiles of 10 MATE inhibitors at one selected assay condition. [(3)H]E3S showed atypical uptake characteristics compared with those observed with the other four substrates. IC50 values of the tested inhibitors were in a similar range (<4-fold difference) when [(14)C]metformin, [(3)H]thiamine, [(3)H]MPP(+), or [(3)H]E3S were used as substrates but were considerably higher with rhodamine 123 (9.8-fold and 4.1-fold differences compared with [(14)C]metformin with MATE1 and MATE2-K, respectively). This study demonstrated for the first time that the impact of assay conditions on IC50 determination is negligible, that kinetic characteristics differ among used test substrates, and that substrate-dependent inhibition exists for MATE1 and MATE2-K, giving valuable insight into the assessment of clinically relevant MATE-mediated DDIs in vitro. PMID

  20. Experimental evidence of bulk chemistry constraint on SiO2 solubility in clinopyroxene at high-pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshisuke; Osanai, Yasuhito

    2015-06-01

    We have experimentally confirmed that the solubility of SiO2 in clinopyroxene at ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic conditions is buffered by coesite and kyanite. The present findings were derived from high-pressure experiments on metapelite glass, powdered andesite and eclogite glass under anhydrous conditions. The metapelite glass and powdered andesite were recrystallised in boron nitride capsules at 8 GPa and 1100-1500 °C. The eclogite glass was heated in an AuPd capsule, both ends of which were welded, at 3 GPa and 1000 °C. Clinopyroxene nucleated from metapelite glass, the bulk composition of which is saturated in both SiO2 and Al2SiO5 components plotting within the Jd (Na,K)(Al,Cr)(Si,Ti)2O6-Qtz (Si,Ti)O2-Grt M3(Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)3O12-Als (Al,Cr)2(Si,Ti)O5 tetrahedron (M = Fe, Mn, Mg, Ni, Zn, Ca), coexists with garnet, coesite and kyanite. The average excess silica content of the clinopyroxene ranges from 23.4 to 35.4 mol%. In contrast, an andesite experiment saturated in SiO2 but undersaturated in Al2SiO5 within the Jd-Qtz-Aug M(Si,Ti)O3-Grt tetrahedron produced clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite but no kyanite. The average excess silica in the clinopyroxene was 9.7-15.5 mol%, which is comparable to previous experimental data. Experiment on the eclogite glass with similar composition to andesite yielded clinopyroxene, garnet and coesite. An average excess silica content in clinopyroxene counts 6.4 mol%, which is much lower than that obtained from the andesite. The SiO2 content of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet, coesite and kyanite is much higher than that of clinopyroxene coexisting with garnet and coesite without kyanite. Although the temperature dependence is unclear, the SiO2 solubility increases with pressure and Fe/(Fe+Mg). Clinopyroxene forms the solid solution series Jd-Es □0.5M0.5Al(Si,Ti)2O6 and Aug-Es, rather than Jd-Ts MAl2(Si,Ti)O6 and Es-Ts joins. Our experimental data suggest the probable existence of octahedral Si which may accompany the M2

  1. Effects of changes in frequency on guinea pig ventricular action potential duration and on QT interval under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    von Savigny, L; Hohnloser, S; Antoni, H

    1981-01-01

    Isolated perfused guinea pig hearts (Langendorff preparation) were arrested by carbachol (0.1-0.2 mg/l) and electrically stimulated in the region of the av-conducting system. The QT interval was determined by means of extracellular electrodes at different driving frequencies. Separate experiments were performed on papillary muscles from the right ventricle to measure the duration of the transmembrane action potential under comparable conditions. At 35 degrees C (Ke+ 5.4 mmol/l) increasing the frequency of stimulation (range 12-120/min) caused the action potential duration (APD) to decrease to a greater extent than the QT interval. Stepwise rising of the external K+ concentration up to 16.2 mmol/l produced a nearly parallel shift to the APD-frequency relation to lower values. Again, the QT interval was less affected by increasing the external K+ concentration than the APD. Stepwise reduction of the temperature down to 20 degrees C prolonged the APD as well as the QT interval, the effects being more pronounced at lower than at higher stimulation frequencies. Under all examined experimental conditions, the APD proved to be markedly shorter than the QT interval even when the latter is diminished by the duration of QRS. The results suggest that no close relation exists between the APD and the QT interval. The observed divergencies may be due to functional differences among various parts of the ventricles.

  2. Optimization of the marinating conditions of cassava fish (Pseudotolithus sp.) fillet for Lanhouin production through application of Doehlert experimental design.

    PubMed

    Kindossi, Janvier Mêlégnonfan; Anihouvi, Victor Bienvenu; Vieira-Dalodé, Générose; Akissoé, Noël Houédougbé; Hounhouigan, Djidjoho Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Lanhouin is a traditional fermented salted fish made from the spontaneous and uncontrolled fermentation of whole salted cassava fish (Pseudotolithus senegalensis) mainly produced in the coastal regions of West Africa. The combined effects of NaCl, citric acid concentration, and marination time on the physicochemical and microbiological characteristics of the fish fillet used for Lanhouin production were studied using a Doehlert experimental design with the objective of preserving its quality and safety. The marination time has significant effects on total viable and lactic acid bacteria counts, and NaCl content of the marinated fish fillet while the pH was significantly affected by citric acid concentration and marination duration with high regression coefficient R (2) of 0.83. The experiment showed that the best conditions for marination process of fish fillet were salt ratio 10 g/100 g, acid citric concentration 2.5 g/100 g, and marination time 6 h. These optimum marinating conditions obtained present the best quality of marinated flesh fish leading to the safety of the final fermented product. This pretreatment is necessary in Lanhouin production processes to ensure its safety quality. PMID:27004115

  3. Hydrolysis of triacetin catalyzed by immobilized lipases: effect of the immobilization protocol and experimental conditions on diacetin yield.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Karel; Garcia-Verdugo, Eduardo; Porcar, Raul; Fernandez-Lafuente, Roberto

    2011-05-01

    The effect of the immobilization protocol and some experimental conditions (pH value and presence of acetonitrile) on the regioselective hydrolysis of triacetin to diacetin catalyzed by lipases has been studied. Lipase B from Candida antarctica (CALB) and lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (RML) were immobilized on Sepabeads (commercial available macroporous acrylic supports) activated with glutaraldehyde (covalent immobilization) or octadecyl groups (adsorption via interfacial activation). All the biocatalysts accumulated diacetin. Covalently immobilized RML was more active towards rac-methyl mandelate than the adsorbed RML. However, this covalent RML preparation presented the lowest activity towards triacetin. For this reason, this preparation was discarded as biocatalyst for this reaction. At pH 7, acyl migration occurred giving a mixture of 1,2 and 1,3 diacetin, but at pH 5.5, only 1,2 diacetin was produced. Yields were improved at acidic pH values and in the presence of 20% acetonitrile (to over 95%). RML immobilized on octadecyl Sepabeads was proposed as optimal preparation, mainly due to its higher specific activity. Each enzyme preparation presented very different properties. Moreover, changes in the reaction conditions affected the various immobilized enzymes in a different way.

  4. Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the dynamics of multiple bubble merger during pool boiling under microgravity conditions.

    PubMed

    Abarajith, H S; Dhir, V K; Warrier, G; Son, G

    2004-11-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental validation of the growth and departure of multiple merging bubbles and associated heat transfer on a horizontal heated surface during pool boiling under variable gravity conditions have been performed. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing mass, momentum, and energy in the vapor liquid phases. The vapor-liquid interface is captured by a level set method that is modified to include the influence of phase change at the liquid-vapor interface. Water is used as test liquid. The effects of reduced gravity condition and orientation of the bubbles on the bubble diameter, interfacial structure, bubble merger time, and departure time, as well as local heat fluxes, are studied. In the experiments, multiple vapor bubbles are produced on artificial cavities in the 2-10 micrometer diameter range, microfabricated on the polished silicon wafer with given spacing. The wafer was heated electrically from the back with miniature strain gage type heating elements in order to control the nucleation superheat. The experiments conducted in normal Earth gravity and in the low gravity environment of KC-135 aircraft are used to validate the numerical simulations.

  5. Frost characteristics and heat transfer on a flat plate under freezer operating conditions: Part 1, Experimentation and correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Y.; Besant, R.W.; Chen, H.

    1999-07-01

    An experimental investigation of frost growth on a flat, cold surface supplied by subfreezing, turbulent, humid, parallel flow of air is presented. The operating conditions are typical of many commercial freezers. A test loop was constructed to perform the tests, and the frost height, frost mass concentration, and cold surface heat flux were measured using specially designed and calibrated instrumentation. Twenty tests were done for steady operating conditions, each starting with no initial frost accumulation, and were run for two to six hours giving 480 data samples. Measured results show that the frost characteristics differ significantly with frost growth data taken previously for room temperature airflow. Depending on the temperature of the cold plate and the relative humidity of the subfreezing supply air, the frost could appear to be either smooth or rough. Smooth frost, which occurred at warmer plate temperatures and lower supply air relative humidities, gave rise to frost growth that was much thinner and denser than that for the rough, thick, low-density frost. Frost growth characteristics are correlated as a function of five independent variables (time, distance from the leading edge, cold plate temperature ratio, humidity ratio, and Reynolds number). These correlations are presented separately for the full data set, the rough frost data, and the smooth frost data.

  6. [Abdominal cure procedures. Adequate use of Nobecutan Spray].

    PubMed

    López Soto, Rosa María

    2009-12-01

    Open abdominal wounds, complicated by infection and/or risk of eventration tend to become chronic and usually require frequent prolonged cure. Habitual changing of bandages develop into one of the clearest risk factors leading to the deterioration of perilesional cutaneous integrity. This brings with it new complications which draw out the evolution of the process, provoking an important deterioration in quality of life for the person who suffers this and a considerable increase in health costs. What is needed is a product and a procedure which control the risk of irritation, which protect the skin, which favor a patient's comfort and which shorten treatment requirements while lowering health care expenses. This report invites medical personnel to think seriously about the scientific rationale, and treatment practice, as to why and how to apply Nobecutan adequately, this reports concludes stating the benefits in the adequate use of this product. The objective of this report is to guarantee the adequate use of this product in treatment of complicated abdominal wounds. This product responds to the needs which are present in these clinical cases favoring skin care apt isolation and protection, while at the same time, facilitating the placement and stability of dressings and bandages used to cure wounds. In order for this to happen, the correct use of this product is essential; medical personnel must pay attention to precautions and recommendations for proper application. The author's experiences in habitual handling of this product during various years, included in the procedures for standardized cures for these wounds, corroborates its usefulness; the author considers use of this product to be highly effective while being simple to apply; furthermore, one succeeds in providing quality care and optimizes resources employed.

  7. How do foragers decide when to leave a patch? A test of alternative models under natural and experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Harry H; Carter, Alecia J; Ashford, Alexandra; Rowcliffe, J Marcus; Cowlishaw, Guy

    2013-07-01

    A forager's optimal patch-departure time can be predicted by the prescient marginal value theorem (pMVT), which assumes they have perfect knowledge of the environment, or by approaches such as Bayesian updating and learning rules, which avoid this assumption by allowing foragers to use recent experiences to inform their decisions. In understanding and predicting broader scale ecological patterns, individual-level mechanisms, such as patch-departure decisions, need to be fully elucidated. Unfortunately, there are few empirical studies that compare the performance of patch-departure models that assume perfect knowledge with those that do not, resulting in a limited understanding of how foragers decide when to leave a patch. We tested the patch-departure rules predicted by fixed rule, pMVT, Bayesian updating and learning models against one another, using patch residency times (PRTs) recorded from 54 chacma baboons (Papio ursinus) across two groups in natural (n = 6175 patch visits) and field experimental (n = 8569) conditions. We found greater support in the experiment for the model based on Bayesian updating rules, but greater support for the model based on the pMVT in natural foraging conditions. This suggests that foragers may place more importance on recent experiences in predictable environments, like our experiment, where these experiences provide more reliable information about future opportunities. Furthermore, the effect of a single recent foraging experience on PRTs was uniformly weak across both conditions. This suggests that foragers' perception of their environment may incorporate many previous experiences, thus approximating the perfect knowledge assumed by the pMVT. Foragers may, therefore, optimize their patch-departure decisions in line with the pMVT through the adoption of rules similar to those predicted by Bayesian updating.

  8. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  9. Reference point indentation is insufficient for detecting alterations in traditional mechanical properties of bone under common experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Krege, John B; Aref, Mohammad W; McNerny, Erin; Wallace, Joseph M; Organ, Jason M; Allen, Matthew R

    2016-06-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) was developed as a novel method to assess mechanical properties of bone in vivo, yet it remains unclear what aspects of bone dictate changes/differences in RPI-based parameters. The main RPI parameter, indentation distance increase (IDI), has been proposed to be inversely related to the ability of bone to form/tolerate damage. The goal of this work was to explore the relationshipre-intervention RPI measurebetween RPI parameters and traditional mechanical properties under varying experimental conditions (drying and ashing bones to increase brittleness, demineralizing bones and soaking in raloxifene to decrease brittleness). Beams were machined from cadaveric bone, pre-tested with RPI, subjected to experimental manipulation, post-tested with RPI, and then subjected to four-point bending to failure. Drying and ashing significantly reduced RPI's IDI, as well as ultimate load (UL), and energy absorption measured from bending tests. Demineralization increased IDI with minimal change to bending properties. Ex vivo soaking in raloxifene had no effect on IDI but tended to enhance post-yield behavior at the structural level. These data challenge the paradigm of an inverse relationship between IDI and bone toughness, both through correlation analyses and in the individual experiments where divergent patterns of altered IDI and mechanical properties were noted. Based on these results, we conclude that RPI measurements alone, as compared to bending tests, are insufficient to reach conclusions regarding mechanical properties of bone. This proves problematic for the potential clinical use of RPI measurements in determining fracture risk for a single patient, as it is not currently clear that there is an IDI, or even a trend of IDI, that can determine clinically relevant changes in tissue properties that may contribute to whole bone fracture resistance. PMID:27072518

  10. Experimental constraints on the differentiation process and pre-eruptive conditions in the magmatic system of Phlegraean Fields (Naples, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrizio, Alessandro; Carroll, Michael R.

    2008-03-01

    Phase relations of two samples of the Breccia Museo Eruption (BME), BME is an explosive event that took place (about 20 ky ago) during the caldera-forming phase of the Ignimbrite Campana eruption, have been determined experimentally as a function of temperature (700 to 885 °C), pressure (50 to 200 MPa) and water content of the melt. The crystallization experiments were carried out at fO 2 = NNO + 1 log unit. Melt water content ranged from 3.4 to 8 wt.% (H 2O saturation). The synthetic products are compared to the natural phases to constrain the pre-eruptive conditions of trachytic magma in the presence of an H 2O-rich fluid. The major phases occurring in the BME have been reproduced. The stability of biotite is favoured at pressures higher than 135 MPa. Phase equilibria at 200 MPa reproduce the phase assemblage of the magma only at temperatures below 775 °C. Phase abundances and melt fractions indicate that the eruption tapped a magma body that was at a temperature of 780 °C and a pressure in the range 200-140 MPa. The observed major element variations are fully consistent with a fractional crystallization of a sanidine-dominated assemblage starting from the least differentiated trachytes. The compositions of the experimental products are compatible with the progressive tapping of a shallow magma chamber that was chemically zoned. These results suggest that after an early eruptive phase during which the upper, most differentiated level of the magma chamber was tapped, the sudden collapse of the roof of the reservoir triggered drainage of the less evolved remaining magma.

  11. Complex response in size-related traits of bulb mites (Rhizoglyphus robini) under elevated thermal conditions - an experimental evolution approach.

    PubMed

    Plesnar-Bielak, Agata; Jawor, Anna; Kramarz, Paulina E

    2013-12-15

    Temperature is a key environmental factor affecting almost all aspects of life history in ectotherms. Theory predicts that they grow faster, reach smaller sizes and produce smaller offspring when temperature increases. In addition, temperature changes, through their effects on metabolism, may also influence the expression of alternative reproductive phenotypes (ARPs) in ectotherms. Although many studies have investigated the phenotypic plasticity of life history traits in relation to temperature change, little is known about how those traits and phenotypic plasticity may evolve together. In our study we subjected bulb mites (non-model, soil organisms that normally experience rather stable thermal conditions) to experimental evolution in two temperature treatments: control (24°C) and elevated (28°C). After 18 generations, we measured adult body size, egg size and development time of both treatments at control as well as at elevated temperatures (test temperatures). Thus, we were able to detect genetic changes (the effects of selection temperature) and environmental effects (the effects of test temperature). We also observed the ARP expression throughout the experimental evolution. Our results revealed quite complex patterns of life history in traits response to temperature. Mites developed faster and reached smaller sizes at increased temperature, but evolutionary responses to increased temperature were not always parallel to the observed phenotypic plasticity. Additionally, despite smaller body sizes, females laid larger eggs at higher temperature. This effect was more pronounced in animals evolving at elevated temperature. Evolution at increased temperature also affected ARP expression, with the proportion of armored fighters decreasing from generation to generation. We propose that this could be the consequence of temperature sensitivity of the cost-to-benefits ratio of expressing ARPs.

  12. Development of an Experimental Data Base to Validate Compressor-Face Boundary Conditions Used in Unsteady Inlet Flow Computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sajben, Miklos; Freund, Donald D.

    1998-01-01

    The ability to predict the dynamics of integrated inlet/compressor systems is an important part of designing high-speed propulsion systems. The boundaries of the performance envelope are often defined by undesirable transient phenomena in the inlet (unstart, buzz, etc.) in response to disturbances originated either in the engine or in the atmosphere. Stability margins used to compensate for the inability to accurately predict such processes lead to weight and performance penalties, which translate into a reduction in vehicle range. The prediction of transients in an inlet/compressor system requires either the coupling of two complex, unsteady codes (one for the inlet and one for the engine) or else a reliable characterization of the inlet/compressor interface, by specifying a boundary condition. In the context of engineering development programs, only the second option is viable economically. Computations of unsteady inlet flows invariably rely on simple compressor-face boundary conditions (CFBC's). Currently, customary conditions include choked flow, constant static pressure, constant axial velocity, constant Mach number or constant mass flow per unit area. These conditions are straightforward extensions of practices that are valid for and work well with steady inlet flows. Unfortunately, it is not at all likely that any flow property would stay constant during a complex system transient. At the start of this effort, no experimental observation existed that could be used to formulate of verify any of the CFBC'S. This lack of hard information represented a risk for a development program that has been recognized to be unacceptably large. The goal of the present effort was to generate such data. Disturbances reaching the compressor face in flight may have complex spatial structures and temporal histories. Small amplitude disturbances may be decomposed into acoustic, vorticity and entropy contributions that are uncoupled if the undisturbed flow is uniform. This study

  13. Speciation of High-Pressure Carbon-Saturated COH Fluids at Buffered fO2 Conditions: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumiati, S.; Tiraboschi, C.; Recchia, S.; Poli, S.

