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Sample records for adequate infection control

  1. Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... lost because of the spread of infections in hospitals. Health care workers can take steps to prevent the spread of infectious diseases. These steps are part of infection control. Proper hand washing is the most effective way ...

  2. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  3. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  4. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  5. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  6. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  7. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... production performance, or biased observation. One or more adequate and well-controlled studies are required... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies. 514.117... Applications § 514.117 Adequate and well-controlled studies. (a) Purpose. The primary purpose of...

  8. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-evident (general anesthetics, drug metabolism). (3) The method of selection of subjects provides adequate... respect to pertinent variables such as age, sex, severity of disease, duration of disease, and use of... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adequate and well-controlled studies....

  9. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels are Adequately Controlled High cholesterol can double a ... with High Cholesterol that is Controlled by Education Level 8k4c-k22f Download these data » Click on legends ...

  10. Infection control in paediatric office settings

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Transmission of infection in the paediatric office is of increasing concern. The present document discusses routes of transmission of infection and the principles of current infection control measures. Prevention includes appropriate office design and administrative policies, triage, routine practices for the care of all patients (eg, hand hygiene; use of gloves, masks, eye protection and gowns for specific procedures; adequate cleaning, disinfection and sterilization of surfaces and equipment including toys, and aseptic technique for invasive procedures), and additional precautions for specific infections. Personnel should be adequately immunized, and those infected should follow work-restriction policies. PMID:19412374

  11. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... conducting clinical investigations of a drug is to distinguish the effect of a drug from other influences... recognized by the scientific community as the essentials of an adequate and well-controlled clinical... randomization and blinding of patients or investigators, or both. If the intent of the trial is to...

  12. Essentials of paediatric infection control

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2001-01-01

    Young children readily transmit and acquire nosocomial infections. Children are also vulnerable to endogenous infections as a result of the breakdown of their normal defences by disease, invasive procedures or therapy. The increasing acuity of illness in hospitalized children and therapeutic advances have resulted in a patient population that is increasingly at higher risk for nosocomial infections. Antibiotic resistance has emerged as a problem in some paediatric hospitals, usually in intensive care and oncology units. Infection rates are the highest in neonatal and paediatric intensive care units (where bloodstream infections are the most frequent), and are usually associated with intravascular devices. On general paediatric wards, respiratory and gastrointestinal infections predominate, reflecting the occurrence in the community. The surveillance of nosocomial infections identifies priorities for infection control activities and permits evaluation of interventions. The prevention of transmission between patients and to personnel requires that certain measures be taken with all patients, and that additional precautions be taken with some infections, based on the route of transmission. The prevention of transmission from personnel involves ensuring that personnel are appropriately immunized and counselled about working with infections. The prevention of nosocomial infection also involves control of visitors, appropriate management of invasive procedures and devices, sterilization and disinfection of equipment, provision of a clean environment and adequate staffing. Severely immunocompromised children require extra protection, including ventilation systems that reduce the risk of exposure to filamentous fungi. Infection control in paediatrics is an evolving field that must adapt to changes in the paediatric patient population and in health care technology. PMID:20084127

  13. Standardising infection control precautions.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Lisa; McIntyre, Jackie

    To minimise the risk of infection transmission, standard infection control precautions must be practised whether a patient is known to have an infection. The main aim of any infection control guideline or policy should, therefore, be to make it easy for staff to do the right thing at the right time. This article outlines standard precautions, explains their importance and presents the critical elements that should be applied in all care settings. PMID:26513984

  14. Informatics in Infection Control.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michael Y; Trick, William E

    2016-09-01

    Informatics tools are becoming integral to routine infection control activities. Informatics has the potential to improve infection control outcomes in surveillance, prevention, and connections with public health. Surveillance activities include fully or semiautomated surveillance of infections, surveillance of device use, and hospital/ward outbreak investigation. Prevention activities include awareness of multidrug-resistant organism carriage on admission, enhanced interfacility communication, identifying inappropriate infection precautions, reducing device use, and antimicrobial stewardship. Public health activities include electronic communicable disease reporting, syndromic surveillance, and regional outbreak detection. The challenge for infection control personnel is in translating the knowledge gained from electronic surveillance systems into action. PMID:27515146

  15. Are current screening protocols for chronic hepatitis B virus infection adequate?

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Eva; Kamali, Amanda; Schirmer, Patricia L; Lucero-Obusan, Cynthia; Winston, Carla A; Oda, Gina; Winters, Mark A; Durfee, Janet; Martinello, Richard A; Davey, Victoria J; Holodniy, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection screening usually includes only HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) testing; HBV core and surface antibody (anti-HBc, anti-HBs) assays, indicating resolved infection and immunity, are not routinely performed. Yet, serum HBV DNA is measurable in approximately 10% of HBsAg-negative/anti-HBc-positive cases, representing occult HBV infection (OBI). Patient blood samples from 2 Veterans Affairs medical center look-back investigations were screened for HBV infection using HBsAg enzyme immunoassays. Supplementary testing included anti-HBc and anti-HBs enzyme immunoassays. For anti-HBc-positive samples, HBV DNA testing was performed. Background OBI prevalence was further estimated at these 2 facilities based on HBV serology testing results from 1999-2012. Finally, a literature review was performed to determine OBI prevalence in the published literature. Of 1887 HBsAg-negative cohort patients, 98 (5.2%) were anti-HBc positive/anti-HBs negative; and 175 (9.3%), anti-HBc positive/anti-HBs positive. Six of 273 were HBV DNA positive, representing 0.3% of the total tested and 2.2% who were anti-HBc positive/anti-HBs negative or anti-HBc positive/anti-HBs positive. Among 32,229 general population veterans at these 2 sites who had any HBV testing, 4/108 (3.7%) were HBV DNA positive, none of whom were part of the cohort. In 129 publications with HBsAg-negative patients, 1817/1,209,426 (0.15%) had OBI. However, excluding blood bank studies with greater than 1000 patients, the OBI rate increased to 1800/17,893 (10%). OBI is not rare and has implications for transmission and disease detection. HBsAg testing alone is insufficient for detecting all chronic HBV infections. These findings may impact blood donation, patient HBV screening, follow-up protocols for patients assumed to have cleared the infection, and initiation of immunosuppression in patients with distant or undetected HBV. PMID:27009896

  16. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  17. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  18. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  19. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  20. 40 CFR 141.522 - How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? 141.522 Section 141.522 Protection of... Additional Watershed Control Requirements for Unfiltered Systems § 141.522 How does the State determine whether my system's watershed control requirements are adequate? During an onsite inspection...

  1. Advances in infection control

    PubMed Central

    Marra, Alexandre Rodrigues

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several initiatives took place in recent years in relation to nosocomial infection control in order to increase patient safety. Some of these initiatives will be commented in this brief review. PMID:27074240

  2. Esmolol in a case of severe tetanus. Adequate haemodynamic control achieved despite markedly elevated catecholamine levels.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Lipman, J; Bothma, P A; Joynt, G M

    1994-03-01

    A patient with severe tetanus, who had a sympathetic crisis while sedated with 30 mg/h diazepam and 30 mg/h morphine, is described. Satisfactory control of the haemodynamic crisis was achieved with bolus doses of esmolol to a total of 180 mg. A disturbing finding was that although there was adequate control of the tachycardia and hypertension, arterial catecholamine levels remained markedly elevated. Adrenaline levels of 531 pg/ml (normal 10-110 pg/ml) and noradrenaline levels of 1,036 pg/ml (normal 100-500 pg/ml) were recorded when the patient had a systolic arterial pressure of 110 mmHg and a heart rate of 97/min. The implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:11218441

  3. Update on infection control.

    PubMed

    1999-12-01

    Infection control is a dynamic and ever-changing subject and all dental staff should be kept aware of the most up-to-date procedures required to prevent the transmission of infection and should understand why these procedures are necessary. Regular monitoring and updating of all procedures in the light of new scientific evidence is necessary and all new staff must be trained in infection control procedures prior to working in the surgery. A practitioner who is routinely following an appropriate infection control policy, including the use of techniques and products of proven efficacy (perhaps through accreditation), is better placed to refute allegations arising in the course of civil litigation, health and safety at work prosecution, complaints and disciplinary procedures, or investigations by the GDC. PMID:16892574

  4. Infection control for norovirus

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, L.; Park, G. W.; Vega, E.; Hall, A.; Parashar, U.; Vinjé, J.; Lopman, B.

    2015-01-01

    Norovirus infections are notoriously difficult to prevent and control, owing to their low infectious dose, high shedding titre, and environmental stability. The virus can spread through multiple transmission routes, of which person-to-person and foodborne are the most important. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have helped to establish norovirus as the most common cause of sporadic gastroenteritis and the most common cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis across all ages. In this article, we review the epidemiology and virology of noroviruses, and prevention and control guidelines, with a focus on the principles of disinfection and decontamination. Outbreak management relies on sound infection control principles, including hand hygiene, limiting exposure to infectious individuals, and thorough environmental decontamination. Ideally, all infection control recommendations would rely on empirical evidence, but a number of challenges, including the inability to culture noroviruses in the laboratory and the challenges of outbreak management in complex environments, has made it difficult to garner clear evidence of efficacy in certain areas of infection control. New experimental data on cultivable surrogates for human norovirus and on environmental survivability and relative resistance to commonly used disinfectants are providing new insights for further refinining disinfection practices. Finally, clinical trials are underway to evaluate the efficacy of vaccines, which may shift the current infection control principles to more targeted interventions. PMID:24813073

  5. Reliable Detection of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children for Adequate Hospital Infection Control Management

    PubMed Central

    Abels, Susanne; Nadal, David; Stroehle, Angelika; Bossart, Walter

    2001-01-01

    By using a rapid test for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) detection (Abbott TestPack RSV), a number of patients were observed, showing repeatedly positive results over a period of up to 10 weeks. A prospective study was initiated to compare the rapid test with an antigen capture enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and a nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) protocol for detection of RSV serotypes A and B. Only respiratory samples from children exhibiting the prolonged presence of RSV (≥5 days) as determined by the rapid test were considered. A total of 134 specimens from 24 children was investigated by antigen capture EIA and nested RT-PCR. Using RT-PCR as the reference method, we determined the RSV rapid test to have a specificity of 63% and a sensitivity of 66% and the antigen capture EIA to have a specificity of 96% and a sensitivity of 69% for acute-phase samples and the homologous virus serotype A. In 7 (29%) of 24 patients, the positive results of the RSV rapid test could not be confirmed by either nested RT-PCR or antigen capture EIA. In these seven patients a variety of other respiratory viruses were detected. For general screening the RSV rapid test was found to be a reasonable tool to get quick results. However, its lack of specificity in some patients requires confirmation by additional tests to rule out false-positive results and/or detection of other respiratory viruses. PMID:11526141

  6. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., such as spontaneous change in the course of the disease, placebo effect, or biased observation. The... control are recognized: (i) Placebo concurrent control. The test drug is compared with an inactive preparation designed to resemble the test drug as far as possible. A placebo-controlled study may...

  7. 21 CFR 314.126 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., such as spontaneous change in the course of the disease, placebo effect, or biased observation. The... control are recognized: (i) Placebo concurrent control. The test drug is compared with an inactive preparation designed to resemble the test drug as far as possible. A placebo-controlled study may...

  8. Glycemic penalty index for adequately assessing and comparing different blood glucose control algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Van Herpe, Tom; De Brabanter, Jos; Beullens, Martine; De Moor, Bart; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Blood glucose (BG) control performed by intensive care unit (ICU) nurses is becoming standard practice for critically ill patients. New (semi-automated) 'BG control' algorithms (or 'insulin titration' algorithms) are under development, but these require stringent validation before they can replace the currently used algorithms. Existing methods for objectively comparing different insulin titration algorithms show weaknesses. In the current study, a new approach for appropriately assessing the adequacy of different algorithms is proposed. Methods Two ICU patient populations (with different baseline characteristics) were studied, both treated with a similar 'nurse-driven' insulin titration algorithm targeting BG levels of 80 to 110 mg/dl. A new method for objectively evaluating BG deviations from normoglycemia was founded on a smooth penalty function. Next, the performance of this new evaluation tool was compared with the current standard assessment methods, on an individual as well as a population basis. Finally, the impact of four selected parameters (the average BG sampling frequency, the duration of algorithm application, the severity of disease, and the type of illness) on the performance of an insulin titration algorithm was determined by multiple regression analysis. Results The glycemic penalty index (GPI) was proposed as a tool for assessing the overall glycemic control behavior in ICU patients. The GPI of a patient is the average of all penalties that are individually assigned to each measured BG value based on the optimized smooth penalty function. The computation of this index returns a number between 0 (no penalty) and 100 (the highest penalty). For some patients, the assessment of the BG control behavior using the traditional standard evaluation methods was different from the evaluation with GPI. Two parameters were found to have a significant impact on GPI: the BG sampling frequency and the duration of algorithm application. A higher BG

  9. MedlinePlus: Infection Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infected Material (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Patient Safety Threat - Syringe Reuse (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) Your Microbes and You (National Institutes of Health) Specifics CDC Vital Signs: Making Health Care Safer -- ...

  10. Infection Control in Dental Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Based Dental Sealant Programs Dental Sealant FAQs Sealant Efficiency Assessment for Locals and States ... of infection control remain unchanged, new technologies, materials, equipment, and data require continuous evaluation of current ...

  11. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  12. [Tuberculosis infection control - recommendations of the DZK].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Just, H-M; Castell, S; Diel, R; Gastmeier, P; Haas, W; Hauer, B; Loytved, G; Mielke, M; Moser, I; Nienhaus, A; Richter, E; Rüden, H; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Schaberg, T; Wischnewski, N; Loddenkemper, R

    2012-06-01

    The epidemiological situation of tuberculosis (TB) in Germany has improved considerably during the past few years. However, those in unprotected contact with infectious tuberculosis patients frequently and/or over longer periods of time and/or intensively continue to have a higher risk for TB infection. Rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of effective treatment, and adequate infection control measures are of particular importance to prevent infection. The present recommendations depict the essentials of infection control as well as specific measures in the hospital (isolation, criteria for its duration and technical requirements, types of respiratory protection, disinfection measures, waste disposal). The specific requirements for outpatients (medical practice), at home, for ambulance services, and in congregate settings, including prisons, are also addressed. Compared with the previous recommendations the pattern of respiratory protection measures has been simplified. As a rule, hospital staff and those visiting infectious tuberculosis patients are advised to wear respiratory protection that satisfies the criteria of FFP2-masks (DIN EN 149), while patients should wear mouth-nose protectors (surgical masks) in the presence of others and outside the isolation room. A detailed depiction of criteria for isolation and its duration in smear positive and only culturally confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis has been added. PMID:22723258

  13. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection... development and transmission of disease and infection. (a) Infection control program. The facility...

  14. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection... development and transmission of disease and infection. (a) Infection control program. The facility...

  15. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection... development and transmission of disease and infection. (a) Infection control program. The facility...

  16. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection... development and transmission of disease and infection. (a) Infection control program. The facility...

  17. Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Saiman, Lisa; Siegel, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Over the past 20 years there has been a greater interest in infection control in cystic fibrosis (CF) as patient-to-patient transmission of pathogens has been increasingly demonstrated in this unique patient population. The CF Foundation sponsored a consensus conference to craft recommendations for infection control practices for CF care providers. This review provides a summary of the literature addressing infection control in CF. Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus have all been shown to spread between patients with CF. Standard precautions, transmission-based precautions including contact and droplet precautions, appropriate hand hygiene for health care workers, patients, and their families, and care of respiratory tract equipment to prevent the transmission of infectious agents serve as the foundations of infection control and prevent the acquisition of potential pathogens by patients with CF. The respiratory secretions of all CF patients potentially harbor clinically and epidemiologically important microorganisms, even if they have not yet been detected in cultures from the respiratory tract. CF patients should be educated to contain their secretions and maintain a distance of >3 ft from other CF patients to avoid the transmission of potential pathogens, even if culture results are unavailable or negative. To prevent the acquisition of pathogens from respiratory therapy equipment used in health care settings as well as in the home, such equipment should be cleaned and disinfected. It will be critical to measure the dissemination, implementation, and potential impact of these guidelines to monitor changes in practice and reduction in infections. PMID:14726455

  18. Telotristat etiprate, a novel serotonin synthesis inhibitor, in patients with carcinoid syndrome and diarrhea not adequately controlled by octreotide.

    PubMed

    Kulke, Matthew H; O'Dorisio, Thomas; Phan, Alexandria; Bergsland, Emily; Law, Linda; Banks, Phillip; Freiman, Joel; Frazier, Kenny; Jackson, Jessica; Yao, James C; Kvols, Larry; Lapuerta, Pablo; Zambrowicz, Brian; Fleming, Douglas; Sands, Arthur

    2014-10-01

    Serotonin produced by neuroendocrine tumors is believed to be a principal cause of the diarrhea in carcinoid syndrome. We assessed the safety and efficacy of telotristat etiprate, an oral serotonin synthesis inhibitor, in patients with diarrhea associated with carcinoid syndrome. In this prospective, randomized study, patients with evidence of carcinoid tumor and ≥4 bowel movements (BMs)/day despite stable-dose octreotide LAR depot therapy were enrolled in sequential, escalating, cohorts of four patients per cohort. In each cohort, one patient was randomly assigned to placebo and three patients to telotristat etiprate, at 150, 250, 350, or 500 mg three times a day (tid). In a subsequent cohort, one patient was assigned to placebo and six patients to telotristat etiprate 500 mg tid. Patients were assessed for safety, BM frequency (daily diary), 24 h urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (u5-HIAA), and adequate relief of carcinoid gastrointestinal symptoms (using a weekly questionnaire). Twenty-three patients were treated: 18 received telotristat etiprate and five received placebo. Adverse events were generally mild. Among evaluable telotristat etiprate-treated patients, 5/18 (28%) experienced a ≥30% reduction in BM frequency for ≥2 weeks, 9/16 (56%) experienced biochemical response (≥50% reduction or normalization in 24-h u5-HIAA) at week 2 or 4, and 10/18 (56%) reported adequate relief during at least 1 of the first 4 weeks of treatment. Similar activity was not observed in placebo-treated patients. Telotristat etiprate was well tolerated. Our observations suggest that telotristat etiprate has activity in controlling diarrhea associated with carcinoid syndrome. Further studies confirming these findings are warranted. PMID:25012985

  19. Telotristat Etiprate, a Novel Serotonin Synthesis Inhibitor, in Patients with Carcinoid Syndrome and Diarrhea Not Adequately Controlled by Octreotide

    PubMed Central

    Kulke, Matthew H.; O’Dorisio, Thomas; Phan, Alexandria; Bergsland, Emily; Law, Linda; Banks, Phillip; Freiman, Joel; Frazier, Kenny; Jackson, Jessica; Yao, James C.; Kvols, Larry; Lapuerta, Pablo; Zambrowicz, Brian; Fleming, Douglas; Sands, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin produced by neuroendocrine tumors is believed to be a principal cause of the diarrhea in carcinoid syndrome. We assessed the safety and efficacy of telotristat etiprate, an oral serotonin synthesis inhibitor, in patients with diarrhea associated with carcinoid syndrome. In this prospective, randomized study, patients with evidence of carcinoid tumor and ≥4 bowel movements (BMs)/day despite stable-dose octreotide LAR depot therapy were enrolled in sequential, escalating, cohorts of 4 patients/cohort. In each cohort, 1 patient was randomly assigned to placebo and 3 patients to telotristat etiprate, at 150, 250, 350, or 500 mg 3x/day (tid). In a subsequent cohort, 1 patient was assigned to placebo and 6 patients to telotristat etiprate 500 mg tid. Patients were assessed for safety, BM frequency (daily diary), 24-hour urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (u5-HIAA), and adequate relief of carcinoid gastrointestinal symptoms (using a weekly questionnaire). Twenty-three patients were treated; 18 received telotristat etiprate and 5 received placebo. Adverse events were generally mild. Among evaluable telotristat etiprate-treated patients, 5/18 (28%) experienced a ≥30% reduction in BM frequency for ≥2 weeks, 9/16 (56%) experienced biochemical response (≥50% reduction or normalization in 24-hour u5-HIAA) at Week 2 or 4, and 10/18 (56%) reported adequate relief during at least 1 of the first 4 weeks of treatment. Similar activity was not observed in placebo-treated patients. Telotristat etiprate was well tolerated. Our observations suggest that telotristat etiprate has activity in controlling diarrhea associated with carcinoid syndrome. Further studies confirming these findings are warranted. PMID:25012985

  20. Macronutrient Supplementation for Malnourished HIV-infected Adults: A Review of the Evidence in Resource-Adequate and Resource-Constrained Settings

    PubMed Central

    Koethe, John R.; Chi, Benjamin H.; Megazzini, Karen M.; Heimburger, Douglas C.; Stringer, Jeffrey S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection has expanded rapidly throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but malnutrition and food insecurity have emerged as major barriers to program success. Protein-calorie malnutrition (a common form in the region) hastens HIV disease progression, and food insecurity is a barrier to medication adherence. Analyses of patient outcomes have identified a low body mass index (BMI) at ART initiation as an independent predictor of early mortality, but the causes of low BMI are multi-factorial may represent normal anthropometric variation, chronic inadequate food intake, or wasting associated with HIV and other infections. While there is much experience population-level humanitarian food assistance, few data exist to measure the effectiveness of macronutrient supplementation or to identify individuals most likely to benefit. In this report, we review the current evidence supporting macronutrient supplementation for HIV-infected adults; clinical trials in resource-adequate and resource-constrained settings; and highlight priority areas for future research. PMID:19624276

  1. Photodynamic Antimicrobial Polymers for Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Colin P.; O’Neil, Edward J.; Cowley, John F.; Carson, Louise; De Baróid, Áine T.; Gdowski, Greg T.; Gorman, Sean P.; Jones, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Hospital-acquired infections pose both a major risk to patient wellbeing and an economic burden on global healthcare systems, with the problem compounded by the emergence of multidrug resistant and biocide tolerant bacterial pathogens. Many inanimate surfaces can act as a reservoir for infection, and adequate disinfection is difficult to achieve and requires direct intervention. In this study we demonstrate the preparation and performance of materials with inherent photodynamic, surface-active, persistent antimicrobial properties through the incorporation of photosensitizers into high density poly(ethylene) (HDPE) using hot-melt extrusion, which require no external intervention except a source of visible light. Our aim is to prevent bacterial adherence to these surfaces and eliminate them as reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens, thus presenting a valuable advance in infection control. A two-layer system with one layer comprising photosensitizer-incorporated HDPE, and one layer comprising HDPE alone is also described to demonstrate the versatility of our approach. The photosensitizer-incorporated materials are capable of reducing the adherence of viable bacteria by up to 3.62 Log colony forming units (CFU) per square centimeter of material surface for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and by up to 1.51 Log CFU/cm2 for Escherichia coli. Potential applications for the technology are in antimicrobial coatings for, or materials comprising objects, such as tubing, collection bags, handrails, finger-plates on hospital doors, or medical equipment found in the healthcare setting. PMID:25250740

  2. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460.74 Public...) PACE Administrative Requirements § 460.74 Infection control. (a) Standard procedures. The PACE organization must follow accepted policies and standard procedures with respect to infection control,...

  3. 42 CFR 483.65 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Infection control. 483.65 Section 483.65 Public... Care Facilities § 483.65 Infection control. The facility must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to provide a safe, sanitary, and comfortable environment and to help prevent...

  4. 38 CFR 52.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infection control. 52.190... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.190 Infection control. The program management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to prevent the development...

  5. 38 CFR 52.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infection control. 52.190... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.190 Infection control. The program management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to prevent the development...

  6. 38 CFR 52.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infection control. 52.190... FOR ADULT DAY HEALTH CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 52.190 Infection control. The program management must establish and maintain an infection control program designed to prevent the development...

  7. Inflammasome control of viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Lupfer, Christopher; Malik, Ankit; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2015-01-01

    The inflammasome is a caspase-1 containing complex that activates the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18 and results in the proinflammatory cell death known as pyroptosis. Numerous recent publications have highlighted the importance of inflammasome activation in the control of virus infection. Inflammasome activation during viral infection is dependent on a variety of upstream receptors including the NOD-Like receptor, RIG-I-Like receptor and AIM2-Like receptor families. Various receptors also function in inflammasome activation in different cellular compartments, including the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The effectiveness of inflammasomes at suppressing virus replication is highlighted by the prevalence and diversity of virus encoded inflammasome inhibitors. Also, the host has a myriad of regulatory mechanisms in place to prevent unwanted inflammasome activation and overt inflammation. Finally, recent reports begin to suggest that inflammasome activation and inflammasome modulation may have important clinical applications. Herein, we highlight recent advances and discuss potential future directions toward understanding the role of inflammasomes during virus infection. PMID:25771504

  8. Lesser-known or hidden reservoirs of infection and implications for adequate prevention strategies: Where to look and what to look for

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Sally; Exner, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heeg, Peter; Ilschner, Carola; Krämer, Irene; Merkens, Wolfgang; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Rutala, William A.; Sonntag, Hans-Günther; Trautmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In developing hygiene strategies, in recent years, the major focus has been on the hands as the key route of infection transmission. However, there is a multitude of lesser-known and underestimated reservoirs for microorganisms which are the triggering sources and vehicles for outbreaks or sporadic cases of infection. Among those are water reservoirs such as sink drains, fixtures, decorative water fountains and waste-water treatment plants, frequently touched textile surfaces such as private curtains in hospitals and laundry, but also transvaginal ultrasound probes, parenteral drug products, and disinfectant wipe dispensers. The review of outbreak reports also reveals Gram-negative and multiple-drug resistant microorganisms to have become an increasingly frequent and severe threat in medical settings. In some instances, the causative organisms are particularly difficult to identify because they are concealed in biofilms or in a state referred to as viable but nonculturable, which eludes conventional culture media-based detection methods. There is an enormous preventative potential in these insights, which has not been fully tapped. New and emerging pathogens, novel pathogen detection methods, and hidden reservoirs of infection should hence be given special consideration when designing the layout of buildings and medical devices, but also when defining the core competencies for medical staff, establishing programmes for patient empowerment and education of the general public, and when implementing protocols for the prevention and control of infections in medical, community and domestic settings. PMID:25699227

  9. Lesser-known or hidden reservoirs of infection and implications for adequate prevention strategies: Where to look and what to look for.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Sally; Exner, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt; Goroncy-Bermes, Peter; Hartemann, Philippe; Heeg, Peter; Ilschner, Carola; Krämer, Irene; Merkens, Wolfgang; Oltmanns, Peter; Rotter, Manfred; Rutala, William A; Sonntag, Hans-Günther; Trautmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    In developing hygiene strategies, in recent years, the major focus has been on the hands as the key route of infection transmission. However, there is a multitude of lesser-known and underestimated reservoirs for microorganisms which are the triggering sources and vehicles for outbreaks or sporadic cases of infection. Among those are water reservoirs such as sink drains, fixtures, decorative water fountains and waste-water treatment plants, frequently touched textile surfaces such as private curtains in hospitals and laundry, but also transvaginal ultrasound probes, parenteral drug products, and disinfectant wipe dispensers. The review of outbreak reports also reveals Gram-negative and multiple-drug resistant microorganisms to have become an increasingly frequent and severe threat in medical settings. In some instances, the causative organisms are particularly difficult to identify because they are concealed in biofilms or in a state referred to as viable but nonculturable, which eludes conventional culture media-based detection methods. There is an enormous preventative potential in these insights, which has not been fully tapped. New and emerging pathogens, novel pathogen detection methods, and hidden reservoirs of infection should hence be given special consideration when designing the layout of buildings and medical devices, but also when defining the core competencies for medical staff, establishing programmes for patient empowerment and education of the general public, and when implementing protocols for the prevention and control of infections in medical, community and domestic settings. PMID:25699227

  10. 75 FR 3912 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID), regarding: (1) The practice of hospital infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  11. 75 FR 22816 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ...), regarding the practice of hospital infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  12. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  13. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  14. 76 FR 63622 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  15. 77 FR 58397 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Infectious Disease (NCEZID), CDC, regarding (1) the practice of infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  16. 75 FR 50770 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), regarding: (1) The practice of hospital infection control; strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  17. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control...

  18. Combination and triple therapy in patients with stable angina pectoris not adequately controlled by optimal β-blocker therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kok, W.E.M.; Visser, F.C.; Visser, C.A.

    2002-01-01

    In 60 to 80% of patients with stable angina pectoris at low risk for future coronary events, monotherapy with a β-blocker is an effective treatment. When patients with stable angina pectoris and low risk for events do not respond adequately to optimal β-blocker monotherapy, combination therapy or even triple therapy is may be recommended, but little is known of the actual benefit of such a strategy. We reviewed the evidence from the literature on the effectiveness of combination and triple therapy. Combination therapy with a calcium antagonist or nitrate was found to be more effective than β-blocker monotherapy in the majority of studies, but only an estimated 30% of patients objectively benefit from these combination therapies. Direct comparison shows that combination therapy of a β-blocker with a calcium antagonist is more effective than the combination of a β-blocker with a nitrate. An inadequate response to β-blocker monotherapy is more effectively improved by addition of a calcium antagonist than by alternative use of a calcium antagonist. The use of triple therapy is controversial and not recommended in patients with mild angina pectoris, while for patients with severe angina pectoris not responding to combination therapy of a β-blocker with a nitrate, triple therapy may be of advantage, although the number of patients studied has been small. PMID:25696045

  19. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51.190 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The...

  20. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51.190 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The...

  1. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51.190 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The...

  2. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51.190 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The...

  3. 38 CFR 51.190 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Infection control. 51.190 Section 51.190 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.190 Infection control. The...

  4. Rectal cancer delivery of radiotherapy in adequate time and with adequate dose is influenced by treatment center, treatment schedule, and gender and is prognostic parameter for local control: Results of study CAO/ARO/AIO-94

    SciTech Connect

    Fietkau, Rainer . E-mail: rainer.fietkau@med.uni-rostock.de; Roedel, Claus; Hohenberger, Werner; Raab, Rudolf; Hess, Clemens; Liersch, Torsten; Becker, Heinz; Wittekind, Christian; Hutter, Matthias; Hager, Eva; Karstens, Johann; Ewald, Hermann; Christen, Norbert; Jagoditsch, Michael; Martus, Peter; Sauer, Rolf

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: The impact of the delivery of radiotherapy (RT) on treatment results in rectal cancer patients is unknown. Methods and Materials: The data from 788 patients with rectal cancer treated within the German CAO/AIO/ARO-94 phase III trial were analyzed concerning the impact of the delivery of RT (adequate RT: minimal radiation RT dose delivered, 4300 cGy for neoadjuvant RT or 4700 cGy for adjuvant RT; completion of RT in <44 days for neoadjuvant RT or <49 days for adjuvant RT) in different centers on the locoregional recurrence rate (LRR) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 5 years. The LRR, DFS, and delivery of RT were analyzed as endpoints in multivariate analysis. Results: A significant difference was found between the centers and the delivery of RT. The overall delivery of RT was a prognostic factor for the LRR (no RT, 29.6% {+-} 7.8%; inadequate RT, 21.2% {+-} 5.6%; adequate RT, 6.8% {+-} 1.4%; p = 0.0001) and DFS (no RT, 55.1% {+-} 9.1%; inadequate RT, 57.4% {+-} 6.3%; adequate RT, 69.1% {+-} 2.3%; p = 0.02). Postoperatively, delivery of RT was a prognostic factor for LRR on multivariate analysis (together with pathologic stage) but not for DFS (independent parameters, pathologic stage and age). Preoperatively, on multivariate analysis, pathologic stage, but not delivery of RT, was an independent prognostic parameter for LRR and DFS (together with adequate chemotherapy). On multivariate analysis, the treatment center, treatment schedule (neoadjuvant vs. adjuvant RT), and gender were prognostic parameters for adequate RT. Conclusion: Delivery of RT should be regarded as a prognostic factor for LRR in rectal cancer and is influenced by the treatment center, treatment schedule, and patient gender.

