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Sample records for adequate fluid resuscitation

  1. Fluid Creep and Over-resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Saffle, Jeffrey R

    2016-10-01

    Fluid creep is the term applied to a burn resuscitation, which requires more fluid than predicted by standard formulas. Fluid creep is common today and is linked to several serious edema-related complications. Increased fluid requirements may accompany the appropriate resuscitation of massive injuries but dangerous fluid creep is also caused by overly permissive fluid infusion and the lack of colloid supplementation. Several strategies for recognizing and treating fluid creep are presented. PMID:27600130

  2. Sepsis Resuscitation: Fluid Choice and Dose.

    PubMed

    Semler, Matthew W; Rice, Todd W

    2016-06-01

    Sepsis is a common and life-threatening inflammatory response to severe infection treated with antibiotics and fluid resuscitation. Despite the central role of intravenous fluid in sepsis management, fundamental questions regarding which fluid and in what amount remain unanswered. Recent advances in understanding the physiologic response to fluid administration, and large clinical studies examining resuscitation strategies, fluid balance after resuscitation, colloid versus crystalloid solutions, and high- versus low-chloride crystalloids, inform the current approach to sepsis fluid management and suggest areas for future research. PMID:27229641

  3. Fluid Resuscitation in Sepsis: Reexamining the Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Tirupakuzhi Vijayaraghavan, Bharath Kumar; Cove, Matthew Edward

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis results in widespread inflammatory responses altering homeostasis. Associated circulatory abnormalities (peripheral vasodilation, intravascular volume depletion, increased cellular metabolism, and myocardial depression) lead to an imbalance between oxygen delivery and demand, triggering end organ injury and failure. Fluid resuscitation is a key part of treatment, but there is little agreement on choice, amount, and end points for fluid resuscitation. Over the past few years, the safety of some fluid preparations has been questioned. Our paper highlights current concerns, reviews the science behind current practices, and aims to clarify some of the controversies surrounding fluid resuscitation in sepsis. PMID:25180196

  4. FLUID RESUSCITATION: PAST, PRESENT, AND THE FUTURE

    PubMed Central

    Santry, Heena P.; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhage remains a major cause of preventable death following both civilian and military trauma. The goals of resuscitation in the face of hemorrhagic shock are restoring end-organ perfusion and maintaining tissue oxygenation while attempting definitive control of bleeding. However, if not performed properly, resuscitation can actually exacerbate cellular injury caused by hemorrhagic shock, and the type of fluid used for resuscitation plays an important role in this injury pattern. This article reviews the historical development and scientific underpinnings of modern resuscitation techniques. We summarized data from a number of studies to illustrate the differential effects of commonly used resuscitation fluids, including isotonic crystalloids, natural and artificial colloids, hypertonic and hyperoncotic solutions, and artificial oxygen carriers, on cellular injury and how these relate to clinical practice. The data reveal that a uniformly safe, effective, and practical resuscitation fluid when blood products are unavailable and direct hemorrhage control is delayed has been elusive. Yet, it is logical to prevent this cellular injury through wiser resuscitation strategies than attempting immunomodulation after the damage has already occurred. Thus, we describe how some novel resuscitation strategies aimed at preventing or ameliorating cellular injury may become clinically available in the future. PMID:20160609

  5. Advances in fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Lorraine N.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The optimal fluid for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock would combine the volume expansion and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood without the need for cross-matching or the risk of disease transmission. Although the ideal fluid has yet to be discovered, current options are discussed in this review, including crystalloids, colloids, blood and blood substitutes. The future role of blood substitutes is not yet defined, but the potential advantages in trauma or elective surgery may prove to be enormous. PMID:11407826

  6. Fluid therapy for septic shock resuscitation: which fluid should be used?

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Thiago Domingos; Rocha, Leonardo Lima; Pessoa, Camila Menezes Souza; Silva, Eliézer; de Assuncao, Murillo Santucci Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Early resuscitation of septic shock patients reduces the sepsis-related morbidity and mortality. The main goals of septic shock resuscitation include volemic expansion, maintenance of adequate tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery, guided by central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, mixed or central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels. An aggressive fluid resuscitation, possibly in association with vasopressors, inotropes and red blood cell concentrate transfusion may be necessary to achieve those hemodynamic goals. Nonetheless, even though fluid administration is one of the most common interventions offered to critically ill patients, the most appropriate type of fluid to be used remains controversial. According to recently published clinical trials, crystalloid solutions seem to be the most appropriate type of fluids for initial resuscitation of septic shock patients. Balanced crystalloids have theoretical advantages over the classic solutions, but there is not enough evidence to indicate it as first-line treatment. Additionally, when large amounts of fluids are necessary to restore the hemodynamic stability, albumin solutions may be a safe and effective alternative. Hydroxyethyl starches solutions must be avoided in septic patients due to the increased risk of acute renal failure, increased need for renal replacement therapy and increased mortality. Our objective was to present a narrative review of the literature regarding the major types of fluids and their main drawbacks in the initial resuscitation of the septic shock patients. PMID:26313437

  7. Fluid resuscitation strategies in the Israeli army.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Michael M

    2003-05-01

    Medical training in the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) is currently based on the principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support course of the American College of Surgeons termed Military Trauma Life Support. The Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines provide a systematic standardized approach to the treatment of trauma casualties that has been very successful in civilian trauma. On the battlefield, however, these guidelines have been modified according to the combat environment. The factors that influence these changes are tactical considerations, availability and level of training of medical personal, direct enemy fire, medical equipment limitations, means of transportation of casualties, and the variable transportation time from the front line to the first medical echelon. The basic strategy of the IDF is to bring the military physician or paramedic and airlifted surgical units as close as possible to the front line, to minimize evacuation time. Also, evacuation helicopters that land in the combat zone close to the front line, sometimes under direct fire, usually have a military physician on board. The dilemma of "scoop and run" or "stay and stabilize" in hemorrhagic shock has been solved in the IDF toward early rapid evacuation of casualties to a surgical unit. Immediately after airway and breathing have been secured, if evacuation time is less than 1 hour, the intravenous line and fluid resuscitation is started en route to the medical facility. When evacuation time is longer than 1 hour, an intravenous line is always started before evacuation. In controlled hemorrhagic shock, where the source of bleeding has been controlled and evacuation time is less than 1 hour, fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's solution or normal saline is started, to achieve normalization of hemodynamic parameters. When evacuation time exceeds 60 minutes, colloids such as Hemaccel or hydroxyethyl starch are added. In uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock, where internal bleeding has

  8. A critique of fluid bolus resuscitation in severe sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resuscitation of septic patients by means of one or more fluid boluses is recommended by guidelines from multiple relevant organizations and as a component of surviving sepsis campaigns. The technique is considered a key and life-saving intervention during the initial treatment of severe sepsis in children and adults. Such recommendations, however, are only based on expert opinion and lack adequate experimental or controlled human evidence. Despite these limitations, fluid bolus therapy (20 to 40 ml/kg) is widely practiced and is currently considered a cornerstone of the management of sepsis. In this pointof-view critique, we will argue that such therapy has weak physiological support, has limited experimental support, and is at odds with emerging observational data in several subgroups of critically ill patients or those having major abdominal surgery. Finally, we will argue that this paradigm is now challenged by the findings of a large randomized controlled trial in septic children. In the present article, we contend that the concept of large fluid bolus resuscitation in sepsis needs to be investigated further. PMID:22277834

  9. Colloid administration normalizes resuscitation ratio and ameliorates "fluid creep".

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Amanda; Faraklas, Iris; Watkins, Holly; Allen, Ashlee; Cochran, Amalia; Morris, Stephen; Saffle, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Although colloid was a component of the original Parkland formula, it has been omitted from standard Parkland resuscitation for over 30 years. However, some burn centers use colloid as "rescue" therapy for patients who exhibit progressively increasing crystalloid requirements, a phenomenon termed "fluid creep." We reviewed our experience with this procedure. With Institutional Review Board approval, we reviewed all adult patients with > or =20%TBSA burns admitted from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2007, who completed formal resuscitation. Patients were resuscitated using the Parkland formula, adjusted to maintain urine output of 30 to 50 ml/hr. Patients who required greater amounts of fluid than expected were given a combination of 5% albumin and lactated Ringer's until fluid requirements normalized. Results were expressed as an hourly ratio (I/O ratio) of fluid infusion (ml/kg/%TBSA/hr) to urine output (ml/kg/hr). Predicted values for this ratio vary for individual patients but are usually less than 0.5 to 1.0. Fifty-two patients were reviewed, of whom 26 completed resuscitation using crystalloid alone, and the remaining 26 required albumin supplementation (AR). The groups were comparable in age, gender, weight, mortality, and time between injury and admission. AR patients had larger total and full-thickness burns and more inhalation injuries. Patients managed with crystalloid alone maintained mean resuscitation ratios from 0.13 to 0.40, whereas AR patients demonstrated progressively increasing ratios to a maximum mean of 1.97, until albumin was started. Administration of albumin produced a dramatic and precipitous return of ratios to within predicted ranges throughout the remainder of resuscitation. No patient developed abdominal compartment syndrome. Measuring hourly I/O ratios is an effective means of expressing and tracking fluid requirements. The addition of colloid to Parkland resuscitation rapidly reduces hourly fluid requirements, restores normal

  10. Translating Resuscitation Guidelines into Practice: Health Care Provider Attitudes, Preferences and Beliefs Regarding Pediatric Fluid Resuscitation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Melissa J.; Manan, Asmaa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Children who require fluid resuscitation for the treatment of shock present to tertiary and non-tertiary medical settings. While timely fluid therapy improves survival odds, guidelines are poorly translated into clinical practice. The objective of this study was to characterize the attitudes, preferences and beliefs of health care providers working in acute care settings regarding pediatric fluid resuscitation performance. Methods A single-centre survey study was conducted at McMaster Children's Hospital from January to May, 2012. The sampling frame (n = 115) included nursing staff, physician staff and subspecialty trainees working in Pediatric Emergency Medicine (PEM) or Pediatric Critical Care Medicine (PCCM). A self-administered questionnaire was developed and assessed for face validity prior to distribution. Eligible participants were invited at 0, 2, and 4 weeks to complete a web-based version of the survey. A follow-up survey administration phase was conducted to improve the response rate. Results Response rate was 72.2% (83/115), with 83% (68/82) self-identifying as nursing staff and 61% (50/82) as PCCM providers. Resuscitation experience, frequency of shock management, and years in specialty, were similar between PCCM and PEM responders. Physicians and nurses had differing opinions regarding the most effective method to achieve rapid fluid resuscitation in young children presenting in shock (p<0.001). Disagreement also existed regarding the age and size of patients in whom rapid infuser devices, such as the Level-1 Rapid Infuser, should be used (p<0.001). Providers endorsed a number of potential concerns related to the use of rapid infuser devices in children, and only 14% of physicians and 55% of nursing staff felt that they had received adequate training in the use of such devices (p = 0.005). Conclusions There is a lack of consensus among health care providers regarding how pediatric fluid resuscitation guidelines should be

  11. Fluid as a Drug: Balancing Resuscitation and Fluid Overload in the Intensive Care Setting.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Matthew D; Heung, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Intravenous fluid resuscitation is ubiquitous throughout medicine and is often considered a benign procedure. Yet, there is now clear recognition of the potential harms of fluid overload after initial resuscitation. In recent years, there has also been an increasing focus on comparing various resuscitation fluids with respect to both benefits and risks. Studies have examined colloids, such as albumin and starches, against the clinical standard of crystalloids. In addition, evidence has emerged to suggest that outcomes may be different between resuscitation with chloride-rich vs balanced crystalloid solutions. In this article, we review the current literature regarding choice of intravenous fluids for resuscitation in the intensive care setting and describe the dangers associated with fluid overload in critically ill patients. PMID:27113691

  12. Fluid resuscitation management in patients with burns: update.

    PubMed

    Guilabert, P; Usúa, G; Martín, N; Abarca, L; Barret, J P; Colomina, M J

    2016-09-01

    Since 1968, when Baxter and Shires developed the Parkland formula, little progress has been made in the field of fluid therapy for burn resuscitation, despite advances in haemodynamic monitoring, establishment of the 'goal-directed therapy' concept, and the development of new colloid and crystalloid solutions. Burn patients receive a larger amount of fluids in the first hours than any other trauma patients. Initial resuscitation is based on crystalloids because of the increased capillary permeability occurring during the first 24 h. After that time, some colloids, but not all, are accepted. Since the emergence of the Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee alert from the European Medicines Agency concerning hydroxyethyl starches, solutions containing this component are not recommended for burns. But the question is: what do we really know about fluid resuscitation in burns? To provide an answer, we carried out a non-systematic review to clarify how to quantify the amount of fluids needed, what the current evidence says about the available solutions, and which solution is the most appropriate for burn patients based on the available knowledge. PMID:27543523

  13. New tools for optimizing fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bortolotti, Perrine; Saulnier, Fabienne; Colling, Delphine; Redheuil, Alban; Preau, Sebastien

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a frequent disease with degrees of increasing severity responsible for high morbidity. Despite continuous improvement in care, mortality remains significant. Because hypovolemia, together with microcirculatory dysfunction lead to poor outcome, fluid therapy remains a cornerstone of the supportive treatment. However, poor clinical evidence actually support the aggressive fluid therapy recommended in recent guidelines since available data are controversial. Fluid management remains unclear and leads to current heterogeneous practice. Different strategies may help to improve fluid resuscitation in AP. On one hand, integration of fluid therapy in a global hemodynamic resuscitation has been demonstrated to improve outcome in surgical or septic patients. Tailored fluid administration after early identification of patients with high-risk of poor outcome presenting inadequate tissue oxygenation is a major part of this strategy. On the other hand, new decision parameters have been developed recently to improve safety and efficiency of fluid therapy in critically ill patients. In this review, we propose a personalized strategy integrating these new concepts in the early fluid management of AP. This new approach paves the way to a wide range of clinical studies in the field of AP. PMID:25473163

  14. Vascular access, fluid resuscitation, and blood transfusion in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel; Bhananker, Sanjay; Ramaiah, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    Trauma care in the general population has largely become protocol-driven, with an emphasis on fast and efficient treatment, good team communication at all levels of care including prehospital care, initial resuscitation, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Most available literature on trauma care has focused on adults, allowing the potential to apply concepts from adult care to pediatric care. But there remain issues that will always be specific to pediatric patients that may not translate from adults. Several new devices such as intraosseous (IO) needle systems and techniques such as ultrasonography to cannulate central and peripheral veins have become available for integration into our pre-existing trauma care system for children. This review will focus specifically on the latest techniques and evidence available for establishing intravenous access, rational approaches to fluid resuscitation, and blood product transfusion in the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:23181207

  15. A noninvasive computational method for fluid resuscitation monitoring in pediatric burns: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Camille L; Mulligan, Jane; Grudic, Greg Z; Pyle, Laura; Moulton, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    The fluid resuscitation needs of children with small area burns are difficult to predict. The authors hypothesized that a novel computational algorithm called the compensatory reserve index (CRI), calculated from the photoplethysmogram waveform, would correlate with percent total body surface area (%TBSA) and fluid administration in children presenting with ≤20% TBSA burns. The authors recorded photoplethysmogram waveforms from burn-injured children that were later processed by the CRI algorithm. A CRI of 1 represents supine normovolemia; a CRI of 0 represents the point at which a subject is predicted to experience hemodynamic decompensation. CRI values from the first 10 minutes of monitoring were compared to clinical data. Waveform data were available for 27 children with small to moderate sized burns (4-20 %TBSA). The average age was 6.3 ± 1.1 years, the average %TBSA was 10.4 ± 0.8%, and the average CRI was 0.36 ± 0.03. CRI inversely correlated with the %TBSA (P < .001). Twenty children were transferred with an average reported %TBSA of 16.5 ± 1.4%, which was significantly higher than the actual %TBSA (P < .001). CRI correlated better with actual %TBSA compared to reported %TBSA (P = .02). CRI correlated with the amount of fluid resuscitation given at the time of CRI measurement (P = .02) and was inversely related to total fluids given per 24 hours for children with adequate urine output (>0.5 ml/kg/hr) (P < .001). The CRI is decreased in children with small to moderate size burns, and correlates with %TBSA and fluid administration. This suggests that the CRI may be useful for fluid resuscitation guidance, warranting further study. PMID:25383980

  16. Protocolized Resuscitation of Burn Patients.

    PubMed

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Salinas, Jose; Kramer, George C

    2016-10-01

    Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication. PMID:27600131

  17. Don't Go Chasing Waterfalls: Excessive Fluid Resuscitation in Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive fluid resuscitation is the mainstay therapy in modern sepsis management. Its efficacy was demonstrated in the landmark study by Emmanuel Rivers in 2001. However, more recent evidence largely shows that a positive fluid balance increases mortality in critically ill patients with sepsis. This article examines the theoretical benefits of fluid resuscitation and physiological responses to it that may negatively affect patients' outcome. PMID:26633156

  18. Development of a fluid resuscitation protocol using inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher W C; Kory, Pierre D; Arntfield, Robert T

    2016-02-01

    Appropriate fluid resuscitation has been a major focus of critical care medicine since its inception. Currently, the most accurate method to guide fluid administration decisions uses "dynamic" measures that estimate the change in cardiac output that would occur in response to a fluid bolus. Unfortunately, their use remains limited due to required technical expertise, costly equipment, or applicability in only a subset of patients. Alternatively, point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become widely used as a tool to help clinicians prescribe fluid therapy. Common POCUS applications that serve as guides to fluid administration rely on assessments of the inferior vena cava to estimate preload and lung ultrasound to identify the early presence of extravascular lung water and avoid fluid overresuscitation. Although application of these POCUS measures has multiple limitations that are commonly misunderstood, current evidence suggests that they can be used in combination to sort patients among 3 fluid management categories: (1) fluid resuscitate, (2) fluid test, and (3) fluid restrict. This article reviews the pertinent literature describing the use of inferior vena cava and lung ultrasound for fluid responsiveness and presents an evidence-informed algorithm using these measures to guide fluid resuscitation decisions in the critically ill. PMID:26475100

  19. Efficacy of limited fluid resuscitation in patients with hemorrhagic shock: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chenyang; Li, Tao; Liu, Liangming

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds: The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy of limited fluid resuscitation during active hemorrhage compared with regular fluid resuscitation and provide strong evidences for the improvement of fluid resuscitation strategies in uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Electronic searches were performed using PubMed, Medline, Embase and CNKI in accordance with pre-set guidelines. Clinical trials and observation studies were included or excluded according to the criteria. The endpoints examined were mortality, hemoglobin (Hb), platelets (PLT), hematocrit (Hct), prothrombin Time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), base excess (BE), blood lactic acid (BLA) and the main complications, such as multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). Risk ratios (RR), mean differences (MDs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% Cl) were calculated using fixed/random effect model. Results: The search indentified 11 studies including 1482 subjects. 725 hemorrhagic patients were treated with limited fluid resuscitation while 757 patients undertook regular fluid resuscitation during active hemorrhage. Limited fluid resuscitation had its advantage to reduce the mortality in hemorrhagic shock (RR = 0.67; 95% CI = 0.56-0.81; P < 0.0001) and easily controlled the blood routine index close to normal compared with regular fluid resuscitation (Hb: MD = 13.04; 95% CI = 2.69-23.38; P = 0.01. PLT: MD = 23.16; 95% CI = 6.41-39.91; P = 0.007. Hct: MD = 0.02; 95% CI = 0.02-0.03; P < 0.00001). LFR also had shorter PT and APTT compared with RFR (PT: MD = -2.81; 95% CI = -3.44--2.17; P < 0.00001 and APTT: MD = -5.14; 95% CI = -6.16--4.12; P < 0.00001). As for blood gas analysis, LFR reduced the decrease of BE (MD = 2.48; 95% CI = 1.11-3.85; P = 0.0004) and increase of BLA (MD = -0.65; 95% CI = -0.85--0.44; P < 0.00001). Besides, LFR may also reduce the occurrence of postoperative complications (MODS: RR= 0.37; 95

  20. KBSIM/FLUIDTHERAPY: a system for optimized design of fluid resuscitation in trauma.

    PubMed

    Groth, T; Hakman, M; Hedlund, A; Zaar, B

    1991-01-01

    An application of the KBSIM (Knowledge-Based SIMulation) system to the improved design of fluid resuscitation is described. The system integrates knowledge from three domains, viz. the pathophysiology of traumatized patients represented in a quantitative biodynamic model, the heuristics of fluid resuscitation of such patients as represented in 'production rules', and some 'metaknowledge' reflected in the design of a multi-window user interface. This technique of combining numerical simulation with symbolic reasoning has obvious advantages during the design process and in training, by giving the user a possibility to evaluate his measures by direct feedback from the system. This feature of the system to assist in evaluation of alternative resuscitation procedures should also be useful as a means for decision support. PMID:2060289

  1. Fluid compartments in hemorrhaged rats after hyperosmotic crystalloid and hyperoncotic colloid resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Moon, P F; Hollyfield-Gilbert, M A; Myers, T L; Uchida, T; Kramer, G C

    1996-01-01

    Postresuscitation organ failure may be associated with detrimental changes in body fluid compartments. We measured how shock and resuscitation acutely alters the interstitial, cellular, and plasma compartments in different organs. Nephrectomized, anesthetized rats were bled to 50 mmHg mean arterial pressure for 1 h, followed by 60 min of resuscitation to restore blood pressure using 0.9% normal saline (NS,n = 10), 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS,n = 8), 10% hyperoncotic albumin (HA, n = 8), or 7.5% hypertonic saline and 10% hyperoncotic albumin (HSA, n = 7). A 2-h 51Cr-EDTA distribution space estimated extracellular fluid volume (ECFV), and a 5-min 125I-labeled albumin distribution space measured plasma volume (PV). Total tissue water (TW) was measured from wet and dry weights; interstitial fluid volume (ISFV) and cell water were calculated. NS resuscitation required 7 times more fluid (50.9 +/- 7.7 vs. 8.6 +/- 0.7 for HA, 5.9 +/- 0.4 for HS, and 3.9 +/- 0.5 ml/kg for HSA), but there were no differences between solutions in whole animal PV, ECFV, or ISFV. Fluid shifts within tissues depended on resuscitation solution and type of tissue. TW was significantly reduced by hypertonic saline groups in heart, muscle, and liver (P < 0.05). ISFV was significantly reduced by HA groups in the skin. In all tissues, mean cell water in groups receiving HS was smaller; this was significant for heart, lung, muscle, and skin. In conclusion, 1) HS solutions mobilize fluid from cells while expanding both PV and ISFV, and 2) TW and cellular water increase with both isotonic crystalloids and hyperoncotic colloids in many tissues. PMID:8769817

  2. The development of pediatric fluid resuscitation: an interview with Dr. Frederic A. 'Fritz' Berry.

    PubMed

    Berry, Fritz

    2014-02-01

    Dr. Frederic A. 'Fritz' Berry (1935), Professor Emeritus of Anesthesiology and Pediatrics at the University of Virginia, has played a pioneering role in the development of pediatric anesthesiology through training generations of anesthesiologists. He identifies his early advocacy of balanced electrolyte solution for perioperative fluid resuscitation as his defining contribution. Based on his clinical experiences, he pushed to extend the advances in adult fluid resuscitation into pediatric practice. He imparted these and other insights to his colleagues although textbooks, book chapters, original journal publications, and decades of Refresher Course Lectures at the American Society of Anesthesiologists' annual meetings. A model educator, clinician, and researcher, he shaped the careers of hundreds of physicians-in-training while advancing the field of pediatric anesthesiology. PMID:24251450

  3. Successful recovery from delayed amniotic fluid embolism with prolonged cardiac resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Kanako; Matsumura, Noriomi; Matsuda, Naoyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Sato, Yukiyasu; Konishi, Ikuo

    2011-08-01

    Amniotic fluid embolisms (AFE) are one of the most fatal complications of pregnancy. We describe a case of AFE that occurred 2 h after vaginal delivery at 41 weeks of gestation. The diagnosis of AFE was made by symptoms of dyspnea, coagulopathy, and severe hypotension. ZnCP-1, the characteristic component of meconium, was elevated in the serum. Cardiac compressions after repeated cardiac arrests were required during the initial 2 h of resuscitation. Primary resuscitation was performed with airway management and aggressive fluid management, including infusion of 33 units of red cell concentrates and 57 units of fresh frozen plasma. The patient recovered without any aftereffects. This case report warrants that AFE should be considered when coagulopathy and dyspnea are observed during the postpartum period. PMID:21463428

  4. Fluid therapy LiDCO controlled trial-optimization of volume resuscitation of extensively burned patients through noninvasive continuous real-time hemodynamic monitoring LiDCO.

    PubMed

    Tokarik, Monika; Sjöberg, Folke; Balik, Martin; Pafcuga, Igor; Broz, Ludomir

    2013-01-01

    This pilot trial aims at gaining support for the optimization of acute burn resuscitation through noninvasive continuous real-time hemodynamic monitoring using arterial pulse contour analysis. A group of 21 burned patients meeting preliminary criteria (age range 18-75 years with second- third- degree burns and TBSA ≥10-75%) was randomized during 2010. A hemodynamic monitoring through lithium dilution cardiac output was used in 10 randomized patients (LiDCO group), whereas those without LiDCO monitoring were defined as the control group. The modified Brooke/Parkland formula as a starting resuscitative formula, balanced crystalloids as the initial solutions, urine output of 0.5 ml/kg/hr as a crucial value of adequate intravascular filling were used in both groups. Additionally, the volume and vasopressor/inotropic support were based on dynamic preload parameters in the LiDCO group in the case of circulatory instability and oligouria. Statistical analysis was done using t-tests. Within the first 24 hours postburn, a significantly lower consumption of crystalloids was registered in LiDCO group (P = .04). The fluid balance under LiDCO control in combination with hourly diuresis contributed to reducing the cumulative fluid balance approximately by 10% compared with fluid management based on standard monitoring parameters. The amount of applied solutions in the LiDCO group got closer to Brooke formula whereas the urine output was at the same level in both groups (0.8 ml/kg/hr). The new finding in this study is that when a fluid resuscitation is based on the arterial waveform analysis, the initial fluid volume provided was significantly lower than that delivered on the basis of physician-directed fluid resuscitation (by urine output and mean arterial pressure). PMID:23511280

  5. [Prompt resuscitation by obstetric anesthesiologists saved a parturient with amniotic fluid embolism: a case report].

    PubMed

    Hyuga, Shunsuke; Kato, Rie; Okutomi, Toshiyuki

    2013-12-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a disorder with a high mortarity rate, because it often causes sudden respiratory failure, circulatory collapse and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). We present a case of AFE in which an obstetric anesthesiologist promptly initiated resuscitation of a parturient and saved her without any sequelae. Her fetus was diagnosed as intrauterine fetal demise on 25th gestational week and vaginal delivery under epidural analgesia was planned. One hundred and five minutes after induction of labor with prostaglandine E1, sudden tetanic convulsion occurred with a loss of consciousness. An obstetric anesthesiologist immediately started to resuscitate her and her consciousness was restored. However, noncoagulable vaginal bleeding followed. As the hemorrhage persisted, AFE was suspected. Anesthesiologists gave effective massive transfusion therapy, and she recovered from coagulopathy. Total blood loss was 5,524 g. This case was diagnosed as AFE with high serum sialyl-Tn antigen and zinc-coproporphyrin. The obstetric anesthesiologists are one of the best groups of physicans for resuscitation because they have skills in managing obstetric emergencies such as AFE. In this case, the crucial points for successful resuscitation were prompt obstetric anesthesiologist involvement and good communications with obstetricians and midwives. PMID:24498777

  6. Restrictive Fluid Resuscitation Leads to Better Oxygenation than Non-Restrictive Fluid Resuscitation in Piglets with Pulmonary or Extrapulmonary Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shunan; Li, Qiujie; Yuan, Shiying; Shu, Huaqing; Yuan, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Background Early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) is used to reduce mortality from septic shock and could be used in early fluid resuscitation of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of restrictive (RFR) and nonrestrictive fluid resuscitation (NRFR) on hemodynamics, oxygenation, pulmonary function, tissue perfusion, and inflammation in piglets with pulmonary or extrapulmonary ARDS (ARDSp and ARDSexp). Material/Methods Chinese miniature piglets (6–8 weeks; 15±1 kg) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n=12/group) for establishing ARDSp and ARDSexp models, and were further divided into 2 subgroups (n=6/subgroup) for performing RFR and NRFR. Piglets were anesthetized and hemodynamic, pulmonary, and oxygenation indicators were collected at different time points for 6 hours. The goal of EGDT was set for PiCCO parameters (mean arterial pressure (MAP), urine output and cardiac index (CI), and central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2). Results Piglets under RFR had lower urine output compared with NRFR, as well as lower total fluid volume (P<0.05). EVLW was decreased in ARDSp+RFR and NRFR, as well as in ARDSexp+RFR, but EVLW increased in ARDSexp+NRFR (P<0.05). PaO2/FiO2 decreased in ARDSp using both methods, but was higher with RFR (P<0.05), and was increased in ARDSexp+RFR. Other pulmonary indicators were comparable. The anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and LXA4 were increased in ARDSexp after RFR (P<0.05), but not in the other groups. Conclusions RFR led to better oxygenation in ARDSp and ARDSexp compared with NRFR, but fluid restriction improved oxygenation in ARDSexp only. PMID:26166324

  7. Associations of Hospital and Patient Characteristics with Fluid Resuscitation Volumes in Patients with Severe Sepsis: Post Hoc Analyses of Data from a Multicentre Randomised Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn; Perner, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Fluid resuscitation is a key intervention in patients with sepsis and circulatory impairment. The recommendations for continued fluid therapy in sepsis are vague, which may result in differences in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate associations between hospital and patient characteristics and fluid resuscitation volumes in ICU patients with severe sepsis. Methods We explored the 6S trial database of ICU patients with severe sepsis needing fluid resuscitation randomised to hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.42 vs. Ringer’s acetate. Our primary outcome measure was fluid resuscitation volume and secondary outcome total fluid input administered from 24 hours before randomisation until the end of day 3 post-randomisation. We performed multivariate analyses with hospital and patient baseline characteristics as covariates to assess associations with fluid volumes given. Results We included 654 patients who were in the ICU for 3 days and had fluid volumes available. Individual trial sites administered significantly different volumes of fluid resuscitation and total fluid input after adjusting for baseline variables (P<0.001). Increased lactate, higher cardiovascular and renal SOFA subscores, lower respiratory SOFA subscore and surgery were all independently associated with increased fluid resuscitation volumes. Conclusions Hospital characteristics adjusted for patient baseline values were associated with differences in fluid resuscitation volumes given in the first 3 days of severe sepsis. The data indicate variations in clinical practice not explained by patient characteristics emphasizing the need for RCTs assessing fluid resuscitation volumes fluid in patients with sepsis. PMID:27196104

  8. Fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual partial pressure of carbon dioxide during hemorrhagic shock in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiefeng; Ma, Linhao; Sun, Shijie; Lu, Xiaoye; Wu, Xiaobo; Li, Zilong; Tang, Wanchun

    2013-04-01

    To avoid aggressive fluid resuscitation during hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation is best guided by a specific measurement of tissue perfusion. We investigated whether fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 would reduce the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock. Ten male domestic pigs weighing between 34 and 37 kg were used. Forty-five percent of estimated blood volume was removed during an interval of 1 h. The animals were then randomized to receive fluid resuscitation based on either sublingual PCO2 or blood pressure (BP). In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when sublingual PCO2 exceeded 70 Torr and stopped when it decreased to 50 Torr. In the BP-guided group, resuscitation was initiated when mean aortic pressure decreased to 60 mmHg and stopped when it increased to 90 mmHg. First, Ringer's lactate solution (RLS) of 30 mL kg was administered; subsequently, the shed blood was transfused if sublingual PCO2 remained greater than 50 Torr in the sublingual PCO2-guided group or mean aortic pressure was less than 90 mmHg in the BP-guided group. All the animals were monitored for 4 h and observed for an additional 68 h. In the sublingual PCO2-guided group, fluid resuscitation was required in only 40% of the animals. In addition, a significantly lower volume of RLS (170 ± 239 mL, P = 0.005 vs. BP-guided group) was administered without the need for blood infusion in this group. However, in the BP-guided group, all the animals required a significantly larger volume of fluid (955 ± 381 mL), including both RLS and blood. There were no differences in postresuscitation tissue microcirculation, myocardial and neurologic function, and 72-h survival between groups. During hemorrhagic shock, fluid resuscitation guided by sublingual PCO2 significantly reduced the amount of resuscitation fluid without compromising the outcomes of hemorrhagic shock. PMID:23364438

  9. Discrepancy in Initial Pediatric Burn Estimates and Its Impact on Fluid Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Goverman, Jeremy; Bittner, Edward A; Friedstat, Jonathan S; Moore, Molly; Nozari, Ala; Ibrahim, Amir E; Sarhane, Karim A; Chang, Philip H; Sheridan, Robert L; Fagan, Shawn P

    2015-01-01

    One of the fundamental aspects of initial burn care is the ability to accurately measure the TBSA of injured tissue. Discrepancies between initial estimates of burn size and actual TBSA (determined at the burn unit) have long been reported. These inconsistencies have the potential for unnecessary patient transfer and inappropriate fluid administration which may result in morbidity. In an effort to study these inconsistencies and their impact on initial care, we evaluated the differences between initial TBSA estimates and its impact on fluid resuscitation at an American Burn Association-verified pediatric burn center. A prospective observational study of 50 consecutive burn patients admitted to Shriner's Hospital for Children in Boston, Massachusetts, between October 2011 and April 2012 was performed. Data collected included age, mechanism of burn injury, type of referral center, referring hospital TBSA, and volume of fluid administration as well as admission TBSA and volume of fluid administration. Determination of over or under resuscitation was based on comparing the amount of fluids received at the referral center to that received at the pediatric burn center. A total of 50 patients were admitted during the 7-month study period. The average age was 4.1 years old (25 days-16 years) and the average TBSA was 2.5% (0.25-55%). There were significant differences in the TBSA calculations between referring centers and the pediatric burn center. Overestimation of scald and contact burn size (P < .05) was noted with no difference in flame burn size estimation. Community referrals were more likely than tertiary centers to overestimate TBSA (P < .05 vs P = .29). Overall, 59% of study patients were administered more fluid at the referring hospital than would have been expected by the burn size calculated at our facility. Inconsistencies with the estimation of TBSA burn between referring hospitals and tertiary referral centers remains a problem in pediatric patients and may

  10. Exploring mechanisms of excess mortality with early fluid resuscitation: insights from the FEAST trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Early rapid fluid resuscitation (boluses) in African children with severe febrile illnesses increases the 48-hour mortality by 3.3% compared with controls (no bolus). We explored the effect of boluses on 48-hour all-cause mortality by clinical presentation at enrolment, hemodynamic changes over the first hour, and on different modes of death, according to terminal clinical events. We hypothesize that boluses may cause excess deaths from neurological or respiratory events relating to fluid overload. Methods Pre-defined presentation syndromes (PS; severe acidosis or severe shock, respiratory, neurological) and predominant terminal clinical events (cardiovascular collapse, respiratory, neurological) were described by randomized arm (bolus versus control) in 3,141 severely ill febrile children with shock enrolled in the Fluid Expansion as Supportive Therapy (FEAST) trial. Landmark analyses were used to compare early mortality in treatment groups, conditional on changes in shock and hypoxia parameters. Competing risks methods were used to estimate cumulative incidence curves and sub-hazard ratios to compare treatment groups in terms of terminal clinical events. Results Of 2,396 out of 3,141 (76%) classifiable participants, 1,647 (69%) had a severe metabolic acidosis or severe shock PS, 625 (26%) had a respiratory PS and 976 (41%) had a neurological PS, either alone or in combination. Mortality was greatest among children fulfilling criteria for all three PS (28% bolus, 21% control) and lowest for lone respiratory (2% bolus, 5% control) or neurological (3% bolus, 0% control) presentations. Excess mortality in bolus arms versus control was apparent for all three PS, including all their component features. By one hour, shock had resolved (responders) more frequently in bolus versus control groups (43% versus 32%, P <0.001), but excess mortality with boluses was evident in responders (relative risk 1.98, 95% confidence interval 0.94 to 4.17, P = 0.06) and 'non

  11. Influence of different fluid resuscitation techniques on the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z J; Wang, H X; Li, L; Wang, L; Dou, H H

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the influence of different fluid resuscitation techniques on the number of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in rats. Seventy-two healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into groups that received sham operation (Sham group), hypertonic saline (HRS group), lactated ringer's solution (LRS group), or crystalloid solution (LCRS group). Six rats from each group were sacrificed by cervical dislocation at 12, 24, and 48 h after resuscitation. The spleens were harvested under sterile conditions and spleen cell suspension was prepared. The number of MDSCs was detected using flow cytometry. The number of MDSCs in the Sham group did not differ significantly among the different time points. Compared with the Sham group, the number of MDSCs after the use of the different fluid resuscitation techniques increased to varying extents and the differences among the groups were significant. The number of MDSCs in the HRS group was much lower than that of the LRS and LCRS groups at both 24 and 48 h (P < 0.05). At 12 h, the number of MDSCs in the HRS group was significantly lower than that of the LRS group (P < 0.05). The differences between the HRS and LCRS groups were not statistically significant. Shortly after hemorrhagic shock resuscitation, the immune function of rats was suppressed to a varying extent and was gradually restored over time. Resuscitation with HRS alleviated the immunosuppression at the early stage after shock. PMID:27173299

  12. Effects of cimetidine on fluid requirement during resuscitation of third-degree burns.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Wada, T; Simazaki, S; Hanumadass, M; Reyes, H M; Matsuda, T

    1991-01-01

    Seventy percent body surface area third-degree burns were produced in four groups of six guinea pigs each, after which all were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate solution. Group 1 received 4 ml/kg/%burn. Group 2 received 1 ml/kg/%burn with cimetidine, which was begun at 0.5 hours after burn injury. Group 3 received 1 ml/kg/%burn with cimetidine, which was begun at 1 hour after burn injury. Group 4 received 1 ml/kg/%burn without cimetidine. There were no significant differences among any of the groups in blood pressures or heart rates during the study period. Group 4 showed significantly higher hematocrit values than group 2 at 4 hours after burn injury and thereafter. The cardiac outputs of group 2 were the same statistically as those of group 1. The cardiac outputs of group 3 were significantly lower than those that received cimetidine early (group 2), though still higher than those of the 1 ml control group (group 4) at 4 hours after burn injury and thereafter. At 24 hours after burn injury, the water content of the burned skin of group 2 was significantly lower than that of the other groups. We conclude that in third-degree burns, cimetidine therapy can effectively reduce burn edema and the amount of required resuscitation fluid. Early administration is better than late administration of cimetidine. PMID:1752876

  13. Modeling Fluid Resuscitation by Formulating Infusion Rate and Urine Output in Severe Thermal Burn Adult Patients: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qizhi; Li, Wei; Zou, Xin; Dang, Yongming; Wu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Acute burn injuries are among the most devastating forms of trauma and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Appropriate fluid resuscitation after severe burn, specifically during the first 48 hours following injury, is considered as the single most important therapeutic intervention in burn treatment. Although many formulas have been developed to estimate the required fluid amount in severe burn patients, many lines of evidence showed that patients still receive far more fluid than formulas recommend. Overresuscitation, which is known as “fluid creep,” has emerged as one of the most important problems during the initial period of burn care. If fluid titration can be personalized and automated during the resuscitation phase, more efficient burn care and outcome will be anticipated. In the present study, a dynamic urine output based infusion rate prediction model was developed and validated during the initial 48 hours in severe thermal burn adult patients. The experimental results demonstrated that the developed dynamic fluid resuscitation model might significantly reduce the total fluid volume by accurately predicting hourly urine output and has the potential to aid fluid administration in severe burn patients. PMID:26090415

  14. Graphic aids for calculation of fluid resuscitation requirements in pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Williams, David; Doerfler, Ronald

    2012-09-01

    The Parkland formula is currently the most widely used protocol to guide fluid resuscitation of acute burns and has been adapted for pediatric use. We describe 3 novel graphic devices (a nomogram, slide rule, and disc calculator) based on this formula, which have significant advantages over existing graphic and electronic devices. The robust low-cost graphic devices would be particularly suited to developing countries and difficult locations, but could be used as the primary means of calculation in any environment. If a computer or calculator is used as the primary means of calculation, the graphic devices provide a simple and rapid means of checking and preventing errors that may arise because of inadvertent mis-keying of data or incorrect application of the pediatric Parkland formula. PMID:22868320

  15. [A propose to suspend the use of hydroxyethyl starch for fluid resuscitation in shock phase of severe burns].

    PubMed

    Luo, Gao-xing; Peng, Yi-zhi; Wu, Jun

    2013-10-01

    Based on the result of randomized controlled trials and meta-analysis recently, the infusion of hydroxyethyl starch (HES) was not shown to over match routine crystalline solution in exerting resuscitation effect against hypovolemia of patients with burn shock, severe systematic infection, or other critical conditions, on the other hand, it may induce renal toxicity and other toxic and side effects. Since the pathological mechanism underlying hypovolemia during shock phase after burn is similar to that of severe systemic infection, we propose to suspend the use of HES for fluid resuscitation during the shock phase of severe burn until further elucidation. PMID:24359998

  16. Early Fluid Resuscitation and High Volume Hemofiltration Decrease Septic Shock Progression in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Zheng, Ruiqiang; Xue, Lu; Zhang, Min; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of early fluid resuscitation (EFR) combined with high volume hemofiltration (HVHF) on the cardiopulmonary function and removal of inflammatory mediators in a septic shock swine model. Eighteen swine were randomized into three groups: control (n = 6) (extracorporeal circulating blood only), continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 25 mL/Kg/h), and HVHF (n = 6; ultrafiltration volume = 85 mL/Kg/h). The septic shock model was established by intravenous infusion of lipopolysaccharides (50 µg/kg/h). Hemodynamic parameters (arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume variability, left ventricular contractility, systemic vascular resistance, and central venous pressure), vasoactive drug parameters (dose and time of norepinephrine and hourly fluid intake), pulmonary function (partial oxygen pressure and vascular permeability), and cytokines (interleukin-6 and interleukin-10) were observed. Treatment resulted in significant changes at 4–6 h. HVHF was beneficial, as shown by the dose of vasoactive drugs, fluid intake volume, left ventricular contractility index, and partial oxygen pressure. Both CRRT and HVHF groups showed improved removal of inflammatory mediators compared with controls. In conclusion, EFR combined with HVHF improved septic shock in this swine model. The combination decreased shock progression, reduced the need for vasoactive drugs, and alleviated the damage to cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:26543849

  17. Fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis: Normal saline or lactated Ringer's solution?

    PubMed Central

    Lipinski, Michal; Rydzewska-Rosolowska, Alicja; Rydzewski, Andrzej; Rydzewska, Grazyna

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether administration of Ringer’s solution (RL) could have an impact on the outcome of acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study on 103 patients [68 men and 35 women, mean age 51.2 years (range, 19-92 years)] hospitalized between 2011 and 2012. All patients admitted to the Department of Gastroenterology of the Central Clinical Hospital of the Ministry of Interior (Poland) with a diagnosis of AP who had disease onset within 48 h of presentation were included in this study. Based on the presence of persistent organ failure (longer than 48 h) as a criterion for the diagnosis of severe AP (SAP) and the presence of local complications [diagnosis of moderately severe AP (MSAP)], patients were classified into 3 groups: mild AP (MAP), MSAP and SAP. Data were compared between the groups in terms of severity (using the revised Atlanta criteria) and outcome. Patients were stratified into 2 groups based on the type of fluid resuscitation: the 1-RL group who underwent standard fluid resuscitation with a RL 1000 mL solution or the 2-NS group who underwent standard fluid resuscitation with 1000 mL normal saline (NS). All patients from both groups received an additional 5% glucose solution (1000-1500 mL) and a multi-electrolyte solution (500-1000 mL). RESULTS: We observed 64 (62.1%) patients with MAP, 26 (25.24%) patients with MSAP and 13 (12.62%) patients with SAP. No significant difference in the distribution of AP severity between the two groups was found. In the 1-RL group, we identified 22 (55.5%) MAP, 10 (25.5%) MSAP and 8 (20.0%) SAP patients, compared with 42 (66.7%) MAP, 16 (24.4%) MSAP and 5 (7.9%) SAP cases in the 2-NS group (P = 0.187). The volumes of fluid administered during the initial 72-h period of hospitalization were similar among the patients from both the 1-RL and 2-NS groups (mean 3400 mL vs 3000 mL, respectively). No significant differences between the 1-RL and 2-NS groups were found in confirmed pancreatic

  18. Multicountry survey of emergency and critical care medicine physicians’ fluid resuscitation practices for adult patients with early septic shock

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Lauralyn; Rowe, Brian H; Walsh, Timothy S; Gray, Alasdair; Arabi, Yaseen; Perner, Anders; Gordon, Anthony; Marshall, John; Cook, Deborah; Fox-Robichaud, Alison; Bagshaw, Sean M; Green, Robert; Schweitzer, Irwin; Turgeon, Alexis; Zarychanski, Ryan; English, Shane; Chassé, Michaël; Stiell, Ian; Fergusson, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence to guide fluid resuscitation evidence in sepsis continues to evolve. We conducted a multicountry survey of emergency and critical care physicians to describe current stated practice and practice variation related to the quantity, rapidity and type of resuscitation fluid administered in early septic shock to inform the design of future septic shock fluid resuscitation trials. Methods Using a web-based survey tool, we invited critical care and emergency physicians in Canada, the UK, Scandinavia and Saudi Arabia to complete a self-administered electronic survey. Results A total of 1097 physicians’ responses were included. 1 L was the most frequent quantity of resuscitation fluid physicians indicated they would administer at a time (46.9%, n=499). Most (63.0%, n=671) stated that they would administer the fluid challenges as quickly as possible. Overall, normal saline and Ringer's solutions were the preferred crystalloid fluids used ‘often’ or ‘always’ in 53.1% (n=556) and 60.5% (n=632) of instances, respectively. However, emergency physicians indicated that they would use normal saline ‘often’ or ‘always’ in 83.9% (n=376) of instances, while critical care physicians said that they would use saline ‘often’ or ‘always’ in 27.9% (n=150) of instances. Only 1.0% (n=10) of respondents indicated that they would use hydroxyethyl starch ‘often’ or ‘always’; use of 5% (5.6% (n=59)) or 20–25% albumin (1.3% (n=14)) was also infrequent. The majority (88.4%, n=896) of respondents indicated that a large randomised controlled trial comparing 5% albumin to a crystalloid fluid in early septic shock was important to conduct. Conclusions Critical care and emergency physicians stated that they rapidly infuse volumes of 500–1000 mL of resuscitation fluid in early septic shock. Colloid use, specifically the use of albumin, was infrequently reported. Our survey identifies the need to conduct a trial on the efficacy of albumin and

  19. Dextrose containing intravenous fluid impairs outcome and increases death after eight minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    D'Alecy, L G; Lundy, E F; Barton, K J; Zelenock, G B

    1986-09-01

    Use of dextrose in intravenous resuscitation fluids is common practice; however, this study indicates that 5% dextrose solutions, even if administered in physiologic quantities, greatly worsens the outcome of survivable cardiac arrest. Twelve adult male mongrel dogs were premedicated with morphine, anesthetized with halothane, instrumented, intubated, and ventilated. Each dog was first given 500 ml of either lactated Ringer's (LR) (n = 6) or 5% dextrose in LR (D5LR) (n = 6). Halothane was stopped and fibrillation was induced (60 Hz). Blood glucose just before cardiac arrest was 129 mg/dl in the LR dogs and was increased to 335 mg/dl in the D5LR dogs. After eight minutes of arrest, resuscitation, including internal cardiac massage and standard advanced cardiac life support drug protocols (modified for dogs), was begun. When stable cardiac rhythm was obtained, the chest was closed, and LR or D5LR continued until a total of 1L was given. A neurologic score (0 = normal to 100 = dead) was assigned at 1, 2, 6, and 24 hours. The LR group did not differ statistically from the D5LR group in operative time, number of defibrillatory shocks, time to spontaneous ventilation, time to extubation, or drugs required. Resuscitation was successful in all six LR and five of six D5LR group; however, by 2 hours after resuscitation and thereafter, D5LR group had a significantly greater neurologic deficit (p less than 0.05) than did the LR group. By 9 hours, four of six D5LR dogs displayed convulsive activity and died. At 24 hours the D5LR group had a greater (p less than 0.008) neurologic deficit (82 +/- 11) than did the LR group (21 +/- 7), which walked and ate. We conclude that the addition of 5% dextrose to standard intravenous fluids greatly increases the morbidity and mortality associated with cardiac resuscitation. PMID:3738770

  20. Autoradiographic determination of regional cerebral blood flow and metabolism in conscious rats after fluid resuscitation from haemorrhage with a haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Waschke, K F; Albrecht, D M; van Ackern, K; Kuschinsky, W

    1994-10-01

    The effects of resuscitation fluids on the brain have been investigated in previous studies by global measurements of cerebral blood flow and metabolism. In this study we have examined the effects of a novel haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier on local cerebral blood flow (LCBF) and local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) after resuscitation from a volume-controlled haemorrhage of 30 min (3.0 ml/100 g body weight) with ultrapurified, polymerized, bovine haemoglobin (UPBHB). LCBF and LCGU were measured in 34 brain structures of conscious rats 2 h after resuscitation using quantitative iodo(14C)antipyrine and 2-(14C)-deoxy-D-glucose methods. The data were compared with a control group without haemorrhage and fluid resuscitation. In the haemorrhage group, LCBF increased after resuscitation by 12-56% in the different brain structures (mean 36%). LCGU changed less (0 to +18%, mean +9%). In the control group there was a close relationship between LCGU and LCBF (r = 0.95). After fluid resuscitation the relationship was preserved (r = 0.95), although it was reset at a higher ratio of LCBF to LCGU (P < 0.05). We conclude that fluid resuscitation of a 30 min volume-controlled haemorrhage using the haemoglobin-based oxygen carrier, UPBHB, induced a moderate degree of heterogeneity in the resulting changes of LCGU and LCBF. Local disturbances of cerebral blood flow or metabolism were not observed. PMID:7999496

  1. [Lazarus phenomenon: spontaneous resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Casielles García, J L; González Latorre, M V; Fernández Amigo, N; Guerra Vélz, A; Cotta Galán, M; Bravo Capaz, E; de las Mulas Béjar, M

    2004-01-01

    A 94-year-old woman undergoing surgery for simple repair of a duodenal perforation experienced a sudden massive hemorrhage (1500 mL) when the duodenum was separated from adjacent structures. Hemodynamic stability was re-established when fluids were replaced. After the abdominal wall was closed, increased amplitude of the QRS wave was observed and heart rate slowed until there was no pulse. Electromechanical dissociation (EMD) was diagnosed and cardiopulmonary resuscitation was started. When EMD persisted after 40 minutes, resuscitative measures were stopped and the ventilator was disconnected, though orotracheal intubation and arterial and electrocardiographic monitoring were maintained. After 2 or 3 minutes, heart rhythm restarted spontaneously and arterial pressure waves reappeared on the monitor. The patient progressed well for 72 hours, after which she developed septic shock and multiorgan failure, dying 18 days later. The Lazarus phenomenon may be more common than the medical literature would indicate, possibly because a large gap in our understanding of the pathophysiology of the phenomenon underlies anecdotes about "miracles". As we wait for adequate international consensus on a protocol for monitoring the withdrawal of resuscitative measures, we should act prudently before definitively certifying death. The case we report occurred during a surgical intervention in which the patient had received general anesthesia. We believe that the causes that might explain the Lazarus phenomenon are quite different in that context than they would be in a nonsurgical setting, such that it would be useful to create a national database to keep a record of such intraoperative events. PMID:15495638

  2. Plasma syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate correlate with microvascular glycocalyx degradation in hemorrhaged rats after different resuscitation fluids.

    PubMed

    Torres Filho, Ivo P; Torres, Luciana N; Salgado, Christi; Dubick, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx plays an essential role in many physiological functions and is damaged after hemorrhage. Fluid resuscitation may further change the glycocalyx after an initial hemorrhage-induced degradation. Plasma levels of syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate have been used as indirect markers for glycocalyx degradation, but the extent to which these measures are representative of the events in the microcirculation is unknown. Using hemorrhage and a wide range of resuscitation fluids, we studied quantitatively the relationship between plasma biomarkers and changes in microvascular parameters, including glycocalyx thickness. Rats were bled 40% of total blood volume and resuscitated with seven different fluids (fresh whole blood, blood products, and crystalloids). Intravital microscopy was used to estimate glycocalyx thickness in >270 postcapillary venules from 58 cremaster preparations in 9 animal groups; other microvascular parameters were measured using noninvasive techniques. Systemic physiological parameters and blood chemistry were simultaneously collected. Changes in glycocalyx thickness were negatively correlated with changes in plasma levels of syndecan-1 (r = -0.937) and heparan sulfate (r = -0.864). Changes in microvascular permeability were positively correlated with changes in both plasma biomarkers (r = 0.8, P < 0.05). Syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate were also positively correlated (r = 0.7, P < 0.05). Except for diameter and permeability, changes in local microcirculatory parameters (red blood cell velocity, blood flow, and wall shear rate) did not correlate with plasma biomarkers or glycocalyx thickness changes. This work provides a quantitative framework supporting plasma syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate as valuable clinical biomarkers of glycocalyx shedding that may be useful in guiding resuscitation strategies following hemorrhage. PMID:27037369

  3. Vasopressin Infusion with Small-Volume Fluid Resuscitation during Hemorrhagic Shock Promotes Hemodynamic Stability and Survival in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Gazmuri, Raúl J.; Whitehouse, Kasen; Whittinghill, Karla; Baetiong, Alvin; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Current management of hemorrhagic shock (HS) in the battlefield and civilian settings favors small-volume fluid resuscitation before controlling the source of bleeding. We investigated in a swine model of HS the effects of vasopressin infusion along with small-volume fluid resuscitation; with erythropoietin (EPO) and HS severity as additional factors. Methods HS was induced in 24 male domestic pigs (36 to 41 kg) by blood withdrawal (BW) through a right atrial cannula modeling spontaneous bleeding by a mono-exponential decay function. The initial 12 pigs received no fluids; the last 12 pigs received normal saline (NS) half the BW volume. Pigs were randomized 2:1 to receive intraosseously vasopressin (0.04 U/kg·min-1) or vehicle control from minute 7 to minute 210. Pigs assigned to vasopressin were further randomized 1:1 to receive EPO (1,200 U/kg) or vehicle control and 1:1 to have 65% or 75% BW of their blood volume. Shed blood was reinfused at 210 minutes and the pigs recovered from anesthesia. Results Survival at 72 hours was influenced by vasopressin and NS but not by EPO or % BW. Vasopressin with NS promoted the highest survival (8/8) followed by vasopressin without NS (3/8), NS without vasopressin (1/4), and neither treatment (0/4) with overall statistical significance (log-rank test, p = 0.009) and each subset different from vasopressin with NS by Holm-Sidak test. Vasopressin increased systemic vascular resistance whereas NS increased cardiac output. Conclusion Vasopressin infusion with small-volume fluid resuscitation during severe HS was highly effective enabling critical hemodynamic stabilization and improved 72 hour survival. PMID:26107942

  4. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carrick, Matthew M.; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S.; Mains, Charles W.

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  5. Hypotensive Resuscitation among Trauma Patients.

    PubMed

    Carrick, Matthew M; Leonard, Jan; Slone, Denetta S; Mains, Charles W; Bar-Or, David

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock is a principal cause of death among trauma patients within the first 24 hours after injury. Optimal fluid resuscitation strategies have been examined for nearly a century, more recently with several randomized controlled trials. Hypotensive resuscitation, also called permissive hypotension, is a resuscitation strategy that uses limited fluids and blood products during the early stages of treatment for hemorrhagic shock. A lower-than-normal blood pressure is maintained until operative control of the bleeding can occur. The randomized controlled trials examining restricted fluid resuscitation have demonstrated that aggressive fluid resuscitation in the prehospital and hospital setting leads to more complications than hypotensive resuscitation, with disparate findings on the survival benefit. Since the populations studied in each randomized controlled trial are slightly different, as is the timing of intervention and targeted vitals, there is still a need for a large, multicenter trial that can examine the benefit of hypotensive resuscitation in both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. PMID:27595109

  6. [Resuscitation of newborn infants].