    2014-12-01

    The quantitative assessment of species in COH fluids is crucial in modelling mantle processes. For instance, H2O/CO2 ratio in the fluid phase influences the location of the solidus and of carbonation/decarbonation reactions in peridotitic systems . In the scientific literature, the speciation of COH fluids has been generally assumed on the basis of thermodynamic calculations using equations of state of simple H2O-non-polar gas systems (e.g., H2O-CO2-CH4). Only few authors dealt with the experimental determination of high-pressure COH fluid species at different conditions, using diverse experimental and analytical approaches (e.g., piston cylinder+capsule-piercing+gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry; cold-seal+silica glass capsules+Raman). We performed experiments on COH fluids using a capsule-piercing device coupled with a quadrupole mass spectrometry. This type of analyzer ensures superior performances in terms of selectivity of molecules to be detected, high acquisition rates and extended linear response range. Experiments were carried out in a rocking piston cylinder apparatus at pressure of 1 GPa and temperatures from 800 to 900°C. Carbon-saturated fluids were generated through the addition of oxalic acid dihydrate and graphite. Single/double capsules and different packing materials (BN and MgO) were used to evaluate the divergence from the thermodynamic speciation model. Moreover, to assess the effect of solutes on COH fluid speciation we also performed a set of experiments adding synthetic forsterite to the charge. To determine the speciation we assembled a capsule-piercing device that allows to puncture the capsule in a gas-tight vessel at 80°C. The extraction Teflon vessel is composed of a base part, where the capsule is allocated on a steel support, and a top part where a steel drill is mounted. To release the quenched fluids from the capsule, the base part of vessel is hand-tighten to the top part, allowing the steel pointer to pierce the capsule. The

  14. A commercial PCV2a-based vaccine significantly reduces PCV2b transmission in experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Rose, N; Andraud, M; Bigault, L; Jestin, A; Grasland, B

    2016-07-19

    Transmission characteristics of PCV2 have been compared between vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs in experimental conditions. Twenty-four Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) piglets, vaccinated against PCV2 at 3weeks of age (PCV2a recombinant CAP protein-based vaccine), were inoculated at 15days post-vaccination with a PCV2b inoculum (6⋅10(5) TCID50), and put in contact with 24 vaccinated SPF piglets during 42days post-inoculation. Those piglets were shared in six replicates of a contact trial involving 4 inoculated piglets mingled with 4 susceptible SPF piglets. Two replicates of a similar contact trial were made with non-vaccinated pigs. Non vaccinated animals received a placebo at vaccination time and were inoculated the same way and at the same time as the vaccinated group. All the animals were monitored twice weekly using quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA for serology until 42days post-inoculation. The frequency of infection and the PCV2 genome load in sera of the vaccinated pigs were significantly reduced compared to the non-vaccinated animals. The duration of infectiousness was significantly different between vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups (16.6days [14.7;18.4] and 26.6days [22.9;30.4] respectively). The transmission rate was also considerably decreased in vaccinated pigs (β=0.09 [0.05-0.14] compared to β=0.19 [0.11-0.32] in non-vaccinated pigs). This led to an estimated reproduction ratio of 1.5 [95% CI 0.8 - 2.2] in vaccinated animals versus 5.1 [95% CI 2.5 - 8.2] in non-vaccinated pigs when merging data of this experiment with previous trials carried out in same conditions. PMID:27318416

  15. Experimental analysis of the vorticity and turbulent flow dynamics of a pitching airfoil at realistic flight (helicopter) conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Dipankar

    Improved basic understanding, predictability, and controllability of vortex-dominated and unsteady aerodynamic flows are important in enhancement of the performance of next generation helicopters. The primary objective of this research project was improved understanding of the fundamental vorticity and turbulent flow physics for a dynamically stalling airfoil at realistic helicopter flight conditions. An experimental program was performed on a large-scale (C = 0.45 m) dynamically pitching NACA 0012 wing operating in the Texas A&M University large-scale wind tunnel. High-resolution particle image velocimetry data were acquired on the first 10-15% of the wing. Six test cases were examined including the unsteady (k>0) and steady (k=0) conditions. The relevant mechanical, shear and turbulent time-scales were all of comparable magnitude, which indicated that the flow was in a state of mechanical non-equilibrium, and the expected flow separation and reattachment hystersis was observed. Analyses of the databases provided new insights into the leading-edge Reynolds stress structure and the turbulent transport processes. Both of which were previously uncharacterized. During the upstroke motion of the wing, a bubble structure formed in the leading-edge Reynolds shear stress. The size of the bubble increased with increasing angle-of-attack before being diffused into a shear layer at full separation. The turbulent transport analyses indicated that the axial stress production was positive, where the transverse production was negative. This implied that axial turbulent stresses were being produced from the axial component of the mean flow. A significant portion of the energy was transferred to the transverse stress through the pressure-strain redistribution, and then back to the transverse mean flow through the negative transverse production. An opposite trend was observed further downstream of this region.

  16. Infiltration-soil moisture redistribution under natural conditions: experimental evidence as a guideline for realizing simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, R.; Corradini, C.; Saltalippi, C.; Flammini, A.; Rossi, E.

    2011-06-01

    The evolution in time, t, of the experimental soil moisture vertical profile under natural conditions is investigated in order to address the corresponding simulation modelling. The measurements were conducted in a plot with a bare silty loam soil. The soil water content, θ, was continuously monitored at different depths, z, using a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) system. For each profile four buriable three-rod waveguides were inserted horizontally at different depths (5, 15, 25 and 35 cm). In addition, we used sensors of air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, evaporation and rain as supports for the application of selected simulation models, as well as for the detection of elements leading to their improvement. The results indicate that, under natural conditions, very different trends of the θ(z,t) function can be observed in the given fine-textured soil, where the formation of a sealing layer over the parent soil requires an adjustment of the simulation modelling commonly used for hydrological applications. In particular, because of the considerable variations in the shape of the moisture content vertical profile as a function of time, a generalization of the existing models should incorporate a representation of the variability in time of the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the uppermost soil. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the observed shape of θ(z) can be appropriately reproduced by adopting this approach, however the observed rainfall rate and the occurrence of freeze-thaw cycles with high soil moisture contents have to be explicitly incorporated.

  17. Infiltration-soil moisture redistribution under natural conditions: experimental evidence as a guideline for realizing simulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, R.; Corradini, C.; Saltalippi, C.; Flammini, A.; Rossi, E.

    2011-09-01

    The evolution in time, t, of the experimental soil moisture vertical profile under natural conditions is investigated in order to address the corresponding simulation modelling. The measurements were conducted in a plot with a bare silty loam soil. The soil water content, θ, was continuously monitored at different depths, z, using a Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) system. Four buriable three-rod waveguides were inserted horizontally at different depths (5, 15, 25 and 35 cm). In addition, we used sensors of air temperature and relative humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, evaporation and rain as supports for the application of selected simulation models, as well as for the detection of elements leading to their improvement. The results indicate that, under natural conditions, very different trends of the θ(z, t) function can be observed in the given fine-textured soil, where the formation of a sealing layer over the parent soil requires an adjustment of the simulation modelling commonly used for hydrological applications. In particular, because of the considerable variations in the shape of the moisture content vertical profile as a function of time, a generalization of the existing models should incorporate a first approximation of the variability in time of the saturated hydraulic conductivity, K1s, of the uppermost soil. This conclusion is supported by the fact that the observed shape of θ(z, t) can be appropriately reproduced by adopting the proposed approach with K1s kept constant during each rainfall event but considered variable from event to event, however the observed rainfall rate and the occurrence of freeze-thaw cycles with high soil moisture contents have to be explicitly incorporated in a functional form for K1s(t).

  18. New generic mathematical model for WWTP sludge digesters operating under aerobic and anaerobic conditions: Model building and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    de Gracia, M; Grau, P; Huete, E; Gómez, J; García-Heras, J L; Ayesa, E

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a new mathematical model developed to reproduce the performance of a generic sludge digester working either under aerobic or anaerobic operational conditions. The digester has been modelled as two completely mixed tanks associated with gaseous and liquid volumes. The conversion model has been developed based on a plant wide modelling methodology (PWM) and comprises biochemical transformations, physicochemical reactions and thermodynamic considerations. The model predicts the reactor temperature and the temporary evolution of an extensive vector of model components which are completely defined in terms of elemental mass fractions (C, H, O, N and P) and charge density. Thus, the comprehensive definition of the model components guarantees the continuity of elemental mass and charge in all the model transformations and between any two systems defined by the model. The aim of the generic digester model is to overcome the problems that arise when trying to connect aerobic and anaerobic digestion processes working in series or to connect water and sludge lines in a WWTP. The modelling methodology used has allowed the systematic construction of the biochemical model which acts as an initial illustrative example of an application that has been experimentally verified. The variation of the temperature is also predicted based on a thermal dynamic model. Real data from four different facilities and a straightforward calibration have been used to successfully verify the model predictions in the cases of mesophilic and thermophilic anaerobic digestion as well as autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD). The large amount of data from the full scale ATAD and the anaerobic digestion pilot plants, all of them working under different conditions, has allowed the validation of the model for that case study. PMID:19720390

  19. A commercial PCV2a-based vaccine significantly reduces PCV2b transmission in experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Rose, N; Andraud, M; Bigault, L; Jestin, A; Grasland, B

    2016-07-19

    Transmission characteristics of PCV2 have been compared between vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs in experimental conditions. Twenty-four Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) piglets, vaccinated against PCV2 at 3weeks of age (PCV2a recombinant CAP protein-based vaccine), were inoculated at 15days post-vaccination with a PCV2b inoculum (6⋅10(5) TCID50), and put in contact with 24 vaccinated SPF piglets during 42days post-inoculation. Those piglets were shared in six replicates of a contact trial involving 4 inoculated piglets mingled with 4 susceptible SPF piglets. Two replicates of a similar contact trial were made with non-vaccinated pigs. Non vaccinated animals received a placebo at vaccination time and were inoculated the same way and at the same time as the vaccinated group. All the animals were monitored twice weekly using quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA for serology until 42days post-inoculation. The frequency of infection and the PCV2 genome load in sera of the vaccinated pigs were significantly reduced compared to the non-vaccinated animals. The duration of infectiousness was significantly different between vaccinated and non-vaccinated groups (16.6days [14.7;18.4] and 26.6days [22.9;30.4] respectively). The transmission rate was also considerably decreased in vaccinated pigs (β=0.09 [0.05-0.14] compared to β=0.19 [0.11-0.32] in non-vaccinated pigs). This led to an estimated reproduction ratio of 1.5 [95% CI 0.8 - 2.2] in vaccinated animals versus 5.1 [95% CI 2.5 - 8.2] in non-vaccinated pigs when merging data of this experiment with previous trials carried out in same conditions.

  20. Enrichment and analysis of phosphopeptides under different experimental conditions using titanium dioxide affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Aryal, Uma K; Ross, Andrew R S

    2010-01-01

    Titanium dioxide metal oxide affinity chromatography (TiO(2)-MOAC) is widely regarded as being more selective than immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for phosphopeptide enrichment. However, the widespread application of TiO(2)-MOAC to biological samples is hampered by conflicting reports as to which experimental conditions are optimal. We have evaluated the performance of TiO(2)-MOAC under a wide range of loading and elution conditions. Loading and stringent washing of peptides with strongly acidic solutions ensured highly selective enrichment for phosphopeptides, with minimal carryover of non-phosphorylated peptides. Contrary to previous reports, the addition of glycolic acid to the loading solution was found to reduce specificity towards phosphopeptides. Base elution in ammonium hydroxide or ammonium phosphate provided optimal specificity and recovery of phosphorylated peptides. In contrast, elution with phosphoric acid gave incomplete recovery of phosphopeptides, whereas inclusion of 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid in the eluant introduced a bias against the recovery of multiply phosphorylated peptides. TiO(2)-MOAC was also found to be intolerant of many reagents commonly used as phosphatase inhibitors during protein purification. However, TiO(2)-MOAC showed higher specificity than immobilized gallium (Ga(3+)), immobilized iron (Fe(3+)), or zirconium dioxide (ZrO(2)) affinity chromatography for phosphopeptide enrichment. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was more effective in detecting larger, multiply phosphorylated peptides than liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS/MS), which was more efficient for smaller, singly phosphorylated peptides. PMID:20014058

  1. Choices for achieving adequate dietary calcium with a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C M; Proulx, W R; Heaney, R

    1999-09-01

    To achieve adequate dietary calcium intake, several choices are available that accommodate a variety of lifestyles and tastes. Liberal consumption of dairy products in the diet is the approach of most Americans. Some plants provide absorbable calcium, but the quantity of vegetables required to reach sufficient calcium intake make an exclusively plant-based diet impractical for most individuals unless fortified foods or supplements are included. Also, dietary constituents that decrease calcium retention, such as salt, protein, and caffeine, can be high in the vegetarian diet. Although it is possible to obtain calcium balance from a plant-based diet in a Western lifestyle, it may be more convenient to achieve calcium balance by increasing calcium consumption than by limiting other dietary factors.

  2. Genetic Modification of Preimplantation Embryos: Toward Adequate Human Research Policies

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects. PMID:15016248

  3. Efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine of porcine circovirus type 2 and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (Fostera™ PCV MH) under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Jeong, Jiwoon; Choi, Kyuhyung; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new bivalent vaccine (Fostera™ PCV MH, Zoetis) of porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae in growing pigs under experimental conditions. A total of 80 pigs were randomly divided into 8 groups (10 pigs per group). The pigs were administered the bivalent vaccine intramuscularly as a 2.0 mL dose at 21 days of age based on the manufacturer's instructions. Three weeks after vaccination, the pigs were inoculated with either PCV2 (intranasal route) or M. hyopneumoniae (intratracheal route) or both. Regardless of the type of inoculation, vaccinated pigs after challenge exhibited effective reduction of clinical signs, PCV2 viremia levels and mycoplasma nasal shedding, and lung and lymphoid lesion when compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. Vaccinated challenged pigs had significantly higher (P<0.05) levels of PCV2-specific neutralizing antibodies, and numbers of PCV2-and M. hyopneumoniae-specific interferon-γ secreting cells compared to unvaccinated challenged pigs. This study demonstrates that the bivalent vaccine is able to protect pigs against either PCV2 or M. hyopneumoniae infection or both based on clinical, microbiological, immunological, and pathological evaluation. PMID:26626212

  4. Optimization of experimental conditions for composite biodiesel production from transesterification of mixed oils of Jatropha and Pongamia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogish, H.; Chandrashekara, K.; Pramod Kumar, M. R.

    2012-11-01

    India is looking at the renewable alternative sources of energy to reduce its dependence on import of crude oil. As India imports 70 % of the crude oil, the country has been greatly affected by increasing cost and uncertainty. Biodiesel fuel derived by the two step acid transesterification of mixed non-edible oils from Jatropha curcas and Pongamia (karanja) can meet the requirements of diesel fuel in the coming years. In the present study, different proportions of Methanol, Sodium hydroxide, variation of Reaction time, Sulfuric acid and Reaction Temperature were adopted in order to optimize the experimental conditions for maximum biodiesel yield. The preliminary studies revealed that biodiesel yield varied widely in the range of 75-95 % using the laboratory scale reactor. The average yield of 95 % was obtained. The fuel and chemical properties of biodiesel, namely kinematic viscosity, specific gravity, density, flash point, fire point, calorific value, pH, acid value, iodine value, sulfur content, water content, glycerin content and sulfated ash values were found to be within the limits suggested by Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS 15607: 2005). The optimum combination of Methanol, Sodium hydroxide, Sulfuric acid, Reaction Time and Reaction Temperature are established.

  5. Experimental Study on the Diet of Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) under Different Ecological Conditions in a Shallow Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Saúl; Romo, Susana; Villena, María-José

    2004-07-01

    We studied the diet of the eastern mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki with in situ experimental mesocosms located in a shallow lake. Different nutrient concentrations (phosphorus and nitrogen) and fish population densities were tested. Our results confirm that it is a planktivorous species, with also a great ingestion of algae and detritus. Nutrient fertilization caused almost no changes in this species feeding behavior, but larger mosquitofish stocks induced a shift to zooplanktivory and a decline in detritivory. When macrophytes were present, the predation effect focused on zooplankton and plant-associated animals, otherwise predation on bottom macroinvertebrates increased. Females preyed upon almost all groups more intensely, including detritus. Males and juveniles did not overlap diet, the former being more selective on ostracods, while juveniles consumed detritus, rotifers and cladoceran. Our data support the idea that mosquitofish can cause important top-down effects in shallow lakes under a wide variety of ecological conditions, being an important zooplanktivore in both turbid and plant-dominated shallow lakes especially in the Mediterranean zone, where high temperatures and absence of piscivores promote maintenance of its populations during the whole year. (

  6. Optimal detection pinhole for lowering speckle noise while maintaining adequate optical sectioning in confocal reflectance microscopes.

    PubMed

    Glazowski, Christopher; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-08-01

    Coherent speckle influences the resulting image when narrow spectral line-width and single spatial mode illumination are used, though these are the same light-source properties that provide the best radiance-to-cost ratio. However, a suitable size of the detection pinhole can be chosen to maintain adequate optical sectioning while making the probability density of the speckle noise more normal and reducing its effect. The result is a qualitatively better image with improved contrast, which is easier to read. With theoretical statistics and experimental results, we show that the detection pinhole size is a fundamental parameter for designing imaging systems for use in turbid media.

  7. Experimental Study of Abiotic Organic Synthesis at High Temperature and Pressure Conditions: Carbon Isotope and Mineral Surface Characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, P. B.

    2010-01-01

    Abiotic organic synthesis processes have been proposed as potential mechanisms for methane generation in subseafloor hydrothermal systems on Earth, and on other planets. To better understand the detailed reaction pathways and carbon isotope fractionations in this process under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions, hydrothermal experiments at high temperature (750 C) and pressure (0.55 GPa) were performed using piston cylinder apparatus. Formic acid was used as the source of CO2 and H2, and magnetite was the mineral catalyst. The chemical and carbon isotopic compositions of dissolved organic products were determined by GC-C-MS-IRMS, while organic intermediaries on the mineral catalyst were characterized by Pyrolysis-GC-MS. Among experimental products, dissolved CO2 was the dominant carbon species with a relative abundance of 88 mol%. Dissolved CH4 and C2H6 were also identified with a mole ratio of CH4 over C2H6 of 15:1. No dissolved CO was detected in the experiment, which might be attributable to the loss of H2 through the Au capsule used in the experiments at high temperature and pressure conditions and corresponding conversion of CO to CO2 by the water-gas shift reaction. Carbon isotope results showed that the 13C values of CH4 and C2H6 were -50.3% and -39.3% (V-PDB), respectively. CO2 derived from decarboxylation of formic acid had a (sigma)C-13 value of -19.2%, which was 3.2% heavier than its source, formic acid. The (sigma)C-13 difference between CO2 and CH4 was 31.1%, which was higher than the value of 9.4% calculated from theoretical isotopic equilibrium predictions at experimental conditions, suggesting the presence of a kinetic isotope effect. This number was also higher than the values (4.6 to 27.1%) observed in similar experiments previously performed at 400 C and 50 MPa with longer reaction times. CH4 is 11.0% less enriched in C-13 than C2H6. Alcohols were observed as carbon compounds on magnetite surfaces by Pyrolysis-GC-MS, which confirms

  8. Experimental Study on the pH of Pore water in Compacted Bentonite under Reducing Conditions with Electromigration

    SciTech Connect

    Nessa, S.A.; Idemitsu, K.; Yamazaki, S.; Ikeuchi, H.; Inagaki, Y.; Arima, T.