  5. Training of personnel for infection control.

    PubMed

    Crow, S

    1984-01-01

    The overall objectives for implementing an infection control program are to make hospital personnel aware of nosocomial infections and to educate these persons in their role in decreasing the risk of these infections. The infection control practitioner (ICP) implements these objectives by performing surveillance to determine problem areas and by developing policies and procedures that prevent and control nosocomial infections. Appropriate qualities for an ICP include initiative, leadership, communication skills, commitment, and charisma. Expertise in patient care practices, aseptic principles, sterilization practices, education, research, epidemiology, microbiology, infectious diseases, and psychology are acquired skills. Local, state, and national organizations, as well as universities, are responsible for ICP training, In the US the Centers for Disease Control have established a training program for the beginning ICP and the Association of Practitioners in Infection Control (APIC) has developed a study guide for developing infection control skills. The ultimate responsibility for education is an individual obligation, however. Certification of the ICP would insure a minimum level of knowledge, thereby standardizing and upgrading the practice of infection control. PMID:6557085

  6. Infection control in severely burned patients

    PubMed Central

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood stream infections. Universal application of early excision of burned tissues has made a substantial improvement in the control of wound-related infections in burns. Additionally, the development of new technologies in wound care have helped to decrease morbidity and mortality in severe burn victims. Many examples can be given of the successful control of wound infection, such as the application of an appropriate antibiotic solution to invasive wound infection sites with simultaneous vacuum-assisted closure, optimal preservation of viable tissues with waterjet debridement systems, edema and exudate controlling dressings impregnated with Ag (Silvercel, Aquacell-Ag). The burned patient is at high risk for NI. Invasive interventions including intravenous and urinary chateterization, and entubation pose a further risk of NIs. The use of newly designed antimicrobial impregnated chateters or silicone devices may help the control of infection in these immunocomprimised patients. Strict infection control practices (physical isolation in a private room, use of gloves and gowns during patient contact) and appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy guided by laboratory surveillance culture as well as routine microbial burn wound culture are essential to help reduce the incidance of infections due to antibiotic resistant microorganisms. PMID:24701406

  7. Enhancement of Bacillus subtilis Lipopeptide Biosurfactants Production through Optimization of Medium Composition and Adequate Control of Aeration

    PubMed Central

    Ghribi, Dhouha; Ellouze-Chaabouni, Semia

    2011-01-01

    Interest in biosurfactants has increased considerably in recent years, as they are potentially used in many commercial applications in petroleum, pharmaceuticals, biomedical, and food processing industries. Since improvement of their production was of great importance to reduce the final coast, cultural conditions were analyzed to optimize biosurfactants production from Bacillus subtilis SPB1 strain. A high yield of biosurfactants was obtained from a culture of B. subtilis using carbohydrate substrate as a carbon source; among carbohydrates, glucose enhanced the best surfactin production. The optimum glucose concentration was 40 g/L. Higher amount of biosurfactants was obtained using 5 g/L of urea as organic nitrogen source and applying C/N ratio of 7 with ammonium chloride as inorganic nitrogen source. The highest amount of biosurfactants was recorded with the addition of 2% kerosene. Moreover, it was shown, using an automated full-controlled 2.6 L fermenter, that aeration of the medium, which affected strongly the growth regulated biosurfactants synthesis by the producing cell. So that, low or high aerations lead to a decrease of biosurfactants synthesis yields. It was found that when using dissolved oxygen saturation of the medium at 30%, biosurfactants production reached 4.92 g/L. PMID:21966596

  8. Infection Control During Filoviral Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa, N Raabe; Matthias, Borchert

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  9. INFECTION CONTROL IN ALTERNATIVE HEALTHCARE SETTINGS

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, Elaine; Chopra, Teena; Mody, Lona

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS With the changing healthcare delivery, patients receive care at various settings including acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, outpatient primary care and specialty clinics, as well as at home, exposing them to pathogens in various settings. Various healthcare settings face unique challenges requiring individualized infection control programs. Infection control programs in skilled nursing facilities should address: surveillance for infections and antimicrobial resistance, outbreak investigation and control plan for epidemics, isolation precautions, hand hygiene, staff education, and employee and resident health programs. Infection control programs in ambulatory clinics should address: Triage and standard – transmission based precautions, cleaning, disinfection and sterilization principles, surveillance in surgical clinics, safe injection practices, and bioterrorism and disaster planning for ambulatory clinics. PMID:21316005

  10. Improving infection control in general practice.

    PubMed

    Farrow, S C; Zeuner, D; Hall, C

    1999-03-01

    Infection control measures in the health care setting should protect patients and staff from cross-infection. The prevention of harm is an essential part of good medical practice and failure might result in professional misconduct proceedings by the General Medical Council (GMC) and prosecution under the Health and Safety at Work legislation, as well as civil liability. For a health authority, overall responsibility for public health includes arrangements for the control of communicable diseases and infection in hospital and the community (NHS Management Executive, 1993), a function usually led by the Consultant in Communicable Disease Control (CCDC). This paper describes one district's collaborative approach between public health and GPs to assess and improve local infection control standards. PMID:10327810

  11. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infected cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.

  12. The training curriculum in hospital infection control.

    PubMed

    Voss, A; Allerberger, F; Bouza, E; Cookson, B; Daschner, F; Dettenkofer, M; Gastmeier, P; Gordts, B; Heczko, P; Jovanovic, B; Koller, W; Mittermeyer, H; Nagy, E; Richet, H; Unal, S; Widmer, A

    2005-04-01

    Standardised training curricula for infection control nurses (ICNs) and recognition of the specialty exist in many European countries, but infection control physician (ICP) is not a specialty recognised by the UEMS. To gather information on curricula for ICPs, members of the ESCMID Study Group on Nosocomial Infections received a questionnaire. There is discussion about which 'professions' should be included in an infection control team. Within the 12 countries included, the average full-time equivalents (FTEs) for ICPs and ICNs per 1000 beds were 1.2 and 3.4, respectively. In addition to ICNs and ICPs, an infection control team should also include a data manager, an epidemiologist, secretarial/administrative support, and possibly, surveillance technicians. Overall, the composition of an ideal infection control team was estimated to be 9.3 FTE per 1000 beds. The background of ICPs can be clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Among the participants, it was predominantly clinical microbiology. The ideal training curriculum for the ICP should include 6 years of postgraduate training. Of these, at least 2 years should be 'clinical training' (e.g., internal medicine) to acquire experience in the management of high-risk patients. Furthermore, training with regard to infection control and hospital epidemiology should be offered as a 'common trunk' for those being trained in clinical microbiology or infectious diseases. Important issues that remain are: implementation/standardisation of training curricula for doctors, recognition of ICP as a separate specialty or sub-specialty of clinical microbiology and/or infectious diseases, validation of on-the-job training facilities in terms of the number of doctors and nurses who can give training and the category of patients/problems present, and mandatory postgraduate education/continuing medical education specific for infection control for doctors and nurses in the field. PMID:15760441

  13. Efficacy and Tolerability of Telmisartan Plus Amlodipine in Asian Patients Not Adequately Controlled on Either Monotherapy or on Low-Dose Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dingliang; Gao, Pingjin; Yagi, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the telmisartan plus amlodipine (T/A) single-pill combination (SPC) in Asian patients with hypertension whose blood pressure (BP) was not adequately controlled on either monotherapy or on low-dose combination therapy. Patients and Methods. Data are presented from five Boehringer Ingelheim-sponsored phase 3, double-blind, 8-week, studies: two studies in nonresponders to amlodipine (data pooled for amlodipine), two studies on nonresponders to telmisartan (pooled data), and one on nonresponders to low-dose T/A SPC. Results. After 8 weeks' treatment, mean reductions from the reference baseline in diastolic BP (DBP; primary endpoint), systolic BP (SBP), and SBP, DBP goal, and response rates were higher with the T/A SPC than respective monotherapies. The T80/A5 SPC resulted in greater reductions in DBP and SBP, and higher DBP goal and response rate than the low-dose T40/A5 SPC. Peripheral edema incidence was low (amlodipine 0.5%, telmisartan 0.0%, and T/A SPC 0.7%). Discussion and Conclusion. In Asian patients whose BP is not adequately controlled with telmisartan or amlodipine monotherapy, T/A SPC treatment results in greater BP reduction, and higher DBP and SBP goal and response rates. The safety and tolerability of the T/A SPC are comparable to those of the respective monotherapies and consistent with those reported in previous studies. PMID:24719757

  14. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular...

  15. [Tuberculosis infection control--recommendations of the DZK].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, R; Just, H-M; Castell, S; Diel, R; Gastmeier, P; Haas, W; Hauer, B; Loytved, G; Mielke, M; Moser, I; Nienhaus, A; Richter, E; Rüden, H; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Schaberg, T; Wischnewski, N; Loddenkemper, R

    2012-05-01

    The epidemiological situation of tuberculosis (TB) in Germany has improved considerably during the past few years. However, those in unprotected contact with infectious tuberculosis patients frequently and/or over longer periods of time and/or intensively continue to have a higher risk for TB infection. Rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of effective treatment, and adequate infection control measures are of particular importance to prevent infection. The present recommendations depict the essentials of infection control as well as specific measures in the hospital (isolation, criteria for its duration and technical requirements, types of respiratory protection, disinfection measures, waste disposal). The specific requirements for outpatients (medical practice), at home, for ambulance services, and in congregate settings, including prisons, are also addressed. Compared with the previous recommendations the pattern of respiratory protection measures has been simplified. As a rule, hospital staff and those visiting infectious tuberculosis patients are advised to wear respiratory protection that satisfies the criteria of FFP2-masks (DIN EN 149), while patients should wear mouth-nose protectors (surgical masks) in the presence of others and outside the isolation room. A detailed depiction of criteria for isolation and its duration in smear positive and only culturally confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis has been added. PMID:22294284

  16. Post-treatment control of HIV infection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Conway, Jessica M.; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-04-13

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV is not a cure. However, recent studies suggest that ART, initiated early during primary infection, may induce post-treatment control (PTC) of HIV infection with HIV RNA maintained at <50 copies per mL. We investigate the hypothesis that ART initiated early during primary infection permits PTC by limiting the size of the latent reservoir, which, if small enough at treatment termination, may allow the adaptive immune response to prevent viral rebound (VR) and control infection. We use a mathematical model of within host HIV dynamics to capture interactions among target cells, productively infected cells, latently infectedmore » cells, virus, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Analysis of our model reveals a range in CTL response strengths where a patient may show either VR or PTC, depending on the size of the latent reservoir at treatment termination. Below this range, patients will always rebound, whereas above this range, patients are predicted to behave like elite controllers. As a result, using data on latent reservoir sizes in patients treated during primary infection, we also predict population-level VR times for non-controllers consistent with observations.« less

  17. [The technology of apical infection control].

    PubMed

    Qing, Yu; Yang, Yang; Bei, Chang

    2014-10-01

    Root canal therapy is the most efficient way to treat pulptitis and periapical inflammation, which can clear infections of root canal systems, fill the root canal firmly, and avoid reinfection. However, the variations in root canal morphology and complexity of infection confer difficulty in thoroughly eliminating microorganisms and their by-products in the root canal system, especially in the root apex area (including the top one-third of the root canal and periapical tissue), which is described as the hardest area to clean during endodontic treatment. Infection is difficult to remove entirely because the apex area is hard to approach using dental instruments and because of the existence of special morphological structures, such as apical ramification, intercanal anastomoses, and lateral branch of root canal. This review gives a brief introduction of the characteristics and difficulties of apical infection and knowledge on how to control such infections, including root apex preparation, irrigation and disinfection, and root canal filling. PMID:25490815

  18. Modelling respiratory infection control measure effects

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, C. M.; CHEN, S. C.; CHANG, C. F.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the most pressing issues in facing emerging and re-emerging respiratory infections is how to bring them under control with current public health measures. Approaches such as the Wells–Riley equation, competing-risks model, and Von Foerster equation are used to prioritize control-measure efforts. Here we formulate how to integrate those three different types of functional relationship to construct easy-to-use and easy-to-interpret critical-control lines that help determine optimally the intervention strategies for containing airborne infections. We show that a combination of assigned effective public health interventions and enhanced engineering control measures would have a high probability for containing airborne infection. We suggest that integrated analysis to enhance modelling the impact of potential control measures against airborne infections presents an opportunity to assess risks and benefits. We demonstrate the approach with examples of optimal control measures to prioritize respiratory infections of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), influenza, measles, and chickenpox. PMID:17475088

  19. Discourse of 'transformational leadership' in infection control.

    PubMed

    Koteyko, Nelya; Carter, Ronald

    2008-10-01

    The article explores the impact of the ;transformational leadership' style in the role of modern matron with regards to infection control practices. Policy and guidance on the modern matron role suggest that it is distinctive in its combination of management and clinical components, and in its reliance on transformational leadership. Senior nurses are therefore expected to motivate staff by creating high expectations, modelling appropriate behaviour, and providing personal attention to followers by giving respect and responsibility. In this article, we draw on policy documents and interview data to explore the potential impact of this new management style on infection control practices. Combining the techniques of discourse analysis and corpus linguistics, we identify examples where matrons appear to disassociate themselves from the role of ;an empowered manager' who has control over human and financial resources to resolve problems in infection control efficiently. PMID:18818276

  20. Infection prevention and control practitioners: improving engagement.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Ann-Marie

    Every healthcare worker plays a vital part in minimising the risk of cross infection. Infection prevention and control (IPC) practitioners have the skills and competencies to assist organisations in improving engagement among staff and play a vital part in achieving this. IPC practitioners have skills in clinical practice, education, research and leadership, and these skills ensure high-quality care for patients and support strategies for engaging staff. This article highlights how IPC practitioners' skills and competencies are required for preventing infection and improving staff engagement. Engaged staff generate positive outcomes for both patients and staff, which is a welcome result for all healthcare organisations. PMID:27019165

  1. Glove powder: implications for infection control.

    PubMed

    Dave, J; Wilcox, M H; Kellett, M

    1999-08-01

    Gloves are increasingly promoted for use by healthcare workers, but this use is not without risk. Data associating powdered gloves with an increased risk of latex allergy is available and there is circumstantial evidence that the powder used may increase bacterial environmental contamination. In animal models, corn starch, the material used as glove powder, promotes wound infection. Infection control teams need to be aware of this evidence and should support switching from use of powdered to powder free gloves. PMID:10467541

  2. Translational Control during Calicivirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Elizabeth; Locker, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the strategies developed by caliciviruses to subvert or regulate the host protein synthesis machinery to their advantage. As intracellular obligate parasites, viruses strictly depend on the host cell resources to produce viral proteins. Thus, many viruses have developed strategies that regulate the function of the host protein synthesis machinery, often leading to preferential translation of viral mRNAs. Caliciviruses lack a 5′ cap structure but instead have a virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5′ end of their mRNAs. Furthermore, they encode 2–4 open reading frames within their genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Therefore, they use alternative mechanisms for translation whereby VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) to act as a proteinaceous cap-substitute, and some structural proteins are produced by reinitiation of translation events. This review discusses our understanding of these key mechanisms during caliciviruses infection as well as recent insights into the global regulation of eIF4E activity. PMID:27104553

  3. Translational Control during Calicivirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Royall, Elizabeth; Locker, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we provide an overview of the strategies developed by caliciviruses to subvert or regulate the host protein synthesis machinery to their advantage. As intracellular obligate parasites, viruses strictly depend on the host cell resources to produce viral proteins. Thus, many viruses have developed strategies that regulate the function of the host protein synthesis machinery, often leading to preferential translation of viral mRNAs. Caliciviruses lack a 5' cap structure but instead have a virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of their mRNAs. Furthermore, they encode 2-4 open reading frames within their genomic and subgenomic RNAs. Therefore, they use alternative mechanisms for translation whereby VPg interacts with eukaryotic initiation factors (eIFs) to act as a proteinaceous cap-substitute, and some structural proteins are produced by reinitiation of translation events. This review discusses our understanding of these key mechanisms during caliciviruses infection as well as recent insights into the global regulation of eIF4E activity. PMID:27104553

  4. 78 FR 6329 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices.... L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announces the following meeting for... of healthcare infection prevention and control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention,...

  5. Behavioral interventions to improve infection control practices.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, E K; Larson, E L

    1998-06-01

    No single intervention has been successful in improving and sustaining such infection control practices as universal precautions and handwashing by health care professionals. This paper examines several behavioral theories (Health Belief Model, Theory of Reasoned Action and Theory of Planned Behavior, self-efficacy, and the Transtheoretic Model) and relates them to individual factors, also considering interpersonal and organizational factors. Further, this article includes recommendations of individual and organizational components to be addressed when planning a theoretically based intervention for improving infection control practices. A hypothetic framework to enhance handwashing practice is proposed. PMID:9638287

  6. RCN introduce new guidelines in infection control.

    PubMed

    Sims-Williams, F

    1987-08-01

    The RCN Safety Representatives Conference Co-ordinating Committee urge all nurses, not only to be vaccinated against hepatitis B, but also to ensure that they understand, and appreciate, infection control guidelines, and to ensure that, in their local working environment, they are followed closely. This statement is contained in the preface of the Royal College of Nursing's Introduction to Hepatitis B and Nursing Guidelines for Infection Control, launched in London on 30th June 1987, as part of the RCN's active campaign on hepatitis B. It is anticipated that these guidelines will have an enormous impact on the NHS. PMID:10284270

  7. Snapshots: Chromatin Control of Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knipe, David M.; Lieberman, Paul M.; Jung, Jae U.; McBride, Alison A.; Morris, Kevin V.; Ott, Melanie; Margolis, David; Nieto, Amelia; Nevels, Michael; Parks, Robin J.; Kristie, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Like their cellular host counterparts, many invading viral pathogens must contend with, modulate, and utilize the host cell’s chromatin machinery to promote efficient lytic infection or control persistent-latent states. While not intended to be comprehensive, this review represents a compilation of conceptual snapshots of the dynamic interplay of viruses with the chromatin environment. Contributions focus on chromatin dynamics during infection, viral circumvention of cellular chromatin repression, chromatin organization of large DNA viruses, tethering and persistence, viral interactions with cellular chromatin modulation machinery, and control of viral latency-reactivation cycles. PMID:23217624

  8. Indoor environmental control of tuberculosis and other airborne infections.

    PubMed

    Nardell, E A

    2016-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains the airborne infection of global importance, although many environmental interventions to control TB apply to influenza and other infections with airborne potential. This review focuses on the global problem and the current state of available environmental interventions. TB transmission is facilitated in overcrowded, poorly ventilated congregate settings, such as hospitals, clinics, prisons, jails, and refugee camps. The best means of TB transmission control is source control- to identify unsuspected infectious cases and to promptly begin effective therapy. However, even with active case finding and rapid diagnostics, not every unsuspected case will be identified, and environmental control measures remain the next intervention of choice. Natural ventilation is the main means of air disinfection and has the advantage of wide availability, low cost, and high efficacy-under optimal conditions. It is usually not applicable all year in colder climates and may not be effective when windows are closed on cold nights in warm climates, for security, and for pest control. In warm climates, windows may be closed when air conditioning is installed for thermal comfort. Although mechanical ventilation, if properly installed and maintained, can provide adequate air disinfection, it is expensive to install, maintain, and operate. The most cost-effective way to achieve high levels of air disinfection is upper room germicidal irradiation. The safe and effective application of this poorly defined intervention is now well understood, and recently published evidence-based application guidelines will make implementation easier. PMID:26178270

  9. Control of viruses infecting grapevine.

    PubMed

    Maliogka, Varvara I; Martelli, Giovanni P; Fuchs, Marc; Katis, Nikolaos I

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine is a high value vegetatively propagated fruit crop that suffers from numerous viruses, including some that seriously affect the profitability of vineyards. Nowadays, 64 viruses belonging to different genera and families have been reported in grapevines and new virus species will likely be described in the future. Three viral diseases namely leafroll, rugose wood, and infectious degeneration are of major economic importance worldwide. The viruses associated with these diseases are transmitted by mealybugs, scale and soft scale insects, or dagger nematodes. Here, we review control measures of the major grapevine viral diseases. More specifically, emphasis is laid on (i) approaches for the production of clean stocks and propagative material through effective sanitation, robust diagnosis, as well as local and regional certification efforts, (ii) the management of vectors of viruses using cultural, biological, and chemical methods, and (iii) the production of resistant grapevines mainly through the application of genetic engineering. The benefits and limitations of the different control measures are discussed with regard to accomplishments and future research directions. PMID:25591880

  10. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460.74 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  11. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460.74 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  12. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460.74 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  13. 42 CFR 460.74 - Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Infection control. 460.74 Section 460.74 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY (PACE) PROGRAMS OF ALL-INCLUSIVE CARE FOR THE ELDERLY...

  14. Infections Control in North American Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, Elise; Dhuru, Virendra B.

    1989-01-01

    Results from 1982 and 1987 surveys of dental schools concerning infection control issues found greater recent emphasis on instrument sterilization and barrier use, but some inconsistency and confusion concerning hepatitis B and HIV virus carrier patients and personnel. The information was used to develop guidelines for school policy formation.…

  15. Infection control practices for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Palenik, Charles John

    2004-06-01

    Infection control for dental radiography employs the same materials, processes, and techniques used in the operatory, yet unless proper procedures are established and followed, there is a definite potential for cross-contamination to clinical area surfaces and DHCP. In general, the aseptic practices used are relatively simple and inexpensive, yet they require complete application in every situation. PMID:15218669

  16. Infection control and biosecurity in equine disease control.

    PubMed

    Weese, J S

    2014-11-01

    Infectious diseases are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in horses, along with economic costs and broader impacts associated with the loss of members of a species that generates income, acts as a working animal and is a companion. Endemic diseases continue to challenge, emerging diseases are an ever-present threat and outbreaks can be both destructive and disruptive. While infectious diseases can never be completely prevented, measures can be introduced to restrict the entry of pathogens into a population or limit the implications of the presence of a pathogen. Objective research regarding infection control and biosecurity in horses is limited, yet a variety of practical infection prevention and control measures can be used. Unfortunately, infection control can be challenging, because of the nature of the equine industry (e.g. frequent horse movement) and endemic pathogens, but also because of lack of understanding or motivation to try to improve practices. Recognition of the basic concepts of infection control and biosecurity, and indeed the need for measures to control infectious diseases, is the foundation for successful infection prevention and control. PMID:24802183

  17. Control of infection in an international airline.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M

    1993-05-01

    The paper examines the possible sources of infection on an international aircraft, including the provision of food, the supply of drinking water, and the removal of waste. It considers aspects of control, and explains some of the steps which have to be taken by a major international carrier to ensure that the high quality expected by the customer is provided in all areas of the world, even those where natural resources and expertise may be limited. The emphasis is on providing a safe product, and removing any possible risk of infection of the passengers. PMID:8495009

  18. Antimicrobial Stewardship for the Infection Control Practitioner.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Jerod L; Kaye, Keith S; LaPlante, Kerry L; Pogue, Jason M

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic misuse is a serious patient safety concern and a national public health priority. Years of indiscriminant antibiotic use has promoted selection for antibiotic resistant bacteria and Clostridium difficile This crisis has led to clinicians being faced with managing untreatable infections, often in the most vulnerable patient populations. This review summarizes the goals of antimicrobial stewardship programs, the essential members needed to initiate a program, various antimicrobial stewardship strategies, the role of the infection control practitioner in stewardship, barriers to its implementation and maintenance, approaches to measure the impact of a program, and the steps needed to initiate a program. PMID:27515147

  19. Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... collaboration Influence of a 5-year serial infection control and antibiotic stewardship intervention on cardiac surgical site infections Trends in mortality, length of stay, and hospital charges associated with health care–associated infections, 2006- ...

  20. Hospital design for better infection control

    PubMed Central

    Lateef, Fatimah

    2009-01-01

    The physical design and infrastructure of a hospital or institution is an essential component of its infection control measure. Thus is must be a prerequisite to take these into consideration from the initial conception and planning stages of the building. The balance between designing a hospital to be an open, accessible and public place and the control to reduce the spread of infections diseases is a necessity. At Singapore General Hospital, many lessons were learnt during the SARS outbreak pertaining to this. During and subsequent to the SARS outbreak, many changes evolved in the hospital to enable us to handle and face any emerging infectious situation with calm, confidence and the knowledge that staff and patients will be in good stead. This paper will share some of our experiences as well as challenges PMID:20009307

  1. Control of infection in hospital wards

    PubMed Central

    Blowers, Robert

    1961-01-01

    Some of the problems of ward management are reviewed. Methods suggested for dealing with them are probably not the ideals that should ultimately be attained but minimum standards to serve as immediate objectives. They concern indications for and methods of isolation, control of infection from staff, environmental contamination, and a few technical procedures. A new type of dressing towel for wounds is described. Images PMID:16810967

  2. 77 FR 28392 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-14

    ... infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings where healthcare is provided; and 3... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding 1) the practice of healthcare...

  3. 77 FR 4820 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-31

    ... infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings where healthcare is provided; and (3... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Director, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) the practice of healthcare...

  4. 42 CFR 418.60 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 418...: Patient Care § 418.60 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospice must maintain and document an effective infection control program that protects patients, families, visitors, and...

  5. What infection control measures will people carry out to reduce transmission of pandemic influenza? A focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Leanne G; Yardley, Lucy

    2009-01-01

    Background Pandemic influenza poses a future health threat against which infection control behaviours may be an important defence. However, there is little qualitative research examining perceptions of infection control measures in the context of pandemic influenza. Methods Eight focus groups and one interview were conducted with a purposive sample of 31 participants. Participants were invited to discuss their perceptions of infection transmission and likely adherence to infection control measures in both non-pandemic and pandemic contexts. Infection control measures discussed included handwashing, social distancing and cough hygiene (e.g. covering mouth, disposing of tissues immediately etc.). Results Thematic analysis revealed that although participants were knowledgeable about infection transmission, most expressed unfavourable attitudes toward control behaviours in non-pandemic situations. However, with the provision of adequate education about control measures and appropriate practical support (e.g. memory aids, access to facilities), most individuals report that they are likely to adhere to infection control protocols in the event of a pandemic. Of the behaviours likely to influence infection transmission, handwashing was regarded by our participants as more feasible than cough and sneeze hygiene and more acceptable than social distancing. Conclusion Handwashing could prove a useful target for health promotion, but interventions to promote infection control may need to address a number of factors identified within this study as potential barriers to carrying out infection control behaviours. PMID:19627568

  6. Multiresistant pathogens in geriatric nursing – infection control in residential facilities for geriatric nursing in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Claudia; Schablon, Anja; Bollongino, Kirsten; Maaß, Monika; Kaß, Dietmar; Dulon, Madeleine; Diel, Roland; Nienhaus, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background: The increase of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) causes problems in geriatric nursing homes. Older people are at increased a growing risk of infection due to multimorbidity and frequent stays in hospital. A high proportion of the elderly require residential care in geriatric nursing facilities, where hygiene requirements in nursing homes are similar to those in hospitals. For this reason we examined how well nursing homes are prepared for MDROs and how effectively protect their infection control residents and staff. Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on infection control in residential geriatric nursing facilities in Germany 2012. The questionnaire recorded important parameters of hygiene, resident and staff protection and actions in case of existing MDROs. Results: The response was 54% in Hamburg and 27% in the rest of Germany. Nursing homes were generally well equipped for dealing with infection control: There were standards for MDROs and regular hygiene training for staff. The facilities provided adequate protective clothing, affected residents are usually isolated and hygienic laundry processing conducted. There are deficits in the communication of information on infected residents with hospitals and general practitioners. 54% of nursing homes performed risk assessments for staff infection precaution. Conclusion: There is a growing interest in MDROs and infection control will be a challenge in for residential geriatric nursing facilities in the future. This issue has also drawn increasing attention. Improvements could be achieved by improving communication between different participants in the health service, together with specific measures for staff protection at work. PMID:25285266

  7. Impact of an Infection Control Program in a Specialized Preschool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krilov, Leonard R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Evaluated effects of infection control interventions--including infection control lectures and attention to environmental hygiene--on the number and types of infection illnesses occurring in a specialized preschool. Subjects were infants and preschoolers with Down Syndrome. Found that total illnesses decreased significantly, particularly for…

  8. 42 CFR 482.42 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 482... Hospital Functions § 482.42 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospital must provide a sanitary environment to avoid sources and transmission of infections and communicable diseases. There...

  9. 42 CFR 482.42 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 482... Hospital Functions § 482.42 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospital must provide a sanitary environment to avoid sources and transmission of infections and communicable diseases. There...

  10. 42 CFR 482.42 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 482... Hospital Functions § 482.42 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospital must provide a sanitary environment to avoid sources and transmission of infections and communicable diseases. There...

  11. 42 CFR 482.42 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 482... Hospital Functions § 482.42 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospital must provide a sanitary environment to avoid sources and transmission of infections and communicable diseases. There...

  12. 42 CFR 482.42 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 482... Hospital Functions § 482.42 Condition of participation: Infection control. The hospital must provide a sanitary environment to avoid sources and transmission of infections and communicable diseases. There...

  13. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in health services 1

    PubMed Central

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Laus, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to evaluate the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in hospital institutions regarding structure and process indicators. METHOD: this is a descriptive, exploratory and quantitative study conducted in 2013. The study population comprised 13 Nosocomial Infection Control Programs of health services in a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo. Public domain instruments available in the Manual of Evaluation Indicators of Nosocomial Infection Control Practices were used. RESULTS: The indicators with the highest average compliance were "Evaluation of the Structure of the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs" (75%) and "Evaluation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Nosocomial Infection" (82%) and those with the lowest mean compliance scores were "Evaluation of Operational Guidelines" (58.97%) and "Evaluation of Activities of Control and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection" (60.29%). CONCLUSION: The use of indicators identified that, despite having produced knowledge about prevention and control of nosocomial infections, there is still a large gap between the practice and the recommendations. PMID:25806637

  14. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  15. Control Measures for Human Respiratory Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Lesley; Waterer, Grant

    2016-08-01

    New viral respiratory pathogens are emerging with increasing frequency and have potentially devastating impacts on the population worldwide. Recent examples of newly emerged threats include severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Experiences with these pathogens have shown up major deficiencies in how we deal globally with emerging pathogens and taught us salient lessons in what needs to be addressed for future pandemics. This article reviews the lessons learnt from past experience and current knowledge on the range of measures required to limit the impact of emerging respiratory infections from public health responses down to individual patient management. Key areas of interest are surveillance programs, political limitations on our ability to respond quickly enough to emerging threats, media management, public information dissemination, infection control, prophylaxis, and individual patient management. Respiratory physicians have a crucial role to play in many of these areas and need to be aware of how to respond as new viral pathogens emerge. PMID:27486741

  16. Infection control in a developing world.

    PubMed

    Elston, James; Hinitt, Ian; Batson, Steve; Noakes, Cath; Wright, John; Walley, John; Humphreys, Clare

    2013-11-01

    The global HIV and tuberculosis (TB) epidemics have placed enormous burdens upon already overstretched healthcare workers and poorly resourced healthcare facilities in sub-Saharan Africa. The rapid emergence of multi-drug resistant TB, and its association with hospital-based outbreaks, have highlighted the role that healthcare facilities inadvertently may play in maintaining TB transmission, and the vital importance of attaining good TB infection control. James Elston, a specialist physician in infectious diseases and general internal medicine, who recently returned from a second stint in Swaziland, says many of the region's healthcare facilities are outdated, poorly ventilated, and were not designed for their current purpose. Here he describes how U.K.-based architects and healthcare engineers responded to an urgent call for assistance and, via close collaboration, and using novel design software, empowered healthcare workers to dramatically and rapidly improve their TB inpatient facilities, and protect the health of patients and staff. PMID:24397225

  17. Ventilator associated pneumonia and infection control

    PubMed Central

    Alp, Emine; Voss, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in intensive care units. The incidence of VAP varies from 7% to 70% in different studies and the mortality rates are 20–75% according to the study population. Aspiration of colonized pathogenic microorganisms on the oropharynx and gastrointestinal tract is the main route for the development of VAP. On the other hand, the major risk factor for VAP is intubation and the duration of mechanical ventilation. Diagnosis remains difficult, and studies showed the importance of early initiation of appropriate antibiotic for prognosis. VAP causes extra length of stay in hospital and intensive care units and increases hospital cost. Consequently, infection control policies are more rational and will save money. PMID:16600048

  18. Infection Control in Alternative Health Care Settings: An Update.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, Elaine; Cassone, Marco; Montoya, Ana; Mody, Lona

    2016-09-01

    With changing health care delivery, patients receive care at various settings including acute care hospitals, nursing homes, outpatient primary care and specialty clinics, and at home, exposing them to pathogens in various settings. Various health care settings face unique challenges, requiring individualized infection control programs. Infection control programs in nursing homes should address surveillance for infections and antimicrobial resistance, outbreak investigation and control plan for epidemics, isolation precautions, hand hygiene, staff education, and employee and resident health programs. PMID:27515148

  19. Healthcare-associated infections in intensive care units: epidemiology and infection control in low-to-middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Alp, Emine; Damani, Nizam

    2015-10-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are major patient safety problems in hospitals, especially in intensive care units (ICUs). Patients in ICUs are prone to HAIs due to reduced host defense mechanisms, low compliance with infection prevention and control (IPC) measures due to lack of education and training, and heavy workload and low staffing levels, leading to cross-transmission of microorganisms from patient to patient. Patients with HAIs have prolonged hospital stays, and have high morbidity and mortality, thus adding economic burden on the healthcare system. For various reasons, in low-to-middle income countries (LMICs), the scale of the problem is huge; each year, many people die from HAIs. In this review, epidemiology of HAIs and infection prevention and control measures in ICUs is discussed, with especial emphasis on LMICs. High rates of HAIs caused by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) are serious problems in ICUs in LMICs. In view of increasing prevalence of MDROs, LMICs should establish effective IPC infrastructure, appoint IPC teams, and provide adequate training and resources. These resources to establish and appoint IPC teams can be released by avoiding ritualistic, wasteful, and unsafe IPC practices, and by diverting resources to implement basic IPC measures, including early detection of infection, isolation of patients, application of appropriate IPC precautions, adherence to hand hygiene, and implementation of HAIs care bundles and basic evidence-based practices. PMID:26517477

  20. [Role of the surgeon in the hospital infections control committees].

    PubMed

    Akçay, Müfide Nuran; Kadanali, Ayten; Oztürk, Gürkan

    2003-10-01

    Hospital-acquired infections are the ones that develop within hospital stay or appear after discharge. These infections are associated with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality, longer hospital stay and higher hospital costs and Hospital Infections Control Committees have been founded to prevent it. In this review, we intended to investigate the role of the surgeon in this committee. PMID:14569476

  1. Hospital Epidemiology and Infection Control in Acute-Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sydnor, Emily R. M.; Perl, Trish M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Health care-associated infections (HAIs) have become more common as medical care has grown more complex and patients have become more complicated. HAIs are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and cost. Growing rates of HAIs alongside evidence suggesting that active surveillance and infection control practices can prevent HAIs led to the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control programs. The role for infection control programs has grown and continues to grow as rates of antimicrobial resistance rise and HAIs lead to increasing risks to patients and expanding health care costs. In this review, we summarize the history of the development of hospital epidemiology and infection control, common HAIs and the pathogens causing them, and the structure and role of a hospital epidemiology and infection control program. PMID:21233510

  2. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  3. Probiotic bacteria and biosurfactants for nosocomial infection control: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Falagas, M E; Makris, G C

    2009-04-01

    The adaptation of strict hygienic practices by healthcare personnel as well as the implementation of appropriate cleaning and disinfection measures form the basis of infection control policies. However, nosocomial infections constitute a considerable problem even in hospitals with meticulous infection control programmes. This should prompt biomedical researchers to evaluate the efficacy and safety of novel infection control measures. There is preliminary evidence that probiotic type micro-organisms may antagonise the growth of nosocomial pathogens on inanimate surfaces. We therefore propose the hypothesis that environmental probiotic organisms may represent a safe and effective intervention for infection control purposes. We suggest that probiotics or their products (biosurfactants), could be applied to patient care equipment, such as tubes or catheters, with the aim of decreasing colonisation of sites by nosocomial pathogens. This could potentially impede a central step in the pathogenesis of nosocomial infections. PMID:19201053

  4. Maintaining infection control during restorative procedures.

    PubMed

    Christensen, R P

    1993-07-01

    This report has listed criteria, example products, and pertinent information to aid clinicians in performing infection control procedures using products and techniques with verified efficacy. The goal is to provide optimal protection of clinicians and patients from cross-contamination in the dental environment. Subjects reviewed were face masks, eye protection, gloves, hand antiseptics, uniforms, vaccines, instrument cleaning, sterilization, environmental surface management, and contaminated waste management. The criteria proposed and the products listed were not intended to be all-inclusive or absolute. The omission of a product from this article or from the examples of products that did meet the criteria listed is not intended to disparage the product. No endorsement or approval of any product is made or intended by the author, editors, or publisher. The intent is to provide some direction at this time. Many new products and concepts now in development will bring changes in the future. The products referenced have been evaluated by independent researchers and clinicians in laboratory and clinical-use tests, and data are available upon request to support all recommendations. PMID:8348988

  5. Infection Control: The Use and Handling of Toothbrushes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control in Dental Settings FAQs for Infection Control File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, PPT, MPEG) on this site? Adobe PDF file Microsoft PowerPoint file Microsoft Word file Microsoft Excel ...