    PubMed

    Kalmbach, Kilian; Leonhardt, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    Successful resuscitation of newborn infants depends on adequate preparation, exact evaluation and prompt initiation of support according to the recently updated recommendations by trained personnel. The key step in postnatal adaptation is the initiation of breathing with a subsequent increase in pulmonary blood flow and pulmonary gas exchange. Therefore, in compromised newborn infants, adequate ventilation is the most important step in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Ventilation should be initiated with room air in term infants and with low concentrations of supplemental oxygen in preterm infants. Subsequently, oxygen supplementation should always be guided by pulse oximetry. Chest compressions are only effective if adequate ventilation has been ensured. The compression ventilation ratio remains 3:1. The prevention of heat loss and maintaining a normal body temperature by adequate measures is an essential part of the care for healthy as well as asphyxiated infants. Therapeutic hypothermia should only be initiated after successful resuscitation and consultation with the regional neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:21815119

  7. Fluid resuscitation in modern combat casualty care: lessons learned from Somalia.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, John B

    2003-05-01

    The medical issues faced by military medics in the combat environment frequently represent a significant variation from their training and civilian experience. The differences between care delivered by military medics under fire and care rendered by civilian medics are profound. The lessons assimilated from extensive discussion and focused conferences form the basis for the proposed changes in combat prehospital care. These differences revolve around a lack of basic monitoring capability, significant logistical constraints, and prolonged evacuation times. The resuscitation algorithm presented in this article represents a consensus of military and civilian trauma experts. PMID:12768103

  8. The Physiologic Basis of Burn Shock and the Need for Aggressive Fluid Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Rae, Lisa; Fidler, Philip; Gibran, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Burn trauma in the current age of medical care still portends a 3% to 8% mortality. Of patients who die from their burn injuries, 58% of deaths occur in the first 72 hours after injury, indicating death from the initial burn shock is still a major cause of burn mortality. Significant thermal injury incites an inflammatory response, which distinguishes burns from other trauma. This article focuses on the current understanding of the pathophysiology of burn shock, the inflammatory response, and the direction of research and targeted therapies to improve resuscitation, morbidity, and mortality. PMID:27600122

  9. Effects of mild hypothermia therapy on the levels of glutathione in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hui; Chen, Yueliang

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of mild hypothermia therapy on oxidative stress injury of rabbit brain tissue after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Materials and Methods: Rabbit models of cardiac arrest were established. After the restoration of spontaneous circulation, 50 rabbits were randomly divided into normothermia and hypothermia groups. The following five time points were selected: before CPR, immediately after CPR, 2 hr after CPR (hypothermia group reached the target temperature), 14 hr after CPR (hypothermia group before rewarming), and 24 hr after CPR (hypothermia group recovered to normal temperature). Glutathione (GSH) concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the normothermia and hypothermia groups were measured. Results: At 2, 14, and 24 hr after CPR, the GSH concentrations in both the blood and cerebrospinal fluid were significantly higher in the hypothermia group than in the nomorthermia group. Conclusion: Mild hypothermia therapy may increase GSH concentrations in rabbit blood and cerebrospinal fluid after CPR as well as promote the recovery of cerebral function. PMID:25810895

  10. Meta-analysis of high- versus low-chloride content in perioperative and critical care fluid resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, M L; Raghunathan, K; Paluszkiewicz, S M; Schermer, C R; Shaw, A D

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the relationship between the chloride content of intravenous resuscitation fluids and patient outcomes in the perioperative or intensive care setting. Methods Systematic searches were performed of PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase and Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) databases in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical trials and observational studies were included if they compared outcomes in acutely ill or surgical patients receiving either high-chloride (ion concentration greater than 111 mmol/l up to and including 154 mmol/l) or lower-chloride (concentration 111 mmol/l or less) crystalloids for resuscitation. Endpoints examined were mortality, measures of kidney function, serum chloride, hyperchloraemia/metabolic acidosis, blood transfusion volume, mechanical ventilation time, and length of hospital and intensive care unit stay. Risk ratios (RRs), mean differences (MDs) or standardized mean differences (SMDs) and confidence intervals were calculated using fixed-effect modelling. Results The search identified 21 studies involving 6253 patients. High-chloride fluids did not affect mortality but were associated with a significantly higher risk of acute kidney injury (RR 1·64, 95 per cent c.i. 1·27 to 2·13; P < 0·001) and hyperchloraemia/metabolic acidosis (RR 2·87, 1·95 to 4·21; P < 0·001). High-chloride fluids were also associated with greater serum chloride (MD 3·70 (95 per cent c.i. 3·36 to 4·04) mmol/l; P < 0·001), blood transfusion volume (SMD 0·35, 0·07 to 0·63; P = 0·014) and mechanical ventilation time (SMD 0·15, 0·08 to 0·23; P < 0·001). Sensitivity analyses excluding heavily weighted studies resulted in non-statistically significant effects for acute kidney injury and mechanical ventilation time. Conclusion A weak but significant association between higher chloride content fluids and unfavourable

  11. Effects of Fluid Resuscitation With 0.9% Saline Versus a Balanced Electrolyte Solution on Acute Kidney Injury in a Rat Model of Sepsis*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Feihu; Peng, Zhi-Yong; Bishop, Jeffery V.; Cove, Matthew E.; Singbartl, Kai; Kellum, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the acute effects of 0.9% saline versus a balanced electrolyte solution on acute kidney injury in a rat model of sepsis. Design Controlled laboratory experiment. Setting University laboratory. Subjects Sixty adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions We induced sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture and randomized animals to receive fluid resuscitation with either 0.9% saline or Plasma-Lyte solution for 4 hours after 18 hours of cecal ligation and puncture (10 mL/kg in the first hour and 5 mL/kg in the next 3 hr). Blood and urine specimens were obtained from baseline, 18 hours after cecal ligation and puncture, immediately after 4 hours fluid resuscitation, and 24 hours later. We measured blood gas, plasma electrolytes, creatinine, interleukin-6, cystatin C, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin concentrations. We also analyzed urine for cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin. We used Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage criteria for creatinine to assess severity of acute kidney injury. We observed all animals for survival up to 1 day after resuscitation. Surviving animals were killed for kidney histology. Finally, we carried out an identical study in 12 healthy animals. Measurements and Main Results Compared with Plasma-Lyte, 0.9% saline resuscitation resulted in significantly greater blood chloride concentrations (p < 0.05) and significantly decreased pH and base excess. Acute kidney injury severity measured by RIFLE criteria was increased with 0.9% saline compared with Plasma-Lyte resuscitation (p < 0.05), and these results were consistent with kidney histology and biomarkers of acute kidney injury. Twenty-four-hour survival favored Plasma-Lyte resuscitation (76.6% vs 53.3%; p = 0.03). Finally, in healthy animals, we found no differences between fluids and no evidence of acute kidney injury. Conclusion Volume resuscitation with Plasma-Lyte resulted in less acidosis and less kidney injury and improved short

  12. Neurohypophyseal response to fluid resuscitation with hypertonic saline during septic shock in rats.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Michael Brian; Vieira, Alexandre Antonio; Elias, Lucila L K; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2013-02-01

    Septic shock is a serious condition with a consequent drop in blood pressure and inadequate tissue perfusion. Small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic saline (HS) has been proposed to restore physiological haemodynamics during haemorrhagic and endotoxic shock. In the present study, we sought to determine the effects produced by an HS infusion in rats subjected to caecal ligation and perforation (CLP). Male Wistar rats were randomly grouped and submitted to either CLP or sham surgery. Either HS (7.5% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) or isotonic saline (IS; 0.9% NaCl, 4 ml kg(-1) i.v.) was administered 6 h after CLP. Recordings of mean arterial pressure and heart rate were made during this protocol. Moreover, measurements of electrolyte, vasopressin and oxytocin secretion were analysed after either the HS or the IS treatment. Six hours after CLP, we observed a characteristic decrease in mean arterial pressure that occurs after CLP. The HS infusion in these rats produced a transient elevation of the plasma sodium concentration and osmolality and increased plasma vasopressin and oxytocin levels. Moreover, the HS infusion could restore the mean arterial pressure after CLP, which was completely blunted by the previous injection of the vasopressin but not the oxytocin antagonist. The present study demonstrated that rats subjected to CLP and an infusion of hypertonic saline respond with secretion of neurohypophyseal hormones and a transient increase in blood pressure mediated by the V(1) receptor. PMID:22903979

  13. Effects of Different Resuscitation Fluids on Pulmonary Expression of Aquaporin1 and Aquaporin5 in a Rat Model of Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yali; Lin, Shunyan; Du, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects of fluids resuscitation on pulmonary expression of aquaporin1 and aquaporin5 in a rat model of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and infection. Methods Sixty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to five groups, sham operation group (Group C) and four treated groups: no fluid resuscitation group (Group NF), groups resuscitated with Lactated Ringer's (LR),7.5% NaCl (HTS) and Hydroxyl ethyl starch (HES) respectively. Three-phased uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock and infection model was used. Phase I: Massive hemorrhage with a mean arterial pressure of 35–40 mmHg for 60 min, and followed by infection of lipopolysaccharide. Then some animals were resuscitated with solutions mentioned above, until 90 min. Phase II: At hemorrhagic shock 90 minutes, phase II of 60 minutes began with hemostasis and returning of all the initial shed blood. Phase III: Observation phase for 3.5 hours. After phase III, arterial blood gas analysis and the survival rates of the rats were recorded, Wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, BALF protein, pulmonary permeability index, and expressions of aquaporin1 and aquaporin5 were tested. Results The expressions of aquaporin1 and aquaporin5 were decreased in treatment groups comparing with sham operation group. Group HES and Group HTS decreased pulmonary vascular permeability and Wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, improved arterial blood gas analysis and survival rates, and attenuated the decreased pulmonary expression of aquaporin1 and aquaporin5 after the “two-hit”, comparing with groups NF and LR,but these beneficial effects were blunted in group HTS. Conclusion The expression of aquaporin1 and aquaporin5 may play important roles in formation of pulmonary edema. Resuscitation with HTS and HES, especially HES can reduce lung injury after hemorrhagic shock, partly by up-regulating the expressions of aquaporin1 and aquaporin5. PMID:23741323

  14. Colloids in Acute Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Greenhalgh, David

    2016-10-01

    Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury. Albumin, in contrast, is less expensive and safer and has demonstrated ability to reduce resuscitation requirements and possibly limit edema-related morbidity. PMID:27600123

  15. Burn Resuscitation in the Austere Environment.

    PubMed

    Peck, Michael; Jeng, James; Moghazy, Amr

    2016-10-01

    Intravenous (IV) cannulation and sterile IV salt solutions may not be options in resource-limited settings (RLSs). This article presents recipes for fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of burns occurring in RLSs. Burns of 20% total body surface area (TBSA) can be resuscitated, and burns up to 40% TBSA can most likely be resuscitated, using oral resuscitation solutions (ORSs) with salt supplementation. Without IV therapy, fluid resuscitation for larger burns may only be possible with ORSs. Published global experience is limited, and the magnitude of burn injuries that successfully respond to World Health Organization ORSs is not well-described. PMID:27600127

  16. In Vivo Evaluation of the Ameliorating Effects of Small-Volume Resuscitation with Four Different Fluids on Endotoxemia-Induced Kidney Injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-ling; Chen, Jing-hui; Zhu, Qiong-fang; Yu, Gao-feng; Luo, Chen-fang; Luo, Gang-jian; Li, Shang-rong; Hei, Zi-qing

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury associated with renal hypoperfusion is a frequent and severe complication during sepsis. Fluid resuscitation is the main therapy. However, heart failure is usually lethal for those patients receiving large volumes of fluids. We compared the effects of small-volume resuscitation using four different treatment regimens, involving saline, hypertonic saline (HTS), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HSH), on the kidneys of rats treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce endotoxemia. LPS injection caused reduced and progressively deteriorated systemic (arterial blood pressure) and renal hemodynamics (renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance index) over time. This deterioration was accompanied by marked renal functional and pathological injury, as well as an oxidative and inflammatory response, manifesting as increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase. Small-volume perfusion with saline failed to improve renal and systemic circulation. However, small-volume perfusion with HES and HSH greatly improved the above parameters, while HTS only transiently improved systemic and renal hemodynamics with obvious renal injury. Therefore, single small-volume resuscitation with HES and HSH could be valid therapeutic approaches to ameliorate kidney injury induced by endotoxemia, while HTS transiently delays injury and saline shows no protective effects. PMID:26273142

  17. In Vivo Evaluation of the Ameliorating Effects of Small-Volume Resuscitation with Four Different Fluids on Endotoxemia-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-ling; Chen, Jing-hui; Zhu, Qiong-fang; Yu, Gao-feng; Luo, Chen-fang; Luo, Gang-jian; Li, Shang-rong; Hei, Zi-qing

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury associated with renal hypoperfusion is a frequent and severe complication during sepsis. Fluid resuscitation is the main therapy. However, heart failure is usually lethal for those patients receiving large volumes of fluids. We compared the effects of small-volume resuscitation using four different treatment regimens, involving saline, hypertonic saline (HTS), hydroxyethyl starch (HES), or hypertonic saline hydroxyethyl starch (HSH), on the kidneys of rats treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to induce endotoxemia. LPS injection caused reduced and progressively deteriorated systemic (arterial blood pressure) and renal hemodynamics (renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance index) over time. This deterioration was accompanied by marked renal functional and pathological injury, as well as an oxidative and inflammatory response, manifesting as increased levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, nitric oxide, and malondialdehyde and decreased activity of superoxide dismutase. Small-volume perfusion with saline failed to improve renal and systemic circulation. However, small-volume perfusion with HES and HSH greatly improved the above parameters, while HTS only transiently improved systemic and renal hemodynamics with obvious renal injury. Therefore, single small-volume resuscitation with HES and HSH could be valid therapeutic approaches to ameliorate kidney injury induced by endotoxemia, while HTS transiently delays injury and saline shows no protective effects. PMID:26273142

  18. Endpoints of resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cestero, Ramon F; Dent, Daniel L

    2015-04-01

    Despite the multiple causes of the shock state, all causes possess the common abnormality of oxygen supply not meeting tissue metabolic demands. Compensatory mechanisms may mask the severity of hypoxemia and hypoperfusion, since catecholamines and extracellular fluid shifts initially compensate for the physiologic derangements associated with patients in shock. Despite the achievement of normal physiologic parameters after resuscitation, significant metabolic acidosis may continue to be present in the tissues, as evidenced by increased lactate levels and metabolic acidosis. This review discusses the major endpoints of resuscitation in clinical use. PMID:25814109

  19. [Automaton resuscitation (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lévy, E; Tollet, M; Cosnes, J

    1979-05-19

    The aim of the Automaton Resuscitation is execution, watching and maintenance of a programme of intricate resuscitation tying for the first time the therapeutic to extemporaneous outflow of biological spoliation. This apparatus executes permanently and automatically the taking of biological fluid, estimates its outflow, amounts its total and realizes or the reinstillation of the fluid in the digestive tract or the order of intravenous perfusion tied to fluid spoliation according to an adjustable connection. A first self acting regulator for the juice intestinal reinstillation has been made in 1974. The second one with 4 units of continuous aspiration, data integration, reinstillation and perfusion tied with security had waked for 6 months. Moreover it allows with fiability the reinstillation of the gastric, duodenal, bilious, pancreatic or intestinal juice, on the other hand an intravenous perfusion tied to spontaneous spoliation (digestive) or instigated spoliation (provocated diuresis) and in a fundamental way simplifies the work of the physicians and the nurses. PMID:471743

  20. Comparison of fluid types for resuscitation in acute hemorrhagic shock and evaluation of gastric luminal and transcutaneous Pco2 in Leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Wernick, Morena B; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Martin-Jurado, Olga; Howard, Judith; Vogler, Barbara; Vogt, Rainer; Codron, Daryl; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different fluid types for resuscitation after experimentally induced hemorrhagic shock in anesthetized chickens and to evaluate partial pressures of carbon dioxide measured in arterial blood (Paco2), with a transcutaneous monitor (TcPco2), with a gastric intraluminal monitor (GiPco2), and by end tidal measurements (Etco2) under stable conditions and after induced hemorrhagic shock. Hemorrhagic shock was induced in 40 white leghorn chickens by removing 50% of blood volume by phlebotomy under general anesthesia. Birds were divided into 4 groups: untreated (control group) and treated with intravenous hetastarch (haes group), with a hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier (hemospan group), or by autotransfusion (blood group). Respiratory rates, heart rates, and systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) were compared at 8 time points (baseline [T0]; at the loss of 10% [T10%], 20% [T20%], 30% [T30%], 40% [T40%], and 50% [T50%] of blood volume; at the end of resuscitation [RES]; and at the end of anesthesia [END]). Packed cell volume (PCV) and blood hemoglobin content were compared at 6 time points (T0, T50%, RES, and 1, 3, and 7 days after induced hemorrhagic shock). Measurements of Paco2, TcPco2, GiPco2, and Etco2 were evaluated at 2 time points (T0 and T50%), and venous lactic acid concentrations were evaluated at 3 time points (T0, T50%, and END). No significant differences were found in mortality, respiratory rate, heart rate, PCV, or hemoglobin values among the 4 groups. Birds given fluid resuscitation had significantly higher SAPs after fluid administration than did birds in the control group. In all groups, PCV and hemoglobin concentrations began to rise by day 3 after phlebotomy, and baseline values were reached 7 days after blood removal. At T0, TcPco2 did not differ significantly from Paco2, but GiPco2 and Etco2 differed significantly from Paco2. After hemorrhagic shock, GiPco2 and TcPco2 differed significantly

  1. Future Therapies in Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hodgman, Erica I; Subramanian, Madhu; Arnoldo, Brett D; Phelan, Herb A; Wolf, Steven E

    2016-10-01

    Since the 1940s, the resuscitation of burn patients has evolved with dramatic improvements in mortality. The most significant achievement remains the creation and adoption of formulae to calculate estimated fluid requirements to guide resuscitation. Modalities to attenuate the hypermetabolic phase of injury include pharmacologic agents, early enteral nutrition, and the aggressive approach of early excision of large injuries. Recent investigations into the genomic response to severe burns and the application of computer-based decision support tools will likely guide future resuscitation, with the goal of further reducing mortality and morbidity, and improving functional and quality of life outcomes. PMID:27600132

  2. The use of cytosolic enzyme increase in cerebrospinal fluid of patients resuscitated after cardiac arrest. Brain Resuscitation Clinical Trial I Study Group.

    PubMed

    Vaagenes, P; Mullie, A; Fodstad, D T; Abramson, N; Safar, P

    1994-11-01

    Levels of brain creatine phosphokinase (CPK), glutamic oxalic transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase, and lactate in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were analyzed as an adjunctive study in a randomized clinical trial evaluating the effects of thiopental loading intravenously in comatose survivors of cardiac arrest. Three hospitals participated and a total of 62 cases of enzyme changes were studied. Enzyme levels but not lactate were higher at 48 hours than at 24 hours after restoration of spontaneous circulation. All enzymes were highly correlated with one another at 24 and 48 hours (P < .001). There was a significant negative correlation between cerebral recovery and increased CPK levels at 24 hours (P < .05), and a highly significant correlation with all three enzyme levels at 48 hours (P < .0001). The increase of cytosolic enzyme activity in lumbar CSF reflects permanent brain damage, and there is a relationship between activity levels and cerebral outcome. PMID:7945601

  3. Reduced fluid volume requirement for resuscitation of third-degree burns with high-dose vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, T; Tanaka, H; Williams, S; Hanumadass, M; Abcarian, H; Reyes, H

    1991-01-01

    The effects of high-dose vitamin C therapy (170 mg, 340 mg, and 680 mg/kg/day) were evaluated in 70% body surface area third-degree burns in guinea pigs that were resuscitated with 1 ml/kg/%burn Ringer's lactate solution. The water content measurements of the burned skin at 24 hours after burn injury in the vitamin C-treated groups were significantly lower than those of the control group (1 ml/kg/%burn) and those of the standard resuscitation group (4 ml/kg/%burn). The cardiac outputs in the group that received 340 mg vitamin C were significantly higher than those of the control group but not significantly different than those of the standard therapy group at 2 hours after burn injury and thereafter. In comparison with the regimen of 340 mg vitamin C, the regimen of 680 mg vitamin C was no more beneficial, and the regimen of 170 mg was less effective. With administration of adjuvant high-dose vitamin C, we were able to reduce the total 24-hour resuscitation volume from 4 ml/kg/%burn to 1 ml/kg/%burn, while a comparable cardiac output was maintained. PMID:1779006

  4. Reduced resuscitation fluid volume for second-degree experimental burns with delayed initiation of vitamin C therapy (beginning 6 h after injury).

    PubMed

    Sakurai, M; Tanaka, H; Matsuda, T; Goya, T; Shimazaki, S; Matsuda, H

    1997-11-01

    We studied the hemodynamic effects of delayed initiation (6 h postburn) of antioxidant therapy with high-dose vitamin C in second-degree thermal injuries. Seventy percent body surface area burns were produced by subxiphoid immersion of 12 guinea pigs into 100 degrees C water for 3 s. The animals were resuscitated with Ringer's lactate solution (R/L) according to the Parkland formula (4 ml/kg/% burn during the first 24 h) from 6 h postburn, after which the resuscitation fluid volume was reduced to 25% of the Parkland formula volume. Animals were divided into two groups. The vitamin C group (n = 6) received R/L to which vitamin C (340 mg/kg/24 h) was added after 6 h postburn. The control group (n = 6) received R/L only. Both groups received identical resuscitation volumes. Heart rates, mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, hematocrit level, and water content of burned and unburned tissue were measured before injury and at intervals thereafter. No animals died. There were no significant differences in heart rates or blood pressures between the two groups throughout the 24-h study period. The vitamin C group showed significantly (P < 0.05) lower hematocrits 8 and 24 h postburn, and higher cardiac outputs after 7 h postburn. At 24 h postburn, the burned skin in the vitamin C group had a significantly (P < 0.05) lower water content (73.1 +/- 1.1) than that of the control group (76.0 +/- 0.8). In conclusion, delayed initiation of high-dose vitamin C therapy beginning 6 h postburn with 25% of the Parkland formula volume significantly reduced edema formation in burned tissue, while maintaining stable hemodynamics. PMID:9441788

  5. Vitamin C in Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Julie A; Rowan, Matthew P; Driscoll, Ian R; Chung, Kevin K; Friedman, Bruce C

    2016-10-01

    The inflammatory state after burn injury is characterized by an increase in capillary permeability that results in protein and fluid leakage into the interstitial space, increasing resuscitative requirements. Although the mechanisms underlying increased capillary permeability are complex, damage from reactive oxygen species plays a major role and has been successfully attenuated with antioxidant therapy in several disease processes. However, the utility of antioxidants in burn treatment remains unclear. Vitamin C is a promising antioxidant candidate that has been examined in burn resuscitation studies and shows efficacy in reducing the fluid requirements in the acute phase after burn injury. PMID:27600125

  6. Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Alterations of the intracranial pressure after normal saline, 3% saline and dextran-40.

    PubMed Central

    Gunnar, W P; Merlotti, G J; Barrett, J; Jonasson, O

    1986-01-01

    Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock by infusion of isotonic (normal) saline (NS) is accompanied by a transient elevation in intracranial pressure (ICP), although cerebral edema, as measured by brain weights at 24 hours, is prevented by adequate volume resuscitation. The transient increase in ICP is not observed during hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation. The effect of colloid resuscitation on ICP is unknown. Beagles were anesthetized, intubated, and ventilated, maintaining pCO2 between 30-45 torr. Femoral artery, pulmonary artery, and urethral catheters were positioned. ICP was measured with a subarachnoid bolt. Forty per cent of the dog's blood volume was shed and the shock state maintained for 1 hour. Resuscitation was done with shed blood and a volume of either NS (n = 5), 3% HS (n = 5), or 10% dextran-40 (D-40, n = 5) equal to the amount of shed blood. Intravascular volume was then maintained with NS. ICP fell from baseline values (4.7 +/- 3.13 mmHg) during the shock state and increased greatly during initial fluid resuscitation in NS and D-40 groups, to 16.0 +/- 5.83 mmHg and 16.2 +/- 2.68 mmHg, respectively. ICP returned to baseline values of 3.0 +/- 1.73 mmHg in the HS group with initial resuscitation and remained at baseline values throughout resuscitation. NS and D-40 ICP were greater than HS ICP at 1 hour (p less than .001) and 2 hours (p less than .05) after resuscitation. These results demonstrate that NS or colloid resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock elevates ICP and that HS prevents elevated ICP. PMID:2431664

  7. Geriatric Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Perera, Thomas; Cortijo-Brown, Alexis

    2016-08-01

    The geriatric population makes up a large portion of the emergency patient population. Geriatric patients have less reserve and more comorbid diseases. They are frequently on multiple medications and are more likely to require aggressive treatment during acute illness. Although it may not be obvious, it is important to recognize the signs of shock as early as possible. Special care and monitoring should be used when resuscitating the elderly. The use of bedside ultrasound and monitoring for coagulopathies are discussed. Clinicians should be constantly vigilant and reassess throughout diagnosis and treatment. Ethical considerations in this population need to be considered on an individual basis. PMID:27475009

  8. Resuscitative strategies in traumatic hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Managing trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock is complex and difficult. Despite our knowledge of the pathophysiology of hemorrhagic shock in trauma patients that we have accumulated during recent decades, the mortality rate of these patients remains high. In the acute phase of hemorrhage, the therapeutic priority is to stop the bleeding as quickly as possible. As long as this bleeding is uncontrolled, the physician must maintain oxygen delivery to limit tissue hypoxia, inflammation, and organ dysfunction. This process involves fluid resuscitation, the use of vasopressors, and blood transfusion to prevent or correct acute coagulopathy of trauma. The optimal resuscitative strategy is controversial. To move forward, we need to establish optimal therapeutic approaches with clear objectives for fluid resuscitation, blood pressure, and hemoglobin levels to guide resuscitation and limit the risk of fluid overload and transfusion. PMID:23311726

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: new concept.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwangha

    2012-05-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a series of life-saving actions that improve the chances of survival, following cardiac arrest. Successful resuscitation, following cardiac arrest, requires an integrated set of coordinated actions represented by the links in the Chain of Survival. The links include the following: immediate recognition of cardiac arrest and activation of the emergency response system, early CPR with an emphasis on chest compressions, rapid defibrillation, effective advanced life support, and integrated post-cardiac arrest care. The newest development in the CPR guideline is a change in the basic life support sequence of steps from "A-B-C" (Airway, Breathing, Chest compressions) to "C-A-B" (Chest compressions, Airway, Breathing) for adults. Also, "Hands-Only (compression only) CPR" is emphasized for the untrained lay rescuer. On the basis of the strength of the available evidence, there was unanimous support for continuous emphasis on high-quality CPR with compressions of adequate rate and depth, which allows for complete chest recoil, minimizing interruptions in chest compressions and avoiding excessive ventilation. High-quality CPR is the cornerstone of a system of care that can optimize outcomes beyond return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). There is an increased emphasis on physiologic monitoring to optimize CPR quality, and to detect ROSC. A comprehensive, structured, integrated, multidisciplinary system of care should be implemented in a consistent manner for the treatment of post-cardiac arrest care patients. The return to a prior quality and functional state of health is the ultimate goal of a resuscitation system of care. PMID:23101004

  10. Miniature oxygen resuscitator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Teegen, J. T.; Waddell, H.

    1969-01-01

    Miniature, portable resuscitation system is used during evacuation of patients to medical facilities. A carrying case contains a modified resuscitator head, cylinder of oxygen, two-stage oxygen regulator, low pressure tube, and a mask for mouth and nose.

  11. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation update.

    PubMed

    Lipley, Nick

    2014-11-01

    THE ROYAL College of Nursing (RCN), Resuscitation Council (UK) and British Medical Association (BMA) have issued a new edition of their guidance on when to attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). PMID:25369953

  12. Neonatal resuscitation: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Indu A

    2010-01-01

    The following guidelines are intended for practitioners responsible for resuscitating neonates. They apply primarily to neonates undergoing transition from intrauterine to extrauterine life. The updated guidelines on Neonatal Resuscitation have assimilated the latest evidence in neonatal resuscitation. Important changes with regard to the old guidelines and recommendations for daily practice are provided. Current controversial issues concerning neonatal resuscitation are reviewed and argued in the context of the ILCOR 2005 consensus. PMID:21189881

  13. Statins for post resuscitation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kämäräinen, Antti; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Silfvast, Tom; Tenhunen, Jyrki

    2009-07-01

    After sudden cardiac arrest, successful resuscitation and return of spontaneous circulation, a multi-faceted ischaemia/reperfusion related disorder develops. This condition now known as post resuscitation syndrome is characterised by marked increases in the inflammatory response and changes in coagulation profile and vascular reactivity. Additionally, the production of reactive oxygen species and activation of cytotoxic cascades of metabolism add to these injury mechanisms resulting in multiorgan perfusion deficits and dysfunction. Especially in the cerebrum these injuries may be the cause of significant morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has shown that statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) exert numerous beneficial effects in cardiovascular diseases irrespective of the lipid status. Remarkably, these pleiotropic effects seem to extended beyond cardiovascular diseases such as immunomodulative and antioxidative properties. We hypothesised that administration of statins early in the post resuscitation phase would prove beneficial in the resuscitated patient via several pleiotropic effects. These include inhibition of excessive coagulation and inflammatory response, suppression of oxygen radical production and improved vascular reactivity. The discussed effects are mediated via multiple pathways activated in the cardiac arrest victim, to which statins have been shown to have a beneficial modulating effect in experimental settings and non-cardiac arrest patients. To test this hypothesis in clinical practice, a randomized, controlled trial with sufficient power and standardised post resuscitation treatment would be necessary. The generally good tolerance of statin therapy with minimal adverse effects would support this experiment, although a parenteral form of the drug to ensure adequate dosage might be a prerequisite. PMID:19254829

  14. Influence of prehospital fluid resuscitation on patients with multiple injuries in hemorrhagic shock in patients from the DGU trauma registry

    PubMed Central

    Huβmann, Björn; Lefering, Rolf; Taeger, Georg; Waydhas, Christian; Ruchholtz, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Background: Severe bleeding as a result of trauma frequently leads to poor outcome by means of direct or delayed mechanisms. Prehospital fluid therapy is still regarded as the main option of primary treatment in many rescue situations. Our study aimed to assess the influence of prehospital fluid replacement on the posttraumatic course of severely injured patients in a retrospective analysis of matched pairs. Materials and Methods: We reviewed data from 35,664 patients recorded in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery (DGU). The following patients were selected: patients having an Injury Severity Score >16 points, who were ≥16 years of age, with trauma, excluding those with craniocerebral injuries, who were admitted directly to the participating hospitals from the accident site. All patients had recorded values for replaced volume and blood pressure, hemoglobin concentration, and units of packed red blood cells given. The patients were matched based on similar blood pressure characteristics, age groups, and type of accident to create pairs. Pairs were subdivided into two groups based on the volumes infused prior to hospitalization: group 1: 0-1500 (low), group 2: ≥2000 mL (high) volume. Results: We identified 1351 pairs consistent with the inclusion criteria. Patients in group 2 received significantly more packed red blood cells (group 1: 6.9 units, group 2: 9.2 units; P=0.001), they had a significantly reduced capacity of blood coagulation (prothrombin ratio: group 1: 72%, group 2: 61.4%; P≤0.001), and a lower hemoglobin value on arrival at hospital (group 1: 10.6 mg/dL, group 2: 9.1 mg/dL; P≤0.001). The number of ICU-free days concerning the first 30 days after trauma was significantly higher in group 1 (group 1: 11.5 d, group 2: 10.1 d; P≤0.001). By comparison, the rate of sepsis was significantly lower in the first group (group 1: 13.8%, group 2: 18.6%; P=0.002); the same applies to organ failure (group 1: 36.0%, group 2: 39

  15. A comparison of two smartphone applications and the validation of smartphone applications as tools for fluid calculation for burns resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Morris, R; Javed, M; Bodger, O; Hemington Gorse, S; Williams, D

    2014-08-01

    We conducted a randomised, blinded study to compare the accuracy and perceived usability of two smartphone apps (uBurn(©) and MerseyBurns(©)) and a general purpose electronic calculator for calculating fluid requirements using the Parkland formula. Bespoke software randomly generated simulated clinical data; randomly allocated the sequence of calculation methods; recorded participants' responses and response times; and calculated error magnitude. Participants calculated fluid requirements for nine scenarios (three for each: calculator, uBurn(©), MerseyBurns(©)); then rated ease of use (VAS) and preference (ranking), and made written comments. Data were analysed using ANOVA and qualitative methods. The sample population consisted of 34 volunteers who performed a total of 306 calculations. The three methods showed no significant difference in incidence or magnitude of errors. Mean (SD) response time in seconds for the calculator was 86.7 (50.7), compared to 71.7 (42.9) for uBurn(©) and 69.0 (35.6) for MerseyBurns(©). Both apps were significantly faster than the calculator (p=0.013 and p=0.017 respectively, ANOVA: Tukey's HSD test). All methods showed a learning effect (p<0.001). The participants rated ease of use on a VAS scale with a higher score indicating greater ease of use. The calculator was easiest to use with a mean score (SD) of 12.3 (2.1), followed by MerseyBurns(©) with 11.8 (2.7) and then uBurn(©) with 11.3 (2.7). The differences were not found to be significant at the p=0.05 level after using paired samples t-test and a multiple correction was applied manually. Preference ranking followed a similar trend with mean rankings (SD) of 1.85 (0.17), 1.94 (0.74) and 2.18 (0.90) for the calculator, MerseyBurns(©) and uBurn(©) respectively. Again, none of these differences were significant at the p=0.05 level. PMID:24246618

  16. Complicated Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David T

    2016-10-01

    More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply. All will require highly individualized resuscitations. PMID:27600129

  17. Effect of baseline serum albumin concentration on outcome of resuscitation with albumin or saline in patients in intensive care units: analysis of data from the saline versus albumin fluid evaluation (SAFE) study

    PubMed Central

    Study Investigators, SAFE

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine whether outcomes of resuscitation with albumin or saline in the intensive care unit depend on patients' baseline serum albumin concentration. Design Analysis of data from a double blind, randomised controlled trial. Setting Intensive care units of 16 hospitals in Australia and New Zealand. Participants 6045 participants in the saline versus albumin fluid evaluation (SAFE) study. Interventions Fluid resuscitation with 4% albumin or saline in patients with a baseline serum albumin concentration of 25 g/l or less or more than 25 g/l. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was all cause mortality at 28 days. Secondary outcomes were length of stay in the intensive care unit, length of stay in hospital, duration of renal replacement therapy, and duration of mechanical ventilation. Main results The odds ratios for death for albumin compared with saline for patients with a baseline serum albumin concentration of 25 g/l or less and more than 25 g/l were 0.87 and 1.09, respectively (ratio of odds ratios 0.80, 95% confidence interval 0.63 to 1.02); P=0.08 for heterogeneity. No significant interaction was found between baseline serum albumin concentration as a continuous variable and the effect of albumin and saline on mortality. No consistent interaction was found between baseline serum albumin concentration and treatment effects on length of stay in the intensive care unit, length of hospital stay, duration of renal replacement therapy, or duration of mechanical ventilation. Conclusion The outcomes of resuscitation with albumin and saline are similar irrespective of patients' baseline serum albumin concentration. Trial registration ISRCTN76588266. PMID:17040925

  18. How to Avoid Fluid Overload

    PubMed Central

    Ogbu, Ogbonna C.; Murphy, David J.; Martin, Greg S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review This review highlights recent evidence describing the outcomes associated with fluid overload in critically ill patients and provides an overview of fluid management strategies aimed at preventing fluid overload during the resuscitation of patients with shock. Recent findings Fluid overload is a common complication of fluid resuscitation and is associated with increased hospital costs, morbidity and mortality. Summary Fluid management goals differ during the resuscitation, optimization, stabilization and evacuation phases of fluid resuscitation. To prevent fluid overload, strategies that reduce excessive fluid infusions and emphasize the removal of accumulated fluids should be implemented. PMID:26103147

  19. Protocol for a systematic review of the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components compared to other resuscitative fluids in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is growing interest in the use of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation of patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. It has been speculated that early resuscitation with blood components may have benefits in terms of treating trauma-induced coagulopathy, which in turn may influence survival. The proposed systematic review will evaluate the evidence on the clinical effectiveness of pre-hospital blood components (red blood cells and/or plasma or whole blood), in both civilian and military settings, compared with other resuscitation strategies in patients with major traumatic haemorrhage. Methods/design Standard systematic review methods aimed at minimising bias will be employed for study identification, selection and data extraction. General medical and specialist databases will be searched; the search strategy will combine terms for the population, intervention and setting. Studies will be selected for review if the population includes adult patients with major traumatic haemorrhage who receive blood components in a pre-hospital setting (civilian or military). Systematic reviews, randomised and non-randomised controlled trials and controlled observational studies will be included. Uncontrolled studies will be considered depending on the volume of controlled evidence. Quality assessment will be tailored to different study designs. Both patient related and surrogate outcomes will be considered. Synthesis is likely to be primarily narrative, but meta-analyses and subgroup analyses will be undertaken where clinical and methodological homogeneity exists. Discussion Given the increasing use by emergency services of blood components for pre-hospital resuscitation, this is a timely systematic review, which will attempt to clarify the evidence base for this practice. As far as the authors are aware, the proposed systematic review will be the first to address this topic. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42014013794 PMID:25344301

  20. Intrapartum fetal resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Cowan, D B

    1980-08-30

    Fetal distress is defined. The pathophysiology of fetal distress is discussed and tretment is recommended. The principles of intrapartum fetal resuscitation are proposed, with particular reference to the inhibition of uterine activity. PMID:7404260

  1. Fluid management in patients with trauma: Restrictive versus liberal approach.

    PubMed

    Chatrath, Veena; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Ahuja, Jogesh

    2015-01-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death worldwide, and almost 30% of trauma deaths are due to blood loss. A number of concerns have been raised regarding the advisability of the classic principles of aggressive crystalloid resuscitation in traumatic hemorrhagic shock. Some recent studies have shown that early volume restoration in certain types of trauma before definite hemostasis may result in accelerated blood loss, hypothermia, and dilutional coagulopathy. This review discusses the advances and changes in protocols in fluid resuscitation and blood transfusion for treatment of traumatic hemorrhage shock. The concept of low volume fluid resuscitation also known as permissive hypotension avoids the adverse effects of early aggressive resuscitation while maintaining a level of tissue perfusion that although lower than normal, is adequate for short periods. Permissive hypotension is part of the damage control resuscitation strategy, which targets the conditions that exacerbate hemorrhage. The elements of this strategy are permissive hypotension, minimization of crystalloid resuscitation, control of hypothermia, prevention of acidosis, and early use of blood products to minimize coagulopathy. PMID:26330707

  2. A protocol for resuscitation of severe burn patients guided by transpulmonary thermodilution and lactate levels: a 3-year prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    pressure and hourly urine output. An adequate CI and tissue perfusion can be achieved with below-normal levels of preload. Early resuscitation guided by lactate levels and below-normal preload volume targets appears safe and avoids unnecessary fluid input. PMID:23947945

  3. Improving outcome in severe trauma: trauma systems and initial management: intubation, ventilation and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tim; Davenport, Ross; Hurst, Tom; Jones, Jonathan

    2012-10-01

    Severe trauma is an increasing global problem mainly affecting fit and healthy younger adults. Improvements in the entire pathway of trauma care have led to improvements in outcome. Development of a regional trauma system based around a trauma centre is associated with a 15-50% reduction in mortality. Trauma teams led by senior doctors provide better care. Although intuitively advantageous, the involvement of doctors in the pre-hospital care of trauma patients currently lacks clear evidence of benefit. Poor airway management is consistently identified as a cause of avoidable morbidity and mortality. Rapid sequence induction/intubation is frequently indicated but the ideal drugs have yet to be identified. The benefits of cricoid pressure are not clear cut. Dogmas in the management of pneumothoraces have been challenged: chest x-ray has a role in the diagnosis of tension pneumothoraces, needle aspiration may be ineffective, and small pneumothoraces can be managed conservatively. Identification of significant haemorrhage can be difficult and specific early resuscitation goals are not easily definable. A hypotensive approach may limit further bleeding but could worsen significant brain injury. The ideal initial resuscitation fluid remains controversial. In appropriately selected patients early aggressive blood product resuscitation is beneficial. Hypothermia can exacerbate bleeding and the benefit in traumatic brain injury is not adequately studied for firm recommendations. PMID:23014941

  4. Brain resuscitation. Ethical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Omery, A; Caswell, D

    1989-03-01

    Brain resuscitation is the newest in a long line of treatment protocols that is designed to aid us in sustaining not just life, but quality life in the critical care setting. Like other, previously established protocols, it is not value free. Its implementation brings ethical considerations that must be addressed. If the issues are not addressed, there is the real danger that the resulting moral dilemmas will overwhelm the nurse. In brain resuscitation, there are at least three ethical issues that must be recognized. These are the role of resuscitation in the life process, allocation of scarce resources, and participation in research. To address these issues, nurses will have to be aware of the ethical principle and/or perspectives involved. For some of these issues, the solutions will have to come from nursing's national organizations, such as the American Association of Critical Care Nurses. Other solutions presented will require the nurse to come to an individual decision regarding the ethics of brain resuscitation. The journey to the conclusion of this discussion will end with disappointment for those who sought an algorhythm or decision tree with which to make definitive decisions in regard to ethical decisions about brain resuscitation. To have assumed that such an absolute discussion in regard to the ethical perspectives related to brain resuscitation is possible or even desirable would have been to deny the moral/ethical responsibilities of the nurse who practices in a critical care setting. While these ethical responsibilities can be overwhelmingly burdensome, they can also be opportunities. They can be positive opportunities for our health care colleagues, our patients, and ourselves. PMID:2803694

  5. International Guidelines for Neonatal Resuscitation: An excerpt from the Guidelines 2000 for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care: International Consensus on Science. Contributors and Reviewers for the Neonatal Resuscitation Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Niermeyer, S; Kattwinkel, J; Van Reempts, P; Nadkarni, V; Phillips, B; Zideman, D; Azzopardi, D; Berg, R; Boyle, D; Boyle, R; Burchfield, D; Carlo, W; Chameides, L; Denson, S; Fallat, M; Gerardi, M; Gunn, A; Hazinski, M F; Keenan, W; Knaebel, S; Milner, A; Perlman, J; Saugstad, O D; Schleien, C; Solimano, A; Speer, M; Toce, S; Wiswell, T; Zaritsky, A

    2000-09-01

    The International Guidelines 2000 Conference on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) and Emergency Cardiac Care (ECC) formulated new evidenced-based recommendations for neonatal resuscitation. These guidelines comprehensively update the last recommendations, published in 1992 after the Fifth National Conference on CPR and ECC. As a result of the evidence evaluation process, significant changes occurred in the recommended management routines for: * Meconium-stained amniotic fluid: If the newly born infant has absent or depressed respirations, heart rate <100 beats per minute (bpm), or poor muscle tone, direct tracheal suctioning should be performed to remove meconium from the airway. * Preventing heat loss: Hyperthermia should be avoided. * Oxygenation and ventilation: 100% oxygen is recommended for assisted ventilation; however, if supplemental oxygen is unavailable, positive-pressure ventilation should be initiated with room air. The laryngeal mask airway may serve as an effective alternative for establishing an airway if bag-mask ventilation is ineffective or attempts at intubation have failed. Exhaled CO(2) detection can be useful in the secondary confirmation of endotracheal intubation. * Chest compressions: Compressions should be administered if the heart rate is absent or remains <60 bpm despite adequate assisted ventilation for 30 seconds. The 2-thumb, encircling-hands method of chest compression is preferred, with a depth of compression one third the anterior-posterior diameter of the chest and sufficient to generate a palpable pulse. * Medications, volume expansion, and vascular access: Epinephrine in a dose of 0.01-0.03 mg/kg (0.1-0.3 mL/kg of 1:10,000 solution) should be administered if the heart rate remains <60 bpm after a minimum of 30 seconds of adequate ventilation and chest compressions. Emergency volume expansion may be accomplished with an isotonic crystalloid solution or O-negative red blood cells; albumin-containing solutions are no longer the

  6. Management of acute burns and burn shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Faldmo, L; Kravitz, M

    1993-05-01

    Initial management of minor and moderate, uncomplicated burn injury focuses on wound management and patient comfort. Initial management of patients with major burn injury requires airway support, fluid resuscitation for burn shock, treatment for associated trauma and preexisting medical conditions, management of adynamic ileus, and initial wound treatment. Fluid resuscitation, based on assessment of the extent and depth of burn injury, requires administration of intravenous fluids using resuscitation formula guidelines for the initial 24 hours after injury. Inhalation injury complicates flame burns and increases morbidity and mortality. Electrical injury places patients at risk for cardiac arrest, metabolic acidosis, and myoglobinuria. Circumferential full-thickness burns to extremities compromise circulation and require escharotomy or fasciotomy. Circumferential torso burns compromise air exchange and cardiac return. Loss of skin function places patients at risk for hypothermia, fluid and electrolyte imbalances, and systemic sepsis. The first 24 hours after burn injury require aggressive medical management to assure survival and minimize complications. PMID:8489882

  7. [Mechanical resuscitation assist devices].

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Breil, M; Ihli, M; Messelken, M; Rauch, S; Schewe, J-C

    2014-03-01

    In Germany 100,000-160,000 people suffer from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) annually. The incidence of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) after OHCA varies between emergency ambulance services but is in the range of 30-90 CPR attempts per 100,000 inhabitants per year. Basic life support (BLS) involving chest compressions and ventilation is the key measure of resuscitation. Rapid initiation and quality of BLS are the most critical factors for CPR success. Even healthcare professionals are not always able to ensure the quality of CPR measures. Consequently in recent years mechanical resuscitation devices have been developed to optimize chest compression and the resulting circulation. In this article the mechanical resuscitation devices currently available in Germany are discussed and evaluated scientifically in context with available literature. The ANIMAX CPR device should not be used outside controlled trials as no clinical results have so far been published. The same applies to the new device Corpuls CPR which will be available on the market in early 2014. Based on the current published data a general recommendation for the routine use of LUCAS™ and AutoPulse® CPR cannot be given. The preliminary data of the CIRC trial and the published data of the LINC trial revealed that mechanical CPR is apparently equivalent to good manual CPR. For the final assessment further publications of large randomized studies must be analyzed (e.g. the CIRC and PaRAMeDIC trials). However, case control studies, case series and small studies have already shown that in special situations and in some cases patients will benefit from the automatic mechanical resuscitation devices (LUCAS™, AutoPulse®). This applies especially to emergency services where standard CPR quality is far below average and for patients who require prolonged CPR under difficult circumstances. This might be true in cases of resuscitation due to hypothermia, intoxication and pulmonary embolism as well as

  8. [Resuscitation - Adult advanced life support].

    PubMed

    Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Bein, Berthold

    2016-03-01

    Enhanced measures for resuscitation of adults are based on basic measures of resuscitation. The central elements are highly effective chest compressions and avoidance of disruptions that are associated with poor patient outcomes that occur within seconds. The universal algorithm distinguishes the therapy for ventricular fibrillation from the therapy in asystole or pulseless electrical activity (PEA) by the need of defibrillation, and amiodarone administration in the former. Defibrillation is biphasic. In all other aspects, there are no differences in therapy. In each episode of cardiac arrest, reversible causes should be excluded or treated. For the diagnosis during resuscitation, sonography can be helpful. What is new in the 2015 ERC recommendations is the use of capnography, which can be used for the assessment of ROSC (return of spontaneous circulation), ventilation, resuscitation and intubation quality. Mechanical resuscitation devices can be used in selected situations. Successful primary resuscitation should be directly followed by measures of the post-resuscitation care. PMID:27022698

  9. Witnessed resuscitation: a concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Wendy Marina

    2006-03-01

    The science and practice of resuscitation is recognised and endorsed on an international level, yet for more than a decade it has appeared in the literature alongside words such as witnessing or witnessed to signify the practice of family presence during a resuscitation attempt. This paper explores the meaning of witnessed resuscitation using the process for concept analysis proposed by Rodgers. The term resuscitation is explored, followed by identification of relevant uses of the concept of witnessed resuscitation. The reader is introduced to conceptual variations that challenge the way in which the concept has become associated with family or relatives presence in the resuscitation room of an accident and emergency department. Conceptual clarity is further enhanced through the identification of references, antecedents and consequences of witnessed resuscitation and by providing a model case of the concept that includes its defining attributes. PMID:16043184

  10. Termination of resuscitative efforts: medical futility for the trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, M

    2001-12-01

    Despite years of research on the resuscitation of the patient with critical traumatic injuries, controversy remains surrounding the criteria to waive initiation of resuscitation in the pre-hospital setting or to terminate such efforts in the emergency department. The decision to initiate or continue resuscitation on moribund trauma patients is associated with considerable costs. Ambulance transport using lights and sirens carries potential risk. Emergency department thoracotomy, with exposure to high risk bodily fluids, involvement of numerous staff, and usage precious blood products, is a procedure that has fewer and fewer indications. This review presents guidelines to help determine when to initiate resuscitation for the critically injured trauma patient and when to cease these efforts in the emergency department. Since there are economic, societal, and ethical implications, each system should establish their own criteria, using these guidelines as a basis. PMID:11805549

  11. The use of multiple intraosseous catheters in combat casualty resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debjeet; Philbeck, Thomas

    2009-02-01

    During the current military engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan, establishing intravenous (IV) access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties remains a persistent challenge. Intraosseous (IO) access has emerged as a viable alternative in resuscitation. In this case report, a 19 year-old male soldier was severely wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq. Given the heavy initial blood loss, anatomic location of the injuries and gross wound contamination, peripheral IV access could not be established. Instead, multiple IO catheters were used to initiate fluid resuscitation prior to transfer to a combat support hospital. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such extensive usage of IO catheters. Multiple IO catheters can be placed rapidly and safely and may help solve the challenge of establishing vascular access for resuscitation of critically injured casualties. PMID:19317188

  12. ROC trials update on prehospital hypertonic saline resuscitation in the aftermath of the US-Canadian trials

    PubMed Central

    Dubick, Michael A; Shek, Pang; Wade, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this review are to assess the current state of hypertonic saline as a prehospital resuscitation fluid in hypotensive trauma patients, particularly after the 3 major Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trauma trials in the US and Canada were halted due to futility. Hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury are the leading causes of death in both military and civilian populations. Prehospital fluid resuscitation remains controversial in civilian trauma, but small-volume resuscitation with hypertonic fluids is of utility in military scenarios with prolonged or delayed evacuation times. A large body of pre-clinical and clinical literature has accumulated over the past 30 years on the hemodynamic and, most recently, the anti-inflammatory properties of hypertonic saline, alone or with dextran-70. This review assesses the current state of hypertonic fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of the failed Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium trials. PMID:23778489

  13. Is the solvation parameter model or its adaptations adequate to account for ionic interactions when characterizing stationary phases for drug impurity profiling with supercritical fluid chromatography?

    PubMed

    Galea, Charlene; West, Caroline; Mangelings, Debby; Vander Heyden, Yvan

    2016-06-14

    Nine commercially available polar and aromatic stationary phases were characterized under supercritical fluid chromatographic (SFC) conditions. Retention data of 64 pharmaceutical compounds was acquired to generate models based on the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER) approach. Previously, adaptation of the LSER model was done in liquid chromatography by the addition of two solute descriptors to describe the influence of positive (D(+)) and negative (D(-)) charges on the retention of ionized compounds. In this study, the LSER models, with and without the ionization terms for acidic and basic solutes, were compared. The improved fits obtained for the modified models support inclusion of the D(+) and D(-) terms for pharmaceutical compounds. Moreover, the statistical significance of the new terms in the models indicates the importance of ionic interactions in the retention of pharmaceutical compounds in SFC. However, unlike characterization through the retention profiles, characterization of the stationary phases by modelling never explains the retention variance completely and thus seems less appropriate. PMID:27181639

  14. Damage control resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pohlman, Timothy H; Walsh, Mark; Aversa, John; Hutchison, Emily M; Olsen, Kristen P; Lawrence Reed, R

    2015-07-01

    The early recognition and management of hemorrhage shock are among the most difficult tasks challenging the clinician during primary assessment of the acutely bleeding patient. Often with little time, within a chaotic setting, and without sufficient clinical data, a decision must be reached to begin transfusion of blood components in massive amounts. The practice of massive transfusion has advanced considerably and is now a more complete and, arguably, more effective process. This new therapeutic paradigm, referred to as damage control resuscitation (DCR), differs considerably in many important respects from previous management strategies for catastrophic blood loss. We review several important elements of DCR including immediate correction of specific coagulopathies induced by hemorrhage and management of several extreme homeostatic imbalances that may appear in the aftermath of resuscitation. We also emphasize that the foremost objective in managing exsanguinating hemorrhage is always expedient and definitive control of the source of bleeding. PMID:25631636

  15. Resuscitation in the dental practice.

    PubMed

    Jevon, P

    2016-03-11

    The Resuscitation Council (UK) published new resuscitation guidelines in October 2015. The aim of this article is to understand these new guidelines and how dental practices should implement them. A 'resuscitation in the dental practice poster' has been designed which incorporates the new Resuscitation Council (UK) adult basic life support algorithm. This poster, endorsed by the British Dental Association, is included with this issue of the British Dental Journal. Further copies can be downloaded from: https://www.walsallhealthcare.nhs.uk/Data/Sites/1/media/documents/health-and-safety/resus.pdf. PMID:26964602

  16. Comparison of the Fluid Resuscitation Rate with and without External Pressure Using Two Intraosseous Infusion Systems for Adult Emergencies, the CITRIN (Comparison of InTRaosseous infusion systems in emergency medicINe)-Study

    PubMed Central

    Gries, André; Hossfeld, Björn; Bechmann, Ingo; Bernhard, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intraosseous infusion is recommended if peripheral venous access fails for cardiopulmonary resuscitation or other medical emergencies. The aim of this study, using body donors, was to compare a semi-automatic (EZ-IO®) device at two insertion sites and a sternal intraosseous infusion device (FASTR™). Methods Twenty-seven medical students being inexperienced first-time users were randomized into three groups using EZ-IO and FASTR. The following data were evaluated: attempts required for successful placement, insertion time and flow rates with and without external pressure to the infusion. Results The first-pass insertion success of the EZ-IO tibia, EZ-IO humerus and FASTR was 91%, 77%, and 95%, respectively. Insertion times (MW±SD) did not show significant differences with 17±7 (EZ-IO tibia) vs. 29±42 (EZ-IO humerus) vs. 33±21 (FASTR), respectively. One-minute flow rates using external pressures between 0 mmHg and 300 mmHg ranged between 27±5 to 69±54 ml/min (EZ-IO tibia), 16±3 to 60±44 ml/min (EZ-IO humerus) and 53±2 to 112±47 ml/min (FASTR), respectively. Concerning pressure-related increases in flow rates, negligible correlations were found for the EZ-IO tibia in all time frames (c = 0.107–0.366; p≤0.013), moderate positive correlations were found for the EZ-IO humerus after 5 minutes (c = 0.489; p = 0.021) and strong positive correlations were found for the FASTR in all time frames (c = 0.63–0.80; p≤0.007). Post-hoc statistical power was 0.62 with the given sample size. Conclusions The experiments with first-time users applying EZ-IO and FASTR in body donors indicate that both devices may be effective intraosseous infusion devices, likely suitable for fluid resuscitation using a pressure bag. Variations in flow rate may limit their reliability. Larger sample sizes will prospectively be required to substantiate our findings. PMID:26630579

  17. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: current guidelines.

    PubMed

    Green, Bart N; Clark, Tammi

    2005-01-01

    It is critical for health care providers to have the skills and composure required to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) when necessary. Unfortunately, it is easy to postpone updating one's CPR certification when confronted with the demands of leading a practice. New guidelines for CPR have been in effect since 2000. This clinical update provides a brief overview of the new guidelines, some suggestions for incorporating CPR training into the clinician's practice, and clarification for some common legal misconceptions that doctors may have pertaining to administering CPR. PMID:19674653

  18. New perspectives of volemic resuscitation in polytrauma patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Bedreag, Ovidiu Horea; Papurica, Marius; Rogobete, Alexandru Florin; Sarandan, Mirela; Cradigati, Carmen Alina; Vernic, Corina; Dumbuleu, Corina Maria; Nartita, Radu; Sandesc, Dorel

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, fluid resuscitation of multiple trauma patients is still a challenging therapy. Existing therapies for volume replacement in severe haemorrhagic shock can lead to adverse reactions that may be fatal for the patient. Patients presenting with multiple trauma often develop hemorrhagic shock, which triggers a series of metabolic, physiological and cellular dysfunction. These disorders combined, lead to complications that significantly decrease survival rate in this subset of patients. Volume and electrolyte resuscitation is challenging due to many factors that overlap. Poor management can lead to post-resuscitation systemic inflammation causing multiple organ failure and ultimately death. In literature, there is no exact formula for this purpose, and opinions are divided. This paper presents a review of modern techniques and current studies regarding the management of fluid resuscitation in trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock. According to the literature and from clinical experience, all aspects regarding post-resuscitation period need to be considered. Also, for every case in particular, emergency therapy management needs to be rigorously respected considering all physiological, biochemical and biological parameters. PMID:27574675

  19. Initial resuscitation and management of pediatric septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kelly; Weiss, Scott L.

    2015-01-01

    The pediatric sepsis syndrome remains a common cause of morbidity, mortality, and health care utilization costs worldwide. The initial resuscitation and management of pediatric sepsis is focused on 1) rapid recognition of abnormal tissue perfusion and restoration of adequate cardiovascular function, 2) eradication of the inciting invasive infection, including prompt administration of empiric broad-spectrum antimicrobial medications, and 3) supportive care of organ system dysfunction. Efforts to improve early and aggressive initial resuscitation and ongoing management strategies have improved outcomes in pediatric severe sepsis and septic shock, though many questions still remain as to the optimal therapeutic strategies for many patients. In this article, we will briefly review the definitions, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and pathophysiology of sepsis and provide an extensive overview of both current and novel therapeutic strategies used to resuscitate and manage pediatric patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:25604591

  20. Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation-Mediated Tissue Water Distribution is Normalized by Adjunctive Peritoneal Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Matheson, Paul J; Flessner, Michael F; Garrison, R Neal

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Adjunctive direct peritoneal resuscitation (DPR) from hemorrhagic shock (HS) improves intestinal blood flow and abrogates postresuscitation edema. HS causes water shifts as a result of sodium redistribution and changes in transcapillary Starling forces. Conventional resuscitation (CR) with crystalloid aggravates water sequestration. We examined the compartment pattern of organ tissue water after HS and CR, and modulation of tissue edema by adjunctive DPR. STUDY DESIGN Rats were hemorrhaged (40% mean arterial pressure for 60 minutes) and assigned to four groups (n = 7): sham, no HS; HS no resuscitation; HS+CR (shed blood plus 2 volumes Ringer’s lactate); and HS+CR+DPR (20 mL clinical intraperitoneal (IP) dialysis fluid). Isotopic markers determined equilibrium distribution volumes [VD] in gut, liver, lung, and muscle by quantitative autoradiography (2-hour postresuscitation). Total tissue water (TTW) was determined by wet-dry weights. Extracellular water was measured from 14C-mannitol VD, and intravascular volume (IVV) from 131I-labeled IgG VD. Cellular and interstitial water volumes were calculated. RESULTS HS alone decreased IVV in all tissues and TTW in gut, lung, and muscle, but not liver, compared with shams. IVV remained decreased with all resuscitations despite restoration of central hemodynamics. CR caused interstitial edema in gut, liver, and muscle, and cellular edema in lung. DPR reduced (liver, muscle) or prevented (gut, lung) these volume shifts. CONCLUSIONS HS decreases IVV. HS-induced water shifts are organ-specific and prominent in gut, lung, and muscle. CR restores central hemodynamics, does not restore IVV, and alters organ-specific TTW distribution. Adjunctive DPR with IP dialysis fluid normalizes TTW and water compartment distribution and prevents edema. Combined effect of DPR and intravascular fluid replacement appears to prevent global tissue edema and improve outcomes from HS. PMID:18471737

  1. Thermal skin injury: I. Acute hemodynamic effects of fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's, plasma, and hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Lund, T; Reed, R

    1989-01-01

    Heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and cardiac index (CI) were measured in anesthetized rats subjected to a 40% body surface area full-thickness scald burn. Postburn intravenous fluid therapy with lactated Ringer's (5 ml/hr), plasma (2.5 ml/hr), or very hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) (0.75 ml/hr) was compared to unburned or burned, untreated controls. HR and CVP were not influenced significantly by thermal injury. MAP decreased steadily in the untreated group from 110 mmHg to 80 mmHg at 3 hr postburn. In the fluid-treated groups MAP did not change significantly. During the first 15 min postburn, CI was reduced to 58-71% of control values (P less than 0.01). CI increased during Ringer's and plasma infusion to 74-80% of control values (P less than 0.02 vs. unburned). Despite infusion therapy, hematocrit increased from 48 to 52%, clearly less than in the unresuscitated group (increase from 48 to 58%). Theoretically, the 2,400 mosmol/l saline would expand extracellular volume by five to six times the infused volume. Still, CI was reduced by 55% at 3 hr postburn in the hypertonic saline as well as in the burned, untreated group (P less than 0.001 vs. unburned). The low CI was mainly due to a reduced stroke volume. PMID:2917370

  2. First resuscitation of critical burn patients: progresses and problems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sánchez, M; García-de-Lorenzo, A; Asensio, M J

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the aim of the resuscitation of burn patients is to maintain end-organ perfusion with fluid intake as minimal as possible. To avoid excess intake, we can improve the estimation using computer methods. Parkland and Brooke are the commonly used formulas, and recently, a new, an easy formula is been used, i.e. the 'Rule of TEN'. Fluid resuscitation should be titrated to maintain the urine output of approximately 30-35 mL/h for an average-sized adult. The most commonly used fluids are crystalloid, but the phenomenon of creep flow has renewed interest in albumin. In severely burn patients, monitoring with transpulmonary thermodilution together with lactate, ScvO2 and intraabdominal pressures is a good option. Nurse-driven protocols or computer-based resuscitation algorithms reduce the dependence on clinical decision making and decrease fluid resuscitation intake. High-dose vitamin C, propranolol, the avoidance of excessive use of morphine and mechanical ventilation are other useful resources. PMID:26873418

  3. Trauma systems, shock, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fallon, W F

    1993-01-01

    This review of early care covers issues pertaining to the analysis of system function, prehospital intravascular volume replacement, diagnosis of proximity vascular injury, the role of emergency thoracotomy, and the value of transesophageal echocardiography. The first six articles deal with various aspects of system function, from triage to analysis of outcome. The next series of articles reviews work in progress evaluating optimal fluid for resuscitation. Hypertonic saline and dextran combinations have been shown to restore vital signs better than isotonic solutions; they are safe, require smaller volumes, and may improve head injury outcome. Danger lies in the restoration of perfusion without hemorrhage control. Two articles on emergency thoracotomy review the indications and outcome in blunt and penetrating trauma. Survival in blunt trauma is virtually zero. An article and two editorials summarize state of the art for diagnosis and treatment of proximity vascular injury. Two articles describe the potential use of the new technique of transesophageal echocardiography. This new modality has not formed a solid indication at present and can be considered investigational in trauma care. PMID:7584006

  4. How to Recognize a Failed Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Brownson, Elisha G; Pham, Tam N; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-10-01

    Failed burn resuscitation can occur at various points. Early failed resuscitation will be largely caused by prehospital factors. During resuscitation, failure will present as a patient's nonresponse to adjunctive therapy. Late failure will occur in the setting of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Burn care providers must be vigilant during the resuscitation to identify a threatened resuscitation so that adjunctive therapies or rescue maneuvers can be used to convert to a successful resuscitation. However, when a patient's resuscitative course becomes unsalvageable, transition to comfort care should be taken to avoid prolongation of suffering. PMID:27600128

  5. Resuscitation Prior to Emergency Endotracheal Intubation: Results of a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Green, Robert S.; Fergusson, Dean A.; Turgeon, Alexis F.; McIntyre, Lauralyn A.; Kovacs, George J.; Griesdale, Donald E.; Zarychanski, Ryan; Butler, Michael B.; Kureshi, Nelofar; Erdogan, Mete

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory failure is a common problem in emergency medicine (EM) and critical care medicine (CCM). However, little is known about the resuscitation of critically ill patients prior to emergency endotracheal intubation (EETI). Our aim was to describe the resuscitation practices of EM and CCM physicians prior to EETI. Methods A cross-sectional survey was developed and tested for content validity and retest reliability by members of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group. The questionnaire was distributed to all EM and CCM physician members of three national organizations. Using three clinical scenarios (trauma, pneumonia, congestive heart failure), we assessed physician preferences for use and types of fluid and vasopressor medication in pre-EETI resuscitation of critically ill patients. Results In total, 1,758 physicians were surveyed (response rate 50.2%, 882/1,758). Overall, physicians would perform pre-EETI resuscitation using either fluids or vasopressors in 54% (1,193/2,203) of cases. Most physicians would “always/often” administer intravenous fluid pre-EETI in the three clinical scenarios (81%, 1,484/1,830). Crystalloids were the most common fluid physicians would “always/often” administer in congestive heart failure (EM 43%; CCM 44%), pneumonia (EM 97%; CCM 95%) and trauma (EM 96%; CCM 96%). Pre-EETI resuscitation using vasopressors was uncommon (4.9%). Training in CCM was associated with performing pre-EETI resuscitation (odds ratio, 2.20; 95% CI, [1.44–3.36], p<0.001). Conclusion Pre-EETI resuscitation is common among Canadian EM and CCM physicians. Most physicians use crystalloids pre-EETI as a resuscitation fluid, while few would give vasopressors. Physicians with CCM training were more likely to perform pre-EETI resuscitation. PMID:27625717

  6. Resuscitation of subdiaphragmatic exsanguination.

    PubMed

    Ross, S E; Schwab, C W

    1988-04-01

    Subdiaphragmatic exsanguination is a major cause of death in civilian trauma. In a 1-year review of 867 consecutive admissions to a Level I Trauma Center, a 4.3 per cent incidence (37 patients) of infradiaphragmatic exsanguination was found. Eleven per cent of all abdominal injuries and 35 per cent of pelvic fractures sustained massive hemorrhage. A treatment protocol incorporating immediate airway control, MAST device, super-large bore venous access, warming rapid infusors, immediate type O blood transfusion, emergency department thoracotomy, and emergent operation as required, produced an overall mortality of 54 per cent. Mortality was higher for pelvic fracture (59%) than abdominal injury (43%). No patient survived ED thoracotomy. Continued developments in resuscitation techniques, as well as prehospital, and operative care are required to reduce mortality from exsanguinating hemorrhage. PMID:3355017

  7. Neonatal resuscitation 3: manometer use in a model of face mask ventilation

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Adequate ventilation is the key to successful neonatal resuscitation. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) is initiated with manual ventilation devices via face masks. These devices may be used with a manometer to measure airway pressures delivered. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To assess the effect of viewing a manometer on the peak inspiratory pressures used, the volume delivered, and leakage from the face mask during PPV with two manual ventilation devices in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Participants gave PPV to a modified resuscitation mannequin using a Laerdal infant resuscitator and a Neopuff infant resuscitator at specified pressures ensuring adequate chest wall excursion. Each participant gave PPV to the mannequin with each device twice, viewing the manometer on one occasion and unable to see the manometer on the other. Data from participants were averaged for each device used with the manometer and without the manometer separately. Results: A total of 7767 inflations delivered by the 18 participants were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressures delivered were lower with the Laerdal device. There were no differences in leakage from the face mask or volumes delivered. Whether or not the manometer was visible made no difference to any measured variable. Conclusions: Viewing a manometer during PPV in this model of neonatal resuscitation does not affect the airway pressure or tidal volumes delivered or the degree of leakage from the face mask. PMID:15871988

  8. Novel Approaches to Neonatal Resuscitation and the Impact on Birth Asphyxia.

    PubMed

    Te Pas, Arjan B; Sobotka, Kristina; Hooper, Stuart B

    2016-09-01

    Historically, recommendations for neonatal resuscitation were largely based on dogma, but there is renewed interest in performing resuscitation studies at birth. The emphasis for resuscitation following birth asphyxia is administering effective ventilation, as adequate lung aeration leads not only to an increase in oxygenation but also increased pulmonary blood flow and heart rate. To aerate the lung, an initial sustained inflation can increase heart rate, oxygenation, and blood pressure recovery much faster when compared with standard ventilation. Hyperoxia should be avoided, and extra oxygen given to restore cardiac function and spontaneous breathing should be titrated based on oxygen saturations. PMID:27524447

  9. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... order; DNR; DNR order; Advance care directive - DNR; Health care agent - DNR; Health care proxy - DNR; End-of-life - DNR; Living ... medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) ...