    2008-07-01

    Compacted bentonite and carbon steel are considered a good buffer and over-pack materials in the repositories of high-level radioactive waste disposal. Sodium bentonite, Kunipia-F contains approximately 95 wt% of montmorillonite. Bentonites prominent properties of high swelling, sealing ability and cation exchange capacity provide retardation against the transport of radionuclides from the waste into the surrounding rocks in the repository and its properties determine the behavior of bentonite. In this regards, the pH of pore water in compacted bentonite is measured with pH test paper wrapped with semi-permeable membrane of collodion sheet under reducing conditions. On 30 days, the pH test paper in the experimental apparatus indicated that the pH of pore water in compacted bentonite is around 8.0 at saturated state. The carbon steel coupon is connected as the working electrode to the potentiostat and is held at a constant supplied potential between +300 and -300 mV vs. Ag/AgCl electrode for up to 7 days. During applying electromigration the pH of pore water in bentonite decreased and it reached 6.0{approx}6.0 on 7 days. The concentration of iron and sodium showed nearly complementary distribution in the bentonite specimen after electromigration. It is expected that iron could migrate as ferrous ion through the interlayer of montmorillonite replacing exchangeable sodium ions in the interlayer. Semi-permeable membrane of collodion sheet does not affect the color change of pH test paper during the experiment. (authors)

  9. Use of in-vitro experimental results to model in-situ experiments: bio-denitrification under geological disposal conditions.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kaoru; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kurimoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Osamu; Kato, Ko; Honda, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Some of the low level radioactive wastes from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels contain nitrates. Nitrates can be present in the form of soluble salts and can be reduced by various reactions. Among them, reduction by metal compounds and microorganisms seems to be important in the underground repository. Reduction by microorganism is more important in near field area than inside the repository because high pH and extremely high salt concentration would prevent microorganism activities. In the near field, pH is more moderate (pH is around 8) and salt concentration is lower. However, the electron donor may be limited there and it might be the control factor for microorganism's denitrification activities. In this study, in-vitro experiments of the nitrate reduction reaction were conducted using model organic materials purported to exist in underground conditions relevant to geological disposal. Two kinds of organic materials were selected. A super plasticizer was selected as being representative of the geological disposal system and humic acid was selected as being representative of pre-existing organic materials in the bedrock. Nitrates were reduced almost to N2 gas in the existence of super plasticizer. In the case of humic acids, although nitrates were reduced, the rate was much lower and, in this case, dead organism was used as an electron donor instead of humic acids. A reaction model was developed based on the in-vitro experiments and verified by running simulations against data obtained from in-situ experiments using actual groundwaters and microorganisms. The simulation showed a good correlation with the experimental data and contributes to the understanding of microbially mediated denitrification in geological disposal systems. PMID:24010028

  10. A PCR assay used to study aerosol transmission of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from samples of live pigs under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Savoye, C; Jobert, J L; Berthelot-Hérault, F; Keribin, A M; Cariolet, R; Morvan, H; Madec, F; Kobisch, M

    2000-05-11

    The study describes a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the detection of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. The test is based on the amplification of the omlA gene coding for an outer membrane protein of A. pleuropneumoniae. To test the specificity of the reaction, 19 other bacterial species related to A. pleuropneumoniae or isolated from pigs were assayed. They were all found negative in the PCR assay. The detection threshold of the test was 10(2) A. pleuropneumoniae CFU/assay. The test was then applied to the detection of A. pleuropneumoniae from tonsillar biopsies and tracheobronchial lavage fluids of pigs without a culture step. The detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in these samples was performed by PCR, by conventional culture and by bacteriology with immunomagnetic beads. The number of samples that were found positive by PCR was almost three times higher than the number of samples from which A. pleuropneumoniae was isolated by both bacteriological techniques. The detection of A. pleuropneumoniae in these samples allowed us to demonstrate its aerosol transmission to pigs under experimental conditions. The trial involved 18 specific pathogen free pigs. Six pigs, infected with A. pleuropneumoniae, were located in a unit A, together with four non-infected animals (contact pigs). Eight non-infected pigs (reporter pigs) were located in a unit B, adjacent to A. We detected A. pleuropneumoniae in samples from infected animals but also from 'contact' (unit A) and 'reporter' (unit B) pigs. The results of this study show that the simple preparation of the samples followed by the PCR assay may be a useful tool for epidemiological studies. PMID:10781732

  11. Experimental Results of the First Two Stages of an Advanced Transonic Core Compressor Under Isolated and Multi-Stage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Patricia S.; Kulkarni, Sameer; Sohn, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Program calls for investigation of the technology barriers associated with improved fuel efficiency of large gas turbine engines. Under ERA the task for a High Pressure Ratio Core Technology program calls for a higher overall pressure ratio of 60 to 70. This mean that the HPC would have to almost double in pressure ratio and keep its high level of efficiency. The challenge is how to match the corrected mass flow rate of the front two supersonic high reaction and high corrected tip speed stages with a total pressure ratio of 3.5. NASA and GE teamed to address this challenge by using the initial geometry of an advanced GE compressor design to meet the requirements of the first 2 stages of the very high pressure ratio core compressor. The rig was configured to run as a 2 stage machine, with Strut and IGV, Rotor 1 and Stator 1 run as independent tests which were then followed by adding the second stage. The goal is to fully understand the stage performances under isolated and multi-stage conditions and fully understand any differences and provide a detailed aerodynamic data set for CFD validation. Full use was made of steady and unsteady measurement methods to isolate fluid dynamics loss source mechanisms due to interaction and endwalls. The paper will present the description of the compressor test article, its predicted performance and operability, and the experimental results for both the single stage and two stage configurations. We focus the detailed measurements on 97 and 100 of design speed at 3 vane setting angles.

  12. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  13. DARHT - an `adequate` EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides a case study that is interesting for many reasons. The EIS was prepared quickly, in the face of a lawsuit, for a project with unforeseen environmental impacts, for a facility that was deemed urgently essential to national security. Following judicial review the EIS was deemed to be {open_quotes}adequate.{close_quotes} DARHT is a facility now being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. DARHT will be used to evaluate the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons, evaluate conventional munitions and study high-velocity impact phenomena. DARHT will be equipped with two accelerator-driven, high-intensity X-ray machines to record images of materials driven by high explosives. DARHT will be used for a variety of hydrodynamic tests, and DOE plans to conduct some dynamic experiments using plutonium at DARHT as well.

  14. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  15. Quantifying variability within water samples: the need for adequate subsampling.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Ian; Irvine, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and precise determination of the concentration of nutrients and other substances in waterbodies is an essential requirement for supporting effective management and legislation. Owing primarily to logistic and financial constraints, however, national and regional agencies responsible for monitoring surface waters tend to quantify chemical indicators of water quality using a single sample from each waterbody, thus largely ignoring spatial variability. We show here that total sample variability, which comprises both analytical variability and within-sample heterogeneity, of a number of important chemical indicators of water quality (chlorophyll a, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, soluble molybdate-reactive phosphorus and dissolved inorganic nitrogen) varies significantly both over time and among determinands, and can be extremely high. Within-sample heterogeneity, whose mean contribution to total sample variability ranged between 62% and 100%, was significantly higher in samples taken from rivers compared with those from lakes, and was shown to be reduced by filtration. Our results show clearly that neither a single sample, nor even two sub-samples from that sample is adequate for the reliable, and statistically robust, detection of changes in the quality of surface waters. We recommend strongly that, in situations where it is practicable to take only a single sample from a waterbody, a minimum of three sub-samples are analysed from that sample for robust quantification of both the concentrations of determinands and total sample variability. PMID:17706740

  16. Healing of periodontal defects treated with enamel matrix proteins and root surface conditioning--an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sakallioğlu, Umur; Açikgöz, Gökhan; Ayas, Bülent; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul; Sakallioğlu, Eser

    2004-05-01

    Application of enamel matrix proteins has been introduced as an alternative method for periodontal regenerative therapy. It is claimed that this approach provides periodontal regeneration by a biological approach, i.e. creating a matrix on the root surfaces that promotes cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone regeneration, thus mimicking the events occurring during tooth development. Although there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating periodontal regeneration, acellular cementum formation and clinical outcomes via enamel matrix proteins usage, their effects on the healing pattern of soft and hard periodontal tissues are not well-established and compared with root conditioning alone. In the present study, the effects of Emdogain (Biora, Malmö, Sweden), an enamel matrix derivative mainly composed of enamel matrix proteins (test), on periodontal wound healing were evaluated and compared with root surface conditioning (performed with 36% orthophosphoric acid) alone (control) histopathologically and histomorphometrically by means of the soft and hard tissue profile of periodontium. An experimental periodontitis model performed at premolar teeth of four dogs were used in the study and the healing pattern of periodontal tissues was evaluated at days 7, 14, 21, 28 (one dog at each day), respectively. At day 7, soft tissue attachment evaluated by means of connective tissue and/or epithelial attachment to the root surfaces revealed higher connective tissue attachment rate in the test group and the amount of new connective tissue proliferation in the test group was significantly greater than the control group (p<0.01). New bone formation by osteoconduction initiated at day 14 in the test and control group. At day 21, the orientation of supra-alveolar and PDL fibers established, and new cementum formation observed in both groups. At day 28, although regenerated cementum was cellular in all of the roots in the control samples, an

  17. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  18. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment.

  19. Are women with psychosis receiving adequate cervical cancer screening?

    PubMed Central

    Tilbrook, Devon; Polsky, Jane; Lofters, Aisha

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate the rates of cervical cancer screening among female patients with psychosis compared with similar patients without psychosis, as an indicator of the quality of primary preventive health care. DESIGN A retrospective cohort study using medical records between November 1, 2004, and November 1, 2007. SETTING Two urban family medicine clinics associated with an academic hospital in Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of female patients with and without psychosis between the ages of 20 and 69 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of Papanicolaou tests in a 3-year period. RESULTS Charts for 51 female patients with psychosis and 118 female patients without psychosis were reviewed. Of those women with psychosis, 62.7% were diagnosed with schizophrenia, 19.6% with bipolar disorder, 17.6% with schizoaffective disorder, and 29.4% with other psychotic disorders. Women in both groups were similar in age, rate of comorbidities, and number of full physical examinations. Women with psychosis were significantly more likely to smoke (P < .0001), to have more primary care appointments (P = .035), and to miss appointments (P = .0002) than women without psychosis. After adjustment for age, other psychiatric illnesses, number of physical examinations, number of missed appointments, and having a gynecologist, women with psychosis were significantly less likely to have had a Pap test in the previous 3 years compared with women without psychosis (47.1% vs 73.7%, respectively; odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.06 to 0.58). CONCLUSION Women with psychosis are more than 5 times less likely to receive adequate Pap screening compared with the general population despite their increased rates of smoking and increased number of primary care visits. PMID:20393098

  20. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  1. Experimental determination of trace element mobility in UK North Sea sandstones under conditions of geological CO2 storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carruthers, Kit; Wilkinson, Mark; Butler, Ian B.

    2016-04-01

    . (1979) and Wigley et al. (2013), to suit the North Sea sandstones used previously in the batch experiments. The extraction method targeted water soluble elements, elements leached through desorption from mineral surfaces, and elements released through the dissolution of carbonates, oxides, sulphides and silicates. From this experimental technique, trace element concentrations were classed as 'mobile' or 'immobile' under weak acid conditions of CO2 storage. The majority of elements were classified as largely immobile. Using the batch experiment results we determined that dissolution of carbonate and feldspar minerals was responsible for much of the observed mobilised concentrations, although the abundance of these minerals was not a predictor for absolute or relative concentrations. References: Tessier, A., Campbell, P. G. C., & Bisson, M. (1979). Sequential Extraction Procedure for the Speciation of Particulate Trace Metals. Analytical Chemistry, 51(7), 844-851. Wigley, M., Kampman, N., Chapman, H. J., Dubacq, B., & Bickle, M. J. (2013). In situ redeposition of trace metals mobilized by CO2-charged brines. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems, 14(5), 1321-1332. doi:10.1002/ggge.20104

  2. Experimental Control of Nodality via Equal Presentations of Conditional Discriminations in Different Equivalence Protocols under Speed and No-Speed Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imam, Abdulrazaq A.

    2006-01-01

    A within-participant comparison of simple-to-complex, complex-to-simple, and simultaneous protocols was conducted establishing different sets of three 7-member equivalence classes for 4 undergraduate students. The protocols were implemented under either accuracy-only or accuracy-plus-speed conditions while keeping number of presentations of…

  3. Experimental results from containment piping bellows subjected to severe accident conditions. Volume 1, Results from bellows tested in `like-new` conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, L.D.; Parks, M.B.

    1994-09-01

    Bellows are an integral part of the containment pressure boundary in nuclear power plants. They are used at piping penetrations to allow relative movement between piping and the containment wall, while minimizing the load imposed on the piping and wall. Piping bellows are primarily used in steel containments; however, they have received limited use in some concrete (reinforced and prestressed) containments. In a severe accident they may be subjected to pressure and temperature conditions that exceed the design values, along with a combination of axial and lateral deflections. A test program to determine the leak-tight capacity of containment penetration bellows is being conducted under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission at Sandia National Laboratories. Several different bellows geometries, representative of actual containment bellows, have been subjected to extreme deflections along with pressure and temperature loads. The bellows geometries and loading conditions are described along with the testing apparatus and procedures. A total of thirteen bellows have been tested, all in the `like-new` condition. (Additional tests are planned of bellows that have been subjected to corrosion.) The tests showed that bellows are capable of withstanding relatively large deformations, up to, or near, the point of full compression or elongation, before developing leakage. The test data is presented and discussed.

  4. Adequate iron stores and the 'Nil nocere' principle.

    PubMed

    Hollán, S; Johansen, K S

    1993-01-01

    There is a need to change the policy of unselective iron supplementation during periods of life with physiologically increased cell proliferation. Levels of iron stores to be regarded as adequate during infancy and pregnancy are still not well established. Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron absorption, utilization and storage. Recent data suggest that the chelatable intracellular iron pool regulates the expression of proteins with central importance in cellular iron metabolism (TfR, ferritin, and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic synthetase) in a coordinately controlled way through an iron dependent cytosolic mRNA binding protein, the iron regulating factor (IRF). This factor is simultaneously a sensor and a regulator of iron levels. The reduction of ferritin levels during highly increased cell proliferation is a mirror of the increased density of TfRs. An abundance of data support the vigorous competition for growth-essential iron between microbial pathogens and their vertebrate hosts. The highly coordinated regulation of iron metabolism is probably crucial in achieving a balance between the blockade of readily accessible iron to invading organisms and yet providing sufficient iron for the immune system of the host. The most evident adverse clinical effects of excess iron have been observed in immunodeficient patients in tropical countries and in AIDS patients. Excess iron also increases the risk of initiation and promotion of malignant processes by iron binding to DNA and by the iron-catalysed release of free radicals. Oxygen radicals were shown to damage critical biomolecules leading, apart from cancer, to a variety of human disease states, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. They are also involved in processes of aging and thrombosis. Recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of iron

  5. An experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system over the Yellow River basin - Part 1: Understanding the role of initial hydrological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Ma, Feng; Wang, Linying; Zheng, Ziyan; Ma, Zhuguo; Ye, Aizhong; Peng, Shaoming

    2016-06-01

    The hydrological cycle over the Yellow River has been altered by the climate change and human interventions greatly during past decades, with a decadal drying trend mixed with a large variation of seasonal hydrological extremes. To provide support for the adaptation to a changing environment, an experimental seasonal hydrological forecasting system is established over the Yellow River basin. The system draws from a legacy of a global hydrological forecasting system that is able to make use of real-time seasonal climate predictions from North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) climate models through a statistical downscaling approach but with a higher resolution and a spatially disaggregated calibration procedure that is based on a newly compiled hydrological observation dataset with 5 decades of naturalized streamflow at 12 mainstream gauges and a newly released meteorological observation dataset including 324 meteorological stations over the Yellow River basin. While the evaluation of the NMME-based seasonal hydrological forecasting will be presented in a companion paper to explore the added values from climate forecast models, this paper investigates the role of initial hydrological conditions (ICs) by carrying out 6-month Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) and reverse ESP-type simulations for each calendar month during 1982-2010 with the hydrological models in the forecasting system, i.e., a large-scale land surface hydrological model and a global routing model that is regionalized over the Yellow River. In terms of streamflow predictability, the ICs outweigh the meteorological forcings up to 2-5 months during the cold and dry seasons, but the latter prevails over the former in the predictability after the first month during the warm and wet seasons. For the streamflow forecasts initialized at the end of the rainy season, the influence of ICs for lower reaches of the Yellow River can be 5 months longer than that for the upper reaches, while such a difference

  6. Experimental Investigation of an Integrated Strut-Rocket/Scramjet Operating at Mach 4.0 and 6.5 Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawk, Clark; Nelson, Karl

    1998-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to investigate RBCC performance at ramjet and scramjet conditions. The hardware consisted of a linear strut-rocket manufactured by Aerojet and a dual-mods scramjet combustor. The hardware was tested at NASA Langley Research Center in the Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility at Mach 4.0 and 6.5 simulated flight conditions.

  7. Open burning of household waste: Effect of experimental condition on combustion quality and emission of PCDD, PCDF and PCB

    EPA Science Inventory

    Open burning for waste disposal is, in many countries, the dominant source of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins/dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCDD/PCDF/PCB) release to the environment. To generate emission factors for open burning, experimental pile burns of ca 100 k...

  8. The incubation theory of fear/anxiety: experimental investigation in a human laboratory model of Pavlovian conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sandin, B; Chorot, P

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this work was to test Eysenck's incubation theory of fear/anxiety in human Pavlovian B conditioning of heart rate (HR) responses. The conditioned stimuli (CSs) were phobia-relevant slides (snakes and spiders) and the unconditioned stimuli (UCSs) were aversive noises. The subjects were presented with two levels of noise intensity during acquisition and three levels of nonreinforced CS presentation (CS-only) in a delay differential (CS+/CS-) conditioning paradigm (2 x 3 x 2). Consistent with the incubation theory, conditioned HR acceleratory responses were sustained (resistance to extinction) for high-noise intensity and short-presentations of CS-only subjects. During the extinction phase, HR acceleratory responses quickly extinguished in low-noise intensity groups after the first presentations of CS-only. These findings were interpreted as support for the incubation theory of phobic fear.

  9. Advanced pancreatic cancer - how to choose an adequate treatment option

    PubMed Central

    Korkeila, Eija A

    2015-01-01

    The prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is poor, making it one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. The 5-year overall survival rate remains below 5% and little progress is made during the past decade. Only about 10%-20% of patients are eligible for curative-intent surgery and the majority end up having recurring disease even after radical surgery and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy. Chemotherapy in metastatic disease is palliative at best, aiming at disease and symptom control and prolongation of life. Treatment always causes side effects, the degree of which varies from patient to patient, depending on the patient’s general condition, concomitant morbidities as well as on the chosen treatment modality. Why is pancreatic cancer so resistant to treatment? How to best help the patient to reach the set treatment goals? PMID:26478662

  10. Biaxial tension of fibrous tissue: using finite element methods to address experimental challenges arising from boundary conditions and anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Nathan T; Cortes, Daniel H; Vresilovic, Edward J; Elliott, Dawn M

    2013-02-01

    Planar biaxial tension remains a critical loading modality for fibrous soft tissue and is widely used to characterize tissue mechanical response, evaluate treatments, develop constitutive formulas, and obtain material properties for use in finite element studies. Although the application of tension on all edges of the test specimen represents the in situ environment, there remains a need to address the interpretation of experimental results. Unlike uniaxial tension, in biaxial tension the applied forces at the loading clamps do not transmit fully to the region of interest (ROI), which may lead to improper material characterization if not accounted for. In this study, we reviewed the tensile biaxial literature over the last ten years, noting experimental and analysis challenges. In response to these challenges, we used finite element simulations to quantify load transmission from the clamps to the ROI in biaxial tension and to formulate a correction factor that can be used to determine ROI stresses. Additionally, the impact of sample geometry, material anisotropy, and tissue orientation on the correction factor were determined. Large stress concentrations were evident in both square and cruciform geometries and for all levels of anisotropy. In general, stress concentrations were greater for the square geometry than the cruciform geometry. For both square and cruciform geometries, materials with fibers aligned parallel to the loading axes reduced stress concentrations compared to the isotropic tissue, resulting in more of the applied load being transferred to the ROI. In contrast, fiber-reinforced specimens oriented such that the fibers aligned at an angle to the loading axes produced very large stress concentrations across the clamps and shielding in the ROI. A correction factor technique was introduced that can be used to calculate the stresses in the ROI from the measured experimental loads at the clamps. Application of a correction factor to experimental biaxial

  11. Do we teach earth science in situ adequately?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakhmenkulova, I.; Zhitov, E.; Zhitova, L.