  6. Perceptions of infection control practices among health professionals.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Rochelle E; Wynaden, Dianne; Hart, Linda; Landsborough, Ian; McGowan, Sunita; Speed, Gaye; Orb, Angelica; Henderson, Saras; Wilson, Sally; Calnan, Wendy

    2006-07-01

    Infection control practice is a cornerstone of modern health care. However, there is minimal research into health professionals' perception of infection control practices and how those perceptions influence staff compliance with recommended protocols. The objective of this study was to explore health care professionals' perceptions of infection control practices in relation to the management of infectious diseases. A grounded theory approach was used as the research framework. Semi-structured interviews were completed with a sample of 16 nurses and doctors working at hospitals in Western Australia. Four major categories emerged from the data. These were: knowledge, culture, conflict, and risk assessment. The findings indicate the importance of both individual and organisational factors in determining clinicians' levels of compliance with recommended infection control practices. Identification of the factors that influence health professionals' level of compliance can be used to develop strategies to support long-term compliance with infection control practices. PMID:16863418

  7. Development of electronic potential and current transducers suitable for gas insulated switchgear and adequate for application to substation digital control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tokoro, K.; Harumoto, Y.; Ida, Y.; Mukae, H.; Ohno, Y.; Shimada, M.; Yamamoto, H.; Yoshida, Y.

    1982-10-01

    Substation Digital Control System (SDCS) had been developed for the future system controlling the large scale power system. For application of SDCS to Gas Insulated Switchgear (GIS), electronic potential and current transducers fit for GIS have been developed. This equipment is composed of a capacitive dividing type potential transducer, a low burden current transformer, an analogue-to-digital conversion unit and an optical fiber signal transmit system. Good performance is confirmed by the application tests simulating the field circumstances.

  8. Enterobiasis (Pinworm Infection): Prevention and Control

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Parasites - Enterobiasis (also known as Pinworm Infection) Note: Javascript ... this? Submit Button Information For: Travelers Related Links Parasites A-Z Index Parasites Glossary Neglected Tropical Diseases ...

  9. Compliance with infection control practices in an university hospital dental clinic

    PubMed Central

    Mutters, Nico T.; Hägele, Ulrike; Hagenfeld, Daniel; Hellwig, Elmar; Frank, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Compliance with infection control practices is the key to quality care and excellence in dentistry. Infection control remains one of the most cost-beneficial interventions available. However, implementing control procedures requires full compliance of the whole dental team. The aim of our study was to measure the compliance in daily clinical practice. Methods: The compliance with infection control practices in dentistry by dental health care personnel (DHCP) in a German university dental clinic was observed during clinical work. In addition, a survey was conducted to assess the individual knowledge about infection control procedures. Contamination of the workplace during invasive dental procedures was tested, as well. Results: A total of 58 invasive dental treatments implying close contacts between HCWs and patients were scrutinized. All HCWs (100%) wore gloves during dental work, but in some cases (female dentists: 14.3%; dental assistants: 28.6%) gloves were neither changed nor hands were disinfected between different activities or patient contacts (female dentists: 68.6%; male dentists: 60.9%; dental assistants: 93%). Only 31.4% of female and 39.1% of male dentists carried out adequate hygienic hand disinfection after removing gloves. Male dentists wore significantly more often (100%) protective eyewear compared to 77.1% of female dentists (p<0.05). In addition, most of female dentists (62.9%) and dental assistants (80.7%) wore jewelry during dental procedures. Conclusion: Despite the knowledge of distinct hygiene procedures only a small percentage of dental staff performs hygiene practices according to recommended guidelines. Strict audit is clearly needed in the dental setting to ensure compliance with infection control guidelines to prevent transmission of pathogens. Our results provide insights for the development of a targeted education and training strategy to enhance compliance of dental staff especially of dental assistants with infection control

  10. Leishmania infection in a population of dogs: an epidemiological investigation relating to visceral leishmaniasis control.

    PubMed

    Penaforte, Klauber Menezes; Belo, Vinícius Silva; Teixeira-Neto, Rafael Gonçalves; Ribeiro, Renata Aparecida Nascimento; de Oliveira, Robson Bruniera; Schettini, Dante Alighieri; da Silva, Eduardo Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Identification of factors associated with Leishmania infection in dogs is essential for targeting visceral leishmaniasis control actions. Thus, the present study analyzed some of these factors in a population of dogs in a Brazilian municipality, along with the limitations of control strategies implemented there. The association between the exposure variables and occurrences of infection was analyzed through logistic regression models. The disease control interventions were treated qualitatively. Out of the 755 animals examined, 13.6% (103/755) were seropositive. Of these, 23.3% (24/103) were asymptomatic and 76.7% (79/103) presented at least one clinical sign possibly associated with visceral leishmaniasis. With weak associations, purebred, shorthaired, over 5 years of age, male and large dogs were more prone to infection. The latter two variables formed the final regression model and the association with dog size was statistically significant. The control strategies developed presented limitations and a great number of seronegative dogs was culled. The data presented contribute towards better understanding of the dynamics of infection in canine visceral leishmaniasis and indicate that actions aimed towards adequate implementation of Visceral Leishmaniasis control program in Brazilian endemic areas should be prioritized. PMID:24473887

  11. Infection Control and Prevention: A Review of Hospital-Acquired Infections and the Economic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Deoine; Kemmerly, Sandra A.

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million patients suffer from hospital-acquired infections every year and nearly 100,000 of them die. Most of these medical errors are preventable. Hospital-acquired infections result in up to $4.5 billion in additional healthcare expenses annually. The U.S. government has responded to this financial loss by focusing on healthcare quality report cards and by taking strong action to curb healthcare spending. The Medicare Program has proposed changes to the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System and Fiscal Year Rates: Proposed Rule CMS 1488-P-Healthcare-associated infection. Payment will be linked to performance. Under the new rule, payment will be withheld from hospitals for care associated with treating certain catheter-associated urinary tract infections, vascular catheter-associated infections, and mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Infection-prevention strategies are essential. In the healthcare setting, the infection control department is categorized as non-revenue-producing. Funds dedicated to resources such as staff, educational programs, and prevention measures are vastly limited. Hospital leaders will need to balance the upfront cost needed to prevent hospital-related infections with the non-reimbursed expense accrued secondary to potentially preventable infections. The purpose of this paper is to present case studies and cost analysis of hospital-acquired infections and present strategies that reduce infections and cost. PMID:21603406

  12. Perceptions of healthcare professionals regarding the main challenges and barriers to effective hospital infection control in Mongolia: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background It is not fully understood why healthcare decision-makers of developing countries often give low priority to infection control and why they are unable to implement international guidelines. This study aimed to identify the main perceived challenges and barriers that hinder the effective implementation of infection control programmes in Mongolia. Methods In 2008, qualitative research involving 4 group and 55 individual interviews was conducted in the capital city of Mongolia and two provincial centres. Results A total of 87 health professionals participated in the study, including policy and hospital-level managers, doctors, nurses and infection control practitioners. Thematic analysis revealed a large number of perceived challenges and barriers to the formulation and implementation of infection control policy. These challenges and barriers were complex in nature and related to poor funding, suboptimal knowledge and attitudes, and inadequate management. The study results suggest that the availability of infection control policy and guidelines, and the provision of specific recommendations for low-resource settings, do not assure effective implementation of infection control programmes. Conclusions The current infection control system in Mongolia is likely to remain ineffective unless the underlying barriers and challenges are adequately addressed. Multifaceted interventions with logistical, educational and management components that are specific to local circumstances need to be designed and implemented in Mongolia. The importance of international peer support is highlighted. PMID:22849768

  13. Framework for controlling infection through isolation precautions in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Kazumi; Misao, Hanako

    2014-03-01

    In Japan, nurses certified in infection control face organizational and structural challenges to the implementation of the recommended isolation precautions. In this study, we developed a conceptual framework for the problem-solving process of certified nurses in infection control when implementing appropriate isolation-precaution measures. We conducted a qualitative, descriptive study using directed content analysis. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 40 nurses who had over five years' experience in infection control. Factors assessing the risk of infection in patients were identified, including microorganism characteristics, patient characteristics, and risk of infection to the entire unit. The nurses also assessed the risk of infection in institutions from the following perspectives: organizational culture, infection control system, human resources, environment surrounding the facility, ethical issues, and external factors. Individual characteristics, such as attributes, knowledge, expertise, and job function, were identified as major influencing factors in the problem-solving process. These findings could be useful for newly-certified nurses in infection control and provide recommendations on implementing isolation-precaution measures. PMID:24635895

  14. 78 FR 62636 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices.... L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announce the following meeting for... p.m., November 7, 2013. Place: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Global...

  15. Survey of wildlife rehabilitators on infection control and personal protective behaviors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saito, E.K.; Shreve, A.A.

    2005-01-01

    Wildlife veterinarians and rehabilitators treat a number of wildlife species that can carry infectious and zoonotic diseases. These can rapidly spread within a facility and to the caregivers when adequate measures are not taken. Financial constraints and reduced access to laboratories often limit identification of disease etiology of many cases admitted into wildlife rehabilitation centers. A survey to investigate wildlife rehabilitator illness during the 2002 West Nile virus season indicated that many rehabilitators do not follow adequate protective measures in their facilities and may not seek medical care when disease symptoms arise or even linger. The recommended precautions and proper infection control measures for those handling and housing wildlife cases should be discussed between rehabilitators and their attending veterinarian(s).

  16. Infection control in the pulmonary function test laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Rasam, Shweta Amol; Apte, Komalkirti Keshavkiran; Salvi, Sundeep Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary function testing plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with lung diseases. Cases of cross infection acquired from the pulmonary function laboratory, although rare, have been reported from various countries. It is therefore imperative to identify the risks and potential organisms implicated in cross infections in a pulmonary function test (PFT) laboratory and implement better and more effective infection control procedures, which will help in preventing cross infections. The infrastructure, the daily patient flow, and the prevalent disinfection techniques used in a PFT laboratory, all play a significant role in transmission of infections. Simple measures to tackle the cross infection potential in a PFT laboratory can help reduce this risk to a bare minimum. Use of specialized techniques and equipment can also be of much use in a set up that has a high turnover of patients. This review aims at creating awareness about the possible pathogens and situations commonly encountered in a PFT laboratory. We have attempted to suggest some relevant and useful infection control measures with regard to disinfection, sterilization, and patient planning and segregation to help minimize the risk of cross infections in a PFT laboratory. The review also highlights the lacuna in the current scenario of PFT laboratories in India and the need to develop newer and better methods of infection control, which will be more user-friendly and cost effective. Further studies to study the possible pathogens in a PFT laboratory and evaluate the prevalent infection control strategies will be needed to enable us to draw more precious conclusions, which can lead to more relevant, contextual recommendations for cross infections control in PFT lab in India. PMID:26180386

  17. Building new hospitals: a UK infection control perspective.

    PubMed

    Stockley, J M; Constantine, C E; Orr, K E

    2006-03-01

    Infection control input is vital throughout the planning, design and building stages of a new hospital project, and must continue through the commissioning (and decommissioning) process, evaluation and putting the facility into full clinical service. Many hospitals continue to experience problems months or years after occupying the new premises; some of these could have been avoided by infection control involvement earlier in the project. The importance of infection control must be recognized by the chief executive of the hospital trust and project teams overseeing the development. Clinical user groups and contractors must also be made aware of infection control issues. It is vital that good working relationships are built up between the infection control team (ICT) and all these parties. ICTs need the authority to influence the process. This may require their specific recognition by the Private Finance Initiative National Unit, the Department of Health or other relevant authorities. ICTs need training in how to read design plans, how to write effective specifications, and in other areas with which they may be unfamiliar. The importance of documentation and record keeping is paramount. External or independent validation of processes should be available, particularly in commissioning processes. Building design in relation to infection control needs stricter national regulations, allowing ICTs to focus on more local usage issues. Further research is needed to provide evidence regarding the relationship between building design and the prevalence of infection. PMID:16337712

  18. Infection control: maintaining the personal hygiene of patients and staff.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lynn

    This article concentrates on the importance of personal hygiene for staff and patients in reducing the risk of healthcare-associated infections for patients. It provides an historical context to the associated risks of "basic nursing care" and how these can be counteracted. With the introduction of modern matrons and directors of infection control, emphasis is again focused on these practices. PMID:15150465

  19. [Critical role of clinical laboratories in hospital infection control].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The hospital infection control and prevention is recognized to be more and more important according to the advances in modern medical treatment and care. Clinical microbiology laboratory play critical roles in the hospital infection control as a member of infection control team (ICT). They are the first in a hospital to identify outbreak of MRSA in NICU and molecular epidemiological analysis of the isolates lead proper intervention of ICT to the concerned ward. From a viewpoint of infectious disease specialist, rapid and precise microbiological information is essential for the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Each medical technologist need to make efforts to understand the characteristics of the examinations for infectious diseases and send out information useful for clinical practices. In our hospital, with the participation of all members of medical technologists, rapid reporting system was developed for blood culture examinations, which greatly contribute to the appropriate treatment of bloodstream infections. Collaborations of clinical microbiology laboratory with other members of ICT realize high quality hospital infection control. They also need to be aware of themselves as good practitioners of infection control measures to prevent hospital infections. PMID:21229708

  20. Harmonizing and supporting infection control training in Europe.

    PubMed

    Brusaferro, S; Arnoldo, L; Cattani, G; Fabbro, E; Cookson, B; Gallagher, R; Hartemann, P; Holt, J; Kalenic, S; Popp, W; Privitera, G; Prikazsky, V; Velasco, C; Suetens, C; Varela Santos, C

    2015-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection (HCAI), patient safety, and the harmonization of related policies and programmes are the focus of increasing attention and activity in Europe. Infection control training for healthcare workers (HCWs) is a cornerstone of all patient safety and HCAI prevention and control programmes. In 2009 the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) commissioned an assessment of needs for training in infection control in Europe (TRICE), which showed a substantial increase in commitment to HCAI prevention. On the other hand, it also identified obstacles to the harmonization and promotion of training in infection control and hospital hygiene (IC/HH), mostly due to differences between countries in: (i) the required qualifications of HCWs, particularly nurses; (ii) the available resources; and (iii) the sustainability of IC/HH programmes. In 2013, ECDC published core competencies for infection control and hospital hygiene professionals in the European Union and a new project was launched ['Implementation of a training strategy for infection control in the European Union' (TRICE-IS)] that aimed to: define an agreed methodology and standards for the evaluation of IC/HH courses and training programmes; develop a flexible IC/HH taxonomy; and implement an easily accessible web tool in 'Wiki' format for IC/HH professionals. This paper reviews several aspects of the TRICE and the TRICE-IS projects. PMID:25777079

  1. Implementing GermWatcher, an enterprise infection control application.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Joshua; Noirot, Laura A; Mayfield, Jennie; Ramiah, Sridhar; Huang, Christine; Dunagan, Wm Claiborne; Bailey, Thomas C

    2006-01-01

    Automated surveillance tools can provide significant advantages to infection control practitioners. When stored in a relational database, the data collected can also be used to support numerous research and quality improvement opportunities. A previously described electronic infection control surveillance system was remodeled to provide multi-hospital support, an XML based rule set, and interoperability with an enterprise terminology server. This paper describes the new architecture being used at hospitals across BJC HealthCare. PMID:17238333

  2. Infection control policies and guidelines--Scandinavian experience.

    PubMed

    Nyström, B

    1991-06-01

    In the Scandinavian countries few regulations govern hospital infection control. In Sweden a common procedure manual is used nationwide, consisting of guidelines covering a wide range of nursing and medical procedures performed by the nursing staff. It is revised every fifth year. A recent enquiry to over 150 wards in some 100 hospitals demonstrated that the manual is widely accepted and used. In the other Scandinavian countries, guidelines and policies on a variety of infection control topics have been published. PMID:1679772

  3. 78 FR 28221 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC) In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), the Centers for Disease Control...

  4. A clinical data repository enhances hospital infection control.

    PubMed Central

    Samore, M.; Lichtenberg, D.; Saubermann, L.; Kawachi, C.; Carmeli, Y.

    1997-01-01

    We describe the benefits of a relational database of hospital clinical data (Clinical Data Repository; CDR) for an infection control program. The CDR consists of > 40 Sybase tables, and is directly accessible for ad hoc queries by members of the infection control unit who have been granted privileges for access by the Information Systems Department. The data elements and functional requirements most useful for surveillance of nosocomial infections, antibiotic use, and resistant organisms are characterized. Specific applications of the CDR are presented, including the use of automated definitions of nosocomial infection, graphical monitoring of resistant organisms with quality control limits, and prospective detection of inappropriate antibiotic use. Hospital surveillance and quality improvement activities are significantly benefited by the availability of a querable set of tables containing diverse clinical data. PMID:9357588

  5. Nursing aspects of infection control in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Sobayo, E I

    1991-06-01

    The quality of the infection control programme in developing countries is determined by the resource allocation to the health sector and the health care delivery system. These depend to a great extent on the socio-economic development of the country. Morbidity and mortality from communicable infections, such as diarrhoeal diseases and malaria are high. There is often an irregular water and electricity supply. Essential material resources, e.g. paper towels, gowns, gloves, masks and disinfectants may not be available and some disposable materials have to be re-used. Most hospitals have no infection control programme due to the lack of awareness of the problem or absence of trained personnel in infection control practices. Developing countries differ in many ways from each other, often having dissimilar cultures and languages and state of socio-economic development. Solutions will emerge only if there is co-operation between countries and provision of assistance, where appropriate, from wealthier countries. PMID:1679805

  6. The fifth evolutionary era in infection control: interventional epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Garcia, R; Barnard, B; Kennedy, V

    2000-02-01

    A historical review of infection control over the last 4 decades indicates that the field has evolved from being one whose investigative work laid the foundation for understanding the chain of infection to an influential profession whose research on effective prevention methods have revoluntionized clinical practice throughout the world. Underlying our successes is the fact that growth in the profession has brought with it an enormous expansion in responsibilities, which in turn has impacted, in some cases severely, the personnel and time resources of infection control departments. At the same time, the economic pressures brought on by the upheavals in the business of health care have trickled down wherein it now influences the makeup and effectiveness of infection control programs. To continue with our mission of reducing morbidity and mortality, and perhaps to avoid a diminishing of our own professional influence, it will become essential that new approaches to the management of infection control programs be implemented. The approach must start by incorporating a basic mandate for change in the infection control professional. PMID:10679135

  7. The employee-safety and infection-control manual: guidelines for the ambulatory health care center.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    1991-04-01

    The ambulatory health care center has an empirical need to maintain adequate policies and procedures designed to safeguard the health and physical safety of both clients and employees. Of particular concern is the health care worker's risk of injury or exposure to infection. This article discusses the development of a comprehensive employee-safety and infection-control manual. Such a manual can assist in the accreditation of an ambulatory health care center by a national accrediting organization, and can also serve as a risk-management tool. An example of a manual's table of contents, a specific policy/procedure, a waiver form regarding human immunodeficiency virus exposure, and a hepatitis B virus "vaccination status" form are provided. Additionally, two "quick-look" texts are presented as examples of fast reference guides for common safety practices and the treatment of the employee with a health-threatening exposure. PMID:1905791

  8. Real cause for concern in infection control.

    PubMed

    Printup, B

    1990-05-01

    All these new regulations are going to cost hospitals millions of dollars per year to comply. If we could get the doctors and nurses to just wash their hands after each procedure and to keep our hospitals cleaner (with more staff), we could accomplish a lot toward getting us out of all these new regulations. To finish, here is something for you to think about. To my knowledge (reported to APIC at its national meeting), there has been only one case of hospital acquired infection of record in the last 20 years related to the handling of infectious waste. PMID:10128537

  9. Control of blood-transmitted infections in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Neguţ, Eugenia Aurora; Bălteanu, Monica; Ionescu, G; Băncescu, A; Iliescu, A; Skaug, N

    2007-01-01

    As knowledge has accumulated on the blood-transmitted pathogenic agents, the contact with biological fluids (blood, plasma, saliva, etc.) from apparently healthy individuals has started to be regarded as a real professional risk for dentists. Theoretically, exposure to a contaminated biological specimen may have as a consequence transmission of infection from patient to dentist, from dentist to patient and from patient to patient via inadequately decontaminated and sterilized dental equipment. The present study is concerned with the analysis of the specific conditions that favor the occurrence of the epidemic process, the estimation of the risk degree of transmission of infections caused by hepatitis B, C viruses as well as of HIV infection in Romania. The data for the study were collected using two processes. First a self reporting survey and secondly an experimental procedure were performed. The testing of dentists' knowledge of blood transmissible diseases and infection control in their offices were performed using a questionnaire with 129 questions. The professional incidents/accidents representing a potential risk were counted using a questionnaire (with 37 questions). Serological markers were tested with ELISA kits. The monitoring of sterilization was accomplished with a questionnaire and biological tests. Many conclusions result from the study. There is an extremely reduced probability and infection transmission from the dentist to the patient. The transmission of infection from the patient to the dentist represents a low risk (for all that, the risk should not be minimized). The rigorous control and observation of infection prevention measures in dental offices is necessary to stop the infection transmission from patient to patient. The dentists' postgraduate training in infection control measures should be completed with knowledge regarding the blood transmissible infections epidemiology. Learning more about the epidemiological process enables the dentists

  10. CD8+ T cells control Ross River virus infection in musculoskeletal tissues of infected mice.

    PubMed

    Burrack, Kristina S; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Homann, Dirk; Morrison, Thomas E

    2015-01-15

    Ross River virus (RRV), chikungunya virus, and related alphaviruses cause debilitating polyarthralgia and myalgia. Mouse models of RRV and chikungunya virus have demonstrated a role for the adaptive immune response in the control of these infections. However, questions remain regarding the role for T cells in viral control, including the magnitude, location, and dynamics of CD8(+) T cell responses. To address these questions, we generated a recombinant RRV expressing the H-2(b)-restricted glycoprotein 33 (gp33) determinant derived from the glycoprotein of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Using tetramers, we tracked gp33-specific CD8(+) T cells during RRV-lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. We found that acute RRV infection induces activation of CD8(+) T cell responses in lymphoid and musculoskeletal tissues that peak from 10-14 d postinoculation, suggesting that CD8(+) T cells contribute to control of acute RRV infection. Mice genetically deficient for CD8(+) T cells or wild-type mice depleted of CD8(+) T cells had elevated RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue, but not joint-associated tissues, at 14 d postinoculation, suggesting that the ability of CD8(+) T cells to control RRV infection is tissue dependent. Finally, adoptively transferred T cells were capable of reducing RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue of Rag1(-/-) mice, indicating that T cells can contribute to the control of RRV infection in the absence of B cells and Ab. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for T cells in the control of RRV infection and suggest that the antiviral capacity of T cells is controlled in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25488988

  11. CD8+ T cells control Ross River virus infection in musculoskeletal tissues of infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Homann, Dirk; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and related alphaviruses cause debilitating polyarthralgia and myalgia. Mouse models of RRV and CHIKV have demonstrated a role for the adaptive immune response in the control of these infections. However, questions remain regarding the role for T cells in viral control, including the magnitude, location, and dynamics of CD8+ T cell responses. To address these questions, we generated a recombinant RRV expressing the H-2b-restricted gp33 determinant derived from the glycoprotein (gp) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) (“RRV-LCMV”). Utilizing tetramers, we tracked gp33-specific CD8+ T cells during RRV-LCMV infection. We found that acute RRV infection induces activation of CD8+ T cell responses in lymphoid and musculoskeletal tissues that peak from 10 to 14 days post-inoculation (dpi), suggesting that CD8+ T cells contribute to control of acute RRV infection. Mice genetically deficient for CD8+ T cells or wild-type mice depleted of CD8+ T cells had elevated RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue, but not joint-associated tissues, at 14 dpi, suggesting that the ability of CD8+ T cells to control RRV infection is tissue-dependent. Finally, adoptively transferred T cells were capable of reducing RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue of Rag1−/− mice, indicating that T cells can contribute to the control of RRV infection in the absence of B cells and antibody. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for T cells in the control of RRV infection and suggest that the antiviral capacity of T cells is controlled in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25488988

  12. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  13. [Control of staphylococcal skin infections in a nursery].

    PubMed

    Huang, F Y; Chen, C M; Chyou, S C; Yau, S K

    1991-01-01

    Outbreaks of skin infections due to Staphylococcus aureus continue to be a major problem in newborn nurseries. In this report, we described how the staphylococcal skin infections were controlled in the nursery during the last 5 1/2 years. An outbreak of staphylococcal skin infection (totally 29 cases) developed in January 1985, and declined dramatically to 3 cases in March of the same year when 3% hexachlorophene (HCP) bathing was used (period 1-January 1985 to March 1985). The infections increased to 30 cases in May when HCP bathing was discontinued and was replaced by baby soap baths (period 2-April 1985 to May 1985). Once again, HCP bathing (period 3-June 1985 to January 1987) was reinstituted and infection rate was reduced. After discontinuation of HCP (period 4-February 1987 to March 1987), another outbreak of staphylococcal skin infection reappeared. It was controlled again with HCP bathing (period 5-April 1987 to April 1988). Daily baby soap baths were continued during period 6 (May 1988 to October 1988), and skin infections increased again. Finally in period 7 (November 1988 to June 1990), daily baby soaps were reinstituted and a triple dye was applied daily to the cord and to the surrounding skin (1 inch diameter) until discharge. During this period, staphylococcal skin infections was reduced to 1-4 cases and no more outbreaks occurred. Our data confirmed that 3% HCP bathing of newborns reduced the infection rate of Staphylococcus aureus during an endemic period, and supported that triple dye may be an alternative to HCP for preventing staphylococcal skin infection in a newborn nursery. PMID:1776440

  14. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  15. Computer-Assisted Instruction in AIDS Infection Control for Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, T. J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    A microcomputer program to provide health care workers with instruction in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) infection control was assessed by medical residents. The experimental group (n=24) acquired more knowledge than controls (n=33). Response to the method was positive, and computer-assisted instruction is seen as useful for AIDS…

  16. Trichophyton tonsurans infection in Japan: epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and infection control.

    PubMed

    Hiruma, Junichiro; Ogawa, Yumi; Hiruma, Masataro

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we summarize the status of Trichophyton tonsurans infection in Japan in terms of epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis and infection control. Since approximately 2000, outbreaks of T. tonsurans infections among combat sports club members have been reported frequently, with the infection then spreading to their friends and family members. The most common clinical features of T. tonsurans infection are tinea corporis, which is difficult to differentiate from eczema, and tinea capitis. Tinea capitis is classified as the seborrheic form, kerion celsi form or "black dot" form, although 90% or more of patients are asymptomatic carriers. The diagnosis of symptomatic T. tonsurans infection is established by potassium hydroxide examination and fungal culture. However, because there are many asymptomatic carriers of T. tonsurans infection, tests using the hairbrush culture method are necessary. An increase in asymptomatic carriers of T. tonsurans makes assessment of the current prevalence of the infection challenging and underscores the importance of educational efforts and public awareness campaigns to prevent T. tonsurans epidemics. PMID:25736317

  17. Implementing basic infection control practices in disaster situations.

    PubMed

    Vane, Elizabeth A P; Winthrop, Thomas G; Martinez, Leonardo M

    2010-06-01

    Infections, troublesome in even optimal health care environments, can be a source of serious and persistent concern for local populations and health care workers during a disaster, and in austere environments such as those found in Iraq and Afghanistan. For these scenarios, it is vital to have standard infection control practices in place and to have them used consistently. Only then will healthcare workers be able to contain the potential spread of disease and improve conditions for those affected. PMID:20510706

  18. Bioengineered probiotics, a strategic approach to control enteric infections

    PubMed Central

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Bhunia, Arun K

    2013-01-01

    Enteric infections account for high morbidity and mortality and are considered to be the fifth leading cause of death at all ages worldwide. Seventy percent of all enteric infections are foodborne. Thus significant efforts have been directed toward the detection, control and prevention of foodborne diseases. Many antimicrobials including antibiotics have been used for their control and prevention. However, probiotics offer a potential alternative intervention strategy owing to their general health beneficial properties and inhibitory effects against foodborne pathogens. Often, antimicrobial probiotic action is non-specific and non-discriminatory or may be ineffective. In such cases, bioengineered probiotics expressing foreign gene products to achieve specific function is highly desirable. In this review we summarize the strategic development of recombinant bioengineered probiotics to control enteric infections, and to examine how scientific advancements in the human microbiome and their immunomodulatory effects help develop such novel and safe bioengineered probiotics. PMID:23327986

  19. Epidemiology and control of bovine herpesvirus 1 infection in Europe.

    PubMed

    Raaperi, Kerli; Orro, Toomas; Viltrop, Arvo

    2014-09-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) causes infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), infectious pustular vulvovaginitis, abortion and balanoposthitis, as well as neurological and systemic disease in cattle. The virus is endemic in cattle populations worldwide although in Europe six countries and several regions in other countries have achieved 'IBR-free' status by implementing control measures. According to European Union (EU) directives, all member states must comply with specific requirements related to BHV-1 infection status in semen and embryos. The requirement that 'IBR-free' states restrict the importation of cattle from endemically infected regions has motivated several European countries to instigate disease eradication programmes. Despite such control measures within the EU, outbreaks of IBR persist in 'IBR-free' states contiguous with infected countries. This review presents a summary of recent research on the epidemiology of BHV-1, highlights the control measures and surveillance systems in place, and discusses the challenges facing eradication schemes. PMID:24954868

  20. Operating room management: operative suite considerations, infection control.

    PubMed

    Allo, Maria D; Tedesco, Maureen

    2005-12-01

    An operating room's condition is rarely directly implicated in dis-ease transmission. Even so, to prevent such rare transmissions,hospitals must be thoughtful in designing operating rooms as important adjuncts to infection control. Proper ventilation in and near the operating room is the single most important component in establishing an environment that stops the spread of infection. Other considerations include attention to traffic control, equipment maintenance and storage, and construction materials that enhance the ability to maintain clean rooms. Hospitals can avert potential infectious problems through preventive maintenance and the use of infection control risk assessments (ICRAs) for preemptive consideration of infectious risks before renovations, repairs and new construction. Guidelines should be consulted and incorporated into each operating room's policies and procedures. PMID:16326209

  1. Looking inside the 2003 CDC dental infection control guidelines.

    PubMed

    Harte, Jennifer A

    2004-11-01

    On Dec. 19, 2003, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention published updated infection control guidelines for dentistry. The guidelines provide comprehensive information on all aspects of dental infection control. The recommendations are designed to prevent or reduce the potential for disease transmission from patient to dental health care personnel, from dental health care personnel to patient, and from patient to patient. Most recommendations will be familiar and are already practiced routinely. This article highlights major updates and additions in the CDC guidelines and provides additional information to assist readers in applying the latest guidelines. Almost a year ago, the CDC and Prevention published updated dental infection control guidelines in a supplement to the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The Guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Health Care Settings--2003 represent a collaborative effort between leading experts in infection control from other federal agencies, public health, and hospital epidemiology and infection control. Unlike regulatory agencies such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the CDC cannot mandate certain practices; it can only recommend. However, the CDC is recognized as the nation's disease prevention agency and develops a broad range of guidelines intended to improve health care and to inform clinicians and the public. As a result, many dental licensing boards adopt CDC's recommendations, or variations of them, as the infection control standard for dental practice in their states. In contrast to the 1986 and 1993 CDC dental infection control recommendations, the 2003 CDC publication includes more background information and the scientific rationale for the recommendations. Also, readers will notice that each recommendation has a rank assigned to it categorizing the recommendation on the basis of existing

  2. Glycerin-Based Hydrogel for Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Edward I.; McKessor, Angie

    2012-01-01

    Problem Infection is a major problem in the health and wellbeing of patients in hospitals, nursing homes, and other medical facilities as well as the homecare patients and the general public. According to Scientia Advisors, wound care costs the healthcare system over $7 billion in 2009. After adding the cost associated with potential complications such as infections, extended physician care, and lengthy hospital stays, the annual wound care expenditures well exceeded over $20 billion.1 There are 20 million reported cases of diabetes per year and more every day. Because of the fact that leg ulcers are the number one health problem of men coupled with the rise in drug resistance of infections, the importance of providing the professional and the public with relatively simple and affordable wound care is of extreme importance. Often the wounds can become chronic wounds, which then result in long-term nursing expense in time and supplies or, worse yet, can result in expensive amputations ranging from $5000 to $40,000 per patient. Solution There are many dressing options now available for treating wounds with components such as glycerin, honey, salt, and many other natural products, with some dressings being more appropriate than others. In 1988, a patented glycerin-based dressing was introduced to the market, called Elasto-Gel™.2 New Technology Elasto-Gel™ is a glycerin-based gel sheet (65%) combined with a hydrophilic polymer that causes the sheet to absorb the exudate from the wound and simultaneously release the glycerin from the gel, which adds many benefits to the wound for excellent healing outcomes. The gel sheet is 1/8th of an inch thick with a four-way stretch backing. It has the ability to absorb 3–4 times its own weight of fluids. The dressing will not dry out or allow the exudate to dry out, thus keeping the dressing from becoming bonded to the wound or the surrounding tissue. It does not have adhesive properties and, therefore, will not cause damage

  3. Putting it into practice: Infection Control Professionals' perspectives on early career nursing graduates' microbiology and infection control knowledge and practice.