  10. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if a patient's breathing stops or if the ... you to choose whether or not you want CPR before an emergency occurs. It is specific about ...

  11. [Forensic medicine aspects of resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Bauer, G

    1987-12-15

    Nowadays, in almost all cases of clinical death, there is at least a remote chance of resuscitation, of restoring breathing and circulation by means of modern methods of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Statistically, there are more cases of cardiocirculatory arrest due to an internal cause than to a traumatic cause. Just as medical activity in general, resuscitation is increasingly discussed in its legal and ethical aspects. The duty to exercise due care and proper qualification require a very specific approach in the case of resuscitation, as the chain of persons potentially involved in life saving stretches from the medical layman to the specialist trained to deal with emergency situations. As opposed to conditions in other countries, in Austria the duty to render aid and assistance as statutory provision of the penal code can be of great importance in such cases. Criteria and definition, especially in the ad hoc establishment of death, assume a special significance in resuscitation. Over the past years, resuscitation measures within the complex of the procurement of death have repeatedly been put up for discussion. Examples from US judicature may help to define the problem more clearly and also to offer solutions for similar cases. Such decisions should essentially be guided by the consideration of the presumed will of the patient who no longer is in a position to exercise the right of self-determination. PMID:3326291

  12. Oral and enteral resuscitation of burn shock the historical record and implications for mass casualty care.

    PubMed

    Kramer, George C; Michell, Michael W; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H; Herndon, David; Baker, R David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10-40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in "peripheral circulatory collapse". The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  13. Oral and Enteral Resuscitation of Burn Shock The Historical Record and Implications for Mass Casualty Care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, George C.; Michell, Michael W.; Oliveira, Hermes; Brown, Tim La H.; Herndon, David; Baker, R. David; Muller, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of a mass disaster, standard care methods for treatment of burn injury will often not be available for all victims. A method of fluid resuscitation for burns that has largely been forgotten by contemporary burn experts is enteral resuscitation. We identified 12 studies with over 700 patients treated with enteral resuscitation, defined as drinking or gastric infusion of salt solutions, from the literature. These studies suggest that enteral resuscitation can be an effective treatment for burn shock under conditions in which the standard IV therapy is unavailable or delayed, such as in mass disasters and combat casualties. Enteral resuscitation of burn shock was effective in patients with moderate (10–40% TBSA) and in some patients with more severe injuries. The data suggests that some hypovolemic burn and trauma patients can be treated exclusively with enteral resuscitation, and others might benefit from enteral resuscitation as an initial alternative and a supplement to IV therapy. A complication of enteral resuscitation was vomiting, which occurred less in children and much less when therapy was initiated within the first postburn hour. Enteral resuscitation is contra-indicated when the patient is in “peripheral circulatory collapse”. The optimal enteral solution and regimen has not yet been defined, nor has its efficacy been tested against modern IV resuscitation. The oldest studies used glucose-free solutions of buffered isotonic and hypotonic saline. Studies that are more recent show benefit of adding glucose to electrolyte solutions similar to those used in the treatment of cholera. If IV therapy for mass casualty care is delayed due to logistical constraints, enteral resuscitation should be considered. PMID:20827301

  14. Proctoclysis: emergency rectal fluid infusion.

    PubMed

    Tremayne, Vincent

    This article describes the use and effectiveness of proctoclysis (rectal fluid infusion) in providing fluid resuscitation in the absence of intravenous access in rural and remote environments. PMID:19856644

  15. Resurrecting autonomy during resuscitation--the concept of professional substituted judgment.

    PubMed

    Ardagh, M

    1999-10-01

    The urgency of the resuscitation and the impaired ability of the patient to make a reasonable autonomous decision both conspire against adequate consideration of the principles of medical ethics. Informed consent is usually not possible for these reasons and this leads many to consider that consent is not required for resuscitation, because resuscitation brings benefit and prevents harm and because the patient is not in a position to give or withhold consent. However, consent for resuscitation is required and the common models employed for this purpose are presumed consent or consent from a patient proxy. However, if we are to honour the principles of respect for patient autonomy, as well as beneficence and non-maleficence, when starting and continuing resuscitation we must try and achieve the best balance between benefit and harm from the patient's perspective. The concept of professional substituted judgment involves the resuscitators gathering as much information about the patient as they possibly can, including any previously expressed attitudes towards such a situation, and combining this with their acquired professional knowledge of the likely benefits and harms of the resuscitation endeavour and then exercising their moral imagination, imagining themselves as the patient, and asking "would I want this treatment?" By employing professional substituted judgment resuscitators should recognise when the balance of benefit and harm becomes unfavourable from the patient's perspective and at this point they have a moral obligation to withdraw resuscitation as they can no longer presume the patient's consent. In this way the principles of beneficence, non-maleficence and respect for patient autonomy are more favourably balanced than under other resuscitation decision making processes. PMID:10536760

  16. Stabilized hemoglobins as acellular resuscitative fluids.

    PubMed

    Cerny, L C; Green, A; Noga, B; Cerny, E R

    1992-01-01

    This study reports some recent work dealing with the stabilization of the tetramers of hemoglobin. It is shown that by using a variety of diacids, it is possible to increase the P50 above that of stroma free hemoglobin. In order to lengthen the retention times in the circulatory system, the stabilized hemoglobins were complexed with both hydroxyethyl starch polymers and polyol tetronic polymers. The resulting hemoglobin-polymer compounds were then freeze-dried. It was possible to reconstitute the powder by the addition of physiological saline when needed. The methods presented here appear to be appear to be as effective as using pyridoxal phosphate but at a fraction of the cost. PMID:1391448

  17. Resuscitating MLK/Drew

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2007-01-01

    To this day, the widespread racial disparities that prompted the August 1965 riots in the Watts community of South Los Angeles frame many of the discussions about race in America. The death and destruction wrought during that five-day upheaval, along with the findings of the December 1965 McCone report that the lack of adequate health care…

  18. [Resuscitation 2015-the new guidelines].

    PubMed

    Wetsch, W A; Böttiger, B W

    2016-06-01

    Sudden cardiac arrest is amongst the major causes of death in industrialized countries. The patient's prognosis however is still very serious. Because diagnosis and therapy in medicine constantly undergo further development, guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation are updated und published frequently, to ensure that every patient receives the best state of the art medical therapy and consequently has the best chances to survive. On October 15, 2015, the new guidelines on cardiopulmonary resuscitation were published. This article gives a short summary of the most important changes. PMID:27160260

  19. Resuscitation in massive obstetric haemorrhage using an intraosseous needle.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, D J; Bukunola, B; Samuels, T L; Induruwage, L; Uncles, D R

    2011-04-01

    A 38-year-old woman experienced a massive postpartum haemorrhage 30 minutes after emergency caesarean delivery. The patient became severely haemodynamically compromised with an unrecordable blood pressure. Rapid fluid resuscitation was limited by the capacity of the intravenous cannula in place at the time and inability to establish additional vascular access using conventional routes in a timely manner. An intraosseous needle was inserted in the proximal humerus at the first attempt and administration of resuscitation fluid by this route subsequently enabled successful placement of further intravenous lines. Blood and blood products were deployed in conjunction with intra-operative cell salvage and transoesophageal Doppler cardiac output monitoring was used to assess adequacy of volume replacement. Haemorrhage control was finally achieved with the use of recombinant factor VIIa and hysterectomy. PMID:21401545

  20. The Effect of Availability of Manpower on Trauma Resuscitation Times in a Tertiary Academic Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Quek, Nathaniel Xin Ern; Koh, Zhi Xiong; Nadkarni, Nivedita; Singaram, Kanageswari; Ho, Andrew Fu Wah; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock

    2016-01-01

    Background For trauma patients, delays to assessment, resuscitation, and definitive care affect outcomes. We studied the effects of resuscitation area occupancy and trauma team size on trauma team resuscitation speed in an observational study at a tertiary academic institution in Singapore. Methods From January 2014 to January 2015, resuscitation videos of trauma team activated patients with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or more were extracted for review within 14 days by independent reviewers. Exclusion criteria were patients dead on arrival, inter-hospital transfers, and up-triaged patients. Data captured included manpower availability (trauma team size and resuscitation area occupancy), assessment (airway, breathing, circulation, logroll), interventions (vascular access, imaging), and process-of-care time intervals (time to assessment/intervention/adjuncts, time to imaging, and total time in the emergency department). Clinical data were obtained by chart review and from the trauma registry. Results Videos of 70 patients were reviewed over a 13-month period. The median time spent in the emergency department was 154.9 minutes (IQR 130.7–207.5) and the median resuscitation team size was 7, with larger team sizes correlating with faster process-of-care time intervals: time to airway assessment (p = 0.08) and time to disposition (p = 0.04). The mean resuscitation area occupancy rate (RAOR) was 1.89±2.49, and the RAOR was positively correlated with time spent in the emergency department (p = 0.009). Conclusion Our results suggest that adequate staffing for trauma teams and resuscitation room occupancy are correlated with faster trauma resuscitation and reduced time spent in the emergency department. PMID:27136299

  1. Intraperitoneal Resuscitation Improves Intestinal Blood Flow Following Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal; Spain, David A.; Matheson, Paul J.; Harris, Patrick D.; Richardson, J. David

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of peritoneal resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock. Summary Background Data Methods for conventional resuscitation (CR) from hemorrhagic shock (HS) often fail to restore adequate intestinal blood flow, and intestinal ischemia has been implicated in the activation of the inflammatory response. There is clinical evidence that intestinal hypoperfusion is a major factor in progressive organ failure following HS. This study presents a novel technique of peritoneal resuscitation (PR) that improves visceral perfusion. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were bled to 50% of baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP) and resuscitated with shed blood plus 2 equal volumes of saline (CR). Groups were 1) sham, 2) HS + CR, and 3) HS + CR + PR with a hyperosmolar dextrose-based solution (Delflex 2.5%). Groups 1 and 2 had normal saline PR. In vivo videomicroscopy and Doppler velocimetry were used to assess terminal ileal microvascular blood flow. Endothelial cell function was assessed by the endothelium-dependent vasodilator acetylcholine. Results Despite restored heart rate and MAP to baseline values, CR animals developed a progressive intestinal vasoconstriction and tissue hypoperfusion compared to baseline flow. PR induced an immediate and sustained vasodilation compared to baseline and a marked increase in average intestinal blood flow during the entire 2-hour post-resuscitation period. Endothelial-dependent dilator function was preserved with PR. Conclusions Despite the restoration of MAP with blood and saline infusions, progressive vasoconstriction and compromised intestinal blood flow occurs following HS/CR. Hyperosmolar PR during CR maintains intestinal blood flow and endothelial function. This is thought to be a direct effect of hyperosmolar solutions on the visceral microvessels. The addition of PR to a CR protocol prevents the splanchnic ischemia that initiates systemic inflammation. PMID:12724637

  2. Closed-loop and decision-assist resuscitation of burn patients.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Jose; Drew, Guy; Gallagher, James; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B; Herndon, David N; Kramer, George C

    2008-04-01

    Effective resuscitation is critical in reducing mortality and morbidity rates of patients with acute burns. To this end, guidelines and formulas have been developed to define infusion rates and volume requirements during the first 48 hours postburn. Even with these standardized resuscitation guidelines, however, over- and under-resuscitation are not uncommon. Two approaches to adjust infusion rate are decision-assist and closed-loop algorithms based on levels of urinary output. Specific decision assist guidelines or a closed-loop system using computer-controlled feedback technology that supplies automatic control of infusion rates can potentially achieve better control of urinary output. In a properly designed system, closed-loop control has the potential to provide more accurate titration rates, while lowering the incidence of over- and under-resuscitation. Because the system can self-adjust based on monitoring inputs, the technology can be pushed to environments such as combat zones where burn resuscitation expertise is limited. A closed-loop system can also assist in the management of mass casualties, another scenario in which medical expertise is often in short supply. This article reviews the record of fluid balance of contemporary burn resuscitation and approaches, as well as the engineering efforts, animal studies, and algorithm development of our most recent autonomous systems for burn resuscitation. PMID:18385584

  3. Cardiorespiratory Monitoring during Neonatal Resuscitation for Direct Feedback and Audit

    PubMed Central

    van Vonderen, Jeroen J.; van Zanten, Henriëtte A.; Schilleman, Kim; Hooper, Stuart B.; Kitchen, Marcus J.; Witlox, Ruben S. G. M.; te Pas, Arjan B.

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures, and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant’s condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, color, and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can not only be used directly to guide care but also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this narrative review, we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation. PMID:27148507

  4. Cardiorespiratory Monitoring during Neonatal Resuscitation for Direct Feedback and Audit.

    PubMed

    van Vonderen, Jeroen J; van Zanten, Henriëtte A; Schilleman, Kim; Hooper, Stuart B; Kitchen, Marcus J; Witlox, Ruben S G M; Te Pas, Arjan B

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal resuscitation is one of the most frequently performed procedures, and it is often successful if the ventilation applied is adequate. Over the last decade, interest in seeking objectivity in evaluating the infant's condition at birth or the adequacy and effect of the interventions applied has markedly increased. Clinical parameters such as heart rate, color, and chest excursions are difficult to interpret and can be very subjective and subtle. The use of ECG, pulse oximetry, capnography, and respiratory function monitoring can add objectivity to the clinical assessment. These physiological parameters, with or without the combination of video recordings, can not only be used directly to guide care but also be used later for audit and teaching purposes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether this will improve the quality of delivery room management. In this narrative review, we will give an update of the current developments in monitoring neonatal resuscitation. PMID:27148507

  5. Measurement of ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ornato, J P; Bryson, B L; Donovan, P J; Farquharson, R R; Jaeger, C

    1983-02-01

    Determining adequacy of mechanical ventilation is as important during CPR as in a more stable situation (such as, a patient on a ventilator in an ICU). Yet, such assessment during CPR usually only means listening for breath sounds, checking chest excursion, and blood gases. Exhaled tidal volume (VT) was measured on 45 intubated adult patients during resuscitation using a Wright's spirometer attached to a T-valve above the endotracheal tube. Ten patients had aspiration prior to intubation; 15 received advanced cardiac life support in the field, including esophageal airway insertion. CPR was performed in all cases with a mechanical compression device (Thumper). The pressure ventilator on this device was calibrated (peak inspiratory pressure, VT vs compliance) using a Dixie Test Lung, allowing indirect assessment of pulmonary compliance during CPR. Our findings suggest that lung compliance is markedly reduced within a short time after cardiac arrest. Fifty-five % of patients in this series could not be adequately oxygenated (PaO2 less than 50 torr) despite an FIO2 of 0.8 and adequate ventilation. Due to the reduced cardiac output during CPR causing venoarterial shunting, it is speculated that pulmonary edema is the most plausible explanation for this observation. PMID:6822084

  6. The impact of in-house surgeons and operating room resuscitation on outcome of traumatic injuries.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, D B; Shackford, S R; McGill, T; Mackersie, R; Davis, J; Hansbrough, J

    1989-08-01

    As trauma systems develop, more patients can potentially benefit from immediate surgery. With in-house surgeons available, enthusiasm for direct transfer from the scene to the operating room (OR) has developed in many institutions. The purpose of this study was to define precisely which patients should be taken to the OR for resuscitation. Three hundred twenty-three patients were taken to the OR directly from the field during a 4-year period (6.9% of trauma activations). Indications included the following: (1) cardiac arrest--one vital sign present, (2) persistent hypotension despite field intravenous fluid, and (3) uncontrolled external hemorrhage. A board-certified surgeon and resuscitation team met the field transport team in the OR in all cases. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation for patients with blunt trauma was not accompanied by survival even with immediate surgery by a trained surgeon and it wastes valuable OR resources. Patients with prehospital hypotension unresponsive to fluid resuscitation indicate the need for rapid surgery. Patients with blunt injuries even with hypotension infrequently undergo operations in less than 20 minutes and can be resuscitated in traditional areas where better roentgenograms are obtained. Penetrating injuries to the chest and abdomen with hypotension are the primary indications for OR resuscitation. It can be anticipated with field communication and accompanied by enhanced survival. PMID:2757502

  7. Sodium hydrosulfide alleviates lung inflammation and cell apoptosis following resuscitated hemorrhagic shock in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dun-quan; Gao, Cao; Niu, Wen; Li, Yan; Wang, Yan-xia; Gao, Chang-jun; Ding, Qian; Yao, Li-nong; Chai, Wei; Li, Zhi-chao

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) against inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis in a rat model of resuscitated hemorrhagic shock. Methods: Hemorrhagic shock was induced in adult male SD rats by drawing blood from the femoral artery for 10 min. The mean arterial pressure was maintained at 35–40 mmHg for 1.5 h. After resuscitation the animals were observed for 200 min, and then killed. The lungs were harvested and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was prepared. The levels of relevant proteins were examined using Western blotting and immunohistochemical analyses. NaHS (28 μmol/kg, ip) was injected before the resuscitation. Results: Resuscitated hemorrhagic shock induced lung inflammatory responses and significantly increased the levels of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, TNF-α, and HMGB1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Furthermore, resuscitated hemorrhagic shock caused marked oxidative stress in lung tissue as shown by significant increases in the production of reactive oxygen species H2O2 and ·OH, the translocation of Nrf2, an important regulator of antioxidant expression, into nucleus, and the decrease of thioredoxin 1 expression. Moreover, resuscitated hemorrhagic shock markedly increased the expression of death receptor Fas and Fas-ligand and the number apoptotic cells in lung tissue, as well as the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins FADD, active-caspase 3, active-caspase 8, Bax, and decreased the expression of Bcl-2. Injection with NaHS significantly attenuated these pathophysiological abnormalities induced by the resuscitated hemorrhagic shock. Conclusion: NaHS administration protects rat lungs against inflammatory responses induced by resuscitated hemorrhagic shock via suppressing oxidative stress and the Fas/FasL apoptotic signaling pathway. PMID:24122010

  8. The Use of Fluids in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Avila, Audrey A; Kinberg, Eliezer C; Sherwin, Nomi K; Taylor, Robinson D

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to severe infection causing significant morbidity and mortality that costs the health care system $20.3 billion annually within the United States. It is well established that fluid resuscitation is a central component of sepsis management; however, to date there is no consensus as to the ideal composition of fluid used for resuscitation. In this review, we discuss the progression of clinical research comparing various fluids, as well as the historical background behind fluid selection for volume resuscitation. We conclude that the use of balanced fluids, such as Ringer's Lactate, seems very promising but further research is needed to confirm their role. PMID:27081589

  9. Hypertonic saline dextran resuscitation of thermal injury.

    PubMed Central

    Horton, J W; White, D J; Baxter, C R

    1990-01-01

    Burn treatment requires large volumes of crystalloid, which may exacerbate burn-induced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Small-volume hypertonic saline dextran (HSD) resuscitation has been used for effective treatment of several types of shock. In this study isolated coronary perfused guinea pig hearts were used to determine if HSD improved left ventricular contractile response to burn injuries. Parameters measured included left ventricular pressure (LVP) and maximal rate of LVP rise (+dP/dt max) and fall (-dP/dt max) at a constant preload. Third-degree scald burns comprising 45% of total body surface area (burn groups, N = 75), or 0% for controls (group 1, N = 25) were produced using a template device. In group 2, 25 burned guinea pigs were not fluid resuscitated and served as untreated burns; 20 burns were resuscitated with 4 mL lactated Ringer's (LR) solution/kg/% burn for 24 hours (group 3); additional burn groups were treated with an initial bolus of HSD (4 mL/kg, 2400 mOsm, sodium chloride, 6% dextran 70) followed by either 1, 2, or 4 mL LR/kg/% burn over 24 hours (groups 4, 5, and 6, respectively). Untreated burn injury significantly impaired cardiac function, as indicated by a fall in LVP (from 88 +/- 3 to 68 +/- 4 mmHg; p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (from 1352 +/- 50 to 1261 +/- 90 and from 1150 +/- 35 to 993 +/- 59; p = 0.01, respectively) and a downward shift of LV function curves from those obtained from control hearts. Compared to untreated burns, hearts from burned animals treated with LR alone showed no significant improvement in cardiac function. However hearts from burned animals treated with HSD + 1 mL LR/kg/% burn had significantly higher LVP (79 +/- 4 vs. 68 +/- 4 mmHg, p = 0.01) and +/- dP/dt max (+dP/dt: 1387 +/- 60 vs. 1261 +/- 90 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01; -dP/dt: 1079 +/- 50 vs. 993 +/- 59 mmHg/sc, p = 0.01) than hearts from untreated burned animals and generated left ventricular function curves comparable to those calculated for hearts from control

  10. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia.

    PubMed

    Menticoglou, Savas; Schneider, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  11. Resuscitating the Baby after Shoulder Dystocia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. To propose hypovolemic shock as a possible explanation for the failure to resuscitate some babies after shoulder dystocia and to suggest a change in clinical practice. Case Presentation. Two cases are presented in which severe shoulder dystocia was resolved within five minutes. Both babies were born without a heartbeat. Despite standard resuscitation by expert neonatologists, no heartbeat was obtained until volume resuscitation was started, at 25 minutes in the first case and 11 minutes in the second. After volume resuscitation circulation was restored, there was profound brain damage and the babies died. Conclusion. Unsuspected hypovolemic shock may explain some cases of failed resuscitation after shoulder dystocia. This may require a change in clinical practice. Rather than immediately clamping the cord after the baby is delivered, it is proposed that (1) the obstetrician delay cord clamping to allow autotransfusion of the baby from the placenta and (2) the neonatal resuscitators give volume much sooner. PMID:27493815

  12. Neonatal Resuscitation in Low-Resource Settings.

    PubMed

    Berkelhamer, Sara K; Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Niermeyer, Susan

    2016-09-01

    Almost one quarter of newborn deaths are attributed to birth asphyxia. Systematic implementation of newborn resuscitation programs has the potential to avert many of these deaths as basic resuscitative measures alone can reduce neonatal mortality. Simplified resuscitation training provided through Helping Babies Breathe decreases early neonatal mortality and stillbirth. However, challenges remain in providing every newborn the needed care at birth. Barriers include ineffective educational systems and programming; inadequate equipment, personnel and data monitoring; and limited political and social support to improve care. Further progress calls for renewed commitments to closing gaps in the quality of newborn resuscitative care. PMID:27524455

  13. Monitoring End Points of Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Daniel M; Matthews, Marc R

    2016-10-01

    This article discusses commonly used methods of monitoring and determining the end points of resuscitation. Each end point of resuscitation is examined as it relates to use in critically ill burn patients. Published medical literature, clinical trials, consensus trials, and expert opinion regarding end points of resuscitation were gathered and reviewed. Specific goals were a detailed examination of each method in the critical care population and how this methodology can be used in the burn patient. Although burn resuscitation is monitored and administered using the methodology as seen in medical/surgical intensive care settings, special consideration for excessive edema formation, metabolic derangements, and frequent operative interventions must be considered. PMID:27600124

  14. An alternative approach to advancing resuscitation science.

    PubMed

    Kern, Karl B; Valenzuela, Terence D; Clark, Lani L; Berg, Robert A; Hilwig, Ronald W; Berg, Marc D; Otto, Charles W; Newburn, Daniel; Ewy, Gordon A

    2005-03-01

    Stagnant survival rates in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remain a great impetus for advancing resuscitation science. International resuscitation guidelines, with all their advantages for standardizing resuscitation therapeutic protocols, can be difficult to change. A formalized evidence-based process has been adopted by the International Liason Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) in formulating such guidelines. Currently, randomized clinical trials are considered optimal evidence, and very few major changes in the Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care are made without such. An alternative approach is to allow externally controlled clinical trials more weight in Guideline formulation and resuscitation protocol adoption. In Tucson, Arizona (USA), the Fire Department cardiac arrest database has revealed a number of resuscitation issues. These include a poor bystander CPR rate, a lack of response to initial defibrillation after prolonged ventricular fibrillation, and substantial time without chest compressions during the resuscitation effort. A local change in our previous resuscitation protocols had been instituted based upon this historical database information. PMID:15733752

  15. Role of permissive hypotension, hypertonic resuscitation and the global increased permeability syndrome in patients with severe hemorrhage: adjuncts to damage control resuscitation to prevent intra-abdominal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Kaplan, Lewis J; Balogh, Zsolt J; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are closely related to fluid resuscitation. IAH causes major deterioration of the cardiac function by affecting preload, contractility and afterload. The aim of this review is to discuss the different interactions between IAH, ACS and resuscitation, and to explore a new hypothesis with regard to damage control resuscitation, permissive hypotension and global increased permeability syndrome. Review of the relevant literature via PubMed search. The recognition of the association between the development of ACS and resuscitation urged the need for new approach in traumatic shock management. Over a decade after wide spread application of damage control surgery damage control resuscitation was developed. DCR differs from previous resuscitation approaches by attempting an earlier and more aggressive correction of coagulopathy, as well as metabolic derangements like acidosis and hypothermia, often referred to as the 'deadly triad' or the 'bloody vicious cycle'. Permissive hypotension involves keeping the blood pressure low enough to avoid exacerbating uncontrolled haemorrhage while maintaining perfusion to vital end organs. The potential detrimental mechanisms of early, aggressive crystalloid resuscitation have been described. Limitation of fluid intake by using colloids, hypertonic saline (HTS) or hyperoncotic albumin solutions have been associated with favourable effects. HTS allows not only for rapid restoration of circulating intravascular volume with less administered fluid, but also attenuates post-injury oedema at the microcirculatory level and may improve microvascular perfusion. Capillary leak represents the maladaptive, often excessive, and undesirable loss of fluid and electrolytes with or without protein into the interstitium that generates oedema. The global increased permeability syndrome (GIPS) has been articulated in patients with persistent systemic inflammation failing

  16. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals.

    PubMed

    Tomori, Zoltan; Donic, Viliam; Benacka, Roman; Jakus, Jan; Gresova, Sona

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath - sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant - autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation and

  17. Resuscitation and auto resuscitation by airway reflexes in animals

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Various diseases often result in decompensation requiring resuscitation. In infants moderate hypoxia evokes a compensatory augmented breath – sigh and more severe hypoxia results in a solitary gasp. Progressive asphyxia provokes gasping respiration saving the healthy infant – autoresuscitation by gasping. A neonate with sudden infant death syndrome, however, usually will not survive. Our systematic research in animals indicated that airway reflexes have similar resuscitation potential as gasping respiration. Nasopharyngeal stimulation in cats and most mammals evokes the aspiration reflex, characterized by spasmodic inspiration followed by passive expiration. On the contrary, expiration reflex from the larynx, or cough reflex from the pharynx and lower airways manifest by a forced expiration, which in cough is preceded by deep inspiration. These reflexes of distinct character activate the brainstem rhythm generators for inspiration and expiration strongly, but differently. They secondarily modulate the control mechanisms of various vital functions of the organism. During severe asphyxia the progressive respiratory insufficiency may induce a life-threatening cardio-respiratory failure. The sniff- and gasp-like aspiration reflex and similar spasmodic inspirations, accompanied by strong sympatho-adrenergic activation, can interrupt a severe asphyxia and reverse the developing dangerous cardiovascular and vasomotor dysfunctions, threatening with imminent loss of consciousness and death. During progressive asphyxia the reversal of gradually developing bradycardia and excessive hypotension by airway reflexes starts with reflex tachycardia and vasoconstriction, resulting in prompt hypertensive reaction, followed by renewal of cortical activity and gradual normalization of breathing. A combination of the aspiration reflex supporting venous return and the expiration or cough reflex increasing the cerebral perfusion by strong expirations, provides a powerful resuscitation

  18. Oxalate Nephropathy After Continuous Infusion of High-Dose Vitamin C as an Adjunct to Burn Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pamplin, Jeremy; Studer, Lynette; Hughes, Rhome L.; King, Booker T.; Graybill, John C.; Chung, Kevin K.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is the foundation of management in burn patients and is the topic of considerable research. One adjunct in burn resuscitation is continuous, high-dose vitamin C (ascorbic acid) infusion, which may reduce fluid requirements and thus decrease the risk for over resuscitation. Research in preclinical studies and clinical trials has shown continuous infusions of high-dose vitamin C to be beneficial with decrease in resuscitative volumes and limited adverse effects. However, high-dose and low-dose vitamin C supplementation has been shown to cause secondary calcium oxalate nephropathy, worsen acute kidney injury, and delay renal recovery in non-burn patients. To the best of our knowledge, the authors present the first case series in burn patients in whom calcium oxalate nephropathy has been identified after high-dose vitamin C therapy. PMID:25812044

  19. Oxalate Nephropathy After Continuous Infusion of High-Dose Vitamin C as an Adjunct to Burn Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Buehner, Michelle; Pamplin, Jeremy; Studer, Lynette; Hughes, Rhome L; King, Booker T; Graybill, John C; Chung, Kevin K

    2016-01-01

    Fluid resuscitation is the foundation of management in burn patients and is the topic of considerable research. One adjunct in burn resuscitation is continuous, high-dose vitamin C (ascorbic acid) infusion, which may reduce fluid requirements and thus decrease the risk for over resuscitation. Research in preclinical studies and clinical trials has shown continuous infusions of high-dose vitamin C to be beneficial with decrease in resuscitative volumes and limited adverse effects. However, high-dose and low-dose vitamin C supplementation has been shown to cause secondary calcium oxalate nephropathy, worsen acute kidney injury, and delay renal recovery in non-burn patients. To the best of our knowledge, the authors present the first case series in burn patients in whom calcium oxalate nephropathy has been identified after high-dose vitamin C therapy. PMID:25812044

  20. Physiologic and Clinical Principles behind Noninvasive Resuscitation Techniques and Cardiac Output Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical assessment and vital signs are poor predictors of the overall hemodynamic state. Optimal measurement of the response to fluid resuscitation and hemodynamics has previously required invasive measurement with radial and pulmonary artery catheterization. Newer noninvasive resuscitation technology offers the hope of more accurately and safely monitoring a broader range of critically ill patients while using fewer resources. Fluid responsiveness, the cardiac response to volume loading, represents a dynamic method of improving upon the assessment of preload when compared to static measures like central venous pressure. Multiple new hemodynamic monitors now exist that can noninvasively report cardiac output and oxygen delivery in a continuous manner. Proper assessment of the potential future role of these techniques in resuscitation requires understanding the underlying physiologic and clinical principles, reviewing the most recent literature examining their clinical validity, and evaluating their respective advantages and limitations. PMID:21860802

  1. Initial resuscitation from severe sepsis: one size does not fit all.

    PubMed

    Vandervelden, Stefanie; Malbrain, Manu L N G

    2015-01-01

    Over recent decades many recommendations for the management of patients with sepsis and septic shock have been published, mainly as the Surviving Sepsis Campaign (SSC) guidelines. In order to use these recommendations at the bedside one must fully understand their limitations, especially with regard to preload assessment, fluid responsiveness and cardiac output. In this review we will discuss the evidence behind the bundles presented by the Surviving Sepsis Campaign and will try to explain why some recommendations may need to be updated. Barometric preload indicators, such as central venous pressure (CVP) or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, can be persistently low or erroneously increased, as is the case in situations of increased intrathoracic pressure, as seen with the application of high positive end-expiratory pressure, or in situations with increased intra-abdominal pressure. Chasing a CVP of 8 to 12 mm Hg may lead to under-resuscitation in these situations. On the other hand, a low CVP does not always correspond to fluid responsiveness and may lead to over-resuscitation and all the deleterious effects on end-organ function associated with fluid overload. We will suggest the introduction of new variables and more dynamic measurements. During the initial resuscitation phase, it is equally important to assess fluid responsiveness, either with a passive leg raising manoeuvre or an end-expiratory occlusion test. The use of functional hemodynamics with stroke volume variation or pulse pressure variation may further help to identify patients who will respond to fluid administration or not. Furthermore, ongoing fluid resuscitation beyond the first 24 hours guided by CVP may lead to futile fluid loading. In patients that do not transgress spontaneously from the Ebb to Flow phase of shock, one should consider (active) de-resuscitation guided by extravascular lung water index measurements. PMID:26578400

  2. Rural Hospital Preparedness for Neonatal Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jukkala, Angela; Henly, Susan J.; Lindeke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Context: Neonatal resuscitation is a critical component of perinatal services in all settings. Purpose: To systematically describe preparedness of rural hospitals for neonatal resuscitation, and to determine whether delivery volume and level of perinatal care were associated with overall preparedness or its indicators. Methods: We developed the…

  3. Resuscitative thoracotomy in penetrating trauma.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Lindsay M; Hsee, Li; Civil, Ian D

    2015-06-01

    The resuscitative thoracotomy (RT) is an important procedure in the management of penetrating trauma. As it is performed only in patients with peri-arrest physiology or overt cardiac arrest, survival is low. Experience is also quite variable depending on volume of penetrating trauma in a particular region. Survival ranges from 0% to as high as 89% depending on patient selection, available resources, and location of RT (operating or emergency rooms). In this article, published guidelines are reviewed as well as outcomes. Technical considerations of RT and well as proper training, personnel, and location are also discussed. PMID:25342073

  4. Out-of-hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation After Traumatic Hypovolemic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Kerby, Jeffery D.; Emerson, Scott; Stiell, Ian G.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Brasel, Karen J.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Coimbra, Raul; Rizoli, Sandro; Minei, Joseph P.; Hata, J. Steven; Sopko, George; Evans, David C.; Hoyt, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids would improve survival after severe injury with hemorrhagic shock. Background Hypertonic fluids have potential benefit in the resuscitation of severely injured patients because of rapid restoration of tissue perfusion, with a smaller volume, and modulation of the inflammatory response, to reduce subsequent organ injury. Methods Multicenter, randomized, blinded clinical trial, May 2006 to August 2008, 114 emergency medical services agencies in North America within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium. Inclusion criteria: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure ≤ 70 mm Hg or systolic blood pressure 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108 beats per minute). Initial resuscitation fluid, 250 mL of either 7.5% saline per 6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran, HSD), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline, HS), or 0.9% saline (normal saline, NS) administered by out-of-hospital providers. Primary outcome was 28-day survival. On the recommendation of the data and safety monitoring board, the study was stopped early (23% of proposed sample size) for futility and potential safety concern. Results A total of 853 treated patients were enrolled, among whom 62% were with blunt trauma, 38% with penetrating. There was no difference in 28-day survival—HSD: 74.5% (0.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], −7.5 to 7.8); HS: 73.0% (−1.4; 95% CI, −8.7–6.0); and NS: 74.4%, P = 0.91. There was a higher mortality for the postrandomization subgroup of patients who did not receive blood transfusions in the first 24 hours, who received hypertonic fluids compared to NS [28-day mortality—HSD: 10% (5.2; 95% CI, 0.4–10.1); HS: 12.2% (7.4; 95% CI, 2.5–12.2); and NS: 4.8%, P < 0.01]. Conclusion Among injured patients with hypovolemic shock, initial resuscitation fluid treatment with either HS or HSD compared with NS, did not result in superior 28-day survival. However

  5. Implementation and execution of military forward resuscitation programs.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Timothy J; Nadler, Roy; Badloe, John; Butler, Frank K; Glassberg, Elon

    2014-05-01

    Through necessity, military medicine has been the driver of medical innovation throughout history. The battlefield presents challenges, such as the requirement to provide care while under threat, resource limitation, and prolonged evacuation times, which must be overcome to improve casualty survival. Focus must also be placed on identifying the causes, and timing, of death within the battlefield. By doing so, military medical doctrine can be shaped, appropriate goals set, new concepts adopted, and relevant technologies investigated and implemented. The majority of battlefield casualties still die in the prehospital environment, before reaching a medical treatment facility, and hemorrhage remains the leading cause of potentially survivable death. Many countries have adopted policies that push damage control resuscitation forward into the prehospital setting, while understanding the need for timely medical evacuation. Although these policies vary according to country, the majority share many common principles. These include the need for early catastrophic hemorrhage control at point-of-wounding, judicious use of fluid resuscitation, use of blood products as far forward as possible, and early evacuation to a surgical facility. Some countries place medical providers with the ability, and resources, for advanced resuscitation with the forward fighting units (perhaps at company level), whereas others have established en route resuscitation capabilities. If we are to continue to improve battlefield casualty survival, we must continue to work together and learn from each other. We must also carry on working alongside our civilian colleagues so that the benefits of translational experience are not lost. This review describes several countries current military approaches to prehospital trauma care. These approaches, refined through a decade of experience, merit consideration for integration into civilian prehospital care practice. PMID:24169209

  6. Prolonged Intraoperative Cardiac Resuscitation Complicated by Intracardiac Thrombus in a Patient Undergoing Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang; DeMaria, Samuel; Cohen, Edmond; Silvay, George; Zerillo, Jeron

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of successful resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest during orthotopic liver transplantation. After reperfusion, the patient developed ventricular tachycardia, complicated by intracardiac clot formation and massive hemorrhage. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated stunned and nonfunctioning right and left ventricles, with developing intracardiac clots. Treatment with heparin, massive transfusion and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation ensued for 51 minutes. Serial arterial blood gases demonstrated adequate oxygenation and ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted for potential use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, however, the myocardial function improved and the surgery was completed without further intervention. On postoperative day 6, the patient was extubated without neurologic or cardiac impairment. The patient continues to do well 2 years posttransplant, able to perform independent daily activities of living and his previous job. This case underscores the potential for positive outcomes with profoundly prolonged, effective advanced cardiovascular life support in patients who experience postreperfusion syndrome. PMID:27233818

  7. In-hospital resuscitation evaluated by in situ simulation: a prospective simulation study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Interruption in chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be characterized as no flow ratio (NFR) and the importance of minimizing these pauses in chest compression has been highlighted recently. Further, documentation of resuscitation performance has been reported to be insufficient and there is a lack of identification of important issues where future efforts might be beneficial. By implementing in situ simulation we created a model to evaluate resuscitation performance. The aims of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of the applied method, and to examine differences in the resuscitation performance between the first responders and the cardiac arrest team. Methods A prospective observational study of 16 unannounced simulated cardiopulmonary arrest scenarios was conducted. The participants of the study involved all health care personel on duty who responded to a cardiac arrest. We measured NFR and time to detection of initial rhythm on defibrillator and performed a comparison between the first responders and the cardiac arrest team. Results Data from 13 out of 16 simulations was used to evaluate the ability of generating resuscitation performance data in simulated cardiac arrest. The defibrillator arrived after median 214 seconds (180-254) and detected initial rhythm after median 311 seconds (283-349). A significant difference in no flow ratio (NFR) was observed between the first responders, median NFR 38% (32-46), and the resuscitation teams, median NFR 25% (19-29), p < 0.001. The difference was significant even after adjusting for pulse and rhythm check and shock delivery. Conclusion The main finding of this study was a significant difference between the first responders and the cardiac arrest team with the latter performing more adequate cardiopulmonary resuscitation with regards to NFR. Future research should focus on the educational potential for in-situ simulation in terms of improving skills of hospital staff and patient

  8. Fibrinogen Concentrate Improves Survival During Limited Resuscitation of Uncontrolled Hemorrhagic Shock in a Swine Model

    PubMed Central

    White, Nathan J.; Wang, Xu; Liles, W. Conrad; Stern, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of fibrinogen concentrate, as a hemostatic agent, on limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. We use a swine model of hemorrhagic shock with free bleeding from a 4mm aortic tear to test the effect of adding a one-time dose of fibrinogen concentrate given at the onset of limited fluid resuscitation. Immature female swine were anesthetized and subjected to catheter hemorrhage and aortic tear to induce uniform hemorrhagic shock. Animals (N=7 per group) were then randomized to receive either; 1. No fluid resuscitation (Neg Control), 2. Limited resuscitation in the form of two boluses of 10ml/kg of 6% hydroxyethyl starch solution (HEX) given 30 minutes apart, or 3. The same fluid regimen with one dose of 120mg/kg fibrinogen concentrate given with the first HEX bolus (FBG). Animals were then observed for a total of 6 hours with aortic repair and aggressive resuscitation with shed blood taking place at 3 hours. Survival to 6 hours was significantly increased with FBG (7/8, 86%) vs. HEX (2/7, 29%), and Neg Control (0/7, 0%) (FBG vs. HEX, Kaplan Meier LR p=0.035). Intraperitoneal blood loss adjusted for survival time was increased in HEX (0.4ml/kg/min) when compared to FBG (0.1mg/kg/min, p=0.047) and Neg Control (0.1ml/kg/min, p=0.041). Systemic and cerebral hemodynamics also showed improvement with FBG vs. HEX. Fibrinogen concentrate may be a useful adjunct to decrease blood loss, improve hemodynamics, and prolong survival during limited resuscitation of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. PMID:25337778

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Crystalloid Resuscitation Rate in a Human Model of Compensated Haemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Loretta; Lau, Lawrence; Churilov, Leonid; Riedel, Bernhard; McNicol, Larry; Hahn, Robert G.; Weinberg, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The most effective rate of fluid resuscitation in haemorrhagic shock is unknown. Methods: We performed a randomized crossover pilot study in a healthy volunteer model of compensated haemorrhagic shock. Following venesection of 15 mL/kg of blood, participants were randomized to 20 mL/kg of crystalloid over 10 min (FAST treatment) or 30 min (SLOW treatment). The primary end point was oxygen delivery (DO2). Secondary end points included pressure and flow-based haemodynamic variables, blood volume expansion, and clinical biochemistry. Results: Nine normotensive healthy adult volunteers participated. No significant differences were observed in DO2 and biochemical variables between the SLOW and FAST groups. Blood volume was reduced by 16% following venesection, with a corresponding 5% reduction in cardiac index (CI) (P < 0.001). Immediately following resuscitation the increase in blood volume corresponded to 54% of the infused volume under FAST treatment and 69% of the infused volume under SLOW treatment (P = 0.03). This blood volume expansion attenuated with time to 24% and 25% of the infused volume 30 min postinfusion. During fluid resuscitation, blood pressure was higher under FAST treatment. However, CI paradoxically decreased in most participants during the resuscitation phase; a finding not observed under SLOW treatment. Conclusion: FAST or SLOW fluid resuscitation had no significant impact on DO2 between treatment groups. In both groups, changes in CI and blood pressure did not reflect the magnitude of intravascular blood volume deficit. Crystalloid resuscitation expanded intravascular blood volume by approximately 25%. PMID:26974423

  10. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation using electrically driven devices: a review

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Stefan; Deutsch, Marcus-André; Lange, Ruediger; Krane, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In the treatment of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) immediate resuscitation with chest compressions and ventilation is crucial for survival. As manual resuscitation is associated with several drawbacks, mechanical resuscitation devices have been developed to support resuscitation teams. These devices are able to achieve better perfusion of heart and brain in laboratory settings, but real world experience showed no significant improved survival in comparison to manual resuscitation. This review will focus on two mechanical resuscitation devices, the Lund University Cardiac Assist System (LUCAS) and AutoPulse devices and the actual literature available. In conclusion, the general use of mechanical resuscitation devices cannot be recommended at the moment. PMID:26623121

  11. Withholding cardiopulmonary resuscitation: proposals for formal guidelines.

    PubMed Central

    Doyal, L; Wilsher, D

    1993-01-01

    Working with members of the Royal London Trust and its medical council, Len Doyal and Daniel Wilsher have composed a set of guidelines governing the making of decisions to withhold resuscitation from patients. The guidelines describe the procedures that should be followed when giving orders for non-resuscitation and the clinical, legal, and moral criteria that should be satisfied before such orders are issued. The authors hope that these guidelines will be of help to those responsible for the creation of hospitals' policies for non-resuscitation. Images p1594-a PMID:8329925

  12. Video recording of emergency department trauma resuscitations.

    PubMed

    Brown, Debra M

    2003-01-01

    Although hospitals are faced with the challenges of appropriately informing the public regarding health care and protecting the privacy of patients, a comprehensive policy concerning videotaping of trauma resuscitations can be developed to comply with regulatory bodies. Video recording of trauma team resuscitations can be utilized as an effective quality improvement tool to evaluate trauma team performance, psychomotor skills and techniques, and to identify educational needs related to specific trauma populations. Video recording of Trauma resuscitations is an effective tool for improving trauma team performance by educating clinical staff regarding roles and responsibilities. PMID:16265920

  13. Minocycline and Doxycycline, but not Tetracycline, Mitigate Liver and Kidney Injury after Hemorrhagic Shock/Resuscitation*

    PubMed Central

    Kholmukhamedov, Andaleb; Czerny, Christoph; Hu, Jiangting; Schwartz, Justin; Zhong, Zhi; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recovery of hemodynamics by fluid resuscitation after hemorrhage, development of the systemic inflammatory response and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes can nonetheless lead to death. Minocycline and doxycycline are tetracycline derivatives that are protective in models of hypoxic, ischemic and oxidative stress. Our Aim was to determine whether minocycline and doxycycline protect liver and kidney and improve survival in a mouse model of hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation. Methods Mice were hemorrhaged to 30 mm Hg for 3 h and then resuscitated with shed blood followed by half the shed volume of lactated Ringer's solution containing tetracycline (10 mg/kg), minocycline (10 mg/kg), doxycycline (5 mg/kg) or vehicle. For pre-plus post-treatment, drugs were administered intraperitoneally prior to hemorrhage followed by second equal dose in Ringer's solution after blood resuscitation. Blood and tissue were harvested after 6 h. Results Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) increased to 1988 and 1878 U/L after post-treatment with vehicle and tetracycline, respectively, whereas minocycline and doxycycline post-treatment decreased ALT to 857 and 863 U/L. Pre-plus post-treatment with minocycline and doxycycline also decreased ALT to 849 and 834 U/L. After vehicle, blood creatinine increased to 279 μM, which minocycline and doxycycline post-treatment decreased to 118 and 112 μM. Minocycline and doxycycline pre- plus post-treatment decreased creatinine similarly. Minocycline and doxycycline also decreased necrosis and apoptosis in liver and apoptosis in both liver and kidney, the latter assessed by TUNEL and caspase-3 activation. Lastly after 4.5 h of hemorrhage followed by resuscitation, minocycline and doxycycline (but not tetracycline) post-treatment improved 1-week survival from 38%(vehicle) to 69% and 67%, respectively. Conclusion Minocycline and doxycycline were similarly protective when given before as after blood resuscitation and might therefore

  14. Permissive hypotension does not reduce regional organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation: animal study with fluorescent microspheres

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to investigate regional organ perfusion acutely following uncontrolled hemorrhage in an animal model that simulates a penetrating vascular injury and accounts for prehospital times in urban trauma. We set forth to determine if hypotensive resuscitation (permissive hypotension) would result in equivalent organ perfusion compared to normotensive resuscitation. Methods Twenty four (n=24) male rats randomized to 4 groups: Sham, No Fluid (NF), Permissive Hypotension (PH) (60% of baseline mean arterial pressure - MAP), Normotensive Resuscitation (NBP). Uncontrolled hemorrhage caused by a standardised injury to the abdominal aorta; MAP was monitored continuously and lactated Ringer’s was infused. Fluorimeter readings of regional blood flow of the brain, heart, lung, kidney, liver, and bowel were obtained at baseline and 85 minutes after hemorrhage, as well as, cardiac output, lactic acid, and laboratory tests; intra-abdominal blood loss was assessed. Analysis of variance was used for comparison. Results Intra-abdominal blood loss was higher in NBP group, as well as, lower hematocrit and hemoglobin levels. No statistical differences in perfusion of any organ between PH and NBP groups. No statistical difference in cardiac output between PH and NBP groups, as well as, in lactic acid levels between PH and NBP. NF group had significantly higher lactic acidosis and had significantly lower organ perfusion. Conclusions Hypotensive resuscitation causes less intra-abdominal bleeding than normotensive resuscitation and concurrently maintains equivalent organ perfusion. No fluid resuscitation reduces intra-abdominal bleeding but also significantly reduces organ perfusion. PMID:23531188

  15. Modification of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program Algorithm for Resuscitation of Conjoined Twins.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nicole K; Fuerch, Janene H; Halamek, Louis P

    2016-03-01

    There are no national or international guidelines for the resuscitation of conjoined twins. We have described how the U.S. Neonatal Resuscitation Program algorithm can be modified for delivery room resuscitation of omphaloischiopagus conjoined twins. In planning for the delivery and resuscitation of these patients, we considered the challenges of providing cardiopulmonary support to preterm conjoined twins in face-to-face orientation and with shared circulation via a fused liver and single umbilical cord. We also demonstrate how in situ simulation can be used to prepare a large, multidisciplinary team of health care professionals to deliver safe, efficient, and effective care to such patients. PMID:26461924

  16. Strategies for Small Volume Resuscitation: Hyperosmotic-Hyperoncotic Solutions, Hemoglobin Based Oxygen Carriers and Closed-Loop Resuscitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, George C.; Wade, Charles E.; Dubick, Michael A.; Atkins, James L.

    2004-01-01

    oxygen from plasma hemoglobin as well as facilitate RBC unloading. We analyzed one volunteer study, 15 intraoperative trials, and 3 trauma studies using HBOCs. Perioperative studies generally suggest ability to deliver oxygen, but one trauma trial using HBOCs (HemAssist) for treatment of trauma resulted in a dramatic increase in mortality, while an intraoperative trauma study using Polyheme demonstrated reductions in blood use and lower mortality compared to historic controls of patients refusing blood. Transfusion reductions with HBOC use have been modest. Two HBOCs (Hemopure and Polyheme) are now in new or planned large-scale multicenter prehospital trials of trauma treatment. A new implementation of small volume resuscitation is closed-loop resuscitation (CLR), which employs microprocessors to titrate just enough fluid to reach a physiologic target . Animal studies suggest less risk of rebleeding in uncontrolled hemorrhage and a reduction in fluid needs with CLR. The first clinical application of CLR was treatment of burn shock and the US Army. Conclusions: Independently sponsored civilian trauma trials and clinical evaluations in operational combat conditions of different small volume strategies are warranted.

  17. Characterization and physiological effect of tapioca maltodextrin colloid plasma expander in hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation model.

    PubMed

    Chatpun, Surapong; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Wansuksri, Rungtiva; Piyachomkwan, Kuakoon

    2016-05-01

    Plasma expanders (PEs) are administered fluids to replace blood volume when massive blood loss has occured. Maltodextrin from tapioca starch was selected as a study candidate to prepare a colloid PE due to an uncomplicated production process. The formulations of mixture between tapioca maltodextrin and 0.9 % sodium chloride solution were prepared and then characterized. This was to investigate the effects of a dextrose equivalent (DE) and the concentration on the physical properties. Storage stability of each formulation was also determined and compared with clinically used PE [6 % hydroxyethyl starch (HES), 130/0.4]. The effects on the circulatory system in hamsters with hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation using prepared PE were also investigated. The results showed that low DE value led to high retrogradation, turbidity and viscosity but low colloid osmotic pressure and poor solubility. Among the prepared solutions, tapioca maltodextrin with DE6 at 10 % w/v concentration had comparable properties with 6 % HES 130/0.4. Animals resuscitated with 10 % DE6 PE had improved mean arterial blood pressure similar to those resuscitated with 6 % HES 130/0.4. However, several parameters in animals resuscitated with 10 % DE6 PE were lower than those resuscitated with 6 % HES 130/0.4, i.e., heart rate, functional capillary density. Therefore, if using tapioca maltodextrin for PE, some properties have to be considered and efficiently optimized. PMID:27015687

  18. Teaching Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carveth, Stephen W.

    1979-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is a key part of emergency cardiac care. It is a basic life support procedure that can be taught in the schools with the assistance of the American Heart Association. (JMF)

  19. Should the "slow code" be resuscitated?

    PubMed

    Lantos, John D; Meadow, William L

    2011-11-01

    Most bioethicists and professional medical societies condemn the practice of "slow codes." The American College of Physicians ethics manual states, "Because it is deceptive, physicians or nurses should not perform half-hearted resuscitation efforts ('slow codes')." A leading textbook calls slow codes "dishonest, crass dissimulation, and unethical." A medical sociologist describes them as "deplorable, dishonest and inconsistent with established ethical principles." Nevertheless, we believe that slow codes may be appropriate and ethically defensible in situations in which cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is likely to be ineffective, the family decision makers understand and accept that death is inevitable, and those family members cannot bring themselves to consent or even assent to a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order. In such cases, we argue, physicians may best serve both the patient and the family by having a carefully ambiguous discussion about end-of-life options and then providing resuscitation efforts that are less vigorous or prolonged than usual. PMID:22047113

  20. Hemodynamic, plasma volume, and prenodal skin lymph responses to varied resuscitation regimens.

    PubMed

    Saxe, J M; Dombi, G W; Lucas, W F; Ledgerwood, A M; Lucas, C E

    1996-08-01

    The theoretical efficacy of hypertonic saline (HS) resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock purportedly stems from the osmolar extraction of intracellular fluid into the plasma. This hypothesis presumes a concomitant expansion of the interstitial fluid space. Colloid resuscitation, in theory, expands the plasma volume by extracting interstitial fluid. These hypotheses were tested in a canine-modified Wigger's model of hemorrhagic shock. Forty, male, splenectomized dogs were anesthetized and instrumented. Animals underwent a baseline equilibration period followed by shock for 120 minutes. Each animal was randomized to one of four groups and received equal amounts of Na+ either as lactated Ringer's (LR) solution, 10% dextran 40 (Dex) in normal saline, 7.5% saline (HS), or 7.5% saline plus Dex (HSD). Parameters measured at baseline, shock, and at postresuscitation 30 minutes, 60 minutes, 90 minutes, and 120 minutes, included: mean pressure (MAP), output, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, prenodal skin lymph flow, serum and lymph albumin, wet-to-dry skin ratios, and plasma volume. MAP, cardiac output, and plasma volume were most quickly restored with LR and Dex resuscitation (MAP = 106 and 118 mm Hg) compared to HS and HSD (MAP = 98 and 92 mm Hg). Lymph flow and lymph albumin flux were best restored with LR and HSD (mean = 85 and 48 microL/min) compared to Dex and HS (mean = 36 and 37 microL/min). Wet/dry skin ratios were greatest at 60 minutes in the LR group but similar at 120 minutes in all four groups. These data suggest that interstitial fluid space remains contracted during the first hour after HS, HSD, and Dex resuscitation compared with LR resuscitation, even though the restoration of plasma volume, MAP, and cardiac output is greatest with the Dex regimen. Further studies with total body water and intracellular water are needed in this model. PMID:8760538

  1. Neonatal resuscitation 1: a model to measure inspired and expired tidal volumes and assess leakage at the face mask

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Kamlin, C; Davis, P; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Neonatal resuscitation is a common and important intervention, and adequate ventilation is the key to success. In the delivery room, positive pressure ventilation is given with manual ventilation devices using face masks. Mannequins are widely used to teach and practise this technique. During both simulated and real neonatal resuscitation, chest excursion is used to assess tidal volume delivery, and leakage from the mask is not measured. Objective: To describe a system that allows measurement of mask leakage and estimation of tidal volume delivery. Methods: Respiratory function monitors, a modified resuscitation mannequin, and a computer were used to measure leakage from the mask and to assess tidal volume delivery in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Results: The volume of gas passing through a flow sensor was measured at the face mask. This was a good estimate of the tidal volume entering and leaving the lung in this model. Gas leakage between the mask and mannequin was also measured. This occurred principally during inflation, although gas leakage during deflation was seen when the total leakage was large. A volume of gas that distended the mask but did not enter the lung was also measured. Conclusion: This system can be used to assess the effectiveness of positive pressure ventilation given using a face mask during simulated neonatal resuscitation. It could be useful for teaching neonatal resuscitation and assessing ventilation through a face mask. PMID:15871990

  2. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: who should decide?