    2006-12-01

    The Russian education system for future earth scientists inherited many good features from ex-Soviet times. Some schools even have unique conditions for teaching earth sciences, both in general, and in situ. For example, at the Department of Geology and Geophysics (DGG) of Novosibirsk State University (NSU) students apart from traditional academic geoscience field excursions are supposed to participate in real scientific expeditions, and the materials they get as the result are actually the basis of their course papers, diploma thesis, and PhD thesis. This is possible because Novosibirsk State University works in close connection with scientific institutions (the Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, the Institute of Oil and Gas Geophysics and others), and most instructors, professors and lecturers are from these institutions. There are five traditional field trips for DGG students of NSU: 1. Geology field trip at the Altay mountain region, a place of unique geological conditions and beautiful nature. 2. Geodesy field work in Academgorodok ( 30km from Novosibirsk). 3. Field trip in structural geology in Khakassia (Shira, the southern part of the Krasnoyarsk region, Siberia) (NSU has its own field camp there). 4. Geophysics field work in Burmistrovo (NSU has its own field camp there). 5. Mineralogy field trip in Tuva (Siberia). Besides the above mentioned field trips (being the academic part DGG education) each student is supposed to participate in at least one real scientific field trip for BsD, in two trips for MsD and much more for PhD. These field trips are chosen by students and the geography of these trips covers Siberia, Far East, Kamchatka, Sahkalin, and even foreign countries (Mongolia, China, etc). The students pay neither for their academic education, not for their later field trips; on the contrary, they get money for their work in real scientific field trips. However, there are many problems the Russian education system and universities face these days

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation on compressor cascade flows with tip clearance at a low Reynolds number condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Hiromasa; Taniguchi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazunari; Funazaki, Ken-Ichi; Kato, Dai; Pallot, Guillaume

    2011-12-01

    High flow rate aeroengines typically employ axial flow compressors, where aerodynamic loss is predominantly due to secondary flow features such as tip leakage and corner vortices. In very high altitude missions, turbomachinery operates at low density ambient atmosphere, and the recent trend toward more compact engine core inevitably leads to the reduction of blade size, which in turn increases the relative height of the blade tip clearance. Low Reynolds number flowfield as a result of these two factors amplifies the relative importance of secondary flow effects. This paper focuses on the behavior of tip leakage flow, investigating by use of both experimental and numerical approaches. In order to understand the complex secondary flow behavior, cascade tests are usually conducted using intrusive probes to determine the loss. However relatively few experimental studies are published on tip leakage flows which take into account the interaction between a rotating blade row and its casing wall. Hence a new linear cascade facility has been designed with a moving belt casing in order to reproduce more realistic flowfield as encountered by a rotating compressor row. Numerical simulations were also performed to aid in the understanding of the complex flow features. The experimental results indicate a significant difference in the flowfield when the moving belt casing is present. The numerical simulations reveal that the leakage vortex is pulled by the shearing motion of the endwall toward the pressure side of the adjacent blade. The results highlight the importance of casing wall relative motion in analyzing leakage flow effects.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of Inlet Distortion on an Ejector Powered Hybrid Wing Body at Take-off and Landing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Melissa B.; Shea, Patrick R.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Schuh, Michael; James, Kevin D.; Sexton, Matthew R.; Tompkins, Daniel M.; Beyar, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aircraft project, an ultra high bypass ratio engine integration on a hybrid wing body demonstration was planned. The goal was to include engine and airframe integration concepts that reduced fuel consumption by at least 50% while still reducing noise 42 db cumulative on the ground. Since the engines would be mounted on the upper surface of the aft body of the aircraft, the inlets may be susceptible to vortex ingestion from the wing leading edge at high angles of attack and sideslip, and separated wing/body flow. Consequently, experimental and computational studies were conducted to collect flow surveys useful for characterizing engine operability. The wind tunnel tests were conducted at two NASA facilities, the 14- by 22-foot at NASA Langley and the 40- by 80-foot at NASA Ames Research Center. The test results included in this paper show that the distortion and pressure recovery levels were acceptable for engine operability. The CFD studies conducted to compare to experimental data showed excellent agreement for the angle of attacks examined, although failed to match the low speed experimental data at high sideslip angles.

  14. Interoceptive fear conditioning as a learning model of panic disorder: an experimental evaluation using 20% CO(2)-enriched air in a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Acheson, Dean T; Forsyth, John P; Prenoveau, Jason M; Bouton, Mark E

    2007-10-01

    Despite the role afforded interoceptive fear conditioning in etiologic accounts of panic disorder, there are no good experimental demonstrations of such learning in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the interoceptive conditioning account using 20% carbon dioxide (CO(2))-enriched air as an interoceptive conditioned stimulus (CS) (i.e., physiologically inert 5-s exposures) and unconditioned stimulus (US) (i.e., physiologically prepotent 15-s exposures). Healthy participants (N=42) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a CS-only, contingent CS-US pairings, or unpaired/non-contingent CS and US presentations. Electrodermal and self-report (e.g., distress, fear) served as indices of conditioned emotional responding. Results showed greater magnitude electrodermal and evaluative fear conditioning in the paired relative to the CS-only condition. The explicitly unpaired condition showed even greater electrodermal and evaluative responding during acquisition, and marked resistance to extinction. The latter results are consistent with the possibility that the unpaired procedure constituted a partial reinforcement procedure in which CO(2) onset was paired with more extended CO(2) exposure on 50% of the trials. Overall, the findings are consistent with contemporary learning theory accounts of panic.

  15. Thermodynamic study and modelling of iron-based melts for adequate prediction of modern ladle metallurgy processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, A. I.; Rodionova, I. G.; Shaposhnikov, N. G.; Zemlyanko, O. A.; Karamisheva, N. A.

    2008-02-01

    The representation of iron-based melts as associated liquids have been developed basing on the detail experimental investigation and analysis of available data on their thermodynamic properties and phase equilibria. It has allowed, for the first time, to interpret adequately the reactivity of the earth metals in the iron-based melts and to predict with high precision the reactions of metal refinement and non-metallic inclusions modifying in modern ladle metallurgy.

  16. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Transonic Flow Field and Associated Boundary Conditions near a Longitudinally-Slotted Wind-Tunnel Wall. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel Lee

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical examination of the slotted-wall flow field is conducted to determine the appropriate wall pressure drop (or boundary condition) equation. This analysis improves the understanding of the fluid physics of these types of flow fields and helps in evaluating the uncertainties and limitations existing in previous mathematical developments. It is shown that the resulting slotted-wall boundary condition contains contributions from the airfoil-induced streamline curvature and the non-linear, quadratic, slot crossflow in addition to an often neglected linear term which results from viscous shearing in the slot. Existing and newly acquired experimental data are examined in the light of this formulation and theoretical developments.

  18. Experimental and theoretical studies of the influence of a tensile load on the relaxation of residual stresses in a hardened cylindrical specimen under creep conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radchenko, V. P.; Kocherov, E. P.; Saushkin, M. N.; Smyslov, V. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study of the influence of a tensile load on the relaxation of residual stresses in a hardened cylindrical specimen of ZhS6KP alloy under creep conditions at 800°C. An experimental study was conducted to investigate the distribution of the axial residual stress tensor component across the thickness of the hardened layer after hardening by air shot blasting using microbeads and after creep loading for 50 and 200 h under a tensile load of 150 and 250 MPa. A detailed theoretical analysis of the problem was performed. In all loading regimes, the calculated and experimental values of the residual stresses were found to be in good agreement. It was shown that at low tensile load, the relaxation rate decreased in comparison with the case of thermal exposure in the absence of a tensile load and, with increasing load intensity, it increased.

  19. Experimental comparison of the oxygen-assist laser cutting with a fiber and CO2-laser under the condition of minimal roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orishich, A. M.; Shulyatyev, V. B.; Malikov, A. G.; Golyshev, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The conditions of minimal-roughness surface production were studied experimentally in the process of the oxygenassisted laser cutting with the fiber and СО2 lasers. The coefficient of the laser radiation absorption in the cut channel during the cutting process was measured as the sheet thickness varied from 3 to 16 mm. It is demonstrated that the cutting conditions with the minimal roughness can be formulated for the two laser types with the same generalized parameters, i.e. dimensionless absorbed laser power and Peclet number (dimensionless speed). Numerical values of these parameters were found experimentally. The optimum Peclet number is 0.5 for the СО2-laser cutting, and 0.35 when the fiber laser is used.

  20. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface into the soak solvent and from removing the surface from the soak solvent. (c) Time of soak. Soak the surface for a minimum of 1 hour. (d) Surface conditions for the validation study. Prior to beginning the validation study, ensure that there are no free-flowing liquids on surfaces and that...

  1. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface into the soak solvent and from removing the surface from the soak solvent. (c) Time of soak. Soak the surface for a minimum of 1 hour. (d) Surface conditions for the validation study. Prior to beginning the validation study, ensure that there are no free-flowing liquids on surfaces and that...

  2. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surface into the soak solvent and from removing the surface from the soak solvent. (c) Time of soak. Soak the surface for a minimum of 1 hour. (d) Surface conditions for the validation study. Prior to beginning the validation study, ensure that there are no free-flowing liquids on surfaces and that...

  3. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface into the soak solvent and from removing the surface from the soak solvent. (c) Time of soak. Soak the surface for a minimum of 1 hour. (d) Surface conditions for the validation study. Prior to beginning the validation study, ensure that there are no free-flowing liquids on surfaces and that...

  4. 40 CFR 761.386 - Required experimental conditions for the validation study and subsequent use during decontamination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface into the soak solvent and from removing the surface from the soak solvent. (c) Time of soak. Soak the surface for a minimum of 1 hour. (d) Surface conditions for the validation study. Prior to beginning the validation study, ensure that there are no free-flowing liquids on surfaces and that...

  5. Experimental study on occupant's thermal responses under the non-uniform conditions in vehicle cabin during the heating period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wencan; Chen, Jiqing; Lan, Fengchong

    2014-03-01

    The existing investigations on thermal comfort mostly focus on the thermal environment conditions, especially of the air-flow field and the temperature distributions in vehicle cabin. Less attention appears to direct to the thermal comfort or thermal sensation of occupants, even to the relationship between thermal conditions and thermal sensation. In this paper, a series of experiments were designed and conducted for understanding the non-uniform conditions and the occupant's thermal responses in vehicle cabin during the heating period. To accurately assess the transient temperature distribution in cabin in common daily condition, the air temperature at a number of positions is measured in a full size vehicle cabin under natural winter environment in South China by using a discrete thermocouples network. The occupant body is divided into nine segments, the skin temperature at each segment and the occupant's local thermal sensation at the head, body, upper limb and lower limb are monitored continuously. The skin temperature is observed by using a discrete thermocouples network, and the local thermal sensation is evaluated by using a seven-point thermal comfort survey questionnaire proposed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc(ASHRAE) Standard. The relationship between the skin temperature and the thermal sensation is discussed and regressed by statistics method. The results show that the interior air temperature is highly non-uniform over the vehicle cabin. The locations where the occupants sit have a significant effect on the occupant's thermal responses, including the skin temperature and the thermal sensation. The skin temperature and thermal sensation are quite different between body segments due to the effect of non-uniform conditions, clothing resistance, and the human thermal regulating system. A quantitative relationship between the thermal sensation and the skin temperature at each body segment of occupant in

  6. Toxicity of pyrolysis products: Influence of experimental conditions - The MSTL/UT and NASA/JSC Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.; Raje, R. R.; Singh, A. R.; Autian, J.

    1978-01-01

    Ten sample materials of various polymeric composition were evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis products utilizing two significantly different experimental methods, the MSTL/UT and NASA/JSC Procedures. A comparison of the LD(50) values obtained by the two methods for these ten samples did not yield a significant correlation. However, when the samples were ranked in order of increasing toxicity by each method independently, a comparison of their rank order toxicity improved the correlation. Because of interlaboratory variations in pyrolysis/combustion test procedures, it is suggested a series of standard materials be adopted to facilitate interlaboratory comparisons of data on pyrolysis toxicity.

  7. Experimental observation and assessment of ice conditions with a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle over Yellow River, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiayuan; Shu, Li; Zuo, Hang; Zhang, Baosen

    2012-01-01

    Due to its unique geographical location and regional climate, the Yellow River and its tributaries are prone to ice jams almost every spring. Ice jams can cause levees to burst, leading to severe flooding, property damage, and human casualties. Hence, there is an urgent need to carry out observations of ice conditions and make risk assessments of ice jam occurrence. Field observation is the most reliable technique, but it is usually too expensive and time-consuming, which has led to the evaluation of applied remote sensing for data capture and analysis. Owing to the factors of timeliness, image resolution, human safety, and cost, satellite or manned aerial remote sensing cannot fully meet the requirements of ice condition observation. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) remote sensing system is proposed for the collection of river ice imagery, providing the benefits of low cost, flexible launch and landing logistics, safety, and appropriate hyperspatial image resolution. One Inner Mongolian segment of the Yellow River was chosen as a test area to demonstrate key technologies and specific procedures of observation and assessment of ice conditions using the UAV system. The specific UAV remote sensing system and its components are introduced along with the procedures of UAV operation and imagery acquisition. Image preprocessing techniques and ice information extraction are described in detail followed by analysis and risk assessment of the ice conditions based on the resulting panoramic imagery. Results prove the feasibility and effectiveness of applying the fixed-wing UAV system to rapid observation and risk assessment of ice jam formation over the Yellow River under harsh weather conditions including low temperatures and strong winds.

  8. Experimental Study on the Influence of the Supporting Condition and Rod Motion on the Fuel Fretting Damage

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung-Kyu; Lee, Young-Ho

    2007-07-01

    Present study focuses on the influence of a supporting condition and a rod motion on a fuel fretting wear through experiments using a self-developed wear simulator, which was presented at the Water Reactor Fuel Performance Meeting, Kyoto Japan in 2005. In the experiment, a fuel rod specimen of two span lengths is vibrated by two perpendicularly aligned electromagnetic actuators. Both ends of the rod specimen are supported with a positive contact force and a variation of the supporting condition is simulated by moving each of the four grid strap specimens constituting a center grid cell. As for the supporting condition, 0.1 mm gap and 10 N force are used; a circular and a diagonal traces are applied for the rod motion. The contact shape of the spring/dimple is concave, to try and increase the contact area. Both the spring/dimple and fuel rod specimens were fabricated from the as-received materials (zirconium alloy) for a commercial fuel assembly. Experiments are carried out under a room temperature and distilled water condition. Experiment of each condition is carried out for 72 hours. Wear volume, area and depth on the cladding tubes are examined. As a result, the present concave shaped spring/dimple causes less wear when the rod moves in a circular manner than a diagonal one if there is a positive contact force (10 N). However, a diagonal motion causes more wear when a gap (0.1 mm) exists. Wear amount at the spring and dimple is influenced by the location of them and the rod motion. It is found that the wear is concentrated at the contact edges between the spring/dimple and rods due to the contact shape. The influence of the rod motion on the worn area and its shape is also discussed. (authors)

  9. A new calculation method adapted to the experimental conditions for determining samples γ-activities induced by 14 MeV neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rzama, A.; Erramli, H.; Misdaq, M. A.

    1994-09-01

    Induced gamma-activities of different disk shaped irradiated samples and standards with 14 MeV neutrons have been determined by using a Monte Carlo calculation method adapted to the experimental conditions. The self-absorption of the multienergetic emitted gamma rays has been taken into account in the final samples activities. The influence of the different activation parameters has been studied. Na, K, Cl and P contents in biological (red beet) samples have been determined.

  10. Performance enhancement of an experimental air conditioning system by using TiO2/methanol nanofluid in heat pipe heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monirimanesh, Negin; Nowee, S. Mostafa; Khayyami, Shideh; Abrishamchi, Iman

    2016-05-01

    The effect of using nanofluid in thermosyphon-type heat pipe heat exchangers on energy conservation of an air-conditioning system was sought in this study. Innovatively, two heat exchangers in-series were deployed using TiO2/methanol nanofluids with 0-4 wt% concentrations as working fluids. The impacts of temperature and relative humidity on the effectiveness of 2 and 4-row heat exchangers were analyzed experimentally and more that 40 % energy saving was obtained.

  11. A Study of Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticle RF Heating in Gellan Gum Polymer Under Various Experimental Conditions for Potential Application in Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Gabriel E.

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have found use in a wide variety of biomedical applications including hyperthermia, imaging and drug delivery. Certain physical properties, such as the ability to generate heat in response to an alternating magnetic field, make these structures ideal for such purposes. This study's objective was to elucidate the mechanisms primarily responsible for RF MNP heating and determine how such processes affect polymer solutions that might be useful in drug delivery. 15-20 nm magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles at 0.2% and 0.5% concentrations were heated with RF fields of different strengths (200 Oe, 400 Oe and 600 Oe) in water and in 0.5% gellan gum solution. Mixing and fan cooling were used in an attempt to improve accuracy of data collection. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values were determined experimentally for each combination of solvent, concentration and field strength. Theoretical calculation of SAR was performed using a model based on linear response theory. Mixing yielded greater precision in experimental determination of SAR while the effects of cooling on this parameter were negligible. Solutions with gellan gum displayed smoother heating over time but no significant changes in SAR values. This was attributed to low polymer concentration and lack of structural phase transition. The LRT model was found to be adequate for calculating SAR at low polymer concentration and was useful in identifying Neel relaxation as the dominant heating process. Heating trials with MNPs in 2% agar confirmed Neel relaxation to be primarily responsible for heat generation in the particles studied.

  12. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  13. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  14. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  15. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  16. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  17. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  18. [NEPHROPROTECTIVE PROPERTIES OF 5-HT3 RECEPTOR BLOCKER RU-63 IN EXPERIMENTAL ACUTE RENAL FAILURE UNDER HYPERGRAVITY CONDITIONS].