    PubMed

    Cox, Jennifer L; Simpson, Maree Donna; Letts, Will; Cavanagh, Heather Ma

    2014-11-10

    Abstract Background: The microbiology component of Australian undergraduate nursing programs varies considerably. Any actual or potential impact of this variation on infection control practice, as a nursing graduate, is relatively unknown. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore Infection Control Professionals' perceptions of the importance of microbiology and infection control training in undergraduate nursing curricula and the perceived retention of that knowledge and its transferability to practice. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight infection control professionals from a range of hospital settings in Australia. Findings: Four main themes emerged: theory versus practice, importance of role modelling, disjunction between university curricula and 'the real world', and learning in context. Conclusion: As the underpinning element of infection control practice, the role of microbiology education and training in nursing education will benefit from review. Further discussions about the nature and timing of theoretical microbiology content and assessment of undergraduate students' microbiology knowledge to ensure retention and appropriate application of that knowledge in practice are urgently needed. PMID:25382059

  4. Prevention and control of infections in intensive care.

    PubMed

    Scott, G

    2000-01-01

    Small intensive care units (ICUs) functioning within their capacity and caring mainly for post-operative patients have fewer problems with infection control than larger ICUs with a varied case mix, sub-optimal staffing levels, and high levels of antibiotic consumption. Under these circumstances chronic cross colonisation and infection are inevitable and outbreaks may occur. Little can be done to reduce the risks of infection which arise as a direct result of the patient's clinical condition and prior colonisation status. However, selection pressure from antibiotic usage can be modified, as can environmental hygiene, ventilation and architectural design. One of the simplest measures for reducing cross infection remains one of the most intractable: compliance by staff with protocols and standards for maintaining hand hygiene. Simplification of procedures by the ready availability of alcohol hand rub preparations with or without chlorhexidine may improve matters. PMID:10786954

  5. Laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of the infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli: a Chinese consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; He, L; Hu, B; Hu, J; Huang, X; Lai, G; Li, Y; Liu, Y; Ni, Y; Qiu, H; Shao, Z; Shi, Y; Wang, M; Wang, R; Wu, D; Xie, C; Xu, Y; Yang, F; Yu, K; Yu, Y; Zhang, J; Zhuo, C

    2016-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) are defined as bacterial isolates susceptible to two or fewer antimicrobial categories. XDR-GNB mainly occur in Enterobacteriaceae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. The prevalence of XDR-GNB is on the rise in China and in other countries, and it poses a major public health threat as a result of the lack of adequate therapeutic options. A group of Chinese clinical experts, microbiologists and pharmacologists came together to discuss and draft a consensus on the laboratory diagnosis, clinical management and infection control of XDR-GNB infections. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created according to documents from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Multiple risk factors of XDR-GNB infections are analyzed, with long-term exposure to extended-spectrum antimicrobials being the most important one. Combination therapeutic regimens are summarized for treatment of XDR-GNB infections caused by different bacteria based on limited clinical studies and/or laboratory data. Most frequently used antimicrobials used for the combination therapies include aminoglycosides, carbapenems, colistin, fosfomycin and tigecycline. Strict infection control measures including hand hygiene, contact isolation, active screening, environmental surface disinfections, decolonization and restrictive antibiotic stewardship are recommended to curb the XDR-GNB spread. PMID:26627340

  6. Controlling healthcare-associated infections in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Duerden, Brian

    2008-04-01

    The prevention and control of healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) is a priority for the NHS. The delivery of national targets for reducing methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemias and Clostridium difficile infection are supported by enhanced mandatory surveillance through the Health Protection Agency and a Department of Health improvement programme that promotes policies and protocols for enhancing clinical procedures and places infection prevention and control at the centre of clinical and corporate governance. The Health Act 2006 Code of Practice makes such policies and protocols a legal requirement and compliance will be assessed by the Healthcare Commission. Clinicians must recognise their responsibilities for patient safety and take a lead role in ensuring good practice to reduce HCAI. PMID:18478854

  7. The impact of economic recession on infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    O'Riordan, M; Fitzpatrick, F

    2015-04-01

    The economic recession that began in 2007 led to austerity measures and public sector cutbacks in many European countries. Reduced resource allocation to infection prevention and control (IPC) programmes is impeding prevention and control of tuberculosis, HIV and vaccine-preventable infections. In addition, higher rates of infectious disease in the community have a significant impact on hospital services, although the extent of this has not been studied. With a focus on quick deficit reduction, preventive services such IPC may be regarded as non-essential. Where a prevention programme succeeds in reducing disease burden to a low level, its very success can undermine the perceived need for the programme. To mitigate the negative effects of recession, we need to: educate our political leaders about the economic benefits of IPC; better quantify the costs of healthcare-associated infection; and evaluate the effects of budget cuts on healthcare outcomes and IPC activities. PMID:25639208

  8. Emergency department ultrasound probe infection control: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Shokoohi, Hamid; Armstrong, Paige; Tansek, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Point-of-care ultrasound (US) has become a cornerstone in the diagnosis and treatment of patients in the emergency department (ED). Despite the beneficial impact on patient care, concern exists over repeat use of probes and the role as a vector for pathogen transmission. US probes are used for various applications, with the level of infection risk, based on the Spaulding Classification, ranging from noncritical with common practice to semicritical with endocavitary probes. To date, the most closely studied organisms are Staphylococcus aureus and human papilloma virus. Current evidence does confirm probe colonization but has not established a causative role in human infection. Based on current literature, US use during invasive procedures remains an infection control concern, but routine use on intact skin does not appear to cause significant risk to patients. Various barrier methods are available, each with indications based on extent of procedure and likelihood of contact with mucosal surfaces. Additionally, chemical cleansing methods have been shown to be effective in limiting probe contamination after use. New technologies utilizing ultraviolet light are available and effective but not widely used in the ED setting. As our understanding of the critical factors in US probe cleaning and disinfection improves, it is important to assess the challenges found in our current practice and to identify potential solutions to improve practices and procedures in infection control across the spectrum of US probe use in various applications in the ED. This article serves as a summary of the current literature available on infection control topics with the utilization of point-of-care US, and discusses challenges and potential solutions to improve the current practice of probe-related infection control. PMID:27147883

  9. Control of pestivirus infections in the management of wildlife populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lack of host-specificity allow pestiviruses to infect domestic livestock as well as captive and free-ranging wildlife, posing unique challenges to different stakeholders. While current control measures for bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) are focused only on cattle, increased attention on the ...

  10. 42 CFR 494.30 - Condition: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ....C. 552(a) and 1 CFR Part 51. This publication is available for inspection at the CMS Information...) and 1 CFR part 51. This publication is available for inspection at the CMS Information Resource Center... Patient Safety § 494.30 Condition: Infection control. The dialysis facility must provide and monitor...

  11. 42 CFR 418.60 - Condition of participation: Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition of participation: Infection control. 418.60 Section 418.60 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) HOSPICE CARE Conditions of Participation: Patient Care § 418.60 Condition of...

  12. Mycobacterium bovis infection and control in domestic livestock.

    PubMed

    Cousins, D V

    2001-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a well-known zoonotic disease which affects cattle world-wide. The public health risk has been alleviated in many countries by the introduction of pasteurisation, but the disease continues to cause production losses when poorly controlled. The Office International des Epizooties classifies bovine tuberculosis as a List B disease, a disease which is considered to be of socio-economic or public health importance within countries and of significance to the international trade of animals and animal products. Consequently, most developed nations have embarked on campaigns to eradicate M. bovis from the cattle population or at least to control the spread of infection. The success of these eradication and control programmes has been mixed. Mycobacterium bovis infects other animal species, both domesticated and wild, and this range of hosts may complicate attempts to control or eradicate the disease in cattle. PMID:11288521

  13. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  14. Mammalian antimicrobial peptide influences control of cutaneous Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manjusha M.; Barbi, Joseph; McMaster, W. Robert; Gallo, Richard L.; Satoskar, Abhay R.; McGwire, Bradford S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cathelicidin-type antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) are important mediators of innate immunity against microbial pathogens acting through direct interaction with and disruption of microbial membranes and indirectly through modulation of host cell migration and activation. Using a mouse knock-out model in CAMP we studied the role of this host peptide in control of dissemination of cutaneous infection by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. The presence of pronounced host inflammatory infiltration in lesions and lymph nodes of infected animals was CAMP-dependent. Lack of CAMP expression was associated with higher levels of IL-10 receptor expression in bone marrow, splenic and lymph node macrophages as well as higher anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by bone marrow macrophages and spleen cells but reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ by lymph nodes. Unlike wild-type mice, local lesions were exacerbated and parasites were found largely disseminated in CAMP knockouts. Infection of CAMP knockouts with parasite mutants lacking the surface metalloprotease virulence determinant resulted in more robust disseminated infection than in control animals suggesting that CAMP activity is negatively regulated by parasite surface proteolytic activity. This correlated with the ability of the pro-tease to degrade CAMP in vitro and co-localization of CAMP with parasites within macrophages. Our results highlight the interplay of antimicrobial peptides and Leishmania that influence the host immune response and the outcome of infection. PMID:21501359

  15. 42 CFR 416.51 - Conditions for coverage-Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for coverage-Infection control. 416.51... Coverage § 416.51 Conditions for coverage—Infection control. The ASC must maintain an infection control program that seeks to minimize infections and communicable diseases. (a) Standard: Sanitary...

  16. 42 CFR 416.51 - Conditions for coverage-Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions for coverage-Infection control. 416.51... Coverage § 416.51 Conditions for coverage—Infection control. The ASC must maintain an infection control program that seeks to minimize infections and communicable diseases. (a) Standard: Sanitary...

  17. 42 CFR 416.51 - Conditions for coverage-Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conditions for coverage-Infection control. 416.51... Coverage § 416.51 Conditions for coverage—Infection control. The ASC must maintain an infection control program that seeks to minimize infections and communicable diseases. (a) Standard: Sanitary...

  18. 42 CFR 416.51 - Conditions for coverage-Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions for coverage-Infection control. 416.51....51 Conditions for coverage—Infection control. The ASC must maintain an infection control program that seeks to minimize infections and communicable diseases. (a) Standard: Sanitary environment. The ASC...

  19. 42 CFR 416.51 - Conditions for coverage-Infection control.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions for coverage-Infection control. 416.51....51 Conditions for coverage—Infection control. The ASC must maintain an infection control program that seeks to minimize infections and communicable diseases. (a) Standard: Sanitary environment. The ASC...

  20. [Healthcare-Associated Infection Control with Awareness of Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Murakami, Nobuo

    2016-03-01

    In order to provide safe and secure medical care for patients, health care-associated infections (HAI) must not occur. HAI should be considered as incidents, and countermeasures should be viewed as a patient safety management itself. Healthcare-associated infection control (HAIC) is practiced by the infection control team (ICT), which is based on multidisciplinary cooperation. Team members have to recognize that it is the most important to make use of the expertise of each discipline. In addition, all members must try to respond quickly, to help the clinic staff. Visualized rapid information provision and sharing, environmental improvement, outbreak factor analysis, hand hygiene compliance rate improvement, proper antibiotic use (Antimicrobial Stewardship Program: ASP), and regional cooperation & leadership comprise the role of the ICT in the flagship hospital. Regarding this role, we present our hospital's efforts and the outcomes. In conclusion, for medical practice quality improvement, healthcare-associated infection control should be conducted thoroughly along with an awareness of patient safety. PMID:27363228

  1. Case-control study of statin prevention of mould infections.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jessica N; Huycke, Mark M; Greenfield, Ronald A; Kurdgelashvili, George; Gentry, Chris A

    2011-09-01

    Invasive mould infections (IMI) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In vitro studies have demonstrated that hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have activity against several pathogenic moulds including Zygomycetes and Aspergillus spp. The aim of our study was to determine if statin use is a preventive factor for the development of IMI. This was a retrospective case-control study of 10 United States Veterans Affairs Medical Centers that comprise the Veterans Integrated Service Network (VISN) 16. Cases with IMI and controls were identified from 2001 to 2008. Controls were matched by age, facility, history of transplantation, presence of chronic steroid use and presence of human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV). Two hundred and thirty-eight patients were included. Independent variables associated with the development of IMI were history of solid malignant tumours (OR 2.63, 1.41-4.87) and hypertension (OR 2.29, 1.13-4.68). Statin use within 3 months of index date was not an independent variable for prevention or development of IMI. No level of exposure to a statin drug appeared to influence the development of infection. This retrospective case-control study suggests that despite evidence of in vitro activity, statins may not decrease risk of IMI. Prospective, controlled trials may be necessary to investigate any potential clinical benefit. PMID:21554419

  2. Human gastrointestinal nematode infections: are new control methods required?

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections affect 50% of the human population worldwide, and cause great morbidity as well as hundreds of thousands of deaths. Despite modern medical practices, the proportion of the population infected with GI nematodes is not falling. This is due to a number of factors, the most important being the lack of good healthcare, sanitation and health education in many developing countries. A relatively new problem is the development of resistance to the small number of drugs available to treat GI nematode infections. Here we review the most important parasitic GI nematodes and the methods available to control them. In addition, we discuss the current status of new anthelmintic treatments, particularly the plant cysteine proteinases from various sources of latex-bearing plants and fruits. PMID:16965561

  3. 29 CFR 98.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Adequate evidence. 98.900 Section 98.900 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a...

  4. 78 FR 6328 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee... information, contact Jeffrey Hageman, M.H.S., Executive Secretary, Healthcare Infection Control...

  5. 76 FR 9577 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee... information, contact Jeffrey Hageman, M.H.S., Executive Secretary, Healthcare Infection Control...

  6. [Infection control team (ICT) in cooperation with microbiology laboratories].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Mitsuhiro

    2012-10-01

    Infection control as a medical safety measure is an important issue in all medical facilities. In order to tackle this measure, cooperation between the infection control team (ICT) and microbiological laboratory is indispensable. Multiple drug-resistant bacteria have shifted from Gram-positive bacteria to Gram-negative bacilli within the last ten years. There are also a variety of bacilli, complicating the examination method and test results further. Therefore, cooperation between the ICT and microbiological laboratory has become important to understand examination results and to use them. In order to maintain functional cooperation, explanatory and communicative ability between the microbiological laboratory and ICT is required every day. Such positive information exchange will develop into efficient and functional ICT activity. PMID:23323467

  7. Hospital infection prevention and control issues relevant to extensive floods.

    PubMed

    Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Mundy, Linda M; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Glen Mayhall, C

    2013-02-01

    The devastating clinical and economic implications of floods exemplify the need for effective global infection prevention and control (IPC) strategies for natural disasters. Reopening of hospitals after excessive flooding requires a balance between meeting the medical needs of the surrounding communities and restoration of a safe hospital environment. Postflood hospital preparedness plans are a key issue for infection control epidemiologists, healthcare providers, patients, and hospital administrators. We provide recent IPC experiences related to reopening of a hospital after extensive black-water floods necessitated hospital closures in Thailand and the United States. These experiences provide a foundation for the future design, execution, and analysis of black-water flood preparedness plans by IPC stakeholders. PMID:23295568

  8. Infection control and hazards management. Economics of regulatory compliance.

    PubMed

    Runnells, R R

    1991-04-01

    Dentistry has become subject to rapid change in office safety, including infection control and hazards management. This change includes increasingly diverse governmental regulations and compliance with such regulations, influencing the very basics of dental practice. As all practitioners are moving toward compliance, costs are increasing substantially. Various sources estimate such increases at between 12.5% and 19%, and it is doubtful whether third-party reimbursement will offset these additional costs. As practitioners plan methods for offsetting the costs of office safety, consideration should be given to providing patients oral and printed information to preclude misinterpretation of the reasons for fee escalation caused by implementation of chemical hazards communication, infection control, and waste disposal programs mandated by OSHA, EPA, and state or other regulatory authorities. The decade of the 1990s may well become the period of meeting the formidable microbiological and regulatory challenges of the 1980s. PMID:2032585

  9. Cross-infection control in Malaysian dental practice.

    PubMed

    Razak, I A; Lind, O P

    1995-07-01

    A questionnaire survey on cross-infection control was conducted among 1371 professionally trained dentists whose names appeared in the Malaysian Government Gazette of 1990. A 73.1 percent response rate was obtained. About 13 percent of the dentists routinely did not wear gloves during treatment of patients as opposed to 54 percent who routinely did. About 83 percent and 52 percent of dentists wore a mask and eyewear or glasses respectively when carrying out dental procedures. About 93 percent of dentists would use a new sterile needle for each patient and about 40 percent would wipe working surfaces with disinfectant after each patient. The practice of sterilizing handpieces was found to be uncommon as opposed to the sterilization of hand instruments. Variations were observed in some of the infection control measures by gender, seniority in service and employment status. More than one-third of the respondents had experienced puncture wounds during the last month prior to the survey. PMID:9582683

  10. Clinical governance and infection control in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Masterson, R G; Teare, E L

    2001-01-01

    The recent organizational changes in the NHS have at their core the concept of clinical governance. Although initially poorly defined and understood this term has now taken on a clear identity, placing quality alongside fiscal probity and corporate governance at the top of NHS priorities. Integral to clinical governance are the basic elements of clear national standards for services and treatments that are to be locally delivered through assured, monitored, high quality healthcare. It is within this framework that workers in infection control must develop their own methods of applying clinical governance. This review explores the implications that the strategy of clinical governance holds for the speciality of infection control, emphasizing the benefits its active adoption can bring and highlighting the key relevance of clinical risk management in this setting. It illustrates clinical governance as a tool to engage colleagues on a multi-disciplinary front, most particularly the crucial link to senior Trust management. PMID:11281117

  11. Vaccine to Control the Viral Infection of Fish.

    DOEpatents

    Leong, JoAnn Ching

    1994-10-11

    Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish. 10 figs.

  12. Vaccine to control the viral infection of fish

    DOEpatents

    Leong, Jo-Ann C.

    1994-10-11

    Subunit vaccines and their use for immunizing fish against infection by viruses are disclosed. In particular, plasmid pG8 is constructed by joining, with the plasmid pUC8, DNA which encodes the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV). E. coli cells are transformed by pG8, whereby pure viral antigen is produced to provide a vaccine for the control of IHNV in fish.

  13. The effectiveness of the "Clean-Area-System" for infection control in the dental clinic.

    PubMed

    Noro, A; Suyama, Y; Takahashi, E; Chattin, B R; Hirai, Y; Takahashi, K; Ishikawa, T

    1998-02-01

    The use of effective infection control procedures and universal precautions in dental clinics, prevents cross contamination that could extend to dental health care workers and patients. The present study was initiated to investigate airborne environmental contamination in the dental clinic by viable cell count of oral streptococci grown on Mitis-Salivarius and blood agar plates. The reduction of the contamination by the "Clean-Area-System" was evaluated. "Andersen-Microbe-Sampler-Apparatus" and "Laser-Particle-Counter-System" were used for sampling and counting the bacterial cells and airborne dust, respectively. Numbers of viable cells counted as total colony forming units (CFUs) in the dental clinic were found to be significantly higher than those in the waiting room and the research laboratory. We found that the "Clean-Area-System" significantly reduced the CFUs grown on blood agar plates (p < 0.05), and that using the "Clean-Area-System" combined with the "Extra-Oral-Vacuum-Aspirator" is desirable in dental procedures such as cavity preparation. The "Extra-Oral-Vacuum-Aspirator" reduced airborne environmental contamination during tooth cutting and ultrasonic scaling procedures. In non-grinding procedures, this system proved to be very useful for infection control in the operative area. The authors concluded that the combined use of "Clean-Area-System" (dust collection ablation) and "Extra-Oral-Vacuum-Aspirator" (absorb dust ablation) was effective to reduce airborne environmental contamination in the dental clinic. We also fully confirmed that oral streptococci were an adequate indicator in the assessment for infection control in dental institutions. PMID:9663027

  14. Gelsolin activity controls efficient early HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-1 entry into target lymphocytes requires the activity of actin adaptors that stabilize and reorganize cortical F-actin, like moesin and filamin-A. These alterations are necessary for the redistribution of CD4-CXCR4/CCR5 to one pole of the cell, a process that increases the probability of HIV-1 Envelope (Env)-CD4/co-receptor interactions and that generates the tension at the plasma membrane necessary to potentiate fusion pore formation, thereby favouring early HIV-1 infection. However, it remains unclear whether the dynamic processing of F-actin and the amount of cortical actin available during the initial virus-cell contact are required to such events. Results Here we show that gelsolin restructures cortical F-actin during HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated signalling, without affecting cell-surface expression of receptors or viral co-receptor signalling. Remarkably, efficient HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion and infection of permissive lymphocytes were impaired when gelsolin was either overexpressed or silenced, which led to a loss or gain of cortical actin, respectively. Indeed, HIV-1 Env-gp120-induced F-actin reorganization and viral receptor capping were impaired under these experimental conditions. Moreover, gelsolin knockdown promoted HIV-1 Env-gp120-mediated aberrant pseudopodia formation. These perturbed-actin events are responsible for the inhibition of early HIV-1 infection. Conclusions For the first time we provide evidence that through its severing of cortical actin, and by controlling the amount of actin available for reorganization during HIV-1 Env-mediated viral fusion, entry and infection, gelsolin can constitute a barrier that restricts HIV-1 infection of CD4+ lymphocytes in a pre-fusion step. These findings provide important insights into the complex molecular and actin-associated dynamics events that underlie early viral infection. Thus, we propose that gelsolin is a new factor that can limit HIV-1 infection acting at a pre-fusion step

  15. Infection control programs and nursing experts for hospital hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Margrith

    2007-01-01

    From the data he had collected, Ignaz Phillip Semmelweis drew the right conclusions and began using disinfectants for handwashing. And this at a time when it was not at all known that infections were caused by bacteria. While ridiculed by colleagues, the results achieved impressively attested to just how correct were his views: there was a demonstrable reduction in mortality rates among puerperae from some 20% to 3%, which was very low for that time. In the course of the 20th century “Surveillance” was introduced, entailing systematic recording, analysis and interpretation of nosocomial infection data, in several countries throughout the world. This helps identify infection problems and take appropriate preventive measures. But the ongoing trend of emergent infectious diseases and the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continue to pose new challenges for us: the microorganisms appear to be always one step ahead of us. During the 20th century the prevailing belief was that hand disinfection was the easiest, least expensive and most effective preventive measure to prevent the spread of microorganisms. In the 21st century compliance is the main focus of attention. We must devise novel motivational systems, tailored to the present day setting, to inculcate a sense of responsibility and ensure observance of hand hygiene regimens. Here, the infection control nurse plays a pivotal role. PMID:20200682

  16. Genetic Control of Weight Loss During Pneumonic Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Felicia D.; Parvathareddy, Jyothi; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Cui, Yan; Williams, Robert W.; Miller, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) is the causal agent of a high morbidity/mortality disease syndrome known as melioidosis. This syndrome can range from acute fulminate disease to chronic, local, and disseminated infections that are often difficult to treat because Bp exhibits resistance to many antibiotics. Bp is a prime candidate for use in biological warfare/terrorism and is classified as a Tier-1 Select Agent by HHS and APHIS. It is known that inbred mouse strains display a range of susceptibility to Bp and that the murine infection model is ideal for studying acute melioidosis. Here we exploit a powerful mouse genetics resource that consists of a large family of BXD type recombinant inbred strains, to perform genome-wide linkage analysis of the weight loss phenotype following pneumonic infection with Bp. We infected parental mice and 32 BXD strains with 50-100 CFU of Bp (strain 1026b) and monitored weight retention each day over an eleven-day time course. Using the computational tools in GeneNetwork, we performed genome-wide linkage analysis to identify an interval on chromosome 12 that appears to control the weight retention trait. We then analysed and ranked positional candidate genes in this interval, several of which have intriguing connections with innate immunity, calcium homeostasis, lipid transport, host cell growth and development, and autophagy. PMID:24687986

  17. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infections: manifestations of infection and recent advances in understanding pathogenesis and control.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, B W

    2014-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to be of economic significance to the livestock industry in terms of acute disease and fetal loss. Many of the lesions relating to BVDV infection have been well described previously. The virus is perpetuated in herds through the presence of calves that are persistently infected. Relationships between various species and biotypes of BVDV and host defenses are increasingly understood. Understanding of the host defense mechanisms of innate immunity and adaptive immunity continues to improve, and the effects of the virus on these immune mechanisms are being used to explain how persistent infection develops. The noncytopathic biotype of BVDV plays the major role in its effects on the host defenses by inhibiting various aspects of the innate immune system and creation of immunotolerance in the fetus during early gestation. Recent advances have allowed for development of affordable test strategies to identify and remove persistently infected animals. With these improved tests and removal strategies, the livestock industry can begin more widespread effective control programs. PMID:24476940

  18. [Dynamic behavior of the adaptive control system, hypothalamus--anterior pituitary--adrenal cortex. Animal experimental study of the adequate system dynamics of the direct and indirect parameters of the adaptive control system].

    PubMed

    Zintzsch, I; Seidel, H; Lantzsch, C; Lantzsch, M

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response of the adaptive closed-loop control system hypothalamus-anterior pituitary-adrenal cortex after application of short-time disturb pulses were examined experimentally in the pig. Blood sampling was performed biologically non-reactive by chronically implanted vascular catheters in the upper vena cava. A circadian biphase periodical dynamics characterizes the distrubance response of the adaptive control system, respectively, its direct and indirect parameters. After distrubance variables induced initial excess the plasma corticosteriods undershoot the basic level over a long period. Conversely, the dynamics of the eosinophils is determined through an initial eosinopenic phase and a subsequent typical overshoot. Periodical dynamic is absent in the steady state. The controller of the adaptive system does not show any spontaneous activity in the steady state without stress. The absence of an endogenic periodicity of the dependent parameters likewise gives evidence of an active oscillator. On the other hand, the controlling unit of the adaptive system constitutes a control response of circadian periodicty after activation by disturbance variables in pulse shape. The high damping of the control system terminates the transient state within 24 hours, and the corticosteriods and the eosinophils reach the steady state level. This control quality of the adaptive control system gains a high importance in the origination of the spontaneous circadian periodicity by corticosteriods and eosinophils and for the biological compensation of exogenous distrubance variables. PMID:233184

  19. Global burden of Shigella infections: implications for vaccine development and implementation of control strategies.

    PubMed Central

    Kotloff, K. L.; Winickoff, J. P.; Ivanoff, B.; Clemens, J. D.; Swerdlow, D. L.; Sansonetti, P. J.; Adak, G. K.; Levine, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    Few studies provide data on the global morbidity and mortality caused by infection with Shigella spp.; such estimates are needed, however, to plan strategies of prevention and treatment. Here we report the results of a review of the literature published between 1966 and 1997 on Shigella infection. The data obtained permit calculation of the number of cases of Shigella infection and the associated mortality occurring worldwide each year, by age, and (as a proxy for disease severity) by clinical category, i.e. mild cases remaining at home, moderate cases requiring outpatient care, and severe cases demanding hospitalization. A sensitivity analysis was performed to estimate the high and low range of morbid and fatal cases in each category. Finally, the frequency distribution of Shigella infection, by serogroup and serotype and by region of the world, was determined. The annual number of Shigella episodes throughout the world was estimated to be 164.7 million, of which 163.2 million were in developing countries (with 1.1 million deaths) and 1.5 million in industrialized countries. A total of 69% of all episodes and 61% of all deaths attributable to shigellosis involved children under 5 years of age. The median percentages of isolates of S. flexneri, S. sonnei, S. boydii, and S. dysenteriae were, respectively, 60%, 15%, 6%, and 6% (30% of S. dysenteriae cases were type 1) in developing countries; and 16%, 77%, 2%, and 1% in industrialized countries. In developing countries, the predominant serotype of S. flexneri is 2a, followed by 1b, 3a, 4a, and 6. In industrialized countries, most isolates are S. flexneri 2a or other unspecified type 2 strains. Shigellosis, which continues to have an important global impact, cannot be adequately controlled with the existing prevention and treatment measures. Innovative strategies, including development of vaccines against the most common serotypes, could provide substantial benefits. PMID:10516787

  20. Important helminth infections in Southeast Asia diversity, potential for control and prospects for elimination.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, Jürg; Bergquist, Robert; Olveda, Remigio; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2010-01-01

    Besides the 'big three'-HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis-there are a host of diseases that, by comparison, are truly neglected. These so-called neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), many of which caused by helminths, are intimately linked with poverty and are rampant where housing is poor; access to clean water and adequate sanitation is lacking; hygiene and nutrition is substandard and populations are marginalized and vulnerable. More than a billion people are affected by NTDs, mainly in remote rural and deprived urban settings of the developing world. An overview of papers published in two special thematic volumes of the Advances in Parasitology is provided here under the umbrella of current status of research and control of important helminth infections. A total of 25 comprehensive reviews are presented, which summarise the latest available data pertaining to the diagnosis, epidemiology, pathogenesis, prevention, treatment, control and eventual elimination of NTDs in Southeast Asia and neighbourhood countries. The focus of the first volume provides the current regional status of schistosomiasis, lymphatic filariasis, food-borne trematodiases, echinococcosis and cysticercosis/taeniasis, less common parasitic diseases that can cause epidemic outbreaks and helminth infections affecting the central nervous system. The second volume deals with the tools and strategies for control, including diagnostics, drugs, vaccines and cutting-edge basic research (e.g. the '-omics' sciences). Moreover, cross-cutting themes such as multiparasitism, social sciences, capacity strengthening, geospatial health technologies, health metrics and modelling the potential impact of climate change on helminthic diseases are discussed. Hopefully, these two volumes will become useful for researchers and, most importantly, disease control managers for integrated and sustainable control, rigorous monitoring and eventual elimination of NTDs in Southeast Asia and elsewhere. PMID:20624526

  1. Controlling bacterial infections by inhibiting proton-dependent processes.

    PubMed

    Kaneti, Galoz; Meir, Ohad; Mor, Amram

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics is recognized as one of the greatest threats in modern healthcare, taking a staggering toll worldwide. New approaches for controlling bacterial infections must be designed, eventually combining multiple strategies for complimentary therapies. This review explores an old/new paradigm for multi-targeted antibacterial therapy, focused at disturbing bacterial cytoplasmic membrane functions at sub minimal inhibitory concentrations, namely through superficial physical alterations of the bilayer, thereby perturbing transmembrane signals transduction. Such a paradigm may have the advantage of fighting the infection while avoiding many of the known resistance mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26522076

  2. The potential for a controlled human infection platform in Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Balasingam, Shobana; Horby, Peter; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2014-01-01

    For over 100 years, controlled human infection (CHI) studies have been performed to advance the understanding of the pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. This methodology has seen a resurgence, as it offers an efficient model for selecting the most promising agents for further development from available candidates. CHI studies are utilised to bridge safety and immunogenicity testing and phase II/III efficacy studies. However, as this platform is not currently utilised in Asia, opportunities to study therapeutics and vaccines for infections that are important in Asia are missed. This review examines the regulatory differences for CHI studies between countries and summarises other regulatory differences in clinical trials as a whole. We found that the regulations that would apply to CHI studies in Singapore closely mirror those in the United Kingdom, and conclude that the regulatory and ethical guidelines in Singapore are compatible with the conduct of CHI studies. PMID:25273928

  3. The potential for a controlled human infection platform in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Balasingam, Shobana; Horby, Peter; Wilder-Smith, Annelies

    2014-09-01

    For over 100 years, controlled human infection (CHI) studies have been performed to advance the understanding of the pathogenesis, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. This methodology has seen a resurgence, as it offers an efficient model for selecting the most promising agents for further development from available candidates. CHI studies are utilised to bridge safety and immunogenicity testing and phase II/III efficacy studies. However, as this platform is not currently utilised in Asia, opportunities to study therapeutics and vaccines for infections that are important in Asia are missed. This review examines the regulatory differences for CHI studies between countries and summarises other regulatory differences in clinical trials as a whole. We found that the regulations that would apply to CHI studies in Singapore closely mirror those in the United Kingdom, and conclude that the regulatory and ethical guidelines in Singapore are compatible with the conduct of CHI studies. PMID:25273928

  4. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-11-22

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  5. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-31

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  6. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-30

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  7. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  8. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-29

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  9. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Brittany E; Mongodin, Emmanuel F; Jones, Cheron E; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi's sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  10. The Oral Bacterial Communities of Children with Well-Controlled HIV Infection and without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Brittany E.; Mongodin, Emmanuel F.; Jones, Cheron E.; Chung, Michelle; Fraser, Claire M.; Tate, Anupama; Zeichner, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The oral microbial community (microbiota) plays a critical role in human health and disease. Alterations in the oral microbiota may be associated with disorders such as gingivitis, periodontitis, childhood caries, alveolar osteitis, oral candidiasis and endodontic infections. In the immunosuppressed population, the spectrum of potential oral disease is even broader, encompassing candidiasis, necrotizing gingivitis, parotid gland enlargement, Kaposi’s sarcoma, oral warts and other diseases. Here, we used 454 pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes to examine the oral microbiome of saliva, mucosal and tooth samples from HIV-positive and negative children. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were collected from a cross-section of patients undergoing routine dental care. Multiple specimens from different sampling sites in the mouth were collected for each patient. The goal of the study was to observe the potential diversity of the oral microbiota among individual patients, sample locations, HIV status and various dental characteristics. We found that there were significant differences in the microbiome among the enrolled patients, and between sampling locations. The analysis was complicated by uneven enrollment in the patient cohorts, with only five HIV-negative patients enrolled in the study and by the rapid improvement in the health of HIV-infected children between the time the study was conceived and completed. The generally good oral health of the HIV-negative patients limited the number of dental plaque samples that could be collected. We did not identify significant differences between well-controlled HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative controls, suggesting that well-controlled HIV-positive patients essentially harbor similar oral flora compared to patients without HIV. Nor were significant differences in the oral microbiota identified between different teeth or with different dental characteristics. Additional studies are needed to better

  11. Infection Control Programs and Antibiotic Control Programs to Limit Transmission of Multi-Drug Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infections: Evolution of Old Problems and New Challenges for Institutes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chang-Hua; Lin, Li-Chen; Chang, Yu-Jun; Chen, Yu-Min; Chang, Chin-Yen; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii complex (A. baumannii) has been isolated worldwide. The rapid spread of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii complex (MDRAB) in clinical settings has made choosing an appropriate antibiotic to treat these infections and executing contact precautions difficult for clinicians. Although controlling the transmission of MDRAB is a high priority for institutions, there is little information about MDRAB control. Therefore, this study evaluated infection control measures for A. baumannii infections, clusters and outbreaks in the literature. Methods: We performed a review of OVID Medline (from 1980 to 2015), and analyzed the literature. Results: We propose that both infection control programs and antibiotic control programs are essential for control of MDRAB. The first, effective control of MDRAB infections, requires compliance with a series of infection control methods including strict environmental cleaning, effective sterilization of reusable medical equipment, concentration on proper hand hygiene practices, and use of contact precautions, together with appropriate administrative guidance. The second strategy, effective antibiotic control programs to decrease A. baumannii, is also of paramount importance. Conclusion: We believe that both infection control programs and antibiotics stewardship programs are essential for control of MDRAB infections. PMID:26264006

  12. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular act or omission has occurred. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec....