    PubMed

    Lederman, Zohar; Garasic, Mirko; Piperberg, Michelle

    2014-05-01

    Whether to allow the presence of family members during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been a highly contentious topic in recent years. Even though a great deal of evidence and professional guidelines support the option of family presence during resuscitation (FPDR), many healthcare professionals still oppose it. One of the main arguments espoused by the latter is that family members should not be allowed for the sake of the patient's best interests, whether it is to increase his chances of survival, respect his privacy or leave his family with a last positive impression of him. In this paper, we examine the issue of FPDR from the patient's point of view. Since the patient requires CPR, he is invariably unconscious and therefore incompetent. We discuss the Autonomy Principle and the Three-Tiered process for surrogate decision making, as well as the Beneficence Principle and show that these are limited in providing us with an adequate tool for decision making in this particular case. Rather, we rely on a novel principle (or, rather, a novel specification of an existing principle) and a novel integrated model for surrogate decision making. We show that this model is more satisfactory in taking the patient's true wishes under consideration and encourages a joint decision making process by all parties involved. PMID:23557910

  3. Prehospital Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock with Hypertonic Solutions Worsens Hypocoagulation and Hyperfibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Delano, Matthew J; Rizoli, Sandro B; Rhind, Shawn G; Cuschieri, Joseph; Junger, Wolfgang; Baker, Andrew J; Dubick, Michael A; Hoyt, David B; Bulger, Eileen M

    2015-07-01

    Impaired hemostasis frequently occurs after traumatic shock and resuscitation. The prehospital fluid administered can exacerbate subsequent bleeding and coagulopathy. Hypertonic solutions are recommended as first-line treatment of traumatic shock; however, their effects on coagulation are unclear. This study explores the impact of resuscitation with various hypertonic solutions on early coagulopathy after trauma. We conducted a prospective observational subgroup analysis of large clinical trial on out-of-hospital single-bolus (250 mL) hypertonic fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock trauma patients (systolic blood pressure, ≤70 mmHg). Patients received 7.5% NaCl (HS), 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran 70 (HSD), or 0.9% NaCl (normal saline [NS]) in the prehospital setting. Thirty-four patients were included: 9 HS, 8 HSD, 17 NS. Treatment with HS/HSD led to higher admission systolic blood pressure, sodium, chloride, and osmolarity, whereas lactate, base deficit, fluid requirement, and hemoglobin levels were similar in all groups. The HSD-resuscitated patients had higher admission international normalized ratio values and more hypocoagulable patients, 62% (vs. 55% HS, 47% NS; P < 0.05). Prothrombotic tissue factor was elevated in shock treated with NS but depressed in both HS and HSD groups. Fibrinolytic tissue plasminogen activator and anti-fibrinolytic plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 were increased by shock but not thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. The HSD patients had the worst imbalance between procoagulation/anticoagulation and profibrinolysis/antifibrinolysis, resulting in more hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis. We concluded that resuscitation with hypertonic solutions, particularly HSD, worsens hypocoagulability and hyperfibrinolysis after hemorrhagic shock in trauma through imbalances in both procoagulants and anticoagulants and both profibrinolytic and antifibrinolytic activities. PMID:25784523

  4. Thermal skin injury: II. Effects on edema formation and albumin extravasation of fluid resuscitation with lactated Ringer's, plasma, and hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Onarheim, H; Lund, T; Reed, R

    1989-01-01

    Pentobarbital anesthetized rats were subjected to a 40% body surface area full-thickness scald burn. Intravenous fluid therapy was given as lactated Ringer's (5 ml/hr), plasma (2.5 ml/hr), or very hypertonic saline (2,400 mosmol/l) (0.75 ml/hr) and compared to unburned or burned, untreated controls. At 3 hr postburn, skin water and albumin content and extravasation of radiolabelled albumin were determined. Water content in injured skin increased by 35-78% (least in the untreated group, most in the plasma group) compared to unburned controls (P less than 0.05). After lactated Ringer's therapy water content increased even in unburned skin and in muscle (P less than 0.05). Tissue albumin mass increased generally slightly more than the increase in water content, from 37% (lactated Ringer's group) to 126% (plasma group) in burned areas. Extravasation rate of radiolabelled albumin increased 5-80 times in burned areas, most following plasma treatment (equivalent to 0.6-1.0 ml plasma/g dry weight/180 min). A major part of the estimated total fluid loss following therapy by lactated Ringer's took place in noninjured tissue. Plasma therapy gave less fluid accumulation in unburned tissues but more edema in the injured areas than lactated Ringer's. PMID:2917371

  5. Resuscitation of extremely preterm infants - controversies and current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pooja N; Banerjee, Jayanta; Godambe, Sunit V

    2016-01-01

    Despite significant advances in perinatal medicine, the management of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room remains a challenge. There is an increasing evidence for improved outcomes regarding the resuscitation and stabilisation of extremely preterm infants but there is a lack of evidence in the periviable (gestational age 23-25 wk) preterm subgroup. Presence of an experienced team during the delivery of extremely preterm infant to improve outcome is reviewed. Adaptation from foetal to neonatal cardiorespiratory haemodynamics is dependent on establishing an optimal functional residual capacity in the extremely preterm infants, thus enabling adequate gas exchange. There is sufficient evidence for a gentle approach to stabilisation of these fragile infants in the delivery room. Evidence for antenatal steroids especially in the periviable infants, delayed cord clamping, strategies to establish optimal functional residual capacity, importance of temperature control and oxygenation in delivery room in extremely premature infants is reviewed in this article. PMID:27170925

  6. Resuscitation of extremely preterm infants - controversies and current evidence.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pooja N; Banerjee, Jayanta; Godambe, Sunit V

    2016-05-01

    Despite significant advances in perinatal medicine, the management of extremely preterm infants in the delivery room remains a challenge. There is an increasing evidence for improved outcomes regarding the resuscitation and stabilisation of extremely preterm infants but there is a lack of evidence in the periviable (gestational age 23-25 wk) preterm subgroup. Presence of an experienced team during the delivery of extremely preterm infant to improve outcome is reviewed. Adaptation from foetal to neonatal cardiorespiratory haemodynamics is dependent on establishing an optimal functional residual capacity in the extremely preterm infants, thus enabling adequate gas exchange. There is sufficient evidence for a gentle approach to stabilisation of these fragile infants in the delivery room. Evidence for antenatal steroids especially in the periviable infants, delayed cord clamping, strategies to establish optimal functional residual capacity, importance of temperature control and oxygenation in delivery room in extremely premature infants is reviewed in this article. PMID:27170925

  7. Clinician performed resuscitative ultrasonography for the initial evaluation and resuscitation of trauma

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Lawrence M; Ball, Chad G; Panebianco, Nova; Al-Kadi, Azzam; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-01-01

    Background Traumatic injury is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries worldwide. Recent studies suggest that many deaths are preventable if injuries are recognized and treated in an expeditious manner – the so called 'golden hour' of trauma. Ultrasound revolutionized the care of the trauma patient with the introduction of the FAST (Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma) examination; a rapid assessment of the hemodynamically unstable patient to identify the presence of peritoneal and/or pericardial fluid. Since that time the use of ultrasound has expanded to include a rapid assessment of almost every facet of the trauma patient. As a result, ultrasound is not only viewed as a diagnostic test, but actually as an extension of the physical exam. Methods A review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to ultrasound-assisted assessment of the trauma patient were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. Discussion In this review we explore the benefits and pitfalls of applying resuscitative ultrasound to every aspect of the initial assessment of the critically injured trauma patient. PMID:19660123

  8. IS IT TIME TO RETHINK CORD MANAGEMENT WHEN RESUSCITATION IS NEEDED?

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Judith S.; Erickson-Owens, Debra A.

    2015-01-01

    An infant who receives a placental transfusion at birth, either from cord milking or delayed cord clamping, obtains about 30% more blood volume than the infant whose cord is cut immediately. Receiving an adequate blood volume from placental transfusion at birth may be protective for the distressed neonate as it prevents hypovolemia and can support optimal perfusion to all organs. New research shows that ventilating before clamping the umbilical cord can reduce large swings in cardiovascular function and help to stabilize the infant. Hypovolemia, often associated with nuchal cord or shoulder dystocia, may lead to an inflammatory cascade and subsequent ischemic injury. A sudden unexpected neonatal asystole at birth may occur from severe hypovolemia. The restoration of blood volume is an important action to protect the hearts and brains of these neonates. Current protocols for resuscitation imply immediate cord clamping and the care of the infant away from the mother's bedside. We suggest that an obstetrical provider can achieve placental transfusion for the distressed neonate by milking the cord several times or resuscitating the infant at the perineum with an intact cord. Milking the cord can be done quickly within the current Neonatal Resuscitation Program guidelines. Cord blood gases can be collected with delayed cord clamping. “Bringing the resuscitation” to the mother's bedside is a novel concept and supports an intact cord. Adopting a policy for resuscitation with an intact cord in a hospital setting will take concentrated effort and team work by obstetrics, pediatrics, midwifery, and nursing. PMID:25297530

  9. 21 CFR 880.6080 - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board. 880.6080... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6080 Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary... during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  10. 21 CFR 880.6080 - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board. 880.6080... Miscellaneous Devices § 880.6080 Cardiopulmonary resuscitation board. (a) Identification. A cardiopulmonary... during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device...

  11. Carbachol promotes gastrointestinal function during oral resuscitation of burn shock

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sen; Che, Jin-Wei; Tian, Yi-Jun; Sheng, Zhi-Yong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of carbachol on gastrointestinal function in a dog model of oral resuscitation for burn shock. METHODS: Twenty Beagle dogs with intubation of the carotid artery, jugular vein and jejunum for 24 h were subjected to 35% total body surface area full-thickness burns, and were divided into three groups: no fluid resuscitation (NR, n = 10), in which animals did not receive fluid by any means in the first 24 h post-burn; oral fluid resuscitation (OR, n = 8), in which dogs were gavaged with glucose-electrolyte solution (GES) with volume and rate consistent with the Parkland formula; and oral fluid with carbachol group (OR/CAR, n = 8), in which dogs were gavaged with GES containing carbachol (20 μg/kg), with the same volume and rate as the OR group. Twenty-four hours after burns, all animals were given intravenous fluid replacement, and 72 h after injury, they received nutritional support. Hemodynamic and gastrointestinal parameters were measured serially with animals in conscious and cooperative state. RESULTS: The mean arterial pressure, cardiac output and plasma volume dropped markedly, and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion was reduced obviously after the burn injury in all the three groups. Hemodynamic parameters and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion in the OR and OR/CAR groups were promoted to pre-injury level at 48 and 72 h, respectively, while hemodynamic parameters in the NR group did not return to pre-injury level till 72 h, and gastrointestinal tissue perfusion remained lower than pre-injury level until 120 h post-burn. CO2 of the gastric mucosa and intestinal mucosa blood flow of OR/CAR groups were 56.4 ± 4.7 mmHg and157.7 ± 17.7 blood perfusion units (BPU) at 24 h post-burn, respectively, which were significantly superior to those in the OR group (65.8 ± 5.8 mmHg and 127.7 ± 11.9 BPU, respectively, all P < 0.05). Gastric emptying and intestinal absorption rates of GES were significantly reduced to the lowest level (52.8% and

  12. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  13. Superiority of blood over saline resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock: a 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, D V; Robinson, M K; Rounds, J D; DeRosa, E; Niles, D A; Ingwall, J S; Wilmore, D W; Jacobs, D O

    1997-01-01

    -carrying capacity of resuscitation fluid has an important impact on intracellular metabolism and outcome. PMID:9389399

  14. Neonatal resuscitation: improving the outcome.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Autumn P

    2014-03-01

    Prudent veterinary intervention in the prenatal, parturient, and postpartum periods can increase neonatal survival by controlling or eliminating factors contributing to puppy morbidity and mortality. Postresuscitation or within the first 24 hours of a natural delivery, a complete physical examination should be performed by a veterinarian, technician, or knowledgeable breeder. Adequate ingestion of colostrum must occur promptly (within 24 hours) postpartum for puppies and kittens to acquire passive immunity. PMID:24580986

  15. A patient with commotio cordis successfully resuscitated by bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Ngai, K Y; Chan, H Y; Ng, F

    2010-10-01

    Sudden deaths of children and adolescents during competitive sports are usually due to congenital heart diseases. Ventricular fibrillation, however, may also occur in individuals with no underlying cardiac disease who have sustained a low-impact chest wall blow. This phenomenon is described as commotio cordis, and the overall survival rate is poor. Successful resuscitation can be achieved by prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation and early defibrillation. We report a teenager who sustained a chest wall blow that resulted in a cardiac arrest during a rugby competition. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was given by bystanders. The ambulance crew arrived with an automated external defibrillator. Ventricular fibrillation was detected and responded to defibrillation. Subsequent investigations including imaging and electrophysiological studies did not reveal any cardiac or brain abnormality, and the patient recovered well neurologically. Accessible cardiopulmonary resuscitation-trained personnel and automated external defibrillators should be present at all organised sporting events. PMID:20890008

  16. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Older Adults' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godkin, M. Dianne; Toth, Ellen L.

    1994-01-01

    Examined knowledge, attitudes, and opinions of 60 older adults about cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Most had little or no accurate knowledge of CPR. Knowledge deficits and misconceptions of older adults should be addressed so that they may become informed and active participants in CPR decision-making process. (BF)

  17. Resuscitation training for emergency nurses in Africa.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Charmaine

    2015-03-01

    Equipment and training for nurses in Africa are scarce but, as this article explains, if aid were targeted at local suppliers of cheap but vital equipment, such as resuscitation manikins, nursing practice would be enhanced and patient outcomes may improve. PMID:25746887

  18. A necessary evil? Intra-abdominal hypertension complicating burn patient resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective Severe burns are devastating injuries that result in considerable systemic inflammation and often require resuscitation with large volumes of fluid. The result of massive resuscitation is often raised intra-abdominal pressures leading to Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and the secondary abdominal compartment syndrome. The objective of this study is to conduct (1) a 10 year retrospective study to investigate epidemiological factors contributing to burn injuries in Alberta, (2) to characterize fluid management and incidence of IAH and ACS and (3) to review fluid resuscitation with a goal to identify optimal strategies for fluid resuscitation. Design A comprehensive 10-year retrospective review of burn injuries from 1999. Outcome Measures Age, sex, date, mechanism of injury, location of incident, on scene vitals and GCS, type of transport to hospital and routing, ISS, presenting vitals and GCS, diagnoses, procedures, complications, hospital LOS, ICU LOS, and events surrounding the injury. Results One hundred and seventy five patients (79.4% M, 20.6% F) were identified as having traumatic burn injuries with a mean ISS score of 21.8 (±8.3). The mean age was 41.6 (±17.5) (range 14-94) years. Nearly half (49.7%) of patients suffered their injuries at home, 17.7% were related to industrial incidents and 14.3% were MVC related. One hundred and ten patients required ICU admission. ICU LOS 18.5 (±8.8) days. Hospital LOS 38.0 (±37.8) days. The mean extent of burn injury was 31.4 (±20.9) % TBSA. Nearly half of the patients suffered inhalational injuries (mild 12.5%, moderate 13.7%, severe 9.1%). Thirty-nine (22.2%) of patients died from their injuries. Routine IAP monitoring began in September, 2005 with 15 of 28 patients having at least two IAP measurements. The mean IAP was 16.5 (±5.7) cm H2O (range: 1-40) with an average of 58 (±97) IAP measurements per patient. Those patients with IAP monitoring had an average TBSA of 35.0 (±16.0)%, ISS of 47.5 (±7

  19. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Mandeville, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart–lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid resuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately. PMID:27249550

  20. Predicting and measuring fluid responsiveness with echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ashley; Mandeville, Justin

    2016-06-01

    Echocardiography is ideally suited to guide fluid resuscitation in critically ill patients. It can be used to assess fluid responsiveness by looking at the left ventricle, aortic outflow, inferior vena cava and right ventricle. Static measurements and dynamic variables based on heart-lung interactions all combine to predict and measure fluid responsiveness and assess response to intravenous fluid resuscitation. Thorough knowledge of these variables, the physiology behind them and the pitfalls in their use allows the echocardiographer to confidently assess these patients and in combination with clinical judgement manage them appropriately. PMID:27249550

  1. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular...

  2. 29 CFR 98.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Adequate evidence. 98.900 Section 98.900 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a...

  3. Fat embolism with the use of intraosseous infusion during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fiallos, M; Kissoon, N; Abdelmoneim, T; Johnson, L; Murphy, S; Lu, L; Masood, S; Idris, A

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this prospective study was to assess the incidence and magnitude of fat emboli after cardiopulmonary resuscitation and intraosseous infusions. An animal laboratory at a university center was used to study 33 mixed-breed piglets. The piglets underwent hypoxic cardiac arrest followed by chest compressions and mechanical ventilation for a minimum of 30 minutes. The animals were divided in groups: group 1 (n = 5), which had no intraosseous cannulas, group 2 (n = 6), which had intraosseous cannulas with infusion, groups 3 (n = 6), 4 (n = 6), and 5 (n = 8), which had intraosseous cannulas with infusion of epinephrine, normal saline, and sodium bicarbonate respectively, and group 6 (n = 2), which was a sham group with no intraosseous cannulas and no cardiopulmonary resuscitation. At cessation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, representative lung samples were collected from upper and lower lobes of each lung and observed for fat globules and bone marrow elements. Fat globules were seen in the peribronchial blood vessels and intravascular areas throughout all lung fields of groups 1 through 5. There was no difference in appearance or distribution of fat globules among the 5 treatment groups. Analysis of variance showed no statistical significance (P < 0.05) within or among groups 1 through 5. The use of the intraosseous cannula for infusion of emergency drugs and fluids did not increase the magnitude of fat embolization over cardiopulmonary resuscitation alone in this animal model. The benefits of using this procedure in critically ill children as a means of rapid vascular access for resuscitation is well established. However, the risk of fat embolism in this population needs further study. PMID:9258208

  4. COMBAT: Initial experience with a randomized clinical trial of plasma-based resuscitation in the field for traumatic hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Michael P.; Moore, Ernest E.; Chin, Theresa L; Ghasabyan, Arsen; Chandler, James; Stringham, John; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Moore, Hunter B.; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C; Sauaia, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The existing evidence shows great promise for plasma as the first resuscitation fluid in both civilian and military trauma. We embarked on the Control of Major Bleeding After Trauma (COMBAT) trial with the support of the Department of Defense, in order to determine if plasma-first resuscitation yields hemostatic and survival benefits. The methodology of the COMBAT study represents not only three years of development work, but the integration of nearly two-decades of technical experience with the design and implementation of other clinical trials and studies. Herein, we describe the key features of the study design, critical personnel and infrastructural elements, and key innovations. We will also briefly outline the systems engineering challenges entailed by this study. COMBAT is a randomized, placebo controlled, semi-blinded prospective Phase IIB clinical trial, conducted in a ground ambulance fleet based at a Level I trauma center, and part of a multicenter collaboration. The primary objective of COMBAT is to determine the efficacy of field resuscitation with plasma first, compared to standard of care (normal saline). To date we have enrolled 30 subjects in the COMBAT study. The ability to achieve intervention with a hemostatic resuscitation agent in the closest possible temporal proximity to injury is critical and represents an opportunity to forestall the evolution of the “bloody vicious cycle”. Thus, the COMBAT model for deploying plasma in first response units should serve as a model for RCTs of other hemostatic resuscitative agents. PMID:25784527

  5. Combat: Initial Experience with a Randomized Clinical Trial of Plasma-Based Resuscitation in the Field for Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Michael P; Moore, Ernest E; Chin, Theresa L; Ghasabyan, Arsen; Chandler, James; Stringham, John; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Moore, Hunter B; Banerjee, Anirban; Silliman, Christopher C; Sauaia, Angela

    2015-08-01

    The existing evidence shows great promise for plasma as the first resuscitation fluid in both civilian and military trauma. We embarked on the Control of Major Bleeding After Trauma (COMBAT) trial with the support of the Department of Defense to determine if plasma-first resuscitation yields hemostatic and survival benefits. The methodology of the COMBAT study represents not only 3 years of development work but also the integration of nearly two decades of technical experience with the design and implementation of other clinical trials and studies. Herein, we describe the key features of the study design, critical personnel and infrastructural elements, and key innovations. We will also briefly outline the systems engineering challenges entailed by this study. The COMBAT trial is a randomized, placebo-controlled, semiblinded, prospective, phase IIB clinical trial conducted in a ground ambulance fleet based at a level I trauma center and part of a multicenter collaboration. The primary objective of the COMBAT trial is to determine the efficacy of field resuscitation with plasma first compared with standard of care (normal saline). To date, we have enrolled 30 subjects in the COMBAT study. The ability to achieve intervention with a hemostatic resuscitation agent in the closest possible temporal proximity to injury is critical and represents an opportunity to forestall the evolution of the "bloody vicious cycle." Thus, the COMBAT model for deploying plasma in first-response units should serve as a model for randomized clinical trials of other hemostatic resuscitative agents. PMID:25784527

  6. Gastric tonometry versus cardiac index as resuscitation goals in septic shock: a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Palizas, Fernando; Dubin, Arnaldo; Regueira, Tomas; Bruhn, Alejandro; Knobel, Elias; Lazzeri, Silvio; Baredes, Natalio; Hernández, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Resuscitation goals for septic shock remain controversial. Despite the normalization of systemic hemodynamic variables, tissue hypoperfusion can still persist. Indeed, lactate or oxygen venous saturation may be difficult to interpret. Our hypothesis was that a gastric intramucosal pH-guided resuscitation protocol might improve the outcome of septic shock compared with a standard approach aimed at normalizing systemic parameters such as cardiac index (CI). Methods The 130 septic-shock patients were randomized to two different resuscitation goals: CI ≥ 3.0 L/min/m2 (CI group: 66 patients) or intramucosal pH (pHi) ≥ 7.32 (pHi group: 64 patients). After correcting basic physiologic parameters, additional resuscitation consisting of more fluids and dobutamine was started if specific goals for each group had not been reached. Several clinical data were registered at baseline and during evolution. Hemodynamic data and pHi values were registered every 6 hours during the protocol. Primary end point was 28 days' mortality. Results Both groups were comparable at baseline. The most frequent sources of infection were abdominal sepsis and pneumonia. Twenty-eight day mortality (30.3 vs. 28.1%), peak Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System scores (32.6 ± 6.5 vs. 33.2 ± 4.7) and ICU length of stay (12.6 ± 8.2 vs. 16 ± 12.4 days) were comparable. A higher proportion of patients exhibited values below the specific target at baseline in the pHi group compared with the CI group (50% vs. 10.9%; P < 0.001). Of 32 patients with a pHi < 7.32 at baseline, only 7 (22%) normalized this parameter after resuscitation. Areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves to predict mortality at baseline, and at 24 and 48 hours were 0.55, 0.61, and 0.47, and 0.70, 0.90, and 0.75, for CI and pHi, respectively. Conclusions Our study failed to demonstrate any survival benefit of using pHi compared with CI as resuscitation goal in septic-shock patients. Nevertheless, a

  7. Exhaled CO2 Parameters as a Tool to Assess Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatching during Neonatal Resuscitation in a Swine Model of Neonatal Asphyxia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Elliott Shang-shun; Cheung, Po-Yin; O'Reilly, Megan; LaBossiere, Joseph; Lee, Tze-Fun; Cowan, Shaun; Bigam, David L.; Schmölzer, Georg Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Background End-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), partial pressure of exhaled CO2 (PECO2), and volume of expired CO2 (VCO2) can be continuously monitored non-invasively to reflect pulmonary ventilation and perfusion status. Although ETCO2 ≥14mmHg has been shown to be associated with return of an adequate heart rate in neonatal resuscitation and quantifying the PECO2 has the potential to serve as an indicator of resuscitation quality, there is little information regarding capnometric measurement of PECO2 and ETCO2 in detecting return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) and survivability in asphyxiated neonates receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Methods Seventeen newborn piglets were anesthetized, intubated, instrumented, and exposed to 45-minute normocapnic hypoxia followed by apnea to induce asphyxia. Protocolized resuscitation was initiated when heart rate decreased to 25% of baseline. Respiratory and hemodynamic parameters including ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, heart rate, cardiac output, and carotid artery flow were continuously measured and analyzed. Results There were no differences in respiratory and hemodynamic parameters between surviving and non-surviving piglets prior to CPR. Surviving piglets had significantly higher ETCO2, PECO2, VCO2, cardiac index, and carotid artery flow values during CPR compared to non-surviving piglets. Conclusion Surviving piglets had significantly better respiratory and hemodynamic parameters during resuscitation compared to non-surviving piglets. In addition to optimizing resuscitation efforts, capnometry can assist by predicting outcomes of newborns requiring chest compressions. PMID:26766424

  8. Automated cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a case study.

    PubMed

    Spiro, Jon; Theodosiou, Maria; Doshi, Sagar

    2014-02-01

    Rates of survival after cardiac arrest are low and correlate with the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Devices that deliver automated CPR (A-CPR) can provide sustained and effective chest compressions, which are especially useful during patient transfer and while simultaneous invasive procedures are being performed. The use of such devices can also release members of resuscitation teams for other work. This article presents a case study involving a man with acute myocardial infarction complicated by cardiogenic shock and pulmonary oedema. It describes how ED nursing and medical teams worked together to deliver A-CPR, discusses the use of A-CPR devices in a tertiary cardiac centre, and highlights the advantages of using such devices. PMID:24494769

  9. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: risks and benefits of ventilation].

    PubMed

    Cordioli, Ricardo Luiz; Garelli, Valentina; Lyazidi, Aissam; Suppan, Laurent; Savary, Dominique; Brochard, Laurent; Richard, Jean-Christophe M

    2013-12-11

    Knowledge of the physiological mechanisms that govern cardiopulmonary interactions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) allows to better assess risks and benefits of ventilation. Ventilation is required to maintain gas exchange, particularly when CPR is prolonged. Nevertheless, conventional ventilation (bag mask or mechanical ventilation) may be harmful when excessive or when chest compressions are interrupted. In fact large tidal volume and/or rapid respiratory rate may adversely compromise hemodynamic effects of chest compressions. In this regard, international recommendations that give the priority to chest compressions, are meaningful. Continuous flow insufflation with oxygen that generates a moderate positive airway pressure avoids any interruption of chest compressions and prevents the risk of lung injury associated with prolonged resuscitation. PMID:24416979

  10. Maintaining adequate hydration and nutrition in adult enteral tube feeding.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the nutritional and fluid requirements of enterally-fed patients can be challenging and the practicalities of ensuring adequate delivery must be taken into consideration. Patients who are enterally fed can be more reliant on clinicians, family members and carers to meet their nutrition and hydration needs and identify any deficiencies, excesses or problems with delivery. Estimating a patient's requirements can be challenging due to the limitations of using predictive equations in the clinical setting. Close monitoring by all those involved in the patient's care, as well as regular review by a dietitian, is therefore required to balance the delivery of adequate feed and fluids to meet each patient's individual needs and prevent the complications of malnutrition and dehydration. Increasing the awareness of the signs of malnutrition and dehydration in patients receiving enteral tube feeding among those involved in a patient's care will help any deficiencies to be detected early on and rectified before complications occur. PMID:26087203

  11. Drug therapy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, A

    1989-03-01

    In contrast to adults, cardiopulmonary arrest in infants and children is rarely an acute, primary cardiac event. Instead, it is often the terminal event in a progressive deterioration of respiratory or circulatory function. Successful resuscitation from cardiac arrest therefore is unusual in the paediatric patient and most survivors have persistent neurological impairment. Rapid vascular access and recall of drug dosages are major obstacles in treating paediatric emergencies. This paper reviews vascular access and alternative drug delivery methods. The endotracheal and intraosseous routes provide alternative sites for drug delivery, but the optimal doses and methods of drug administration via these routes are unknown. Indeed, although great progress in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) research has been made over the past 10 years, there are only limited data on paediatric arrest mechanisms and drug treatment. In this paper, recommended dosages and mechanisms of action of drugs useful during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are reviewed, highlighting recent data which suggest that changes in current drug recommendations may be needed. To avoid delays in management, precalculated tables of drugs should be readily available in emergency departments and other care areas where paediatric cases are likely to be seen. Adrenaline (epinephrine) remains the drug of choice in a cardiac arrest, but the most effective dose may be higher than currently used. Treatment of acidosis during the arrest concentrates on restoration of ventilation and blood flow and not on bicarbonate administration. In the post-arrest setting increasing data suggest bicarbonate may not be beneficial and may actually be detrimental. Calcium and atropine also have relatively minor roles in resuscitation pharmacology. Calcium is only indicated to treat hypocalcaemia, counteract the effects of hyperkalaemia or hypermagnesaemia, or reverse calcium channel blocker toxicity. Finally, the role of isoprenaline

  12. Pediatric Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Advances in Science, Techniques, and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.

    2009-01-01

    More than 25% of children survive to hospital discharge after in-hospital cardiac arrests, and 5% to 10% survive after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests. This review of pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation addresses the epidemiology of pediatric cardiac arrests, mechanisms of coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the 4 phases of cardiac arrest resuscitation, appropriate interventions during each phase, special resuscitation circumstances, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The key elements of pathophysiology that impact and match the timing, intensity, duration, and variability of the hypoxic-ischemic insult to evidence-based interventions are reviewed. Exciting discoveries in basic and applied-science laboratories are now relevant for specific subpopulations of pediatric cardiac arrest victims and circumstances (eg, ventricular fibrillation, neonates, congenital heart disease, extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Improving the quality of interventions is increasingly recognized as a key factor for improving outcomes. Evolving training strategies include simulation training, just-in-time and just-in-place training, and crisis-team training. The difficult issue of when to discontinue resuscitative efforts is addressed. Outcomes from pediatric cardiac arrests are improving. Advances in resuscitation science and state-of-the-art implementation techniques provide the opportunity for further improvement in outcomes among children after cardiac arrest. PMID:18977991

  13. Review article: Updated resuscitation guidelines for 2016: A summary of the Australian and New Zealand Committee on Resuscitation recommendations.

    PubMed

    Leman, Peter; Morley, Peter

    2016-08-01

    This review paper summarises the key changes made to the resuscitation guidelines used in Australia and New Zealand. They were released by the Australian and New Zealand Committee on Resuscitation in January 2016. These are local adaptations of the evidence previously published in October 2015 by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR). They are presented across the main working groups in ILCOR: ALS, BLS, paediatrics, neonates, acute coronary syndromes, first aid and 'Education, Implementation and Teams'. PMID:27357213

  14. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular act or omission has occurred. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec....

  15. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  16. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  17. The Importance of the Monitoring of Resuscitation with Blood Transfusion for Uterine Inversion in Obstetrical Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Seishi; Sameshima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to describe critical care for obstetrical hemorrhage, especially in cases of uterine inversion. Study Design. We extracted data for six patients diagnosed with uterine inversion concerning resuscitation. Results. The shock index on admission of the six patients was 1.6 or more on admission. Four of the six experienced delay in diagnosis and received inadequate fluid replacement. Five of the six experienced delay in transfer. Five of the six underwent simultaneous blood transfusion on admission, and the remaining patient experienced a delay of 30 minutes. All six patients successfully underwent uterine replacement soon after admission. One maternal death occurred due to inappropriate practices that included delay in diagnosis, delay in transfer, inadequate fluid replacement, and delayed transfusion. Two patients experiencing inappropriate practices involving delay in diagnosis, delay in transfer, and inadequate fluid replacement survived. Conclusion. If a delay in diagnosis occurs simultaneously with a delay in transfer and inadequate fluid replacement, failure in providing a prompt blood transfusion may be critical and result in maternal death. The monitoring of resuscitation with blood transfusion for uterine inversion is essential for the improvement of obstetrical care. PMID:26491450

  18. Trainers' Attitudes towards Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, Current Care Guidelines, and Training

    PubMed Central

    Mäkinen, M.; Castrén, M.; Nurmi, J.; Niemi-Murola, L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have shown that healthcare personnel hesitate to perform defibrillation due to individual or organisational attitudes. We aimed to assess trainers' attitudes towards cardiopulmonary resuscitation and defibrillation (CPR-D), Current Care Guidelines, and associated training. Methods. A questionnaire was distributed to CPR trainers attending seminars in Finland (N = 185) focusing on the updated national Current Care Guidelines 2011. The questions were answered using Likert scale (1 = totally disagree, 7 = totally agree). Factor loading of the questionnaire was made using maximum likelihood analysis and varimax rotation. Seven scales were constructed (Hesitation, Nurse's Role, Nontechnical Skill, Usefulness, Restrictions, Personal, and Organisation). Cronbach's alphas were 0.92–0.51. Statistics were Student's t-test, ANOVA, stepwise regression analysis, and Pearson Correlation. Results. The questionnaire was returned by 124/185, 67% CPR trainers, of whom two-thirds felt that their undergraduate training in CPR-D had not been adequate. Satisfaction with undergraduate defibrillation training correlated with the Nontechnical Skills scale (p < 0.01). Participants scoring high on Hesitation scale (p < 0.01) were less confident about their Nurse's Role (p < 0.01) and Nontechnical Skills (p < 0.01). Conclusion. Quality of undergraduate education affects the work of CPR trainers and some feel uncertain of defibrillation. The train-the-trainers courses and undergraduate medical education should focus more on practical scenarios with defibrillators and nontechnical skills. PMID:27144027

  19. Challenges and possibilities in forward resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Timothy James; De Pasquale, Marc; Strandenes, Geir; Sunde, Geir; Ward, Kevin R

    2014-05-01

    The environmental and logistical constraints of the prehospital setting make it a challenging place for the treatment of trauma patients. This is perhaps more pronounced in the management of battlefield casualties before extraction to definitive care. In seeking solutions, interest has been renewed in implementing damage control resuscitation principles in the prehospital setting, a concept termed remote damage control resuscitation. These developments, while improving conflict survival rates, are not exclusive to the military environment, with similar situations existing in the civilian setting. By understanding the pathophysiology of shock, particularly the need for oxygen debt repayment, improvements in the assessment and management of trauma patients can be made. Technology gaps have previously hampered our ability to accurately monitor the prehospital trauma patient in real time. However, this is changing, with devices such as tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation monitors and point-of-care lactate analysis currently being refined. Other monitoring modalities including newer signal analysis and artificial intelligence techniques are also in development. Advances in hemostatic resuscitation are being made as our understanding and ability to effectively monitor patients improve. The reevaluation of whole-blood use in the prehospital environment is yielding favorable results and challenging the negative dogma currently associated with its use. Management of trauma-related airway and respiratory compromise is evolving, with scope to improve on currently accepted practices. The purpose of this review is to highlight the challenges of treating patients in the prehospital setting and suggest potential solutions. In doing so, we hope to maintain the enthusiasm from people in the field and highlight areas for prehospital specific research and development, so that improved rates of casualty survival will continue. PMID:24296432

  20. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation: how far have we come?

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, John J; Blackman, Virginia Schmied

    2007-01-01

    In the 43 years since it was first described, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has grown from an obscure medical theory to a basic first aid skill taught to adults and is now the near-universal technique used in CPR instruction. This article provides insight into the history of CPR. We explore the phenomenon of sudden cardiac arrest, the historical roots of CPR, current practice data and recommendations, and the society's role in the development of this life-saving technique. We conclude with a review of CPR's economic impact on the healthcare system and the ethical and policy issues surrounding CPR. PMID:17179837

  1. Resuscitative challenges in nerve agent poisoning.

    PubMed

    Ben Abraham, Ron; Weinbroum, Avi A

    2003-09-01

    The threat of weapons of mass destruction such as nerve agents has become real since last year. The medical community has established protocols for the rapid evacuation and decontamination of affected civilians. However, protocols for resuscitative measures or acute perioperative care in cases of life-saving surgical interventions in toxic-traumatized casualties are still lacking. The database concerning the effects of nerve agent poisoning in humans is limited, and is largely based on reports of unintentional exposures to pesticide organophosphate poisoning and similar chemical substances. In this review, we summarize the knowledge on the possible pharmacological interactions between nerve agents and acute care. PMID:12972890

  2. Early goal-directed resuscitation of patients with septic shock: current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi G; Hartigan, Sarah M; Kashiouris, Markos G; Sessler, Curtis N; Bearman, Gonzalo M L

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are among the leading causes of mortality in the intensive care unit. Over a decade ago, early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) emerged as a novel approach for reducing sepsis mortality and was incorporated into guidelines published by the international Surviving Sepsis Campaign. In addition to requiring early detection of sepsis and prompt initiation of antibiotics, the EGDT protocol requires invasive patient monitoring to guide resuscitation with intravenous fluids, vasopressors, red cell transfusions, and inotropes. The effect of these measures on patient outcomes, however, remains controversial. Recently, three large randomized trials were undertaken to re-examine the effect of EGDT on morbidity and mortality: the ProCESS trial in the United States, the ARISE trial in Australia and New Zealand, and the ProMISe trial in England. These trials showed that EGDT did not significantly decrease mortality in patients with septic shock compared with usual care. In particular, whereas early administration of antibiotics appeared to increase survival, tailoring resuscitation to static measurements of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation did not confer survival benefit to most patients. In the following review, we examine these findings as well as other evidence from recent randomized trials of goal-directed resuscitation. We also discuss future areas of research and emerging paradigms in sepsis trials. PMID:26316210

  3. Heart Rate Variability Analysis in an Experimental Model of Hemorrhagic Shock and Resuscitation in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown as a promising non-invasive technique for assessing the cardiac autonomic modulation in trauma. The aim of this study was to evaluate HRV during hemorrhagic shock and fluid resuscitation, comparing to traditional hemodynamic and metabolic parameters. Methods Twenty anesthetized and mechanically ventilated pigs were submitted to hemorrhagic shock (60% of estimated blood volume) and evaluated for 60 minutes without fluid replacement. Surviving animals were treated with Ringer solution and evaluated for an additional period of 180 minutes. HRV metrics (time and frequency domain) as well as hemodynamic and metabolic parameters were evaluated in survivors and non-survivors animals. Results Seven of the 20 animals died during hemorrhage and initial fluid resuscitation. All animals presented an increase in time-domain HRV measures during haemorrhage and fluid resuscitation restored baseline values. Although not significantly, normalized low-frequency and LF/HF ratio decreased during early stages of haemorrhage, recovering baseline values later during hemorrhagic shock, and increased after fluid resuscitation. Non-surviving animals presented significantly lower mean arterial pressure (43±7vs57±9 mmHg, P<0.05) and cardiac index (1.7±0.2vs2.6±0.5 L/min/m2, P<0.05), and higher levels of plasma lactate (7.2±2.4vs3.7±1.4 mmol/L, P<0.05), base excess (-6.8±3.3vs-2.3±2.8 mmol/L, P<0.05) and potassium (5.3±0.6vs4.2±0.3 mmol/L, P<0.05) at 30 minutes after hemorrhagic shock compared with surviving animals. Conclusions The HRV increased early during hemorrhage but none of the evaluated HRV metrics was able to discriminate survivors from non-survivors during hemorrhagic shock. Moreover, metabolic and hemodynamic variables were more reliable to reflect hemorrhagic shock severity than HRV metrics. PMID:26247476

  4. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  5. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  6. The role of simulation in teaching pediatric resuscitation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yiqun; Cheng, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The use of simulation for teaching the knowledge, skills, and behaviors necessary for effective pediatric resuscitation has seen widespread growth and adoption across pediatric institutions. In this paper, we describe the application of simulation in pediatric resuscitation training and review the evidence for the use of simulation in neonatal resuscitation, pediatric advanced life support, procedural skills training, and crisis resource management training. We also highlight studies supporting several key instructional design elements that enhance learning, including the use of high-fidelity simulation, distributed practice, deliberate practice, feedback, and debriefing. Simulation-based training is an effective modality for teaching pediatric resuscitation concepts. Current literature has revealed some research gaps in simulation-based education, which could indicate the direction for the future of pediatric resuscitation research. PMID:25878517

  7. Design of a Functional Training Prototype for Neonatal Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Rajaraman, Sivaramakrishnan; Ganesan, Sona; Jayapal, Kavitha; Kannan, Sadhani

    2014-01-01

    Birth Asphyxia is considered to be one of the leading causes of neonatal mortality around the world. Asphyxiated neonates require skilled resuscitation to survive the neonatal period. The project aims to train health professionals in a basic newborn care using a prototype with an ultimate objective to have one person at every delivery trained in neonatal resuscitation. This prototype will be a user-friendly device with which one can get trained in performing neonatal resuscitation in resource-limited settings. The prototype consists of a Force Sensing Resistor (FSR) that measures the pressure applied and is interfaced with Arduino® which controls the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and Light Emitting Diode (LED) indication for pressure and compression counts. With the increase in population and absence of proper medical care, the need for neonatal resuscitation program is not well addressed. The proposed work aims at offering a promising solution for training health care individuals on resuscitating newborn babies under low resource settings.

  8. A Review of Carbon Dioxide Monitoring During Adult Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Xanthos, Theodoros; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis; Papalois, Apostolos; Kouskouni, Evangelia; Iacovidou, Nicoletta

    2015-11-01

    Although high quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation is one of the most significant factors related to favourable outcome, its quality depends on many components, such as airway management, compression depth and chest recoil, hands-off time, and early defibrillation. The most common way of controlling the resuscitation efforts is monitoring of end-tidal carbon dioxide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation suggests this method both for in-hospital and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, despite the abundant human and animal studies supporting the usefulness of end-tidal carbon dioxide, its optimal values during cardiopulmonary resuscitation remain controversial. In this review, the advantages and effectiveness of end-tidal carbon dioxide during cardiopulmonary resuscitation are discussed and specific target values are suggested based on the available literature. PMID:26150002

  9. “Putting It All Together” to Improve Resuscitation Quality

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Robert M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Abella, Benjamin S.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac arrest is a major public health problem affecting thousands of individuals each year in both the before hospital and in-hospital settings. However, although the scope of the problem is large, the quality of care provided during resuscitation attempts frequently does not meet quality of care standards, despite evidence-based cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines, extensive provider training, and provider credentialing in resuscitation medicine. Although this fact may be disappointing, it should not be surprising. Resuscitation of the cardiac arrest victim is a highly complex task requiring coordination between various levels and disciplines of care providers during a stressful and relatively infrequent clinical situation. Moreover, it requires a targeted, high-quality response to improve clinical outcomes of patients. Therefore, solutions to improve care provided during resuscitation attempts must be multifaceted and targeted to the diverse number of care providers to be successful. PMID:22107978

  10. Investigation of noninvasive muscle pH and oxygen saturation during uncontrolled hemorrhage and resuscitation in swine.

    PubMed

    Soller, Babs; Smith, Charles; Zou, Fengmei; Ellerby, Gwenn E C; Prince, M Dale; Sondeen, Jill L

    2014-07-01

    This study evaluated noninvasively determined muscle pH (pHm) and muscle oxygen saturation (SmO2) in a swine shock model that used uncontrolled hemorrhage and restricted volume resuscitation. Anesthetized 40-kg female swine underwent hemorrhage until 24 mL/kg of blood was removed (n = 26), followed by transection of the spleen, causing uncontrolled hemorrhage throughout the remainder of the protocol. After 15 min, 15 mL/kg of resuscitation fluid (Hextend, fresh-frozen plasma or platelets) was given for 30 min. Arterial and venous blood gases were measured at baseline, shock, end of resuscitation, and end of the study (death or 5 h), along with lactate and base excess. In addition, seven animals underwent a sham procedure. Spectra were collected continuously from the posterior thigh using a prototype CareGuide 1100 Oximeter, and pHm and SmO2 were calculated from the spectra. A two-factor analysis of variance with repeated measures followed by Tukey post hoc comparisons was used to compare experimental factors. It was shown that, for both pH and SO2, venous and muscle values were similar to each other at the end of the resuscitation period and at the end of the study for both surviving and nonsurviving animals. pH and SO2, venous and muscle, significantly declined as a result of bleeding, but lactate and base excess did not show significant changes during this period. Noninvasive pHm and SmO2 tracked the adequacy of resuscitation in real time, indicating at the time all of the fluid was delivered, which animals would live and which would die. The results of this swine study indicate that further evaluation on trauma patients is warranted. PMID:24667624

  11. Emergency center thoracotomy: impact of prehospital resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Durham, L A; Richardson, R J; Wall, M J; Pepe, P E; Mattox, K L

    1992-06-01

    Emergency center thoracotomy was performed at our facility on 389 patients from 1984 through 1989. There were no patients excluded from the study, and survival for all patients was 8.3% with survival rates of 15.2% and 7.3% for stab and gunshot wounds, respectively. Emergency center thoracotomy was performed on 42 patients suffering from isolated extrathoracic injuries with 7% survival. There were no survivors of blunt trauma in this study. Fifty-three percent of the patients arrived with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in progress. The average time of prehospital CPR for survivors was 5.1 minutes compared with 9.1 minutes for nonsurvivors. Of the survivors, prehospital endotracheal intubation prolonged successful toleration of CPR to 9.4 minutes compared with 4.2 minutes for nonintubated surviving patients (p less than 0.001). Emergency center thoracotomy is useful in the resuscitation of victims dying of penetrating truncal trauma. Prehospital endotracheal intubation significantly lengthened the time of successful CPR. PMID:1613838

  12. Intrauterine resuscitation: active management of fetal distress.

    PubMed

    Thurlow, J A; Kinsella, S M

    2002-04-01

    Acute fetal distress in labour is a condition of progressive fetal asphyxia with hypoxia and acidosis. It is usually diagnosed by finding characteristic features in the fetal heart rate pattern, wherever possible supported by fetal scalp pH measurement. Intrauterine resuscitation consists of applying specific measures with the aim of increasing oxygen delivery to the placenta and umbilical blood flow, in order to reverse hypoxia and acidosis. These measures include initial left lateral recumbent positioning followed by right lateral or knee-elbow if necessary, rapid intravenous infusion of a litre of non-glucose crystalloid, maternal oxygen administration at the highest practical inspired percentage, inhibition of uterine contractions usually with subcutaneous or intravenous terbutaline 250 microg, and intra-amniotic infusion of warmed crystalloid solution. Specific manoeuvres for umbilical cord prolapse are also described. Intrauterine resuscitation may be used as part of the obstetric management of labour, while preparing for caesarean delivery for fetal distress, or at the time of establishment of regional analgesia during labour in the compromised fetus. The principles may also be applied during inter-hospital transfers of sick or labouring parturients. PMID:15321562

  13. Review and Outcome of Prolonged Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Youness, Houssein; Al Halabi, Tarek; Hussein, Hussein; Awab, Ahmed; Jones, Kellie; Keddissi, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The maximal duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is unknown. We report a case of prolonged CPR. We have then reviewed all published cases with CPR duration equal to or more than 20 minutes. The objective was to determine the survival rate, the neurological outcome, and the characteristics of the survivors. Measurements and Main Results. The CPR data for 82 patients was reviewed. The median duration of CPR was 75 minutes. Patients mean age was 43 ± 21 years with no significant comorbidities. The main causes of the cardiac arrests were myocardial infarction (29%), hypothermia (21%), and pulmonary emboli (12%). 74% of the arrests were witnessed, with a mean latency to CPR of 2 ± 6 minutes and good quality chest compression provided in 96% of the cases. Adjunct therapy included extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (18%), thrombolysis (15.8%), and rewarming for hypothermia (19.5%). 83% were alive at 1 year, with full neurological recovery reported in 63 patients. Conclusion. Patients undergoing prolonged CPR can survive with good outcome. Young age, myocardial infarction, and potentially reversible causes of cardiac arrest such as hypothermia and pulmonary emboli predict a favorable result, especially when the arrest is witnessed and followed by prompt and good resuscitative efforts. PMID:26885387

  14. Outcome predictors of pediatric extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Robert B; Harrison, Rick E

    2010-07-01

    Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) allows clinicians to potentially rescue pediatric patients unresponsive to traditional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Clinical and laboratory variables predictive of survival to hospital discharge are beginning to emerge. In this retrospective, historical cohort case series, clinical, and laboratory data from 31 pediatric patients (<21 years of age) receiving ECPR from March 2000 to April 2006 at our university-affiliated, tertiary-care children's hospital were statistically analyzed in an attempt to identify variables predictive of survival to hospital discharge. Seven patients survived to hospital discharge (23%), and 24 patients died. Survival was independent of gender, age, and CPR duration. ECPR survival was, however, associated with a lower pre-ECPR phosphorus concentration (P = 0.002) and a lower pre-ECPR creatinine concentration (P = 0.05). A classification tree analysis, using, in part, a pre-ECPR phosphorus concentration threshold and a CPR ABG base excess concentration threshold, yielded a 96% nominal accuracy of predicting survival to hospital discharge or death. A large, multicenter, prospective cohort study aimed at validating these predictive variables is needed to guide appropriate ECPR patient selection. This study reveals the potential survival benefit of ECPR for pediatric patients, regardless of CPR duration prior to ECPR cannulation. PMID:20145916

  15. Fully Balanced Fluids do not Improve Microvascular Oxygenation, Acidosis and Renal Function in a Rat Model of Endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Bulent; Zafrani, Lara; Kandil, Asli; Baasner, Silke; Lupp, Corinna; Demirci, Cihan; Westphal, Martin; Ince, Can

    2016-07-01

    The expectation of fluid therapy in patients with septic shock is that it corrects hypovolemia, with the aim of restoring tissue perfusion and oxygenation and organ function. This study investigated whether different types of resuscitation fluids were effective in improving renal microcirculatory oxygenation, acidosis, oxidative stress, and renal function in a rat model of endotoxemic shock. Five groups of rats were used: a sham group, a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group, and three LPS groups that received 30 mL/kg/h of 0.9% sodium chloride (0.9% NaCl), a new bicarbonate buffered crystalloid solution closely resembling the composition of plasma (FB-Cxt) or a hydroxyethyl starch-ringer acetate solution. Systemic hemodynamic variables, renal blood flow, microvascular oxygenation, oxidative/nitrosative stress, and renal function were measured. LPS-induced shock was only partially resolved by fluid administration. Animals became arterially hypotensive despite adequate central venous pressure. Hydroxyethyl starch-ringer acetate was more effective at improving arterial pressures and renal blood flow than 0.9% NaCl or FB-Cxt. Fluids had marginal effects on pH and HCO3 levels irrespective of the buffer, or on renal μPO2 and dysfunction. Colloids increased the markers of renal oxidative stress (P < 0.001), whereas unbalanced crystalloids increased the markers of nitrosative stress during sepsis (P < 0.01). Endotoxemia-induced acidosis and decreases in renal μPO2 or renal injury were not corrected solely by fluid resuscitation, irrespective of the buffer of the fluid. Our study supported the idea that fluids must be supplemented by other compounds that specifically correct renal inflammation and oxygenation to be effective in resolving septic shock-induced renal failure. PMID:26825634

  16. A Randomized Controlled Study of Manikin Simulator Fidelity on Neonatal Resuscitation Program Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; White, Susan; Bessell, Clare; Deshpandey, Akhil; Drover, Anne; Hayward, Mark; Valcour, James

    2015-01-01

    The neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) has been developed to educate physicians and other health care providers about newborn resuscitation and has been shown to improve neonatal resuscitation skills. Simulation-based training is recommended as an effective modality for instructing neonatal resuscitation and both low and high-fidelity manikin…

  17. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  18. Association of Cord Blood Magnesium Concentration and Neonatal Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lynn H.; Mapp, Delicia C.; Rouse, Dwight J.; Spong, Catherine Y.; Mercer, Brian M.; Leveno, Kenneth J.; Varner, Michael W.; Iams, Jay D.; Sorokin, Yoram; Ramin, Susan M.; Miodovnik, Menachem; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Peaceman, Alan M.; Caritis, Steve N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Assess the relationship between umbilical cord blood magnesium concentration and level of delivery room resuscitation received by neonates. Study design Secondary analysis of a controlled fetal neuroprotection trial that enrolled women at imminent risk for delivery between 24 and 31 weeks’ gestation and randomly allocated them to receive intravenous magnesium sulfate or placebo. The cohort included 1507 infants for whom total cord blood magnesium concentration and delivery room resuscitation information were available. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the association between cord blood magnesium concentration and highest level of delivery room resuscitation, using the following hierarchy: none, oxygen only, bag-mask ventilation with oxygen, intubation or chest compressions. Results There was no relationship between cord blood magnesium and delivery room resuscitation (odds ratio [OR] 0.92 for each 1.0 mEq/L increase in magnesium; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.83-1.03). Maternal general anesthesia was associated with increased neonatal resuscitation (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.72-3.68). Each 1-week increase in gestational age at birth was associated with decreased neonatal resuscitation (OR 0.63; 95% CI: 0.60 – 0.66). Conclusion Cord blood magnesium concentration does not correlate with the level of delivery room resuscitation of infants exposed to magnesium sulfate for fetal neuroprotection. PMID:22056282

  19. Availability and Utilization of Cardiac Resuscitation Centers

    PubMed Central

    Mumma, Bryn E.; Diercks, Deborah B.; Holmes, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends regionalized care following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) at cardiac resuscitation centers (CRCs). Key level 1 CRC criteria include 24/7 percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) capability, therapeutic hypothermia capability, and annual volume of ≥40 patients resuscitated from OHCA. Our objective was to characterize the availability and utilization of resources relevant to post-cardiac arrest care, including level 1 CRCs in California. Methods We combined data from the AHA, the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD), and surveys to identify CRCs. We surveyed emergency department directors and nurse managers at all 24/7 PCI centers identified by the AHA to determine their post-OHCA care capabilities. The survey included questions regarding therapeutic hypothermia use and specialist availability and was pilot-tested prior to distribution. Cases of OHCA were identified in the 2011 OSHPD Patient Discharge Database using a “present on admission” diagnosis of cardiac arrest (ICD-9-CM code 427.5). We defined key level 1 CRC criteria as 24/7 PCI capability, therapeutic hypothermia, and annual volume ≥40 patients admitted with a “present on admission” diagnosis of cardiac arrest. Our primary outcome was the proportion of hospitals meeting these criteria. Descriptive statistics and 95% CI are presented. Results Of the 333 acute care hospitals in California, 31 (9.3%, 95% CI 6.4–13%) met level 1 CRC criteria. These hospitals treated 25% (1937/7780; 95% CI 24–26%) of all admitted OHCA patients in California in 2011. Of the 125 hospitals identified as 24/7 PCI centers by the AHA, 54 (43%, 95% CI 34–52%) admitted ≥40 patients following OHCA in 2011. Seventy (56%, 95% CI 47–65%) responded to the survey; 69/70 (99%, 95% CI 92–100%) reported having a therapeutic hypothermia protocol in effect by 2011. Five percent of admitted OHCA patients (402/7780; 95% CI 4

  20. Leadership and Teamwork in Trauma and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kelsey; Menchine, Michael; Burner, Elizabeth; Arora, Sanjay; Inaba, Kenji; Demetriades, Demetrios; Yersin, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Leadership skills are described by the American College of Surgeons’ Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) course as necessary to provide care for patients during resuscitations. However, leadership is a complex concept, and the tools used to assess the quality of leadership are poorly described, inadequately validated, and infrequently used. Despite its importance, dedicated leadership education is rarely part of physician training programs. The goals of this investigation were the following: 1. Describe how leadership and leadership style affect patient care; 2. Describe how effective leadership is measured; and 3. Describe how to train future physician leaders. Methods We searched the PubMed database using the keywords “leadership” and then either “trauma” or “resuscitation” as title search terms, and an expert in emergency medicine and trauma then identified prospective observational and randomized controlled studies measuring leadership and teamwork quality. Study results were categorized as follows: 1) how leadership affects patient care; 2) which tools are available to measure leadership; and 3) methods to train physicians to become better leaders. Results We included 16 relevant studies in this review. Overall, these studies showed that strong leadership improves processes of care in trauma resuscitation including speed and completion of the primary and secondary surveys. The optimal style and structure of leadership are influenced by patient characteristics and team composition. Directive leadership is most effective when Injury Severity Score (ISS) is high or teams are inexperienced, while empowering leadership is most effective when ISS is low or teams more experienced. Many scales were employed to measure leadership. The Leader Behavior Description Questionnaire (LBDQ) was the only scale used in more than one study. Seven studies described methods for training leaders. Leadership training programs included didactic teaching

  1. Comparison of training in neonatal resuscitation using self inflating bag and T-piece resuscitator

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, S.S.; Adhikari, K.M.; Rajeev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Both the self inflating bag and the T-piece resuscitator are recommended for neonatal resuscitation, but many health care workers are unfamiliar with using the latter. A prospective, comparative, observational study was done to determine the ease and effectiveness of training of health care personnel in the two devices using infant training manikins. Methods 100 health care workers, who had no prior formal training in neonatal resuscitation, were divided into small groups and trained in the use of the two devices by qualified trainers. Assessment of cognitive skills was done by pre and post MCQs. Psychomotor skill was assessed post training on manikins using a 10-point objective score. Acceptance by users was ascertained by questionnaire. Assessments were also done after 24 h and 3 months. Comparison was done by Chi square and paired t-tests. Results Pre-training cognitive tests increased from 3.77 (+1.58) to 6.99 (+1.28) on day of training which was significant. Post training assessment of psychomotor skills showed significantly higher initial scores for the T-piece group (7.07 + 2.57) on day of training. Reassessment after 24 h showed significant improvement in cognitive scores (9.89 + 1.24) and psychomotor scores in both groups (8.86 + 1.42 for self inflating bag and 9.70 + 0.57 for T-piece resuscitator). After 3–6 months the scores in both domains showed some decline which was not statistically significant. User acceptability was the same for both devices. Conclusion It is equally easy to train health care workers in both devices. Both groups showed good short term recall and both devices were equally acceptable to the users. PMID:25609858

  2. Basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation - guidelines of the Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils 2010.

    PubMed

    Tibballs, James; Aickin, Richard; Nuthall, Gabrielle

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have been revised by Australian and New Zealand Resuscitation Councils. Changes encourage CPR out-of-hospital and aim to improve the quality of CPR in-hospital. Features of basic CPR include: omission of abdominal thrusts for foreign body airway obstruction; commencement with chest compression followed by ventilation in a ratio of 30:2 or compression-only CPR if the rescuer is unwilling/unable to give expired-air breathing when the victim is 'unresponsive and not breathing normally'. Use of automated external defibrillators is encouraged. Features of advanced CPR include: prevention of cardiac arrest by rapid response systems; restriction of pulse palpation to 10 s to diagnosis cardiac arrest; affirmation of 15:2 compression-ventilation ratio for children and for infants other than newly born; initial bag-mask ventilation before tracheal intubation; a single direct current shock of 4 J/kg for ventricular fibrillation (VF) and pulseless ventricular tachycardia followed by immediate resumption of CPR for 2 min without analysis of cardiac rhythm and avoidance of unnecessary interruption of continuous external cardiac compressions. Monitoring of exhaled carbon dioxide is recommended to detect non-tracheal intubation, assess quality of CPR, and to help match ventilation to reduced cardiac output. The intraosseous route is recommended if immediate intravenous access is impossible. Amiodarone is strongly favoured over lignocaine for refractory VF and adrenaline over atropine for severe bradycardia, asystole and pulseless electrical activity. Family presence at resuscitation is encouraged. Therapeutic hypothermia is acceptable after resuscitation to improve neurological outcome. Extracorporeal circulatory support for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be used in equipped centres. PMID:22017373

  3. Adequate supervision for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James; Moffatt, Mary

    2014-11-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) have the opportunity to improve child health and well-being by addressing supervision issues before an injury or exposure has occurred and/or after an injury or exposure has occurred. Appropriate anticipatory guidance on supervision at well-child visits can improve supervision of children, and may prevent future harm. Adequate supervision varies based on the child's development and maturity, and the risks in the child's environment. Consideration should be given to issues as wide ranging as swimming pools, falls, dating violence, and social media. By considering the likelihood of harm and the severity of the potential harm, caregivers may provide adequate supervision by minimizing risks to the child while still allowing the child to take "small" risks as needed for healthy development. Caregivers should initially focus on direct (visual, auditory, and proximity) supervision of the young child. Gradually, supervision needs to be adjusted as the child develops, emphasizing a safe environment and safe social interactions, with graduated independence. PCPs may foster adequate supervision by providing concrete guidance to caregivers. In addition to preventing injury, supervision includes fostering a safe, stable, and nurturing relationship with every child. PCPs should be familiar with age/developmentally based supervision risks, adequate supervision based on those risks, characteristics of neglectful supervision based on age/development, and ways to encourage appropriate supervision throughout childhood. PMID:25369578

  4. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  5. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  6. Applying lessons from commercial aviation safety and operations to resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Ornato, Joseph P; Peberdy, Mary Ann

    2014-02-01

    Both commercial aviation and resuscitation are complex activities in which team members must respond to unexpected emergencies in a consistent, high quality manner. Lives are at stake in both activities and the two disciplines have similar leadership structures, standard setting processes, training methods, and operational tools. Commercial aviation crews operate with remarkable consistency and safety, while resuscitation team performance and outcomes are highly variable. This commentary provides the perspective of two physician-pilots showing how commercial aviation training, operations, and safety principles can be adapted to resuscitation team training and performance. PMID:24215731

  7. Definitive studies on pole-top resuscitation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, A.S.; Ridolpho, P.F.; Cole, J.E.

    1983-02-01

    This report summarizes the history of the application of cardiopulmonary resuscitation to the electric shock victim located at the top of a utility pole. This dramatic and urgent situation requires that rescue be attempted with procedures which are thoroughly understood and effective. Questions related to the use of resuscitation and precordial thump at the pole top were subjected to experimental testing, both in animals and in humans. Results of this study clearly demonstrate the advantages of postponing resuscitation until the victim has been lowered to the ground. The author concludes with seven recommendations for emergency treatment at the scene.

  8. Cerebral blood flow in humans following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Cohan, S.L.; Mun, S.K.; Petite, J.; Correia, J.; Tavelra Da Silva, A.T.; Waldhorn, R.E.

    1989-06-01

    Cerebral blood flow was measured by xenon-133 washout in 13 patients 6-46 hours after being resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Patients regaining consciousness had relatively normal cerebral blood flow before regaining consciousness, but all patients who died without regaining consciousness had increased cerebral blood flow that appeared within 24 hours after resuscitation (except in one patient in whom the first measurement was delayed until 28 hours after resuscitation, by which time cerebral blood flow was increased). The cause of the delayed-onset increase in cerebral blood flow is not known, but the increase may have adverse effects on brain function and may indicate the onset of irreversible brain damage.

  9. [RESUSCITATION MEASURES IN CASE OF CARDIAC ARREST].