    PubMed

    Zaitseva, E N; Dubishchev, A V; Yakovlev, D S; Anisimova, V A

    2016-01-01

    The effective diuretic dose of 5-HT3 receptor blocker RU-63 (1 mg/kg) was found in experiments on white rats. It is established that the diuretic and saluretic effects of compound RU-63 increase on the background of impact of the gravitational factor. Compound RU-63 (1 mg/kg, subcutaneously) administered daily under hypergravity conditions (3 g in the direction of centrifugal force toward the kidneys) in animals with model ischemic acute renal failure increased excretory function of kidneys, glomerular filtration rate, and creatininuresis (on average by 180%; p < 0.05), and decreased serum creatinine, urinary excretion of protein, lactate dehydrogenase, and g-glutamyl transferase (on average by 49%; p < 0.05) as compared to the untreated control. Under similar conditions, the diuretic hydrochlorothiazide (in a dose of 20 mg/kg, intragastric) produced a more pronounced creatininuretic action than that of RU-63 (by 358%; p < 0.05). PMID:27455574

  19. Pore-scale Evaluation of Immiscible Fluid Characteristics and Displacements: Comparison Between Ambient- and Supercritical-Condition Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herring, A. L.; Wildenschild, D.; Andersson, L.; Harper, E.; Sheppard, A.

    2015-12-01

    The transport of immiscible fluids within porous media is a topic of great importance for a wide range of subsurface processes; e.g. oil recovery, geologic sequestration of CO2, gas-water mass transfer in the vadose zone, and remediation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from groundwater. In particular, the trapping and mobilization of nonwetting phase fluids (e.g. oil, CO2, gas, or NAPL in water-wet media) is of significant concern; and has been well documented to be a function of both wetting and nonwetting fluid properties, morphological characteristics of the porous medium, and system history. However, generalization of empirical trends and results for application between different fluid-fluid-medium systems requires careful consideration and characterization of the relevant system properties. We present a comprehensive and cohesive description of nonwetting phase behaviour as observed via a suite of three dimensional x-ray microtomography imaging experiments investigating immiscible fluid flow, trapping, and interfacial interactions of wetting (brine) and nonwetting (air, oil, and supercritical CO2) phase in sandstones and synthetic media. Microtomographic images, acquired for drainage and imbibition flow processes, allow for precise and extensive characterization of nonwetting phase fluid saturation, topology, and connectivity; imaging results are paired with externally measured capillary pressure data to provide a comprehensive description of fluid states. Fluid flow and nonwetting phase trapping behaviour is investigated as a function of system history, morphological metrics of the geologic media, and nonwetting phase fluid characteristics; and particular emphasis is devoted to the differences between ambient condition (air-brine) and reservoir condition (supercritical CO2-brine) studies. Preliminary results provide insight into the applicability of using ambient condition experiments to explore reservoir condition processes, and also elucidate the

  20. A review on experimental and clinical genetic associations studies on fear conditioning, extinction and cognitive-behavioral treatment.

    PubMed

    Lonsdorf, T B; Kalisch, R

    2011-09-20

    Fear conditioning and extinction represent basic forms of associative learning with considerable clinical relevance and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. There is considerable inter-individual variation in the ability to acquire and extinguish conditioned fear reactions and the study of genetic variants has recently become a focus of research. In this review, we give an overview of the existing genetic association studies on human fear conditioning and extinction in healthy individuals and of related studies on cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) and exposure, as well as pathology development after trauma. Variation in the serotonin transporter (5HTT) and the catechol-o-methyltransferase (COMT) genes has consistently been associated with effects in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Interesting new findings, which however require further replication, have been reported for genetic variation in the dopamine transporter (DAT1) and the pituitary adenylate cyclase 1 receptor (ADCYAP1R1) genes, whereas the current picture is inconsistent for variation in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. We end with a discussion of the findings and their limitations, as well as future directions that we hope will aid the field to develop further.

  1. Communities of different plant diversity respond similarly to drought stress: experimental evidence from field non-weeded and greenhouse conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanta, Vojtěch; Doležal, Jiří; Zemková, Lenka; Lepš, Jan

    2012-06-01

    Accelerating rate of species loss has prompted researchers to study the role of species diversity in processes that control ecosystem functioning. Although negative impact of species loss has been documented, the evidence concerning its impact on ecosystem stability is still limited. Here, we studied the effects of declining species and functional diversity on plant community responses to drought in the field (open to weed colonization) and greenhouse conditions. Both species and functional diversity positively affected the average yields of field communities. However, this pattern was similar in both drought-stressed and control plots. No effect of diversity on community resistance, biomass recovery after drought and resilience was found because drought reduced biomass production similarly at each level of diversity by approximately 30 %. The use of dissimilarity (characterized by Euclidean distance) revealed higher variation under changing environments (drought-stressed vs. control) in more diverse communities compared to less species-rich assemblages. In the greenhouse experiment, the effect of species diversity affected community resistance, indicating that more diverse communities suffered more from drought than species-poor ones. We conclude that our study did not support the insurance hypothesis (stability properties of a community should increase with species richness) because species diversity had an equivocal effect on ecosystem resistance and resilience in an environment held under non-weeded practice, regardless of the positive relationship between sown species diversity and community biomass production. More species-rich communities were less resistant against drought-stressed conditions than species-poor ones grown in greenhouse conditions.

  2. Routine experimental system for defining conditions used in photodynamic therapy and fluorescence photodetection of (non-) neoplastic epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Norbert; Vaucher, Laurent; Marti, Alexandre; Etter, Anne-Lise; Gerber, Patrick; van den Bergh, Hubert; Jichlinski, Patrice; Kucera, Pavel

    2001-04-01

    A common method to induce enhanced short-term endogenous porphyrin synthesis and accumulation in cell is the topical, systemic application of 5-aminolevulinic acid or one of its derivatives. This circumvents the intravenous administration of photosensitizers normally used for photodynamic therapy (PDT) of fluorescence photodetection. However, in the majority of potential medical indications, optimal conditions with respect to the porphyrin precursor or its pharmaceutical formulation have not yet been found. Due to ethical restrictions and animal right directives, the number of available test objects is limited. Hence, definition and use of nonanimal test methods are needed. Tissue and organ cultures are a promising approach in replacing cost intensive animal models in early stages of drug development. In this paper, we present a tissue culture, which can among others be used routinely to answer specific questions emerging in the field of photodynamic therapy and fluorescence photodetection. This technique uses mucosae excised from sheep paranasal sinuses or pig bladder, which is cultured under controlled conditions. It allows quasiquantative testing of different protoporphyrin IX precursors with respect to dose-response curves and pharmacokinetics, as well as the evaluation of different incubation conditions and/or different drug formulations. Furthermore, this approach, when combined with the use of electron microscopy and fluorescence-based methods, can be used to quantitatively determine the therapeutic outcome following protoporphyrin IX-mediated PDT.

  3. Control of experimental Triatoma infestans populations: effect of pour-on cypermethrin applied to chickens under natural conditions in the Argentinean Chaco region.

    PubMed

    Amelotti, I; Catalá, S S; Gorla, D E

    2014-06-01

    Among peridomestic structures, chicken coops are sites of major importance for the domestic ecology of Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). The aim of this study was to evaluate in an experimental context the effects of a cypermethrin pour-on formulation applied to chickens on blood intake, moulting and mortality in T. infestans, under the natural climatic conditions of a region endemic for Chagas' disease. Experimental chicken huts were made of bricks and covered with plastic mosquito nets. Ninety fourth-instar nymphs were maintained in each hut. The study used a completely random design in which chickens in the experimental group were treated with a cypermethrin pour-on formulation. Five replicates (= huts) of the experimental and control groups were conducted. The number of live T. infestans, blood intake and moults to fifth-instar stage were recorded at 1, 5, 20, 35 and 45 days after the application of cypermethrin. Cumulative mortality was higher in nymphs exposed to treated chickens (> 71%) than in control nymphs (< 50%) (P < 0.01). Blood intake and moulting rate were lower in nymphs fed on treated chickens than in control nymphs (P < 0.05). Pour-on cypermethrin was able to cause significant mortality, although it did not eliminate the experimental population of T. infestans.

  4. [Analysis of 8-OH-DPAT and NAN-190 effects in young prenatally stressed rats under experimental estrogen deficiency conditions].

    PubMed

    Fedotova, Iu O; Pivina, S G; Ordian, N É

    2012-01-01

    The present work was aimed at a comparative investigation of the effects of chronic administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.05 mg/kg, s.c.) and 5-HT1A receptors antagonist NAN-190 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) for 14 days on anxiety-like behavior in prenatally stressed female with the experimental estrogen deficiency induced by ovariectomy. Chronic administration of 8-OH-DPAT to ovariectomized prenatally stressed females resulted in an anxiolytic effect and led to correction of the impaired levels of follitropine and estradiol. Administration of NAN-190 to ovariectomized prenatally stressed females increased the level of anxiety and more profoundly destroyed a relation between the levels of gonadotropic hormones and peripheral gonadal hormones.

  5. Design of the Experimental Exposure Conditions to Simulate Ionizing Radiation Effects on Candidate Replacement Materials for the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. Montgomery

    1998-01-01

    In this effort, experimental exposure times for monoenergetic electrons and protons were determined to simulate the space radiation environment effects on Teflon components of the Hubble Space Telescope. Although the energy range of the available laboratory particle accelerators was limited, optimal exposure times for 50 keV, 220 keV, 350 keV, and 500 KeV electrons were calculated that produced a dose-versus-depth profile that approximated the full spectrum profile, and were realizable with existing equipment. For the case of proton exposure, the limited energy range of the laboratory accelerator restricted simulation of the dose to a depth of .5 mil. Also, while optimal exposure times were found for 200 keV, 500 keV and 700 keV protons that simulated the full spectrum dose-versus-depth profile to this depth, they were of such short duration that the existing laboratory could not be controlled to within the required accuracy. In addition to the obvious experimental issues, other areas exist in which the analytical work could be advanced. Improved computer codes for the dose prediction- along with improved methodology for data input and output- would accelerate and make more accurate the calculational aspects. This is particularly true in the case of proton fluxes where a paucity of available predictive software appears to exist. The dated nature of many of the existing Monte Carlo particle/radiation transport codes raises the issue as to whether existing codes are sufficient for this type of analysis. Other areas that would result in greater fidelity of laboratory exposure effects to the space environment is the use of a larger number of monoenergetic particle fluxes and improved optimization algorithms to determine the weighting values.

  6. Conditioned Medium from Early-Outgrowth Bone Marrow Cells Is Retinal Protective in Experimental Model of Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Diego A; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Gilbert, Richard E; Thai, Kerri; Zhang, Yanling; Rosales, Mariana A B; Lopes de Faria, José B; Lopes de Faria, Jacqueline M

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells were demonstrated to improve organ function, but the lack of cell retention within injured organs suggests that the protective effects are due to factors released by the cells. Herein, we tested cell therapy using early outgrowth cells (EOCs) or their conditioned media (CM) to protect the retina of diabetic animal models (type 1 and type 2) and assessed the mechanisms by in vitro study. Control and diabetic (db/db) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to receive a unique intravenous injection of 5×105EOCs or 0.25 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM and Wystar Kyoto rats rendered diabetic were randomized to receive 0.50 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM. Four weeks later, the animals were euthanized and the eyes were enucleated. Rat retinal Müller cells (rMCs) were exposed for 24 h to high glucose (HG), combined or not with EOC-conditioned medium (EOC-CM) from db/m EOC cultures. Diabetic animals showed increase in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and oxidative damage markers; the treatment with EOCs or CM infusions significantly reduced this damage and re-established the retinal function. In rMCs exposed to diabetic milieu conditions (HG), the presence of EOC-CM reduced reactive oxygen species production by modulating the NADPH-oxidase 4 system, thus upregulating SIRT1 activity and deacetylating Lys-310-p65-NFκB, decreasing GFAP and VEGF expressions. The antioxidant capacity of EOC-CM led to the prevention of carbonylation and nitrosylation posttranslational modifications on the SIRT1 molecule, preserving its activity. The pivotal role of SIRT1 on the mode of action of EOCs or their CM was also demonstrated on diabetic retina. These findings suggest that EOCs are effective as a form of systemic delivery for preventing the early molecular markers of DR and its conditioned medium is equally protective revealing a novel possibility for cell-free therapy for the treatment of DR. PMID:26836609

  7. Crystal growth under nonuniform conditions; Experimental observations in MgSO 4·7 H 2O-water system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, C.; Erstrin, J.; Youngquist, G. R.

    1981-08-01

    A characteristic feature of crystals is their tendency to maintain uniform growth despite adverse conditions in the surrounding fluid. This is strikingly demonstrated when the (110) face of MgSO 4·7 H 2O is grown from aqueous solution under the influence of an impinging jet. In this case, despite the solute concentration variation at the interface, uniform growth is maintained by incorporating solvent inclusions. Based on classical theory, the boundary of the inclusion-free region is believed to indicate the attainment of the limiting Wilson-Frenkel growth locally. Accordingly, the adsorption coefficient of the solute is calculated from these data.

  8. An Experimental Investigation of Flow Conditions in the Vicinity of an NACA D(sub S)-type Cowling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Rosemary P.; Boswinkle, Robert W.

    1946-01-01

    Data are presented of the flow conditions in the vicinity of an NACA D sub S -type cowling. Tests were made of a 1/2 scale-nacelle model at inlet-velocity ratios ranging from 0.23 to 1.02 and angles of attack from 6 deg to 10 deg. The velocity and direction of flow in the vertical plane of symmetry of the cowling were determined from orifices and tufts installed on a board aligned with the flow. Diagrams showing velocity ratio contours and lines of constant flow angles are given.

  9. [Importance, especially in aeronautics, of color perception tests under dynamic conditions. Study of a suitable experimental apparatus].

    PubMed

    Linzi, S; Modugno, G C; Bollini, M

    1977-12-15

    Following a review of the most recent opinion on the physiology of colour vision, a device for examining it in dynamic, i.e. real-life conditions is described. The apparatus consist of two projectors which flash two absolutely identical pictures on to the screen, one of them is upside down. It appears at fixed but adjustable intervals so that the exposure time of the intelligible image can be varied. Subjects were also controlled with Ishihara charts and Nägel anomaloscope. The results are compared and point to the higher sensitivity of the dynamic test to even slight degrees of dyschromatopsia.

  10. Conditioned Medium from Early-Outgrowth Bone Marrow Cells Is Retinal Protective in Experimental Model of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Diego A.; Papadimitriou, Alexandros; Gilbert, Richard E.; Thai, Kerri; Zhang, Yanling; Rosales, Mariana A. B.; Lopes de Faria, José B.; Lopes de Faria, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived cells were demonstrated to improve organ function, but the lack of cell retention within injured organs suggests that the protective effects are due to factors released by the cells. Herein, we tested cell therapy using early outgrowth cells (EOCs) or their conditioned media (CM) to protect the retina of diabetic animal models (type 1 and type 2) and assessed the mechanisms by in vitro study. Control and diabetic (db/db) mice (8 weeks of age) were randomized to receive a unique intravenous injection of 5×105EOCs or 0.25 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM and Wystar Kyoto rats rendered diabetic were randomized to receive 0.50 ml thrice weekly tail-vein injections of 10x concentrated CM. Four weeks later, the animals were euthanized and the eyes were enucleated. Rat retinal Müller cells (rMCs) were exposed for 24 h to high glucose (HG), combined or not with EOC-conditioned medium (EOC-CM) from db/m EOC cultures. Diabetic animals showed increase in diabetic retinopathy (DR) and oxidative damage markers; the treatment with EOCs or CM infusions significantly reduced this damage and re-established the retinal function. In rMCs exposed to diabetic milieu conditions (HG), the presence of EOC-CM reduced reactive oxygen species production by modulating the NADPH-oxidase 4 system, thus upregulating SIRT1 activity and deacetylating Lys-310-p65-NFκB, decreasing GFAP and VEGF expressions. The antioxidant capacity of EOC-CM led to the prevention of carbonylation and nitrosylation posttranslational modifications on the SIRT1 molecule, preserving its activity. The pivotal role of SIRT1 on the mode of action of EOCs or their CM was also demonstrated on diabetic retina. These findings suggest that EOCs are effective as a form of systemic delivery for preventing the early molecular markers of DR and its conditioned medium is equally protective revealing a novel possibility for cell-free therapy for the treatment of DR. PMID:26836609

  11. Validation of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Studies of Gene Expression in Preharvest and Postharvest Longan Fruits under Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianyang; Zhang, Hongna; Liu, Liqin; Li, Weicai; Wei, Yongzan; Shi, Shengyou

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) as the accurate and sensitive method is use for gene expression analysis, but the veracity and reliability result depends on whether select appropriate reference gene or not. To date, several reliable reference gene validations have been reported in fruits trees, but none have been done on preharvest and postharvest longan fruits. In this study, 12 candidate reference genes, namely, CYP, RPL, GAPDH, TUA, TUB, Fe-SOD, Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, 18SrRNA, Actin, Histone H3, and EF-1a, were selected. Expression stability of these genes in 150 longan samples was evaluated and analyzed using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Preharvest samples consisted of seven experimental sets, including different developmental stages, organs, hormone stimuli (NAA, 2,4-D, and ethephon) and abiotic stresses (bagging and girdling with defoliation). Postharvest samples consisted of different temperature treatments (4 and 22°C) and varieties. Our findings indicate that appropriate reference gene(s) should be picked for each experimental condition. Our data further showed that the commonly used reference gene Actin does not exhibit stable expression across experimental conditions in longan. Expression levels of the DlACO gene, which is a key gene involved in regulating fruit abscission under girdling with defoliation treatment, was evaluated to validate our findings. In conclusion, our data provide a useful framework for choice of suitable reference genes across different experimental conditions for RT-qPCR analysis of preharvest and postharvest longan fruits. PMID:27375640

  12. Validation of Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Studies of Gene Expression in Preharvest and Postharvest Longan Fruits under Different Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Zhang, Hongna; Liu, Liqin; Li, Weicai; Wei, Yongzan; Shi, Shengyou

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) as the accurate and sensitive method is use for gene expression analysis, but the veracity and reliability result depends on whether select appropriate reference gene or not. To date, several reliable reference gene validations have been reported in fruits trees, but none have been done on preharvest and postharvest longan fruits. In this study, 12 candidate reference genes, namely, CYP, RPL, GAPDH, TUA, TUB, Fe-SOD, Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, 18SrRNA, Actin, Histone H3, and EF-1a, were selected. Expression stability of these genes in 150 longan samples was evaluated and analyzed using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. Preharvest samples consisted of seven experimental sets, including different developmental stages, organs, hormone stimuli (NAA, 2,4-D, and ethephon) and abiotic stresses (bagging and girdling with defoliation). Postharvest samples consisted of different temperature treatments (4 and 22°C) and varieties. Our findings indicate that appropriate reference gene(s) should be picked for each experimental condition. Our data further showed that the commonly used reference gene Actin does not exhibit stable expression across experimental conditions in longan. Expression levels of the DlACO gene, which is a key gene involved in regulating fruit abscission under girdling with defoliation treatment, was evaluated to validate our findings. In conclusion, our data provide a useful framework for choice of suitable reference genes across different experimental conditions for RT-qPCR analysis of preharvest and postharvest longan fruits. PMID:27375640

  13. Experimental Evidence for Fast Lithium Diffusion and Isotope Fractionation in Water-bearing Rhyolitic Melts at Magmatic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichy, S. B.; Till, C. B.; Roggensack, K.; Hervig, R. L.; Clarke, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work is to extend the existing database of experimentally-determined lithium diffusion coefficients to more natural cases of water-bearing melts at the pressure-temperature range of the upper crust. In particular, we are investigating Li intra-melt and melt-vapor diffusion and Li isotope fractionation, which have the potential to record short-lived magmatic processes (seconds to hours) in the shallow crust, especially during decompression-induced magma degassing. Hydrated intra-melt Li diffusion-couple experiments on Los Posos rhyolite glass [1] were performed in a piston cylinder at 300 MPa and 1050 °C. The polished interfaces between the diffusion couples were marked by addition of Pt powder for post-run detection. Secondary ion mass spectrometry analyses indicate that lithium diffuses extremely fast in the presence of water. Re-equilibration of a hydrated ~2.5 mm long diffusion-couple experiment was observed during the heating period from room temperature to the final temperature of 1050 °C at a rate of ~32 °C/min. Fractionation of ~40‰ δ7Li was also detected in this zero-time experiment. The 0.5h and 3h runs show progressively higher degrees of re-equilibration, while the isotope fractionation becomes imperceptible. Li contamination was observed in some experiments when flakes filed off Pt tubing were used to mark the diffusion couple boundary, while the use of high purity Pt powder produced better results and allowed easier detection of the diffusion-couple boundary. The preliminary lithium isotope fractionation results (δ7Li vs. distance) support findings from [2] that 6Li diffuses substantially faster than 7Li. Further experimental sets are in progress, including lower run temperatures (e.g. 900 °C), faster heating procedure (~100 °C/min), shorter run durations and the extension to mafic systems. [1] Stanton (1990) Ph.D. thesis, Arizona State Univ., [2] Richter et al. (2003) GCA 67, 3905-3923.