  13. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  14. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  15. Observations and thoughts on infection control practices in Russia.

    PubMed

    Hill, J E

    1994-04-01

    Members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Registered Nurses (ASORN), as a delegation of ophthalmic nurses for the People to People Citizen Ambassador Program, had the opportunity to visit five ophthalmic facilities in St. Petersburg and Moscow in August 1993. Russian hosts described their operations through a translator and then provided tours and answered questions. Unrestricted photographs were allowed. This article describes a perspective of infection control practices as observed and documents statements or responses made to questions that were posed. Generalizations cannot be made from this brief encounter, but comparisons and thoughts are presented. PMID:7616058

  16. Association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with vaccine response in adults with well-controlled HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Troy, S B; Rossheim, A E B; Siik, J; Cunningham, T D; Kerry, J A

    2016-05-01

    Even after CD4 count recovery on antiretroviral therapy, HIV infection is associated with decreased response to most vaccines compared to the general population. Chronic infections with viruses such as cytomegalovirus (CMV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), which are more prevalent in HIV-infected populations, have been linked to immune dysfunction and decreased vaccine response in the general population. However, whether co-infection with these other viruses contributes to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection is unknown. We conducted a secondary analysis of data and serum from adults with well-controlled HIV infection from an inactivated polio vaccine trial (224 subjects) and a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine study (128 subjects). We evaluated the association of CMV, HBV, or HCV co-infection with post-vaccination antibody levels using both univariate and multivariate analyses, controlling for factors such as age, race, CD4 count, comorbidities, smoking status, and baseline antibody levels. Ninety-three percent, 7%, and 14% of subjects were co-infected with CMV, HBV, and HCV respectively. On both univariate and multivariate analysis, neither CMV nor HCV co-infection were significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody levels to either vaccine. HBV co-infection was significantly associated with post-vaccination antibody concentrations for pneumococcal serotype 7F on univariate analysis and 6A on multivariate analysis, but the association was with higher antibody concentrations. In conclusion, co-infection with CMV, HBV, or HCV does not appear to contribute to the decreased vaccine response seen in adults with well-controlled HIV infection. PMID:26751638

  17. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  18. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  19. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Infection Control and Prevention Guideline for Healthcare Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Yong; Song, Joon Young; Yoon, Young Kyung; Choi, Seong-Ho; Song, Young Goo; Kim, Sung-Ran; Son, Hee-Jung; Jeong, Sun-Young; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Kyung Mi; Yoon, Hee Jung; Choi, Jun Yong; Kim, Tae Hyong; Choi, Young Hwa; Kim, Hong Bin; Yoon, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jacob; Eom, Joong Sik; Lee, Sang-Oh; Oh, Won Sup; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Kim, Woo Joo

    2015-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is an acute viral respiratory illness with high mortality caused by a new strain of betacoronavirus (MERS-CoV). Since the report of the first patient in Saudi Arabia in 2012, large-scale outbreaks through hospital-acquired infection and inter-hospital transmission have been reported. Most of the patients reported in South Korea were also infected in hospital settings. Therefore, to eliminate the spread of MERS-CoV, infection prevention and control measures should be implemented with rigor. The present guideline has been drafted on the basis of the experiences of infection control in the South Korean hospitals involved in the recent MERS outbreak and on domestic and international infection prevention and control guidelines. To ensure efficient MERS-CoV infection prevention and control, care should be taken to provide comprehensive infection control measures including contact control, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment, disinfection, and environmental cleaning. PMID:26788414

  20. Development of a resource model for infection prevention and control programs in acute, long term, and home care settings: conference proceedings of the Infection Prevention and Control Alliance.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Judith

    2004-02-01

    There is mounting concern about the impact of health care restructuring on the provision of infection prevention services across the health care continuum. In response to this, Health Canada hosted two meetings of Canadian infection control experts to develop a model upon which the resources required to support an effective, integrated infection prevention and control program across the health care continuum could be based. The final models project the IPCP needs as three full time equivalent infection control professionals/500 beds in acute care hospitals and one full time equivalent infection control professional/150-250 beds in long term care facilities. Non human resource requirements are also described for acute, long term, community, and home care settings. PMID:14755227

  1. Using a Novel Lysin To Help Control Clostridium difficile Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiong; Euler, Chad W.; Delaune, Aurelia

    2015-01-01

    As a consequence of excessive antibiotic therapies in hospitalized patients, Clostridium difficile, a Gram-positive anaerobic spore-forming intestinal pathogen, is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhea and colitis. Drug treatments for these diseases are often complicated by antibiotic-resistant strains and a high frequency of treatment failures and relapse; therefore, novel nonantibiotic approaches may prove to be more effective. In this study, we recombinantly expressed a prophage lysin identified from a C. difficile strain, CD630, which we named PlyCD. PlyCD was found to have lytic activity against specific C. difficile strains. However, the recombinantly expressed catalytic domain of this protein, PlyCD1–174, displayed significantly greater lytic activity (>4-log kill) and a broader lytic spectrum against C. difficile strains while still retaining a high degree of specificity toward C. difficile versus commensal clostridia and other bacterial species. Our data also indicated that noneffective doses of vancomycin and PlyCD1–174 when combined in vitro could be significantly more bactericidal against C. difficile. In an ex vivo treatment model of mouse colon infection, we found that PlyCD1–174 functioned in the presence of intestinal contents, significantly decreasing colonizing C. difficile compared to controls. Together, these data suggest that PlyCD1–174 has potential as a novel therapeutic for clinical application against C. difficile infection, either alone or in combination with other preexisting treatments to improve their efficacy. PMID:26392484

  2. Viral infections as controlling factors for the deep biosphere? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, B.; Engelhardt, T.; Sahlberg, M.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere represents the largest biotope on Earth. Throughout the last years, we have obtained interesting insights into its microbial community composition. However, one component that was completely overlooked so far is the viral inventory of deep-subsurface sediments. While viral infections were identified to have a major impact on the benthic microflora of deep-sea surface sediments (Danavaro et al. 2008), no studies were performed on deep-biosphere samples, so far. As grazers probably play only a minor role in anoxic and highly compressed deep sediments, viruses might be the main “predators” for indigenous microorganisms. Furthermore, the release of cell components, called “the viral shunt”, could have a major impact on the deep biosphere in providing labile organic compounds to non-infected microorganisms in these generally nutrient depleted sediments. However, direct counting of viruses in sediments is highly challenging due to the small size of viruses and the high background of small particles. Even molecular surveys using “universal” PCR primers that target phage-specific genes fail due to the vast phage diversity. One solution for this problem is the lysogenic viral life cycle as many bacteriophages integrate their DNA into the host genome. It is estimated that up to 70% of cultivated bacteria contain prophages within their genome. Therefore, culture collections (Batzke et al. 2007) represent an archive of the viral composition within the respective habitat. These prophages can be induced to become free phage particles in stimulation experiments in which the host cells are set under certain stress situations such as a treatment with UV exposure or DNA-damaging antibiotics. The study of the viral component within the deep biosphere offers to answer the following questions: To which extent are deep-biosphere populations controlled by viral infections? What is the inter- and intra-specific diversity and the host-specific viral

  3. Healthcare Associated Infections of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Case-Control-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhenjiang; Peng, Yang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Bi, Jiaqi; Li, Ying; Ye, Xiaohua; Shi, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread and dangerous pathogens in healthcare settings. We carried out this case-control-control study at a tertiary care hospital in Guangzhou, China, to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, risk factors and clinical outcomes of MRSA infections. Methods A total of 57 MRSA patients, 116 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) patients and 102 S. aureus negative patients were included in this study. We applied the disk diffusion method to compare the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 18 antibiotics between MRSA and MSSA isolates. Risk factors of MRSA infections were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. We used Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression analysis to assess the hospital stay duration and fatality for patients with MRSA infections. Results The MRSA group had significantly higher resistance rates for most drugs tested compared with the MSSA group. Using MSSA patients as controls, the following independent risk factors of MRSA infections were identified: 3 or more prior hospitalizations (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3–5.8, P = 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 5.9, 95% CI 1.7–20.7, P = 0.006), and use of a respirator (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.0–12.9, P = 0.046). With the S. aureus negative patients as controls, use of a respirator (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.0–13.9, P = 0.047) and tracheal intubation (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.5–45.1, P = 0.016) were significant risk factors for MRSA infections. MRSA patients had a longer hospital stay duration and higher fatality in comparison with those in the two control groups. Conclusions MRSA infections substantially increase hospital stay duration and fatality. Thus, MRSA infections are serious issues in this healthcare setting and should receive more attention from clinicians. PMID:26470023

  4. Reengineering and infection control programs: commentary and a case study.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M; Massanari, R M

    2000-02-01

    Transformation of the health care system has been an ongoing process for generations, but many changes in the past 2 decades have focused on reducing costs in concert with rapidly changing technologies and demands for high quality care. Many cost-containment efforts in the 1990s are characterized by attempts to apply the business model for "reengineering the corporation" to health care systems. This commentary reviews principles of reengineering and how strategies to reduce costs through market forces, competition, and downsizing can result in substantial problems for bureaucratic organizations unaccustomed to rapid change and innovation. A case study drawn from experiences of a large metropolitan academic health care system is presented, with specific focus on lessons that will be helpful to infection control professionals (ICPs) confronted with similar situations. PMID:10679136

  5. Device Cleaning and Infection Control in Aerosol Therapy.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Catherine A

    2015-06-01

    Aerosol delivery equipment used to administer inhaled medications includes the nebulizer, positive expiratory pressure devices added to the nebulizer, and valved holding chambers (spacers). These devices are semi-critical medical devices, and as such, infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines recommend that they be cleaned, disinfected, rinsed with sterile water, and air-dried. There is confusion surrounding the care of aerosol devices because of inconsistencies in the various published IPC guidelines, lack of a standard of practice among institutions and respiratory therapists (RTs), and manufacturer's instructions for use of these devices are not always compatible with guidelines or practice. Challenges lie in awareness of IPC guidelines and establishing a standard for the care of aerosol delivery devices among all stakeholders/manufacturers, governments, vendors, and users. The latest IPC guideline from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, reviewed and endorsed by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and the Association for Professionals in Infection Control, has a recommendation for disposable nebulizers and a recommendation for reusable nebulizers. Reusable nebulizers should be cleaned, disinfected, rinsed with sterile water (if using a cold disinfectant), and air-dried between uses. The mouthpiece/mask of disposable nebulizers should be wiped with an alcohol pad, the residual volume should be rinsed out with sterile water after use, and the nebulizer should be replaced every 24 h. The RT plays a significant and responsible role in providing and teaching aerosol therapy to patients. The RT and all stakeholders need to work together to provide a standard of care for the safe use of aerosol delivery devices. PMID:26070583

  6. Airborne infection control in India: Baseline assessment of health facilities

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Malik M.; Sachdeva, K.S.; Rade, Kiran; Ghedia, Mayank; Bansal, Avi; Nagaraja, Sharath Burugina; Willis, Matthew D.; Misquitta, Dyson P.; Nair, Sreenivas A.; Moonan, Patrick K.; Dewan, Puneet K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis transmission in health care settings represents a major public health problem. In 2010, national airborne infection control (AIC) guidelines were adopted in India. These guidelines included specific policies for TB prevention and control in health care settings. However, the feasibility and effectiveness of these guidelines have not been assessed in routine practice. This study aimed to conduct baseline assessments of AIC policies and practices within a convenience sample of 35 health care settings across 3 states in India and to assess the level of implementation at each facility after one year. Method A multi-agency, multidisciplinary panel of experts performed site visits using a standardized risk assessment tool to document current practices and review resource capacity. At the conclusion of each assessment, facility-specific recommendations were provided to improve AIC performance to align with national guidelines. Result Upon initial assessment, AIC systems were found to be poorly developed and implemented. Administrative controls were not commonly practiced and many departments needed renovation to achieve minimum environmental standards. One year after the baseline assessments, there were substantial improvements in both policy and practice. Conclusion A package of capacity building and systems development that followed national guidelines substantially improved implementation of AIC policies and practice. PMID:26970461

  7. Adequate supervision for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James; Moffatt, Mary

    2014-11-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) have the opportunity to improve child health and well-being by addressing supervision issues before an injury or exposure has occurred and/or after an injury or exposure has occurred. Appropriate anticipatory guidance on supervision at well-child visits can improve supervision of children, and may prevent future harm. Adequate supervision varies based on the child's development and maturity, and the risks in the child's environment. Consideration should be given to issues as wide ranging as swimming pools, falls, dating violence, and social media. By considering the likelihood of harm and the severity of the potential harm, caregivers may provide adequate supervision by minimizing risks to the child while still allowing the child to take "small" risks as needed for healthy development. Caregivers should initially focus on direct (visual, auditory, and proximity) supervision of the young child. Gradually, supervision needs to be adjusted as the child develops, emphasizing a safe environment and safe social interactions, with graduated independence. PCPs may foster adequate supervision by providing concrete guidance to caregivers. In addition to preventing injury, supervision includes fostering a safe, stable, and nurturing relationship with every child. PCPs should be familiar with age/developmentally based supervision risks, adequate supervision based on those risks, characteristics of neglectful supervision based on age/development, and ways to encourage appropriate supervision throughout childhood. PMID:25369578

  8. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  9. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  10. Impact of dengue virus infection and its control.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, A

    1997-08-01

    Dengue virus infection has been counted among emerging and re-emerging diseases because of (1) the increasing number of patients, (2) the expansion of epidemic areas, and (3) the appearance of severe clinical manifestation of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS), which is often fatal if not properly treated. In the meantime, there are no effective dengue control measures: a dengue vaccine is still under development and vector control does not provide a long-lasting effect. In order to obtain direct evidence for the virulent virus theory concerning the pathogenesis of DHF/DSS, type 2 dengue virus strains isolated from patients with different clinical severities in the same epidemic area in northeast Thailand, during the same season, were comparatively sequenced. The result revealed a DF strain specific amino acid substitution from I to R in the PrM, and a DSS strain specific amino acid substitution from D to G in the NS1 gene regions, which could significantly alter the nature of these proteins. Moreover, DF strain specific nucleotide substitutions in the 3' noncoding region were predicted to alter its secondary structure. These amino acid and nucleotide substitutions in other strains isolated in different epidemic areas during other seasons, together with their biological significance, remain to be confirmed. In order to innovate dengue vector control, field tests were carried out in dengue epidemic areas in Vietnam to examine the efficacy of Olyset Net screen, which is a wide-mesh net made of polyethylene thread impregnated with permethrin. The results show that Olyset Net (1) reduced the number of principal dengue vector species, Aedes aegypti, (2) interrupted the silent transmission of dengue viruses and (3) was highly appreciated by the local people as a convenient and comfortable vector control method. This encouraging evaluation of the Olyset Net screen should be confirmed further by other tests under different settings. PMID:9348165

  11. Knowledge and Practice of Nursing Staff towards Infection Control Measures in the Palestinian Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fashafsheh, Imad; Ayed, Ahmad; Eqtait, Faeda; Harazneh, Lubna

    2015-01-01

    Health care professionals are constantly exposed to microorganisms. Many of which can cause serious or even lethal infections. Nurses in particular are often exposed to various infections during the course of carrying out their nursing activities. Therefore nurses should have sound knowledge and strict adherence to infection control practice. Aim…

  12. Relationship of Antimicrobial Control Policies and Hospital and Infection Control Characteristics to Antimicrobial Resistance Rates

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Elaine L.; Quiros, Dave; Giblin, Tara; Lin, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Background Antibiotic misuse and noncompliance with infection control precautions have contributed to increasing levels of antimicrobial resistance in hospitals. Objectives To assess the extent to which resistance is monitored in infection control programs and to correlate resistance rates with characteristics of antimicrobial control policies, provider attitudes and practices, and systems-level indicators of implementation of the hand hygiene guideline of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methods An on-site survey of intensive care unit staff and infection control directors of 33 hospitals in the United States was conducted. The following data were collected: antimicrobial control policies; rates during the previous 12 months of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and ceftazidime-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae; an implementation score of systems-level efforts to implement the guideline; staff attitudes toward practice guidelines; and observations of staff hand hygiene. Variables associated with resistance rates were examined for independent effects by using logistic regression. Results Resistance rates for S aureus, enterococci, and K pneumoniae were 52.5%, 18.2%, and 16.0%, respectively. Ten (30.3%) hospitals had an antibiotic control policy. No statistically significant correlation was observed between staff attitudes toward practice guidelines, observed hand hygiene behavior, or having an antibiotic use policy and resistance rates. In logistic regression analysis, higher scores on measures of systems-level efforts to implement the guideline were associated with lower rates of resistant S aureus and enterococci (P=.046). Conclusions Organizational-level factors independent of the practices of individual clinicians may be associated with rates of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:17322010

  13. REVIEW OF CONTROL OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION IN NIGERIA.

    PubMed

    Dami, N; Shehu, N Y; Dami, S; Iroezindu, M O

    2015-01-01

    The global scourge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is inundating, especially in sub-Saharan Africa and in particular Nigeria which is home to 10% of the world's HIV-infected persons. The target of the millennium development goal 6 is to halt and reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. HIV control in Nigeria was initially shrouded in denial and apathy. Subsequently, a more pragmatic approach was launched during the tenure of President Olusegun Obasanjo. Several policies were formulated. The national prevalence of HIV witnessed some progressive decline and is currently 4.1%. There is now improvement in both HIV awareness and counselling and testing. Greater access to antiretroviral therapy and other support services have also been witnessed with over 300,000 persons currently on drugs. Notable achievements have been recorded in prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTC). However, with increased access to antiretroviral therapy, antiretroviral drug resistance has become inevitable. Acquired drug resistance is high-82% and transmitted drug resistance ranges between 0.7 and 4.5%. The achievements were largely facilitated by international partnerships which have become more streamlined in recent years. A sustained shift to indigenously sourced financial and manpower resource has become imperative. It is also important to integrate HIV facilities with other existing health care facilities for sustainability and cost-effectiveness. In an attempt to strengthen the national response, President Goodluck Ebele Jonathan launched the President's Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS in Nigeria. It is hoped that this well-articulated policy would be well implemented to significantly reverse the epidemic. PMID:27487603

  14. Prevention and control of nosocomial infections in Spain: current problems and future trends.

    PubMed

    Trilla, A; Vaqué, J; Roselló, J; Salles, M; Marco, F; Prat, A; Bayas, J M; de Anta, M T; Asenjo, M A

    1996-09-01

    Spain is a state member of the European Union, with more than 180,000 hospital beds and 800 public and private institutions. Only 6.9% of our gross national product is devoted to health expenditures. All citizens receive free health care through the National Health System. This system has given increasing attention to the prevention and control of nosocomial infections since 1986. In this article, results of serial prevalence surveys of antibiotic use and resistance patterns of microorganisms isolated from nosocomial infections are discussed. The needs for future development of infection control and quality assurance training programs in Spain also are discussed. Overall, a clinically and epidemiologically oriented approach to infection control is preferred, with greater emphasis in the role of infection control practitioners and infection control committees. PMID:8880236

  15. Outbreak of hepatitis C virus infections at an outpatient hemodialysis facility: the importance of infection control competencies.

    PubMed

    Rao, Agam K; Luckman, Emily; Wise, Matthew E; MacCannell, Taranisia; Blythe, David; Lin, Yulin; Xia, Guoliang; Drobeniuc, Jan; Noble-Wang, Judith; Arduino, Matthew J; Thompson, Nicola D; Patel, Priti R; Wilson, Lucy E

    2013-01-01

    In the United States, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus infection among patients treated in hemodialysis facilities is five times higher than among the general population. This study investigated eight new hepatitis C virus infections among patients treated at an outpatient hemodialysis facility. Epidemiologic investigation and viral sequencing demonstrated that transmission likely occurred between patients typically treated during the same or consecutive shifts at the same or a nearby station. Several infection control breaches were observed including lapses involving the preparation, handling, and administration of parenteral medications. Improved infection control education and training for all hemodialysis facility staff is an important component of assuring adherence to appropriate procedures and preventing future outbreaks. PMID:23785746

  16. Spatial Targeting for Bovine Tuberculosis Control: Can the Locations of Infected Cattle Be Used to Find Infected Badgers?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine M.; Downs, Sara H.; Mitchell, Andy; Hayward, Andrew C.; Fry, Hannah; Le Comber, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a disease of historical importance to human health in the UK that remains a major animal health and economic issue. Control of the disease in cattle is complicated by the presence of a reservoir species, the Eurasian badger. In spite of uncertainty in the degree to which cattle disease results from transmission from badgers, and opposition from environmental groups, culling of badgers has been licenced in two large areas in England. Methods to limit culls to smaller areas that target badgers infected with TB whilst minimising the number of uninfected badgers culled is therefore of considerable interest. Here, we use historical data from a large-scale field trial of badger culling to assess two alternative hypothetical methods of targeting TB-infected badgers based on the distribution of cattle TB incidents: (i) a simple circular ‘ring cull’; and (ii) geographic profiling, a novel technique for spatial targeting of infectious disease control that predicts the locations of sources of infection based on the distribution of linked cases. Our results showed that both methods required coverage of very large areas to ensure a substantial proportion of infected badgers were removed, and would result in many uninfected badgers being culled. Geographic profiling, which accounts for clustering of infections in badger and cattle populations, produced a small but non-significant increase in the proportion of setts with TB-infected compared to uninfected badgers included in a cull. It also provided no overall improvement at targeting setts with infected badgers compared to the ring cull. Cattle TB incidents in this study were therefore insufficiently clustered around TB-infected badger setts to design an efficient spatially targeted cull; and this analysis provided no evidence to support a move towards spatially targeted badger culling policies for bovine TB control. PMID:26565626

  17. Spatial Targeting for Bovine Tuberculosis Control: Can the Locations of Infected Cattle Be Used to Find Infected Badgers?

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine M; Downs, Sara H; Mitchell, Andy; Hayward, Andrew C; Fry, Hannah; Le Comber, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a disease of historical importance to human health in the UK that remains a major animal health and economic issue. Control of the disease in cattle is complicated by the presence of a reservoir species, the Eurasian badger. In spite of uncertainty in the degree to which cattle disease results from transmission from badgers, and opposition from environmental groups, culling of badgers has been licenced in two large areas in England. Methods to limit culls to smaller areas that target badgers infected with TB whilst minimising the number of uninfected badgers culled is therefore of considerable interest. Here, we use historical data from a large-scale field trial of badger culling to assess two alternative hypothetical methods of targeting TB-infected badgers based on the distribution of cattle TB incidents: (i) a simple circular 'ring cull'; and (ii) geographic profiling, a novel technique for spatial targeting of infectious disease control that predicts the locations of sources of infection based on the distribution of linked cases. Our results showed that both methods required coverage of very large areas to ensure a substantial proportion of infected badgers were removed, and would result in many uninfected badgers being culled. Geographic profiling, which accounts for clustering of infections in badger and cattle populations, produced a small but non-significant increase in the proportion of setts with TB-infected compared to uninfected badgers included in a cull. It also provided no overall improvement at targeting setts with infected badgers compared to the ring cull. Cattle TB incidents in this study were therefore insufficiently clustered around TB-infected badger setts to design an efficient spatially targeted cull; and this analysis provided no evidence to support a move towards spatially targeted badger culling policies for bovine TB control. PMID:26565626

  18. Glycolytic control of vacuolar-type ATPase activity: A mechanism to regulate influenza viral infection

    SciTech Connect

    Kohio, Hinissan P.; Adamson, Amy L.

    2013-09-15

    As new influenza virus strains emerge, finding new mechanisms to control infection is imperative. In this study, we found that we could control influenza infection of mammalian cells by altering the level of glucose given to cells. Higher glucose concentrations induced a dose-specific increase in influenza infection. Linking influenza virus infection with glycolysis, we found that viral replication was significantly reduced after cells were treated with glycolytic inhibitors. Addition of extracellular ATP after glycolytic inhibition restored influenza infection. We also determined that higher levels of glucose promoted the assembly of the vacuolar-type ATPase within cells, and increased vacuolar-type ATPase proton-transport activity. The increase of viral infection via high glucose levels could be reversed by inhibition of the proton pump, linking glucose metabolism, vacuolar-type ATPase activity, and influenza viral infection. Taken together, we propose that altering glucose metabolism may be a potential new approach to inhibit influenza viral infection. - Highlights: • Increased glucose levels increase Influenza A viral infection of MDCK cells. • Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase inhibited Influenza A viral infection. • Inhibition of hexokinase induced disassembly the V-ATPase. • Disassembly of the V-ATPase and Influenza A infection was bypassed with ATP. • The state of V-ATPase assembly correlated with Influenza A infection of cells.

  19. [Practical approach to infection control and antimicrobial stewardship by medical technologists].

    PubMed

    Komori, Toshiaki; Yamada, Yukiji; Kimura, Takeshi; Kosaka, Tadashi; Nakanishi, Masaki; Fujitomo, Yumiko; Fujita, Naohisa

    2013-04-01

    Since establishing an antimicrobial management team (AMT) in 2003, we have been promoting both appropriate diagnosis and treatment and improving the prognosis of hospitalized patients with infections. AMT is composed of 4 doctors, 2 nurses, 2 pharmacists and one medical technologist. AMT members meet twice a week and discuss patients with positive blood cultures, with prescribed anti-MRSA drugs and suspected infections. Antimicrobial prescription and clinical laboratory data are obtained from the database of electric medical records and microbiological data from the laboratory database system. The initial step in infection control and antimicrobial stewardship is an accurate diagnosis of infection. Clinical microbiology laboratories play a critical role in infection control and antimicrobial stewardship by reporting accurate and timely results of both bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests. Medical technologists are required to develop better competency and proficiency about clinical microbiology in both infection control and antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:23855192

  20. Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... care providers is poor. Hand washing with plain soap (detergents) is effective in removing most transient microbial ... hand washing include using an adequate amount of soap, rubbing the hands together to create some friction, ...

  1. Educating the infection control team - past, present and future. A British prespective.

    PubMed

    Jenner, E A; Wilson, J A

    2000-10-01

    This review sets out to explore how education and training provisions for members of the Infection Control Team (ICT) have developed alongside their roles and in response to changes in the British National Health Service. It focuses on the Consultant in Communicable Disease Control, the Infection Control Doctor and the Infection Control Nurse in the United Kingdom, but also briefly considers approaches adopted by other countries. Future developments should include maximizing information technology for delivering teaching materials, shared learning and improvements to pre-registration curricula for both doctors and nurses. PMID:11049701

  2. Models for the organisation of hospital infection control and prevention programmes.

    PubMed

    Gordts, B

    2005-04-01

    Hospital infection control is an essential part of infectious disease management and must be firmly structured and professionally organised. Prevention, limitation and eradication of nosocomial infections requires specific expertise not fully provided by clinical microbiologists and/or infectious disease consultants. Therefore, dedicated infection control physicians and nurses are essential. The basic components for successful hospital infection control include: (1) personnel and supporting resources proportional to size, complexity and estimated risk of the population served; (2) trained hospital infection control practitioners; and (3) the necessary structure to implement changes in medical, nursing and logistical organisation. The identification of areas of concern, provision of written policies and education still constitute the backbone of infection control. The infection control team must propose priorities and necessary resources, objectives, development methods, implementation and follow-up. The strategic approach must be discussed and approved by the infection control committee, comprising the hospital administrator(s), medical and nursing directors, a microbiologist, a hospital pharmacist and a delegation of clinicians. Follow-up of the projects is regularly presented to the committee by the infection control team. To what extent may evolution in the organisation of hospital infection control contribute to the optimisation of allocated resources and fulfillment of these objectives? From the Belgian experience, we conclude that structural changes represent an essential incentive. The impact of changes is greater when they are directed by the national authorities, providing resources and imposing new standards. Recommendations for staffing must consider not only the number of beds but also the objectives, complexity and characteristics of the patient population. PMID:15760439

  3. Studying fitness cost of Plasmodium falciparum infection in malaria vectors: validation of an appropriate negative control

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The question whether Plasmodium falciparum infection affects the fitness of mosquito vectors remains open. A hurdle for resolving this question is the lack of appropriate control, non-infected mosquitoes that can be compared to the infected ones. It was shown recently that heating P. falciparum gametocyte-infected blood before feeding by malaria vectors inhibits the infection. Therefore, the same source of gametocyte-infected blood could be divided in two parts, one heated, serving as the control, the other unheated, allowing the comparison of infected and uninfected mosquitoes which fed on exactly the same blood otherwise. However, before using this method for characterizing the cost of infection to mosquitoes, it is necessary to establish whether feeding on previously heated blood affects the survival and fecundity of mosquito females. Methods Anopheles gambiae M molecular form females were exposed to heated versus non-heated, parasite-free human blood to mimic blood meal on non-infectious versus infectious gametocyte-containing blood. Life history traits of mosquito females fed on blood that was heat-treated or not were then compared. Results The results reveal that heat treatment of the blood did not affect the survival and fecundity of mosquito females. Consistently, blood heat treatment did not affect the quantity of blood ingested. Conclusions The study indicates that heat inactivation of gametocyte-infected blood will only inhibit mosquito infection and that this method is suitable for quantifying the fitness cost incurred by mosquitoes upon infection by P. falciparum. PMID:23282172

  4. TLR signaling controls lethal encephalitis in WNV-infected brain.

    PubMed

    Sabouri, Amir H; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Flynn, Claudia; Berger, Michael; Xiao, Nengming; Fox, Howard S; Sarvetnick, Nora E

    2014-07-29

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to be activated in Central Nervous System (CNS) viral infections and are recognized to be a critical component in innate immunity. Several reports state a role for particular TLRs in various CNS viral infections. However, excessive TLR activation was previously reported by us in correlation with a pathogenic, rather than a protective, outcome, in a model of SIV encephalitis. Here we aimed at understanding the impact of TLR-mediated pathways by evaluating the early course of pathogenesis in the total absence of TLR signaling during CNS viral infections. We utilized a mouse model of sublethal West Nile virus (WNV) infection. WNV is an emerging neurotropic flavivirus, and a significant global cause of viral encephalitis. The virus was peripherally injected into animals that simultaneously lacked two key adapter molecules of TLR signaling, MyD88 and TRIF. On day 2 pi (post infection), MyD88/Trif-/- mice showed an increased susceptibility to WNV infection, and revealed an impairment in innate immune cytokines, when compared to wild type mice (WT). By day 6 pi, there was an increase in viral burden and robust expression of inflammatory cytokines as well as higher cell infiltration into the CNS in MyD88/Trif-/-, when compared to infected WT. A drastic increase in microglia activation, astrogliosis, and inflammatory trafficking were also observed on day 6 pi in MyD88/Trif-/-. Our observations show a protective role for TLR signaling pathways in preventing lethal encephalitis at early stages of WNV infection. PMID:24928618

  5. Compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Oosthuysen, Jeanné; Potgieter, Elsa; Fossey, Annabel

    2014-12-01

    Many publications are available on the topic of compliance with infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities all over the world. The approaches of developing and developed countries show wide variation, but the principles of infection prevention and control are the same globally. This study is a systematic review and global perspective of the available literature on infection prevention and control in oral health-care facilities. Nine focus areas on compliance with infection-control measures were investigated: knowledge of infectious occupational hazards; personal hygiene and care of hands; correct application of personal protective equipment; use of environmental barriers and disposable items; sterilisation (recirculation) of instruments and handpieces; disinfection (surfaces) and housekeeping; management of waste disposal; quality control of dental unit waterlines, biofilms and water; and some special considerations. Various international studies from developed countries have reported highly scientific evidence-based information. In developed countries, the resources for infection prevention and control are freely available, which is not the case in developing countries. The studies in developing countries also indicate serious shortcomings with regard to infection prevention and control knowledge and education in oral health-care facilities. This review highlights the fact that availability of resources will always be a challenge, but more so in developing countries. This presents unique challenges and the opportunity for innovative thinking to promote infection prevention and control. PMID:25244364

  6. Mathematical models of immune effector responses to viral infections: Virus control versus the development of pathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2005-12-01

    This article reviews mathematical models which have investigated the importance of lytic and non-lytic immune responses for the control of viral infections. Lytic immune responses fight the virus by killing infected cells, while non-lytic immune responses fight the virus by inhibiting viral replication while leaving the infected cell alive. The models suggest which types or combinations of immune responses are required to resolve infections which vary in their characteristics, such as the rate of viral replication and the rate of virus-induced target cell death. This framework is then applied to persistent infections and viral evolution. It is investigated how viral evolution and antigenic escape can influence the relative balance of lytic and non-lytic responses over time, and how this might correlate with the transition from an asymptomatic infection to pathology. This is discussed in the specific context of hepatitis C virus infection.