    PubMed

    Lamhaut, Lionel; Cariou, Alain

    2015-09-01

    Improving the survival rate of sudden cardiac death victims mainly relies in the prompt activation of the "chain of survival", resulting in efficient performance at basic life support maneuvers by bystanders. Among these maneuvers, cardiac compressions and use of automated external defibrillation are the most important components. Since basic life support is easy to learn, spreading its practice throughout the general population should be a priority for public health policy. Following initial resuscitation, the last step of the "chain of survival" is ensured by expert pre-hospital and ICU teams, which are able to provide appropriate care. Organization and sequence of these different steps are the object of regularly updated guidelines, summarized in the form of algorithms that facilitate their application. PMID:26619726

  10. Educational aspects of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) training.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, S J

    1990-03-01

    The knowledge and skills surrounding the practice of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have become essential to intensive care nurses and to nurses in general. With formalized training and refresher courses becoming more common in this country, it is evident that after relatively short periods of time the knowledge and skills acquired at such courses may be lost. While much consideration has been given to the content of both Basic and Advanced Cardiac Life Support (BCLS and ACLS) courses, relatively little attention has been paid to the educational issues surrounding CPR training. This paper explores some of these issues from the perspective of adult learning (andragogy). Research is cited from a wide range of sources to illustrate that CPR skill and knowledge deterioration is not unique to nursing, and that educational techniques exist which may improve current educational practices. PMID:2329270

  11. Brain Resuscitation in the Drowning Victim

    PubMed Central

    Topjian, Alexis A.; Berg, Robert A.; Bierens, Joost J. L. M.; Branche, Christine M.; Clark, Robert S.; Friberg, Hans; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia W. E.; Holzer, Michael; Katz, Laurence M.; Knape, Johannes T. A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Nadkarni, Vinay; van der Hoeven, Johannes G.

    2013-01-01

    Drowning is a leading cause of accidental death. Survivors may sustain severe neurologic morbidity. There is negligible research specific to brain injury in drowning making current clinical management non-specific to this disorder. This review represents an evidence-based consensus effort to provide recommendations for management and investigation of the drowning victim. Epidemiology, brain-oriented prehospital and intensive care, therapeutic hypothermia, neuroimaging/monitoring, biomarkers, and neuroresuscitative pharmacology are addressed. When cardiac arrest is present, chest compressions with rescue breathing are recommended due to the asphyxial insult. In the comatose patient with restoration of spontaneous circulation, hypoxemia and hyperoxemia should be avoided, hyperthermia treated, and induced hypothermia (32–34 °C) considered. Arterial hypotension/hypertension should be recognized and treated. Prevent hypoglycemia and treat hyperglycemia. Treat clinical seizures and consider treating non-convulsive status epilepticus. Serial neurologic examinations should be provided. Brain imaging and serial biomarker measurement may aid prognostication. Continuous electroencephalography and N20 somatosensory evoked potential monitoring may be considered. Serial biomarker measurement (e.g., neuron specific enolase) may aid prognostication. There is insufficient evidence to recommend use of any specific brain-oriented neuroresuscitative pharmacologic therapy other than that required to restore and maintain normal physiology. Following initial stabilization, victims should be transferred to centers with expertise in age-specific post-resuscitation neurocritical care. Care should be documented, reviewed, and quality improvement assessment performed. Preclinical research should focus on models of asphyxial cardiac arrest. Clinical research should focus on improved cardiopulmonary resuscitation, re-oxygenation/reperfusion strategies, therapeutic hypothermia

  12. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Lunar and Martian Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkar, Subhajit

    2004-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is required training for all astronauts. No studies thus far have investigated how chest compressions may be affected in lunar and Martian gravities. Therefore a theoretical quantitative study was performed. The maximum downward force an unrestrained person can apply is mg N (g(sub Earth) = 9.78 ms(sup -2), g(sub moon) = 1.63 ms(sup -2), g(sub Mars) = 3.69 ms(sup -2). Tsitlik et a1 (Critical Care Medicine, 1983) described the human sternal elastic force-displacement relationship (compliance) by: F = betaD(sub s) + gammaD(sub s)(sup 2) (beta = 54.9 plus or minus 29.4 Ncm(sup -1) and gamma = 10.8 plus or minus 4.1 Ncm(sup -2)). Maximum forces in the 3 gravitational fields produced by 76 kg (US population mean), 41 kg and 93 kg (masses derived from the limits for astronaut height), produced solutions for compression depth using Tsitlik equations for chests of: mean compliance (beta = 54.9, gamma = 10.8), low compliance (beta = 84.3, gamma = 14.9) and high compliance (beta = 25.5, gamma = 6.7). The mass for minimum adequate adult compression, 3.8 cm (AHA guidelines), was also calculated. 76 kg compresses the mean compliance chest by: Earth, 6.1 cm, Mars, 3.2 cm, Moon, 1.7 cm. In lunar gravity, the high compliance chest is compressed only 3.2 cm by 93 kg, 120 kg being required for 3.8 cm. In Martian gravity, on the mean chest, 93 kg compresses 3.6 cm; 99 kg is required for 3.8 cm. On Mars, the high compliance chest is compressed 4.8 cm with 76 kg, 5.5 cm with 93 kg, with 52 kg required for 3.8 cm.

  13. Chest Compression With Personal Protective Equipment During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin; Chen, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Following a chemical, biological, radiation, and nuclear incident, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure is essential for patients who suffer cardiac arrest. But CPR when wearing personal protection equipment (PPE) before decontamination becomes a challenge for healthcare workers (HCW). Although previous studies have assessed the impact of PPE on airway management, there is little research available regarding the quality of chest compression (CC) when wearing PPE. A present randomized cross-over simulation study was designed to evaluate the effect of PPE on CC performance using mannequins. The study was set in one university medical center in the China. Forty anesthesia residents participated in this randomized cross-over study. Each participant performed 2 min of CC on a manikin with and without PPE, respectively. Participants were randomized into 2 groups that either performed CC with PPE first, followed by a trial without PPE after a 180-min rest, or vice versa. CPR recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of CC. Additionally, participants’ physiological parameters and subjective fatigue score values were recorded. With the use of PPE, a significant decrease of the percentage of effective compressions (41.3 ± 17.1% with PPE vs 67.5 ± 15.6% without PPE, P < 0.001) and the percentage of adequate compressions (67.7 ± 18.9% with PPE vs 80.7 ± 15.5% without PPE, P < 0.001) were observed. Furthermore, the increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and subjective fatigue score values were more obvious with the use of PPE (all P < 0.01). We found significant deterioration of CC performance in HCW with the use of a level-C PPE, which may be a disadvantage for enhancing survival of cardiac arrest. PMID:27057878

  14. Evaluation of Microvascular Perfusion and Resuscitation after Severe Injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yann-Leei L; Simmons, Jon D; Gillespie, Mark N; Alvarez, Diego F; Gonzalez, Richard P; Brevard, Sidney B; Frotan, Mohammad A; Schneider, Andrew M; Richards, William O

    2015-12-01

    Achieving adequate perfusion is a key goal of treatment in severe trauma; however, tissue perfusion has classically been measured by indirect means. Direct visualization of capillary flow has been applied in sepsis, but application of this technology to the trauma population has been limited. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the efficacy of standard indirect measures of perfusion to direct imaging of the sublingual microcirculatory flow during trauma resuscitation. Patients with injury severity scores >15 were serially examined using a handheld sidestream dark-field video microscope. In addition, measurements were also made from healthy volunteers. The De Backer score, a morphometric capillary density score, and total vessel density (TVD) as cumulative vessel area within the image, were calculated using Automated Vascular Analysis (AVA3.0) software. These indices were compared against clinical and laboratory parameters of organ function and systemic metabolic status as well as mortality. Twenty severely injured patients had lower TVD (X = 14.6 ± 0.22 vs 17.66 ± 0.51) and De Backer scores (X = 9.62 ± 0.16 vs 11.55 ± 0.37) compared with healthy controls. These scores best correlated with serum lactate (TVD R(2) = 0.525, De Backer R(2) = 0.576, P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure, heart rate, oxygen saturation, pH, bicarbonate, base deficit, hematocrit, and coagulation parameters correlated poorly with both TVD and De Backer score. Direct measurement of sublingual microvascular perfusion is technically feasible in trauma patients, and seems to provide real-time assessment of microcirculatory perfusion. This study suggests that in severe trauma, many indirect measurements of perfusion do not correlate with microvascular perfusion. However, visualized perfusion deficiencies do reflect a shift toward anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26736167

  15. A Comfortability Level Scale for Performance of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otten, Robert Drew

    1984-01-01

    This article discusses the development of an instrument to appraise the comfortability level of college students in performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methodology and findings of data collection are given. (Author/DF)

  16. Technique of Automated Control Over Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh; Kiseleva, E. Yu; Kutsov, M. S.; Zhdanov, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    The article describes a technique of automated control over cardiopulmonary resuscitation procedures on the basis of acoustic data. The research findings have allowed determining the primary important characteristics of acoustic signals (sounds of blood circulation in the carotid artery and respiratory sounds) and proposing a method to control the performance of resuscitation procedures. This method can be implemented as a part of specialized hardware systems.

  17. The Use of Pre-Hospital Mild Hypothermia after Resuscitation from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K.; Cobb, Leonard A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4°C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  18. The use of pre-hospital mild hypothermia after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Kim, Francis; Olsufka, Michele; Nichol, Graham; Copass, Michael K; Cobb, Leonard A

    2009-03-01

    Hypothermia has emerged as a potent neuroprotective modality following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. Although delayed hospital cooling has been demonstrated to improve outcome after cardiac arrest, in-field cooling begun immediately following the return of spontaneous circulation may be more beneficial. Cooling in the field following resuscitation, however, presents new challenges, in that the cooling method has to be portable, safe, and effective. Rapid infusion of intravenous fluid at 4 degrees C, the use of a cooling helmet, and cooling plates have all been proposed as methods for field cooling, and are all in various stages of clinical and animal testing. Whether field cooling will improve survival and neurologic outcome remains an important unanswered clinical question. PMID:19072587

  19. Resuscitation of the trauma patient: tell me a trigger for early haemostatic resuscitation please!

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew J; Lone, Nazir; Walsh, Timothy S

    2011-01-01

    The management of trauma-related coagulopathy and haemorrhage is changing from a reactive strategy to a proactive early intervention with blood products and haemostatic agents. Although major haemorrhage and massive transfusion are associated with higher mortality, the pattern of this association with modern trauma care is poorly described. In addition, early predictors of massive transfusion, which might trigger a proactive haemostatic resuscitation strategy, are not currently available. We review recent literature relating to predictors of massive transfusions and the relationship between transfusion and mortality. PMID:21371347

  20. [Kidney, Fluid, and Acid-Base Balance].

    PubMed

    Shioji, Naohiro; Hayashi, Masao; Morimatsu, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Kidneys play an important role to maintain human homeostasis. They contribute to maintain body fluid, electrolytes, and acid-base balance. Especially in fluid control, we, physicians can intervene body fluid balance using fluid resuscitation and diuretics. In recent years, one type of fluid resuscitation, hydroxyl ethyl starch has been extensively studied in the field of intensive care. Although their effects on fluid resuscitation are reasonable, serious complications such as kidney injury requiring renal replacement therapy occur frequently. Now we have to pay more attention to this important complication. Another topic of fluid management is tolvaptan, a selective vasopressin-2 receptor antagonist Recent randomized trial suggested that tolvaptan has a similar supportive effect for fluid control and more cost effective compared to carperitide. In recent years, Stewart approach is recognized as one important tool to assess acid-base balance in critically ill patients. This approach has great value, especially to understand metabolic components in acid-base balance. Even for assessing the effects of kidneys on acid-base balance, this approach gives us interesting insight. We should appropriately use this new approach to treat acid-base abnormality in critically ill patients. PMID:27319095

  1. Do Not Resuscitate, Anesthesia, and Perioperative Care: A Not So Clear Order

    PubMed Central

    Sumrall, William D.; Mahanna, Elizabeth; Sabharwal, Vivek; Marshall, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Advance directives guide healthcare providers to listen to and respect patients' wishes regarding their right to die in circumstances when cardiopulmonary resuscitation is required, and hospitals accredited by The Joint Commission are required to have a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) policy in place. However, when surgery and anesthesia are necessary for the care of the patient with a DNR order, this advance directive can create ethical dilemmas specifically involving patient autonomy and the physician's responsibility to do no harm. Methods: This paper discusses the ethical considerations regarding perioperative DNR orders and provides guidance on how to handle situations that may arise in the conduct of perioperative care. Results: Because of the potential conflicts between ethical care and the restrictions of DNR orders, it is critically important to discuss the medical and ethical issues surrounding this clinical scenario with the patient or surrogate prior to any surgical intervention. However, many anesthesiologists do not adequately address this ethical dilemma prior to the procedure. Conclusion: Practitioners are advised to first consider what is best for the patient and, when in doubt, to communicate with patients or surrogates and with colleagues to arrive at the most appropriate care plan. If irreconcilable conflicts arise, consultation with the institution's bioethics committee, if available, is beneficial to help reach a resolution. PMID:27303230

  2. Resuscitation with Na+/H+ exchanger inhibitor in traumatic haemorrhagic shock: cardiopulmonary performance, oxygen transport and tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongmei; Qi, Jiansong; Dai, Hui; Doods, Henri; Abraham, William M

    2010-03-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of inhibition of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE-1) on cardiopulmonary performance, oxygen carrying capacity and tissue inflammation in a pig model of traumatic haemorrhage-resuscitation. 2. In 12 instrumented anaesthetized pigs, traumatic haemorrhage was modelled by producing tibia fractures, followed by haemorrhage of 25 mL/kg for 20 min, and then a 4 mm hepatic arterial tear with surgical repair after 20 min. Animals then underwent low-volume fluid resuscitation with either Hextend (vehicle; n = 6; Hospira, Lake Forest, IL, USA) or 3 mg/kg BIIB513 (an NHE-1 inhibitor) + Hextend (n = 6). The experiment was terminated 6 h after the beginning of resuscitation. 3. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, the addition of NHE-1 inhibition with BIIB513 significantly improved the left ventricle stroke work index and attenuated increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance. Furthermore, BIIB513 treatment significantly increased the oxygenated haemoglobin ratio, blood oxygen content and mixed venous blood oxygen saturation and improved blood oxygen delivery. In addition, BIIB513 treatment reduced lung tissue levels of interleukin-6 by 80%, tumour necrosis factor-alpha by 37% and myeloperoxidase activity by 38%. Nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding activity in the lung was also slightly and significantly attenuated following BIIB513 treatment. 4. In conclusion, the present study shows that NHE-1 inhibition facilitates the response to fluid resuscitation after traumatic haemorrhage by improving cardiac function, pulmonary vascular function and oxygen carrying capacity, which results in reduced tissue inflammatory injury. PMID:19769605

  3. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries: a statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Councils of Southern Africa).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-11-23

    Outcome after cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002, a task force of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (ie, essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conferences. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage

  4. Possible SARS Coronavirus Transmission during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona; McDonald, L. Clifford; Martinez, Kenneth F.; Ofner, Mariana; Wong, Tom; Wallington, Tamara; Gold, Wayne L.; Mederski, Barbara; Green, Karen; Low, Donald E.

    2004-01-01

    Infection of healthcare workers with the severe acute respiratory syndrome–associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is thought to occur primarily by either contact or large respiratory droplet transmission. However, infrequent healthcare worker infections occurred despite the use of contact and droplet precautions, particularly during certain aerosol-generating medical procedures. We investigated a possible cluster of SARS-CoV infections in healthcare workers who used contact and droplet precautions during attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a SARS patient. Unlike previously reported instances of transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, the index case-patient was unresponsive, and the intubation procedure was performed quickly and without difficulty. However, before intubation, the patient was ventilated with a bag-valve-mask that may have contributed to aerosolization of SARS-CoV. On the basis of the results of this investigation and previous reports of SARS transmission during aerosol-generating procedures, a systematic approach to the problem is outlined, including the use of the following: 1) administrative controls, 2) environmental engineering controls, 3) personal protective equipment, and 4) quality control. PMID:15030699

  5. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation techniques in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billica, Roger; Gosbee, John; Krupa, Debra T.

    1991-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques were investigated in microgravity with specific application to planned medical capabilities for Space Station Freedom (SSF). A KC-135 parabolic flight test was performed with the goal of evaluating and quantifying the efficacy of different types of microgravity CPR techniques. The flight followed the standard 40 parabola profile with 20 to 25 seconds of near-zero gravity in each parabola. Three experiments were involved chosen for their clinical background, certification, and practical experience in prior KC-135 parabolic flight. The CPR evaluation was performed using a standard training mannequin (recording resusci-Annie) which was used in practice prior to the actual flight. Aboard the KC-135, the prototype medical restraint system (MRS) for the SSF Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) was used for part of the study. Standard patient and crew restraints were used for interface with the MRS. During the portion of study where CPR was performed without MRS, a set of straps for crew restraint similar to those currently employed for the Space Shuttle program were used. The entire study was recorded via still camera and video.

  6. Results of Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Children

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong Ju; Song, Seunghwan; Park, Han Ki; Park, Young Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Survival of children experiencing cardiac arrest refractory to conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is very poor. We sought to examine current era outcomes of extracorporeal CPR (ECPR) support for refractory arrest. Methods Patients who were <18 years and underwent ECPR between November 2013 and January 2016 were including in this study. We retrospectively investigated patient medical records. Results Twelve children, median age 6.6 months (range, 1 day to 11.7 years), required ECPR. patients’ diseases spanned several categories: congenital heart disease (n=5), myocarditis (n=2), respiratory failure (n=2), septic shock (n=1), trauma (n=1), and post-cardiotomy arrest (n=1). Cannulation sites included the neck (n=8), chest (n=3), and neck to chest conversion (n=1). Median duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was five days (range, 0 to 14 days). Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was successfully discontinued in 10 (83.3%) patients. Nine patients (75%) survived more than seven days after support discontinuation and four patients (33.3%) survived and were discharged. Causes of death included ischemic brain injury (n=4), sepsis (n=3), and gastrointestinal bleeding (n=1). Conclusion ECPR plays a valuable role in children experiencing refractory cardiac arrest. The weaning rate is acceptable; however, survival is related to other organ dysfunction and the severity of ischemic brain injury. ECPR prior to the emergence of end-organ injury and prevention of neurologic injury might enhance survival. PMID:27298791

  7. Prolonged Field Care Working Group Fluid Therapy Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Baker, Benjamin L; Powell, Doug; Riesberg, Jamie; Keenan, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The Prolonged Field Care Working Group concurs that fresh whole blood (FWB) is the fluid of choice for patients in hemorrhagic shock, and the capability to transfuse FWB should be a basic skill set for Special Operations Forces (SOF) Medics. Prolonged field care (PFC) must also address resuscitative and maintenance fluid requirements in nonhemorrhagic conditions. PMID:27045508

  8. Inhaled Carbon Monoxide Protects against the Development of Shock and Mitochondrial Injury following Hemorrhage and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Hernando; Kautza, Benjamin; Escobar, Daniel; Nassour, Ibrahim; Luciano, Jason; Botero, Ana Maria; Gordon, Lisa; Martinez, Silvia; Holder, Andre; Ogundele, Olufunmilayo; Loughran, Patricia; Rosengart, Matthew R.; Pinsky, Michael; Shiva, Sruti; Zuckerbraun, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Currently, there is no effective resuscitative adjunct to fluid and blood products to limit tissue injury for traumatic hemorrhagic shock. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) to limit inflammation and tissue injury, and specifically mitochondrial damage, in experimental models of hemorrhage and resuscitation. Results Inhaled CO (250 ppm for 30 minutes) protected against mortality in severe murine hemorrhagic shock and resuscitation (HS/R) (20% vs. 80%; P<0.01). Additionally, CO limited the development of shock as determined by arterial blood pH (7.25±0.06 vs. 7.05±0.05; P<0.05), lactate levels (7.2±5.1 vs 13.3±6.0; P<0.05), and base deficit (13±3.0 vs 24±3.1; P<0.05). A dose response of CO (25–500 ppm) demonstrated protection against HS/R lung and liver injury as determined by MPO activity and serum ALT, respectively. CO limited HS/R-induced increases in serum tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 levels as determined by ELISA (P<0.05 for doses of 100–500ppm). Furthermore, inhaled CO limited HS/R induced oxidative stress as determined by hepatic oxidized glutathione:reduced glutathione levels and lipid peroxidation. In porcine HS/R, CO did not influence hemodynamics. However, CO limited HS/R-induced skeletal muscle and platelet mitochondrial injury as determined by respiratory control ratio (muscle) and ATP-linked respiration and mitochondrial reserve capacity (platelets). Conclusion These preclinical studies suggest that inhaled CO can be a protective therapy in HS/R; however, further clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26366865

  9. 'Scoop and run' strategy for a resuscitative sternotomy following unstable penetrating chest injury.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Guillermo Parra; Peng, Edward W K; Marks, Richard; Sarkar, Pradip K

    2010-03-01

    The optimal management strategy of an unstable penetrating thoracic trauma remains a debate. It is unclear whether a 'stay and treat' or 'scoop and run' to the nearest operating theatre with cardiothoracic expertise is the best strategy. We describe a successful outcome of a young patient with injuries to the left internal mammary artery, upper lobe and main pulmonary artery following a stab injury to his left chest. He was transferred to the nearest cardiac centre for emergency sternotomy. Thoracotomy is the classical surgical approach in emergency setting but sternotomy allows adequate exposure to repair any cardiac injury, institution of cardiopulmonary bypass, and careful inspection of the mediastinal structures to prevent any late complications including pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysm. An immediate transfer, where possible, to the nearest trauma centre with cardiothoracic expertise for 'resuscitative' sternotomy is advocated in penetrating thoracic injury for optimal outcome. An emergency room thoracotomy should be reserved to those in the extremis. PMID:20026489

  10. Brief Bedside Refresher Training to Practice Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in the Ambulatory Surgery Center Setting.

    PubMed

    Kemery, Stephanie; Kelly, Kelley; Wilson, Connie; Wheeler, Corrine A

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac arrest can occur in any health care setting at any time, requiring nursing staff to be prepared to quickly and adequately perform basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Currently, the American Heart Association certifies health care providers in Basic Life Support (BLS) for a 2-year period, but evidence indicates that psychomotor skills decline well before the end of the certification time frame. Nurses in the ambulatory surgery setting expressed concern regarding their ability to implement CPR successfully, given the infrequent occurrence of cardiac and respiratory arrests. Using a study by Niles et al. as a model, the authors piloted the implementation of brief CPR refresher training at the bedside of an ambulatory surgery center to assess and increase nurse confidence in BLS skills. PMID:26247660

  11. Human factors in resuscitation: Lessons learned from simulator studies

    PubMed Central

    Hunziker, S; Tschan, F; Semmer, N K; Howell, M D; Marsch, S

    2010-01-01

    Medical algorithms, technical skills, and repeated training are the classical cornerstones for successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Increasing evidence suggests that human factors, including team interaction, communication, and leadership, also influence the performance of CPR. Guidelines, however, do not yet include these human factors, partly because of the difficulties of their measurement in real-life cardiac arrest. Recently, clinical studies of cardiac arrest scenarios with high-fidelity video-assisted simulations have provided opportunities to better delineate the influence of human factors on resuscitation team performance. This review focuses on evidence from simulator studies that focus on human factors and their influence on the performance of resuscitation teams. Similar to studies in real patients, simulated cardiac arrest scenarios revealed many unnecessary interruptions of CPR as well as significant delays in defibrillation. These studies also showed that human factors play a major role in these shortcomings and that the medical performance depends on the quality of leadership and team-structuring. Moreover, simulated video-taped medical emergencies revealed that a substantial part of information transfer during communication is erroneous. Understanding the impact of human factors on the performance of a complex medical intervention like resuscitation requires detailed, second-by-second, analysis of factors involving the patient, resuscitative equipment such as the defibrillator, and all team members. Thus, high-fidelity simulator studies provide an important research method in this challenging field. PMID:21063563

  12. Design of a Functional Training Prototype for Neonatal Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Sivaramakrishnan; Ganesan, Sona; Jayapal, Kavitha; Kannan, Sadhani

    2014-01-01

    Birth Asphyxia is considered to be one of the leading causes of neonatal mortality around the world. Asphyxiated neonates require skilled resuscitation to survive the neonatal period. The project aims to train health professionals in a basic newborn care using a prototype with an ultimate objective to have one person at every delivery trained in neonatal resuscitation. This prototype will be a user-friendly device with which one can get trained in performing neonatal resuscitation in resource-limited settings. The prototype consists of a Force Sensing Resistor (FSR) that measures the pressure applied and is interfaced with Arduino(®) which controls the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) and Light Emitting Diode (LED) indication for pressure and compression counts. With the increase in population and absence of proper medical care, the need for neonatal resuscitation program is not well addressed. The proposed work aims at offering a promising solution for training health care individuals on resuscitating newborn babies under low resource settings. PMID:27417489

  13. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  14. Current Neonatal Resuscitation Practices among Paediatricians in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Satvik C.; Nimbalkar, Archana S.; Patel, Dipen V.; Sethi, Ankur R.; Phatak, Ajay G.; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. We assessed neonatal resuscitation practices among paediatricians in Gujarat. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of 23 questions based on guidelines of Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) and Navjaat Shishu Suraksha Karyakram (NSSK) was conducted using web-based tool. Questionnaire was developed and consensually validated by three neonatologists. Results. Total of 142 (21.2%) of 669 paediatricians of Gujarat, India, whose e-mail addresses were available, attempted the survey and, from them, 126 were eligible. Of these, 74 (58.7%) were trained in neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with mechanical ventilation facilities was available for 54% of respondents. Eighty-eight (69.8%) reported correct knowledge and practice regarding effective bag and mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions. Knowledge and practice about continuous positive airway pressure use in delivery room were reported in 18.3% and 30.2% reported use of room air for BMV during resuscitation. Suctioning oral cavity before delivery in meconium stained liquor was reported by 27.8% and 38.1% cut the cord after a minute of birth. Paediatricians with NRP training used appropriate method of tracheal suction in cases of nonvigorous newborns than those who were not trained. Conclusions. Contemporary knowledge about neonatal resuscitative practices in paediatricians is lacking and requires improvement. Web-based tools provided low response in this survey. PMID:24688549

  15. A survey of resuscitation training in Canadian undergraduate medical programs.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, D H; Beckwith, R K

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish a national profile of undergraduate training in resuscitation at Canadian medical schools, to compare the resuscitation training programs of the schools and to determine the cost of teaching seven resuscitation courses. DESIGN: Mail survey in 1989 and follow-up telephone interviews in 1991 to update and verify the information. SUBJECTS: The undergraduate deans of the 16 Canadian medical schools. INTERVENTION: The mail survey asked five questions: (a) Is completion of a standard first aid or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) course a requirement for admission to medical school? (b) Are these courses and those in basic and advanced cardiac, trauma and neurologic life support for children and adults provided to undergraduate students? (c) During which undergraduate year are these courses offered? (d) Is their successful completion required for graduation? and (e) Who funds the training courses? RESULTS: The medical schools placed emphasis on the seven courses differently. More than half the schools required the completion of courses before admission or taught some courses but did not require the completion of the courses for graduation. On average, fewer than three of the seven courses were taught, and the completion of fewer than two was required for graduation. About half of the courses were funded by the universities. The annual projected maximum cost of teaching the seven courses was $1790 per medical student. CONCLUSION: The seven resuscitation courses have not been fully implemented at the undergraduate level in Canadian medical schools. PMID:2049693

  16. The Role of Plasma and Urine Metabolomics in Identifying New Biomarkers in Severe Newborn Asphyxia: A Study of Asphyxiated Newborn Pigs following Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Sachse, Daniel; Solevåg, Anne Lee; Berg, Jens Petter; Nakstad, Britt

    2016-01-01

    Background Optimizing resuscitation is important to prevent morbidity and mortality from perinatal asphyxia. The metabolism of cells and tissues is severely disturbed during asphyxia and resuscitation, and metabolomic analyses provide a snapshot of many small molecular weight metabolites in body fluids or tissues. In this study metabolomics profiles were studied in newborn pigs that were asphyxiated and resuscitated using different protocols to identify biomarkers for subject characterization, intervention effects and possibly prognosis. Methods A total of 125 newborn Noroc pigs were anesthetized, mechanically ventilated and inflicted progressive asphyxia until asystole. Pigs were randomized to resuscitation with a FiO2 0.21 or 1.0, different duration of ventilation before initiation of chest compressions (CC), and different CC to ventilation ratios. Plasma and urine samples were obtained at baseline, and 2 h and 4 h after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC, heart rate > = 100 bpm). Metabolomics profiles of the samples were analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Results Plasma and urine showed severe metabolic alterations consistent with hypoxia and acidosis 2 h and 4 h after ROSC. Baseline plasma hypoxanthine and lipoprotein concentrations were inversely correlated to the duration of hypoxia sustained before asystole occurred, but there was no evidence for a differential metabolic response to the different resuscitation protocols or in terms of survival. Conclusions Metabolic profiles of asphyxiated newborn pigs showed severe metabolic alterations. Consistent with previously published reports, we found no evidence of differences between established and alternative resuscitation protocols. Lactate and pyruvate may have a prognostic value, but have to be independently confirmed. PMID:27529347

  17. Amniotic fluid embolism: A diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Mathur, Megha

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is a rare obstetric catastrophe with an incidence of 7.7 per 100 000 deliveries and mortality as high as 60% to 80%. We describe a case of perioperative cardiac arrest in a young parturient undergoing an emergent cesarean section. Just after delivery of live healthy male baby, patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation not responding to resuscitation with fluids and blood products. Her autopsy revealed edematous lungs with amniotic fluid debris within pulmonary vessels thus establishing the diagnosis of AFE. Amniotic fluid embolism is life threatening and difficult to predict or prevent condition, which should be always be kept in mind in a parturient with sudden cardiovascular collapse, so that resuscitation commences immediately, as early intervention is essential for a positive outcome. PMID:25885396

  18. Effect of a pharmacologically induced decrease in core temperature in rats resuscitated from cardiac arrest

    EPA Science Inventory

    Targeted temperature management is recommended to reduce brain damage after resuscitation from cardiac arrest in humans although the optimal target temperature remains controversial. 1 4 The American Heart Association (AHA) and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation...

  19. Microvascular experimental evidence on the relative significance of restoring oxygen carrying capacity vs. blood viscosity in shock resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar Vázquez, Beatriz Y.; Wettstein, Reto; Cabrales, Pedro; Tsai, Amy G.; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2010-01-01

    Summary The development of volume replacement fluids for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock comprises oxygen carrying and non carrying fluids. Non oxygen carrying fluids or plasma expanders are used up to the transfusion trigger, and upon reaching this landmark either blood, and possibly in the near future oxygen carrying blood substitutes, are used. An experimental program in hemorrhagic shock using the hamster chamber window model allowed to compare the relative performance of most fluids proposed for shock resuscitation. This model allows investigating simultaneously the microcirculation and systemic reactions, in the awake condition, in a tissue isolated from the environment. Results from this program show that in general plasma expanders such as Ringer’s lactate and dextran 70 kDa do not sufficiently restore blood viscosity upon reaching the transfusion trigger, causing microvascular collapse. This is in part restored by a blood transfusion, independently of the oxygen carrying capacity of red blood cells. These results lead to the proposal that effective blood substitutes must be designed to prevent microvascular collapse, manifested in the decrease of functional capillary density. Achievement of this goal, in combination with the increase of oxygen affinity, significantly postpones the need for a blood transfusion, and lowers the total requirement of restoration of intrinsic oxygen carrying capacity. PMID:18502215

  20. Efficacy of cardiopulmonary resuscitation using intratracheal insufflation.

    PubMed

    Brochard, L; Boussignac, G; Adnot, S; Bertrand, C; Isabey, D; Harf, A

    1996-11-01

    The effects of constant-flow insufflation (CFI) of air in the trachea at the distal end of a modified endotracheal tube as the sole mode of ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) were studied in pigs. The ventilatory effect of CFI (15 +/- 2 L/min) generating a positive pressure of about 10 cm H2O with concomitant chest compression was studied first. In nine sedated, paralyzed animals disconnected from the ventilator, CFI alone did not significantly alter the decrease in PaO2 and the rise in PaCO2 observed during apnea. By contrast, the combination of precordial compression and CFI (CFI-CPR) maintained arterial blood gases over a 4-min period at the level obtained during mechanical ventilation. In the second part of the study, ventricular fibrillation was induced and CFI-CPR was compared with standard CPR using conventional mechanical ventilation during two successive 4-min periods, in random order. Ventilatory parameters were identical in the two situations, whereas hemodynamic parameters were similar or better with CFI-CPR than with standard CPR. Significant differences were observed between standard CPR and CFI-CPR for systolic aortic pressure (72 +/- 22 versus 82 +/- 27 mm Hg, respectively; p < 0.02) and for systolic (322 +/- 216 versus 431 +/- 237 ml/s; p < 0.01) and mean (116 +/- 106 versus 143 +/- 108 ml/s; p < 0.01) common carotid blood flows. The ease of use of CFI together with its beneficial hemodynamic effects suggests that CFI deserves to be investigated further as a mode of ventilation during CPR. PMID:8912743

  1. Ambient oxygen concentrations during simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Robertshaw, H; McAnulty, G

    1998-07-01

    Oxygen concentrations were measured at 12 points around a cardiopulmonary resuscitation practice mannequin following simulated ventilation with a self-inflating bag, a 'Waters' bag and a ventilator to determine whether increased oxygen concentrations may contribute to the risk of combustion from arcing defibrillator paddles. Ventilation was simulated using either a mask or via a tracheal tube fitted to the airway. The head of the mannequin rested upon a 10-cm-high pillow. Gas sampling took place after 5 min of ventilation with subsequent removal of the ventilatory device and placement on the pillow to the left of the mouth, with the tubing of the device removed to a point 1 m behind the mouth and with the device left connected to the tracheal tube. Gas was sampled after using all devices at oxygen flows of 10l.min-1 and 15l.min-1. Slightly increased oxygen concentrations were noted over the anterior chest after placement of all devices on the pillow at the higher flow. Concentrations of greater than 30% were measured in the left axilla after placement of all devices on the pillow at both flows. No increase in oxygen concentration was seen when the devices were either left connected to the tracheal tube or removed to a distance of 1 m. It would appear that leaving a patient connected to a ventilator poses no increase in risk of fire from ignition of combustible material in an oxygen-enriched atmosphere during defibrillation. Disconnecting any device which continues to discharge oxygen and leaving it on the pillow before defibrillation is dangerous. PMID:9771170

  2. Extracorporeal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: Predictors of Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Joon Bum; Jung, Sung-Ho; Choo, Suk Jung; Chung, Cheol Hyun; Lee, Jae Won

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in the setting of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has shown improved outcomes compared with conventional CPR. The aim of this study was to determine factors predictive of survival in extracorporeal CPR (E-CPR). Methods Consecutive 85 adult patients (median age, 59 years; range, 18 to 85 years; 56 males) who underwent E-CPR from May 2005 to December 2012 were evaluated. Results Causes of arrest were cardiogenic in 62 patients (72.9%), septic in 18 patients (21.2%), and hypovolemic in 3 patients (3.5%), while the etiology was not specified in 2 patients (2.4%). The survival rate in patients with septic etiology was significantly poorer compared with those with another etiology (0% vs. 24.6%, p=0.008). Septic etiology (hazard ratio [HR], 2.84; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49 to 5.44; p=0.002) and the interval between arrest and ECLS initiation (HR, 1.05 by 10 minutes increment; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.09; p=0.005) were independent risk factors for mortality. When the predictive value of the E-CPR timing for in-hospital mortality was assessed using the receiver operating characteristic curve method, the greatest accuracy was obtained at a cutoff of 60.5 minutes (area under the curve, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.54 to 0.80; p=0.032) with 47.8% sensitivity and 88.9% specificity. The survival rate was significantly different according to the cutoff of 60.5 minutes (p=0.001). Conclusion These results indicate that efforts should be made to minimize the time between arrest and ECLS application, optimally within 60 minutes. In addition, E-CPR in patients with septic etiology showed grave outcomes, suggesting it to be of questionable benefit in these patients. PMID:27525236

  3. [Care practices on the resuscitation of newborns in the context of a delivery center].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Karina; Kimura, Amelia Fumiko

    2005-12-01

    Approximately 10 to 15% of the neonates present difficulties in adapting to extra uterine life, which requires ability and readiness from the professional to intervene properly. This is an observational, cross-sectional study aimed at describing the care practices on the resuscitation of the newborn in the Delivery Center of a public hospital in the city of São Paulo. Data were obtained from the observation of 100 assistances given by health care professional staff and were recorded on a check-list instrument. Meconium-amniotic fluid was found in 24 (24.0%) births and 47 (47.0%) newborns were submitted to respiratory airways aspiration. Of these, 6.4% (3) had their trachea aspirated. 26 (26.0%) newborns were ventilated, 5 (19.2%) of which by mask plus positive pressure; 1 (1.0%) newborn was submitted to a chest compression. After the initial resuscitation procedures, 6 (6.0%) newborns were referred to the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:16419447

  4. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise. PMID:9670174

  5. Initiation of resuscitation in the delivery room for extremely preterm infants: a profile of neonatal resuscitation instructors

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Cristiane Ribeiro; Sanudo, Adriana; de Almeida, Maria Fernanda Branco; Guinsburg, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The goal of the present study was to examine the decisions of pediatricians who teach neonatal resuscitation in Brazil, particularly those who start resuscitation in the delivery room for newborns born at 23-26 gestational weeks. METHODS: The present study was a cross-sectional study that used electronic questionnaires (Dec/11-Sep/13) sent to instructors of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program of the Brazilian Society of Pediatrics. The primary outcome was the gestational age at which the respondent said that he/she would initiate positive pressure ventilation in the delivery room. Latent class analysis was used to identify the major profiles of these instructors, and logistic regression was used to identify variables associated with belonging to one of the derived classes. RESULTS: Of 685 instructors, 82% agreed to participate. Two latent classes were identified: ‘pro-resuscitation' (instructors with a high probability of performing ventilation on infants born at 23-26 weeks) and ‘pro-limitation' (instructors with a high probability of starting ventilation only for infants born at 25-26 weeks). In the multivariate model, compared with the ‘pro-limitation' class, ‘pro-resuscitation' pediatricians were more likely to be board-certified neonatologists and less likely to base their decision on the probability of the infant's death or on moral/religious considerations. CONCLUSION: The pediatricians in the most aggressive group were more likely to be specialists in neonatology and to use less subjective criteria to make delivery room decisions. PMID:27166771

  6. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and post-cardiac arrest brain injury].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    One of the most important topics in the field of resuscitation at present is the drafting of the 2015 version of the Consensus on Science and Treatment Recommendation (CoSTR) by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation. The Japan Resuscitation Council is preparing its 2015 Guideline based on this CoSTR and plans to release it in October 2015. A critical change in the upcoming CoSTR is the adoption of the GRADE system. The new Guideline incorporating the GRADE system will surely be more scientific than the previous Guideline issued in 2010. Meanwhile, an important finding appeared in a report from Nielsen et al.: hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33 degrees C did not confer a benefit versus 36 degrees in unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause. PMID:26915250

  7. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Resuscitation Following Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Rittenberger, Jon C; Friess, Stuart; Polderman, Kees H

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is the most common cause of death in North America. Neurocritical care interventions, including targeted temperature management (TTM), have significantly improved neurological outcomes in patients successfully resuscitated from cardiac arrest. Therefore, resuscitation following cardiac arrest was chosen as an emergency neurological life support protocol. Patients remaining comatose following resuscitation from cardiac arrest should be considered for TTM. This protocol will review induction, maintenance, and re-warming phases of TTM, along with management of TTM side effects. Aggressive shivering suppression is necessary with this treatment to ensure the maintenance of a target temperature. Ancillary testing, including electrocardiography, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, continuous electroencephalography monitoring, and correction of electrolyte, blood gas, and hematocrit changes, are also necessary to optimize outcomes. PMID:26438463

  8. One hospital's experience with a "Do not resuscitate" policy.

    PubMed Central

    McPhail, A.; Moore, S.; O'Connor, J.; Woodward, C.

    1981-01-01

    A "No not resuscitate" policy was instituted at McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton, in January 1979. Its objectives were to ensure that physicians decide on the appropriateness of resuscitation attempts before they might be needed; to have each physician consult his or her patients, or the families of incompetent patients, to determine their wishes concerning further treatment; and to provide legal protection of or physicians and the hospital in regard to the policy. To determine the effectiveness of the "Do not resuscitate" policy a questionnaire was sent to a sample of the professional staff of the hospital; the overall response rate was 87%. The respondents felt that a better way of informing hospital staff of the policy and its objectives was needed. However, the results of the questionnaire suggested that, on the whole, the policy was perceived as beneficial to both patients and physicians at the hospital. PMID:7306894

  9. Damage control resuscitation: from emergency department to the operating room.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Juan C; Barbeau, James M; Islam, Tareq M; Wahl, Georgia; Greiffenstein, Patrick; McSwain, Norman E

    2011-02-01

    Damage control surgery emphasizes limited operations with control of bleeding and contamination. Traditional management centered upon correction of acidosis and hypotension with crystalloids. Damage control resuscitation (DCR) is permissive hypotension and early hemostatic resuscitation combined identified and corrects coagulopathy with fresh-frozen plasma (FFP), restricting use of crystalloids. We hypothesize a survival advantage in patients managed with DCR when compared with a historical cohort of patients. During the 2-year retrospective review, a 1-year period after institution of DCR was compared with a historical control. Resuscitation strategies were analyzed and stratified into emergency department (ED) resuscitation and intraoperative resuscitation. Univariate analysis of continuous data was done with Student's t test followed by multiple logistic regression. Fifty-seven and 61 patients were managed during the NonDCR and DCR periods respectively. Baseline demographic patient characteristics and physiologic variables were similar between groups. ED DCR patients received less crystalloids: 1.1 versus 4.7 liters (P = 0.0001), more FFP: 1.8 versus 0.5 (P = 0.001). NonDCR had a lower initial systolic pressure in the operating room when compared with DCR: 81 mm Hg versus 95 mm Hg (P = 0.03). DCR patients received less intraoperative crystalloids: 5.7 versus 15.8 liters (P = 0.0001) and more FFP: 15.1 versus 6.2 (P = 0.0001). DCR conveyed a survival benefit (Odds Ratio; 95% confidence interval: 0.40 (0.18-0.90), P = 0.024). NonDCR group had 13.2 days longer hospital length of stay. Damage control resuscitation, beginning in the ED, used more packed red blood cells and FFP minimizing crystalloids. DCR was associated with a survival advantage and shorter length of stay in patients with severe hemorrhage. PMID:21337881

  10. An Exploratory Study of Factors Influencing Resuscitation Skills Retention and Performance among Health Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, Vernon; Fleet, Lisa; Greene, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Resuscitation and life support skills training comprises a significant proportion of continuing education programming for health professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of certified resuscitation providers toward the retention of resuscitation skills, regular skills updating, and methods…

  11. Cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcome reports: update and simplification of the Utstein templates for resuscitation registries. A statement for healthcare professionals from a task force of the international liaison committee on resuscitation (American Heart Association, European Resuscitation Council, Australian Resuscitation Council, New Zealand Resuscitation Council, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, InterAmerican Heart Foundation, Resuscitation Council of Southern Africa).

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Ian; Nadkarni, Vinay; Bahr, Jan; Berg, Robert A; Billi, John E; Bossaert, Leo; Cassan, Pascal; Coovadia, Ashraf; D'Este, Kate; Finn, Judith; Halperin, Henry; Handley, Anthony; Herlitz, Johan; Hickey, Robert; Idris, Ahamed; Kloeck, Walter; Larkin, Gregory Luke; Mancini, Mary Elizabeth; Mason, Pip; Mears, Gregory; Monsieurs, Koenraad; Montgomery, William; Morley, Peter; Nichol, Graham; Nolan, Jerry; Okada, Kazuo; Perlman, Jeffrey; Shuster, Michael; Steen, Petter Andreas; Sterz, Fritz; Tibballs, James; Timerman, Sergio; Truitt, Tanya; Zideman, David

    2004-12-01

    Outcome following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation is dependent on critical interventions, particularly early defibrillation, effective chest compressions, and advanced life support. Utstein-style definitions and reporting templates have been used extensively in published studies of cardiac arrest, which has led to greater understanding of the elements of resuscitation practice and progress toward international consensus on science and resuscitation guidelines. Despite the development of Utstein templates to standardize research reports of cardiac arrest, international registries have yet to be developed. In April 2002 a task force of ILCOR met in Melbourne, Australia, to review worldwide experience with the Utstein definitions and reporting templates. The task force revised the core reporting template and definitions by consensus. Care was taken to build on previous definitions, changing data elements and operational definitions only on the basis of published data and experience derived from those registries that have used Utstein-style reporting. Attention was focused on decreasing the complexity of the existing templates and addressing logistical difficulties in collecting specific core and supplementary (i.e., essential and desirable) data elements recommended by previous Utstein consensus conference. Inconsistencies in terminology between in-hospital and out-of-hospital Utstein templates were also addressed. The task force produced a reporting tool for essential data that can be used for both quality improvement (registries) and research reports and that should be applicable to both adults and children. The revised and simplified template includes practical and succinct operational definitions. It is anticipated that the revised template will enable better and more accurate completion of all reports of cardiac arrest and resuscitation attempts. Problems with data definition, collection, linkage, confidentiality, management, and registry

  12. Blood Transfusion Strategies for Hemostatic Resuscitation in Massive Trauma.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Massive transfusion practices were transformed during the 1970s without solid evidence supporting the use of component therapy. A manual literature search was performed for all references to the lethal triad, acute or early coagulopathy of trauma, fresh whole blood, and component transfusion therapy in massive trauma, and damage control resuscitation. Data from recent wars suggest traditional component therapy causes a nonhemostatic resuscitation worsening the propagation of the lethal triad hastening death. These same studies also indicate the advantage of fresh whole blood over component therapy even when administered in a 1:1:1 replacement ratio. PMID:26897426

  13. Case report on effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Radhe; Madan, Anita; Makkar, Vega; Attri, Joginder Pal

    2016-01-01

    The management of cardiac arrest in pregnancy is an important task for the emergency physicians. Some reasons for cardiac arrest are reversible and should be recognized and managed promptly. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation follows general advanced cardiac life support guidelines with several modifications for pregnant women, taking into account the lives of both mother and fetus. Here, we present the case of 23-year-old pregnant patient who came to Guru Nanak Dev Hospital, Amritsar; in shock, had a cardiac arrest, successfully resuscitated in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), delivered by emergency cesarean section and was discharged from ICU on 9th day in healthy state. PMID:26957705

  14. Remote damage control resuscitation and the Solstrand Conference: defining the need, the language, and a way forward.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Strandenes, Geir; Cap, Andrew P; Rentas, Francisco J; Glassberg, Elon; Mott, Jeff; Dubick, Michael A; Spinella, Philip C

    2013-01-01

    Damage control resuscitation (DCR) is emerging as a standard practice in civilian and military trauma care. Primary objectives include resolution of immediate life threats followed by optimization of physiological status in the perioperative period. To accomplish this, DCR employs a unique hypotensive-hemostatic resuscitation strategy that avoids traditional crystalloid intravenous fluids in favor of early blood component use in ratios mimicking whole blood. The presence of uncontrolled major hemorrhage (UMH) coupled with a delay in access to hemostatic surgical intervention remains a primary contributor to preventable death in both combat and in many domestic settings, including rural areas and disaster sites. As a result, civilian and military emergency care leaders throughout the world have sought a means to project DCR principles forward of the traditional trauma resuscitation bay, into such remote environments as disaster scenes, rural health facilities, and the contemporary battlefield. After reflecting on experiences from past conflicts, defining current capability gaps, and examining available and potential solutions, a strategy for "remote damage control resuscitation" (RDCR) has been proposed. In order for RDCR to progress from concept to clinical strategy, it will be necessary to define existing gaps in knowledge and clinical capability; develop a lexicon so that investigators and operators may understand each other; establish coherent research and development agendas; and execute comprehensive investigations designed to predict, diagnose, and mitigate the consequences of hemorrhagic shock and acute traumatic coagulopathy before they become irreversible. This article seeks to introduce the concept of RDCR; to reinforce the importance of identifying and optimally managing UMH and the resulting shock state as part of a comprehensive approach to out-of-hospital stabilization and en route care; and to propose investigational strategies to enable the

  15. A CONTROLLED RESUSCITATION STRATEGY IS FEASIBLE AND SAFE IN HYPOTENSIVE TRAUMA PATIENTS: RESULTS OF A PROSPECTIVE RANDOMIZED PILOT TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Martin A.; Meier, Eric N.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Newgard, Craig D.; Brasel, Karen; Egan, Debra; Witham, William; Williams, Carolyn; Daya, Mohamud; Beeson, Jeff; McCully, Belinda H.; Wheeler, Stephen; Kannas, Delores; May, Susanne; McKnight, Barbara; Hoyt, David B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Optimal resuscitation of hypotensive trauma patients has not been defined. This trial was performed to assess the feasibility and safety of controlled resuscitation (CR) versus standard resuscitation (SR) in hypotensive trauma patients. METHODS Patients were enrolled and randomized in the out-of-hospital setting. 19 EMS systems in the Resuscitation Outcome Consortium participated. Eligible patients had an out-of-hospital systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 90 mmHg. CR patients received 250 cc of fluid if they had no radial pulse or a SBP < 70 mmHg and additional 250 cc boluses to maintain a radial pulse or a SBP ≥ 70 mmHg. SR group patients received 2 liters initially and additional fluid as needed to maintain a SBP ≥ 110 mmHg. The crystalloid protocol was maintained until hemorrhage control or 2 hours after hospital arrival. RESULTS 192 patients were randomized (97 CR and 95 SR). The CR and SR groups were similar at baseline. Average crystalloid volume administered during the study period was 1.0 liter (SD 1.5) in the CR group and 2.0 liters (SD 1.4) in the SR group, a difference of 1.0 liter (95% CI: 0.6 to 1.4). ICU-free days, ventilator-free days, renal injury and renal failure did not differ between groups. At 24 hours after admission, there were 5 deaths (5%) in the CR group and 14 (15%) in the SR group (adjusted odds ratio 0.39 [95% CI: 0.12, 1.26]). Among patients with blunt trauma, 24-hour mortality was 3% (CR) and 18% (SR) with an adjusted OR of 0.17 (0.03, 0.92). There was no difference among patients with penetrating trauma: 9% vs 9%, adjusted OR 1.93 (0.19, 19.17). CONCLUSION Controlled resuscitation is achievable in out-of-hospital and hospital settings and may offer an early survival advantage in blunt trauma. A large-scale, Phase III trial to examine its effects on survival and other clinical outcomes is warranted. PMID:25807399

  16. Resuscitative Long-Bone Sonography for the Clinician: Usefulness and Pitfalls of Focused Clinical Ultrasound to Detect Long-Bone Fractures During Trauma Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadi, Azzam S; Gillman, Lawrence M; Ball, Chad G; Panebianco, Nova L; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-08-01

    Bone has one of the highest acoustic densities (AD) in the human body. Traditionally, bone has been considered to be a hindrance to the use of ultrasound (US), as US waves are reflected by the dense matrix and obscure underlying structures. The intense wave reflection, however, can clearly illustrate the cortical bony anatomy of long bones, making cortical disruption obvious. Ultrasound can be used at the bedside concurrently with the overall trauma resuscitation, and may potentially limit the patient's and treating team's exposure to ionizing radiation, corroborate clinical findings, and augment procedural success. The extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) is an essential tool in the resuscitation of severe torso trauma, frequently demonstrating intra- pericardial and intra-peritoneal fluid, inferring hemo/pneumothoraces, and demonstrating cardiac function. Although it is typically considered as a diagnosis of exclusion, multiple long-bone fractures may be a source of shock and can be quickly confirmed at the bedside with EFAST. Further, the early detection of long-bone fractures can also aid in the early stabilization of severely injured patients. Sonographic evaluation for long-bone fractures may be particularly useful in austere environments where other imaging modalities are limited, such as in the battlefield, developing world, and space. While prospective study has been limited, selected series have demonstrated high accuracy among both physician and para-medical clinicians in detecting long-bone fractures. Pitfalls in this technique include reduced accuracy with the small bones of the hands and feet, as well as great reliance on user experience. PMID:26815050

  17. Usefulness of the bispectral index during cardiopulmonary resuscitation -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Yong; Kim, Yeonbaek; Kim, Jung-Eun

    2013-01-01

    The usefulness of using the bispectral index (BIS) for monitoring during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is not clearly understood. However, BIS has been a popular anesthetic monitoring device used during operations. The case presented is of a pregnant woman going into cardiac arrest due to an amniotic fluid embolism during a Cesarean section. CPR was performed, but neither the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) nor the return of consciousness was achieved, despite 50 min of effective CPR. However, CPR was continued based on BIS. ROSC was achieved, and an alert consciousness state was reached 1 day postoperation. This finding suggests that BIS be used as a basic monitoring device during CPR and that it may help in deciding to continue CPR. PMID:23372890

  18. Modeling cardiac arrest and resuscitation in the domestic pig

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, Brandon H; Nguyen, Anh Q; Hollrah, Roger A; Olivencia-Yurvati, Albert H; Mallet, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac arrest remains a leading cause of death and permanent disability worldwide. Although many victims are initially resuscitated, they often succumb to the extensive ischemia-reperfusion injury inflicted on the internal organs, especially the brain. Cardiac arrest initiates a complex cellular injury cascade encompassing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, Ca2+ overload, ATP depletion, pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, mitochondrial dysfunction, and neuronal glutamate excitotoxity, which injures and kills cells, compromises function of internal organs and ignites a destructive systemic inflammatory response. The sheer complexity and scope of this cascade challenges the development of experimental models of and effective treatments for cardiac arrest. Many experimental animal preparations have been developed to decipher the mechanisms of damage to vital internal organs following cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and to develop treatments to interrupt the lethal injury cascades. Porcine models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation offer several important advantages over other species, and outcomes in this large animal are readily translated to the clinical setting. This review summarizes porcine cardiac arrest-CPR models reported in the literature, describes clinically relevant phenomena observed during cardiac arrest and resuscitation in pigs, and discusses numerous methodological considerations in modeling cardiac arrest/CPR. Collectively, published reports show the domestic pig to be a suitable large animal model of cardiac arrest which is responsive to CPR, defibrillatory countershocks and medications, and yields extensive information to foster advances in clinical treatment of cardiac arrest. PMID:25685718

  19. A National Survey of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training for the Deaf.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Kenneth H.; Tomasetti, James A.

    1983-01-01

    Responses to a national survey by regional directors of the American Heart Association, American National Red Cross, and continuing education programs for the deaf indicated that little is done to train the deaf in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and that communication barriers and inadequate training resources are major reasons. (Author)

  20. Family presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Cristiana Araújo G.; Balbino, Flávia Simphronio; Balieiro, Maria Magda F. G.; Mandetta, Myriam Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify literature evidences related to actions to promote family's presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures in children hospitalized in pediatric and neonatal critical care units. Data sources : Integrative literature review in PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases, from 2002 to 2012, with the following inclusion criteria: research article in Medicine, or Nursing, published in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the keywords "family", "invasive procedures", "cardiopulmonary resuscitation", "health staff", and "Pediatrics". Articles that did not refer to the presence of the family in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and invasive procedures were excluded. Therefore, 15 articles were analyzed. Data synthesis : Most articles were published in the United States (80%), in Medicine and Nursing (46%), and were surveys (72%) with healthcare team members (67%) as participants. From the critical analysis, four themes related to the actions to promote family's presence in invasive procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were obtained: a) to develop a sensitizing program for healthcare team; b) to educate the healthcare team to include the family in these circumstances; c) to develop a written institutional policy; d) to ensure the attendance of family's needs. Conclusions: Researches on these issues must be encouraged in order to help healthcare team to modify their practice, implementing the principles of the Patient and Family Centered Care model, especially during critical episodes. PMID:24676198

  1. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills by Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fossel, Michael; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study of preclinical medical students' cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills showed students had a very recent CPR course had a significantly lower failure rate than those with courses one or two years previously. The most frequent errors were in chest compression rate and inability to adhere to the single-rescuer compression-to-ventilation…

  2. Retention of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills in Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin

    2016-01-01

    Background/Objective: For effective bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), retention of CPR skills after the training is central. The objective of this study was to find out how much of the CPR skills a group of Nigerian secondary school students would retain six weeks after their first exposure to the conventional CPR training. Materials…

  3. Efficacy of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Microgravity Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Smith L.; Campbell, Mark R.; Billica, Roger D.; Gilmore, Stevan M.

    2001-01-01

    End tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO 2) has been previously shown to be an effective non-invasive tool for estimating cardiac output during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Animal models have shown that this diagnostic adjunct can be used as a predictor of survival when EtCO 2 values are maintained above 25% of prearrest values.

  4. Out-of-Hospital Hypertonic Resuscitation Following Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bulger, Eileen M.; May, Susanne; Brasel, Karen J.; Schreiber, Martin; Kerby, Jeffrey D.; Tisherman, Samuel A.; Newgard, Craig; Slutsky, Arthur; Coimbra, Raul; Emerson, Scott; Minei, Joseph P.; Bardarson, Berit; Kudenchuk, Peter; Baker, Andrew; Christenson, Jim; Idris, Ahamed; Davis, Daniel; Fabian, Timothy C.; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Callaway, Clifton; Williams, Carolyn; Banek, Jane; Vaillancourt, Christian; van Heest, Rardi; Sopko, George; Hata, J. Steven; Hoyt, David B.

    2010-01-01

    Context Hypertonic fluids restore cerebral perfusion with reduced cerebral edema and modulate inflammatory response to reduce subsequent neuronal injury and thus have potential benefit in resuscitation of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Objective To determine whether out-of-hospital administration of hypertonic fluids improves neurologic outcome following severe TBI. Design, Setting, and Participants Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 114 North American emergency medical services agencies within the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, conducted between May 2006 and May 2009 among patients 15 years or older with blunt trauma and a prehospital Glasgow Coma Scale score of 8 or less who did not meet criteria for hypovolemic shock. Planned enrollment was 2122 patients. Intervention A single 250-mL bolus of 7.5% saline/6% dextran 70 (hypertonic saline/dextran), 7.5% saline (hypertonic saline), or 0.9% saline (normal saline) initiated in the out-of-hospital setting. Main Outcome Measure Six-month neurologic outcome based on the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) (dichotomized as >4 or ≤4). Results The study was terminated by the data and safety monitoring board after randomization of 1331 patients, having met prespecified futility criteria. Among the 1282 patients enrolled, 6-month outcomes data were available for 1087 (85%). Baseline characteristics of the groups were equivalent. There was no difference in 6-month neurologic outcome among groups with regard to proportions of patients with severe TBI (GOSE ≤4) (hypertonic saline/dextran vs normal saline: 53.7% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.2% [95% CI, −4.5% to 9.0%]; hypertonic saline vs normal saline: 54.3% vs 51.5%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, −4.0% to 9.7%]; P=.67). There were no statistically significant differences in distribution of GOSE category or Disability Rating Score by treatment group. Survival at 28 days was 74.3% with hypertonic saline

  5. OPTIMIZED FLUID MANAGEMENT IMPROVES OUTCOMES OF PEDIATRIC BURN PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Branski, Ludwik K; Finnerty, Celeste C; Leonard, Katrina R; Jeschke, Marc G

    2012-01-01

    Background One of the major determinants for survival of severely burned patients is appropriate fluid resuscitation. At present, fluid resuscitation is calculated based on bodyweight or body surface area, burn size, and urinary output. However, recent evidence suggests that fluid calculation is inadequate and that over- and under-resuscitation is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that optimizing fluid administration during the critical initial phase using a transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution monitoring device (PiCCO) would have beneficial effects on the outcome of burned patients. Methods A cohort of seventy-six severely burned pediatric patients with burns over 30% total body surface area (TBSA) who received adjusted fluid resuscitation using the PiCCO (P) system were compared to 76 conventionally monitored patients (C). Clinical hemodynamic measurements, organ function (DENVER2 score), and biomarkers were recorded prospectively for the first 20 days after burn injury. Results Both cohorts were similar in demographic and injury characteristics. Patients in the PiCCO group received significantly less fluids (p<0.05) with similar urinary output, resulting in a significantly lower positive fluid balance (p<0.05). The central venous pressure (CVP) in the P group was maintained in a more controlled range (p<0.05), associated with a significantly lower heart rate and significantly lower incidence of cardiac and renal failure, p<0.05. Conclusions Fluid resuscitation guided by transcardiopulmonary thermo-dilution during hospitalization represents an effective adjunct and is associated with beneficial effects on post-burn morbidity. PMID:22703982

  6. The Effectiveness of a ‘Train the Trainer’ Model of Resuscitation Education for Rural Peripheral Hospital Doctors in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Bishan N.; Neeman, Teresa; Dawson, Andrew H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sri Lankan rural doctors based in isolated peripheral hospitals routinely resuscitate critically ill patients but have difficulty accessing training. We tested a train-the-trainer model that could be utilised in isolated rural hospitals. Methods Eight selected rural hospital non-specialist doctors attended a 2-day instructor course. These “trained trainers” educated their colleagues in advanced cardiac life support at peripheral hospital workshops and we tested their students in resuscitation knowledge and skills pre and post training, and at 6- and 12-weeks. Knowledge was assessed through 30 multiple choice questions (MCQ), and resuscitation skills were assessed by performance in a video recorded simulated scenario of a cardiac arrest using a Resuci Anne Skill Trainer mannequin. Results/Discussion/Conclusion Fifty seven doctors were trained. Pre and post training assessment was possible in 51 participants, and 6-week and 12-week follow up was possible for 43, and 38 participants respectively. Mean MCQ scores significantly improved over time (p<0.001), and a significant improvement was noted in “average ventilation volume”, “compression count”, and “compressions with no error”, “adequate depth”, “average depth”, and “compression rate” (p<0.01). The proportion of participants with compression depth ≥40mm increased post intervention (p<0.05) and at 12-week follow up (p<0.05), and proportion of ventilation volumes between 400-1000mls increased post intervention (p<0.001). A significant increase in the proportion of participants who “checked for responsiveness”, “opened the airway”, “performed a breathing check”, who used the “correct compression ratio”, and who used an “appropriate facemask technique” was also noted (p<0.001). A train-the-trainer model of resuscitation education was effective in improving resuscitation knowledge and skills in Sri Lankan rural peripheral hospital doctors. Improvement was

  7. Strategies to sustain a quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    van Heerden, Carlien; Janse van Rensburg, Elsie S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Many neonatal deaths can be prevented globally through effective resuscitation. South Africa (SA) committed towards attaining the Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG4) set by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, SA’s district hospitals have the highest early neonatal mortality rates. Modifiable and avoidable causes associated with patient-related, administrative and health care provider factors contribute to neonatal mortality. A quality improvement initiative in neonatal resuscitation could contribute towards decreasing neonatal mortality, thereby contributing towards the attainment of the MDG4. Aim The aim of this study was, (1) to explore and describe the existing situation regarding neonatal resuscitation in a district hospital, (2) to develop strategies to sustain a neonatal resuscitation quality improvement initiative and (3) to decrease neonatal mortality. Changes that occurred and the sustainability of strategies were evaluated. Setting A maternity section of a district hospital in South Africa. Methods The National Health Service (NHS) Sustainability Model formed the theoretical framework for the study. The Problem Resolving Action Research model was applied and the study was conducted in three cycles. Purposive sampling was used for the quantitative and qualitative aspects of data collection. Data was analysed accordingly. Results The findings indicated that the strategies formulated and implemented to address factors related to neonatal resuscitation (training, equipment and stock, staff shortages, staff attitude, neonatal transport and protocols) had probable sustainability and contributed towards a reduction in neonatal mortality in the setting. Conclusion These strategies had the probability of sustainability and could potentially improve neonatal outcomes and reduce neonatal mortality to contribute toward South Africa’s’ drive to attain the MDG4. PMID:27380840

  8. Peer-initiated overdose resuscitation: fellow drug users could be mobilised to implement resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Strang; Best; Man; Noble; Gossop

    2000-12-01

    Research interviews about overdose experiences were conducted with 115 patients attending a methadone maintenance clinic in south London, UK. While almost half (49.6%) reported having experienced overdose personally (on an average of four occasions each), almost all (97.4%) reported that they had witnessed overdoses (on an average of six occasions each). This represents a total of 706 overdoses witnessed, of which 106 had resulted in fatalities. The vast majority of patients (86/97) reported that they had taken actions when they had witnessed overdoses with those acting taking an average of nearly threee different actions on the last occasion on which they had seen someone overdosing. Most respondents reported that they would be willing to act, even if they did not know the overdose victim personally and that they had not been deterred from acting by the previous response from the emergency services. Fear of punishment was not a strong deterrent from acting certainly not for this sample, with many participants also expressing an interest in expanding their repertoire of overdose interventions, for example through training in resuscitation techniques and by keeping naloxone at home for use in overdose emergency. PMID:11099924

  9. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  10. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  11. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200.14 Section 200.14 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and...