  14. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  15. Electrophysiological effects of non-invasive Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyor (REAC) on thalamocortical neural activities and perturbed experimental conditions

    PubMed Central

    Zippo, Antonio G.; Rinaldi, Salvatore; Pellegata, Giulio; Caramenti, Gian Carlo; Valente, Maurizio; Fontani, Vania; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2015-01-01

    The microwave emitting Radio Electric Asymmetric Conveyor (REAC) is a technology able to interact with biological tissues at low emission intensity (2 mW at the emitter and 2.4 or 5.8 GHz) by inducing radiofrequency generated microcurrents. It shows remarkable biological effects at many scales from gene modulations up to functional global remodeling even in human subjects. Previous REAC experiments by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) on healthy human subjects have shown deep modulations of cortical BOLD signals. In this paper we studied the effects of REAC application on spontaneous and evoked neuronal activities simultaneously recorded by microelectrode matrices from the somatosensory thalamo-cortical axis in control and chronic pain experimental animal models. We analyzed the spontaneous spiking activity and the Local Field Potentials (LFPs) before and after REAC applied with a different protocol. The single neuron spiking activities, the neuronal responses to peripheral light mechanical stimuli, the population discharge synchronies as well as the correlations and the network dynamic connectivity characteristics have been analyzed. Modulations of the neuronal frequency associated with changes of functional correlations and significant LFP temporal realignments have been diffusely observed. Analyses by topological methods have shown changes in functional connectivity with significant modifications of the network features. PMID:26658170

  16. Preliminary study on the use of a Teladorsagia circumcincta bulk milk ELISA test in dairy goats under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Molina, J M; Hernández, Y; Ruiz, A; González, J F; Argüello, A; Ferrer, O; Forbes, A B

    2009-12-23

    An ELISA test for the detection of anti-Teladorsagia circumcincta antibodies in goat milk samples (both individual and bulk milk samples) has been developed in dairy goats experimentally infected with a trickle infection. The results observed were compared with those obtained when some other standard methods for the detection of animals infected with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), such as faecal egg counts (FEC) and serum pepsinogen levels. Some factors that could affect the final results of the test (dilution and nature of samples as well as their preservation at 4 degrees C for 0-10 days) were also monitored. The results show that the proposed test could allow the detection of infected herds using bulk milk samples. The levels of anti-T. circumcincta antibodies in milk and serum samples and the concentrations of serum pepsinogen showed a similar pattern over time. Refrigeration of milk samples for less than 5 days or its preservation with potassium dichromate for 10 days did not significantly affect the ability of the test to detect infected animals. Finally, when a commercial Ostertagia ostertagi ELISA kit was used to assay milk samples from goats infected with T. circumcincta, the results suggest that it may be possible to use a crude O. ostertagi antigen-based ELISA for the detection of goats infected with T. circumcincta.

  17. The Effects of Experimental Conditions on the Refractive Index and Density of Low-temperature Ices: Solid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) at 14-70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz-Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO2 across the full 14-70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where n vis and ρ are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  18. Investigation of As, Mn and Fe fixation inside the aquifer during groundwater exploitation in the experimental system imitated natural conditions.

    PubMed

    Dung, Nguyen Thi Kim; Con, Tran Hong; Cam, Bui Duy; Kang, Yumei

    2012-06-01

    Water-dissolved oxygen was supplied into anaerobic aquifer , which oxidized Fe(II), Mn(II) and trivalent arsenic and changed them into undissolved solid matter through hydrolysis, precipitation, co-precipitation and adsorption processes. The experiment was carried out on the column imitated a bore core of anaerobic aquifer with water phase containing Fe(II), Mn(II), As(III) concentration of 45.12 mg/L, 14.52 mg/L, 219.4 μg/L, respectively and other ions similarly composition in groundwater. After 6 days of air supply, concentration of iron reduced to 0.38 mg/L, manganese to 0.4 mg/L, arsenic to 9.8 μg/L (equivalent 99.16% of iron, 97.25% of manganese and 95.53% of arsenic fixed), and for other ions, the concentration changed almost according to general principles. Ion phosphate and silicate strongly influenced on arsenic removal but supported iron and manganese precipitation from water phase. Based on the experimental results, new model of groundwater exploitation was proposed.

  19. The Effects of Experimental Conditions on the Refractive Index and Density of Low-temperature Ices: Solid Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Moore, M. H.; Gerakines, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We present the first study on the effects of the deposition technique on the measurements of the visible refractive index and the density of a low-temperature ice using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) at 14–70 K as an example. While our measurements generally agree with previous studies that show a dependence of index and density on temperature below 50 K, we also find that the measured values depend on the method used to create each sample. Below 50 K, we find that the refractive index varied by as much as 4% and the density by as much as 16% at a single temperature depending on the deposition method. We also show that the Lorentz–Lorenz approximation is valid for solid CO2 across the full 14–70 K temperature range, regardless of the deposition method used. Since the refractive index and density are important in calculations of optical constants and infrared (IR) band strengths of materials, our results suggest that the deposition method must be considered in cases where n vis and ρ are not measured in the same experimental setup where the IR spectral measurements are made.

  20. River bed armoring in a local scour under no-supply conditions; experimental investigation and numerical model validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Török, Gergerly; Baranya, Sandor; Rüther, Nils

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to present a novel method for numerical modeling of morphological changes. The essence of the method doesn't mean the development of a new sediment transport formula, but the combined application of the existing, conditionally validated sediment transport models. Many bedload transport formulas can be found in the literature, which were developed based on different field and laboratory measurements. Thus, the most reliability of the models usually can be expected only for the given morphological and hydrological conditions connected to the base measurements. However, commonly in the analysed cases the morphological and hydrological features are more variable both in time and in space. Therefore, the hypothesis of this study is that, complex hydromorphological processes can't be modeled by one sediment transport formula. The authors present a solution based on laboratory experiments. Spatio-temporal developments of bed armoring, local scouring and local sediment deposition under no supply condition was monitored and analysed. The sediment transport model of Wilcock and Crowe (2003) was expected to calculate properly the local scouring and bed armoring processes, while the motion and aggradation of the finer materials were supposed to estimate reliably by the van Rijn formula (1984). The main challenge of the combining method is to find an appropriate criterion to decide which transport formula is activated in the given space and in the given time step. The result of the investigation showed that the most reliable criteria is based on the d50 value. As soon as the d50 grain size goes below a certain value, van Rijn is activated, otherwise the Wilcock and Crowe formula calculates the sorting and armoring processes. The results show that the combining method clearly improve the reliability of the morphological calculation. The benefit of the Wilcock and Crowe model is that it estimates quite well the sediment transport in mixed or armored

  1. Comparison of 'HoBi'-like viral populations among persistent infected calves generated under experimental conditions and to inoculum virus.

    PubMed

    Weber, M N; Bauermann, F V; Bayles, D O; Canal, C W; Neill, J D; Ridpath, J F

    2016-05-01

    Like other members from the Pestivirus genus, 'HoBi'-like pestiviruses cause economic losses for cattle producers due to both acute and persistent infections. The present study analyzed for the first time PI animals derived from a controlled infection with two different 'HoBi'-like strains where the animals were maintained under conditions where superinfection by other pestiviruses could be excluded. The sequence of the region coding for viral glycoproteins E1/E2 of variants within the swarms of viruses present in the PI calves and two viral inoculums used to generate them were compared. Differences in genetic composition of the viral swarms were observed suggesting that host factors can play a role in genetic variations among PIs. Moreover, PIs generated with the same inoculum showed amino acid substitutions in similar sites of the polyprotein, even in serum from PIs with different quasispecies composition, reinforcing that some specific sites in E2 are important for host adaptation.

  2. Boundary conditions in the vicinity of a dynamic contact line: experimental investigation of viscous drops sliding down an inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Daerr, A; Andreotti, B; Limat, L

    2005-01-21

    To probe the microscopic balance of forces close to a moving contact line, the boundary conditions around viscous drops sliding down an inclined plane are investigated. At first, the variation of the contact angle as a function of the scale of analysis is discussed. The dynamic contact angle is measured at a scale of 6 mum all around sliding drops for different volumes and speeds. We show that it depends only on the capillary number based on the local liquid velocity, measured by particle tracking. This velocity turns out to be normal to the contact line everywhere. It indirectly proves that, in comparison with the divergence involved in the normal direction, the viscous stress is not balanced by intermolecular forces in the direction tangential to the contact line, so that any motion in this last direction gets damped.

  3. An Experimental and Modeling Study of Evaporation from Bare Soils Subjected to Natural Boundary Conditions at the Land-Atmospheric Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smits, K. M.; Ngo, V. V.; Cihan, A.; Sakaki, T.; Illangasekare, T. H.; kathleen m smits

    2011-12-01

    Bare soil evaporation is a key process for water exchange between the land and the atmosphere and an important component of the water balance in semiarid and arid regions. However, there is no agreement on the best methodology to determine evaporation under different boundary conditions. Because it is difficult to measure evaporation from soil,with the exception of using lysimeters, numerous formulations have been proposed to establish a relationship between the rate of evaporation and soil moisture and/or soil temperature and thermal properties. Different formulations vary in how they partition available energy and include, among others, a classical bulk aerodynamic formulation which requires knowledge of the relative humidity at the soil surface and a more non-traditional heat balance method which requires knowledge of soil temperature and soil thermal properties. A need exists to systematically compare existing methods to experimental data under highly controlled conditions not achievable in the field. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmospheric interface to test different conceptual and mathematical formulations for evaporation rate estimates and to develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. In this study, to better understand the coupled water-vapor-heat flow processes in the shallow subsurface near the land surface, we modified a previously developed theory that allows non-equilibrium liquid/gas phase change with gas phase vapor diffusion to better account for evaporation under dry soil conditions. This theory was used to compare estimates of evaporation based on different formulations of the bulk aerodynamic and heat balance methods. In order to experimentally validate the numerical formulations/code, we performed a series of two-dimensional physical model experiments under varying boundary conditions using test sand for which the

  4. Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles for the removal of aqueous zinc ions under various experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wen; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2014-01-01

    Application of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) for Zn²⁺ removal and its mechanism were discussed. It demonstrated that the uptake of Zn²⁺ by nZVI was efficient. With the solids concentration of 1 g/L nZVI, more than 85% of Zn²⁺ could be removed within 2 h. The pH value and dissolved oxygen (DO) were the important factors of Zn²⁺ removal by nZVI. The DO enhanced the removal efficiency of Zn²⁺. Under the oxygen-contained condition, oxygen corrosion gave the nZVI surface a shell of iron (oxy)hydroxide, which could show high adsorption affinity. The removal efficiency of Zn²⁺ increased with the increasing of the pH. Acidic condition reduced the removal efficiency of Zn²⁺ by nZVI because the existing H⁺ inhibited the formation of iron (oxy)hydroxide. Adsorption and co-precipitation were the most likely mechanism of Zn²⁺ removal by nZVI. The FeOOH-shell could enhance the adsorption efficiency of nZVI. The removal efficiency and selectivity of nZVI particles for Zn²⁺ were higher than Cd²⁺. Furthermore, a continuous flow reactor for engineering application of nZVI was designed and exhibited high removal efficiency for Zn²⁺. PMID:24416439

  5. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  6. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-14

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  7. Increased resistance of Bt aspens to Phratora vitellinae (Coleoptera) leads to increased plant growth under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E Petter; Whitham, Thomas G; LeRoy, Carri J; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Wennström, Anders; Pilate, Gilles

    2012-01-01

    One main aim with genetic modification (GM) of trees is to produce plants that are resistant to various types of pests. The effectiveness of GM-introduced toxins against specific pest species on trees has been shown in the laboratory. However, few attempts have been made to determine if the production of these toxins and reduced herbivory will translate into increased tree productivity. We established an experiment with two lines of potted aspens (Populus tremula×Populus tremuloides) which express Bt (Bacillus thuringiensis) toxins and the isogenic wildtype (Wt) in the lab. The goal was to explore how experimentally controlled levels of a targeted leaf beetle Phratora vitellinae (Coleoptera; Chrysomelidae) influenced leaf damage severity, leaf beetle performance and the growth of aspen. Four patterns emerged. Firstly, we found clear evidence that Bt toxins reduce leaf damage. The damage on the Bt lines was significantly lower than for the Wt line in high and low herbivory treatment, respectively. Secondly, Bt toxins had a significant negative effect on leaf beetle survival. Thirdly, the significant decrease in height of the Wt line with increasing herbivory and the relative increase in height of one of the Bt lines compared with the Wt line in the presence of herbivores suggest that this also might translate into increased biomass production of Bt trees. This realized benefit was context-dependent and is likely to be manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. However, these herbivore induced patterns did not translate into significant affect on biomass, instead one Bt line overall produced less biomass than the Wt. Fourthly, compiled results suggest that the growth reduction in one Bt line as indicated here is likely due to events in the transformation process and that a hypothesized cost of producing Bt toxins is of subordinate significance.

  8. Experimental Demonstration of the Formation of Liquid Brines under Martian Polar Conditions in the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Erik; Martinez, German; Elliott, Harvey; Borlina, Caue; Renno, Nilton

    2014-05-01

    Liquid water is one of the necessary ingredients for the development of life as we know it. The behavior of various liquid states of H2O such as liquid brine, undercooled liquid interfacial water, subsurface melt water and ground water [1] needs to be understood in order to address the potential habitability of Mars for microbes and future human exploration. It has been shown thermodynamically that liquid brines can exist under Martian polar conditions [2, 3]. We have developed the Michigan Mars Environmental Chamber (MMEC) to simulate the entire range of Martian surface and shallow subsurface conditions with respect to temperature, pressure, relative humidity, solar radiation and soil wetness at equatorial and polar latitudes. Our experiments in the MMEC show that deliquescence of NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2 and Ca(ClO4)2 occurs diurnally under the environmental conditions of the Phoenix landing site when these salts get in contact with water ice. Since Phoenix detected these salts and water ice at the landing site, including frost formation, it is extremely likely that deliquescence occurs at the Phoenix landing site. By layering NaClO4, Mg(ClO4)2 or Ca(ClO4)2 on top of a pure water ice slab at 800 Pa and 190 K and raising the temperature stepwise across the eutectic temperature of the perchlorate salts, we observe distinct changes in the Raman spectra of the samples when deliquescence occurs. When crossing the eutectic temperatures of NaClO4 (236 K), Mg(ClO4)2 (205 K) and Ca(ClO4)2 (199 K) [4, 5], the perchlorate band of the Raman spectrum shows a clear shift from 953 cm-1 to 936 cm-1. Furthermore, the appearance of a broad O-H vibrational stretching spectrum between 3244 cm-1 and 3580 cm-1 is another indicator of deliquescence. This process of deliquescence occurs on the order of seconds when the perchlorate salt is in contact with water ice. On the contrary, when the perchlorate salt is only subjected to water vapor in the Martian atmosphere, deliquescence was not

  9. Experimental evidence for effects of stress on the CO2 sorption capacity of coal under conditions relevant to ECBM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hol, Sander; Peach, Colin J.; Spiers, Christopher J.

    2010-05-01

    Enhanced Coalbed Methane production (ECBM) involves the injection of CO2 to desorb CH4 from coal seams, while trapping CO2 as a preferentially adsorbed phase. Successful ECBM relies on a clear understanding of coal-CO2 interaction processes under the relevant subsurface conditions. Though adsorption of CO2 by coal has been extensively studied in experiments, few systematic studies have been done on the effects of stress state on CO2 sorption by coal. We have directly investigated the effects of stress on CO2 adsorption by coal matrix material. To do this, we performed experiments in a one-dimensional oedometer-type compaction cell, using granular (crushed and sieved) coal matrix material. The loose, granular material was first equilibrated with CO2 at pressures of 10.0-20.0 MPa and at a temperature of 40°C. The samples were then compacted at 40.0 MPa. After unloading and re-equilibration with respect to CO2, the samples were re-loaded in a stepwise manner to axial stresses up to 35.0 MPa. Changes in the volume of CO2 present in the sample during this stepping procedure were measured using a syringe pump. Our data show that stress reduces the adsorption capacity of the coal matrix for CO2 by up to 20-50% under the conditions investigated. We explain our observations in terms of an effect of the external applied effective stress upon the free energy of adsorption in the nanoscale pores of the coal matrix. As reservoir models currently do not consider the role of overburden and horizontal stresses on the adsorption capacity in the coal seams, the effects of stress observed here may have important implications for predictions of the in situ CO2 storage capacity of deep coal formations. Acknowledgements The authors acknowledge Shell International for funding the research presented in this paper (Contract No. 4600003671). Rick Wentinck, Niels van Wageningen and Claus Otto are thanked for their support and valuable suggestions during the course of this study. Eimert de

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigations of Cs-Ba vapor tacitron inverter for power conditioning in space power systems. Annual report, April 15, 1992--April 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    El-Genk, M.; Murray, C.; Wernsman, B.

    1993-01-01

    The operation characteristics of the Cs-Ba tacitron as a switch are investigated experimentally in three modes: (a) breakdown mode, (b) I-V mode, and (c) current modulation mode. The switching frequency, grid potentials for ignition and extinguishing of discharge, and the Cs pressure and emission conditions (Ba pressure and emitter temperature) for stable current modulation are determined. The experimental data is also used to determine the off-time required for successful ignition, and the effects of the aforementioned operation parameters on the ignition duty cycle threshold for stable modulation. Operation parameters measured include switching frequency up to 20 kHz, hold-off voltage up to 180 V, current densities in excess of 15 A/cm{sup 2}, switch power density of 1 kW/cm{sup 2}. and a switching efficiency in excess of 90% at collector C: realer than 30 V. The voltage drop strongly depends on the Cs pressure and to a lesser extent on the emission conditions. Increasing the Cs pressure and/or the emission current lowers the voltage drop, however, for the same initial Cs pressure and emission conditions, the voltage drop in the I-V mode is usually lower than that during current modulation. As long as the discharge current is kept lower that the.emission current, the voltage drop during stable current modulation could be as low as 3 V.