  7. Azithromycin is able to control Toxoplasma gondii infection in human villous explants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although Toxoplasma gondii infection is normally asymptomatic, severe cases of toxoplasmosis may occur in immunosuppressed patients or congenitally infected newborns. When a fetal infection is established, the recommended treatment is a combination of pyrimethamine, sulfadiazine and folinic acid (PSA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of azithromycin to control T. gondii infection in human villous explants. Methods Cultures of third trimester human villous explants were infected with T. gondii and simultaneously treated with either PSA or azithromycin. Proliferation of T. gondii, as well as production of cytokines and hormones by chorionic villous explants, was analyzed. Results Treatment with either azithromycin or PSA was able to control T. gondii infection in villous explants. After azithromycin or PSA treatment, TNF-α, IL-17A or TGF-β1 levels secreted by infected villous explants did not present significant differences. However, PSA-treated villous explants had decreased levels of IL-10 and increased IL-12 levels, while treatment with azithromycin increased production of IL-6. Additionally, T. gondii-infected villous explants increased secretion of estradiol, progesterone and HCG + β, while treatments with azithromycin or PSA reduced secretion of these hormones concurrently with decrease of parasite load. Conclusions In conclusion, these results suggest that azithromycin may be defined as an effective alternative drug to control T. gondii infection at the fetal-maternal interface. PMID:24885122

  8. Management of Hospital Infection Control in Iran: A Need for Implementation of Multidisciplinary Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mamishi, Setareh; Pourakbari, Babak; Teymuri, Mostafa; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Mahmoudi, Shima

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial, or hospital-acquired, infections are considered the most common complications affecting hospitalized patients. According to results obtained from studies conducted in the Children Medical Center Hospital, a teaching children's hospital and a tertiary care referral unit in Tehran, Iran, improvements in infection control practices in our hospital seem necessary. The aim of this study was to identify risk management and review potential hospital hazards that may pose a threat to the health as well as safety and welfare of patients in an Iranian referral hospital. Barriers to compliance and poor design of facilities, impractical guidelines and policies, lack of a framework for risk management, failure to apply behavioral-change theory, and insufficient obligation and enforcement by infection control personnel highlight the need of management systems in infection control in our hospital. In addition, surveillance and early reporting of infections, evaluation of risk-based interventions, and production of evidence-based guidelines in our country are recommended. PMID:25379367

  9. Infection Control Practice in the Operating Room: Staff Adherence to Existing Policies in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Cawich, Shamir O; Tennant, Ingrid A; McGaw, Clarence D; Harding, Hyacinth; Walters, Christine A; Crandon, Ivor W

    2013-01-01

    Context: Infection control interventions are important for containing surgery-related infections. For this reason, the modern operating room (OR) should have well-developed infection control policies. The efficacy of these policies depends on how well the OR staff adhere to them. There is a lack of available data documenting adherence to infection control policies. Objective: To evaluate OR staff adherence to existing infection control policies in Jamaica. Methods: We administered a questionnaire to all OR staff to assess their training, knowledge of local infection control protocols, and practice with regard to 8 randomly selected guidelines. Adherence to each guideline was rated with fixed-choice items on a 4-point Likert scale. The sum of points determined the adherence score. Two respondent groups were defined: adherent (score > 26) and nonadherent (score ≤ 26). We evaluated the relationship between respondent group and age, sex, occupational rank, and time since completion of basic medical training. We used χ2 and Fisher exact tests to assess associations and t tests to compare means between variables of interest. Results: The sample comprised 132 participants (90 physicians and 42 nurses) with a mean age of 36 (standard deviation ± 9.5) years. Overall, 40.1% were adherent to existing protocols. There was no significant association between the distribution of adherence scores and sex (p = 0.319), time since completion of basic training (p = 0.595), occupational rank (p = 0.461), or age (p = 0.949). Overall, 19% felt their knowledge of infection control practices was inadequate. Those with working knowledge of infection control practices attained it mostly through informal communication (80.4%) and self-directed research (62.6%). Conclusion: New approaches to the problem of nonadherence to infection control guidelines are needed in the Caribbean. Several unique cultural, financial, and environmental factors influence adherence in this region, in contrast to

  10. Selecting antagonists for control of postharvest brown rot of stone fruits originating from latent infections

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In contrast to biological control of postharvest decays (BCPD) of fruits originating from wound infections after harvest, BCPD originating from latent infections occurring in the orchard has not been developed. This is largely due to the lack of methodology to screen and evaluate microbes for bioco...

  11. Pathogenic Bacterial Species Associated with Endodontic Infection Evade Innate Immune Control by Disabling Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aritsune; Jin, Jun-O; Johnston, Christopher D.; Yamazaki, Hajime; Houri-Haddad, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Endodontic infections, in which oral bacteria access the tooth pulp chamber, are common and do not resolve once established. To investigate the effects of these infections on the innate immune response, we established a mouse subcutaneous chamber model, where a mixture of four oral pathogens commonly associated with these infections (endodontic pathogens [EP]), i.e., Fusobacterium nucleatum, Streptococcus intermedius, Parvimonas micra, and Prevotella intermedia, was inoculated into subcutaneously implanted titanium chambers. Cells that infiltrated the chamber after these infections were primarily neutrophils; however, these neutrophils were unable to control the infection. Infection with a nonpathogenic oral bacterial species, Streptococcus mitis, resulted in well-controlled infection, with bacterial numbers reduced by 4 to 5 log units after 7 days. Propidium iodide (PI) staining of the chamber neutrophils identified three distinct populations: neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were intermediate in PI staining, while cells in chambers from mice infected with S. mitis were PI positive (apoptotic) or negative (live). Strikingly, neutrophils from EP-infected chambers were severely impaired in their ability to phagocytose and to generate reactive oxygen species in vitro after removal from the chamber compared to cells from S. mitis-infected chambers. The mechanism of neutrophil impairment was necrotic cell death as determined by morphological analyses. P. intermedia alone could induce a similar neutrophil phenotype. We conclude that the endodontic pathogens, particularly P. intermedia, can efficiently disable and kill infiltrating neutrophils, allowing these infections to become established. These results can help explain the persistence of endodontic infections and demonstrate a new virulence mechanism associated with P. intermedia. PMID:25024367

  12. The Aedes aegypti Toll Pathway Controls Dengue Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Zhiyong; Ramirez, Jose L.; Dimopoulos, George

    2008-01-01

    Aedes aegypti, the mosquito vector of dengue viruses, utilizes its innate immune system to ward off a variety of pathogens, some of which can cause disease in humans. To date, the features of insects' innate immune defenses against viruses have mainly been studied in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which appears to utilize different immune pathways against different types of viruses, in addition to an RNA interference–based defense system. We have used the recently released whole-genome sequence of the Ae. aegypti mosquito, in combination with high-throughput gene expression and RNA interference (RNAi)-based reverse genetic analyses, to characterize its response to dengue virus infection in different body compartments. We have further addressed the impact of the mosquito's endogenous microbial flora on virus infection. Our findings indicate a significant role for the Toll pathway in regulating resistance to dengue virus, as indicated by an infection-responsive regulation and functional assessment of several Toll pathway–associated genes. We have also shown that the mosquito's natural microbiota play a role in modulating the dengue virus infection, possibly through basal-level stimulation of the Toll immune pathway. PMID:18604274

  13. Building and Strengthening Infection Control Strategies to Prevent Tuberculosis - Nigeria, 2015.

    PubMed

    Dokubo, E Kainne; Odume, Bethrand; Lipke, Virginia; Muianga, Custodio; Onu, Eugene; Olutola, Ayodotun; Ukachukwu, Lucy; Igweike, Patricia; Chukwura, Nneka; Ubochioma, Emperor; Aniaku, Everistus; Ezeudu, Chinyere; Agboeze, Joseph; Iroh, Gabriel; Orji, Elvina; Godwin, Okezue; Raji, Hasiya Bello; Aboje, S A; Osakwe, Chijioke; Debem, Henry; Bello, Mustapha; Onotu, Dennis; Maloney, Susan

    2016-03-18

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of infectious disease mortality worldwide, accounting for more than 1.5 million deaths in 2014, and is the leading cause of death among persons living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Nigeria has the fourth highest annual number of TB cases among countries, with an estimated incidence of 322 per 100,000 population (1), and the second highest prevalence of HIV infection, with 3.4 million infected persons (2). In 2014, 100,000 incident TB cases and 78,000 TB deaths occurred among persons living with HIV infection in Nigeria (1). Nosocomial transmission is a significant source of TB infection in resource-limited settings (3), and persons with HIV infection and health care workers are at increased risk for TB infection because of their routine exposure to patients with TB in health care facilities (3-5). A lack of TB infection control in health care settings has resulted in outbreaks of TB and drug-resistant TB among patients and health care workers, leading to excess morbidity and mortality. In March 2015, in collaboration with the Nigeria Ministry of Health (MoH), CDC implemented a pilot initiative, aimed at increasing health care worker knowledge about TB infection control, assessing infection control measures in health facilities, and developing plans to address identified gaps. The approach resulted in substantial improvements in TB infection control practices at seven selected facilities, and scale-up of these measures across other facilities might lead to a reduction in TB transmission in Nigeria and globally. PMID:26985766

  14. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise. PMID:9670174

  15. Parasite Infection and Tuberculosis Disease among Children: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; del Castillo, Hernán; Pereda, Ynés; Lecca, Leonid; Fuertes, Jhoelma; Cárdenas, Luz; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Bayona, Jaime; Murray, Megan

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a case–control study to examine associations between parasite infection, including protozoa infection, and tuberculosis (TB) in children in Lima, Peru. We enrolled 189 matched-pairs. In multivariable conditional logistic regression analyses, Blastocystis hominis infection (rate ratio = 0.30, 95% confidence interval = 0.14–0.64, P = 0.002) was strongly associated with a lower risk of TB. We observed a statistically significant inverse linear dose-response relationship between Blastocystis hominis infection and TB. These findings should be confirmed in future prospective studies. PMID:24379242

  16. Nosocomial infection control in healthcare settings: Protection against emerging infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanxi; Wang, Shengyong

    2016-01-01

    The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea in 2015 may be attributable to poor nosocomial infection control procedures implemented. Strict infection control measures were taken in the hospital where an imported case with MERS was treated in southern China and 53 health care workers were confirmed to be MERS-CoV negative. Infection control in healthcare settings, in which patients with emerging infectious diseases such as MERS, Ebola virus disease, and the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) are diagnosed and treated, are often imperfect. When it comes to emerging or unknown infectious diseases, before the imported case was finally identified or community transmission was reported, cases have often occurred in clusters in healthcare settings. Nosocomial infection control measures should be further strengthened among the workers and inpatients in designated healthcare settings that accommodate suspected cases suffering from emerging or unknown infectious diseases. PMID:27068809

  17. How-to-Do-It: Infection Control Guidelines for Blood Typing & Blood Smear Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vetter, Edwin A.

    1989-01-01

    Provides a set of guidelines for infection control of the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and the serum hepatitis viruses during blood typing procedures. Emphasizes that disposal of blood contaminated materials should comply with local health department recommendations. (RT)

  18. A novel experience in the use of control charts for the detection of nosocomial infection outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Isabel Cristina; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Di Lorenzo Oliveira, Cláudia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to compare different control charts to monitor the nosocomial infection rate per 1,000 patient-days. METHODS: The control charts considered in this study were the traditional Shewhart chart and a variation of this, the Cumulative Sum and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average charts. RESULTS: We evaluated 238 nosocomial infections that were registered in the intensive care unit and were detected by the Committee for Nosocomial Infection Control in a university hospital in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, in 2004 and 2005. The results showed that the traditional Shewhart chart was the most appropriate method for monitoring periods with large deviations, while the Exponentially Weighted Moving Average and Cumulative Sum charts were better for monitoring periods with smaller deviations of the mean infection rate. CONCLUSION: The ability to detect nosocomial outbreaks was improved by using the information provided by all three different control charts. PMID:22012038

  19. Infection control in implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices: current evidence, controversial points, and unresolved issues.

    PubMed

    Korantzopoulos, Panagiotis; Sideris, Skevos; Dilaveris, Polychronis; Gatzoulis, Konstantinos; Goudevenos, John A

    2016-04-01

    A significant increase in the implantation of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) is evident over the past years, while there is evidence for a disproportionate increase in CIED-related infections. The cumulative probability of device infection seems to be higher in implantable cardioverter defibrillator and in cardiac resynchronization therapy patients compared with permanent pacemaker patients. Given that more than a half of CIED infections are possibly related to the operative procedure, there is a need for effective periprocedural infection control. However, many of the current recommendations are empirical and not evidence-based, while questions, unresolved issues, and conflicting evidence arise. The perioperative systemic use of antibiotics confers significant benefit in prevention of CIED infections. However, there are no conclusive data regarding the specific value of each agent in different clinical settings, the value of post-operative antibiotic treatment as well as the optimal duration of therapy. The merit of local pocket irrigation with antibiotic and/or antiseptic agents remains unproved. Of note, recent evidence indicates that the application of antibacterial envelopes into the device pocket markedly decreases the infection risk. In addition, limited reports on strict integrated infection control protocols show a dramatic reduction in infection rates in this setting and therefore deserve further attention. Finally, the relative impact of particular factors on the infection risk, including the type of the CIED, patients' individual characteristics and comorbidities, should be further examined since it may facilitate the development of tailored prophylactic interventions for each patient. PMID:26516219

  20. [Infection control in orthodontics: infective agents and modality of transmission. 1].

    PubMed

    Garattini, G; Bersani, E; Moruzzi, E

    1989-01-01

    Adequate attention to prevention of cross-contamination in dental operatory is largely ignored by orthodontists. This occurs for two principal reasons. The first one is that orthodontic patients, usually children, are erroneously considered a low-risk population. The second one is that orthodontic procedures are usually considered nontissue invasive and not able to produce contamination of staff, patients or instruments. Nevertheless, since 1972, we know that we can find HBsAg in saliva too and moreover we cannot exclude to see blood in the mouth of our patients during orthodontic procedures. Furthermore the high volume of patients that orthodontists see every day and the possibility to treat orthodontically adult patients, take the risk of cross-contamination in orthodontic at the same level of other dental practices. The aim of the Authors is to sensitize orthodontists to the risk of cross-contamination giving the latest data of prevalence of hepatitis, tuberculosis and AIDS in adolescent population. PMID:2640947

  1. Blockade of interferon Beta, but not interferon alpha, signaling controls persistent viral infection.

    PubMed

    Ng, Cherie T; Sullivan, Brian M; Teijaro, John R; Lee, Andrew M; Welch, Megan; Rice, Stephanie; Sheehan, Kathleen C F; Schreiber, Robert D; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2015-05-13

    Although type I interferon (IFN-I) is thought to be beneficial against microbial infections, persistent viral infections are characterized by high interferon signatures suggesting that IFN-I signaling may promote disease pathogenesis. During persistent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, IFNα and IFNβ are highly induced early after infection, and blocking IFN-I receptor (IFNAR) signaling promotes virus clearance. We assessed the specific roles of IFNβ versus IFNα in controlling LCMV infection. While blockade of IFNβ alone does not alter early viral dissemination, it is important in determining lymphoid structure, lymphocyte migration, and anti-viral T cell responses that lead to accelerated virus clearance, approximating what occurs during attenuation of IFNAR signaling. Comparatively, blockade of IFNα was not associated with improved viral control, but with early dissemination of virus. Thus, despite their use of the same receptor, IFNβ and IFNα have unique and distinguishable biologic functions, with IFNβ being mainly responsible for promoting viral persistence. PMID:25974304

  2. Development of a Clinical Data Warehouse for Hospital Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Mary F.; Kieszkowski, Piotr; Zagorski, Brandon M.; Trick, William E.; Sommers, Michael; Weinstein, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    Existing data stored in a hospital's transactional servers have enormous potential to improve performance measurement and health care quality. Accessing, organizing, and using these data to support research and quality improvement projects are evolving challenges for hospital systems. The authors report development of a clinical data warehouse that they created by importing data from the information systems of three affiliated public hospitals. They describe their methodology; difficulties encountered; responses from administrators, computer specialists, and clinicians; and the steps taken to capture and store patient-level data. The authors provide examples of their use of the clinical data warehouse to monitor antimicrobial resistance, to measure antimicrobial use, to detect hospital-acquired bloodstream infections, to measure the cost of infections, and to detect antimicrobial prescribing errors. In addition, they estimate the amount of time and money saved and the increased precision achieved through the practical application of the data warehouse. PMID:12807807

  3. Into the Root: How Cytokinin Controls Rhizobial Infection.

    PubMed

    Miri, Mandana; Janakirama, Preetam; Held, Mark; Ross, Loretta; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof

    2016-03-01

    Leguminous plants selectively initiate primary responses to rhizobial nodulation factors (NF) that ultimately lead to symbiotic root nodule formation. Functioning downstream, cytokinin has emerged as the key endogenous plant signal for nodule differentiation, but its role in mediating rhizobial entry into the root remains obscure. Nonetheless, such a role is suggested by aberrant infection phenotypes of plant mutants with defects in cytokinin signaling. We postulate that cytokinin participates in orchestrating signaling events that promote rhizobial colonization of the root cortex and limit the extent of subsequent infection at the root epidermis, thus maintaining homeostasis of the symbiotic interaction. We further argue that cytokinin signaling must have been crucial during the evolution of plant cell predisposition for rhizobial colonization. PMID:26459665

  4. Using an integrated infection control strategy during outbreak control to minimize nosocomial infection of severe acute respiratory syndrome among healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Yen, M-Y; Lin, Y E; Su, I-J; Huang, F-Y; Huang, F-Y; Ho, M-S; Chang, S-C; Tan, K-H; Chen, K-T; Chang, H; Liu, Y-C; Loh, C-H; Wang, L-S; Lee, C-H

    2006-02-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of acquiring severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) while caring for SARS patients. Personal protective equipment and negative pressure isolation rooms (NPIRs) have not been completely successful in protecting HCWs. We introduced an innovative, integrated infection control strategy involving triaging patients using barriers, zones of risk, and extensive installation of alcohol dispensers for glove-on hand rubbing. This integrated infection control approach was implemented at a SARS designated hospital ('study hospital') where NPIRs were not available. The number of HCWs who contracted SARS in the study hospital was compared with the number of HCWs who contracted SARS in 86 Taiwan hospitals that did not use the integrated infection control strategy. Two HCWs contracted SARS in the study hospital (0.03 cases/bed) compared with 93 HCWs in the other hospitals (0.13 cases/bed) during the same three-week period. Our strategy appeared to be effective in reducing the incidence of HCWs contracting SARS. The advantages included rapid implementation without NPIRs, flexibility to transfer patients, and re-inforcement for HCWs to comply with infection control procedures, especially handwashing. The efficacy and low cost are major advantages, especially in countries with large populations at risk and fewer economic resources. PMID:16153744

  5. Serological diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia using protein antigens: A study of cut-offs with positive and negative controls.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dafne Carvalho; Borges, Igor Carmo; Ivaska, Lauri; Peltola, Ville; Meinke, Andreas; Barral, Aldina; Käyhty, Helena; Ruuskanen, Olli; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria

    2016-06-01

    The etiological diagnosis of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children is difficult, and the use of indirect techniques is frequently warranted. We aimed to study the use of pneumococcal proteins for the serological diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia. We analyzed paired serum samples from 13 Brazilian children with invasive pneumococcal pneumonia (positive control group) and 23 Finnish children with viral pharyngitis (negative control group), all aged <5years-old. Children with pharyngitis were evaluated for oropharyngeal colonization, and none of them carried S. pneumoniae. We used a multiplex bead-based assay with eight proteins: Ply, CbpA, PspA1 and 2, PcpA, PhtD, StkP and PcsB. The optimal cut-off for increase in antibody level for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection was determined for each antigen by ROC curve analysis. The positive control group had a significantly higher rate of ≥2-fold rise in antibody levels against all pneumococcal proteins, except Ply, compared to the negative controls. The cut-off of ≥2-fold increase in antibody levels was accurate for pneumococcal infection diagnosis for all investigated antigens. However, there was a substantial increase in the accuracy of the test with a cut-off of ≥1.52-fold rise in antibody levels for PcpA. When using the investigated protein antigens for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection, the detection of response against at least one antigen was highly sensitive (92.31%) and specific (91.30%). The use of serology with pneumococcal proteins is a promising method for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia. The use of a ≥2-fold increase cut-off is adequate for most pneumococcal proteins. PMID:26928648

  6. Control of HIV/AIDS infection system with drug dosages design via robust H(∞) fuzzy controller.

    PubMed

    Assawinchaichote, Wudhichai

    2015-01-01

    The designing of H∞ fuzzy controller for HIV/AIDS infected dynamic system has been considered in this paper. With TS fuzzy model and LMIs approach, the proposed controller is obtained for such a system. A set of sufficient conditions of the H∞ controller is given to ensure the closed-loop system asymptotic stability and the prescribed H∞ performance level. Finally, the effectiveness of the fuzzy controller design approach is finally presented through the simulation results. PMID:26405968

  7. 29 CFR 505.5 - Adequate assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... amount of a weekly or monthly salary, talent or performance fee, hourly rate or other basis on which... requirements in paragraph (b) were approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  8. 29 CFR 505.5 - Adequate assurances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... amount of a weekly or monthly salary, talent or performance fee, hourly rate or other basis on which... requirements in paragraph (b) were approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  9. Chemoprophylaxis of Onchocerca infections: in a controlled, prospective study ivermectin prevents calves becoming infected with O. ochengi.

    PubMed

    Tchakouté, V L; Bronsvoort, M; Tanya, V; Renz, A; Trees, A J

    1999-02-01

    Onchocerciasis ('River Blindness'), caused by the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus is of major public health importance in West Africa. Ivermectin, a drug originally developed for veterinary use, is now being incorporated in control strategies but whilst it has potent efficacy against L1 larvae (microfilariae), ivermectin is not lethal to adult (L5) O. volvulus, nor to adults of the related cattle parasite O. ochengi. We have exploited this model to determine if ivermectin has prophylactic activity against naturally transmitted, O. ochengi infections in a controlled, prospective study in northern Cameroon. Calves were treated monthly with ivermectin at either 200 micrograms/kg or 500 micrograms/kg for 21 months. None of 15 treated calves developed adult worm infection, whereas 5/6 untreated controls became infected (P < 0.001) with a total of 54 O. ochengi nodules, and all 5 developed patent microfilaridermia. These results have significant implications for the use of ivermectin in humans, and suggest that strategic chemotherapy at times of maximal transmission will confer prophylactic as well as therapeutic benefits. PMID:10028534

  10. Impact of infection control training for interns on PICU-acquired bloodstream infections in a middle-income country

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Yun Yun; Abdel-Latif, Mohamed El-Amin; Gan, Chin Seng; Siham, Anis; Zainol, Hasimah; Lum, Lucy Chai See

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The present study aimed to determine the impact of an extended infection control training programme, which was conducted for all interns posted to the Department of Paediatrics, on the incidence of paediatric intensive care unit (PICU)-acquired bloodstream infections (BSIs) in University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia. METHODS The development of nosocomial BSIs during the baseline period (1 January–31 October 2008) and intervention period (1 November–31 December 2009) was monitored. During the intervention period, all paediatric interns underwent training in hand hygiene and aseptic techniques for accessing vascular catheters. RESULTS A total of 25 patients had PICU-acquired BSIs during the baseline period, while 18 patients had PICU-acquired BSIs during the intervention period (i.e. infection rate of 88 per 1,000 and 41 per 1,000 admissions, respectively). The infections were related to central venous catheters (CVCs) in 22 of the 25 patients who had PICU-acquired BSIs during the baseline period and 11 of the 18 patients who had PICU-acquired BSIs during the intervention period. Thus, the incidence rates of catheter-related BSIs were 25.2 per 1,000 CVC-days and 9.3 per 1,000 CVC-days, respectively (p < 0.05). The Paediatric Risk of Standardised Mortality III score was an independent risk factor for PICU-acquired BSIs and the intervention significantly reduced this risk. CONCLUSION The education of medical interns on infection control, a relatively low-cost intervention, resulted in a substantial reduction in the incidence of PICU-acquired BSIs. PMID:26451053

  11. Onchocerciasis infection in children born during 14 years of Simulium control in West Africa.

    PubMed

    De Sole, G; Remme, J

    1991-01-01

    The incidence of onchocerciasis infection in children born since the start of vector control is one of the indicators used in the epidemiological evaluation of the Onchocerciasis Control Programme in West Africa (OCP). Though initially of littel value, after a decade of control it has become a sensitive indicator of residual transmission. The results of 14 years of control are reported. In 179 villages parasitological surveys were undertaken at intervals of 3-4 years. 15,286 children were examined and 110 were found to be infected, compared to an expected number of 2467 infected had there been no control. There was considerable geographical variation in the results. In the large central OCP area the results were excellent. Of 12,172 children examined in 127 villages, only 23 were found to be infected compared to an expected number of 1960 without control. This suggests that larviciding had achieved a 99% reduction in the incidence of infection in children. Additional surveys in 2 foci in the central OCP area where transmission had relapsed showed that these problems were very localized. Most villages with infected children were found in OCP border areas in the east and west, which had been reinvaded by infective vectors from elsewhere, and in the intermediate area between forest and savanna in Côte d'Ivoire where there had been partial control failures because of resistance. The incidence of infection in children was reduced by an estimated 68% in the eastern reinvaded area, by 87% in the western reinvaded area, and by 84% in the intermediate area. PMID:1949145

  12. A SURVEY OF CROSS-INFECTION CONTROL PROCEDURES: KNOWLEDGE AND ATTITUDES OF TURKISH DENTISTS

    PubMed Central

    Yüzbaşioglu, Emir; Saraç, Duygu; Canbaz, Sevgi; Saraç, Y. Şinasi; Cengiz, Seda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Turkish dentists in Samsun City regarding cross-infection control. Material and methods: A questionnaire was designed to obtain information about procedures used for the prevention of cross-infection in dental practices and determine the attitudes and perceptions of respondent dental practitioners to their procedures. The study population included all dentists in the city of Samsun, Turkey, in April 2005 (n=184). The questionnaire collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge and practice of infection control procedures, sterilization, wearing of gloves, mask, use of rubber dam, method of storing instruments and disposal methods of contaminated material, etc. Questionnaire data was entered into a computer and analyzed by SPSS statistical software. Results: From the 184 dentists to whom the questionnaires were submitted, 135 participated in the study (overall response rate of 73.36%). As much as 74.10% dentists expressed concern about the risk of cross-infection from patients to themselves and their dental assistants. Forty-three percent of the participants were able to define "cross-infection" correctly. The greatest majority of the respondents (95.60%) stated that all patients have to be considered as infectious and universal precautions must apply to all of them. The overall responses to the questionnaire showed that the dentists had moderate knowledge of infection control procedures. Conclusions: Improved compliance with recommended infection control procedures is required for all dentists evaluated in the present survey. Continuing education programs and short-time courses about cross-infection and infection control procedures are suitable to improve the knowledge of dentists. PMID:20027427

  13. Progress in research, control and elimination of helminth infections in Asia.

    PubMed

    Utzinger, Jürg; Brattig, Norbert W; Leonardo, Lydia; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Bergquist, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Global health has substantially improved over the past 20 years. In low- and middle-income countries, in particular, great strives have been made in the control of communicable diseases, including helminth infections. Nevertheless, the most marginalised communities still suffer from infectious diseases that are intimately connected with poverty and lack of access to essential commodities and services, such as clean water, improved sanitation and sufficient food. A two-pronged approach is thus necessary: (i) intensifying control in remaining high-endemicity areas and pockets of high transmission; and (ii) moving from morbidity control to interruption of disease transmission in low-endemicity areas with the goal of local elimination. The latter will require new tools and strategies, going hand-in-hand with strong partnerships and new strategic alliances. In this special issue of Acta Tropica, 35 articles are featured that, together, provide an up-to-date overview of the latest progress made in research, control and elimination of helminth infections in East and Southeast Asia. The first 12 articles expound tools and approaches for improved detection, surveillance and monitoring of helminth infections. Control and elimination approaches for the most important helminth infections are revisited in the next 20 articles. The three remaining articles are cross-cutting pieces examining the interface of agriculture, environment and helminth infections and providing a rationale for integrated, multi-sectorial control approaches that are necessary for sustaining helminthiasis control and progressively moving towards elimination. An interesting aspect revealed through an in-depth analysis of the provenance of the 35 contributions is that the People's Republic of China emerges as a key player in global health, which is documented through its prominent role in research and control of helminth infection and networking throughout Asia. Policy implications are discussed and will

  14. Biofilms and persistent wound infections in United States military trauma patients: a case–control analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex traumatic injuries sustained by military personnel, particularly when involving extremities, often result in infectious complications and substantial morbidity. One factor that may further impair patient recovery is the persistence of infections. Surface-attached microbial communities, known as biofilms, may play a role in hindering the management of infections; however, clinical data associating biofilm formation with persistent or chronic infections are lacking. Therefore, we evaluated the production of bacterial biofilms as a potential risk factor for persistent infections among wounded military personnel. Methods Bacterial isolates and clinical data from military personnel with deployment-related injuries were collected through the Trauma Infectious Disease Outcomes Study. The study population consisted of patients with diagnosed skin and soft-tissue infections. Cases (wounds with bacterial isolates of the same organism collected 14 days apart) were compared to controls (wounds with non-recurrent bacterial isolates), which were matched by organism and infectious disease syndrome. Potential risk factors for persistent infections, including biofilm formation, were examined in a univariate analysis. Data are expressed as odds ratios (OR; 95% confidence interval [CI]). Results On a per infected wound basis, 35 cases (representing 25 patients) and 69 controls (representing 60 patients) were identified. Eight patients with multiple wounds were utilized as both cases and controls. Overall, 235 bacterial isolates were tested for biofilm formation in the case–control analysis. Biofilm formation was significantly associated with infection persistence (OR: 29.49; CI: 6.24-infinity) in a univariate analysis. Multidrug resistance (OR: 5.62; CI: 1.02-56.92), packed red blood cell transfusion requirements within the first 24 hours (OR: 1.02; CI: 1.01-1.04), operating room visits prior to and on the date of infection diagnosis (OR: 2.05; CI: 1

  15. Controlling the seedbeds of tuberculosis: diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rangaka, Molebogeng X; Cavalcante, Solange C; Marais, Ben J; Thim, Sok; Martinson, Neil A; Swaminathan, Soumya; Chaisson, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    The billions of people with latent tuberculosis infection serve as the seedbeds for future cases of active tuberculosis. Virtually all episodes of tuberculosis disease are preceded by a period of asymptomatic Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection; therefore, identifying infected individuals most likely to progress to disease and treating such subclinical infections to prevent future disease provides a crucial opportunity to interrupt tuberculosis transmission and reduce the global burden of tuberculosis disease. Programmes focusing on single strategies rather than comprehensive programmes that deliver an integrated arsenal for tuberculosis control might continue to struggle. Tuberculosis preventive therapy is a poorly used method that is essential for controlling the reservoirs of disease that drive the epidemic. Comprehensive control strategies that combine preventive therapy for the most high-risk populations and communities with improved case-finding and treatment, control of transmission, and health systems strengthening could ultimately lead to worldwide tuberculosis elimination. In this Series paper we outline challenges to implementation of preventive therapy and provide pragmatic suggestions for overcoming them. We further advocate for tuberculosis preventive therapy as the core of a renewed worldwide focus to implement a comprehensive epidemic control strategy that would reduce new tuberculosis cases to elimination targets. This strategy would be underpinned by accelerated research to further understand the biology of subclinical tuberculosis infections, develop novel diagnostics and drug regimens specifically for subclinical tuberculosis infection, strengthen health systems and community engagement, and enhance sustainable large scale implementation of preventive therapy programmes. PMID:26515679

  16. Border Control in Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Inhibiting Viral Entry.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Cameron J; Liang, T Jake

    2015-09-11

    A new era has begun in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with powerful yet expensive therapies. New treatments are emerging that target the entry step of HCV and could potentially block reinfection after liver transplant. These treatments include antibodies, which target the virus or host receptors required by HCV. Additionally, several new and previously approved small-molecule compounds have been described that target unique aspects of HCV entry. Overall, the blocking entry represents an attractive strategy that could yield powerful combination therapies to combat HCV. PMID:27617924

  17. Review: phage therapy: a modern tool to control bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic-resistant in bacteria has aggravated curiosity in development of alternative therapy to conventional drugs. One of the emerging drugs that can be used alternative to antibiotics is bacteriophage therapy. The use of living phages in the cure of lethal infectious life threatening diseases caused by Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria has been reported. Another development in the field of bacteriophage therapy is the use of genetically modified and non replicating phages in the treatment of bacterial infection. Genetically engineered bacteriophages can be used as adjuvant along with antibiotic therapy. Phages encoded with lysosomal enzymes are also effectual in the treatment of infectious diseases. PMID:25553704

  18. Infection.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Gaurav; Nagornaya, Natalya; Post, M Judith D

    2016-01-01

    Imaging is useful in the diagnosis and management of infections of the central nervous system. Typically, imaging findings at the outset of the disease are subtle and nonspecific, but they often evolve to more definite imaging patterns in a few days, with less rapidity than for stroke but faster than for neoplastic lesions. This timing is similar to that of noninfectious inflammatory brain disease, such as multiple sclerosis. Fortunately, imaging patterns help to distinguish the two kinds of processes. Other than for sarcoidosis, the meninges are seldom involved in noninfectious inflammation; in contrast, many infectious processes involve the meninges, which then enhance with contrast on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, brain infection causes a vast array of imaging patterns. Although CT is useful when hemorrhage or calcification is suspected or bony detail needs to be determined, MRI is the imaging modality of choice in the investigation of intracranial infections. Imaging sequences such as diffusion-weighted imaging help in accurately depicting the location and characterizing pyogenic infections and are particularly useful in differentiating bacterial infections from other etiologies. Susceptibility-weighted imaging is extremely useful for the detection of hemorrhage. Although MR spectroscopy findings can frequently be nonspecific, certain conditions such as bacterial abscesses show a relatively specific spectral pattern and are useful in diagnosing and constituting immediate therapy. In this chapter we review first the imaging patterns associated with involvement of various brain structures, such as the epidural and subdural spaces, the meninges, the brain parenchyma, and the ventricles. Involvement of these regions is illustrated with bacterial infections. Next we illustrate the patterns associated with viral and prion diseases, followed by mycobacterial and fungal infections, to conclude with a review of imaging findings

  19. Infection control in general practices in Buffalo City and OR Tambo District Municipalities, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Good infection control practices are effective in reducing rates of infection in health care settings. Studies in primary care in developed countries indicate that many general practitioners (GPs) do not comply with optimal infection control practices. There are no published studies from developing countries in Southern Africa. Objectives The aim of this study was to describe infection control practices in private GP surgeries in the Buffalo City and OR Tambo District Municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Method A literature review was conducted to appraise current best practice with respect to Standard Infection Control and Transmission Based Precautions. A questionnaire, inquiring into GPs’ actual practices, was posted to each surgery. Results The valid response rate was 34% (47/140). Methods used to sterilise instruments in 40 practices were: ultraviolet sterilisation (23), chemical disinfection (14), boiling water (7), and steam autoclave (2). Compounds used for chemical disinfection included organotin quaternary, chlorhexidine and benzyl ammonium chloride with a quaternary complex. Twenty-two (47%) used a hand rub. Sixteen (35%) GPs stated that they had a policy to promptly triage patients who are coughing, and 23 (50%) had a policy for airflow movement in the surgery. All practices appropriately disposed of sharps. Thirty-seven (80%) expressed interest in a seminar on infection control. Conclusions Overall, GPs were aware of infection control precautions. Ultraviolet sterilisers and chlorhexidine are not recommended, however, for sterilisation or high level disinfection of medical instruments, and their use should be discontinued. Hand rubs are underutilised. GPs should implement Transmission Based Precautions to prevent airborne and droplet infections.