  12. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  13. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  14. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200....14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure...

  15. Intraosseous approach to vascular access in adult resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Rob

    2010-07-01

    Establishing vascular access is vital to maximise resuscitation in critically ill children and adults (LaRocco and Wang 2003), and failure can result in delays in life-saving treatment (Nutbeam and Daniels 2010). The traditional intravenous access method can be difficult to achieve in patients with circulatory collapse (LaRocco and Wang 2003) and failure rates in emergency situations vary between 10 and 40 per cent (Lewis 1986). Other routes, such as endotracheal and intramuscular, do not provide controlled and reliable administration rates (Leidel et al 2009). This article focuses on the increased use of intraosseous (IO) access in adult resuscitation. The IO route is described and the indications and contraindications considered. Common insertion sites and devices of IO access are discussed. PMID:20662405

  16. Extracorporeal Life Support for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for Adults: Evolving Evidence.

    PubMed

    Kehrl, Thompson; Kaczorowski, David J

    2016-01-01

    For years, conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been the cornerstone of treatment for cardiac arrest. However, the survival of patients that suffer a cardiac arrest is unsatisfactory despite the use of CPR. The use of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) to aid in the resuscitation of patients in cardiac arrest has the potential benefit of immediate restoration of circulation. Previously, several case reports and small series have suggested that ECLS might provide benefit for patients with refractory cardiac arrest. Several recent larger series, including a number of prospective studies, have emerged that provide further evidence for the utility of emergent institution of ECLS as an adjunct to conventional CPR in the management of cardiac arrest. These studies, which are reviewed here, have provided useful insight into the role of ECLS in cardiac arrest and have set the stage for randomized controlled trials. Ongoing ECLS trials, logistical issues, and future direction of ECLS are reviewed as well. PMID:26919179

  17. Applied physiology at the bedside to drive resuscitation algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Holder, Andre L.; Pinsky, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Hemodynamic instability is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Goal-directed therapeutic algorithms have been used in various clinical settings to reverse or prevent organ damage and death that could occur with a low oxygen delivery state. Most current resuscitative algorithms use static physiologic measures to determine if a patient will respond to proven therapies. While static parameters are useful in identifying the potential for clinical instability, they cannot tell us how patients will respond to an intervention. Applied physiology, through the use of functional hemodynamic monitoring can predict the body's reaction to therapy because they are based on cardiovascular dynamics. A growing body of evidence supports the use of applied physiologic principles in goal directed therapeutic algorithms for appropriate and effective resuscitation/optimization. Over time, applied physiology should be incorporated into standardized protocol-driven care to improve outcomes in patients experiencing, or at risk for hemodynamic instability. PMID:25479921

  18. The resuscitation status of a patient: a constant dilemma.

    PubMed

    Dean, J A

    Since the first description of closed chest cardiac massage in 1960, healthcare has evolved considerably. The modern-day skill and expertise of both doctors and nurses in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques are now supported by an advanced medical technology. Indeed, CPR is now perceived as the definitive life-saving procedure. However, paradoxically, it has also prolonged the process of dying and denied many patients a dignified and peaceful death. It has also denied the patient's loved ones the opportunity to be present at the time of death. The main focus of this article is to explore the current ethical issues in clinical practice relating to determining the resuscitation status of patients. Attention will also be given to patient advocacy, and the nurse's role in supporting this concept. PMID:12066047

  19. A Primer on Updates to the Neonatal Resuscitation Program.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    In October 2015, the American Heart Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics released advanced notification of substantive changes to appear in the seventh edition of the Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) scheduled for release in the spring of 2016. The expectation is that all NRP providers will be educated in the seventh edition of the NRP during 2016, with the national implementation target date set as January 2017. This column presents a brief discussion and summary of changes to the NRP. PMID:27287357

  20. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li; Lu, Yuan-Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them. PMID:26380744

  1. Implementation and execution of civilian remote damage control resuscitation programs.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Donald; Stubbs, James; Williams, Steve; Berns, Kathleen; Zielinski, Martin; Strandenes, Geir; Zietlow, Scott

    2014-05-01

    Remote damage control resuscitation is a recently defined term used to describe techniques and strategies to provide hemostatic resuscitation to injured patients in the prehospital setting. In the civilian setting, unlike the typical military setting, patients who require treatment for hemorrhage come in all ages with all types of comorbidities and have bleeding that may be non-trauma related. Thus, in the austere setting, addressing the needs of the patient is no less challenging than in the military environment, albeit the caregivers are typically not putting their lives at risk to provide such care. Two organizations have pioneered remote damage control resuscitation in the civilian environment: Mayo Clinic and Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. The limitations in rural Minnesota and shipboard are daunting. Patients who have hemorrhage requiring transfusion are often hundreds of miles from hospitals able to provide damage control resuscitation. This article details the development and implementation of novel programs specifically designed to address the varied needs of patients in such circumstances. The Mayo Clinic program essentially takes a standard-of-care treatment algorithm, by which the patient would be treated in the emergency department or trauma bay, and projects that forward into the rural environment with specially trained prehospital personnel and special resources. Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd has adapted a traditional military field practice of transfusing warm fresh whole blood, adding significant safety measures not yet reported on the battlefield (see within this Supplement the article entitled "Emergency Whole Blood Use in the Field: A Simplified Protocol for Collection and Transfusion"). The details of development, implementation, and preliminary results of these two civilian programs are described herein. PMID:24662783

  2. Strategy analysis of cardiopulmonary resuscitation training in the community

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Ma, Li

    2015-01-01

    Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a crucial therapy for sudden cardiac arrest. This appreciation produced immense efforts by professional organizations to train laypeople for CPR skills. However, the rate of CPR training is low and varies widely across communities. Several strategies are used in order to improve the rate of CPR training and are performed in some advanced countries. The Chinese CPR training in communities could gain enlightenment from them. PMID:26380744

  3. Options for intravascular access during resuscitation of adults.

    PubMed

    Cairney, Kevin; Ibrahim, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    For most emergency care teams, initial intravascular access is performed intravenously, despite the challenges posed by low cardiac output physiology. Intraosseous (IO) access has been included in recent Resuscitation Council UK (2010) adult advanced life support (ALS) guidelines for cases in which intravenous access is difficult or unavailable. This article discusses how the use of IO access devices can improve ALS therapy for patients who are in, or who are at risk of, cardiac arrest. PMID:22690475

  4. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed

    Leite, Heitor Pons; de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-07-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named "metabolic resuscitation", would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to "mitochondrial resuscitation" are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  5. Vasopressin during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and different shock states: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Krismer, Anette C; Dünser, Martin W; Lindner, Karl H; Stadlbauer, Karl H; Mayr, Viktoria D; Lienhart, Hannes G; Arntz, Richard H; Wenzel, Volker

    2006-01-01

    Vasopressin administration may be a promising therapy in the management of various shock states. In laboratory models of cardiac arrest, vasopressin improved vital organ blood flow, cerebral oxygen delivery, the rate of return of spontaneous circulation, and neurological recovery compared with epinephrine (adrenaline). In a study of 1219 adult patients with cardiac arrest, the effects of vasopressin were similar to those of epinephrine in the management of ventricular fibrillation and pulseless electrical activity; however, vasopressin was superior to epinephrine in patients with asystole. Furthermore, vasopressin followed by epinephrine resulted in significantly higher rates of survival to hospital admission and hospital discharge. The current cardiopulmonary resuscitation guidelines recommend intravenous vasopressin 40 IU or epinephrine 1mg in adult patients refractory to electrical countershock. Several investigations have demonstrated that vasopressin can successfully stabilize hemodynamic variables in advanced vasodilatory shock. Use of vasopressin in vasodilatory shock should be guided by strict hemodynamic indications, such as hypotension despite norepinephrine (noradrenaline) dosages >0.5 mug/kg/min. Vasopressin must never be used as the sole vasopressor agent. In our institutional routine, a fixed vasopressin dosage of 0.067 IU/min (i.e. 100 IU/50 mL at 2 mL/h) is administered and mean arterial pressure is regulated by adjusting norepinephrine infusion. When norepinephrine dosages decrease to 0.2 microg/kg/min, vasopressin is withdrawn in small steps according to the response in mean arterial pressure. Vasopressin also improved short- and long-term survival in various porcine models of uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. In the clinical setting, we observed positive effects of vasopressin in some patients with life-threatening hemorrhagic shock, which had no longer responded to adrenergic catecholamines and fluid resuscitation. Clinical employment of

  6. Evaluation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) techniques. The Cerebral Resuscitation Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bossaert, L; Van Hoeyweghen, R

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of different CPR techniques and the use of adjuncts during the resuscitation attempt by the members of the emergency medical service (EMS) system [bystander, emergency medical technician (EMT), ward nurse, tiered nurse or paramedic, mobile intensive care unit (MICU) has been registrated prospectively during a 5-year period by 7 major Belgian EMS systems. A total of 4548 cardiac arrests have been registered, 3083 happened outside and 1465 inside the hospital. Evaluation of the methods used for assessment of quality of the CPR techniques revealed that this approach was biased both by the status of the health care provider and by the outcome of the patient. Nevertheless, it was evident that the well-accepted standards and guidelines for CPR and emergency cardiac care (American Heart Association and Safar) are poorly applied. This seems to be influenced by the qualification, the experience and the training level of the health care provider. In 998 of 3053 studies out-of-hospital arrests (33%) CPR was initiated by bystanders. Of these, 59% were bystanding health care workers. They performed external chest compression (ECC) more frequently than mouth-to-mouth insufflation (MOMO) (poor technique: 16-19%). In 18% the rescuers were family members who applied more MOMO than ECC (poor technique: +/- 50%). Laymen (23%) performed more ECC than MOMO (poor technique: +/- 33%). EMT and ward nurses apply mainly the bag-valve-mask technique. The bag-valve-tube technique is more frequently used by nurses of a tiered system. The MICU-team applies usually the bag-valve-mask prior to intubation. PMID:2551024

  7. Midwives' Experiences, Education, and Support Needs Regarding Basic Newborn Resuscitation in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Kassab, Manal; Alnuaimi, Karimeh; Mohammad, Khitam; Creedy, Debra; Hamadneh, Shereen

    2016-06-01

    Newborns who are compromised at birth require rapid attention to stabilize their respiration attempts. Lack of knowledge regarding basic newborn resuscitation is a contributing factor to poor newborn health outcomes and increased mortality. The purpose of this study was to explore Jordanian midwives' experiences, education, and support needs to competently perform basic newborn resuscitation. Qualitative descriptive methodology was used to analyze a convenience sample of 20 midwives. A thematic approach was used to analyze the data. Participants discussed their experiences of basic newborn resuscitation including knowledge, skills, and barriers and suggested solutions to improve practice. Four themes were revealed: lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints, inadequate teamwork, and educational needs. The midwives perceived that their ability to perform newborn resuscitation was hindered by lack of knowledge and skills in newborn resuscitation, organizational constraints (such as lack of equipment), and poor co-ordination and communication among team members. PMID:26635311

  8. Successful roadside resuscitative thoracotomy: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wall, M J; Pepe, P E; Mattox, K L

    1994-01-01

    Patients with injuries severe enough to require cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) have a dismal prognosis. Time to surgical intervention is a major determinant of outcome in moribund trauma patients who have a potential for survival. With the exception of endotracheal intubation during evacuation to surgical intervention, no other usual prehospital procedures have been validated to affect outcome in such cases of extremis. This is a report of a case in which resuscitative surgical techniques were extended successfully to the prehospital environment. The patient was a 30-year-old man in extremis after a stab wound to the left chest. Estimating a transport time of 15 minutes, a physician riding with the emergency medical service (EMS) crews elected to perform a resuscitative thoracotomy. Following digital aortic compression, the patient regained both blood pressure and consciousness by the time of arrival at the trauma center. A left lower lobectomy was then performed in the operating room. The patient recovered fully and was discharged home in 21 days, neurologically intact. Four years later, the patient was alive, healthy, and working. This report demonstrates the feasibility of prehospital thoracotomy and raises provocative issues regarding future intense surgical involvement in prehospital care. PMID:8295241

  9. Resident procedure and resuscitation tracking using a palm computer

    PubMed

    Rosenthal; Wolford

    2000-10-01

    Resident procedure and resuscitation tracking is an onerous task required for residency accreditation and for future hospital privilege applications by the resident. To date, most tracking systems have been somewhat cumbersome and prone to data loss (forms not being filled out, recorded, etc.). Our residency program uses a palm computer database tracking system utilizing Palm III (3Com) hardware and a custom written data collection form utilizing an inexpensive, commercially available software package (Pendragon Forms (version 2), Pendragon Software Corporation, Libertyville, IL). Every resident receives a Palm III on entry into the residency. Residents enter basic demographic data and record procedures and resuscitations into the Palm III after each encounter. Generally, each patient logged requires approximately one minute for data entry. On a frequent basis, the resident's Palm is 'HotSync-ed' and the recorded data transferred to the program's central computer. Resident data are easily manipulated and reports are generated using a common, relational database program (Access97, Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA). We have found this system to be relatively inexpensive, to improve data capture, to reduce demands on secretarial time, and to allow improved tracking of resident procedure and resuscitation experiences. PMID:11015285

  10. [THEORETICAL BACKGROUND OF FINDING ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION AMONG NON-HEART BEATING DONORS UNDER UNSUCCESSFUL EXTRACORPOREAL RESUSCITATION (LITERATURE REVIEW)].

    PubMed

    Khodeli, N; Chkhaidze, Z; Partsakhashvili, D; Pilishvili, O; Kordzaia, D

    2016-05-01

    The number of patients who are in the "Transplant Waiting List" is increasing each year. At the same time, as a result of the significant shortage of donor organs, part of the patients dies without waiting till surgery. According to the Maastricht classification for non-heart beating donors, the patients, who had cardiac arrest outside the hospital (in the uncontrolled by medical staff conditions) should be considered as a potential donors of category II. For these patients, the most effective resuscitation is recommended. The extracorporeal life support (ECLS) considers the connection to a special artificial perfusion system for the restoration of blood circulation out-of-hospital with further transportation to the hospital. If restoration of independent cardiac activity does not occur, in spite of the full range of resuscitative measures, these patients may be regarded as potential donors. The final decision should be received in the hospital, by the council of physicians, lawyers and patient's family members. Until the final decision, the prolongation of ECLS and maintaining adequate systemic and organic circulation is recommended. PMID:27348175

  11. Influence of Rescuers' Gender and Body Mass Index on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation according to the American Heart Association 2010 Resuscitation Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Jaafar, Ahmad; Abdulwahab, Mohammad; Al-Hashemi, Eman

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an important factor in determining its overall outcome. This study aims to test the association between rescuers' gender, Body Mass Index (BMI), and the accuracy of chest compressions (CC) as well as ventilation, according to American Heart Association (AHA) 2010 resuscitation guidelines. Methods. The study included 72 participants of both genders. All the participants received CPR training according to AHA 2010 resuscitation guidelines. One week later, an assessment of their CPR was carried out. Moreover, the weight and height of the participants were measured in order to calculate their BMI. Results. Our analysis showed no significant association between gender and the CC depth (P = 0.53) as well as between gender and ventilation (P = 0.42). Females were significantly faster than males in CC (P = 0.000). Regarding BMI, participants with a BMI less than the mean BMI of the study sample tended to perform CC with the correct depth (P = 0.045) and to finish CC faster than those with a BMI more than the mean (P = 0.000). On the other hand, no significant association was found between BMI and ventilation (P = 0.187). Conclusion. CPR can be influenced by factors such as gender and BMI, as such the individual rescuer and CPR training programs should take these into account in order to maximize victims' outcome.

  12. Fluid imbalance

    MedlinePlus

    ... up in the body. This is called fluid overload (volume overload). This can lead to edema (excess fluid in ... Water imbalance; Fluid imbalance - dehydration; Fluid buildup; Fluid overload; Volume overload; Loss of fluids; Edema - fluid imbalance; ...

  13. Choice of Fluid Therapy in the Initial Management of Sepsis, Severe Sepsis, and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ronald; Holcomb, John B

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis results in disruption of the endothelial glycocalyx layer and damage to the microvasculature, resulting in interstitial accumulation of fluid and subsequently edema. Fluid resuscitation is a mainstay in the initial treatment of sepsis, but the choice of fluid is unclear. The ideal resuscitative fluid is one that restores intravascular volume while minimizing edema; unfortunately, edema and edema-related complications are common consequences of current resuscitation strategies. Crystalloids are recommended as first-line therapy, but the type of crystalloid is not specified. There is increasing evidence that normal saline is associated with increased mortality and kidney injury; balanced crystalloids may be a safer alternative. Albumin is similar to crystalloids in terms of outcomes in the septic population but is costlier. Hydroxyethyl starches appear to increase mortality and kidney injury in the critically ill and are no longer indicated in these patients. In the trauma population, the shift to plasma-based resuscitation with decreased use of crystalloid and colloid in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock has led to decreased inflammatory and edema-mediated complications. Studies are needed to determine if these benefits also occur with a similar resuscitation strategy in the setting of sepsis. PMID:26844975

  14. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  15. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  16. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  17. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  18. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  19. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  20. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  1. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  2. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  3. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  4. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  5. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  6. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  7. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  8. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  9. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  10. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  11. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  12. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  13. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  14. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  15. Aqueous cutting fluid for machining fissionable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, Walter K.; Googin, John M.; Napier, Jr., Bradley

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a cutting fluid for machining fissionable material. The cutting fluid is formed of glycol, water and boron compound in an adequate concentration for effective neutron attenuation so as to inhibit criticality incidents during machining.

  16. A National Perspective of Do-Not-Resuscitate Order Utilization Predictors in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achint A; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Benjo, Alexandre; Jani, Vishal B; Annapureddy, Narender; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Simoes, Priya K; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya; Sinha, Vikash; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Pathak, Ambarish; Nadkarni, Girish N

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders are linked to poorer outcomes in patients with ICH, possibly due to less active management. Demographic, regional, and social factors, not related to ICH severity, have not been adequately looked at as significant predictors of DNR utilization. We reviewed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database in 2011 for adult ICH admissions and DNR status. We generated hierarchical 2-level multivariate regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios. We analyzed 25 768 ICH hospitalizations, 18% of which (4620 hospitalizations) had DNR orders, corresponding to national estimates of 126 254 and 22 668, respectively. In multivariable regression, female gender, white or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, no insurance coverage, and teaching hospitals were significantly associated with increased DNR utilization after adjusting for confounders. There was also significantly more interhospital variability in the lowest quartile of hospital volume. In conclusion, demographic factors and insurance status are significantly associated with increased DNR utilization, with more individual hospital variability in low-volume hospitals. The reasons for this are likely qualitative and linked to patient, provider, and hospital practices. PMID:26753051

  17. A National Perspective of Do-Not-Resuscitate Order Utilization Predictors in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Achint A.; Benjo, Alexandre; Jani, Vishal B.; Annapureddy, Narender; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Simoes, Priya K.; Pakanati, Krishna Chaitanya; Sinha, Vikash; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Pathak, Ambarish; Nadkarni, Girish N.

    2016-01-01

    Nontraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders are linked to poorer outcomes in patients with ICH, possibly due to less active management. Demographic, regional, and social factors, not related to ICH severity, have not been adequately looked at as significant predictors of DNR utilization. We reviewed the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project’s Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database in 2011 for adult ICH admissions and DNR status. We generated hierarchical 2-level multivariate regression models to estimate adjusted odds ratios. We analyzed 25 768 ICH hospitalizations, 18% of which (4620 hospitalizations) had DNR orders, corresponding to national estimates of 126 254 and 22 668, respectively. In multivariable regression, female gender, white or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, no insurance coverage, and teaching hospitals were significantly associated with increased DNR utilization after adjusting for confounders. There was also significantly more interhospital variability in the lowest quartile of hospital volume. In conclusion, demographic factors and insurance status are significantly associated with increased DNR utilization, with more individual hospital variability in low-volume hospitals. The reasons for this are likely qualitative and linked to patient, provider, and hospital practices. PMID:26753051

  18. A patient and relative centred evaluation of treatment escalation plans: a replacement for the do-not-resuscitate process.

    PubMed

    Obolensky, L; Clark, T; Matthew, G; Mercer, M

    2010-09-01

    The Treatment Escalation Plan (TEP) was introduced into our trust in an attempt to improve patient involvement and experience of their treatment in hospital and to embrace and clarify a wider remit of treatment options than the Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) order currently offers. Our experience suggests that the patient and family are rarely engaged in DNR discussions. This is acutely relevant considering that the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) now obliges these discussions to take place. The TEP is a form that the doctor completes, ideally with the competent patient or close relative, documenting what treatment options would be appropriate if that patient were to become acutely unwell. Ventilation of the lungs, cardiac resuscitation, renal replacement therapy, intravenous fluids and antibiotics are all discussed. The study evaluated patient and relative experiences with the TEP. 55 patients or their relatives were interviewed regarding their experience of the TEP and thoughts regarding the process. 96% of patients and relatives evaluated thought that the TEP was a good idea. Free text comments were all positive and only 34% of patients claimed to feel anxious when completing the form. Following this study, the TEP has been expanded hospital wide and into the community within our trust. Discussions are currently taking place in hospitals within our region to introduce the TEP form into other local trusts. PMID:20817818

  19. The brain metabolic activity after resuscitation with liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin in a rat model of hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Rao, Geeta; Hedrick, Andria F; Yadav, Vivek R; Xie, Jun; Hussain, Alamdar; Awasthi, Vibhudutta

    2015-09-01

    We examined the effect of resuscitation with liposome-encapsulated hemoglobin (LEH) on cerebral bioenergetics in a rat model of 45% hypovolemia. The rats were resuscitated with isovolemic LEH or saline after 15 minutes of shock and followed up to 6 hours. Untreated hypovolemic rats received no fluid. The cerebral uptake of F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was measured by PET, and at 6 hours, the brain was collected for various assays. Hypovolemia decreased cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP), phosphocreatine, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)/NADH ratio, citrate synthase activity, glucose-6-phosphate, and nerve growth factor (NGF), even when FDG uptake remained unchanged. The FDG uptake was reduced by saline, but not by LEH infusion. The reduced FDG uptake in saline group was associated with a decrease in hexokinase I expression. The LEH infusion effectively restored ATP content, NAD/NADH ratio, and NGF expression, and reduced the hypovolemia-induced accumulation of pyruvate and ubiquitinated proteins; in comparison, saline was significantly less effective. The LEH infusion was associated with low pH and high anion gap, indicating anionic gap acidosis. The results suggest that hypovolemic shock perturbs glucose metabolism at the level of pyruvate utilization, resulting in deranged cerebral energy stores. The correction of volume and oxygen deficits by LEH recovers the cerebral metabolism and creates a prosurvival phenotype. PMID:25944591

  20. Amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Thongrong, Cattleya; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Hofmann, James P; Bergese, Sergio D; Papadimos, Thomas J; Gracias, Vicente H; Adolph, Michael D; Stawicki, Stanislaw P A

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an unpredictable and as-of-yet unpreventable complication of maternity. With its low incidence it is unlikely that any given practitioner will be confronted with a case of AFE. However, this rare occurrence carries a high probability of serious sequelae including cardiac arrest, ARDS, coagulopathy with massive hemorrhage, encephalopathy, seizures, and both maternal and infant mortality. In this review the current state of medical knowledge about AFE is outlined including its incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations. Special attention is paid to the modern aggressive supportive care that resulted in an overall reduction in the still alarmingly high mortality rate of this devastating entity. The key factors for successful management and resolution of this disease process continue to be sharp vigilance, a high level of clinical suspicion, and rapid all-out resuscitative efforts on the part of all clinicians involved in the medical care of the parturient. PMID:23724386

  1. Amniotic fluid embolism

    PubMed Central

    Thongrong, Cattleya; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Hofmann, James P.; Bergese, Sergio D.; Papadimos, Thomas J.; Gracias, Vicente H.; Adolph, Michael D.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is an unpredictable and as-of-yet unpreventable complication of maternity. With its low incidence it is unlikely that any given practitioner will be confronted with a case of AFE. However, this rare occurrence carries a high probability of serious sequelae including cardiac arrest, ARDS, coagulopathy with massive hemorrhage, encephalopathy, seizures, and both maternal and infant mortality. In this review the current state of medical knowledge about AFE is outlined including its incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, pathophysiology, and clinical manifestations. Special attention is paid to the modern aggressive supportive care that resulted in an overall reduction in the still alarmingly high mortality rate of this devastating entity. The key factors for successful management and resolution of this disease process continue to be sharp vigilance, a high level of clinical suspicion, and rapid all-out resuscitative efforts on the part of all clinicians involved in the medical care of the parturient. PMID:23724386

  2. New Low Volume Resuscitation Solutions Containing PEG-20k

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Dan; Plant, Valerie; Lindell, Susanne L.; Limkemann, Ashley; Reichstetter, Heather; Aboutanos, Michel; Mangino, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypovolemic shock reduces oxygen delivery and compromises energy dependent cell volume control. Consequent cell swelling compromises microcirculatory flow, which reducing oxygen exchange further. The importance of this mechanism is highlighted by the effectiveness of cell impermeants in low volume resuscitation (LVR) solutions in acute studies. The objective of this study was to assess impermeants in survival models and compare them to commonly used crystalloid solutions. Methods Adult rats were hemorrhaged to a pressure of 30–35 mm Hg, held there until the plasma lactate reached 10 mM, and given an LVR solution (5–10% blood volume) with saline alone (control), saline with various concentrations of Polyethylene glycol-20k (PEG-20k), hextend or albumin. When lactate again reached 10 mM following LVR, full resuscitation was started with crystalloid and red cells. Rats were either euthanized (acute) or allowed to recover (survival). The LVR time, which is the time from the start of the LVR solution until the start of full resuscitation was measured as was survival and diagnostic labs. In some studies, the capillary oncotic reflection coefficient was determined for PEG-20k to determine its relative impermeant and oncotic effects. Results PEG-20k (10%) significantly increased LVR times relative to saline (8 fold), hextend, and albumin. Lower amounts of PEG-20k (5%) were also effective but less so than 10% doses. PEG-20k maintained normal arterial pressure during the low volume state. Survival of a 180 minute LVR time challenge was 0% in saline controls and 100% in rats given PEG-20k as the LVR solution. Surviving rats had normal labs 24 hours later. PEG-20k had an oncotic reflection coefficient of 0.65, which indicates that the molecule is a hybrid cell impermeant with significant oncotic properties. Conclusions PEG-20k based LVR solutions are highly effective for inducing tolerance to the low volume state and for improving survival. PMID:26091310

  3. Glucosamine administration during resuscitation improves organ function after trauma hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaolong; Zou, Lu-Yun; Bounelis, Pam; Chaudry, Irshad; Chatham, John C; Marchase, Richard B

    2006-06-01

    Stress-induced hyperglycemia is necessary for maximal rates of survival after severe hemorrhage; however, the responsible mechanisms are not clear. One consequence of hyperglycemia is an increase in hexosamine biosynthesis, which leads to increases in levels of O-linked attachment of N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins. This modification has been shown to lead to improved survival of isolated cells after stress. In view of this, we hypothesized that glucosamine (GlcNH2), which more selectively increases the levels of O-GlcNAc administration after shock, will have salutary effects on organ function after trauma hemorrhage (TH). Fasted male rats that underwent midline laparotomy were bled to a mean arterial blood pressure of 40 mmHg for 90 min and then resuscitated with Ringer lactate (four times the shed blood volume). Administration of 2.5 mL of 150 mmol L GlcNH2 midway during resuscitation improved cardiac output 2-fold compared with controls that received 2.5 mL of 150 mmol L NaCl. GlcNH2 also improved perfusion of various organs systems, including kidney and brain, and attenuated the TH-induced increase in serum levels of IL-6 (902+/-224 vs. 585+/-103 pg mL) and TNF-alpha (540+/-81 vs. 345+/-110 pg mL) (values are mean+/-SD). GlcNH2 administration resulted in significant increase in protein-associated O-GlcNAc in the heart and brain after TH. Thus, GlcNH2 administered during resuscitation improves recovery from TH, as assessed by cardiac function, organ perfusion, and levels of circulating inflammatory cytokines. This protection correlates with enhanced levels of nucleocytoplasmic protein O-GlcNAcylation and suggests that increased O-GlcNAc could be the mechanism that links stress-induced hyperglycemia to improved outcomes. PMID:16721268

  4. Prehospital Blood Product Resuscitation for Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Iain M.; James, Robert H.; Dretzke, Janine; Midwinter, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Administration of high ratios of plasma to packed red blood cells is a routine practice for in-hospital trauma resuscitation. Military and civilian emergency teams are increasingly carrying prehospital blood products (PHBP) for trauma resuscitation. This study systematically reviewed the clinical literature to determine the extent to which the available evidence supports this practice. Methods: Bibliographic databases and other sources were searched to July 2015 using keywords and index terms related to the intervention, setting, and condition. Standard systematic review methodology aimed at minimizing bias was used for study selection, data extraction, and quality assessment (protocol registration PROSPERO: CRD42014013794). Synthesis was mainly narrative with random effects model meta-analysis limited to mortality outcomes. Results: No prospective comparative or randomized studies were identified. Sixteen case series and 11 comparative studies were included in the review. Seven studies included mixed populations of trauma and non-trauma patients. Twenty-five of 27 studies provided only very low quality evidence. No association between PHBP and survival was found (OR for mortality: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84–1.96, P = 0.24). A single study showed improved survival in the first 24 h. No consistent physiological or biochemical benefit was identified, nor was there evidence of reduced in-hospital transfusion requirements. Transfusion reactions were rare, suggesting the short-term safety of PHBP administration. Conclusions: While PHBP resuscitation appears logical, the clinical literature is limited, provides only poor quality evidence, and does not demonstrate improved outcomes. No conclusions as to efficacy can be drawn. The results of randomized controlled trials are awaited. PMID:26825635

  5. Does Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Cause Rib Fractures in Children? A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Sabine; Mann, Mala; John, Nia; Ellaway, Bev; Sibert, Jo R.; Kemp, Alison M.

    2006-01-01

    Background: There is a diagnostic dilemma when a child presents with rib fractures after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) where child abuse is suspected as the cause of collapse. We have performed a systematic review to establish the evidence base for the following questions: (i) Does cardiopulmonary resuscitation cause rib fractures in…

  6. Regional blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Luce, J M; Rizk, N A; Niskanen, R A

    1984-10-01

    We studied regional blood flow (QR) using radiolabeled microspheres in 12 anesthetized dogs during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A circumferential vest and abdominal binder were used with a mechanical ventilator to deliver 30 simultaneous chest compressions and ventilations per minute. When this device was modified to increase aortic pressure (Pao) during compression and the aortic-to-right atrial pressure gradient (Pao-Pra) during relaxation, cerebral and myocardial QR increased significantly. These findings suggest that QR during CPR can be improved by augmenting perfusion-pressure gradients across the cerebral and coronary circulations. PMID:6488828

  7. A method of automatic control procedures cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureev, A. Sh.; Zhdanov, D. S.; Kiseleva, E. Yu.; Kutsov, M. S.; Trifonov, A. Yu.

    2015-11-01

    The study is to present the results of works on creation of methods of automatic control procedures of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). A method of automatic control procedure of CPR by evaluating the acoustic data of the dynamics of blood flow in the bifurcation of carotid arteries and the dynamics of air flow in a trachea according to the current guidelines for CPR is presented. Evaluation of the patient is carried out by analyzing the respiratory noise and blood flow in the interspaces between the chest compressions and artificial pulmonary ventilation. The device operation algorithm of automatic control procedures of CPR and its block diagram has been developed.

  8. [Do not resuscitate orders in the intensive care setting].

    PubMed

    Kleiren, P; Sohawon, S; Noordally, S O

    2010-01-01

    Even if Belgium (2002), The Netherlands (2002) and Luxemburg (2009) are the first three countries in the world to have legalized active euthanasia, there still is not a law on the do not resuscitate concept (NTBR or DNR). Nevertheless, numerous royal decrees and some consensus as well as advice given by the Belgian Medical Council, hold as jurisprudence. These rules remain amenable to change so as to suite the daily practice in intensive care units. This article describes the actual Belgian legal environment surrounding the intensive care specialist when he has to take such decisions. PMID:20687449

  9. Dr. William Thornton's views on sleep, dreams, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Paulson, George

    2009-01-01

    William Thornton, MD, was a polymath who designed the Capitol of the U.S. Capital and the Octagon House, present home of the American Institute of Architecture. He was the founding director of the U.S. Patent Office. His collected papers, which are now preserved at the U.S. Library of Congress, though pruned by the wife who lived almost 40 years after him, are extensive and include comments on science, education, slavery, and politics. His views on sleep and dreaming and his concepts of resuscitation are reviewed as the opinions of an educated man early in the nineteenth century. PMID:19160112

  10. Feedback on the Rate and Depth of Chest Compressions during Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Using Only Accelerometers

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Gauna, Sofía; González-Otero, Digna M.; Ruiz, Jesus; Russell, James K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is key to increase survival from cardiac arrest. Providing chest compressions with adequate rate and depth is difficult even for well-trained rescuers. The use of real-time feedback devices is intended to contribute to enhance chest compression quality. These devices are typically based on the double integration of the acceleration to obtain the chest displacement during compressions. The integration process is inherently unstable and leads to important errors unless boundary conditions are applied for each compression cycle. Commercial solutions use additional reference signals to establish these conditions, requiring additional sensors. Our aim was to study the accuracy of three methods based solely on the acceleration signal to provide feedback on the compression rate and depth. Materials and Methods We simulated a CPR scenario with several volunteers grouped in couples providing chest compressions on a resuscitation manikin. Different target rates (80, 100, 120, and 140 compressions per minute) and a target depth of at least 50 mm were indicated. The manikin was equipped with a displacement sensor. The accelerometer was placed between the rescuer’s hands and the manikin’s chest. We designed three alternatives to direct integration based on different principles (linear filtering, analysis of velocity, and spectral analysis of acceleration). We evaluated their accuracy by comparing the estimated depth and rate with the values obtained from the reference displacement sensor. Results The median (IQR) percent error was 5.9% (2.8–10.3), 6.3% (2.9–11.3), and 2.5% (1.2–4.4) for depth and 1.7% (0.0–2.3), 0.0% (0.0–2.0), and 0.9% (0.4–1.6) for rate, respectively. Depth accuracy depended on the target rate (p < 0.001) and on the rescuer couple (p < 0.001) within each method. Conclusions Accurate feedback on chest compression depth and rate during CPR is possible using exclusively the chest

  11. Selected concepts and controversies in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, A

    1988-10-01

    Although more than 80 years of research in cardiac resuscitation produced many important findings and greatly enhanced our understanding of the arrest state, outcome following pediatric cardiac arrest remains poor. Resuscitation guidelines have recently been published, but they may not reflect optimal therapy. Closed-chest compression-induced cardiac output may be higher in pediatric patients, particularly infants, than that previously reported in adults. To achieve higher cardiac outputs, direct cardiac compression is important; the recommended compression location has therefore been changed based on recent data. The optimal rate of compression, however, is uncertain, so further research is needed. Alternative vascular access sites, such as the endotracheal and intraosseous route for drug administration may permit more rapid drug delivery, but data suggest that a larger epinephrine dose than currently recommended should be used. It may also be helpful to dilute the drug in normal saline before endotracheal administration. Although experimental data suggest that a pure alpha-adrenergic agonist may be beneficial in a cardiac arrest, recent data show that epinephrine remains the drug of choice. Finally, the role of sodium bicarbonate in both the arrest and postarrest setting has become controversial. Recent data suggest that bicarbonate may be detrimental and that therapy of acidosis is best directed at improving perfusion, oxygenation, and ventilation. Alternative forms of therapy for acidosis, such as THAM and dichloroacetate may prove beneficial in the postarrest setting. PMID:3052707

  12. Use of the impedance threshold device in cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Demestiha, Theano D; Pantazopoulos, Ioannis N; Xanthos, Theodoros T

    2010-01-01

    Although approximately one million sudden cardiac deaths occur yearly in the US and Europe, cardiac arrest (CA) remains a clinical condition still characterized by a poor prognosis. In an effort to improve the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) technique, the 2005 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for CPR gave the impedance threshold device (ITD) a Class IIa recommendation. The AHA recommendation means that there is strong evidence to demonstrate that ITD enhances circulation, improves hemodynamics and increases the likelihood of resuscitation in patients in CA. During standard CPR, venous blood return to the heart relies on the natural elastic recoil of the chest which creates a transient decrease in intrathoracic pressure. The ITD further decreases intrathoracic pressure by preventing respiratory gases from entering the lungs during the decompression phase of CPR. Thus, although ITD is placed into the respiratory circuit it works as a circulatory enhancer device that provides its therapeutic benefit with each chest decompression. The ease of use of this device, its ability to be incorporated into a mask and other airway devices, the absence of device-related adverse effects and few requirements in additional training, suggest that ITD may be a favorable new device for improving CPR efficiency. Since the literature is short of studies with clinically meaningful outcomes such as neurological outcome and long term survival, further evidence is still needed. PMID:21160680

  13. In-hospital resuscitation: opioids and other factors influencing survival

    PubMed Central

    Fecho, Karamarie; Jackson, Freeman; Smith, Frances; Overdyk, Frank J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: “Code Blue” is a standard term used to alertt hospital staff that a patient requires resuscitation. This study determined rates of survival from Code Blue events and the role of opioids and other factors on survival. Methods: Data derived from medical records and the Code Blue and Pharmacy databases were analyzed for factors affecting survival. Results: During 2006, rates of survival from the code only and to discharge were 25.9% and 26.4%, respectively, for Code Blue events involving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR; N = 216). Survival rates for events not ultimately requiring CPR (N = 77) were higher, with 32.5% surviving the code only and 62.3% surviving to discharge. For CPR events, rates of survival to discharge correlated inversely with time to chest compressions and defibrillation, precipitating event, need for airway management, location and age. Time of week, witnessing, postoperative status, gender and opioid use did not influence survival rates. For non-CPR events, opioid use was associated with decreased survival. Survival rates were lowest for patients receiving continuous infusions (P < 0.01) or iv boluses of opioids (P < 0.05). Conclusions: One-quarter of patients survive to discharge after a CPR Code Blue event and two-thirds survive to discharge after a non-CPR event. Opioids may influence survival from non-CPR events. PMID:20057895

  14. Age-related changes in chest geometry during cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Dean, J M; Koehler, R C; Schleien, C L; Michael, J R; Chantarojanasiri, T; Rogers, M C; Traystman, R J

    1987-06-01

    We studied alterations of chest geometry during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in anesthetized immature swine. Pulsatile force was applied to the sternum in increments to determine the effects of increasing compression on chest geometry and intrathoracic vascular pressures. In 2-wk- and 1-mo-old piglets, permanent changes in chest shape developed due to incomplete recoil of the chest along the anteroposterior axis, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were generated. In 3-mo-old animals, permanent chest deformity did not develop, and large intrathoracic vascular pressures were not produced. We propose a theoretical model of the chest as an elliptic cylinder. Pulsatile displacement along the minor axis of an ellipse produces a greater decrease in cross-sectional area than displacement of a circular cross section. As thoracic cross section became less circular due to deformity, greater changes in thoracic volume, and hence pressure, were produced. With extreme deformity at high force, pulsatile displacement became limited, diminishing pressure generation. We conclude that changes in chest geometry are important in producing intrathoracic intravascular pressure during conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in piglets. PMID:3610916

  15. Do-not-resuscitate order: a view throughout the world.

    PubMed

    Santonocito, Cristina; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Gullo, Antonino; Weil, Max Harry

    2013-02-01

    Resuscitation has the ability to reverse premature death. It can also prolong terminal illness, increase discomfort, and consume resources. The do-not-resuscitate (DNR) order and advance directives are still a debated issue in critical care. This review will focus on several aspects, regarding withholding and/or withdrawing therapies and advance directives in different continents. It is widely known that there is a great diversity of cultural and religious beliefs in society, and therefore, some critical ethical and legal issues have still to be solved. To achieve a consensus, we believe in the priority of continuing education and training programs for health care professionals. It is our opinion that a serious reflection on ethical values and principles would be useful to understand the definition of medical professionalism to make it possible to undertake the best way to avoid futile and aggressive care. There is evidence of the lack of DNR order policy worldwide. Therefore, it appears clear that there is a need for standardization. To improve the attitude about the DNR order, it is necessary to achieve several goals such as: increased communication, consensus on law, increased trust among patients and health care systems, and improved standards and quality of care to respect the patient's will and the family's role. PMID:22981534

  16. Families’ Stressors and Needs at Time of Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation: A Jordanian Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Masa’Deh, Rami; Saifan, Ahmad; Timmons, Stephen; Nairn, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Background: During cardio-pulmonary resuscitation, family members, in some hospitals, are usually pushed to stay out of the resuscitation room. However, growing literature implies that family presence during resuscitation could be beneficial. Previous literature shows controversial belief whether or not a family member should be present during resuscitation of their relative. Some worldwide association such as the American Heart Association supports family-witnessed resuscitation and urge hospitals to develop policies to ease this process. The opinions on family-witnessed resuscitation vary widely among various cultures, and some hospitals are not applying such polices yet. This study explores family members’ needs during resuscitation in adult critical care settings. Methods: This is a part of larger study. The study was conducted in six hospitals in two major Jordanian cities. A purposive sample of seven family members, who had experience of having a resuscitated relative, was recruited over a period of six months. Semi-structured interview was utilised as the main data collection method in the study. Findings: The study findings revealed three main categories: families’ need for reassurance; families’ need for proximity; and families’ need for support. The need for information about patient’s condition was the most important need. Updating family members about patient’s condition would reduce their tension and improve their acceptance for the end result of resuscitation. All interviewed family members wanted the option to stay beside their loved one at end stage of their life. Distinctively, most of family members want this option for some religious and cultural reasons such as praying and supplicating to support their loved one. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the importance of considering the cultural and religious dimensions in any family-witnessed resuscitation programs. The study recommends that family members of resuscitated patients should

  17. Severe dehydration and acute renal failure associated with external ventricular drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in children.

    PubMed

    Simpson, S; Yung, M; Slater, A

    2006-10-01

    We report three paediatric cases of severe dehydration and hyponatraemia with circulatory compromise associated with the use of external ventricular drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. Two of the children had cardiac arrests. All were successfully resuscitated. While there were additional factors that contributed to other fluid losses, and fluid balance data are incomplete, these cases highlight a need for increased vigilance when managing children with external ventricular drains. PMID:17061645

  18. Neonatal resuscitation in low-resource settings: What, who, and how to overcome challenges to scale up?

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Stephen N.; Lee, Anne CC; Niermeyer, Susan; English, Mike; Keenan, William J.; Carlo, Wally; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Bang, Abhay; Narayanan, Indira; Ariawan, Iwan; Lawn, Joy E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Each year approximately 10 million babies do not breathe immediately at birth, of which about 6 million require basic neonatal resuscitation. The major burden is in low-income settings, where health system capacity to provide neonatal resuscitation is inadequate. Objective To systematically review the evidence for neonatal resuscitation content, training and competency, equipment and supplies, cost, and key program considerations, specifically for resource-constrained settings. Results Evidence from several observational studies shows that facility-based basic neonatal resuscitation may avert 30% of intrapartum-related neonatal deaths. Very few babies require advanced resuscitation (endotracheal intubation and drugs) and these newborns may not survive without ongoing ventilation; hence, advanced neonatal resuscitation is not a priority in settings without neonatal intensive care. Of the 60 million nonfacility births, most do not have access to resuscitation. Several trials have shown that a range of community health workers can perform neonatal resuscitation with an estimated effect of a 20% reduction in intrapartum-related neonatal deaths, based on expert opinion. Case studies illustrate key considerations for scale up. Conclusion Basic resuscitation would substantially reduce intrapartum-related neonatal deaths. Where births occur in facilities, it is a priority to ensure that all birth attendants are competent in resuscitation. Strategies to address the gap for home births are urgently required. More data are required to determine the impact of neonatal resuscitation, particularly on long-term outcomes in low-income settings. PMID:19815203

  19. Observational Skill-based Clinical Assessment tool for Resuscitation (OSCAR): Development and validation☆

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S.; Brett, S.; McKay, A.; Lambden, S.; Vincent, C.; Sevdalis, N.

    2011-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study reported here was to address the need to assess and train teamwork and non-technical skills in the context of Resuscitation. Specifically, we sought to develop a tool that is feasible to use and psychometrically sound to assess team behaviours during cardiac arrest resuscitation attempts. Methods To ensure validity, reliability, and feasibility, the Observational Skill based Clinical Assessment tool for Resuscitation (OSCAR) was developed in 3 phases. A review of the literature leading to initial tool development was followed by an assessment of face and content validity, and finally a thorough reliability assessment, using Cronbach's α to assess internal consistency and intraclass correlation to assess inter-rater reliability. Results OSCAR was developed methodically, and tested for face and content validity. Cronbach's α results ranged from 0.736 to 0.965 demonstrating high internal consistency, and intraclass correlation results ranged from 0.652 to 0.911, all of which are strongly significant and indicate good inter-rater reliability. Conclusion On the basis of our results, we conclude that OSCAR is psychometrically robust, scientifically sound, and clinically relevant. We have developed the Observational Skill-based Clinical Assessment tool for Resuscitation (OSCAR) for the assessment of non-technical skills in Resuscitation teams. We propose the use of this tool in simulation and real Cardiac Arrest Resuscitation attempts to assess, guide and train non-technical skills to team members, to improve patient safety and maximise the chances of successful resuscitation. PMID:21481519

  20. Recommendations for resuscitation after ascent to high altitude and in aircrafts.

    PubMed

    Chalkias, Athanasios; Georgiou, Marios; Böttiger, Bernd; Monsieurs, Koenraad G; Svavarsdóttir, Hildigunnur; Raffay, Violetta; Iacovidou, Nicoletta; Xanthos, Theodoros

    2013-09-01

    Human exposure to high altitude is increasing, through inhabitation of areas of high altitude, expansion of tourism into more remote areas, and air travel exposing passengers to typical altitudes equivalent to 8005 ft (2440 m). With ascent to high altitude, a number of acute and chronic physiological changes occur, influencing all systems of the human body. When considering that cardiac arrest is the second most common cause of death in the mountains and that up to 60% of the elderly have significant heart disease or other health problems, these changes are of particular importance as they may have a significant impact on resuscitation efforts. Current guidelines for resuscitation lack specific recommendations regarding treatment of cardiac arrest after ascent to high altitude or in aircraft. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive search in PubMed, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, and Scopus databases for studies relevant to resuscitation at high altitude. As no randomized trials evaluating the effects of physiological changes after ascent to high altitude on cardiopulmonary resuscitation were identified, our search was expanded to include all studies addressing important aspects on high altitude physiology which could have a potential impact on the resuscitation of cardiac arrest victims. The aim of this review is to discuss the major physiological changes occurring after ascent to high altitude and their potential effects on cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Based on the available data, specific suggestions are proposed regarding resuscitation at high altitude. PMID:23219316

  1. Neonatal resuscitation 2: an evaluation of manual ventilation devices and face masks

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, C; Davis, P; Lau, R; Dargaville, P; Doyle, L; Morley, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: The key to successful neonatal resuscitation is effective ventilation. Little evidence exists to guide clinicians in their choice of manual ventilation device or face mask. The expiratory tidal volume measured at the mask (VTE(mask)) is a good estimate of the tidal volume delivered during simulated neonatal resuscitation. Aim: To compare the efficacy of (a) the Laerdal infant resuscitator and the Neopuff infant resuscitator, used with (b) round and anatomically shaped masks in a model of neonatal resuscitation. Methods: Thirty four participants gave positive pressure ventilation to a mannequin at specified pressures with each of the four device-mask combinations. Flow, inspiratory tidal volume at the face mask (VTI(mask)), VTE(mask), and airway pressure were recorded. Leakage from the mask was calculated from VTI(mask) and VTE(mask). Results: A total of 10 780 inflations were recorded and analysed. Peak inspiratory pressure targets were achieved equally with the Laerdal and Neopuff resuscitators. Positive end expiratory pressure was delivered with the Neopuff but not the Laerdal device. Despite similar peak pressures, VTE(mask) varied widely. Mask leakage was large for each combination of device and mask. There were no differences between the masks. Conclusion: During face mask ventilation of a neonatal resuscitation mannequin, there are large leaks around the face mask. Airway pressure is a poor proxy for volume delivered during positive pressure ventilation through a mask. PMID:15871989

  2. A Rat Model of Ventricular Fibrillation and Resuscitation by Conventional Closed-chest Technique.

    PubMed

    Lamoureux, Lorissa; Radhakrishnan, Jeejabai; Gazmuri, Raúl J

    2015-01-01

    A rat model of electrically-induced ventricular fibrillation followed by cardiac resuscitation using a closed chest technique that incorporates the basic components of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in humans is herein described. The model was developed in 1988 and has been used in approximately 70 peer-reviewed publications examining a myriad of resuscitation aspects including its physiology and pathophysiology, determinants of resuscitability, pharmacologic interventions, and even the effects of cell therapies. The model featured in this presentation includes: (1) vascular catheterization to measure aortic and right atrial pressures, to measure cardiac output by thermodilution, and to electrically induce ventricular fibrillation; and (2) tracheal intubation for positive pressure ventilation with oxygen enriched gas and assessment of the end-tidal CO2. A typical sequence of intervention entails: (1) electrical induction of ventricular fibrillation, (2) chest compression using a mechanical piston device concomitantly with positive pressure ventilation delivering oxygen-enriched gas, (3) electrical shocks to terminate ventricular fibrillation and reestablish cardiac activity, (4) assessment of post-resuscitation hemodynamic and metabolic function, and (5) assessment of survival and recovery of organ function. A robust inventory of measurements is available that includes - but is not limited to - hemodynamic, metabolic, and tissue measurements. The model has been highly effective in developing new resuscitation concepts and examining novel therapeutic interventions before their testing in larger and translationally more relevant animal models of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. PMID:25938619

  3. Resuscitation and quantification of stressed Escherichia coli K12 NCTC8797 in water samples.

    PubMed

    Ozkanca, R; Saribiyik, F; Isik, K; Sahin, N; Kariptas, E; Flint, K P

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact on numbers of using different media for the enumeration of Escherichia coli subjected to stress, and to evaluate the use of different resuscitation methods on bacterial numbers. E. coli was subjected to heat stress by exposure to 55 degrees C for 1h or to light-induced oxidative stress by exposure to artificial light for up to 8h in the presence of methylene blue. In both cases, the bacterial counts on selective media were below the limits of detection whereas on non-selective media colonies were still produced. After resuscitation in non-selective media, using a multi-well MPN resuscitation method or resuscitation on membrane filters, the bacterial counts on selective media matched those on non-selective media. Heat and light stress can affect the ability of E. coli to grow on selective media essential for the enumeration as indicator bacteria. A resuscitation method is essential for the recovery of these stressed bacteria in order to avoid underestimation of indicator bacteria numbers in water. There was no difference in resuscitation efficiency using the membrane filter and multi-well MPN methods. This study emphasises the need to use a resuscitation method if the numbers of indicator bacteria in water samples are not to be underestimated. False-negative results in the analysis of drinking water or natural bathing waters could have profound health effects. PMID:17418553

  4. Withholding or termination of resuscitation in pediatric out-of-hospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Fallat, Mary E

    2014-04-01

    This multiorganizational literature review was undertaken to provide an evidence base for determining whether or not recommendations for out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation could be made for children who are victims of traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. Although there is increasing acceptance of out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation for adult traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest when there is no expectation of a good outcome, children are routinely excluded from state termination-of-resuscitation protocols. The decision to withhold resuscitative efforts in a child under specific circumstances (decapitation or dependent lividity, rigor mortis, etc) is reasonable. If there is any doubt as to the circumstances or timing of the traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest, under the current status of limiting termination of resuscitation in the field to persons older than 18 years in most states, resuscitation should be initiated and continued until arrival to the appropriate facility. If the patient has arrested, resuscitation has already exceeded 30 minutes, and the nearest facility is more than 30 minutes away, involvement of parents and family of these children in the decision-making process with assistance and guidance from medical professionals should be considered as part of an emphasis on family-centered care, because the evidence suggests that either death or a poor outcome is inevitable. PMID:24655460

  5. Withholding or termination of resuscitation in pediatric out-of-hospital traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest.