  11. Ozonation of sunflower oils: impact of experimental conditions on the composition and the antibacterial activity of ozonized oils.

    PubMed

    Moureu, Sophie; Violleau, Frédéric; Ali Haimoud-Lekhal, Djamila; Calmon, Anne

    2015-02-01

    Ozone can react with vegetable oils to produce ozonized oils which have antimicrobial properties and can be used in dermatology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of ozonation conditions and of the initial fatty acid composition on iodine index (II), peroxide index (IP), acidity value (AV) of ozonized sunflower oils. The antibacterial activity of these products against the three bacterial strains that are more often involved in mastitis (Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus uberis) was also evaluated. In that purpose, two different sunflower oils have been studied: a "classical" oil (55% linoleic acid, 35% oleic acid) and a "high oleic" oil (90% oleic acid). Both were ozonized with or without water during different times (from 1 to 7 h). Results show that the addition of water has a direct impact on the increase in IP (up to 2600 meq of active oxygen/kg of oil with water and 430 without) and AV but does not influence the kinetic of the decrease in II. Minimal inhibitory concentrations were ranging from 1.25 to 40 mg/mL and the antibacterial activity of oils ozonized with water was better than the one of oils ozonized alone. These results are an open door to new applications of ozonized oils.

  12. The use of FDTD in establishing in vitro experimentation conditions representative of lifelike cell phone radiation on the spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mouradi, Rand; Desai, Nisarg; Erdemir, Ahmet; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that exposing human semen samples to cell phone radiation leads to a significant decline in sperm parameters. In daily living, a cell phone is usually kept in proximity to the groin, such as in a trouser pocket, separated from the testes by multiple layers of tissue. The aim of this study was to calculate the distance between cell phone and semen sample to set up an in vitro experiment that can mimic real life conditions (cell phone in trouser pocket separated by multiple tissue layers). For this reason, a computational model of scrotal tissues was designed by considering these separating layers, the results of which were used in a series of simulations using the Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. To provide an equivalent effect of multiple tissue layers, these results showed that the distance between a cell phone and semen sample should be 0.8 cm to 1.8 cm greater than the anticipated distance between a cell phone and the testes.

  13. Experimental investigation and planetary implications of the stability of clathrate hydrates in aqueous solution at icy satellite conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, M.; Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Smythe, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages in which gas molecules are trapped individually. They are among the favored volatile reservoirs in solar system bodies, and are expected to play an important role in many processes: accretion of volatiles in planetesimals, outgassing on Titan, Enceladus, and comets. Their insulating thermal properties and high mechanical strength also bear important implications for understanding the evolution of icy satellites like Europa. However, the conditions allowing for their formation and/or their dissociation and the release of volatiles to the atmosphere (Titan) or the plumes (Enceladus) are still poorly understood. This is mainly because of a lack of knowledge on the stability of mixed clathrate hydrates in presence of anti-freeze agents such as ammonia. We have developed a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter to address this deficiency in the literature. This liquid nitrogen - cooled Setaram BT2.15 calorimeter is located at the JPL Ice Physics Laboratory. The temperature range achievable with this instrument is 77-473 K. This calorimeter uses Calvet elements (3D arrays of thermocouples) to measure the heat flow required to follow a predefined heating rate within a sample and a reference cell with a resolution of 0.1 μW. A gas handling system has been designed and fabricated in house to reach pressures up to 100 bars, corresponding to several km depth in icy satellites. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 and CH4 clathrates with ammonia are under investigation, and the results will be used to constrain a statistical thermodynamic model of clathrates for applications to planetary environments. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support from the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, the NASA Outer Planets Research program, and government sponsorship are gratefully

  14. Effects of ischaemic post-conditioning on the early and late testicular damage after experimental testis ischaemia-reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Minutoli, L; Irrera, N; Squadrito, F; Marini, H; Nicotina, P A; Arena, S; Romeo, C; Antonuccio, P; Altavilla, D

    2014-01-01

    Ischaemic post-conditioning (IPostC) might represent an innovative surgical approach to protect organs from ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the contrasting effects of IPostC on the early and late damage induced by testicular I/R injury. Testis I/R was induced by occluding the right testicular vessels using a clip. Male rats were divided into the following groups: sham, I/R and I/R + IPostC. In the I/R group, the clip was removed after 60 min of ischaemia, and reperfusion was allowed for 30 min, 1 and 30 days. In the I/R + IPostC group, three cycles of 30-sec reperfusion and 30-sec ischaemia were performed after 60 min of ischaemia and then reperfusion followed up for 30 min, 1 and 30 days. Following 30-min reperfusion, there was an increase in mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in I/R rats; after 1 day of reperfusion, interleukin-6, tumour necrosis factor-α and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) expression were significantly increased; IκB-α expression reduced; and a marked damage in both testes was observed. IPostC inhibited MAPKs, cytokines and NF-κB expression, augmented IκB-α expression and decreased histological damage in testes subjected to I/R. After 30 days of reperfusion, I/R injury activated the apoptosis machinery, caused severe histological damage and reduced spermatogenic activity. By contrast, IPostC did not modify the apoptotic markers, the histological alterations as well as spermatogenic activity following 30 days of reperfusion. Our data demonstrate that IPostC protects the testis from the early damage induced by I/R injury, but it does not protect against the late damage.

  15. Conditional cash transfers and the double burden of malnutrition among children in Colombia: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Arana, Sandra; Avendano, Mauricio; Forde, Ian; van Lenthe, Frank J; Burdorf, Alex

    2016-05-28

    Conditional cash-transfer (CCT) programmes have been shown to improve the nutritional and health status of children from poor families. However, CCT programmes may have unintended and not fully known consequences by increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. We examined the impact of Familias en Acción (FA), a large CCT programme in Colombia, on the double burden of malnutrition among pre-school and school-aged children. Height and weight were measured before programme enrolment and during follow-ups in 1290 children from thirty-one treatment municipalities, being compared with 1584 children from sixty-two matched control municipalities. We used a difference-in-differences approach to evaluate the effect of FA on children's stunting, BMI z-scores, thinness, overweight and obesity, controlling for individual and municipality-level confounders. At baseline, the prevalences of stunting and overweight were 30·3 and 15·4 %, respectively, in treatment municipalities and 27·9 and 17·4 % in control municipalities. FA was associated with reduced odds of thinness (OR 0·26; 95 % CI 0·09, 0·75) and higher BMI-for-age z-scores (BMI z-scores) (β 0·14; 95 % CI 0·00, 0·27; P<0·05), although the latter was of small clinical significance. The prevalence of stunting, overweight and obesity decreased over time, but the effect of FA on these outcomes was not significant. The CCT programme in Colombia reduced the odds of thinness, but had no effect on stunting, a more prevalent outcome. The FA programme had no effect on overweight or obesity, although BMI z-scores were higher for children under treatment, raising the possibility of an increase of small clinical significance on BMI among pre-school and school-aged children. PMID:26988836

  16. Conditional cash transfers and the double burden of malnutrition among children in Colombia: a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Arana, Sandra; Avendano, Mauricio; Forde, Ian; van Lenthe, Frank J; Burdorf, Alex

    2016-05-28

    Conditional cash-transfer (CCT) programmes have been shown to improve the nutritional and health status of children from poor families. However, CCT programmes may have unintended and not fully known consequences by increasing the risk of overweight and obesity. We examined the impact of Familias en Acción (FA), a large CCT programme in Colombia, on the double burden of malnutrition among pre-school and school-aged children. Height and weight were measured before programme enrolment and during follow-ups in 1290 children from thirty-one treatment municipalities, being compared with 1584 children from sixty-two matched control municipalities. We used a difference-in-differences approach to evaluate the effect of FA on children's stunting, BMI z-scores, thinness, overweight and obesity, controlling for individual and municipality-level confounders. At baseline, the prevalences of stunting and overweight were 30·3 and 15·4 %, respectively, in treatment municipalities and 27·9 and 17·4 % in control municipalities. FA was associated with reduced odds of thinness (OR 0·26; 95 % CI 0·09, 0·75) and higher BMI-for-age z-scores (BMI z-scores) (β 0·14; 95 % CI 0·00, 0·27; P<0·05), although the latter was of small clinical significance. The prevalence of stunting, overweight and obesity decreased over time, but the effect of FA on these outcomes was not significant. The CCT programme in Colombia reduced the odds of thinness, but had no effect on stunting, a more prevalent outcome. The FA programme had no effect on overweight or obesity, although BMI z-scores were higher for children under treatment, raising the possibility of an increase of small clinical significance on BMI among pre-school and school-aged children.

  17. Experimental study on evaporation from seasonally frozen soils under various water, solute and groundwater conditions in Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mousong; Huang, Jiesheng; Wu, Jingwei; Tan, Xiao; Jansson, Per-Erik

    2016-04-01

    Soil freezing and thawing significantly impact water balance in cold regions. To improve estimations of evaporation from seasonally frozen and saline soils, field experiments representing various water and solute conditions were conducted during a 5-month-period in Inner Mongolia, China. A mass balance method was used to estimate evaporation from frost tubes (5.5 × 300 cm) with treatments combining three solute contents (0.2%, 0.4%, and 0.6% g g-1 dry soil) with three initial groundwater table depth (GWTDs) (2.0, 1.5, and 1.0 m). The dynamics of water, heat and solute transport in the frost tubes and in field plots were also investigated. Seasonal changes in evaporation rates were observed during soil freezing/thawing periods. Low evaporation rates were maintained when the soil was deeply frozen (e.g., in P3), and relatively higher values occurred at the beginning and the end of the experiments (e.g., in P1 and P5). The cumulative evaporation amount increased with an increase in initial solute content and declined with a lowering of the initial GWTDs. Solute accumulation with water in the surface layer during freezing decreased the osmotic potential in soil, resulting in obvious freezing point depressions and higher liquid water contents in the uppermost layer of soil. During the soil thawing periods, no evidence of any control of water availability on evaporation was noticed, although the surface soil contained large amounts of water. This study has led to an improved understanding of the coupled effects of water, heat and solute on evaporation from seasonally frozen saline soils and also has important implications for water and energy balance studies in cold regions.

  18. Experimentally determined dissolution kinetics of Na-rich borosilicate glass at far from equilibrium conditions: Implications for Transition State Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Shaw, Wendy J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Shuh, David K.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.

    2008-04-14

    correlates with the forward rate of reaction. Thus, dissolution appears to be rate-limited by rupture of the Si—O bond, which is consistent with the tenants of Transition State Theory (TST). Therefore, dissolution at far from equilibrium conditions is dependent upon the speed of the rate-controlling elementary reaction and not on the sum of the free energies of hydration of the constituents of boroaluminosilicate glass.

  19. Experimentally determined dissolution kinetics of Na-rich borosilicate glass at far from equilibrium conditions: Implications for Transition State Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B. Peter; Shaw, Wendy J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Nachimuthu, P.; Shuh, David K.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.

    2008-06-01

    rate-limited by rupture of the Si-O bond, which is consistent with the tenants of Transition State Theory (TST). Therefore, dissolution at far from equilibrium conditions is dependent upon the speed of the rate-controlling elementary reaction and not on the sum of the free energies of hydration of the constituents of boroaluminosilicate glass.

  20. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana Tapia

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  1. SPINE: SParse eIgengene NEtwork linking gene expression clusters in Dehalococcoides mccartyi to perturbations in experimental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Debs, Garrett E.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Mande, Shekhar C.

    2015-02-25

    We present a statistical model designed to identify the effect of experimental perturbations on the aggregate behavior of the transcriptome expressed by the bacterium Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195. Strains of Dehalococcoides are used in sub-surface bioremediation applications because they organohalorespire tetrachloroethene and trichloroethene (common chlorinated solvents that contaminate the environment) to non-toxic ethene. However, the biochemical mechanism of this process remains incompletely described. Additionally, the response of Dehalococcoides to stress-inducing conditions that may be encountered at field-sites is not well understood. The constructed statistical model captured the aggregate behavior of gene expression phenotypes by modeling the distinct eigengenes of 100 transcript clusters, determining stable relationships among these clusters of gene transcripts with a sparse network-inference algorithm, and directly modeling the effect of changes in experimental conditions by constructing networks conditioned on the experimental state. Based on the model predictions, we discovered new response mechanisms for DMC, notably when the bacterium is exposed to solvent toxicity. The network identified a cluster containing thirteen gene transcripts directly connected to the solvent toxicity condition. Transcripts in this cluster include an iron-dependent regulator (DET0096-97) and a methylglyoxal synthase (DET0137). To validate these predictions, additional experiments were performed. Continuously fed cultures were exposed to saturating levels of tetrachloethene, thereby causing solvent toxicity, and transcripts that were predicted to be linked to solvent toxicity were monitored by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Twelve hours after being shocked with saturating levels of tetrachloroethene, the control transcripts (encoding for a key hydrogenase and the 16S rRNA) did not significantly change. By contrast

  2. Experimental investigation of effect of surface gravity waves and spray on heat and momentum flux at strong wind conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskaya, Yuliya; Sergeev, Daniil; Vdovin, Maxim; Kandaurov, Alexander; Ermakova, Olga; Kazakov, Vassily

    2015-04-01

    The most important characteristics that determine the interaction between atmosphere and ocean are fluxes of momentum, heat and moisture. For their parameterization the dimensionless exchange coefficients (the surface drag coefficient CD and the heat transfer coefficient or the Stanton number CT) are used. Numerous field and laboratory experiments show that CD increases with increasing wind speed at moderate and strong wind, and as it was shows recently CD decreases at hurricane wind speed. Waves are known to increase the sea surface resistance due to enhanced form drag, the sea spray is considered as a possible mechanism of the 'drag reduction' at hurricane conditions. The dependence of heat transfer coefficient CD on the wind speed is not so certain and the role of the mechanism associated with the wave disturbances in the mass transfer is not completely understood. Observations and laboratory data show that this dependence is weaker than for the CD, and there are differences in the character of the dependence in different data sets. The purpose of this paper is investigation of the effect of surface waves on the turbulent exchange of momentum and heat within the laboratory experiment, when wind and wave parameters are maintained and controlled. The effect of spray on turbulent exchange at strong winds is also estimated. A series of experiments to study the processes of turbulent exchange of momentum and heat in a stably stratified temperature turbulent boundary layer air flow over waved water surface were carried out at the Wind - wave stratified flume of IAP RAS, the peculiarity of this experiment was the option to change the surface wave parameters regardless of the speed of the wind flow in the channel. For this purpose a polyethylene net with the variable depth (0.25 mm thick and a cell of 1.6 mm × 1.6mm) has been stretched along the channel. The waves were absent when the net was located at the level of the undisturbed water surface, and had maximum

  3. Comparison of interference-free numerical results with sample experimental data for the AEDC wall-interference model at transonic and subsonic flow conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.; Allison, D. O.

    1974-01-01

    Numerical results obtained from two computer programs recently developed with NASA support and now available for use by others are compared with some sample experimental data taken on a rectangular-wing configuration in the AEDC 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel at transonic and subsonic flow conditions. This data was used in an AEDC investigation as reference data to deduce the tunnel-wall interference effects for corresponding data taken in a smaller tunnel. The comparisons were originally intended to see how well a current state-of-the-art transonic flow calculation for a simple 3-D wing agreed with data which was felt by experimentalists to be relatively interference-free. As a result of the discrepancies between the experimental data and computational results at the quoted angle of attack, it was then deduced from an approximate stress analysis that the sting had deflected appreciably. Thus, the comparisons themselves are not so meaningful, since the calculations must be repeated at the proper angle of attack. Of more importance, however, is a demonstration of the utility of currently available computational tools in the analysis and correlation of transonic experimental data.

  4. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  5. Geochemical Data for Upper Mineral Creek, Colorado, Under Existing Ambient Conditions and During an Experimental pH Modification, August 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; Kimball, Briant A.; Steiger, Judy I.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2009-01-01

    Mineral Creek, an acid mine drainage stream in south-western Colorado, was the subject of a water-quality study that employed a paired synoptic approach. Under the paired synoptic approach, two synoptic sampling campaigns were conducted on the same study reach. The initial synoptic campaign, conducted August 22, 2005, documented stream-water quality under existing ambient conditions. A second synoptic campaign, conducted August 24, 2005, documented stream-water quality during a pH-modification experiment that elevated the pH of Mineral Creek. The experimental pH modification was designed to determine the potential reductions in dissolved constituent concentrations that would result from the implementation of an active treatment system for acid mine drainage. During both synoptic sampling campaigns, a solution containing lithium bromide was injected continuously to allow for the calculation of streamflow using the tracer-dilution method. Synoptic water-quality samples were collected from 30 stream sites and 11 inflow locations along the 2-kilometer study reach. Data from the study provide spatial profiles of pH, concentration, and streamflow under both existing and experimentally-altered conditions. This report presents the data obtained August 21-24, 2005, as well as the methods used for sample collection and data analysis.

  6. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  7. Nematode community shifts in response to experimental warming and canopy conditions are associated with plant community changes in the temperate-boreal forest ecotone.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Madhav Prakash; Reich, Peter B; Fisichelli, Nicholas A; Stefanski, Artur; Cesarz, Simone; Dobies, Tomasz; Rich, Roy L; Hobbie, Sarah E; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2014-06-01

    Global climate warming is one of the key forces driving plant community shifts, such as range shifts of temperate species into boreal forests. As plant community shifts are slow to observe, ecotones, boundaries between two ecosystems, are target areas for providing early evidence of ecological responses to warming. The role of soil fauna is poorly explored in ecotones, although their positive and negative effects on plant species can influence plant community structure. We studied nematode communities in response to experimental warming (ambient, +1.7, +3.4 °C) in soils of closed and open canopy forest in the temperate-boreal ecotone of Minnesota, USA and calculated various established nematode indices. We estimated species-specific coverage of understory herbaceous and shrub plant species from the same experimental plots and tested if changes in the nematode community are associated with plant cover and composition. Individual nematode trophic groups did not differ among warming treatments, but the ratio between microbial-feeding and plant-feeding nematodes increased significantly and consistently with warming in both closed and open canopy areas and at both experimental field sites. The increase in this ratio was positively correlated with total cover of understory plant species, perhaps due to increased predation pressure on soil microorganisms causing higher nutrient availability for plants. Multivariate analyses revealed that temperature treatment, canopy conditions and nematode density consistently shaped understory plant communities across experimental sites. Our findings suggest that warming-induced changes in nematode community structure are associated with shifts in plant community composition and productivity in the temperate-boreal forest ecotones.