  20. A Legume Genetic Framework Controls Infection of Nodules by Symbiotic and Endophytic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zgadzaj, Rafal; James, Euan K.; Kelly, Simon; Kawaharada, Yasuyuki; de Jonge, Nadieh; Jensen, Dorthe B.; Madsen, Lene H.; Radutoiu, Simona

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have an intrinsic capacity to accommodate both symbiotic and endophytic bacteria within root nodules. For the symbionts, a complex genetic mechanism that allows mutual recognition and plant infection has emerged from genetic studies under axenic conditions. In contrast, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the endophytic infection. Here we investigate the contribution of both the host and the symbiotic microbe to endophyte infection and development of mixed colonised nodules in Lotus japonicus. We found that infection threads initiated by Mesorhizobium loti, the natural symbiont of Lotus, can selectively guide endophytic bacteria towards nodule primordia, where competent strains multiply and colonise the nodule together with the nitrogen-fixing symbiotic partner. Further co-inoculation studies with the competent coloniser, Rhizobium mesosinicum strain KAW12, show that endophytic nodule infection depends on functional and efficient M. loti-driven Nod factor signalling. KAW12 exopolysaccharide (EPS) enabled endophyte nodule infection whilst compatible M. loti EPS restricted it. Analysis of plant mutants that control different stages of the symbiotic infection showed that both symbiont and endophyte accommodation within nodules is under host genetic control. This demonstrates that when legume plants are exposed to complex communities they selectively regulate access and accommodation of bacteria occupying this specialized environmental niche, the root nodule. PMID:26042417

  1. Immunoregulatory pathways in murine leishmaniasis: different regulatory control during Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major infections.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J; Kaye, P M

    1985-01-01

    The effect of whole body sublethal gamma irradiation on the subsequent growth of Leishmania mexicana mexicana and Leishmania major was studied in CBA/Ca and BALB/c mice. Whereas BALB/c mice are highly susceptible to both parasites developing non healing progressively growing lesions at the site of cutaneous infection, CBA/Ca mice develop small healing cutaneous ulcers following subcutaneous infection with L. major but non healing lesions following subcutaneous infection with L.m. mexicana. Prior whole body sublethal irradiation of CBA/Ca mice, but not BALB/c mice, resulted in strong resistance against infection with L.m. mexicana: no lesions developed at the site of cutaneous infection. Irradiated BALB/c mice did, however, develop small lesions which healed when infected with L. major. The protective effects of irradiation coincided with the development of delayed type hypersensitivity. Both naive and sensitized nylon wool purified lymphocytes could restore susceptibility to L. major in irradiated BALB/c mice but only lymphocytes from long term infected donor mice adoptively transferred a non healing response to irradiated CBA/Ca mice infected with L.m. mexicana. Non-irradiated, L. major infected, CBA/Ca mice, but not similarly treated BALB/c mice, were found to be resistant to subsequent infection with L.m. mexicana. On the other hand, irradiated BALB/c mice infected with L. major were resistant to subsequent infectious challenge with L.m. mexicana. We suggest that the susceptibility of CBA/Ca mice to L.m. mexicana is under the control of an as yet unidentified gene which is not dependent on the generation of T suppressor cells and is bypassed by previous infection with L. major. Therefore, BALB/c mice immunized against L. major by prior sublethal irradiation are also resistant to L.m. mexicana. PMID:3907906

  2. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  3. Analysis of Postoperative Thoracolumbar Spine Infections in a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Using the Centers for Disease Control Surgical Site Infection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Richelle C.; Lonner, Baron S.; Andres, Tate M.; Park, Justin J.; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro A.; Bendo, John A.; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.; Errico, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound infections following spinal surgery place a high toll on both the patient and the healthcare system. Although several large series studies have examined the incidence and distribution of spinal wound infection, the applicability of these studies varies greatly since nearly every study is either retrospective and/or lacks standard inclusion criteria for defining surgical site infection. To address this void, we present results from prospectively gathered thoracolumbar spine surgery data for which the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria were stringently applied to define a surgical site infection (SSI). Methods A prospective randomized trial of 314 patients who underwent multilevel thoracolumbar spinal surgery with instrumentation followed by postoperative drain placement was completed (Takemoto et al., 2015). The trial consisted of two antibiotic arms: one for 24-hours, and the other for the duration of the drain; no differences were found between the arms. All infections meeting CDC criteria for SSI were included. Results A total of 40 infections met CDC criteria for SSI, for an overall incidence of 12.7%. Of these, 20 (50%) were culture-positive. The most common organism was Staphylococcus aureus (4 total: methicillin-sensitive=2; methicillin-resistant=2), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (3 cases), Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli (2 cases each). Six infections grew multiple organisms, most commonly involving coagulase-negative staphylococcus and enterococcus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that thoracolumbar SSI occurs at the higher end of the range cited in the literature (2-13%), which is largely based on retrospective data not subjected to the inclusivity of SSI as defined by the CDC. The three most common organisms in our analysis (S. aureus, P. acnes, E. coli) are consistent with previous reports. Staphylococcus aureus continues to be the most common causative organism and continued vigilance and

  4. Metabolomics of bronchoalveolar lavage differentiate healthy HIV-1-infected subjects from controls.

    PubMed

    Cribbs, Sushma K; Park, Youngja; Guidot, David M; Martin, Greg S; Brown, Lou Ann; Lennox, Jeffrey; Jones, Dean P

    2014-06-01

    Despite antiretroviral therapy, pneumonias from pathogens such as pneumococcus continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in HIV-1-infected individuals. Respiratory infections occur despite high CD4 counts and low viral loads; therefore, better understanding of lung immunity and infection predictors is necessary. We tested whether metabolomics, an integrated biosystems approach to molecular fingerprinting, could differentiate such individual characteristics. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALf ) was collected from otherwise healthy HIV-1-infected individuals and healthy controls. A liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry method was used to detect metabolites in BALf. Statistical and bioinformatic analyses used false discovery rate (FDR) and orthogonally corrected partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) to identify groupwise discriminatory factors as the top 5% of metabolites contributing to 95% separation of HIV-1 and control. We enrolled 24 subjects with HIV-1 (median CD4=432) and 24 controls. A total of 115 accurate mass m/z features from C18 and AE analysis were significantly different between HIV-1 subjects and controls (FDR=0.05). Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed clusters of metabolites, which discriminated the samples according to HIV-1 status (FDR=0.05). Several of these did not match any metabolites in metabolomics databases; mass-to-charge 325.065 ([M+H](+)) was significantly higher (FDR=0.05) in the BAL of HIV-1-infected subjects and matched pyochelin, a siderophore-produced Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Metabolic profiles in BALf differentiated healthy HIV-1-infected subjects and controls. The lack of association with known human metabolites and inclusion of a match to a bacterial metabolite suggest that the differences could reflect the host's lung microbiome and/or be related to subclinical infection in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:24417396

  5. Provoking "Eureka" moments for effective infection control strategies.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Safety is now a fundamental principle of patient care and a critical component of quality management. Health care-associated infection prevention strategies need to be constantly revisited and updated to be effective. The "Geneva hand hygiene model" is a typical example of a breakthrough innovatory campaign that caught fire and went viral worldwide, thanks to its adoption by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the First Global Patient Safety Challenge. The campaign remains an inspiration for further innovation. To encourage new and disruptive technologies with the potential to improve patient safety through the successful implementation of the WHO multimodal strategy, the University of Geneva Hospitals/WHO Collaborating Centre on Patient Safety, together with the Aesculap Academy, have created a series of "Hand Hygiene Excellence Awards" and "Hand Hygiene Innovation Awards" worldwide. PMID:26502484

  6. Control of infection in general practice: a survey and recommendations.

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, P. N.; Cooke, E. M.; Larkin, D. P.; Southgate, L. J.; Mayon-White, R. T.; Pether, J. V.; Wright, A. E.; Keenlyside, D.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty general practices in four areas in Britain were surveyed to establish their needs for and practices of sterilising and disinfecting equipment. Of the 327 items of equipment and instruments examined in the survey, 190 were satisfactorily decontaminated, 100 were treated in a way judged to result in doubtful decontamination, and in 37 cases treatment was considered unsatisfactory. Decontamination apparatuses (autoclaves, hot air ovens, and hot water disinfectors) were generally in good working order, but the use of chemical disinfectants was often inappropriate. Recommendations were made on appropriate methods of decontamination for various items in common use in general practice. By virtue of the large numbers of patients treated by general practitioners there is a substantial possibility of transmitting infection; having appropriate methods for decontaminating instruments and equipment is therefore imperative. PMID:3408909

  7. Protecting Our Front-liners: Occupational Tuberculosis Prevention Through Infection Control Strategies.

    PubMed

    Verkuijl, Sabine; Middelkoop, Keren

    2016-05-15

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low- and middle-income countries with high tuberculosis prevalence are at increased risk of tuberculosis infection; however, tuberculosis infection control (TBIC) measures are often poorly implemented. The World Health Organization recommends 4 levels of TBIC: managerial (establishment and oversight of TBIC policies), administrative controls (reducing HCWs' exposure to tuberculosis), environmental controls (reducing the concentration of infectious respiratory aerosols in the air), and personal respiratory protection. This article will discuss each of these levels of TBIC, and review the available data on the implementation of each in sub-Saharan African countries. In addition, we review the attitudes and motivation of HCWs regarding TBIC measures, and the impact of stigma on infection control practices and implementation. After summarizing the challenges facing effective TBIC implementation, we will discuss possible solutions and recommendations. Last, we present a case study of how a clinic effectively addressed some of the challenges of TBIC implementation. PMID:27118852

  8. TOCSIN: a proposed dashboard of indicators to control healthcare-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Blais, Régis; Champagne, François; Rousseau, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) constitute a major safety problem. Healthcare managers need complete and valid information to fight against these infections. The purpose of this study was to develop a dashboard of indicators to help healthcare managers monitor HAIs. A pilot testing approach was used that was composed of the following steps: literature review, consultation with infection control experts and healthcare managers, operationalization of selected indicators, data collection from six Quebec hospital complexes to test the feasibility of the selected indicators and results dissemination. The literature review identified 299 possible indicators. After consulting infection control experts and healthcare managers and having collected data in the hospitals, a proposed dashboard was created that includes 97 indicators divided in three categories (structure, process and outcome) and grouped in 22 themes. The proposed indicators are both scientifically valid and administratively feasible. However, many healthcare facilities need additional financial resources and expertise to measure these indicators and manage the information they will generate. PMID:19667795

  9. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Tan, Jeslin J. L.; McCarthy, Mary K.; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N.; Ng, Lisa F. P.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  10. Myeloid Cell Arg1 Inhibits Control of Arthritogenic Alphavirus Infection by Suppressing Antiviral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Burrack, Kristina S; Tan, Jeslin J L; McCarthy, Mary K; Her, Zhisheng; Berger, Jennifer N; Ng, Lisa F P; Morrison, Thomas E

    2015-10-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV) and chikungunya virus (CHIKV), are responsible for explosive epidemics involving millions of cases. These mosquito-transmitted viruses cause inflammation and injury in skeletal muscle and joint tissues that results in debilitating pain. We previously showed that arginase 1 (Arg1) was highly expressed in myeloid cells in the infected and inflamed musculoskeletal tissues of RRV- and CHIKV-infected mice, and specific deletion of Arg1 from myeloid cells resulted in enhanced viral control. Here, we show that Arg1, along with other genes associated with suppressive myeloid cells, is induced in PBMCs isolated from CHIKV-infected patients during the acute phase as well as the chronic phase, and that high Arg1 expression levels were associated with high viral loads and disease severity. Depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells from RRV-infected Arg1-deficient mice restored viral loads to levels detected in T cell-depleted wild-type mice. Moreover, Arg1-expressing myeloid cells inhibited virus-specific T cells in the inflamed and infected musculoskeletal tissues, but not lymphoid tissues, following RRV infection in mice, including suppression of interferon-γ and CD69 expression. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the immune response following arthritogenic alphavirus infection and suggest that immunosuppressive myeloid cells may contribute to the duration or severity of these debilitating infections. PMID:26436766

  11. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection.

    PubMed

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V; Kamuyango, Alfred A; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C; Renshaw, Stephen A; Johnston, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis. PMID:26887656

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans Intracellular Proliferation and Capsule Size Determines Early Macrophage Control of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bojarczuk, Aleksandra; Miller, Katie A.; Hotham, Richard; Lewis, Amy; Ogryzko, Nikolay V.; Kamuyango, Alfred A.; Frost, Helen; Gibson, Rory H.; Stillman, Eleanor; May, Robin C.; Renshaw, Stephen A.; Johnston, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen of immunocompromised patients. Many questions remain regarding the function of macrophages in normal clearance of cryptococcal infection and the defects present in uncontrolled cryptococcosis. Two current limitations are: 1) The difficulties in interpreting studies using isolated macrophages in the context of the progression of infection, and 2) The use of high resolution imaging in understanding immune cell behavior during animal infection. Here we describe a high-content imaging method in a zebrafish model of cryptococcosis that permits the detailed analysis of macrophage interactions with C. neoformans during infection. Using this approach we demonstrate that, while macrophages are critical for control of C. neoformans, a failure of macrophage response is not the limiting defect in fatal infections. We find phagocytosis is restrained very early in infection and that increases in cryptococcal number are driven by intracellular proliferation. We show that macrophages preferentially phagocytose cryptococci with smaller polysaccharide capsules and that capsule size is greatly increased over twenty-four hours of infection, a change that is sufficient to severely limit further phagocytosis. Thus, high-content imaging of cryptococcal infection in vivo demonstrates how very early interactions between macrophages and cryptococci are critical in the outcome of cryptococcosis. PMID:26887656

  13. Hospital outbreak control requires joint efforts from hospital management, microbiology and infection control.

    PubMed

    Ransjö, U; Lytsy, B; Melhus, A; Aspevall, O; Artinger, C; Eriksson, B-M; Günther, G; Hambraeus, A

    2010-09-01

    An outbreak of multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae producing the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase CTX-M15 affected 247 mainly elderly patients in more than 30 wards in a 1000-bedded swedish teaching hospital between May 2005 and August 2007. A manual search of the hospital administrative records for possible contacts between cases in wards and outpatient settings revealed a complex chain of transmission. Faecal screening identified twice as many cases as cultures from clinical samples. Transmission occurred by direct and indirect patient-to-patient contact, facilitated by patient overcrowding. Interventions included formation of a steering group with economic power, increased bed numbers, better compliance with alcohol hand disinfection and hospital dress code, better hand hygiene for patients and improved cleaning. The cost of the interventions was estimated to be euro3 million. Special infection control policies were not necessary, but resources were needed to make existing policies possible to follow, and for educational efforts to improve compliance. PMID:20359768

  14. Staphylococcus aureus epidemic in a neonatal nursery: a strategy of infection control.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Giovanna; Nicoletti, PierLuigi; Scopetti, Franca; Manoocher, Pourshaban; Dani, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella

    2006-08-01

    The risk of nosocomial infection due to Staphylococcus aureus in fullterm newborns is higher under hospital conditions where there are overcrowded nurseries and inadequate infection control techniques. We report on an outbreak of skin infection in a Maternity Nursery (May 21, 2000) and the measures undertaken to bring the epidemic under control. These measures included: separating neonates already present in the nursery on August 23, 2000 from ones newly arriving by creating two different cohorts, one of neonates born before this date and one of neonates born later; restricting healthcare workers caring for S. aureus- infected infants from working with non-infected infants; disallowing carrier healthcare workers from caring for patients; introducing contact and droplet precautions (including the routine use of gowns, gloves, and mask); ensuring appropriate disinfection of potential sources of contamination. A representative number of isolates were typed by genomic DNA restriction length polymorphism analysis by means of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 227 cases of skin lesions, microbiological laboratory analyses confirmed that 175 were staphylococcal infections. The outbreak showed a gradual reduction in magnitude when the overcrowding of the Nursery was reduced by separating the newborns into the two different Nurseries (two cohorts). The genotyping of the strains by PFGE confirmed the nurse-to-newborn transmission of S. aureus. The measures adopted for controlling the S. aureus outbreak can, in retrospect, be assessed to have been very effective. PMID:16602005

  15. Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials of Antibiotics and Antiseptics for Preventing Infection in People Receiving Primary Total Hip and Knee Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Michael; Darouiche, Rabih

    2015-01-01

    Infection rates in primary (first-time) major joint arthroplasty continue to be a significant issue. The effect of antibiotic and antiseptic prophylaxis on outcomes for this type of surgery has not been adequately reviewed. A systematic search of the main databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating antibiotics and antiseptics was conducted to evaluate the predetermined endpoints of infection, adverse events, costs, quality of life, and concentration levels of antibiotics. A meta-analysis using pooled effect estimates and fixed-effect and random-effect models of risk ratios (RR), calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI), was utilized. Thirty (30) RCTs examined the effects of antibiotic and antiseptic prophylaxis on infections after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) (total of 11,597 participants) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) (total of 6,141 participants). For THA, preoperative systemic intravenous (i.v.) antibiotic prophylaxis may be effective in reducing the incidence of infection after THA from 6 months to ≥5 years. For TKA, there is no RCT evidence that antibiotics and/or antiseptics have any effect on infection rate. Preoperative systemic antibiotic prophylaxis in primary THA may be effective at reducing infection rate. There is no evidence that timing, route of administration, or concentration levels have an effect on reducing infections, adverse events, or costs in THA or TKA. Many of the trials included in this study were published in the 1980s and 1990s. Thus, it would be important to replicate a number of them based on current patient demographics and incidence of bacterial resistance. PMID:26259793

  16. Repurposing drugs for the treatment and control of helminth infections

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Gordana; Duthaler, Urs; Speich, Benjamin; Keiser, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Helminth infections are responsible for a considerable public health burden, yet the current drug armamentarium is small. Given the high cost of drug discovery and development, the high failure rates and the long duration to develop novel treatments, drug repurposing circumvents these obstacles by finding new uses for compounds other than those they were initially intended to treat. In the present review, we summarize in vivo and clinical trial findings testing clinical candidates and marketed drugs against schistosomes, food-borne trematodes, soil-transmitted helminths, Strongyloides stercoralis, the major human filariases lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, taeniasis, neurocysticercosis and echinococcosis. While expanding the applications of broad-spectrum or veterinary anthelmintics continues to fuel alternative treatment options, antimalarials, antibiotics, antiprotozoals and anticancer agents appear to be producing fruitful results as well. The trematodes and nematodes continue to be most investigated, while cestodal drug discovery will need to be accelerated. The most clinically advanced drug candidates include the artemisinins and mefloquine against schistosomiasis, tribendimidine against liver flukes, oxantel pamoate against trichuriasis, and doxycycline against filariasis. Preclinical studies indicate a handful of promising future candidates, and are beginning to elucidate the broad-spectrum activity of some currently used anthelmintics. Challenges and opportunities are further discussed. PMID:25516827

  17. Atmospheric pressure plasmas: infection control and bacterial responses.

    PubMed

    Mai-Prochnow, Anne; Murphy, Anthony B; McLean, Keith M; Kong, Michael G; Ostrikov, Kostya Ken

    2014-06-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) is a recent, cutting-edge antimicrobial treatment. It has the potential to be used as an alternative to traditional treatments such as antibiotics and as a promoter of wound healing, making it a promising tool in a range of biomedical applications with particular importance for combating infections. A number of studies show very promising results for APP-mediated killing of bacteria, including removal of biofilms of pathogenic bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, the mode of action of APP and the resulting bacterial response are not fully understood. Use of a variety of different plasma-generating devices, different types of plasma gases and different treatment modes makes it challenging to show reproducibility and transferability of results. This review considers some important studies in which APP was used as an antibacterial agent, and specifically those that elucidate its mode of action, with the aim of identifying common bacterial responses to APP exposure. The review has a particular emphasis on mechanisms of interactions of bacterial biofilms with APP. PMID:24637224

  18. Pharmaceutical control of endoparasitic helminth infections in sheep.

    PubMed

    Sargison, Neil D

    2011-03-01

    Sheep are hosts to numerous genera and species of helminth parasites, which are an important cause of production-limiting diseases. Their proper treatment and control requires knowledge of the epidemiology of these parasites in the region where the farm is located, including knowledge of the important species and their pathogenic effects, the role of immunity and resilience of the sheep, survival of L(3) on pasture under different conditions, and farm management practices. Use of anthelmintics must be combined with this knowledge to reduce risk of development of anthelmintic resistance, particularly with the control of gastrointestinal nematode parasites. PMID:21215898

  19. Impact of hospital care on incidence of bloodstream infection: the evaluation of processes and indicators in infection control study.

    PubMed Central

    Kritchevsky, S. B.; Braun, B. I.; Wong, E. S.; Solomon, S. L.; Steele, L.; Richards, C.; Simmons, B. P.

    2001-01-01

    The Evaluation of Processes and Indicators in Infection Control (EPIC) study assesses the relationship between hospital care and rates of central venous catheter-associated primary bacteremia in 54 intensive-care units (ICUs) in the United States and 14 other countries. Using ICU rather than the patient as the primary unit of statistical analysis permits evaluation of factors that vary at the ICU level. The design of EPIC can serve as a template for studies investigating the relationship between process and event rates across health-care institutions. PMID:11294704

  20. Breaking the Chain of Infection: Dental Unit Water Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Amrita; Mehta, Sonia; Dang, Rajat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The air–water syringes, ultrasonic scalers, high speed air turbine handpieces are connected to dental units by a network of small-bore plastic tubes through which water and air travel to activate or cool the instruments and it had been shown that this system is extensively contaminated with microbial biofilms and pose a potential risk of infection for patients as well as dental professionals. Aim To evaluate and compare the efficacy of various disinfectants in reducing the microbial colony count in water derived from Dental Unit Waterlines. Materials and Methods Five random dental units were selected and samples were collected before and after intervention with 5 disinfectants (0.02% H2O2 continuously, 0.02% H2O2 continuously with shock treatment with 0.25% H2O2 weekly, 0.12% Chlorohexidine and 12% Ethanol overnight, 1:50 Original Listerine overnight, 2% Sodium Perborate and 2% EDTA 5 minutes in morning) using different disinfection methods for 4 weeks. Samples were cultured on Reasoner’s 2A (R2A) agar for microbial counting. Results Results were recorded as Colony forming units/ml (cfu/ml) and were evaluated statistically. Results showed that all the dental unit waterlines were heavily contaminated with microbes before any intervention. After 1 day of disinfection regime the counts reduced significantly and showed progressive reduction in consecutive weeks. Goals set by ADA & CDC were ultimately achieved at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion All the disinfectants were equally effective in reducing the microbial colony count of DUWLs, irrespective of their concentration and method of disinfection.

  1. [The Role of the Microbiology Laboratory in Healthcare-Associated Infection Control].

    PubMed

    Nishi, Isao; Hidaka, Yoh

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare-associated infection control aims to protect patients and health care workers from infections. For successful control, it is important not to transmit pathogens and resistant bacteria as well as not to create new resistant bacteria. Preventing the transmission of pathogens and resistant bacteria involves the reliable implementation of preventative measures for specific pathways in response to the causative microorganism. Appropriate information from the microbiology laboratory promotes the thorough implementation of prevention measures. This laboratory also makes it possible to promptly understand data on infections for the whole hospital. Therefore, in addition to the normal reporting of results, surveillance reports of infectious agents, such as drug-resistant bacteria, acid-fast bacilli smear-positive patients, and influenza virus antigen-positive patients must be immediately reported to the infection control team (ICT), which is the unit responsible for infection control. In addition, it is important to provide information on the detection of resistant bacteria and antimicrobial susceptibility rates to clinical staff and promote the development of systems in which new resistant bacteria are not created. PMID:27363227

  2. Infection Control Link Nurse Program: An interdisciplinary approach n targeting health care-acquired infection

    PubMed Central

    Sopirala, Madhuri M.; Yahle-Dunbar, Lisa; Smyer, Justin; Wellington, Linda; Dickman, Jeanne; Zikri, Nancy; Martin, Jennifer; Kulich, Pat; Taylor, David; Mekhjian, Hagop; Nash, Mary; Mansfield, Jerry; Pancholi, Preeti; Howard, Mary; Chase, Linda; Brown, Susan; Kipp, Kristopher; Lefeld, Kristen; Myers, Amber; Pan, Xueliang; Mangino, Julie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe a successful interdisciplinary liaison program that effectively reduced health care-acquired (HCA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a university hospital setting. Methods Baseline was from January 2006 to March 2008, and intervention period was April 2008 to September 2009. Staff nurses were trained to be liaisons (link nurses) to infection prevention (IP) personnel with clearly defined goals assigned and with ongoing monthly education. HCA-MRSA incidence per 1,000 patient-days (PD) was compared between baseline and intervention period along with total and non-HCA-MRSA, HCA and non-HCA-MRSA bacteremia, and hand soap/sanitizer usage. Hand hygiene compliance was assessed. Results A reduction in MRSA rates was as follows in intervention period compared with baseline: HCA-MRSA decreased by 28% from 0.92 to 0.67 cases per 1,000 PD (incidence rate ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval: 0.62–0.83, P < .001), and HCA-MRSA bacteremia rate was reduced by 41% from 0.18 to 0.10 per 1,000 PD (incidence rate ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval: 0.42–0.84, P = .003). Total MRSA rate and MRSA bacteremia rate also showed significant reduction with nonsignificant reductions in overall non-HCA-MRSA and non-HCA-MRSA bacteremia. Hand soap/sanitizer usage and compliance with hand hygiene also increased significantly during IP. Conclusion Link nurse program effectively reduced HCA-MRSA. Goal-defined metrics with ongoing reeducation for the nurses by IP personnel helped drive these results. PMID:24548456

  3. Controlling endemic multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Intensive Care Units using antimicrobial stewardship and infection control

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Shinhye; Kim, Mi-Ja; Yun, Seon-Jin; Moon, Jae Young; Kim, Yeon-Sook

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii have become public-health problem. However, few studies have evaluated the control of endemic MDR A. baumannii in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship and comprehensive intensified infection control measures for controlling endemic MDR A. baumannii in ICUs at a tertiary care center. Methods: Carbapenem use was strictly restricted through antimicrobial stewardship. Environmental cleaning and disinfection was performed at least 3 times per day in addition to basic infection control measures. Isolation using plastic curtains and contact precautions were applied to patients who were colonized or infected with MDR A. baumannii. The outcome was measured as the incidence density rate of hospital-onset MDR A. baumannii among patients in the ICUs. Results: The incidence density rate of hospital-onset MDR A. baumannii decreased from 22.82 cases per 1,000 patient-days to 2.68 cases per 1,000 patient-days after the interventions were implemented (odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.03 to 0.4; p < 0.001). The mean monthly use of carbapenems also decreased from 134.99 ± 82.26 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days to 94.85 ± 50.98 defined daily doses per 1,000 patient-days (p = 0.016). Conclusions: Concomitant implementation of strict antimicrobial stewardship and comprehensive infection control measures effectively controlled endemic MDR A. baumannii in our ICUs within 1 year. PMID:26874513

  4. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  5. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  6. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200.14 Section 200.14 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and...

  7. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  8. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  9. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200....14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure...

  10. Stress Response and Translation Control in Rotavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    López, Susana; Oceguera, Alfonso; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The general stress and innate immune responses are closely linked and overlap at many levels. The outcomes of these responses serve to reprogram host expression patterns to prevent viral invasions. In turn, viruses counter attack these cell responses to ensure their replication. The mechanisms by which viruses attempt to control host cell responses are as varied as the number of different virus families. One of the most recurrent strategies used by viruses to control the antiviral response of the cell is to hijack the translation machinery of the host, such that viral proteins are preferentially synthesized, while the expression of the stress and antiviral responses of the cell are blocked at the translation level. Here, we will review how rotaviruses, an important agent of acute severe gastroenteritis in children, overcome the stress responses of the cell to establish a productive infectious cycle. PMID:27338442

  11. Stress Response and Translation Control in Rotavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    López, Susana; Oceguera, Alfonso; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The general stress and innate immune responses are closely linked and overlap at many levels. The outcomes of these responses serve to reprogram host expression patterns to prevent viral invasions. In turn, viruses counter attack these cell responses to ensure their replication. The mechanisms by which viruses attempt to control host cell responses are as varied as the number of different virus families. One of the most recurrent strategies used by viruses to control the antiviral response of the cell is to hijack the translation machinery of the host, such that viral proteins are preferentially synthesized, while the expression of the stress and antiviral responses of the cell are blocked at the translation level. Here, we will review how rotaviruses, an important agent of acute severe gastroenteritis in children, overcome the stress responses of the cell to establish a productive infectious cycle. PMID:27338442

  12. Chicken industry strategies for control of tumor virus infections.

    PubMed

    Kreager, K S

    1998-08-01

    Marek's disease (MD) and lymphoid leukosis (LL) are two distinct viral diseases that cause tumor mortality in chickens. Marek's disease, being horizontally transmitted, is controlled through biosecurity measures and vaccination. Prevention of early exposure before vaccine immunity is established is most important. Some multi-house growing farms have converted to all single-age placements to break the ongoing cycle of transmission. Vaccination against MD involves either in ovo or day-old administration of live vaccine, including single or multiple serotype products. Field viruses appear to adapt over time and become resistant to the prevalent vaccine. The Rispens vaccine (CVI-988) has shown good efficacy against recently emerging very virulent MD strains in the U.S. Genetic resistance of the host to MD and control of other immunosuppressive diseases also affects MD susceptibility. Lymphoid leukosis is primarily vertically transmitted and therefore controlled by elimination of shedder hens at the primary breeder level. Depending upon the genetic type, commercial performance of laying hens may be greatly improved by eradication of the LL virus from the breeding stock. PMID:9706092

  13. A review of infection control in community healthcare: new challenges but old foes.

    PubMed

    Mackay, W G; Smith, K; Williams, C; Chalmers, C; Masterton, R

    2014-12-01

    The demographics of the healthcare population are changing, with an ever-greater proportion of people being treated outside the traditional hospital setting through community healthcare. This shift in the way that healthcare is delivered raises new concerns over community healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). A literature search between 2000 and December 2013 was conducted in databases including PubMed, SciVerse ScienceDirect and Google Scholar. National and international guideline and policy documents were searched using Google. Many terms were used in the literature searches, including 'nosocomial', 'healthcare infection', 'community' and 'nursing home'. The rates of HCAI in community healthcare are similar to the rates found in the acute hospital setting, but the types of infection differ, with a greater focus on urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the community and ventilator-associated pneumonias in the hospital setting. Patients who acquire a community HCAI are more likely to exhibit reduced physical condition, have increased levels of morbidity and have higher mortality rates than individuals without infection. Infection control programmes have been developed worldwide to reduce the rates of hospital HCAIs. Such interventions are equally as valid in the community, but how best to implement them and their subsequent impact are much less well understood. The future is clear: HCAIs in the community are going to become an ever-increasing burden and it is critical that our approach to these infections is brought quickly in line with present hospital sector standards. PMID:24993151

  14. Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

  15. Assessing coughing-induced influenza droplet transmission and implications for infection risk control.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y-H; Wang, C-H; You, S-H; Hsieh, N-H; Chen, W-Y; Chio, C-P; Liao, C-M

    2016-01-01

    Indoor transmission of respiratory droplets bearing influenza within humans poses high risks to respiratory function deterioration and death. Therefore, we aimed to develop a framework for quantifying the influenza infection risk based on the relationships between inhaled/exhaled respiratory droplets and airborne transmission dynamics in a ventilated airspace. An experiment was conducted to measure the size distribution of influenza-containing droplets produced by coughing for a better understanding of potential influenza spread. Here we integrated influenza population transmission dynamics, a human respiratory tract model, and a control measure approach to examine the indoor environment-virus-host interactions. A probabilistic risk model was implemented to assess size-specific infection risk for potentially transmissible influenza droplets indoors. Our results found that there was a 50% probability of the basic reproduction number (R0) exceeding 1 for small-size influenza droplets of 0·3-0·4 µm, implicating a potentially high indoor infection risk to humans. However, a combination of public health interventions with enhanced ventilation could substantially contain indoor influenza infection. Moreover, the present dynamic simulation and control measure assessment provide insights into why indoor transmissible influenza droplet-induced infection is occurring not only in upper lung regions but also in the lower respiratory tract, not normally considered at infection risk. PMID:26211781

  16. Factors associated with syphilis infection: a comprehensive analysis based on a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Li, S-L; Lin, H-L; Lin, Z-F; Zhu, X-Z; Fan, J-Y; Gao, K; Zhang, H-L; Lin, L-R; Liu, L-L; Tong, M-L; Niu, J-J; Yang, T-C

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate factors that influence the likelihood of syphilis infection from risk-taking behaviours and medical conditions. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by enrolling 664 syphilis inpatients (excluding 11 congenital syphilis patients) and 800 sex- and age-matched controls. Medical histories, clinical data and patient interview data were collected and subjected to logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of syphilis in the study population was 3·9% (675/17,304). By univariate analysis, syphilis infection was associated with migration between cities, marital status, smoking, reproductive history, hypertension, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (P < 0·05). A high rate of syphilis-HBV co-infection was observed in HIV-negative patients and further research revealed an association between syphilis and specific HBV serological reactivity. Syphilis was also associated with the frequency, duration and status of tobacco use. Multivariate analysis indicated that syphilis infection was independently associated with migration between cities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·368, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·048-1·785], current smoking (aOR 1·607, 95% CI 1·177-2·195), elevated BUN (aOR 1·782, 95% CI 1·188-2·673) and some serological patterns of HBV infection. To prevent the spread of infectious diseases, inpatients and blood donors should be tested for HIV, syphilis, HBV and HCV simultaneously. PMID:26467944

  17. Risk factors for HIV infection among circumcised men in Uganda: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ediau, Michael; Matovu, Joseph KB; Byaruhanga, Raymond; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, the risk reduction effect of MC can be modified by type of circumcision (medical, traditional and religious) and sexual risk behaviours post-circumcision. Understanding the risk behaviours associated with HIV infection among circumcised men (regardless of form of circumcision) is critical to the design of comprehensive risk reduction interventions. This study assessed risk factors for HIV infection among men circumcised through various circumcision approaches. Methods This was a case-control study which enrolled 155 cases (HIV-infected) and 155 controls (HIV-uninfected), all of whom were men aged 18–35 years presenting at the AIDS Information Center for HIV testing and care. The outcome variable was HIV sero-status. Using SPSS version 17, multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with HIV infection. Results Overall, 83.9% among cases and 56.8% among controls were traditionally circumcised; 7.7% of cases and 21.3% of controls were religiously circumcised while 8.4% of cases and 21.9% of controls were medically circumcised. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported resuming sexual intercourse before complete wound healing (36.9% vs. 14.1%; p<0.01). Risk factors for HIV infection prior to circumcision were:being in a polygamous marriage (AOR: 6.6, CI: 2.3–18.8) and belonging to the Bagisu ethnic group (AOR: 6.1, CI: 2.6–14.0). After circumcision, HIV infection was associated with: being circumcised at >18 years (AOR: 5.0, CI: 2.4–10.2); resuming sexual intercourse before wound healing (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.6–7.3); inconsistent use of condoms (AOR: 2.7, CI: 1.5–5.1); and having sexual intercourse under the influence of peers (AOR: 2.9, CI: 1.5–5.5). Men who had religious circumcision were less likely to have HIV infection (AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9) than the traditionally circumcised but there was no statistically

  18. Global epidemiology, ecology and control of soil-transmitted helminth infections

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Simon; Clements, Archie CA; Bundy, Don AP

    2007-01-01

    Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are among the most prevalent of chronic human infections worldwide. Based on the demonstrable impact on child development, there is a global commitment to finance and implement control strategies with a focus on school-based chemotherapy programmes. The major obstacle to the implementation of cost-effective control is the lack of accurate descriptions of the geographical distribution of infection. In recent years considerable progress has been made in the use of geographical information systems (GIS) and remote sensing (RS) to better understand helminth ecology and epidemiology, and to develop low cost ways to identify target populations for treatment. This chapter explores how this information has been used practically to guide large-scale control programmes. The use of satellite-derived environmental data has yielded new insights into the ecology of infection at a geographical scale that has proven impossible to address using more traditional approaches, and has in turn allowed spatial distributions of infection prevalence to be predicted robustly by statistical approaches. GIS/RS have increasingly been used in the context of large-scale helminth control programmes, including not only STH infections but also those focusing on schistosomiasis, filariasis and onchocerciasis. The experience indicates that GIS/RS provides a cost-effective approach to designing and monitoring programs at realistic scale. Importantly, the use of this approach has begun to transition from being a specialist approach of international vertical programs to become a routine tool in developing public sector control programs. GIS/RS is used here to describe the global distribution of STH infections and to estimate the number of infections in school age children in sub-Saharan Africa (89.9 million) and the annual cost of providing a single anthelmintic treatment using a school-based approach (US$5.0-7.6 million). These are the first estimates at a

  19. Implementation of tuberculosis infection control measures in designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China: are we doing enough to prevent nosocomial tuberculosis infections?