    PubMed

    Fallat, Mary E

    2014-04-01

    This multiorganizational literature review was undertaken to provide an evidence base for determining whether recommendations for out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation could be made for children who are victims of traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest. Although there is increasing acceptance of out-of-hospital termination of resuscitation for adult traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest when there is no expectation of a good outcome, children are routinely excluded from state termination-of-resuscitation protocols. The decision to withhold resuscitative efforts in a child under specific circumstances (decapitation or dependent lividity, rigor mortis, etc) is reasonable. If there is any doubt as to the circumstances or timing of the traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest, under the current status of limiting termination of resuscitation in the field to persons older than 18 years in most states, resuscitation should be initiated and continued until arrival to the appropriate facility. If the patient has arrested, resuscitation has already exceeded 30 minutes, and the nearest facility is more than 30 minutes away, involvement of parents and family of these children in the decision-making process with assistance and guidance from medical professionals should be considered as part of an emphasis on family-centered care because the evidence suggests that either death or a poor outcome is inevitable. PMID:24685948

  6. Resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock with HBOC-201 in the setting of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Kerby, Jeffrey D; Sainz, Jorge G; Zhang, Fangyi; Hutchings, Anne; Sprague, Shane; Farrokhi, Farrokh R; Son, Minnette

    2007-06-01

    Outcomes after mild or moderate head trauma are worsened with associated hypotension, and secondary brain injury can be reduced with timely resuscitation. This study was performed to investigate HBOC-201 as a resuscitation therapy in a combined hemorrhagic shock and brain injury model. Anesthetized rats sustained moderate brain injury using a controlled cortical impact device, followed by rapid hemorrhage to a mean arterial pressure of 30 mmHg. After 30 min of hypotension, animals were resuscitated with HBOC-201, autologous shed blood (SB), or lactated Ringer solution (LR). Brain injury was assessed by measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral vasoreactivity to hypercapnia (CVH) using a laser Doppler flowmeter. Contusion volume was evaluated histologically, and cerebral edema was determined by total water content. The HBOC rats required significantly less resuscitation volume versus LR and SB. The CBF was significantly diminished at 60 min after resuscitation with HBOC (70.1% +/- 3.8% baseline) compared with LR (105.8% +/- 10.1% baseline; P < 0.01) and SB (96.8% +/- 5% baseline; P < 0.05). The CVH was preserved in the HBOC and SB groups. The CVH was significantly diminished compared with baseline in the LR group at 30 min after resuscitation and showed a significant loss compared with HBOC at 60 min after resuscitation. The contusion volume for HBOC (45.1 mm3) and SB (35.1 mm3) was less than LR (63.5 mm3, P < 0.01). Although CBF was diminished after resuscitation in the HBOC group, HBOC-treated animals maintained CVH and experienced significantly smaller contusion volume than those treated with LR. These results suggest that resuscitation with HBOC-201 protects autoregulatory mechanisms and may reduce secondary brain injury in traumatic brain injury. PMID:17505305

  7. Endpoints of Resuscitation of Critically Injured Patients: Normal or Supranormal?

    PubMed Central

    Velmahos, George C.; Demetriades, Demetrios; Shoemaker, William C.; Chan, Linda S.; Tatevossian, Raymond; Wo, Charles C. J.; Vassiliu, Pantelis; Cornwell, Edward E.; Murray, James A.; Roth, Bradley; Belzberg, Howard; Asensio, Juan A.; Berne, Thomas V.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of early optimization in the survival of severely injured patients. Summary Background Data It is unclear whether supranormal (“optimal”) hemodynamic values should serve as endpoints of resuscitation or simply as markers of the physiologic reserve of critically injured patients. The failure of optimization to produce improved survival in some randomized controlled trials may be associated with delays in starting the attempt to reach optimal goals. There are limited controlled data on trauma patients. Methods Seventy-five consecutive severely injured patients with shock resulting from bleeding and without major intracranial or spinal cord trauma were randomized to resuscitation, starting immediately after admission, to either normal values of systolic blood pressure, urine output, base deficit, hemoglobin, and cardiac index (control group, 35 patients) or optimal values (cardiac index >4.5 L/min/m2, ratio of transcutaneous oxygen tension to fractional inspired oxygen >200, oxygen delivery index >600 mL/min/m2, and oxygen consumption index >170 mL/min/m2; optimal group, 40 patients). Initial cardiac output monitoring was done noninvasively by bioimpedance and, subsequently, invasively by thermodilution. Crystalloids, colloids, blood, inotropes, and vasopressors were used by predetermined algorithms. Results Optimal values were reached intentionally by 70% of the optimal patients and spontaneously by 40% of the control patients. There was no difference in rates of death (15% optimal vs. 11% control), organ failure, sepsis, or the length of intensive care unit or hospital stay between the two groups. Patients from both groups who achieved optimal values had better outcomes than patients who did not. The death rate was 0% among patients who achieved optimal values compared with 30% among patients who did not. Age younger than 40 years was the only independent predictive factor of the ability to reach optimal values. Conclusions

  8. Foregoing prehospital care: should ambulance staff always resuscitate?

    PubMed Central

    Iserson, K V

    1991-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 people die outside US hospitals or chronic care facilities each year. While there has been some recent movement towards initiating procedures for prehospital Do Not Resuscitate (DNR) orders, the most common situation in the US is that emergency medical systems (EMS) personnel are not authorized to pronounce patients dead, but are required to attempt resuscitation with all of the modalities at their disposal in virtually all patients. It is unfair and probably unrealistic for EMS personnel to have to make a determination of the validity of a non-standard prehospital DNR order (for example, a living will or a durable power of attorney for health care). Existing prehospital DNR protocols range from being very restrictive in the scope of patients allowed to participate and in their implementation, to those that are more liberal. Potential benefits of prehospital DNR orders include freeing up vital personnel and material for use by those who would more fully benefit, and alleviating the enormous emotional strain on patients, families, EMS personnel, and hospital medical staffs involved in unwanted resuscitations that only prolong the dying process. Given this, prehospital DNR orders present several legal and moral problems. These include proper patient identification, the nature of the document itself, precautions incorporated into a DNR system to prevent misuse, potential liability for EMS and hospital personnel, and potential errors in implementation. Functioning prehospital DNR systems need to include: 1) specific legislation detailing the circumstances in which such a document could be used, the wording of such a document, and protection from liability for those implementing the document's directives; 2) having the currently valid document immediately available to the EMS personnel or base station doctors; and 3) acceptable means of identifying the patient. Relatively few US jurisdictions as yet have a prehospital DNR order system, although it

  9. Role of emergency thoracotomy in the resuscitation of moribund trauma victims: 100 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Harnar, T J; Oreskovich, M R; Copass, M K; Heimbach, D M; Herman, C M; Carrico, C J

    1981-07-01

    (1) Emergency thoracotomy can be a lifesaving procedure in critically injured patients who present with no detectable pulse or blood pressure. (2) Emergency thoracotomy is nonproductive if cardiac electrical activity is absent. (3) Best results are achieved in patients with chest injuries and the worst results in those with isolated blunt abdominal injury. (4) Survival was better if patient was taken directly to the operating room with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation. (5) Prehospital airway control, volume resuscitation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation play a significant role in improving the outcome in traumatized patients who undergo emergency thoracotomy. PMID:7258520

  10. Guidelines for paediatric life support. Paediatric Life Support Working Party of the European Resuscitation Council.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The paediatric life support working party of the European Resuscitation Council was set up in 1992 with the aim of producing guidelines for basic and advanced paediatric resuscitation that would be acceptable throughout Europe. The commonest cause of cardiac arrest in children is problems with the airway. The resulting difficulties in breathing and the associated hypoxia rapidly cause a severe bradycardia or asystole. In contrast, adults have primary cardiac events resulting in ventricular fibrillation. This important difference in the pathogenesis of paediatric and adult cardiac arrest is reflected in these European Resuscitation Council guidelines, which complement those already published for adults. PMID:8019227

  11. Vascular access in resuscitation: is there a role for the intraosseous route?

    PubMed

    Anson, Jonathan A

    2014-04-01

    Intraosseous vascular access is a time-tested procedure which has been incorporated into the 2010 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Intravenous access is often difficult to achieve in shock patients, and central line placement can be time consuming. Intraosseous vascular access, however, can be achieved quickly with minimal disruption of chest compressions. Newer insertion devices are easy to use, making the intraosseous route an attractive alternative for venous access during a resuscitation event. It is critical that anesthesiologists, who are often at the forefront of patient resuscitation, understand how to properly use this potentially life-saving procedure. PMID:24481418

  12. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    PubMed

    Zobel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for dicot plant root systems. PMID:26904040

  13. Resuscitation great. Willem Einthoven: the development of the human electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Cajavilca, Christian; Varon, Joseph

    2008-03-01

    The electrocardiogram is one of the most commonly used diagnostic tools in healthcare. This ingenious device was developed and created in the early 1900s by Willem Einthoven, MD, PhD after studying the mechanisms of electromagnetism and Waller's capillary electrometer. Einthoven dedicated most of his research and clinical activities to improve the early versions of the electrical current recording medical devices. Einthoven's most notable invention was the string galvanometer which we now know as the electrocardiogram. Although the idea of using the string galvanometer as a diagnostic tool faced opposition by scientists and physicians of his time, he remained convinced of the potential of his machine to improve patient care. Einthoven's string galvanometer subsequently became the standard diagnostic tool for recognition and differentiation of heart conditions through the interpretation of cardiac waves, and has become standard practice in the field of resuscitation. In 1924, Einthoven received the Nobel Prize in Medicine for his development of the string galvanometer. PMID:18164799

  14. Pelvic fractures: part 1. Evaluation, classification, and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Langford, Joshua R; Burgess, Andrew R; Liporace, Frank A; Haidukewych, George J

    2013-08-01

    Pelvic fractures range in severity from low-energy, generally benign lateral compression injuries to life-threatening, unstable fracture patterns. Initial management of severe pelvic fractures should follow Advanced Trauma Life Support protocols. Initial reduction of pelvic blood loss can be provided by binders, sheets, or some form of external fixation, which serve to reduce pelvic volume, stabilize clot formation, and reduce ongoing tissue damage. Persistently unstable patients may benefit from angiography with selective embolization, pelvic packing, or a combination of these interventions. Open pelvic fractures involving the perineum or bowel injury benefit from fecal diversion by colostomy. Trauma team coordination facilitates efficient resuscitative efforts and may affect definitive management by optimizing incision, ostomy, or catheter placement. Established protocols for both open and closed pelvic fractures help to standardize care. PMID:23908251

  15. Coronary blood flow during cardiopulmonary resuscitation in swine

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, R.F.; DeGuzman, L.R.; Pedersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Recent papers have raised doubt as to the magnitude of coronary blood flow during closed-chest cardiopulmonary resuscitation. We will describe experiments that concern the methods of coronary flow measurement during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Nine anesthetized swine were instrumented to allow simultaneous measurements of coronary blood flow by both electromagnetic cuff flow probes and by the radiomicrosphere technique. Cardiac arrest was caused by electrical fibrillation and closed-chest massage was performed by a Thumper (Dixie Medical Inc., Houston). The chest was compressed transversely at a rate of 66 strokes/min. Compression occupied one-half of the massage cycle. Three different Thumper piston strokes were studied: 1.5, 2, and 2.5 inches. Mean aortic pressure and total systemic blood flow measured by the radiomicrosphere technique increased as Thumper piston stroke was lengthened (mean +/- SD): 1.5 inch stroke, 23 +/- 4 mm Hg, 525 +/- 195 ml/min; 2 inch stroke, 33 +/- 5 mm Hg, 692 +/- 202 ml/min; 2.5 inch stroke, 40 +/- 6 mm Hg, 817 +/- 321 ml/min. Both methods of coronary flow measurement (electromagnetic (EMF) and radiomicrosphere (RMS)) gave similar results in technically successful preparations (data expressed as percent prearrest flow mean +/- 1 SD): 1.5 inch stroke, EMF 12 +/- 5%, RMS 16 +/- 5%; 2 inch stroke, EMF 30 +/- 6%, RMS 26 +/- 11%; 2.5 inch stroke, EMF 50 +/- 12%, RMS 40 +/- 20%. The phasic coronary flow signal during closed-chest compression indicated that all perfusion occurred during the relaxation phase of the massage cycle. We concluded that coronary blood flow is demonstrable during closed-chest massage, but that the magnitude is unlikely to be more than a fraction of normal.

  16. Goal-directed Resuscitative Interventions during Pediatric Interfacility Transport

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Michael H; Sanders, Ronald C; Moss, M Michele; Sullivan, Janice E; Prodhan, Parthak; Melguizo-Castro, Maria; Nick, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This manuscript reports results of the first NIH-funded prospective interfacility transport study, to determine the effect of goal-directed therapy administered by a specialized pediatric team to critically ill children with the Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS). We hypothesized that goal-directed therapy during interfacility transport would decrease hospital length of stay, prevent multiple organ dysfunction, and reduce subsequent ICU interventions. Methods Prospective data was collected on all pediatric interfacility transport patients with SIRS transported by the Angel One Transport team at Arkansas Children’s Hospital. A 10 month data collection period was followed by institution of a goal-directed resuscitation protocol. Data was subsequently collected for 10 additional months followed by comparison of pre and post-intervention groups. All transport personnel underwent training with didactics and high-fidelity simulation until mastery with goal-directed resuscitation was achieved. Results All transport patients were screened for SIRS using established parameters, and 235 (123 pre-intervention; 112 post-intervention) were enrolled. Univariate analysis revealed shorter hospital stay (11±15vs.7±10days; p=0.02) and fewer required therapeutic ICU interventions in the post-intervention group (TISS-28 scores:19.4±6.8vs.17.3; p=0.04). ICU stay and incidence of organ dysfunction were not statistically different. Multi-variable analysis showed a 1.6 day (95%CI:1.3-2.03; p=0.02) decrease in hospital stay in the post-intervention group. Conclusions and Relevance This study suggests that goal-directed therapy administered by a specialized pediatric transport team has the potential to impact the outcomes of critically ill children. Findings from this study should be confirmed across multiple institutions, but have the potential to impact the clinical outcomes of critically ill children with SIRS. PMID:25860203

  17. Metabolic resuscitation in sepsis: a necessary step beyond the hemodynamic?

    PubMed Central

    de Lima, Lúcio Flávio Peixoto

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances made in monitoring and treatment of sepsis and septic shock, many septic patients ultimately develop multiple organ dysfunction (MODS) and die, suggesting that other players are involved in the pathophysiology of this syndrome. Mitochondrial dysfunction occurs early in sepsis and has a central role in MODS development. MODS severity and recovery of mitochondrial function have been associated with survival. In recent clinical and experimental investigations, mitochondrion-target therapy for sepsis and septic shock has been suggested to reduce MODS severity and mortality. This intervention, which might be named “metabolic resuscitation”, would lead to improved mitochondrial activity afforded by pharmacological and nutritional agents. Of particular interest in this therapeutic strategy is thiamine, a water-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in cellular energy metabolism. Critical illness associated with hypermetabolic states may predispose susceptible individuals to the development of thiamine deficiency, which is not usually identified by clinicians as a source of lactic acidosis. The protective effects of thiamine on mitochondrial function may justify supplementation in septic patients at risk of deficiency. Perspectives of supplementation with other micronutrients (ascorbic acid, tocopherol, selenium and zinc) and potential metabolic resuscitators [coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), cytochrome oxidase (CytOx), L-carnitine, melatonin] to target sepsis-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are also emerging. Metabolic resuscitation may probably be a safe and effective strategy in the treatment of septic shock in the future. However, until then, preliminary investigations should be replicated in further researches for confirmation. Better identification of groups of patients presumed to benefit clinically by a certain intervention directed to “mitochondrial resuscitation” are expected to increase driven by genomics and metabolomics. PMID:27501325

  18. Oxygent as a top load to colloid and hyperoxia is more effective in resuscitation from hemorrhagic shock than colloid and hyperoxia alone.

    PubMed

    Kemming, Gregor I; Meisner, Franz G; Wojtczyk, Christoph J; Packert, Kristian B; Minor, Thomas; Thiel, Manfred; Tillmanns, Jochen; Meier, Jens; Bottino, Daniel; Keipert, Peter E; Faithfull, Simon; Habler, Oliver P

    2005-09-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions are intravascular oxygen therapeutics that temporarily enhance tissue oxygenation in dilutional anemia. However, PFC emulsions are not resuscitation fluids because PFCs only work optimally in the presence of high O2 partial pressure (hyperoxia); moreover, because they have no oncotic potential, dosing limitations prevent their use to permanently replace large hemorrhage volumes. Our objective was to clarify whether in the presence of hyperoxia a conventional colloid therapy supplemented by PFC is more efficacious than colloid alone. To answer this question, 22 anesthetized, ventilated dogs were hemorrhaged to a mean arterial pressure of 45 mmHg and were kept at this level until a metabolic O2 debt of 120 mL kg(-1) body weight had evolved. Hyperoxia was established and dogs were randomly allocated to receive colloid (6% HES, Hydroxy Ethyl Starch shed blood volume) or colloid together with Oxygent (perflubron emulsion, 60%, w/v; Alliance Pharmaceutical Corp., San Diego, CA; single dose, 4.5 mL kg(-1); i.e., 2.7 g PFC kg body weight) in a blinded fashion. Hemodynamic and O2 transport parameters, intestinal mucosal blood flow (microspheres), and O2 partial pressure (MDO-Electrode; Eschweiler, Kiel, Germany) were measured at baseline, in shock, and during 3 h post-therapy. In the presence of hyperoxia, Oxygent improved the amount of physically dissolved O2 in plasma and increased the contribution of physically dissolved O2 to global O2 delivery (P < 0.05) and thus whole body O2 consumption when compared with colloid alone (P < 0.05). As a result, Oxygent reduced intestinal mucosal hypoxia and global O2 debt within the first hour post-therapy (P < 0.05). We conclude that under hyperoxic conditions, fluid resuscitation supplemented by Oxygent was more efficacious than colloid and hyperoxia alone. PFC temporarily enhanced intestinal mucosal tissue oxygenation during resuscitation. PMID:16135964

  19. Is the Marketing Concept Adequate for Continuing Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenburg, Terri L.

    1984-01-01

    Because educators have a social responsibility to those they teach, the marketing concept may not be adequate as a philosophy for continuing education. In attempting to broaden the audience for continuing education, educators should consider a societal marketing concept to meet the needs of the educationally disadvantaged. (SK)

  20. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  1. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION...

  2. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  3. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  4. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  5. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED...

  6. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  7. Chest Compression With Personal Protective Equipment During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: A Randomized Crossover Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin; Chen, Yan

    2016-04-01

    Following a chemical, biological, radiation, and nuclear incident, prompt cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) procedure is essential for patients who suffer cardiac arrest. But CPR when wearing personal protection equipment (PPE) before decontamination becomes a challenge for healthcare workers (HCW). Although previous studies have assessed the impact of PPE on airway management, there is little research available regarding the quality of chest compression (CC) when wearing PPE.A present randomized cross-over simulation study was designed to evaluate the effect of PPE on CC performance using mannequins.The study was set in one university medical center in the China.Forty anesthesia residents participated in this randomized cross-over study.Each participant performed 2 min of CC on a manikin with and without PPE, respectively. Participants were randomized into 2 groups that either performed CC with PPE first, followed by a trial without PPE after a 180-min rest, or vice versa.CPR recording technology was used to objectively quantify the quality of CC. Additionally, participants' physiological parameters and subjective fatigue score values were recorded.With the use of PPE, a significant decrease of the percentage of effective compressions (41.3 ± 17.1% with PPE vs 67.5 ± 15.6% without PPE, P < 0.001) and the percentage of adequate compressions (67.7 ± 18.9% with PPE vs 80.7 ± 15.5% without PPE, P < 0.001) were observed. Furthermore, the increases in heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and subjective fatigue score values were more obvious with the use of PPE (all P < 0.01).We found significant deterioration of CC performance in HCW with the use of a level-C PPE, which may be a disadvantage for enhancing survival of cardiac arrest. PMID:27057878

  8. "In the beginning...": tools for talking about resuscitation and goals of care early in the admission.

    PubMed

    White, Jocelyn; Fromme, Erik K

    2013-11-01

    Quality standards no longer allow physicians to delay discussing goals of care and resuscitation. We propose 2 novel strategies for discussing goals and resuscitation on admission. The first, SPAM (determine Surrogate decision maker, determine resuscitation Preferences, Assume full care, and advise them to expect More discussion especially with clinical changes), helps clinicians discover patient preferences and decision maker during routine admissions. The second, UFO-UFO (Understand what they know, Fill in knowledge gaps, ask about desired Outcomes, Understand their reasoning, discuss the spectrum Feasible Outcomes), helps patients with poor or uncertain prognosis or family-team conflict. Using a challenging case example, this article illustrates how SPAM and UFO-UFO can help clinicians have patient-centered resuscitation and goals of care discussions at the beginning of care. PMID:23236089

  9. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation quality and beyond: the need to improve real-time feedback and physiologic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lin, Steve; Scales, Damon C

    2016-01-01

    High-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has been shown to improve survival outcomes after cardiac arrest. The current standard in studies evaluating CPR quality is to measure CPR process measures-for example, chest compression rate, depth, and fraction. Published studies evaluating CPR feedback devices have yielded mixed results. Newer approaches that seek to optimize CPR by measuring physiological endpoints during the resuscitation may lead to individualized patient care and improved patient outcomes. PMID:27349642

  10. [Provision of apparatus to resuscitation and intensive therapy departments of the cardiology service].

    PubMed

    Smerdov, A A

    1980-01-01

    The article describes monitoring systems for following critically-ill patients, and cardio-resuscitation complex, apparatus for defibrillation, and short-term anaesthesy, cardiostimulators. All these units have been elaborated and serially produced by the Radioelectronic Medical Equipment Association. Their importance and place in providing the patients treatment and diagnosis in resuscitation and intensive care departments of the cardiological service are shown. PMID:7442501

  11. [TO CURE THE APPARENTLY DEAD. NOSOLOGY AND MEDICAL RESUSCITATION IN ITALY(XVIII CENT.)].

    PubMed

    Marinozzi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    The first specific techniques and triages for medical resuscitation developed in the XVIII century, specifically to rescue the drowned persons. The topic of resuscitation in strictly connected to the theme of the apparent death, to the dread of the "buried alive", to the progress of forensic medicine and to the administrative and legislative policies. The contribute aims to focus on the contribution of the medical and pathologic nosology about the conception of the apparent death, read as asphyxia. PMID:26946822

  12. Post-resuscitation care following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Girotra, Saket; Chan, Paul S; Bradley, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in developed countries. Although a majority of cardiac arrest patients die during the acute event, a substantial proportion of cardiac arrest deaths occur in patients following successful resuscitation and can be attributed to the development of post-cardiac arrest syndrome. There is growing recognition that integrated post-resuscitation care, which encompasses targeted temperature management (TTM), early coronary angiography and comprehensive critical care, can improve patient outcomes. TTM has been shown to improve survival and neurological outcome in patients who remain comatose especially following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest due to ventricular arrhythmias. Early coronary angiography and revascularisation if needed may also be beneficial during the post-resuscitation phase, based on data from observational studies. In addition, resuscitated patients usually require intensive care, which includes mechanical ventilator, haemodynamic support and close monitoring of blood gases, glucose, electrolytes, seizures and other disease-specific intervention. Efforts should be taken to avoid premature withdrawal of life-supporting treatment, especially in patients treated with TTM. Given that resources and personnel needed to provide high-quality post-resuscitation care may not exist at all hospitals, professional societies have recommended regionalisation of post-resuscitation care in specialised 'cardiac arrest centres' as a strategy to improve cardiac arrest outcomes. Finally, evidence for post-resuscitation care following in-hospital cardiac arrest is largely extrapolated from studies in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Future studies need to examine the effectiveness of different post-resuscitation strategies, such as TTM, in patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest. PMID:26385451

  13. Preparation and use of resuscitation equipment to assess and treat children in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Angela; Charnock, Elizabeth; Miller, Amanda

    2015-03-01

    This article uses the (A) Airway, (B) Breathing and, (C) Circulation structured approach to the assessment of a sick child to provide an overview of the equipment used in resuscitation attempts involving children. It emphasises that a working knowledge of the resuscitation equipment used in emergency situations is fundamental to the process of checking and preparing it. The article is aimed at students and newly qualified nurses, but may be also useful as revision for more experienced nurses. PMID:25760012

  14. Diltiazem restores cardiac output and improves renal function after hemorrhagic shock and crystalloid resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Ba, Z F; Meldrum, D R; Chaudry, I H

    1992-05-01

    Although calcium antagonists produce salutary effects after shock and ischemia, it is unknown whether such agents restore the depressed cardiac output (CO) and renal function in a nonheparinized model of trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation. To study this, rats underwent a midline laparotomy (i.e., trauma induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of the maximum bleedout was returned in the form of Ringer lactate (RL). They were then resuscitated with four times the volume of shed blood with RL over 60 min. Diltiazem (400 micrograms/kg body wt) or an equal volume of saline was infused intravenously over 95 min. This infusion was started during the last 15 min of resuscitation. CO was determined by indocyanine green dilution. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed with [3H]inulin clearance, and cortical microcirculation was examined by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results indicate that crystalloid resuscitation alone transiently restored but did not maintain CO after hemorrhage. Diltiazem infusion in conjunction with crystalloid resuscitation, however, restored and maintained CO and cortical microcirculation. Although GFR decreased in both groups, the values in diltiazem-treated animals were significantly higher than those in the sham-operated animals. Furthermore, diltiazem markedly decreased tissue water content. Thus diltiazem appears to be a promising adjunct in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock even in the absence of blood resuscitation. PMID:1590448

  15. Effect of cutaneous burn injury and resuscitation on the cerebral circulation in an ovine model.

    PubMed

    Shin, C; Kinsky, M P; Thomas, J A; Traber, D L; Kramer, G C

    1998-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of a large cutaneous burn injury on the cerebral circulation. Anesthetized sheep (n = 8) were prepared with vascular catheters, a urinary catheter and a Richmond bolt for intracranial pressure monitoring. A scald injury was inflicted on 70 percent of total body surface area with hot water. Resuscitation was started 30 min after scald with Ringer's lactate to restore and maintain baseline oxygen delivery. Resuscitation maintained blood pressure, cardiac output and urine output at normal levels. Brain blood flow was measured with colored microspheres. During resuscitation intracranial pressure rose slowly from 10.6 +/- 1.5 to 17.0 +/- 4.0 mmHg (P < 0.05) and cerebral perfusion pressure was reduced from 86.4 +/- 6.8 to 64.1 +/- 2.8 mmHg (P < 0.05). During early resuscitation cerebrovascular resistance declined to maintain brain blood flow and oxygen delivery at baseline or better. After 6 h, mean cerebrovascular resistance was inappropriately increased during a period of reduced cerebral perfusion pressure which resulted in brain blood flow reductions of half the baseline levels. These data suggest that autoregulation maintains brain blood flow immediately after burn shock and early resuscitation, but the autoregulation may be less effective as burn resuscitation proceeds. PMID:9601589

  16. Use of venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference to guide resuscitation therapy in septic shock

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Jihad; Lemyze, Malcolm; Tronchon, Laurent; Vallet, Benoît; Thevenin, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The mixed venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) tension difference [P (v-a) CO2] is the difference between carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) in mixed venous blood (sampled from a pulmonary artery catheter) and the PCO2 in arterial blood. P (v-a) CO2 depends on the cardiac output and the global CO2 production, and on the complex relationship between PCO2 and CO2 content. Experimental and clinical studies support the evidence that P (v-a) CO2 cannot serve as an indicator of tissue hypoxia, and should be regarded as an indicator of the adequacy of venous blood to wash out the total CO2 generated by the peripheral tissues. P (v-a) CO2 can be replaced by the central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2), which is calculated from simultaneous sampling of central venous blood from a central vein catheter and arterial blood and, therefore, more easy to obtain at the bedside. Determining the ΔPCO2 during the resuscitation of septic shock patients might be useful when deciding when to continue resuscitation despite a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) > 70% associated with elevated blood lactate levels. Because high blood lactate levels is not a discriminatory factor in determining the source of that stress, an increased ΔPCO2 (> 6 mmHg) could be used to identify patients who still remain inadequately resuscitated. Monitoring the ΔPCO2 from the beginning of the reanimation of septic shock patients might be a valuable means to evaluate the adequacy of cardiac output in tissue perfusion and, thus, guiding the therapy. In this respect, it can aid to titrate inotropes to adjust oxygen delivery to CO2 production, or to choose between hemoglobin correction or fluid/inotrope infusion in patients with a too low ScvO2 related to metabolic demand. The combination of P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2 with oxygen-derived parameters through the calculation of the P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2/arteriovenous oxygen content difference ratio can detect the presence of global anaerobic metabolism

  17. Use of venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference to guide resuscitation therapy in septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mallat, Jihad; Lemyze, Malcolm; Tronchon, Laurent; Vallet, Benoît; Thevenin, Didier

    2016-02-01

    The mixed venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide (CO2) tension difference [P (v-a) CO2] is the difference between carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) in mixed venous blood (sampled from a pulmonary artery catheter) and the PCO2 in arterial blood. P (v-a) CO2 depends on the cardiac output and the global CO2 production, and on the complex relationship between PCO2 and CO2 content. Experimental and clinical studies support the evidence that P (v-a) CO2 cannot serve as an indicator of tissue hypoxia, and should be regarded as an indicator of the adequacy of venous blood to wash out the total CO2 generated by the peripheral tissues. P (v-a) CO2 can be replaced by the central venous-to-arterial CO2 difference (ΔPCO2), which is calculated from simultaneous sampling of central venous blood from a central vein catheter and arterial blood and, therefore, more easy to obtain at the bedside. Determining the ΔPCO2 during the resuscitation of septic shock patients might be useful when deciding when to continue resuscitation despite a central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) > 70% associated with elevated blood lactate levels. Because high blood lactate levels is not a discriminatory factor in determining the source of that stress, an increased ΔPCO2 (> 6 mmHg) could be used to identify patients who still remain inadequately resuscitated. Monitoring the ΔPCO2 from the beginning of the reanimation of septic shock patients might be a valuable means to evaluate the adequacy of cardiac output in tissue perfusion and, thus, guiding the therapy. In this respect, it can aid to titrate inotropes to adjust oxygen delivery to CO2 production, or to choose between hemoglobin correction or fluid/inotrope infusion in patients with a too low ScvO2 related to metabolic demand. The combination of P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2 with oxygen-derived parameters through the calculation of the P (v-a) CO2 or ΔPCO2/arteriovenous oxygen content difference ratio can detect the presence of global anaerobic metabolism

  18. Assessing juvenile sex offenders to determine adequate levels of supervision.

    PubMed

    Gerdes, K E; Gourley, M M; Cash, M C

    1995-08-01

    The present study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories currently being used by probation officers in the state of Utah to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. The internal consistency or reliability of the inventories ranged from moderate to good. Factor analysis was utilized to significantly increase the reliability of the four inventories by collapsing them into the following three factors: (a) Custodian's and Juvenile's Attitude Toward Intervention; (b) Offense Characteristics; and (c) Historical Risk Factors. These three inventories/factors explained 41.2% of the variance in the combined inventories' scores. Suggestions are made regarding the creation of an additional inventory. "Characteristics of the Victim" to account for more of the variance. In addition, suggestions as to how these inventories can be used by probation officers to make objective and consistent decisions about adequate supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders are discussed. PMID:7583754

  19. Surviving lethal septic shock without fluid resuscitation in a rodent model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yongqing; Liu, Baoling; Fukudome, Eugene Y.; Kochanek, Ashley R.; Finkelstein, Robert A.; Chong, Wei; Jin, Guang; Lu, Jennifer; deMoya, Marc A.; Velmahos, George C.; Alam, Hasan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background We have recently demonstrated that treatment with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, before a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) improves survival in mice. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether SAHA treatment would attenuate LPS-induced shock and improve survival when given postinsult in a rodent model. Methods C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally (IP) injected with LPS (30 mg/kg), and 2 hours later randomized into 2 groups: (1) vehicle animals (n = 10) received dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solution only; and (2) SAHA animals (n = 10) were given SAHA (50 mg/kg, IP) in DMSO solution. Survival was monitored over the next 7 days. In a second study, LPS-injected mice were treated with either DMSO or SAHA as described, and normal (sham) animals served as controls. Lungs were harvested at 4, 6, and 8 hours after LPS injection for analysis of gene expression. In addition, RAW264.7 mouse macrophages were cultured to assess the effects of SAHA post-treatment on LPS-induced inflammation using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results All LPS-injected mice that received the vehicle agent alone died within 24 hours, whereas the SAHA-treated animals displayed a significant improvement in 1 week survival (80% vs 0%; P < .001). LPS insult significantly enhanced gene expression of MyD88, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6, and was associated with an increased protein secretion of TNF-α and IL-6 into the cell culture medium. In contrast, SAHA treatment significantly attenuated all of these LPS-related alterations. Conclusion We report for the first time that administration of SAHA (50 mg/kg IP) after a lethal dose of LPS significantly improves long-term survival, and attenuates expression of the proinflammatory mediators TNF-α and IL-6. Furthermore, our data suggest that the anti-inflammatory effects of SAHA may be due to downregulation of the MyD88-dependent pathway, and decreased expression of associated proinflammatory genes. PMID:20561658

  20. Microgravity Fluids for Biology, Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, DeVon; Kohl, Fred; Massa, Gioia D.; Motil, Brian; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Quincy, Charles; Sato, Kevin; Singh, Bhim; Smith, Jeffrey D.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity Fluids for Biology represents an intersection of biology and fluid physics that present exciting research challenges to the Space Life and Physical Sciences Division. Solving and managing the transport processes and fluid mechanics in physiological and biological systems and processes are essential for future space exploration and colonization of space by humans. Adequate understanding of the underlying fluid physics and transport mechanisms will provide new, necessary insights and technologies for analyzing and designing biological systems critical to NASAs mission. To enable this mission, the fluid physics discipline needs to work to enhance the understanding of the influence of gravity on the scales and types of fluids (i.e., non-Newtonian) important to biology and life sciences. In turn, biomimetic, bio-inspired and synthetic biology applications based on physiology and biology can enrich the fluid mechanics and transport phenomena capabilities of the microgravity fluid physics community.

  1. Pharmacological postconditioning with sevoflurane after cardiopulmonary resuscitation reduces myocardial dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we sought to examine whether pharmacological postconditioning with sevoflurane (SEVO) is neuro- and cardioprotective in a pig model of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Methods Twenty-two pigs were subjected to cardiac arrest. After 8 minutes of ventricular fibrillation and 2 minutes of basic life support, advanced cardiac life support was started. After successful return of spontaneous circulation (N = 16), animals were randomized to either (1) propofol (CONTROL) anesthesia or (2) SEVO anesthesia for 4 hours. Neurological function was assessed 24 hours after return of spontaneous circulation. The effects on myocardial and cerebral damage, especially on inflammation, apoptosis and tissue remodeling, were studied using cellular and molecular approaches. Results Animals treated with SEVO had lower peak troponin T levels (median [IQR]) (CONTROL vs SEVO = 0.31 pg/mL [0.2 to 0.65] vs 0.14 pg/mL [0.09 to 0.25]; P < 0.05) and improved left ventricular systolic and diastolic function compared to the CONTROL group (P < 0.05). SEVO was associated with a reduction in myocardial IL-1β protein concentrations (0.16 pg/μg total protein [0.14 to 0.17] vs 0.12 pg/μg total protein [0.11 to 0.14]; P < 0.01), a reduction in apoptosis (increased procaspase-3 protein levels (0.94 arbitrary units [0.86 to 1.04] vs 1.18 arbitrary units [1.03 to 1.28]; P < 0.05), increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α protein expression (P < 0.05) and increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (P < 0.05). SEVO did not, however, affect neurological deficit score or cerebral cellular and molecular pathways. Conclusions SEVO reduced myocardial damage and dysfunction after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the early postresuscitation period. The reduction was associated with a reduced rate of myocardial proinflammatory cytokine expression, apoptosis, increased HIF-1α expression and increased activity of matrix metalloproteinase 9. Early administration of SEVO may not

  2. Dose and type of crystalloid fluid therapy in adult hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective In this narrative review, an overview is given of the pros and cons of various crystalloid fluids used for infusion during initial resuscitation or maintenance phases in adult hospitalized patients. Special emphasis is given on dose, composition of fluids, presence of buffers (in balanced solutions) and electrolytes, according to recent literature. We also review the use of hypertonic solutions. Methods We extracted relevant clinical literature in English specifically examining patient-oriented outcomes related to fluid volume and type. Results A restrictive fluid therapy prevents complications seen with liberal, large-volume therapy, even though restrictive fluid loading with crystalloids may not demonstrate large hemodynamic effects in surgical or septic patients. Hypertonic solutions may serve the purpose of small volume resuscitation but carry the disadvantage of hypernatremia. Hypotonic solutions are contraindicated in (impending) cerebral edema, whereas hypertonic solutions are probably more helpful in ameliorating than in preventing this condition and improving outcome. Balanced solutions offer a better approach for plasma composition than unbalanced ones, and the evidence for benefits in patient morbidity and mortality is increasing, particularly by helping to prevent acute kidney injury. Conclusions Isotonic and hypertonic crystalloid fluids are the fluids of choice for resuscitation from hypovolemia and shock. The evidence that balanced solutions are superior to unbalanced ones is increasing. Hypertonic saline is effective in mannitol-refractory intracranial hypertension, whereas hypotonic solutions are contraindicated in this condition. PMID:24472418

  3. Use of Backboard and Deflation Improve Quality of Chest Compression When Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Is Performed on a Typical Air Inflated Mattress Configuration

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaehoon; Chee, Youngjoon; Lim, Taeho; Song, Yeongtak; Cho, Youngsuk; Je, Sangmo

    2013-01-01

    No study has examined the effectiveness of backboards and air deflation for achieving adequate chest compression (CC) depth on air mattresses with the typical configurations seen in intensive care units. To determine this efficacy, we measured mattress compression depth (MCD, mm) on these surfaces using dual accelerometers. Eight cardiopulmonary resuscitation providers performed CCs on manikins lying on 4 different surfaces using a visual feedback system. The surfaces were as follows: A, a bed frame; B, a deflated air mattress placed on top of a foam mattress laid on a bed frame; C, a typical air mattress configuration with an inflated air mattress placed on a foam mattress laid on a bed frame; and D, C with a backboard. Deflation of the air mattress decreased MCD significantly (B; 14.74 ± 1.36 vs C; 30.16 ± 3.96, P < 0.001). The use of a backboard also decreased MCD (C; 30.16 ± 3.96 vs D; 25.46 ± 2.89, P = 0.002). However, deflation of the air mattress decreased MCD more than use of a backboard (B; 14.74 ± 1.36 vs D; 25.46 ± 2.89, P = 0.002). The use of a both a backboard and a deflated air mattress in this configuration reduces MCD and thus helps achieve accurate CC depth during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. PMID:23399985

  4. Ubiquinol decreases hemorrhagic shock/resuscitation-induced microvascular inflammation in rat mesenteric microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qiuhua; Holloway, Naomi; Thimmesch, Amanda; Wood, John G; Clancy, Richard L; Pierce, Janet D

    2014-11-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) is a leading cause of death in traumatic injury. Ischemia and hypoxia in HS and fluid resuscitation (FR) creates a condition that facilitates excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This is a major factor causing increased leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions and inflammation in the microcirculation resulting in reperfusion tissue injury. The aim of this study was to determine if ubiquinol (coenzyme Q10) decreases microvascular inflammation following HS and FR. Intravital microscopy was used to measure leukocyte-endothelial cell adhesive interactions in the rat mesentery following 1-h of HS and 2-h post FR with or without ubiquinol. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by removing ~ 40% of anesthetized Sprague Dawley rats' blood volume to maintain a mean arterial blood pressure <50 mmHg for 1 h. Ubiquinol (1 mg/100 g body weight) was infused intravascularly in the ubiquinol group immediately after 1-h HS. The FR protocol included replacement of the shed blood and Lactate Ringer's in both the control and ubiquinol groups. We found that leukocyte adherence (2.3 ± 2.0), mast cell degranulation (1.02 ± 0.01), and ROS levels (159 ± 35%) in the ubiquinol group were significantly reduced compared to the control group (10.8 ± 2.3, 1.36 ± 0.03, and 343 ± 47%, respectively). In addition, vascular permeability in the control group (0.54 ± 0.11) was significantly greater than the ubiquinol group (0.34 ± 0.04). In conclusion, ubiquinol attenuates HS and FR-induced microvascular inflammation. These results suggest that ubiquinol provides protection to mesenteric microcirculation through its antioxidant properties. PMID:25413319

  5. Factors Associated With Pelvic Fracture-Related Arterial Bleeding During Trauma Resuscitation: A Prospective Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Laszlo; King, Kate L.; McGrath, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine predictors of pelvic fracture-related arterial bleeding (PFRAB) from the information available in the Emergency Department (ED). Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Single level-1 Trauma Center. Patients: In a 3-year period ending in December 2008, consecutive high-energy pelvic fracture patients older than 18 years were included. Patients who arrived >4 hours after injury or dead on arrival were excluded. Patient management followed advanced trauma life support and institutional guidelines. Collected data included patient demographics, mechanism of injury, vital signs, acid-base status, fluid resuscitation, trauma scores, fracture patterns, procedures, and outcomes. Potential predictors were identified using standard statistical tests: Univariate analysis, Pearson correlation (r), receiver operator characteristic, and decision tree analysis. Intervention: Observational study. Outcome Measures: PFRAB was determined based on angiography or computed tomography angiogram or laparotomy findings. Results: Of the 143 study patients, 15 (10%) had PFRAB. They were significantly older, more severely injured, more hypotensive, more acidotic, more likely to require transfusions in the ED, and had higher mortality rate than non-PFRAB patients. No single variable proved to be a strong predictor but some had a significant correlation with PFRAB. Useful predictors identified were worst base deficit (BD), receiver operator characteristic (0.77, cutoff: 6 mmol/L, r = 0.37), difference between any 2 measures of BD within 4 hours (ΔBD) >2 mmol/L, transfusion in ED (yes/no), and worst systolic blood pressure <104 mm Hg. Demographics, injury mechanism, fracture pattern, temperature, and pH had poor predictive value. Conclusions: BD <6 mmol/L, ΔBD >2 mmol/L, systolic blood pressure <104 mm Hg, and the need for transfusion in ED are independent predictors of PFRAB in the ED. These predictors can be valuable to triage blunt trauma victims for pelvic

  6. Code Status and Resuscitation Options in the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Haresh L.; Patel, Neal R.; Choma, Neesha N.; Grande, Jonathan; Giuse, Dario A.; Lehmann, Christoph U.

    2014-01-01

    Aim The advance discussion and documentation of code-status is important in preventing undesired cardiopulmonary resuscitation and related End of Life interventions. Code-status documentation remains infrequent and paper-based, which limits its usefulness. This study evaluates a tool to document code-status in the electronic health records at a large teaching hospital, and analyzes the corresponding data. Methods Encounter data for patients admitted to the Medical Center were collected over a period of 12 months (01-APR-2012 – 31-MAR-2013) and the code-status attribute was tracked for individual patients. The code-status data were analyzed separately for adult and pediatric patient populations. We considered 131,399 encounters for 83,248 adult patients and 80,778 encounters for 55,656 pediatric patients in this study. Results 71% of the adult patients and 30% of the pediatric patients studied had a documented code-status. Age and severity of illness influenced the decision to document code-status. Demographics such as gender, race, ethnicity, and proximity of primary residence were also associated with the documentation of code-status. Conclusion Absence of a recorded code-status may result in unnecessary interventions. Code-status in paper charts may be difficult to access in cardiopulmonary arrest situations and may result in unnecessary and unwanted interventions and procedures. Documentation of Code-status in electronic records creates a readily available reference for care providers. PMID:25447035

  7. The Iranian physicians attitude toward the do not resuscitate order

    PubMed Central

    Fallahi, Masood; Banaderakhshan, Homayion; Abdi, Alireza; Borhani, Fariba; Kaviannezhad, Rasool; Karimpour, Hassan Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Physicians are responsible for making decisions about the do not resuscitate (DNR) order of patients; however, most of them are faced with some uncertainty in decision making and ethical aspects. Moreover, there are differences on decision making related to the DNR order among physicians, which may be related to the different attitudes toward this issue. Considering the lack of information, this study was performed to investigate doctors’ attitude about DNR order for patients in their final phases of life. Methods In a descriptive–analytical study, 152 physicians were enrolled as quota sampling subjects from educational hospitals affiliated to the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences. The tool used was a researcher-developed questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software by descriptive and inferential statistics. Results The mean of attitude toward DNR was 3.22, for which the univariate t-test showed a significant positive attitude toward DNR (P=0.002); the mean of attitude number toward DNR was higher in physicians with higher education level (P=0.002). But this difference was not found in terms of age group, sex, and experiences in participating in DNR decisions. Conclusion Due to the positive attitude of doctors toward DNR orders and lack of identified guidance, clear guidelines that comply with the Iranian Islamic culture are necessary to be established. Implementing this directive requires comprehensive training to various groups, including patients, doctors, nurses, administrators, and policy makers of the health system. PMID:27418832

  8. Rhythm analysis during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Ruiz de Gauna, Sofia; Irusta, Unai; Ruiz, Jesus; Ayala, Unai; Aramendi, Elisabete; Eftestøl, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    Survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest depends largely on two factors: early cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation. CPR must be interrupted for a reliable automated rhythm analysis because chest compressions induce artifacts in the ECG. Unfortunately, interrupting CPR adversely affects survival. In the last twenty years, research has been focused on designing methods for analysis of ECG during chest compressions. Most approaches are based either on adaptive filters to remove the CPR artifact or on robust algorithms which directly diagnose the corrupted ECG. In general, all the methods report low specificity values when tested on short ECG segments, but how to evaluate the real impact on CPR delivery of continuous rhythm analysis during CPR is still unknown. Recently, researchers have proposed a new methodology to measure this impact. Moreover, new strategies for fast rhythm analysis during ventilation pauses or high-specificity algorithms have been reported. Our objective is to present a thorough review of the field as the starting point for these late developments and to underline the open questions and future lines of research to be explored in the following years. PMID:24527445

  9. [Out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation needs the ventilation].

    PubMed

    Bao, Fang-ping; Pan, Yuan-min; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2014-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is series of rescue measures for saving cardiac arrest patients. Early initiation and good quality of CPR is crucial for increasing chance of survival from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. In recent years, the CPR guidelines have changed a lot, especially in basic life support. The guideline now pays more attention on chest compression and less to ventilation. CPR with chest compression only and without mouth-to-mouth ventilation is more popular. In this article, we outline the development and recent researches of CPR. As depriving oxygen from a collapsed patient for 6 min may result in poor outcome, the average time for ambulance transport is longer (about 10 to 16 min) in China, which makes rescuers easy to feel fatigue, chest compression only CPR is not suitable in China. Though non-professional rescuers have difficulty to perform mouth-to-mouth ventilation, they generally show a willingness to do so. To strengthen public standard CPR training including mouth-to-mouth ventilation and chest compression, is most important to promote CPR in China. PMID:25372633

  10. Whole blood: the future of traumatic hemorrhagic shock resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Murdock, Alan D; Berséus, Olle; Hervig, Tor; Strandenes, Geir; Lunde, Turid Helen

    2014-05-01

    Toward the end of World War I and during World War II, whole-blood transfusions were the primary agent in the treatment of military traumatic hemorrhage. However, after World War II, the fractionation of whole blood into its components became widely accepted and replaced whole-blood transfusion to better accommodate specific blood deficiencies, logistics, and financial reasons. This transition occurred with very few clinical trials to determine which patient populations or scenarios would or would not benefit from the change. A smaller population of patients with trauma hemorrhage will require massive transfusion (>10 U packed red blood cells in 24 h) occurring in 3% to 5% of civilian and 10% of military traumas. Advocates for hemostatic resuscitation have turned toward a ratio-balanced component therapy using packed red blood cells-fresh frozen plasma-platelet concentration in a 1:1:1 ratio due to whole-blood limited availability. However, this "reconstituted" whole blood is associated with a significantly anemic, thrombocytopenic, and coagulopathic product compared with whole blood. In addition, several recent military studies suggest a survival advantage of early use of whole blood, but the safety concerns have limited is widespread civilian use. Based on extensive military experience as well as recent published literature, low-titer leukocyte reduced cold-store type O whole blood carries low adverse risks and maintains its hemostatic properties for up to 21 days. A prospective randomized trial comparing whole blood versus ratio balanced component therapy is proposed with rationale provided. PMID:24662782

  11. To resuscitate or not: a dilemma in terminal cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hinkka, H; Kosunen, E; Metsänoja, R; Lammi, U K; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, P

    2001-06-01

    One of the difficult dilemmas in terminal care is the decision on whether to start or withhold cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Is this decision made on purely medical grounds, or is it also influenced by the physician's personal characteristics or education? The aim of this study was to look at factors affecting this decision. A questionnaire was sent out to a stratified sample of 1180 Finnish doctors. The response rate was 62%. The physicians were asked whether they would (a) start CPR or (b) withhold CPR in a scenario describing the unexpected death of a young terminal cancer patient. Data were also collected on demographics, post-graduate training, experience of terminal care, general life values and attitudes, and experiences of severe illness in the family. The proportion of surgeons, internists, GPs and oncologists who said they would have started CPR was 16, 10, 19 and 14%, respectively. Among physicians aged under 35 years, from 35 to 49 years and over 49 years, the proportions of physicians choosing active CPR were 29, 14 and 13%, respectively (P<0.001). As for those with personal experience of terminal care, 13% indicated they would have started CPR compared with 23% of those who had no experience (P<0.01). Those who made a decision in favour of CPR showed a significantly (P<0.001) more negative attitude to withdrawing life-sustaining treatment and valued length of life to a much greater extent (P<0.01). PMID:11719124

  12. The Attitude of Iranian Nurses About Do Not Resuscitate Orders

    PubMed Central

    Mogadasian, Sima; Abdollahzadeh, Farahnaz; Rahmani, Azad; Ferguson, Caleb; Pakanzad, Fermisk; Pakpour, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Do not resuscitate (DNR) orders are one of many challenging issues in end of life care. Previous research has not investigated Muslim nurses’ attitudes towards DNR orders. Aims: This study aims to investigate the attitude of Iranian nurses towards DNR orders and determine the role of religious sects in forming attitudes. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study, 306 nurses from five hospitals affiliated to Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUOMS) in East Azerbaijan Province and three hospitals in Kurdistan province participated. Data were gathered by a survey design on attitudes on DNR orders. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) software examining descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: Participants showed their willingness to learn more about DNR orders and highlights the importance of respecting patients and their families in DNR orders. In contrast, in many key items participants reported their negative attitude towards DNR orders. There were statistical differences in two items between the attitude of Shiite and Sunni nurses. Conclusions: Iranian nurses, regardless of their religious sects, reported negative attitude towards many aspects of DNR orders. It may be possible to change the attitude of Iranian nurses towards DNR through education. PMID:24600178

  13. Challenges in conducting research after family presence during resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Leske, Jane S; McAndrew, Natalie S; Evans, Crystal-Rae Dawn; Garcia, Annette E; Brasel, Karen J

    2012-01-01

    Family presence during resuscitation (FPDR) is an option occurring in clinical practice. National clinical guidelines on providing the option of FPDR are available from the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses, American Heart Association, Emergency Nurses Association, and Society of Critical Care Medicine. The FPDR option currently remains controversial, underutilized, and not the usual practice with trauma patients. This article is based on the methodological and practical research challenges associated with an ongoing study to examine the effects of the FPDR option on family outcomes in patients experiencing critical injury after motor vehicle crashes and gunshot wounds. The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of the FPDR option on family outcomes of anxiety, stress, well-being, and satisfaction and compare those outcomes in families who participate in FPDR to those families who do not participate in FPDR. Examples of real clinical challenges faced by the researchers are described throughout this article. Research challenges include design, sampling, inclusion/exclusion criteria, human subjects, and procedures. Recruitment of family members who participated in the FPDR option is a complex process, especially after admission to the critical care unit. PMID:22955717

  14. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Bhavani Shankar; Urman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO2). Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA). There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes. PMID:25400399

  15. A negative cranial computed tomographic scan is not adequate to support a diagnosis of pseudotumor cerebri.

    PubMed

    Said, Rana R; Rosman, N Paul

    2004-08-01

    A 10-year-old boy with daily headache for 1 month and intermittent diplopia for 1 week was found to have a unilateral partial abducens palsy and bilateral papilledema; otherwise, his neurologic examination showed no abnormalities. A cranial computed tomographic (CT) scan was normal. Lumbar puncture disclosed a markedly elevated opening pressure of > 550 mm of cerebrospinal fluid with normal cerebrospinal fluid. Medical therapy with acetazolamide for presumed pseudotumor cerebri was begun. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain, done several days later because of continuing symptoms, unexpectedly showed multiple hyperintensities of cerebral white matter on T2-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Despite high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone for possible demyelinating disease, he failed to improve. A left temporal brain biopsy followed and disclosed an anaplastic oligodendroglioma. In a patient with features indicating pseudotumor cerebri, a negative cranial CT scan is not adequate to rule out underlying pathology; thus, MRI of the brain should probably always be performed. A revised definition of pseudotumor cerebri could better include "normal MRI of the brain" rather than "normal neuroimaging." PMID:15605471

  16. Adequation of mini satellites to oceanic altimetry missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellaieche, G.; Aguttes, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    Association of the mini satellite concept and oceanic altimetry missions is discussed. Mission definition and most constraining requirements (mesoscale for example) demonstrate mini satellites to be quite adequate for such missions. Progress in altimeter characteristics, orbit determination, and position reporting allow consideration of oceanic altimetry missions using low Earth orbit satellites. Satellite constellation, trace keeping and orbital period, and required payload characteristics are exposed. The mission requirements covering Sun synchronous orbit, service area, ground system, and launcher characteristics as well as constellation maintenance strategy are specified. Two options for the satellite, orbital mechanics, propulsion, onboard power and stabilizing subsystems, onboard management, satellite ground linkings, mechanical and thermal subsystems, budgets, and planning are discussed.

  17. Induced Hypothermia During Resuscitation From Hemorrhagic Shock Attenuates Microvascular Inflammation In The Rat Mesenteric Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Coyan, Garrett N.; Moncure, Michael; Thomas, James H.; Wood, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Microvascular inflammation occurs during resuscitation following hemorrhagic shock, causing multiple organ dysfunction and mortality. Pre-clinical evidence suggests that hypothermia may have some benefit in selected patients by decreasing this inflammation, but this effect has not been extensively studied. Methods Intravital microscopy was used to visualize mesenteric venules of anesthetized rats in real time to evaluate leukocyte adherence and mast cell degranulation. Animals were randomly allocated to normotensive or hypotensive groups, and further subdivided into hypothermic and normothermic resuscitation (N=6 per group). Animals in the shock groups underwent mean arterial blood pressure reduction to 40-45 mmHg for 1 hour via blood withdrawal. During the first two hours following resuscitation by infusion of shed blood plus double that volume of normal saline, rectal temperature of the hypothermic groups were maintained at 32-34°C, while the normothermic groups were maintained between 36-38°C. The hypothermic group was then rewarmed for the final two hours of resuscitation. Results Leukocyte adherence was significantly lower after 2 hours of hypothermic resuscitation compared with normothermic resuscitation: (2.8±0.8 vs 8.3±1.3 adherent leukocytes, p=0.004). Following rewarming, leukocyte adherence remained significantly different between hypothermic and normothermic shock groups: (4.7±1.2 vs 9.5±1.6 adherent leukocytes, p=0.038). Mast cell degranulation index (MDI) was significantly decreased in the hypothermic (1.02±0.04 MDI) vs normothermic (1.22±0.07 MDI) shock groups (p=0.038) after the experiment. Conclusions Induced hypothermia during resuscitation following hemorrhagic shock attenuates microvascular inflammation in rat mesentery. Furthermore, this decrease in inflammation is carried over after rewarming takes place. PMID:25046540

  18. Evaluation of the alert line of partogram in recognizing the need for neonatal resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Bolbol-Haghighi, Nahid; Keshavarz, Maryam; Delvarianzadeh, Mehri; Molzami, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    Background: A major problem of the first moments of childbirth, especially in “prolonged labor,” is perinatal asphyxia which necessitates neonatal resuscitation. This study aimed at evaluating the alert line of the partogram in recognizing the need for neonatal resuscitation 20–30 s after delivery. Materials and Methods: 140 full-term pregnant women were kept under surveillance through using a partogram. In order to decide on the onset of resuscitation, the three indicators of fetal respiration, heart rate, and skin color were used 20–30 s after delivery. The findings from the evaluation of fetal conditions were compared to the position of the ultimate cervical dilatation graph to the alert line of the partogram, and through using appropriate statistical procedures, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative prediction values of the alert line to recognize the need for neonatal resuscitation were computed. Results: There was a significant relationship between the need for neonatal resuscitation within 20–30 seconds after delivery and the graph of the cervical dilatations on the partogram (P = 0.001). The indices of the alert line for predicting the need for resuscitation 20–30 s after birth had a sensitivity of 97.5%, specificity of 80.2%, positive prediction value of 97.2%, and negative prediction value of 98.7%. Conclusions: In mothers who had normal vaginal delivery, with normal fetal heart rate, and with no oxytocin administration or omniotomy, the alert line showed appropriate sensitivity, specificity, and negative prediction value. So, it can assist in predicting the necessity of action for neonatal resuscitation 20–30 s after delivery. PMID:26457092

  19. How we developed a comprehensive resuscitation-based simulation curriculum in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Dagnone, Jeffrey Damon; McGraw, Robert; Howes, Daniel; Messenger, David; Bruder, Eric; Hall, Andrew; Chaplin, Timothy; Szulewski, Adam; Kaul, Tom; O'Brien, Terrence

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, simulation-based education has emerged as a new and exciting adjunct to traditional bedside teaching and learning. Simulation-based education seems particularly relevant to emergency medicine training where residents have to master a very broad skill set, and may not have sufficient real clinical opportunities to achieve competence in each and every skill. In 2006, the Emergency Medicine program at Queen's University set out to enhance our core curriculum by developing and implementing a series of simulation-based teaching sessions with a focus on resuscitative care. The sessions were developed in such as way as to satisfy the four conditions associated with optimum learning and improvement of performance; appropriate difficulty of skill, repetitive practice, motivation, and immediate feedback. The content of the sessions was determined with consideration of the national training requirements set out by the Royal College of Physicians & Surgeons of Canada. Sessions were introduced in a stepwise fashion, starting with a cardiac resuscitation series based on the AHA ACLS guidelines, and leading up to a more advanced resuscitation series as staff became more adept at teaching with simulation, and as residents became more comfortable with this style of learning. The result is a longitudinal resuscitation curriculum that begins with fundamental skills of resuscitation and crisis resource management (CRM) in the first 2 years of residency and progresses through increasingly complex resuscitation cases where senior residents are expected to play a leadership role. This paper documents how we developed, implemented, and evaluated this resuscitation-based simulation curriculum for Emergency Medicine postgraduate trainees, with discussion of some of the challenges encountered. PMID:25410350

  20. Detailed Description of all Deaths in Both the Shock and Traumatic Brain Injury Hypertonic Saline Trials of the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Tisherman, Samuel A; Schmicker, Robert H.; Brasel, Karen J; Bulger, Eileen M; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Minei, Joseph P; Powell, Judy L; Reiff, Donald A; Rizoli, Sandro B; Schreiber, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify causes and timing of mortality in trauma patients to determine targets for future studies. Summary Background Data In trials conducted by the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium (ROC) in patients with traumatic hypovolemic shock (shock) or traumatic brain injury (TBI), hypertonic saline failed to improve survival. Selecting appropriate candidates is challenging. Methods Retrospective review of patients enrolled in multicenter, randomized, trials performed 2006–2009. Inclusion criteria were: injured patients, age ≥ 15 years with hypovolemic shock (systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≤ 70 mm Hg or SBP 71–90 mm Hg with heart rate ≥ 108) or severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) ≤8]. Initial fluid administered was 250 mL of either 7.5% saline with 6% dextran 70, 7.5% saline or 0.9% saline. Results 2061 subjects were enrolled (809 shock, 1252 TBI) and 571 (27.7%) died. Survivors were younger than non-survivors [30(IQR 23) vs 42(34)] and had a higher GCS, though similar hemodynamics. Most deaths occurred despite ongoing resuscitation. Forty six percent of deaths in the TBI cohort were within 24 hours, compared with 82% in the shock cohort and 72% in the cohort with both shock and TBI. Median time to death was 29 hours in the TBI cohort, 2 hours in the shock cohort, and 4 hours in patients with both. Sepsis and multiple organ dysfunction accounted for 2% of deaths. Conclusions Most deaths from trauma with shock or TBI occur within 24 hours of from hypovolemic shock or TBI. Novel resuscitation strategies should focus on early deaths, though prevention may have a greater impact. PMID:25072443

  1. Fluid type and the use of renal replacement therapy in sepsis: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Rochwerg, B; Alhazzani, W; Gibson, A; Ribic, C M; Sindi, A; Heels-Ansdell, D; Thabane, L; Fox-Robichaud, A; Mbuagbaw, L; Szczeklik, W; Alshamsi, F; Altayyar, S; Ip, W; Li, G; Wang, M; Włudarczyk, A; Zhou, Q; Annane, D; Cook, D J; Jaeschke, R; Guyatt, G H

    2015-09-01

    Fluid resuscitation, along with the early administration of antibiotics, is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with sepsis. However, whether differences in resuscitation fluids impact on the requirements for renal replacement therapy (RRT) remains unclear. To examine this issue, we performed a network meta-analysis (NMA), including direct and indirect comparisons, that addressed the effect of different resuscitation fluids on the use of RRT in patients with sepsis. The data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, ACPJC, CINAHL and Cochrane Central Register were searched up to March 2014. Eligible studies included randomized trials reported in any language that enrolled adult patients with sepsis or septic shock and addressed the use of RRT associated with alternative resuscitation fluids. The risk of bias for individual studies and the overall certainty of the evidence were assessed. Ten studies (6664 patients) that included a total of nine direct comparisons were assessed. NMA at the four-node level showed that an increased risk of receiving RRT was associated with fluid resuscitation with starch versus crystalloid [odds ratio (OR) 1.39, 95% credibility interval (CrI) 1.17-1.66, high certainty]. The data suggested no difference between fluid resuscitation with albumin and crystalloid (OR 1.04, 95% CrI 0.78-1.38, moderate certainty) or starch (OR 0.74, 95% CrI 0.53-1.04, low certainty). NMA at the six-node level showed a decreased risk of receiving RRT with balanced crystalloid compared to heavy starch (OR 0.50, 95% CrI 0.34-0.74, moderate certainty) or light starch (OR 0.70, 95% CrI 0.49-0.99, high certainty). There was no significant difference between balanced crystalloid and saline (OR 0.85, 95% CrI 0.56-1.30, low certainty) or albumin (OR 0.82, 95% CrI 0.49-1.37, low certainty). Of note, these trials vary in terms of case mix, fluids evaluated, duration of fluid exposure and risk of bias. Imprecise estimates contributed to low confidence in most estimates of effect

  2. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  3. Purchasing a cycle helmet: are retailers providing adequate advice?

    PubMed Central

    Plumridge, E.; McCool, J.; Chetwynd, J.; Langley, J. D.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the selling of cycle helmets in retail stores with particular reference to the adequacy of advice offered about the fit and securing of helmets. METHODS: All 55 retail outlets selling cycle helmets in Christchurch, New Zealand were studied by participant observation. A research entered each store as a prospective customer and requested assistance to purchase a helmet. She took detailed field notes of the ensuing encounter and these were subsequently transcribed, coded, and analysed. RESULTS: Adequate advice for helmet purchase was given in less than half of the stores. In general the sales assistants in specialist cycle shops were better informed and gave more adequate advice than those in department stores. Those who have good advice also tended to be more good advice also tended to be more active in helping with fitting the helmet. Knowledge about safety standards was apparent in one third of sales assistants. Few stores displayed information for customers about the correct fit of cycle helmets. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the advice and assistance being given to ensure that cycle helmets fit properly is often inadequate and thus the helmets may fail to fulfil their purpose in preventing injury. Consultation between retailers and policy makers is a necessary first step to improving this situation. PMID:9346053

  4. Adequate drainage system design for heap leaching structures.

    PubMed

    Majdi, Abbas; Amini, Mehdi; Nasab, Saeed Karimi

    2007-08-17

    The paper describes an optimum design of a drainage system for a heap leaching structure which has positive impacts on both mine environment and mine economics. In order to properly design a drainage system the causes of an increase in the acid level of the heap which in turn produces severe problems in the hydrometallurgy processes must be evaluated. One of the most significant negative impacts induced by an increase in the acid level within a heap structure is the increase of pore acid pressure which in turn increases the potential of a heap-slide that may endanger the mine environment. In this paper, initially the thickness of gravelly drainage layer is determined via existing empirical equations. Then by assuming that the calculated thickness is constant throughout the heap structure, an approach has been proposed to calculate the required internal diameter of the slotted polyethylene pipes which are used for auxiliary drainage purposes. In order to adequately design this diameter, the pipe's cross-sectional deformation due to stepped heap structure overburden pressure is taken into account. Finally, a design of an adequate drainage system for the heap structure 2 at Sarcheshmeh copper mine is presented and the results are compared with those calculated by exiting equations. PMID:17321044

  5. Totem and taboo: fluids in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Andrew K; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2011-01-01

    The need for early, rapid, and substantial fluid resuscitation in septic patients has long been an article of faith in the intensive care community, a tribal totem that is taboo to question. The results of a recent multicenter trial in septic children in Africa, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, powerfully challenge the fluid paradigm. The salient aspects of the trial need to be understood and reflected upon. In this commentary, we discuss the background to and findings of the trial and explain why they will likely trigger a re-evaluation of our thinking about fluids in sepsis, a re-evaluation that is already happening in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury and in postoperative care. PMID:21672278

  6. Dormant Cells of Staphylococcus aureus Are Resuscitated by Spent Culture Supernatant

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Ben; Dams, Lucy; Wilkinson, Tom S.; Harris, Llinos G.; Bodger, Owen; Mack, Dietrich; Davies, Angharad P.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first in vitro model of dormancy in Staphylococcus aureus, showing that cells are generated which can be resuscitated by addition of spent medium supernatant taken from cultures of the same organism. Over 30 days, culturable counts in dormant cultures of S. aureus SH1000 fell from 106–107 cfu/ml to <10 cfu/ml as measured by the Most Probable Number method in liquid culture, while total counts as determined by microscopy, and supported by data from RT-qPCR, remained around 106–107 cells/ml. Supplementing cultures with 25–50% spent medium resulted in a >600-fold increase in bacterial growth. Resuscitation was a specific effect, greatly reduced by boiling or addition of trypsin to the spent supernatant. Supernatant also effected a reduction in lag phase of dormant cultures. SEM demonstrated the presence of small coccoid cells in dormant cultures. The results are similar to those seen with resuscitation promoting factors (Rpfs) in actinobacteria. This is the first time resuscitation has been demonstrated in Staphylococcus aureus, which is an important human pathogen. A better understanding of control and reactivation of dormant cells could lead to major improvements in managing staphylococcal infections; resuscitation could be an important step in restoring susceptibility to antibiotic treatment. PMID:24523858

  7. Short Duration Combined Mild Hypothermia Improves Resuscitation Outcomes in a Porcine Model of Prolonged Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tao; Yang, Zhengfei; Li, Heng; Ding, Youde; Huang, Zitong; Li, Yongqin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. In this study, our aim was to investigate the effects of combined hypothermia with short duration maintenance on the resuscitation outcomes in a porcine model of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Methods. Fourteen porcine models were electrically induced with VF and untreated for 11 mins. All animals were successfully resuscitated manually and then randomized into two groups: combined mild hypothermia (CH group) and normothermia group (NT group). A combined hypothermia of ice cold saline infusion and surface cooling was implemented in the animals of the CH group and maintained for 4 hours. The survival outcomes and neurological function were evaluated every 24 hours until a maximum of 96 hours. Neuron apoptosis in hippocampus was analyzed. Results. There were no significant differences in baseline physiologies and primary resuscitation outcomes between both groups. Obvious improvements of cardiac output were observed in the CH group at 120, 180, and 240 mins following resuscitation. The animals demonstrated better survival at 96 hours in the CH group when compared to the NT group. In comparison with the NT group, favorable neurological functions were observed in the CH group. Conclusion. Short duration combined cooling initiated after resuscitation improves survival and neurological outcomes in a porcine model of prolonged VF. PMID:26558261

  8. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills. A survey among health and rescue personnel outside hospital].