  8. A Review of Evidence for High Life Coefficients on Propeller and Rotor Blades Under Static Thrust Conditions with Some New Experimental Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, Peter D.; Meyer, Mark; Branum, Lonnie; Burks, John S. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Interest has increased recently in the thrust-producing capability of rotors at very high collective pitch angles. An early reference noted this behaviour in rotors and offered alternative models for section lift characteristics to explain it. The same phenomenon was coincidentally noted and used in a propeller code, resulting in very good correlation with static thrust data. The proposed paper will present experimental data demonstrating the pronounced persistence of thrust for propellers at increasing collective pitch angles. Comparisons with blade element/momentum theory will be made. These results are expected to point to the need to define (ultimately to explain) aerodynamic lift and drag behaviour in a rotating environment. Experimental measurements made by the U.S. Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate at the Ames Research Center have shown that locally measured normal force coefficients along the span of a highly twisted rotor blade continue to increase at high values of collective pitch. In some cases these coefficients exceed expected values for the same type of airfoil tested under two dimensional conditions. To date no one to the authors' knowledge has defined the variation of C(n) with pitch for very high angles (to 45 deg) in a rotating environment and for a blade of reasonably high aspect ratio; however, total propeller thrust measurements support the idea that stalling does not occur in the same way as on a wing. This paper will present experimental data in the form of surface pressure distributions as well as flow visualization (microtufts) to explore the aerodynamic behavior of the rotating airfoil at high values of blade incidence. This paper also reviews experimental evidence and infers some high lift coefficient behavior from it. Comparisons between predicted thrust, utilizing modified airfoil characteristics and a blade element model, and measured thrust for both rotors and propellers that cover the extremes of collective pitch are shown and

  9. Calculation of the Cost of an Adequate Education in Kentucky: A Professional Judgment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    What is an adequate education and how much does it cost? In 1989, Kentucky's State Supreme Court found the entire system of education unconstitutional--"all of its parts and parcels". The Court called for all children to have access to an adequate education, one that is uniform and has as its goal the development of seven capacities, including:…

  10. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  11. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  12. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  13. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  14. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  15. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  16. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  17. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  18. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  19. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  20. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  1. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  2. Receptor-level interrelationships of amino acids and the adequate amino acid type hormones in Tetrahymena: a receptor evolution model.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Darvas, Z

    1986-01-01

    Histidine stimulates the phagocytosis of Tetrahymena to the same extent as histamine, and also stimulates its division, which histamine does not. Tyrosine and diiodotyrosine equally stimulate the growth of the Tetrahymena. Both amino acids inhibit the characteristic influence of the adequate amino acid hormone when added to Tetrahymena culture 72 h in advance of it. Primary interaction with diiodotyrosine and tyrosine notably increases the cellular growth rate. Histamine has a similar, although less notable effect than histidine. In the light of these experimental observations there is reason to postulate that the receptors of the amino acid hormones have developed from amino acid receptors.

  3. On the conditional logistic estimator in two-arm experimental studies with non-compliance and before-after binary outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bartolucci, Francesco

    2010-06-15

    The behavior of the conditional logistic estimator is analyzed under a causal model for two-arm experimental studies with possible non-compliance in which the effect of the treatment is measured by a binary response variable. We show that, when non-compliance may only be observed in the treatment arm, the effect (measured on the logit scale) of the treatment on compliers and that of the control on non-compliers can be identified and consistently estimated under mild conditions. The same does not happen for the effect of the control on compliers. A simple correction of the conditional logistic estimator is then proposed, which allows us to considerably reduce the bias in estimating this quantity and the causal effect of the treatment over control on compliers. A two-step estimator results on the basis of which we can also set up a Wald test for the hypothesis of absence of a causal effect of the treatment. The asymptotic properties of the estimator are studied by exploiting the general theory on maximum likelihood estimation of misspecified models. Finite-sample properties of the estimator and of the related Wald test are studied by simulation. The extension of the approach to the case of missing responses is also outlined. The approach is illustrated by an application to a dataset deriving from a study on the efficacy of a training course on the breast self examination practice. PMID:20209479

  4. Experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers under conditions of minimal roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Golyshev, A A; Malikov, A G; Orishich, A M; Shulyatyev, V B

    2014-10-31

    The results of an experimental study of laser-oxygen cutting of low-carbon steel using fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers are generalised. The dependence of roughness of the cut surface on the cutting parameters is investigated, and the conditions under which the surface roughness is minimal are formulated. It is shown that for both types of lasers these conditions can be expressed in the same way in terms of the dimensionless variables – the Péclet number Pe and the output power Q of laser radiation per unit thickness of the cut sheet – and take the form of the similarity laws: Pe = const, Q = const. The optimal values of Pe and Q are found. We have derived empirical expressions that relate the laser power and cutting speed with the thickness of the cut sheet under the condition of minimal roughness in the case of cutting by means of radiation from fibre and CO{sub 2} lasers. (laser technologies)

  5. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  6. D/H isotopic fractionation effects in the H2-H2O system: An in-situ experimental study at supercritical water conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foustoukos, D.; Mysen, B. O.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the effect of temperature on the relative distribution of volatiles in supercritical aqueous solutions is important to constrain elemental and isotopic partitioning/fractionation effects in systems applicable to planetary interiors where the temperature-pressure conditions are often beyond existing experimental or theoretical datasets. For example, very little exists for the fundamental equilibria between H2, D2 and HD (H2 + D2 = 2HD), which, in turn, constrains the internal D/H isotope exchange and the evolution of HD in H2-containing systems such as H2-CH4 and H2-H2O. Theoretical calculations considering the partition functions of the molecules predict that with temperature increase, the equilibrium constant of this reaction approximates values that correspond to the stochastic distribution of species. These calculations consider pure harmonic vibrational frequencies, which, however, do not apply to the diatomic molecule of hydrogen, especially because anharmonic oscillations are anticipated to become stronger at high temperatures. Published experimental data have been limited to conditions lower than 468°C with large uncertainties at elevated temperatures. To address the lack of experimental data, a series of hydrothermal diamond anvil experiments has been conducted utilizing vibrational spectroscopy as a novel quantitative method to explore the relative distribution of H- and D-bearing volatiles in the H2-D2-D2O-H2O-Ti-TiO2 system. The fundamentals of this methodology are based on the distinct Raman frequency shift resulting from deuterium substitution in the H-H and O-H bonds. In detail, H2O-D2O solutions (1:1) were reacted with Ti metal (for 3-9hrs) at 600-800°C and pressures of 0.5-1 GPa, leading to formation of H2, D2, HD and HDO species through Ti oxidation and H-D isotope exchange reactions. Experimental results obtained in-situ and in the quenched gas phase, indicate a significant deviation from the theoretical estimate of the equilibrium

  7. [The protective activity of a new variant of the probiotic Acilact in exposure to ionizing radiation and anticancer chemotherapy under experimental conditions].

    PubMed

    Budagov, R S; Ul'ianova, L P; Pospelova, V V

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the protective activity of a new variant of the probiotic Acilact in exposure to ionizing radiation and anticancer chemotherapy under experimental conditions. The study revealed protective effects of the preparation after combined exposure of mice to radiation and temperature. The preparation increased 30-day survival of the mice, inhibited intestinal colonization with gram-negative microorganisms, and increased resistance to LPS. A multidirectional protective effect of the probiotic was observed after the use of sublethal doses of radiation; this effect was manifested by quicker normalization of hematological parameters and bone marrow cellularity, as well as elevation of blood concentration of the hemoragulatory cytokines IL-3 and IL-6.

  8. [The protective activity of a new variant of the probiotic Acilact in exposure to ionizing radiation and anticancer chemotherapy under experimental conditions].

    PubMed

    Budagov, R S; Ul'ianova, L P; Pospelova, V V

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the protective activity of a new variant of the probiotic Acilact in exposure to ionizing radiation and anticancer chemotherapy under experimental conditions. The study revealed protective effects of the preparation after combined exposure of mice to radiation and temperature. The preparation increased 30-day survival of the mice, inhibited intestinal colonization with gram-negative microorganisms, and increased resistance to LPS. A multidirectional protective effect of the probiotic was observed after the use of sublethal doses of radiation; this effect was manifested by quicker normalization of hematological parameters and bone marrow cellularity, as well as elevation of blood concentration of the hemoragulatory cytokines IL-3 and IL-6. PMID:16544896

  9. Analytical prediction and experimental verification of performance at various operating conditions of a dual-mode traveling wave tube with multistage depressed collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Kosmahl, H. G.; Ramins, P.; Stankiewicz, N.

    1981-01-01

    A comparison of analytical and experimental results is presented for a high performance dual-mode traveling wave tube (TWT) operated over a wide range conditions. The computations are carried out with advanced multidimensional computer programs. These programs model the electron beam as a series of disks or rings of charge and follow their trajectories from the rf input of the TWT through the slow-wave structure refocusing system to their points of impacts in the depressed collector. TWT performance, collector efficiency, and collector current distribution are computed and compared with measurements. Very good agreement was obtained between computed and measured TWT performance and collector efficiencies, and the computer design of a highly efficient collector was demonstrated.

  10. Experimental and molecular modeling study of the three-phase behavior of (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) at reservoir conditions.

    PubMed

    Forte, Esther; Galindo, Amparo; Trusler, J P Martin

    2011-12-15

    Knowledge of the phase behavior of mixtures of oil with carbon dioxide and water is essential for reservoir engineering, especially in the processes of enhanced oil recovery and geological storage of carbon dioxide. However, for a comprehensive understanding, the study of simpler systems needs to be completed. In this work the system (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) was studied as a model (oil + carbon dioxide + water) mixture. To accomplish our aim, a new analytical apparatus to measure phase equilibria at high pressure was designed with maximum operating temperature and pressure of 423 K and 45 MPa, respectively. The equipment relies on recirculation of two coexisting phases using a two-channel magnetically operated micropump designed during this work, with sampling and online compositional analysis by gas chromatography. The apparatus has been validated by comparison with published isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the binary system (n-decane + carbon dioxide). New experimental data have been measured for the system (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) under conditions of three-phase equilibria. Data for the three coexisting phases have been obtained on five isotherms at temperatures from 323 to 413 K and at pressures up to the point at which two of the phases become critical. The experimental work is complemented here with a theoretical effort in which we developed models for these molecules within the framework of the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR). The phase behavior of the three binary subsystems was calculated using this theory, and where applicable, a modification of the Hudson and McCoubrey combining rules was used to treat the systems predictively. The experimental data obtained for the ternary mixture are compared to the predictions of the theory. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the ternary mixture is carried out based on comparison with available data for the constituent binary

  11. Experimental and molecular modeling study of the three-phase behavior of (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) at reservoir conditions.

    PubMed

    Forte, Esther; Galindo, Amparo; Trusler, J P Martin

    2011-12-15

    Knowledge of the phase behavior of mixtures of oil with carbon dioxide and water is essential for reservoir engineering, especially in the processes of enhanced oil recovery and geological storage of carbon dioxide. However, for a comprehensive understanding, the study of simpler systems needs to be completed. In this work the system (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) was studied as a model (oil + carbon dioxide + water) mixture. To accomplish our aim, a new analytical apparatus to measure phase equilibria at high pressure was designed with maximum operating temperature and pressure of 423 K and 45 MPa, respectively. The equipment relies on recirculation of two coexisting phases using a two-channel magnetically operated micropump designed during this work, with sampling and online compositional analysis by gas chromatography. The apparatus has been validated by comparison with published isothermal vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the binary system (n-decane + carbon dioxide). New experimental data have been measured for the system (n-decane + carbon dioxide + water) under conditions of three-phase equilibria. Data for the three coexisting phases have been obtained on five isotherms at temperatures from 323 to 413 K and at pressures up to the point at which two of the phases become critical. The experimental work is complemented here with a theoretical effort in which we developed models for these molecules within the framework of the statistical associating fluid theory for potentials of variable range (SAFT-VR). The phase behavior of the three binary subsystems was calculated using this theory, and where applicable, a modification of the Hudson and McCoubrey combining rules was used to treat the systems predictively. The experimental data obtained for the ternary mixture are compared to the predictions of the theory. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the ternary mixture is carried out based on comparison with available data for the constituent binary

  12. Selection of reliable reference genes for expression studies by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR in litchi under different experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai-Ying; Chen, Jian-Wen; Li, Cai-Qin; Chen, Lei; Wu, Jian-Yang; Chen, Jian-Ye; Lu, Wang-Jin; Li, Jian-Guo

    2011-04-01

    Reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), a sensitive technique for quantifying gene expression, depends on the stability of the reference gene(s) used for data normalization. Only a few studies on reference genes have been done in fruit trees and none in litchi. In the present study, seven frequently used candidate reference genes, including actin (ACTIN), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GADPH), elongation factor 1-alpha (EF-1α), poly ubiquitin enzyme (UBQ), α-tubulin (TUA), β-tubulin (TUB) and RNA polymerase-II transcription factor (RPII), were evaluated for their expression stability in litchi. A total of 78 samples, including different varieties, tissues, organs, developmental stages and treatments, such as NAA, shading and girdling plus defoliation, were addressed in this analysis. Our results showed that GAPDH was the most suitable reference gene among all the tested samples, different organs and NAA treatment. ACTIN was stably expressed in varieties and fruit developmental stages. RPII and UBQ exhibited better expression stability in tissues. EF-1α was the most stable gene in shading and girdling plus defoliation treatments. Moreover, using combination of two genes as reference genes might improve the reliability of gene expression by RT-qPCR in litchi. A better combination was GAPDH + EF-1α or GAPDH + ACTIN for all the examined samples. In addition, the validated reference genes were further relied on to quantify the expression of an interested gene, LcARF13 under different experimental conditions. These results first provide guidelines for reference genes selection under different experimental conditions and also a foundation for more accurate and widespread use of RT-qPCR in litchi. PMID:21301853

  13. Minimum quench power dissipation and current non-uniformity in international thermonuclear experimental reactor type NbTi cable-in-conduit conductor samples under direct current conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolando, G.; van Lanen, E. P. A.; Nijhuis, A.

    2012-05-01

    The level of current non-uniformity in NbTi cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) sections near the joints in combination with the magnetic field profile needs attention in view of proper joint design. The strand joule power and current distribution at quench under DC conditions of two samples of ITER poloidal field coil conductors, as tested in the SULTAN facility, and of the so called PFCI model coil insert, have been analyzed with the numerical cable model JackPot. The precise trajectories of all individual strands, joint design, cabling configuration, spatial distribution of the magnetic field, sample geometry, and experimentally determined interstrand resistance distributions have been taken into account. Although unable to predict the quench point due to the lack of a thermal-hydraulic routine, the model allows to assess the instantaneous strand power at quench and its local distribution in the cable once the quench conditions in terms of current and temperature are experimentally known. The analysis points out the relation of the above mentioned factors with the DC quench stability of both short samples and coils. The possible small scale and local electrical-thermal interactions were ignored in order to examine the relevance of such effects in the overall prediction of the CICC performance. The electromagnetic code shows an excellent quantitative predictive potential for CICC transport properties, excluding any freedom for matching the results. The influence of the local thermal effects in the modeling is identified as being marginal and far less than the generally accepted temperature margin for safe operation.

  14. Experimental constraints on the serpentinization rate of fore-arc peridotites: Implications for the upwelling condition of the slab-derived fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, T.; Nakamura, M.

    2016-08-01

    To constrain the water circulation in subduction zones, the hydration rates of peridotites were investigated experimentally in fore-arc mantle conditions. Experiments were conducted at 400-580°C and 1.3 and 1.8 GPa, where antigorite is expected to form as a stable serpentine phase. Crushed powders of olivine ± orthopyroxene and orthopyroxene + clinopyroxene were reacted with 15 wt % distilled water for 4-19 days. The synthesized serpentine varieties were lizardite and aluminous lizardite (Al-lizardite) in all experimental conditions except those of 1.8 GPa and 580°C in the olivine + orthopyroxene system, in which antigorite was formed. In the olivine + orthopyroxene system, the reactions were interface-controlled except for the reaction at 400°C, which was transport-controlled. The corresponding reaction rates were 7.0 × 10-12 to 1.5 × 10-11 m s-1 at 500-580°C and 7.5 × 10-16 m2 s-1 at 400°C for the interface and transport-controlled reactions, respectively. Based on a simple reaction-transport model including these hydration rates, we infer that penetration of the slab-derived fluid all the way through a water-unsaturated fore-arc mantle is allowed only when focused flow occurs with a spacing larger than 77-229 km in hot subduction zones such as Nankai and Cascadia. However, the necessary spacing is only 2.3-4.6 m in intermediate-temperature subduction zones such as Kyushu and Costa Rica. These calculations imply that fluid leakage in hot subduction zones may occur after the fore-arc mantle is totally hydrated, whereas in intermediate-temperature subduction zones, leakage through a water-unsaturated fore-arc mantle may be facilitated.

  15. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems.

  16. Evaluation of Experimentally Measured and Model-Calculated pH for Rock-Brine-CO2 Systems under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-14

    Reliable pH estimation is essential for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies of formation reactivities conducted under geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH; however, the accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In this study, we expanded the measurement range of a spectrophotometric method for pH determination, and we applied the method to measure the pH in batch-reactor experiments utilizing rock samples from five ongoing GCS demonstration projects. A combination of color-changing pH indicators, bromophenol blue and bromocresol green, was shown to enable measurements over the pH range of 2.5-5.2. In-situ pH measurements were compared with pH values calculated using geochemical models. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. For rocks comprised of carbonate, siltstone, and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain proton consuming and producing reactions that occur between the basalt minerals and CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  17. Assessment of real-time method to detect liver parasite burden under different experimental conditions in mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Arif Jamal; Bhardwaj, Jyoti; Goyal, Manish; Prakash, Kirtika; Soni, Awakash; Tiwari, Vishvanath; Puri, Sunil K

    2015-12-01

    Use of highly specific, sensitive and quantitative Real-Time PCR (qRT-PCR) based methods greatly facilitate the monitoring of experimental drug intervention and vaccination efficacy targeting liver stage malaria parasite. Here, in this study we have used qRT-PCR to detect the growing liver stage parasites following inoculation of Plasmodium yoelii sporozoite. Route of sporozoite administration and size of the sporozoite inoculums are two major determinants that affect the liver stage parasite load and therefore its detection and quantification. Thus, these factors need to be addressed to determine the accuracy of detection and quantification of Real-Time PCR method. Furthermore, applicability of quantitative RT-PCR system needs to be confirmed by analyzing the effect of different antimalarials on liver stage parasite burden. We have observed that parasite burden in mice infected via intravenous route was higher compared to that in subcutaneous, intradermal and intraperitoneal route infected mice. Moreover, this method detected liver stage parasite load with as low as 50 sporozoites. The inhibition studies with primaquine and atovaquone revealed inhibition of liver stage parasite and well correlated with patency and course of blood stage infection. This study characterized the simplicity, accuracy, and quantitative analysis of liver stage parasite development by real time PCR under different experimental conditions. Use of real time PCR method greatly improves the reproducibility and applicability to estimate the efficacy and potency of vaccine or drug candidates targeting liver stage parasite.

  18. 129Xe NMR chemical shift in Xe@C60 calculated at experimental conditions: essential role of the relativity, dynamics, and explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Standara, Stanislav; Kulhánek, Petr; Marek, Radek; Straka, Michal

    2013-08-15

    The isotropic (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift (CS) in Xe@C60 dissolved in liquid benzene was calculated by piecewise approximation to faithfully simulate the experimental conditions and to evaluate the role of different physical factors influencing the (129)Xe NMR CS. The (129)Xe shielding constant was obtained by averaging the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic shieldings calculated for snapshots obtained from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the Xe@C60 system embedded in a periodic box of benzene molecules. Relativistic corrections were added at the Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) level, included the solvent, and were dynamically averaged. It is demonstrated that the contribution of internal dynamics of the Xe@C60 system represents about 8% of the total nonrelativistic NMR CS, whereas the effects of dynamical solvent add another 8%. The dynamically averaged relativistic effects contribute by 9% to the total calculated (129)Xe NMR CS. The final theoretical value of 172.7 ppm corresponds well to the experimental (129)Xe CS of 179.2 ppm and lies within the estimated errors of the model. The presented computational protocol serves as a prototype for calculations of (129)Xe NMR parameters in different Xe atom guest-host systems. PMID:23703381

  19. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  20. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of