    PubMed

    Bjørshol, C A

    1996-02-10

    The aim of this study was to survey practical skills and theoretical knowledge in lifesaving first aid among health and rescue workers outside hospital. 45 police officers, 46 firemen, 57 nurses and 42 general practitioners participated. Unprepared, they were presented with a "patient" (resuscitation doll) without respiration or heart beat, and were asked to do what was necessary to revive the "patient". They were afterwards questioned about specific emergency medical situations, how they assessed their own achievement and when they last had training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Only 1% were able to perform satisfactory basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation of a cardiac arrest according to the accepted guidelines, and only 17% ventilated and compressed efficiently with a rhythm of 2:15 or 1:5. 50% believed they were efficient in lifesaving first aid. Those who had taken a course in first aid during the previous year achieved significantly better results than the rest. It is concluded that health and rescue workers outside hospital follow the European Resuscitation Council's guidelines for basic cardiopulmonary resuscitation to only a small degree, but that the situation can be improved by more regular training. PMID:8644057

  9. Are PPS payments adequate? Issues for updating and assessing rates

    PubMed Central

    Sheingold, Steven H.; Richter, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Declining operating margins under Medicare's prospective payment system (PPS) have focused attention on the adequacy of payment rates. The question of whether annual updates to the rates have been too low or cost increases too high has become important. In this article we discuss issues relevant to updating PPS rates and judging their adequacy. We describe a modification to the current framework for recommending annual update factors. This framework is then used to retrospectively assess PPS payment and cost growth since 1985. The preliminary results suggest that current rates are more than adequate to support the cost of efficient care. Also discussed are why using financial margins to evaluate rates is problematic and alternative methods that might be employed. PMID:10127450

  10. Hydrogen sulfide improves neural function in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JI-YAN; ZHANG, MIN-WEI; WANG, JIN-GAO; LI, HUI; WEI, HONG-YAN; LIU, RONG; DAI, GANG; LIAO, XIAO-XING

    2016-01-01

    The alleviation of brain injury is a key issue following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiological process of ischemia-reperfusion injury, and exerts a protective effect on neurons. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of H2S on neural functions following cardiac arrest (CA) in rats. A total of 60 rats were allocated at random into three groups. CA was induced to establish the model and CPR was performed after 6 min. Subsequently, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), hydroxylamine or saline was administered to the rats. Serum levels of H2S, neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100β were determined following CPR. In addition, neurological deficit scoring (NDS), the beam walking test (BWT), prehensile traction test and Morris water maze experiment were conducted. Neuronal apoptosis rates were detected in the hippocampal region following sacrifice. After CPR, as the H2S levels increased or decreased, the serum NSE and S100β concentrations decreased or increased, respectively (P<0.0w. The NDS results of the NaHS group were improved compared with those of the hydroxylamine group at 24 h after CPR (P<0.05). In the Morris water maze experiment, BWT and prehensile traction test the animals in the NaHS group performed best and rats in the hydroxylamine group performed worst. At day 7, the apoptotic index and the expression of caspase-3 were reduced in the hippocampal CA1 region, while the expression of Bcl-2 increased in the NaHS group; and results of the hydroxylamine group were in contrast. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that H2S is able to improve neural function in rats following CPR. PMID:26893650

  11. Emergency room resuscitative thoracotomy: when is it indicated?

    PubMed

    Boyd, M; Vanek, V W; Bourguet, C C

    1992-11-01

    This study was designed to examine the results of emergency room resuscitative thoracotomy (ERRT) and to formulate cost-effective indications for this procedure. A retrospective study was performed of 28 patients who had ERRT at St. Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center, Youngstown, Ohio, during the 4 years from July 1985 through June 1989. The prognostic factors analyzed included mechanism and site of injury, signs of life (SOL), vital signs (VS), age, gender, and prehospital care. The overall survival rate of ERRT was 7% (2 of 28 patients). The survival rate was 18% (2 of 11 patients) with penetrating trauma, and 0% (none of 17 patients) with blunt trauma. The best survival rate was 66% in the subgroup of patients with penetrating trauma and SOL present at the scene and in the emergency room (ER), (two of three patients). Our observations were combined with those of 23 studies from the literature involving 2294 trauma patients who had ERRT. Using meta-analysis, the survival rate was 11% overall. Improved survival was noted for patients with penetrating trauma compared with patients with blunt trauma (14% vs. 2%, p < 0.01). There were no survivors in the group of patients with no SOL at the scene, and there were no neurologically intact survivors among blunt trauma patients with no SOL upon arrival at the ER. An algorithm based on mechanism of injury and presence or absence of SOL at the scene and in the ER is proposed. This algorithm would decrease the number of ERRTs performed by 41% without decreasing the number of neurologically intact survivors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1464921

  12. The patient inflating valve in anaesthesia and resuscitation breathing systems.

    PubMed

    Fenton, P M; Bell, G

    2013-03-01

    Patient inflating valves combined with self-inflating bags are known to all anaesthetists as resuscitation devices and are familiar as components of draw-over anaesthesia systems. Their variants are also commonplace in transfer and home ventilators. However, the many variations in structure and function have led to difficulties in their optimal use, definition and classification. After reviewing the relevant literature, we defined a patient inflating valve as a one-way valve that closes an exit port to enable lung inflation, also permitting exhalation and spontaneous breathing, the actions being automatic. We present a new classification based on the mechanism of valve opening/closure; namely elastic recoil of a flexible flap/diaphragm, sliding spindle opened by a spring/magnet or a hollow balloon collapsed by external pressure. The evolution of these valves has been driven by the difficulties documented in critical incidents, which we have used along with information from modern International Organization for Standardization standards to identify 13 ideal properties, the top six of which are non-jamming, automatic, no bypass effect, no rebreathing or air entry at patient end, low resistance, robust and easy to service. The Ambu and the Laerdal valves have remained popular due to their simplicity and reliability. Two new alternatives, the Fenton and Diamedica valves, offer the benefits of location away from the patient while retaining a small functional dead space. They also offer the potential for greater use of hybrid continuous flow/draw-over systems that can operate close to atmospheric pressure. The reliable application of positive end-expiratory pressure/continuous positive airway pressure remains a challenge. PMID:23530783

  13. Evaluation of manual resuscitators used in ICUs in Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Tatiana de Arruda; Forti, Germano; Volpe, Márcia Souza; Beraldo, Marcelo do Amaral; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro; Tucci, Mauro Roberto

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance of manual resuscitators (MRs) used in Brazil in accordance with international standards. METHODS: Using a respiratory system simulator, four volunteer physiotherapists employed eight MRs (five produced in Brazil and three produced abroad), which were tested for inspiratory and expiratory resistance of the patient valve; functioning of the pressure-limiting valve; and tidal volume (VT) generated when the one-handed and two-handed techniques were used. The tests were performed and analyzed in accordance with the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F920-93 criteria. RESULTS: Expiratory resistance was greater than 6 cmH2O . L−1 . s−1 in only one MR. The pressure-limiting valve, a feature of five of the MRs, opened at low pressures (< 17 cmH2O), and the maximal pressure was 32.0-55.9 cmH2O. Mean VT varied greatly among the MRs tested. The mean VT values generated with the one-handed technique were lower than the 600 mL recommended by the ASTM. In the situations studied, mean VT was generally lower from the Brazilian-made MRs that had a pressure-limiting valve. CONCLUSIONS: The resistances imposed by the patient valve met the ASTM criteria in all but one of the MRs tested. The pressure-limiting valves of the Brazilian-made MRs usually opened at low pressures, providing lower VT values in the situations studied, especially when the one-handed technique was used, suggesting that both hands should be used and that the pressure-limiting valve should be closed whenever possible. PMID:24310633

  14. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds the unborn baby (fetus) during pregnancy. It is ... in the womb, the baby floats in the amniotic fluid. The amount of amniotic fluid is greatest at ...

  15. Nurses' Perceptions of Role, Team Performance, and Education Regarding Resuscitation in the Adult Medical-Surgical Patient.

    PubMed

    O'Donoghue, Sharon C; DeSanto-Madeya, Susan; Fealy, Natalie; Saba, Christine R; Smith, Stacey; McHugh, Allison T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore nurses' perception of their roles, team performance, and educational needs during resuscitation using an electronic survey. Findings provide direction for clinical practice, nursing education, and future research to improve resuscitation care. PMID:26665866

  16. Assessment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation practices in emergency departments for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims in Lebanon

    PubMed Central

    Noureddine, Samar; Avedissian, Tamar; Isma’eel, Hussain; El Sayed, Mazen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The survival rate of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims in Lebanon is low. A national policy on resuscitation practice is lacking. This survey explored the practices of emergency physicians related to the resuscitation of OHCA victims in Lebanon. Methods: A sample of 705 physicians working in emergency departments (EDs) was recruited and surveyed using the LimeSurvey software (Carsten Schmitz, Germany). Seventy-five participants responded, yielding 10.64% response rate. Results: The most important factors in the participants’ decision to initiate or continue resuscitation were presence of pulse on arrival (93.2%), underlying cardiac rhythm (93.1%), the physician’s ethical duty to resuscitate (93.2%), transport time to the ED (89%), and down time (84.9%). The participants were optimistic regarding the survival of OHCA victims (58.1% reporting > 10% survival) and reported frequent resuscitation attempts in medically futile situations. The most frequently reported challenges during resuscitation decisions were related to pressure or presence of victim’s family (38.8%) and lack of policy (30%). Conclusion: In our setting, physicians often rely on well-established criteria for initiating/continuing resuscitation; however, their decisions are also influenced by cultural factors such as victim’s family wishes. The findings support the need for a national policy on resuscitation of OHCA victims. PMID:27512333

  17. [New Insights into Maternal Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation--Significance of Simulation Research and Training].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Majima, Nozomi; Minami, Toshiaki

    2015-08-01

    Pregnancy-related mortality, estimated to occur in approximately 1: 50,000 deliveries, is rare in developed countries. The 2010 American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Resuscitation emphasize the importance of high-quality chest compression as a key determinant of successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation. During pregnancy, the uterus can compress the inferior vena cava, impeding venous return and thereby reducing stroke volume and cardiac output. To maximize the effectiveness of chest compressions in pregnancy, the AHA guidelines recommend the 27-30 degrees left-lateral tilt (LLT) position. When CPR is performed on parturients in the LLT position, chest compressions will probably be more effective if performed with the operator standing on the left side of the patient. The videolaryngoscope Pentax-AWS Airwayscope (AWS) was found to be an effective tool for airway management during chest compressions in 27 LLT simulations, suggesting that the AWS may be a useful device for airway management during maternal resuscitation. PMID:26442426

  18. Not for resuscitation instructions: the law for adult patients in the UK.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    Case Scenario: Marion, aged 55 years, has suffered from multiple sclerosis for 10 years and had reached the stage where she was wheelchair bound and had become extremely depressed. She was admitted to hospital for review of her medication and treatment plan. She discussed with a nurse what should happen in the event of her suffering a cardiac arrest and stated that she would not wish to be resuscitated. She had not discussed this with her relatives, nor had she put the instructions in writing. Two days later, when her daughter was visiting her, she had a cardiac arrest. Her daughter was anxious every effort should be made to resuscitate her and asked the nurse to call the arrest team. However, the nurse said that Marion had told her that she did not want to be resuscitated and that was therefore binding upon her. The daughter disagreed. What is the law? PMID:15389142

  19. Hospital implementation of resuscitation guidelines and review of CPR training programmes: a nationwide study.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anders S; Lauridsen, Kasper G; Adelborg, Kasper; Løfgren, Bo

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guideline implementation and CPR training in hospitals. This nationwide study included mandatory resuscitation protocols from each Danish hospital. Protocols were systematically reviewed for adherence to the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2010 guidelines and CPR training in each hospital. Data were included from 45 of 47 hospitals. Adherence to the ERC basic life support (BLS) algorithm was 49%, whereas 63 and 58% of hospitals adhered to the recommended chest compression depth and rate. Adherence to the ERC advanced life support (ALS) algorithm was 81%. Hospital BLS course duration was [median (interquartile range)] 2.3 (1.5-2.5) h, whereas ALS course duration was 4.0 (2.5-8.0) h. Implementation of ERC 2010 guidelines on BLS is limited in Danish hospitals 2 years after guideline publication, whereas the majority of hospitals adhere to the ALS algorithm. CPR training differs among hospitals. PMID:26181002

  20. [Tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax following tracheal perforation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation].

    PubMed

    Buschmann, C T; Tsokos, M; Kurz, S D; Kleber, C

    2015-07-01

    Tension pneumothorax can occur at any time during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with external cardiac massage and invasive ventilation either from primary or iatrogenic rib fractures with concomitant pleural or parenchymal injury. Airway injury can also cause tension pneumothorax during CPR. This article presents the case of a 41-year-old woman who suffered cardiopulmonary arrest after undergoing elective mandibular surgery. During CPR the upper airway could not be secured by orotracheal intubation due to massive craniofacial soft tissue swelling. A surgical airway was established with obviously unrecognized iatrogenic tracheal perforation and subsequent development of tension pneumomediastinum and tension pneumothorax during ventilation. Neither the tension pneumomediastinum nor the tension pneumothorax were decompressed and accordingly resuscitation efforts remained unsuccessful. This case illustrates the need for a structured approach to resuscitate patients with ventilation problems regarding decompression of tension pneumomediastinum and/or tension pneumothorax during CPR. PMID:26036317

  1. Perioperative Intravascular Fluid Assessment and Monitoring: A Narrative Review of Established and Emerging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sumit; Kuschner, Ware G.; Lighthall, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessments of intravascular fluid status are an essential part of perioperative care and necessary in the management of the hemodynamically unstable patient. Goal-directed fluid management can facilitate resuscitation of the hypovolemic patient, reduce the risk of fluid overload, reduce the risk of the injudicious use of vasopressors and inotropes, and improve clinical outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the strengths and limitations of a spectrum of noninvasive and invasive techniques for assessing and monitoring intravascular volume status and fluid responsiveness in the perioperative and critically ill patient. PMID:21785588

  2. Fluid creep: the pendulum hasn't swung back yet!

    PubMed

    Cartotto, Robert; Zhou, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Fluid creep was recognized nearly a decade ago. Although many burn centers are now aware of fluid creep, it is not clear whether any reversal of this phenomenon has occurred. The purpose of this study was to examine whether we have made any headway in reversing fluid creep at our facility. This is a retrospective review of the first 48 hours of fluid resuscitation using the Parkland formula among patients with >/=15% TBSA burns admitted to our adult regional burn centre (BC) between January 1, 2000, and May 30, 2008. All values are reported as the mean +/- SD. There were 196 consecutive resuscitations available for analysis. Group characteristics were age 46 +/- 18 years, burn size 31% +/- 15% (range 15-81%), and full-thickness burn size 13% +/- 16%, with a 26% incidence of inhalation injury. The delay between injury and BC admission was 4.5 +/- 2.6 hours. During this time, a total crystalloid volume of 1.5 +/- 1.0 ml/kg/%burn, or nearly 40% of the recommended 24-hour Parkland volume, was administered. Total crystalloids given in the first 24 hours (prior to and within the BC) were 6.3 +/- 2.9 ml/kg/%TBSA, with 76% of all resuscitations receiving >4.3 ml/kg/%burn (the upper limit predicted by Baxter). Hourly urine output (UO) in the first 24 hours postburn was 1.2 +/- 0.7 ml/kg/h. There were minimal insignificant downward trends in the volume of resuscitation fluids and the mean hourly UO of the 194 cases over the 8-year period of the study. In contrast, use of colloids (5% albumin) and formal measurement of intraabdominal pressures increased during the same time period. Despite awareness of fluid creep, we have not substantially reversed this phenomenon, primarily because of failure to titrate down fluid infusion rates and by accepting higher than recommended UO. Excessive pre-BC fluid also continues to be a contributing factor. PMID:20616649

  3. Basic life support knowledge of secondary school students in cardiopulmonary resuscitation training using a song

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca del Pozo, Francisco Javier; Canales Velis, Nancy Beatriz; Andrade Barahona, Mario Miguel; Siggers, Aidan; Lopera, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of a “cardiopulmonary resuscitation song” in improving the basic life support skills of secondary school students. Methods This pre-test/post-test control design study enrolled secondary school students from two middle schools randomly chosen in Córdoba, Andalucia, Spain. The study included 608 teenagers. A random sample of 87 students in the intervention group and 35 in the control group, aged 12-14 years were selected. The intervention included a cardiopulmonary resuscitation song and video. A questionnaire was conducted at three-time points: pre-intervention, one month and eight months post-intervention. Results On global knowledge of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, there were no significant differences between the intervention group and the control group in the trial pre-intervention and at the month post-intervention. However, at 8 months there were significant differences with a p-value = 0.000 (intervention group, 95% CI: 6.39 to 7.13 vs. control group, 95% CI: 4.75 to 5.92), (F (1,120)=16.644, p= 0.000). In addition, significant differences about students’ basic life support knowledge about chest compressions at eight months post-intervention (F(1,120)=15.561, p=0.000) were found. Conclusions Our study showed that incorporating the song component in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching increased its effectiveness and the ability to remember the cardiopulmonary resuscitation algorithm. Our study highlights the need for different methods in the cardiopulmonary resuscitation teaching to facilitate knowledge retention and increase the number of positive outcomes after sudden cardiac arrest. PMID:27442599

  4. Use of Naloxone by Emergency Medical Services during Opioid Drug Overdose Resuscitation Efforts.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Steven Allan; Mercado-Crespo, Melissa C; Spelke, M Bridget; Paulozzi, Leonard; Sugerman, David E; Hillis, Susan D; Stanley, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Naloxone administration is an important component of resuscitation attempts by emergency medical services (EMS) for opioid drug overdoses. However, EMS providers must first recognize the possibility of opioid overdose in clinical encounters. As part of a public health response to an outbreak of opioid overdoses in Rhode Island, we examined missed opportunities for naloxone administration and factors potentially influencing EMS providers' decision to administer naloxone. We reviewed medical examiner files on all individuals who died of an opioid-related drug overdose in Rhode Island from January 1, 2012 through March 31, 2014, underwent attempted resuscitation by EMS providers, and had records available to assess for naloxone administration. We evaluated whether these individuals received naloxone as part of their resuscitation efforts and compared patient and scene characteristics of those who received naloxone to those who did not receive naloxone via chi-square, t-test, and logistic regression analyses. One hundred and twenty-four individuals who underwent attempted EMS resuscitation died due to opioid overdose. Naloxone was administered during EMS resuscitation attempts in 82 (66.1%) of cases. Females were nearly three-fold as likely not to receive naloxone as males (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.2-7.0; p-value 0.02). Additionally, patients without signs of potential drug abuse also had a greater than three-fold odds of not receiving naloxone (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.2-9.2; p-value 0.02). Older individuals, particularly those over age 50, were more likely not to receive naloxone than victims younger than age 30 (OR 4.8; 95% CI 1.3-17.4; p-value 0.02). Women, older individuals, and those patients without clear signs of illicit drug abuse, were less likely to receive naloxone in EMS resuscitation attempts. Heightened clinical suspicion for opioid overdose is important given the recent increase in overdoses among patients due to prescription opioids. PMID:26383533

  5. Marked variation in newborn resuscitation practice: A national survey in the UK☆

    PubMed Central

    Mann, Chantelle; Ward, Carole; Grubb, Mark; Hayes-Gill, Barrie; Crowe, John; Marlow, Neil; Sharkey, Don

    2012-01-01

    Background Although international newborn resuscitation guidance has been in force for some time, there are no UK data on current newborn resuscitation practices. Objective Establish delivery room (DR) resuscitation practices in the UK, and identify any differences between neonatal intensive care units (NICU), and other local neonatal services. Methods We conducted a structured two-stage survey of DR management, among UK neonatal units during 2009–2010 (n = 192). Differences between NICU services (tertiary level) and other local neonatal services (non-tertiary) were analysed using Fisher's exact and Student's t-tests. Results There was an 89% response rate (n = 171). More tertiary NICUs institute DR CPAP than non-tertiary units (43% vs. 16%, P = 0.0001) though there was no significant difference in frequency of elective intubation and surfactant administration for preterm babies. More tertiary units commence DR resuscitation in air (62% vs. 29%, P < 0.0001) and fewer in 100% oxygen (11% vs. 41%, P < 0.0001). Resuscitation of preterm babies in particular, commences with air in 56% of tertiary units. Significantly more tertiary units use DR pulse oximeters (58% vs. 29%, P < 0.01) and titrate oxygen based on saturations. Almost all services use occlusive wrapping to maintain temperature for preterm infants. Conclusions In the UK, there are many areas of good evidence based DR practice. However, there is marked variation in management, including between units of different designation, suggesting a need to review practice to fulfil new resuscitation guidance, which will have training and resource implications. PMID:22245743

  6. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  7. New evidence in trauma resuscitation - is 1:1:1 the answer?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic injury is a common problem, with over five million worldwide deaths from trauma per year. An estimated 10 to 20% of these deaths are potentially preventable with better control of bleeding. Damage control resuscitation involves early delivery of plasma and platelets as a primary resuscitation approach to minimize trauma-induced coagulopathy. Plasma, red blood cell and platelet ratios of 1:1:1 appear to be the best substitution for fresh whole blood; however, the current literature consists only of survivor bias-prone observational studies. PMID:24472306

  8. District nurse responsibilities in relation to 'do not attempt resuscitation' decisions.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2014-07-01

    The Court of Appeal has ruled that patients and their relatives have the right to be consulted prior to a 'do not attempt resuscitation' notice being placed on file by a health professional. Failing to do so would be in breach of the patient's right to respect for a private and family life under the European Convention of Human Rights, article 8. This article sets out the steps that district nurses must take to ensure that 'do not attempt resuscitation' notices placed on the file of their patients are lawful. PMID:25039346

  9. The impact of the code drugs: cardioactive medications in cardiac arrest resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Kelly; Breed, Meghan; Alibertis, Kostas; Brady, William J

    2012-02-01

    The goal of treating patients who present with cardiac arrest is to intervene as quickly as possible to affect the best possible outcome. The mainstays of these interventions, including early activation of the emergency response team, early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, and early defibrillation, are essential components with demonstrated positive impact on resuscitation outcomes. Conversely, the use of the code drugs as a component of advanced life support has not benefited these patients to the same extent as the basic interventions in a general. Although short-term outcomes are improved as a function of these medications, the final outcome has not been altered significantly in most instances. PMID:22107975

  10. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  11. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  12. Adequate peritoneal dialysis: theoretical model and patient treatment.

    PubMed

    Tast, C

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between adequate PD with sufficient weekly Kt/V (2.0) and Creatinine clearance (CCR) (60l) and necessary daily dialysate volume. This recommended parameter was the result of a recent multi-centre study (CANUSA). For this there were 40 patients in our hospital examined and compared in 1996, who carried out PD for at least 8 weeks and up to 6 years. These goals (CANUSA) are easily attainable in the early treatment of many individuals with a low body surface area (BSA). With higher BSA or missing RRF (Residual Renal Function) the daily dose of dialysis must be adjusted. We found it difficult to obtain the recommended parameters and tried to find a solution to this problem. The simplest method is to increase the volume or exchange rate. The most expensive method is to change from CAPD to APD with the possibility of higher volume or exchange rates. Selection of therapy must take into consideration: 1. patient preference, 2. body mass, 3. peritoneal transport rates, 4. ability to perform therapy, 5. cost of therapy and 6. risk of peritonitis. With this information in mind, an individual prescription can be formulated and matched to the appropriate modality of PD. PMID:10392062

  13. DARHT - an `adequate` EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides a case study that is interesting for many reasons. The EIS was prepared quickly, in the face of a lawsuit, for a project with unforeseen environmental impacts, for a facility that was deemed urgently essential to national security. Following judicial review the EIS was deemed to be {open_quotes}adequate.{close_quotes} DARHT is a facility now being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. DARHT will be used to evaluate the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons, evaluate conventional munitions and study high-velocity impact phenomena. DARHT will be equipped with two accelerator-driven, high-intensity X-ray machines to record images of materials driven by high explosives. DARHT will be used for a variety of hydrodynamic tests, and DOE plans to conduct some dynamic experiments using plutonium at DARHT as well.

  14. Better outcome after pediatric resuscitation is still a dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Kishore, Kamal; Lata, Indu

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric cardiac arrest is not a single problem. Although most episodes of pediatric cardiac arrest occur as complications and progression of respiratory failure and shock. Sudden cardiac arrest may result from abrupt and unexpected arrhythmias. With a better-tailored therapy, we can optimize the outcome. In the hospital, cardiac arrest often develops as a progression of respiratory failure and shock. Typically half or more of pediatric victims of in-hospital arrest have pre-existing respiratory failure and one-third or more have shock, although these figures vary somewhat among reporting hospitals. When in-hospital respiratory arrest or failure is treated before the development of cardiac arrest, survival ranges from 60% to 97%. Bradyarrthmia, asystole or pulseless electric activity (PEA) were recorded as an initial rhythm in half or more of the recent reports of in-hospital cardiac arrest, with survival to hospital discharge ranging from 22% to 40%. Data allowing characterization of out of hospital pediatric arrest are limited, although existing data support the long-held belief that as with hospitalized children, cardiac arrest most often occurs as a progression of respiratory failure or shock to cardiac arrest with bradyasystole rhythm. Although VF (Ventricular fibrillation, is a very rapid, uncoordinated, ineffective series of contractions throughout the lower chambers of the heart. Unless stopped, these chaotic impulses are fatal) and VT (Ventricular tachycardia is a rapid heartbeat that originates in one of the ventricles of the heart. To be classified as tachycardia, the heart rate is usually at least 100 beats per minute) are not common out-of-cardiac arrest in children, they are more likely to be present with sudden, witnessed collapse, particularly among adolescents. Pre-hospital care till the late 1980s was mainly concerned with adult care, and the initial focus for pediatric resuscitation was provision of oxygen and ventilation, with initial rhythm at

  15. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  16. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  17. Intravenous fluids: should we go with the flow?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive monitoring should be used when prescribing intravenous fluids for volume resuscitation. The extent and duration of tissue hypoperfusion determine the severity of cellular damage, which should be kept to a minimum with timely volume substitution. Optimizing the filling status to normovolaemia may boost the resuscitation success. Macrocirculatory pressure values are not sensitive in this indication. While the Surviving Sepsis Campaign guidelines focus on these conventional pressure parameters, the guidelines from the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) on perioperative bleeding management recommend individualized care by monitoring the actual volume status and correcting hypovolaemia promptly if present. The motto is: 'give what is missing'. The credo of the ESA guidelines is to use management algorithms with predefined intervention triggers. Stop signals should help in avoiding hyper-resuscitation. The high-quality evidence-based S3 guidelines on volume therapy in adults have recently been prepared by 14 German scientific societies. Statements include, for example, repeated clinical inspection including turgor of the skin and mucosa. Adjunctive laboratory parameters such as central venous oxygen saturation, lactate, base excess and haematocrit should be considered. The S3 guidelines propose the use of flow-based and/or dynamic preload parameters for guiding volume therapy. Fluid challenges and/or the leg-raising test (autotransfusion) should be performed. The statement from the Co-ordination group for Mutual Recognition and Decentralized Procedures--Human informs healthcare professionals to consider applying individualized medicine and using sensitive monitoring to assess hypovolaemia. The authorities encourage a personalized goal-directed volume resuscitation technique. PMID:26728428

  18. Helicopter In-flight Resuscitation with Freeze-dried Plasma of a Patient with a High-velocity Gunshot Wound to the Neck in Afghanistan - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gellerfors, Mikael; Linde, Joacim; Gryth, Dan

    2015-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage with coagulopathy is one of the leading causes of preventable death in the battlefield. The development of freeze-dried plasma (FDP) allows for early treatment with coagulation-optimizing resuscitation fluid in the prehospital setting. This report describes the first prehospital use of FDP in a patient with carotid artery injury due to a high-velocity gunshot wound (HVGSW) to the neck. It also describes in-flight constitution and administration of FDP in a Medevac Helicopter. Early administration of FDP may contribute to hemodynamic stabilization and reduction in trauma-induced coagulopathy and acidosis. However, large-scale studies are needed to define the prehospital use of FDP and other blood products. PMID:26323858

  19. The Utility of 3D Left Atrial Volume and Mitral Flow Velocities as Guides for Acute Volume Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Claudia M.; Rose, David D.; Fleming, Neal W.

    2015-01-01

    Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP) is the foundation of cardiac function assessment. Because of difficulties and risks associated with its direct measurement, correlates of LVEDP derived by pulmonary artery (PA) catheterization or transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) are commonly adopted. TEE has the advantage of being less invasive; however TEE-based estimation of LVEDP using correlates such as left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) has technical difficulties that limit its clinical usefulness. Using intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) as a controlled hemorrhagic model, we examined various mitral flow parameters and three-dimensional reconstructions of left atrial volume as surrogates of LVEDP. Our results demonstrate that peak E wave velocity and left atrial end-diastolic volume (LAEDV) correlated with known changes in intravascular volume associated with ANH. Although left atrial volumetric analysis was done offline in our study, recent advances in echocardiographic software may allow for continuous display and real-time calculation of LAEDV. Along with the ease and reproducibility of acquiring Doppler images of flow across the mitral valve, these two correlates of LVEDP may justify a more widespread use of TEE to optimize intraoperative fluid management. The clinical applicability of peak E wave velocity and LAEDV still needs to be validated during uncontrolled resuscitation. PMID:26236733

  20. A Curriculum-Based Health Service Program in Hypertension, Diabetes, Venereal Diseases and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Samuel T.; Janer, Ann L.

    1978-01-01

    Special screening and education courses in hypertension, diabetes, venereal disease, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were added as electives at the Auburn University School of Pharmacy. Applied learning experiences for students and services to the community are achieved. Course goals and content and behavioral objectives in each area are…

  1. Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR)--The Role of the School Nurse. Position Statement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Christine M.; Jordan, Alicia; Lambert, Patrice; Porter, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that each student with a Do Not Attempt Resuscitation (DNAR) order have an Individualized Healthcare Plan (IHP) and an Emergency Care Plan (ECP) developed by the registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse) with input from parents or guardians,…

  2. Respiratory and Cardiac Resuscitation Skills of the High School Athletic Coach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furney, Steven

    Athletic coaches (n=149) responded to a survey questionnaire on two cardiac and respiratory emergency procedures: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and the Heimlich maneuver. The coaches were asked to indicate how proficient they were at these skills, how important these skills were to their job, the availability and the need for in-service…

  3. Study of Survival Rate After Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) in Hospitals of Kermanshah in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Afshin; Jalali, Amir; Almasi, Afshin; Naderipour, Arsalan; Kalhori, Reza Pourmirza; Khodadadi, Amineh

    2015-01-01

    Background: After CPR, the follow-up of survival rate and caused complications are the most important practices of the medical group. This study was performed aimed at determining the follow-up results after CPR in patients of university hospitals in Kermanshah in 2014. Methods: In this prospective study, 320 samples were examined. A purposive sampling method was used, and data was collected using a researcher-made information form with content and face validity and reliability of r= 0.79. Data was analyzed with STATA9 software and statistical tests, including calculation of the success rate, relative risk (RR), chi-square and Fisher at significance level of P < 0.05. Results: The initial success rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation was equal to 15.3%, while the ultimate success rate (discharged alive from the hospital) was as 10.6%. The six-month success rate after resuscitation was 8.78% than those who were discharged alive. There were no significant statistical differences between different age groups regarding the initial success rate of resuscitation (P = 0.14), and the initial resuscitation success rate was higher in patients in morning shift (P = 0.02). Conclusion: By the results of study, it is recommended to increase the medical - nursing knowledge and techniques for personnel in the evening and night shifts. Also, an appropriate dissemination of health care staff in working shifts should be done to increase the success rate of CPR procedure. PMID:25560341

  4. What's new in resuscitation strategies for the patient with multiple trauma?

    PubMed

    Curry, N; Davis, P W

    2012-07-01

    The last decade has seen a sea change in the management of major haemorrhage following traumatic injury. Damage control resuscitation (DCR), a strategy combining the techniques of permissive hypotension, haemostatic resuscitation and damage control surgery has been widely adopted as the preferred method of resuscitation in patients with haemorrhagic shock. The over-riding goals of DCR are to mitigate metabolic acidosis, hypothermia and coagulopathy and stabilise the patient as early as possible in a critical care setting. This narrative review examines the background to these changes in resuscitation practice, discusses the central importance of traumatic coagulopathy in driving these changes particularly in relation to the use of high FFP:RBC ratio and explores methods of predicting, diagnosing and treating the coagulopathy with massive transfusion protocols as well as newer coagulation factor concentrates. We discuss other areas of trauma haemorrhage management including the role of hypertonic saline and interventional radiology. Throughout this review we specifically examine whether the available evidence supports these newer practices. PMID:22487163

  5. Evaluation of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation curriculum in a low resource environment

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Camila B.; Janiszewski, David; Aksamit, Deborah; Kateh, Francis; Sampson, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate whether a 2-day International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) Universal Algorithm-based curriculum taught in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia increases local health care provider knowledge and skill comfort level. Methods A combined basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum was developed for low-resource settings that included lectures and low-fidelity manikin-based simulations. In March 2014, the curriculum was taught to healthcare providers in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia. In a quality assurance review, participants were evaluated for knowledge and comfort levels with resuscitation before and after the workshop. They were also videotaped during simulation sessions and evaluated on standardized performance metrics. Results Fifty-two hospital staff completed both pre- and post-curriculum surveys. The median score was 45% pre-curriculum and 82% post-curriculum (p<0.00001). The median provider comfort level score was 4 of 5 pre-curriculum and 5 of 5 post-curriculum (p<0.00001). During simulations, 93.2% of participants performed the pulse check within 10 seconds, and 97.7% performed defibrillation within 180 seconds. Conclusion Clinician knowledge of and comfort level with CPR increased significantly after participating in our curriculum. A CPR curriculum based on lectures and low-fidelity manikin simulations may be an effective way to teach resuscitation in this low-resource setting. PMID:26547092

  6. Evaluation of a Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation Curriculum for Junior and Senior High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderschmidt, Hannelore Falk

    An adaptation of the standard American Heart Association training program was utilized to teach secondary school students cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) procedures. Students, at both junior and senior high levels, were randomly assigned to practice and no-practice groups, of ten students each. All were taught CPR procedures didactically, but…

  7. Effects of Age, Gender, School Class on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Skills of Nigerian Secondary School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyeaso, Adedamola Olutoyin; Onyeaso, Chukwudi Ochi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The need for training of schoolchildren on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as potential bystander CPR providers is growing globally but Nigeria is still behind and lacks basic necessary data. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of age, gender and school class on CPR skills of Nigerian secondary school…

  8. Understanding the Impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training on Participants' Perceived Confidence Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordheim, Shawn M.

    2013-01-01

    This pre-experimental, participatory action research study investigated the impact of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training on participants' perceived confidence and willingness to initiate CPR. Parents of seventh and eighth grade students were surveyed. Parent participants were asked to watch the American Heart Association's Family and…

  9. Challenging the 4- to 5-minute rule: from perimortem cesarean to resuscitative hysterotomy.

    PubMed

    Rose, Carl H; Faksh, Arij; Traynor, Kyle D; Cabrera, Daniel; Arendt, Katherine W; Brost, Brian C

    2015-11-01

    Although perimortem delivery has been recorded in the medical literature for millennia, the procedural intent has evolved to the current fetocentric approach, predicating timing of delivery following maternal cardiopulmonary arrest to optimize neonatal outcome. We suggest a call to action to reinforce the concept that if the uterus is palpable at or above the umbilicus, preparations for delivery should be made simultaneous with initiation of maternal resuscitative efforts; if maternal condition is not rapidly reversible, hysterotomy with delivery should be performed regardless of fetal viability or elapsed time since arrest. Cognizant of the difficulty in determining precise timing of arrest in clinical practice, if fetal status is already compromised further delay while attempting to assess fetal heart rate, locating optimal surgical equipment, or transporting to an operating room will result in unnecessary worsening of both maternal and fetal condition. Even if intrauterine demise has already occurred, maternal resuscitative efforts will typically be markedly improved following delivery with uterine decompression. Consequently we suggest that perimortem cesarean delivery be renamed "resuscitative hysterotomy" to reflect the mutual optimization of resuscitation efforts that would potentially provide earlier and more substantial benefit to both mother and baby. PMID:26212180

  10. Implementation of a High-Performance Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Protocol at a Collegiate Emergency Medical Services Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefos, Kathryn A.; Nable, Jose V.

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a significant public health issue. Although OHCA occurs relatively infrequently in the collegiate environment, educational institutions with on-campus emergency medical services (EMS) agencies are uniquely positioned to provide high-quality resuscitation care in an expedient fashion. Georgetown University's…

  11. Ischemia, resuscitation, and reperfusion: mechanisms of tissue injury and prospects for protection.

    PubMed

    Krause, G S; Kumar, K; White, B C; Aust, S D; Wiegenstein, J G

    1986-04-01

    Since its introduction in 1960, CPR has evolved into a complex program involving not only the medical community but also the lay public. Currently, program activities include instruction of the lay public in basic life support techniques, development and deployment of emergency medical systems, recommendations for drug protocols for advanced cardiac life support and, most recently, introduction of new methods for tissue protection following resuscitation. After 25 years of experience, we are beginning to understand the pathophysiology of tissue ischemia during cardiac arrest and the interventions required to improve chances of survival and quality of life of the cardiac arrest victim. Recent data in the literature suggest that modification of certain interventions in the resuscitation program may be needed. The poor neurologic outcomes with prolonged standard CPR show that it is not protective after 4 to 6 minutes of cardiac arrest. Modifications to this technique, including SVC-CPR or IAC-CPR, have not been shown to increase resuscitability or hospital discharge rates. Human studies of open-chest cardiac massage are needed to evaluate this option. Defibrillation is the definitive treatment for ventricular fibrillation. Greater emphasis should be placed on the earliest possible delivery of this treatment modality. Computerized defibrillators may provide greater and earlier access to defibrillation in the homes of patients at high risk of ventricular fibrillation. They may also be applicable by untrained public service personnel (police and firemen), individuals in geographically inaccessible areas (aircraft), or emergency medical technicians in rural areas where skill retention is a significant problem. Calcium has no proved benefit in cardiac resuscitation. There is biochemical evidence that it may be harmful in brain resuscitation. Its use in resuscitation should be discontinued. The dose of epinephrine currently advocated in the ACLS protocols may be inadequate

  12. Hypertonic saline resuscitation enhances blood pressure recovery and decreases organ injury following hemorrhage in acute alcohol intoxicated rodents

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, Jesse K.; Whitaker, Annie M.; Molina, Patricia E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) impairs the hemodynamic and arginine vasopressin (AVP) counter-regulation to hemorrhagic shock (HS) and lactated Ringer’s (LR) fluid resuscitation (FR). The mechanism of AAI-induced suppression of AVP release in response to HS involves accentuated nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory tone. In contrast, AAI does not prevent AVP response to increased osmolarity produced by hypertonic saline (HTS) infusion. We hypothesized that FR with HTS during AAI would enhance AVP release by decreasing PVN NO inhibitory tone subsequently improving mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and organ perfusion. Methods Male Sprague Dawley rats received a 15h alcohol infusion (2.5g/kg + 0.3 g/kg/h) or dextrose (DEX) prior to HS (40mmHg × 60 min) and FR with HTS (7.5%; 4ml/kg) or LR (2.4 × blood volume removed). Organ blood flow was determined and brains collected for NO content at 2h post-FR. Results HTS improved MABP recovery in AAI (109 vs 80mmHg) and DEX (114 vs 83mmHg) animals compared to LR. This was associated with higher (>60%) circulating AVP levels at 2h post-FR than those detected in LR animals in both groups. Neither AAI alone nor HS in DEX animals resuscitated with LR altered organ blood flow. In AAI animals, HS and FR with LR reduced blood flow to liver (72%), small intestine (65%), and large intestine (67%) compared to shams. FR with HTS improved liver (3-fold) and small intestine (2-fold) blood flow compared to LR in AAI-HS animals. The enhanced MABP response to HTS was prevented by pretreatment with a systemic AVP V1a receptor antagonist. HTS decreased PVN NO content in both groups 2h post-FR. Conclusions These results suggest that FR with HTS in AAI results in removal of central NO inhibition of AVP, restoring AVP levels and improving MABP and organ perfusion in AAI-HS. PMID:23147176

  13. Controversies in fluid therapy: Type, dose and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    McDermid, Robert C; Raghunathan, Karthik; Romanovsky, Adam; Shaw, Andrew D; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2014-01-01

    Fluid therapy is perhaps the most common intervention received by acutely ill hospitalized patients; however, a number of critical questions on the efficacy and safety of the type and dose remain. In this review, recent insights derived from randomized trials in terms of fluid type, dose and toxicity are discussed. We contend that the prescription of fluid therapy is context-specific and that any fluid can be harmful if administered inappropriately. When contrasting ‘‘crystalloid vs colloid’’, differences in efficacy are modest but differences in safety are significant. Differences in chloride load and strong ion difference across solutions appear to be clinically important. Phases of fluid therapy in acutely ill patients are recognized, including acute resuscitation, maintaining homeostasis, and recovery phases. Quantitative toxicity (fluid overload) is associated with adverse outcomes and can be mitigated when fluid therapy based on functional hemodynamic parameters that predict volume responsiveness and minimization of non-essential fluid. Qualitative toxicity (fluid type), in particular for iatrogenic acute kidney injury and metabolic acidosis, remain a concern for synthetic colloids and isotonic saline, respectively. Physiologically balanced crystalloids may be the ‘‘default’’ fluid for acutely ill patients and the role for colloids, in particular hydroxyethyl starch, is increasingly unclear. We contend the prescription of fluid therapy is analogous to the prescription of any drug used in critically ill patients. PMID:24834399

  14. Recommended guidelines for reviewing, reporting, and conducting research on post-resuscitation care: the Utstein style.

    PubMed

    Langhelle, Audun; Nolan, Jerry; Herlitz, Johan; Castren, Maaret; Wenzel, Volker; Soreide, Eldar; Engdahl, Johan; Steen, Petter Andreas

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this report is to establish recommendations for reviewing, reporting, and conducting research during the post-resuscitation period in hospital. It defines data that are needed for research and more specialised registries and therefore supplements the recently updated Utstein template for resuscitation registries. The updated Utstein template and the out-of-hospital "Chain of Survival" describe factors of importance for successful resuscitation up until return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Several factors in the in-hospital phase after ROSC are also likely to affect the ultimate outcome of the patient. Large differences in survival to hospital discharge for patients admitted alive are reported between hospitals. Therapeutic hypothermia has been demonstrated to improve the outcome, and other factors such as blood glucose, haemodynamics, ventilatory support, etc., might also influence the result. No generally accepted, scientifically based protocol exists for the post-resuscitation period in hospital, other than general brain-oriented intensive care. There is little published information on this in-hospital phase. This statement is the result of a scientific consensus development process started as a symposium by a task force at the Utstein Abbey, Norway, in September 2003. Suggested data are defined as core and supplementary and include the following categories: pre-arrest co-morbidity and functional status, cause of death, patients' quality of life, in-hospital system factors, investigations and treatment, and physiological data at various time points during the first three days after admission. It is hoped that the publication of these recommendations will encourage research into the in-hospital post-resuscitation phase, which we propose should be included in the chain-of-survival as a fifth ring. Following these recommendations should enable better understanding of the impact of different in-hospital treatment strategies on outcome. PMID:16129543

  15. Resuscitation and Obstetrical Care to Reduce Intrapartum-Related Neonatal Deaths: A MANDATE Study.

    PubMed

    Kamath-Rayne, Beena D; Griffin, Jennifer B; Moran, Katelin; Jones, Bonnie; Downs, Allan; McClure, Elizabeth M; Goldenberg, Robert L; Rouse, Doris; Jobe, Alan H

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of neonatal resuscitation and basic obstetric care on intrapartum-related neonatal mortality in low and middle-income countries, using the mathematical model, Maternal and Neonatal Directed Assessment of Technology (MANDATE). Using MANDATE, we evaluated the impact of interventions for intrapartum-related events causing birth asphyxia (basic neonatal resuscitation, advanced neonatal care, increasing facility birth, and emergency obstetric care) when implemented in home, clinic, and hospital settings of sub-Saharan African and India for 2008. Total intrapartum-related neonatal mortality (IRNM) was acute neonatal deaths from intrapartum-related events plus late neonatal deaths from ongoing intrapartum-related injury. Introducing basic neonatal resuscitation in all settings had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing facility births and scaling up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals also had a large impact on decreasing IRNM. Increasing prevalence and utilization of advanced neonatal care in hospital settings had limited impact on IRNM. The greatest improvement in IRNM was seen with widespread advanced neonatal care and basic neonatal resuscitation, scaled-up emergency obstetric care in clinics and hospitals, and increased facility deliveries, resulting in an estimated decrease in IRNM to 2.0 per 1,000 live births in India and 2.5 per 1,000 live births in sub-Saharan Africa. With more deliveries occurring in clinics and hospitals, the scale-up of obstetric care can have a greater effect than if modeled individually. Use of MANDATE enables health leaders to direct resources towards interventions that could prevent intrapartum-related deaths. A lack of widespread implementation of basic neonatal resuscitation, increased facility births, and emergency obstetric care are missed opportunities to save newborn lives. PMID:25656720

  16. Regional blood flow redistribution in preterm piglets with hemorrhage and resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Dyess, D L; Powell, R W; Roberts, W S; Tacchi, E J; Swafford, A N; Ferrara, J J; Ardell, J L

    1995-07-01

    Acute hemorrhage in premature infants occurs as the result of obstetrical complications, birth trauma, or operative procedures. This study evaluates the response of the preterm piglet to acute hemorrhage and resuscitation. Piglets delivered by Caesarean section 7-14 days preterm underwent acute arterial/venous hemorrhage (20 cc/kg). At 0, 15, and 60 min after hemorrhage, hemodynamic parameters and regional blood flows (reference organ technique) were measured. Animals were then resuscitated with shed blood (20 cc/kg), crystalloid (60 cc/kg), or colloid (dextran 40, 20 cc/kg) with study parameters obtained 30 min later (statistical analysis by ANOVA). Significant decreases in blood pressure (BP) and cardiac output (CO) occurred after hemorrhage. BP and CO were reestablished to near control levels following resuscitation with blood and crystalloid. Dextran failed to return BP to baseline; however, it resulted in CO 1.7 x control. Heart and CNS blood flow were not significantly influenced by hemorrhage; however, dextran increased flows to these organs significantly above control levels. In the kidney and small bowel, flows decreased significantly following hemorrhage; blood and crystalloid restored flows to near baseline, while dextran resulted in flows significantly greater. In summary, the preterm piglet responds to hemorrhage with maintenance of blood flow to the heart and brain and significantly decreased flows to the kidney and small intestine. Flows following resuscitation with blood and crystalloid are comparable to those in control. Dextran resuscitation resulted in flows significantly greater than baseline; this response might be detrimental with ongoing hemorrhage and/or prolonged ischemia. PMID:7630133

  17. [Endotracheal aspiration: respirator vs. manual resuscitation as method for hyperoxygenation and hyperinflation].

    PubMed

    Herce, A; Lerga, C; Martínez, A; Zapata, M A; Asiain, M C

    1999-01-01

    Endotracheal aspiration protocols (EAT) include hyperoxygenation and hyperinflation to minimize the negative effects of the technique. No conclusive studies have determined the most effective hyperoxygenation and hyperinflation method. This study had two aims: to compare the effects on patient oxygenation and hemodynamics during endotracheal aspiration of secretions using, respectively, a respirator or manual resuscitator as the hyperoxygenation and hyperinflation method. Tidal volume (TV) and FIO2 with the manual resuscitator were quantified. The study was based on 172 aspiration sessions carried out under artificial ventilation in the immediate postoperative period of 26 patients who had undergone cardiac surgery without lung damage. Hyperinflation and hyperoxygenation before, during and after aspiration were carried out with and artificial ventilator in group I and with a manual resuscitator in group II. In all aspiration interventions, an analysis was made of hemodynamic parameters (MAP, MPAP, HR, CO and arrhythmias), ventilation and oxygenation parameters (HR, FIO2, SpO2, and SvO2), and the influence of the method on the appearance of atelectasis. Both methods produced small increases in all hemodynamic parameters, and significant differences in HR (p < 0.001) and MPAP (p < 0.002), although no clinical repercussions were observed. No severe arrhythmias were observed. No statistically significant differences between the two methods were found in the evolution of SpO2 and SvO2, which remained above baseline levels throughout both procedures. Analysis of the effectiveness of the manual resuscitator (the second aim) under the conditions established yielded a mean FIO2 of 0.86 and a mean tidal volume of 153% in relation to baseline tidal volume. Both methods of hyperoxygenation and hyperinflation prevent hypoxia and maintain hemodynamic stability in patients without producing lung damage. The effectiveness of the manual resuscitator for administering high oxygen

  18. Cutting fluid for machining fissionable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Duerksen, W.K.; Googin, J.M.; Napier, B. Jr.

    1982-01-28

    The present invention is directed to a cutting fluid for machining fissionable material. The cutting fluid is formed of glycol, water and a boron compound in an adequate concentration for effective neutron attenuation so as to inhibit criticality incidents during machining.

  19. Providing newborn resuscitation at the mother’s bedside: assessing the safety, usability and acceptability of a mobile trolley

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Deferring cord clamping at very preterm births may be beneficial for babies. However, deferring cord clamping should not mean that newborn resuscitation is deferred. Providing initial care at birth at the mother’s bedside would allow parents to be present during resuscitation, and would potentially allow initial care to be given with the cord intact. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of a new mobile trolley for providing newborn resuscitation by describing the range of resuscitation procedures performed on a group of babies, to assess the acceptability to clinicians compared with standard equipment, based on a questionnaire survey, to assess safety from post resuscitation temperature measurements and serious adverse event reports and to assess whether the trolley allowed resuscitation with the umbilical cord intact by assessing the proportion of babies that could be placed on the trolley to allow resuscitation with the cord intact. Methods The trolley was used when the attendance of a clinician trained in newborn life support was required at a birth. Clinicians were asked to complete a questionnaire about their experience of using the trolley. Serious adverse events were reported. Results 78 babies were managed on the trolley. Median (range) gestation was 34 weeks (24 to 41 weeks). Median (range) birth weight was2470 grams (520 to 4080 grams). The full range of resuscitation procedures has been successfully provided, although only one baby required emergency umbilical venous catheterisation. 77/78 babies had a post resuscitation temperature above 36°C. There were no adverse events. Most clinicians rated the trolley as ‘the same’, ‘better’ or ’much better’ than conventional resuscitation equipment. In most situations, the baby could be resuscitated with umbilical cord intact, although on 18 occasions the cord was too short to reach the trolley. Conclusions Immediate stabilisation at birth and resuscitation can be

  20. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Chang, Mingtao; Tang, Hao; Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  1. Comparison of Melatonin, Hypertonic Saline, and Hydroxyethyl Starch for Resuscitation of Secondary Intra-Abdominal Hypertension in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong; Li, Yang; Zhang, Lianyang

    2016-01-01

    A variety of agents may have a beneficial effect in reducing injury-induced intestinal edema of fluid, but studies confirming the efficacy and mechanisms of these agents in secondary intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) are lacking. This study was to compare the effectiveness of melatonin, 7.5% hypertonic saline (HS), and hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) on the resuscitation of secondary IAH in a rat model. Female SD rats were divided into: sham group, shock group, lactated Ringer solution (LR) group, melatonin group, HS group, and HES group. Except for the sham group, all rats underwent a combination of inducing portal hypertension, hemorrhaging to a MAP of 40 mmHg for 2 hr, and using an abdominal restraint device. The collected blood was reinfused and the rats were treated with LR (30ml/h), melatonin (50 mg/kg) + LR, HS (6 ml/kg) + LR, and HES (30 ml/kg) + LR, respectively. The shock group received no fluids. LR was continuously infused for 6hr. The intestinal permeability, immunofluorescence of tight junction proteins, transmission electron microscopy, level of inflammatory mediators (TNF-a, IL-1β, IL-6) and of biochemical markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity, and glutathione peroxidase) were assessed. Expressions of the protein kinase B (Akt) and of tight junction proteins were detected by Western blot. Compared with LR, HS, and HES, melatonin was associated with less inflammatory and oxidative injury, less intestinal permeability and injury, and lower incidence of secondary IAH in this model. The salutary effect of melatonin in this model was associated with the upregulation of intestinal Akt phosphorylation. PMID:27560478

  2. Amniotic fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002220.htm Amniotic fluid To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amniotic fluid is a clear, slightly yellowish liquid that surrounds ...

  3. External Ventricular Catheters: Is It Appropriate to Use an Open/Monitor Position to Adequately Trend Intracranial Pressure in a Neuroscience Critical Care Environment?

    PubMed

    Sunderland, Nicole E; Villanueva, Nancy E; Pazuchanics, Susan J

    2016-10-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring can be an important assessment tool in critically and acutely ill patients. An external ventricular drain offers a comprehensive way to monitor ICP and drain cerebrospinal fluid. The Monro-Kellie hypothesis, Pascal's principle, and fluid dynamics were used to formulate an assumption that an open/monitor position on the stopcock is an adequate trending measure for ICP monitoring while concurrently draining cerebrospinal fluid. Data were collected from 50 patients and totaled 1053 separate number sets. The open/monitor position was compared with the clamped position every hour. An order for "open to drain" was needed for appropriate measurement and nursing care. Results showed the absolute average differences between open/monitor and clamped positions at 1.6268 mm Hg. This finding suggests that it is appropriate to use an open/monitor position via an external ventricular drain for adequate trending of patients' ICP. PMID:27579963

  4. Fluid Mechanics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drazin, Philip

    1987-01-01

    Outlines the contents of Volume II of "Principia" by Sir Isaac Newton. Reviews the contributions of subsequent scientists to the physics of fluid dynamics. Discusses the treatment of fluid mechanics in physics curricula. Highlights a few of the problems of modern research in fluid dynamics. Shows that problems still remain. (CW)

  5. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  6. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  7. Amniotic fluid embolism: review.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Greco; Luigi, Nappi; Federica, Trezza; Paola, Storelli; Margherita, Neri; Tahir, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism is a rare but dreadful syndrome in Obstetrics, which happens, in most of the cases, in the peripartum period. The actual "embolisation" of the pulmonary vessels does not explain the whole picture of the syndrome. An immune mechanism, similar to an anaphylactic reaction, is more convincingly the background of the event, but the pathogenesis is still ill-defined. Similarly the initial symptoms are difficult to interpret and distinguish from other acute and life-threatening emergencies (i.e. pulmonary embolism, placental abruption, septic shock, stroke, myocardial ischemia, etc.), therefore the diagnosis is one of exclusion, very often on postmortem report. Thus the prevalence of the disease is difficult to establish, most of the reports being postmortem cases or National Registries data. These data, based either on autopsy series or on registries, are non representative of the true prevalence of the event and obviously confusing for the correct understanding of the disease process. Risk factors are all those conditions or manouvres, which contemplate a breech in the maternal-fetal barrier. Again, given the rarity of the syndrome, no single event is clearly identifiable as a case-effect risk factor. Prognosis, which is obviously biased by the reporting system, is particularly grim both in terms of survival and morbidity. The symptoms being often elusive at the beginning, but rapidly and progressively catastrophic, a multidisciplinary team approach is warranted in order to provide the best chance of survival both for mother and baby. Immediate and aggressive resuscitation is, therefore, advised whenever a mother in labour or in the early postpartum period experiences a sudden collapse. PMID:24804726

  8. Does Resuscitation Training Reduce Neonatal Deaths in Low-Resource Communities? A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Sarah; Mielke, John G

    2015-10-01

    Every year, nearly 1 million babies succumb to birth asphyxia (BA) within the Asia-Pacific region. The present study sought to determine whether educational interventions containing some element of resuscitation training would decrease the relative risk (RR) of neonatal mortality attributable to BA in low-resource communities. We systematically reviewed 3 electronic databases and identified 14 relevant reports. For community deliveries, providing traditional birth attendants (TBAs) with neonatal resuscitation training modestly reduced the RR in 3 of 4 studies. For institutional deliveries, training a range of clinical staff clearly reduced the RR within 2 of 8 studies. When resuscitation-specific training was directed to community and institutional health care workers, a slight benefit was observed in 1 of 2 studies. Specific training in neonatal resuscitation appears most effective when provided to TBAs (specifically, those presented with ongoing opportunities to review and update their skills), but this particular intervention alone may not appreciably reduce mortality. PMID:26378066

  9. Effect of a Neonatal Resuscitation Course on Healthcare Providers’ Performances Assessed by Video Recording in a Low-Resource Setting

    PubMed Central

    Trevisanuto, Daniele; Bertuola, Federica; Lanzoni, Paolo; Cavallin, Francesco; Matediana, Eduardo; Manzungu, Olivier Wingi; Gomez, Ermelinda; Da Dalt, Liviana; Putoto, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Background We assessed the effect of an adapted neonatal resuscitation program (NRP) course on healthcare providers’ performances in a low-resource setting through the use of video recording. Methods A video recorder, mounted to the radiant warmers in the delivery rooms at Beira Central Hospital, Mozambique, was used to record all resuscitations. One-hundred resuscitations (50 before and 50 after participation in an adapted NRP course) were collected and assessed based on a previously published score. Results All 100 neonates received initial steps; from these, 77 and 32 needed bag-mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions (CC), respectively. There was a significant improvement in resuscitation scores in all levels of resuscitation from before to after the course: for “initial steps”, the score increased from 33% (IQR 28–39) to 44% (IQR 39–56), p<0.0001; for BMV, from 20% (20–40) to 40% (40–60), p = 0.001; and for CC, from 0% (0–10) to 20% (0–50), p = 0.01. Times of resuscitative interventions after the course were improved in comparison to those obtained before the course, but remained non-compliant with the recommended algorithm. Conclusions Although resuscitations remained below the recommended standards in terms of quality and time of execution, clinical practice of healthcare providers improved after participation in an adapted NRP course. Video recording was well-accepted by the staff, useful for objective assessment of performance during resuscitation, and can be used as an educational tool in a low-resource setting. PMID:26659661

  10. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. PMID:27015887

  11. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  12. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  13. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  14. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  15. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  16. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  17. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  18. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  19. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  20. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...