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Min; Gu, Hua; Wang, Xiaomeng; Qiu, Wei; Shen, Jian; Jiang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures are very important to prevent nosocomial transmission and protect healthcare workers (HCWs) in hospitals. The TB infection control situation in TB treatment institutions in southeastern China has not been studied previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures in TB-designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China. Design Cross-sectional survey using observation and interviews. Setting All TB-designated hospitals (n=88) in Zhejiang Province, China in 2014. Primary and secondary outcome measures Managerial, administrative, environmental and personal infection control measures were assessed using descriptive analyses and univariate logistic regression analysis. Results The TB-designated hospitals treated a median of 3030 outpatients (IQR 764–7094) and 279 patients with confirmed TB (IQR 154–459) annually, and 160 patients with TB (IQR 79–426) were hospitalised in the TB wards. Most infection control measures were performed by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including regular monitoring of TB infection control in high-risk areas (49%), shortening the wait times (42%), and providing a separate waiting area for patients with suspected TB (46%) were sometimes neglected. N95 respirators were available in 85 (97%) hospitals, although only 44 (50%) hospitals checked that they fit. Hospitals with more TB staff and higher admission rates of patients with TB were more likely to set a dedicated sputum collection area and to conduct annual respirator fit testing. Conclusions TB infection control measures were generally implemented by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including separation of suspected patients, regular monitoring of infection control practices, and regular fit testing of respirators should be strengthened. Infection measures for sputum collection and respirator fit testing should be improved in hospitals with lower admission

  20. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A. M.; Li, Tao; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Kremsner, Peter G.; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F.; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-01-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase. PMID:27070311

  1. Mosquito Passage Dramatically Changes var Gene Expression in Controlled Human Plasmodium falciparum Infections.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, Anna; Petter, Michaela; Krumkamp, Ralf; Esen, Meral; Held, Jana; Scholz, Judith A M; Li, Tao; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Kremsner, Peter G; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Duffy, Michael F; Tannich, Egbert

    2016-04-01

    Virulence of the most deadly malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum is linked to the variant surface antigen PfEMP1, which is encoded by about 60 var genes per parasite genome. Although the expression of particular variants has been associated with different clinical outcomes, little is known about var gene expression at the onset of infection. By analyzing controlled human malaria infections via quantitative real-time PCR, we show that parasite populations from 18 volunteers expressed virtually identical transcript patterns that were dominated by the subtelomeric var gene group B and, to a lesser extent, group A. Furthermore, major changes in composition and frequency of var gene transcripts were detected between the parental parasite culture that was used to infect mosquitoes and Plasmodia recovered from infected volunteers, suggesting that P. falciparum resets its var gene expression during mosquito passage and starts with the broad expression of a specific subset of var genes when entering the human blood phase. PMID:27070311

  2. Perception, Attitude, and Knowledge Regarding Antimicrobial Resistance, Appropriate Antimicrobial Use, and Infection Control Among Future Medical Practitioners: A Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Chuenchom, Nuttagarn; Thamlikitkul, Visanu; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Deoisares, Rawisut; Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo

    2016-05-01

    A questionnaire-based study was conducted among final-year Thai medical students. The problem of antimicrobial resistance is well recognized, but their knowledge of antimicrobial resistance, appropriate antimicrobial use, and infection control was substantially limited. Only half of these students recognized existence of an antimicrobial stewardship program or infection control unit in their hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:603-605. PMID:26809753

  3. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrheal Disease in Ghanaian Infants and Children: An Outpatient Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Krumkamp, Ralf; Sarpong, Nimako; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Adelkofer, Julia; Loag, Wibke; Eibach, Daniel; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diarrheal diseases are among the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide, especially in resource-poor areas. This case-control study assessed the associations between gastrointestinal infections and diarrhea in children from rural Ghana. Methods Stool samples were collected from 548 children with diarrhea and from 686 without gastrointestinal symptoms visiting a hospital from 2007–2008. Samples were analyzed by microscopy and molecular methods. Results The organisms most frequently detected in symptomatic cases were Giardia lamblia, Shigella spp./ enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), and Campylobacter jejuni. Infections with rotavirus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 8.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.3–16.6), C. parvum/hominis (aOR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.2) and norovirus (aOR = 2.0; 95%CI: 1.3–3.0) showed the strongest association with diarrhea. The highest attributable fractions (AF) for diarrhea were estimated for rotavirus (AF = 14.3%; 95% CI: 10.9–17.5%), Shigella spp./EIEC (AF = 10.5%; 95% CI: 3.5–17.1%), and norovirus (AF = 8.2%; 95% CI 3.2–12.9%). Co-infections occurred frequently and most infections presented themselves independently of other infections. However, infections with E. dispar, C. jejuni, and norovirus were observed more often in the presence of G. lamblia. Conclusions Diarrheal diseases in children from a rural area in sub-Saharan Africa are mainly due to infections with rotavirus, Shigella spp./EIEC, and norovirus. These associations are strongly age-dependent, which should be considered when diagnosing causes of diarrhea. The presented results are informative for both clinicians treating gastrointestinal infections as well as public health experts designing control programs against diarrheal diseases. PMID:25738935

  4. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary for 2003-2008, issued June 2009.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Maki, Dennis G; Jamulitrat, Silom; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Todi, Subhash Kumar; Gomez, David Yepes; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Abu Khader, Ilham; Miranda Novales, María Guadalupe; Berba, Regina; Ramírez Wong, Fernando Martín; Barkat, Amina; Pino, Osiel Requejo; Dueñas, Lourdes; Mitrev, Zan; Bijie, Hu; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Kanj, S S; Mapp, Trudell; Hidalgo, Rosalía Fernández; Ben Jaballah, Nejla; Raka, Lul; Gikas, Achilleas; Ahmed, Altaf; Thu, Le Thi Anh; Guzmán Siritt, María Eugenia

    2010-03-01

    We report the results of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from January 2003 through December 2008 in 173 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. During the 6-year study, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) US National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN; formerly the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system [NNIS]) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection, we collected prospective data from 155,358 patients hospitalized in the consortium's hospital ICUs for an aggregate of 923,624 days. Although device utilization in the developing countries' ICUs was remarkably similar to that reported from US ICUs in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were markedly higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals: the pooled rate of central venous catheter (CVC)-associated bloodstream infections (BSI) in the INICC ICUs, 7.6 per 1000 CVC-days, is nearly 3-fold higher than the 2.0 per 1000 CVC-days reported from comparable US ICUs, and the overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was also far higher, 13.6 versus 3.3 per 1000 ventilator-days, respectively, as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), 6.3 versus 3.3 per 1000 catheter-days, respectively. Most strikingly, the frequencies of resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates to methicillin (MRSA) (84.1% vs 56.8%, respectively), Klebsiella pneumoniae to ceftazidime or ceftriaxone (76.1% vs 27.1%, respectively), Acinetobacter baumannii to imipenem (46.3% vs 29.2%, respectively), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (78.0% vs 20.2%, respectively) were also far higher in the consortium's ICUs, and the crude unadjusted excess mortalities of device-related infections ranged from 23.6% (CVC-associated bloodstream infections) to 29.3% (VAP). PMID:20176284

  5. Communication interventions to improve adherence to infection control precautions: a randomised crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ineffective communication of infection control requirements during transitions of care is a potential cause of non-compliance with infection control precautions by healthcare personnel. In this study, interventions to enhance communication during inpatient transfers between wards and radiology were implemented, in the attempt to improve adherence to precautions during transfers. Methods Two interventions were implemented, comprising (i) a pre-transfer checklist used by radiology porters to confirm a patient’s infectious status; (ii) a coloured cue to highlight written infectious status information in the transfer form. The effectiveness of the interventions in promoting adherence to standard precautions by radiology porters when transporting infectious patients was evaluated using a randomised crossover trial at a teaching hospital in Australia. Results 300 transfers were observed over a period of 4 months. Compliance with infection control precautions in the intervention groups was significantly improved relative to the control group (p < 0.01). Adherence rate in the control group was 38%. Applying the coloured cue resulted in a compliance rate of 73%. The pre-transfer checklist intervention achieved a comparable compliance rate of 71%. When both interventions were applied, a compliance rate of 74% was attained. Acceptability of the coloured cue was high, but adherence to the checklist was low (40%). Conclusions Simple measures to enhance communication through the provision of a checklist and the use a coloured cue brought about significant improvement in compliance with infection control precautions by transport personnel during inpatient transfers. The study underscores the importance of effective communication in ensuring compliance with infection control precautions during transitions of care. PMID:23388051

  6. A simple inexpensive audio-visual reminder of infection control procedures on entry to a neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Taylor, R J; El-Kafrawy, U

    2012-11-01

    A novel audio-visual computerized infection control initiative was designed, installed and tested in the neonatal intensive care unit at a busy teaching hospital, with the primary aim of improving visitors' adherence to hand hygiene and infection control procedures. The system has proved to be reliable, self-administering, inexpensive, requires no prior education or training, is rapidly deployable and can be used immediately. A measurable improvement in visitors' handwashing technique and recall of infection control instructions was seen after introduction of this initiative. This system provides a new opportunity to educate and promote infection control measures to visitors. PMID:23009802

  7. The Effect of Infection Control Nurses on the Occurrence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Healthcare-Acquired Infection and Multidrug-Resistant Strains in Critically-Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; He, Linxi; Liu, Chunfeng; Rong, Jian; Shi, Yongyan; Song, Wenliang; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Lijie

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infections in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), which have a high incidence, increase treatment costs and mortality, and seriously threaten the safety of critically ill children. It is essential to seek convenient and effective methods to control and prevent healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs). This research was conducted to study the effect of infection control nurses on the occurrence of P. aeruginosa HAIs and multi-drug resistance (MDR) strains in PICU. Methods The clinical data was divided into two groups, with the age ranging from 1 month to 14 years. One group of the critically ill patients(N = 3,722) was admitted to PICU from 2007 to 2010, without the management of infection control nurses. The other group of the critically ill patients (N = 3,943) was admitted to PICU from 2011 to 2013, with the management of infection control nurses. Compare the mortality, morbidity and the incidence of acquired P. aeruginosa infections to evaluate the effect of infection control nurses. Results After implementation of the post of infection control nurses, the patient's overall mortality fell from 4.81% to 3.73%. Among the patients with endotracheal intubation more than 48 hours, the incidence of endotracheal intubation-related pneumonia decreased from 44.6% to 34.32%. The mortality of patients with endotracheal intubation decreased from 16.96% to 10.17%, and the morbidity of HAIs with P. aeruginosa decreased from 1.89% to 1.07%. The mutual different rate (MDR) dropped from 67.95% to 44.23%. There were remarkable differences in these rates between the two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion Implementing the post of infection control nurses is associated with effectively reducing the HAI rate, especially the incidence and morbidity of P. aeruginosa HAIs, reducing PICU mortality, improving P. aeruginosa drug resistance. PMID:26630032

  8. Multiple Origins of Virus Persistence during Natural Control of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Boritz, Eli A; Darko, Samuel; Swaszek, Luke; Wolf, Gideon; Wells, David; Wu, Xiaolin; Henry, Amy R; Laboune, Farida; Hu, Jianfei; Ambrozak, David; Hughes, Marybeth S; Hoh, Rebecca; Casazza, Joseph P; Vostal, Alexander; Bunis, Daniel; Nganou-Makamdop, Krystelle; Lee, James S; Migueles, Stephen A; Koup, Richard A; Connors, Mark; Moir, Susan; Schacker, Timothy; Maldarelli, Frank; Hughes, Stephen H; Deeks, Steven G; Douek, Daniel C

    2016-08-11

    Targeted HIV cure strategies require definition of the mechanisms that maintain the virus. Here, we tracked HIV replication and the persistence of infected CD4 T cells in individuals with natural virologic control by sequencing viruses, T cell receptor genes, HIV integration sites, and cellular transcriptomes. Our results revealed three mechanisms of HIV persistence operating within distinct anatomic and functional compartments. In lymph node, we detected viruses with genetic and transcriptional attributes of active replication in both T follicular helper (TFH) cells and non-TFH memory cells. In blood, we detected inducible proviruses of archival origin among highly differentiated, clonally expanded cells. Linking the lymph node and blood was a small population of circulating cells harboring inducible proviruses of recent origin. Thus, HIV replication in lymphoid tissue, clonal expansion of infected cells, and recirculation of recently infected cells act together to maintain the virus in HIV controllers despite effective antiviral immunity. PMID:27453467

  9. Efficacy and safety of nanohybrids comprising silver nanoparticles and silicate clay for controlling Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Chiao, Shu-Her; Lin, Siou-Hong; Shen, Ching-I; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Bau, I-Jiuan; Wei, Jiun-Chiou; Tseng, Li-Ping; Hsu, Shan-hui; Lai, Ping-Shan; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Su, Hong-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Developing effective and safe drugs is imperative for replacing antibiotics and controlling multidrug-resistant microbes. Nanoscale silicate platelet (NSP) and its nanohybrid, silver nanoparticle/NSP (AgNP/NSP), have been developed, and the nanohybrids show a strong and general antibacterial activity in vitro. Here, their efficacy for protecting Salmonella-infected chicks from fatality and septicemia was evaluated. Both orally administrated NSP and AgNP/NSP, but not AgNPs alone, effectively reduced the systemic Salmonella infection and mortality. In addition, quantitative Ag analyses demonstrated that Ag deposition from AgNP/NSP in the intestines was less than that from conventional AgNPs, indicating that the presence of NSP for immobilizing AgNPs reduced Ag accumulation in tissue and improved the safety of AgNPs. These in vivo results illustrated that both NSP and AgNP/NSP nanohybrid represent potential agents for controlling enteric bacterial infections. PMID:22654516

  10. Case-control study of disease determinants for non-typhoidal Salmonella infections among Michigan children

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infections with Salmonella serotypes continue to be a significant global public health problem. In addition to contaminated foods, several other sources contribute to infections with Salmonella serotypes. We have assessed the role of socioeconomic factors, exposure to food, and environmental sources in the etiology of non-typhoidal Salmonella infections in Michigan children. Findings A case-control study among Michigan children aged ≤ 10 years was conducted. A total of 123 cases of children with laboratory-confirmed Salmonella infections and 139 control children, who had not experienced symptoms of gastrointestinal illness during the month prior to the interviews, were enrolled. The cases and controls were matched on age-category (<1 year, 2-<6 years and 6-10 years). Data on socioeconomic status, food intake, and environmental exposures, were collected on the queried case and control subjects. After adjusting for race and household-income the final regression multivariable model revealed that Salmonella infections were significantly associated with attendance of a daycare center (adjusted matched odds ratio = 5.00, 95% CI: 1.51 - 16.58), contact with cats (MOR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.14 - 5.88), and contact with reptiles (MOR = 7.90, 95% CI: 1.52 - 41.01), during the 3 days prior to the onset of child's illness. Conclusions Study results suggest that exposure to environmental sources may play an important role in sporadic infections with Salmonella serotypes in children. Additional efforts are needed to educate parents and caretakers about the risk of Salmonella transmission to children from these sources. PMID:20398398

  11. The Feasibility of an Infection Control "Safe Zone" in a Spinal Cord Injury Unit.

    PubMed

    Lones, Keshonna; Ramanathan, Swetha; Fitzpatrick, Margaret; Hill, Jennifer N; Guihan, Marylou; Richardson, Michael S A; Evans, Charlesnika T

    2016-06-01

    We report on healthcare worker use of a safe zone (outside a 3-foot perimeter around the patient's bed) and personal protective equipment in 2 inpatient spinal cord injury/disorder units. Workers remained within the safe zone during 22% of observations but were less compliant with personal protective equipment inside the zone. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:714-716. PMID:26916410

  12. Education of the adult learner: a practical approach for the infection control practitioner.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M M; Lynch, P

    1986-12-01

    Infection control practitioners (ICPs) are expected to be educators in their role, yet few have had formal training in preparing, presenting, and evaluating education programs for personnel from different disciplines. This article presents guidance from several sources specific to "andragogy"--the art and science of helping adults learn--to assist the ICP in the role of educator. PMID:3642995

  13. Innovative Training for Occupational Health and Infection Control Workplace Assessment in Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Lyndsay; Bryce, Elizabeth Ann; Scharf, Sydney; Yassi, Annalee

    2012-01-01

    A user-friendly, high quality workplace assessment field guide and an accompanying worksheet are invaluable tools for recognizing hazards in the hospital environment. These tools ensure that both front line workers as well as health and safety and infection control professionals can systematically evaluate hazards and formulate recommendations.…

  14. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Miguel P.; Ribeiro, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. PMID:26551709

  15. Nrf2 as a master regulator of tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection.

    PubMed

    Soares, Miguel P; Ribeiro, Ana M

    2015-08-01

    Damage control refers to those actions made towards minimizing damage or loss. Depending on the context, these can range from emergency procedures dealing with the sinking of a ship or to a surgery dealing with severe trauma or even to an imaginary company in Marvel comics, which repairs damaged property arising from conflicts between super heroes and villains. In the context of host microbe interactions, tissue damage control refers to an adaptive response that limits the extent of tissue damage associated with infection. Tissue damage control can limit the severity of infectious diseases without interfering with pathogen burden, conferring disease tolerance to infection. This contrasts with immune-driven resistance mechanisms, which although essential to protect the host from infection, can impose tissue damage to host parenchyma tissues. This damaging effect is countered by stress responses that confer tissue damage control and disease tolerance to infection. Here we discuss how the stress response regulated by the transcription factor nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) acts in such a manner. PMID:26551709

  16. Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections – implementation of the recommendations of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) in nursing homes for the elderly in Frankfurt am Main, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Heudorf, Ursel; Gasteyer, Stefanie; Müller, Maria; Samoiski, Yvonne; Serra, Nicole; Westphal, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infections range among the most frequent infections not only in hospital patients but also in residents of long-term care facilities for the elderly. Urinary catheters are the greatest risk factor for urinary tract infections. In the guidance paper on the “prevention of infections in nursing homes” (2005) as well as in the updated recommendations for the “prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” (2015), the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) has recommended adequate preventive measures. In 2015, the implementation of these KRINKO recommendations was investigated. Method: All of Frankfurt’s 40 nursing homes were evaluated using a checklist based on the KRINKO recommendations. The evaluation included assessing the availability of operating instructions, appropriate indications for the placement of catheters etc. Age, sex and duration of catheterization, as well as current and previous infections within the past 6 months were documented for every resident with a catheter. Results: In 35 (87.5%) of the nursing homes, operating instructions for the handling of urinary tract catheters were available. The decision as to whether a catheter is indicated is made by physicians, while its placement is often delegated to the nursing service. Typically, silicon catheters are used. In three-quarters of the nursing homes, regular intervals of 4–6 weeks for changing catheters were reported. On the respective survey day, 7.3% of the residents were catheterized. On the survey day, 3.6% (4.2%) and in the previous 6 months a total of 28% (28.9%) of the residents had a urinary tract infection (prevalence of antibiotic therapy in parentheses). Ciprofloxacin was used most often followed by cefuroxime and cotrimoxazole. Discussion: In the current evaluation, fewer nursing home residents were catheterized than in previous years and the rate of urinary tract infections was low. This

  17. Transmission of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus from persistently infected sows to contact controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bierk, M D; Dee, S A; Rossow, K D; Otake, S; Collins, J E; Molitor, T W

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) could persist in non-pregnant sows and if persistently infected sows could transmit virus to naive contact controls. Twelve PRRSV-naive, non-pregnant sows (index sows) were infected with a field isolate of PRRSV and housed in individual isolation rooms for 42 to 56 days postinfection. Following this period, 1 naive contact sow was placed in each room divided by a gate allowing nose-to-nose contact with a single index sow. Index sows were not viremic at the time of contact sow entry. Virus nucleic acid was detected by polymerase chain reaction, and infectious virus was detected by virus isolation in sera from 3 of the 12 contact sows at 49, 56, and 86 days postinfection. All 3 infected contacts developed PRRSV antibodies. Virus nucleic acid was detected in tissues of all of the 12 index sows at 72 or 86 days postinfection. Nucleic acid sequencing indicated that representative samples from index and infected contacts were homologous (> 99%) to the PRRSV used to infect index sows at the onset of the study. This study demonstrates that PRRSV can persist in sows and that persistently infected sows can transmit virus to naive contact animals. PMID:11768134

  18. Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n = 72) and controls (n = 72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk. PMID:23457535

  19. Cellular Requirements for Systemic Control of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedoui, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    The rational design of vaccines requires an understanding of the contributions of individual immune cell subsets to immunity. With this understanding, targeted vaccine delivery approaches and adjuvants can be developed to maximize vaccine efficiency and to minimize side effects (S. H. E. Kaufmann et al., Immunity 33:555–577, 2010; T. Ben-Yedidia and R. Arnon, Hum. Vaccines 1:95–101, 2005). We have addressed the contributions of different immune cell subsets and their ability to contribute to the control and clearance of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a murine model. Using a systematic and reproducible model of experimental attenuated S. Typhimurium infection, we show that distinct lymphocyte deficiencies lead to one of four different infection outcomes: clearance, chronic infection, early death, or late death. Our study demonstrates a high level of functional redundancy in the ability of different lymphocyte subsets to provide interferon gamma (IFN-γ), a critical cytokine in Salmonella immunity. Whereas early control of the infection was entirely dependent on IFN-γ but not on any particular lymphocyte subset, clearance of the infection critically required CD4+ T cells but appeared to be independent of IFN-γ. These data reinforce the idea of a bimodal immune response against Salmonella: an early T cell-independent but IFN-γ-dependent phase and a late T cell-dependent phase that may be IFN-γ independent. PMID:25225248

  20. Controlled Human Malaria Infection of Tanzanians by Intradermal Injection of Aseptic, Purified, Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Shekalaghe, Seif; Rutaihwa, Mastidia; Billingsley, Peter F.; Chemba, Mwajuma; Daubenberger, Claudia A.; James, Eric R.; Mpina, Maximillian; Ali Juma, Omar; Schindler, Tobias; Huber, Eric; Gunasekera, Anusha; Manoj, Anita; Simon, Beatus; Saverino, Elizabeth; Church, L. W. Preston; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; Sauerwein, Robert W.; Plowe, Christopher; Venkatesan, Meera; Sasi, Philip; Lweno, Omar; Mutani, Paul; Hamad, Ali; Mohammed, Ali; Urassa, Alwisa; Mzee, Tutu; Padilla, Debbie; Ruben, Adam; Lee Sim, B. Kim; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) by mosquito bite has been used to assess anti-malaria interventions in > 1,500 volunteers since development of methods for infecting mosquitoes by feeding on Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) gametocyte cultures. Such CHMIs have never been used in Africa. Aseptic, purified, cryopreserved Pf sporozoites, PfSPZ Challenge, were used to infect Dutch volunteers by intradermal injection. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to assess safety and infectivity of PfSPZ Challenge in adult male Tanzanians. Volunteers were injected intradermally with 10,000 (N = 12) or 25,000 (N = 12) PfSPZ or normal saline (N = 6). PfSPZ Challenge was well tolerated and safe. Eleven of 12 and 10 of 11 subjects, who received 10,000 and 25,000 PfSPZ respectively, developed parasitemia. In 10,000 versus 25,000 PfSPZ groups geometric mean days from injection to Pf positivity by thick blood film was 15.4 versus 13.5 (P = 0.023). Alpha-thalassemia heterozygosity had no apparent effect on infectivity. PfSPZ Challenge was safe, well tolerated, and infectious. PMID:25070995

  1. Cellular requirements for systemic control of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Kupz, Andreas; Bedoui, Sammy; Strugnell, Richard A

    2014-12-01

    The rational design of vaccines requires an understanding of the contributions of individual immune cell subsets to immunity. With this understanding, targeted vaccine delivery approaches and adjuvants can be developed to maximize vaccine efficiency and to minimize side effects (S. H. E. Kaufmann et al., Immunity 33:555-577, 2010; T. Ben-Yedidia and R. Arnon, Hum. Vaccines 1:95-101, 2005). We have addressed the contributions of different immune cell subsets and their ability to contribute to the control and clearance of the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) in a murine model. Using a systematic and reproducible model of experimental attenuated S. Typhimurium infection, we show that distinct lymphocyte deficiencies lead to one of four different infection outcomes: clearance, chronic infection, early death, or late death. Our study demonstrates a high level of functional redundancy in the ability of different lymphocyte subsets to provide interferon gamma (IFN-γ), a critical cytokine in Salmonella immunity. Whereas early control of the infection was entirely dependent on IFN-γ but not on any particular lymphocyte subset, clearance of the infection critically required CD4(+) T cells but appeared to be independent of IFN-γ. These data reinforce the idea of a bimodal immune response against Salmonella: an early T cell-independent but IFN-γ-dependent phase and a late T cell-dependent phase that may be IFN-γ independent. PMID:25225248

  2. Transcriptomic Analysis of the Host Response to Giardia duodenalis Infection Reveals Redundant Mechanisms for Parasite Control

    PubMed Central

    Tako, Ernest A.; Hassimi, Maryam F.; Li, Erqiu; Singer, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The immune system has numerous mechanisms that it can use to combat pathogens and eliminate infections. Nevertheless, studies of immune responses often focus on single pathways required for protective responses. We applied microarray analysis of RNA in order to investigate the types of immune responses produced against infection with the intestinal pathogen Giardia duodenalis. Infection with G. duodenalis is one of the most common causes of diarrheal disease in the world. While several potential antiparasitic effector mechanisms, including complement lysis, nitric oxide (NO), and α-defensin peptides, have been shown to inhibit parasite growth or kill Giardia in vitro, studies in vivo have thus far shown clear roles only for antibody and mast cell responses in parasite control. A total of 96 transcripts were identified as being upregulated or repressed more than 2-fold in the small intestine 10 days following infection. Microarray data were validated using quantitative PCR. The most abundant category of transcripts was antibody genes, while the most highly induced transcripts were all mast cell proteases. Among the other induced transcripts was matrix metalloprotease 7 (Mmp7), the protease responsible for production of mature α-defensins in mice. While infections in Mmp7-deficient mice showed only a small increase in parasite numbers, combined genetic deletion of Mmp7 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, Nos2) or pharmacological blockade of iNOS in Mmp7-deficient mice resulted in significant increases in parasite loads following infection. Thus, α-defensins and NO are redundant mechanisms for control of Giardia infections in vivo. PMID:24194537

  3. Prevention and control of enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) infections: memorandum from a WHO meeting. WHO Consultation on Prevention and Control of Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) Infections.

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, A.

    1998-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a commonly occurring inhabitant of the intestine of humans and other animals, but there are several pathogenic types of E. coli which cause a variety of human diseases. One of these pathogenic types, E. coli O157:H7, belongs to the group of enterohaemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) which produce potent toxins and cause a particularly severe form of disease, haemorrhagic colitis (HC). About 10% of patients with HC can go on to develop haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening complication of E. coli O157:H7 infection that is characterized by acute renal failure, haemolytic anaemia, and thrombocytopenia. These sequelae are particularly serious in young children and older people. On average, 2-7% of patients with HUS die, but in some outbreaks among the elderly the mortality rate has been as high as 50%. This Memorandum reviews the growing importance of E. coli O157:H7 as a foodborne pathogen and reports on the issues of surveillance, outbreak investigation, and control strategies with respect to EHEC infections that were discussed at the WHO Consultation on Prevention and Control of EHEC Infections, held in Geneva on 28 April to 1 May 1997. Recommended measures for prevention and control include the following: use of potable water in food production; presentation of clean animals at slaughter; improved hygiene throughout the slaughter process; appropriate use of food processing measures; thorough cooking of foods; and the education of food handlers, abattoir workers, and farm workers on the principles and application of food hygiene. PMID:9744244

  4. Toxoplasma Gondii Infection and Depression: A Case–Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Berumen-Segovia, Luis Omar; Torres-Prieto, Yazmin Elizabeth; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Pérez-Álamos, Alma Rosa; Ortiz-Jurado, María Nalleli; Molotla-de-León, Gabriel; Beristain-García, Isabel; Rábago-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the association of Toxoplasma gondii infection and depression in a sample of psychiatric patients and control subjects without depression. We performed an age- and gender-matched case–control study of 89 patients suffering from depression attended in a public psychiatric hospital in Durango City, Mexico and 356 control subjects without depression from the general population of the same city. Participants were tested for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 11 (12.4%) of the 89 cases and in 22 (6.2%) of the 356 controls (OR = 2.14; 95% CI: 1.00–4.59; P = 0.04). Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were found in four (19%) of 21 anti-T. gondii IgG seropositive controls but not in 11 anti-T. gondii IgG seropositive cases (P = 0.27). Patients aged 30 years old and younger had a significantly higher seroprevalence of T. gondii infection than controls of the same age group (P = 0.001). Results of the present study suggest a potential association between T. gondii infection and depression. Furthers studies to confirm our results and to determine the epidemiology of T. gondii in young depressed patients should be conducted. PMID:27429790

  5. Toxoplasma Gondii Infection and Depression: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Berumen-Segovia, Luis Omar; Torres-Prieto, Yazmin Elizabeth; Estrada-Martínez, Sergio; Pérez-Álamos, Alma Rosa; Ortiz-Jurado, María Nalleli; Molotla-de-León, Gabriel; Beristain-García, Isabel; Rábago-Sánchez, Elizabeth; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2016-06-24

    We assessed the association of Toxoplasma gondii infection and depression in a sample of psychiatric patients and control subjects without depression. We performed an age- and gender-matched case-control study of 89 patients suffering from depression attended in a public psychiatric hospital in Durango City, Mexico and 356 control subjects without depression from the general population of the same city. Participants were tested for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were found in 11 (12.4%) of the 89 cases and in 22 (6.2%) of the 356 controls (OR = 2.14; 95% CI: 1.00-4.59; P = 0.04). Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were found in four (19%) of 21 anti-T. gondii IgG seropositive controls but not in 11 anti-T. gondii IgG seropositive cases (P = 0.27). Patients aged 30 years old and younger had a significantly higher seroprevalence of T. gondii infection than controls of the same age group (P = 0.001). Results of the present study suggest a potential association between T. gondii infection and depression. Furthers studies to confirm our results and to determine the epidemiology of T. gondii in young depressed patients should be conducted. PMID:27429790

  6. Infection control practices in health care: Teaching and learning requirements of medical undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Ayub, Afreen; Goyal, Ashish; Kotwal, Anupam; Kulkarni, Aniket; Kotwal, Atul; Mahen, Ajoy

    2012-01-01

    Background Compliance and implementation of infection control guidelines have been recognized as efficient means to prevent and control hospital acquired infections. Objectives To evaluate knowledge and practices about infection control guidelines amongst medical students and to explore their education needs as perceived by them and faculty. Methods A total of 160 final year students and 100 faculty members of one of the top medical colleges in India were selected by simple random sampling in each group as per sample size of 143 students (alpha 0.05, error 7%, prevalence 60%) and 99 (error 7.5%) faculty. Data collected by pilot-tested, unlinked, anonymous questionnaire. Results Amongst students, knowledge (77.50%; 95% CI, 70.24–83.72) was mixed with misconceptions. Only 31.25% always followed hand hygiene procedure; 50% recapped needles; disposal of hazardous material into designated containers always was low (sharps 20%, contaminated items 25%). Despite experiencing needle stick injury (6.25%) and splashes (40%), less than 30% reported these as 44% were unaware of reporting procedure. The discord between the perceptions of faculty regarding students and students' own perceptions was clearly evident (all Kappa values less than 0.50). Students and faculty agreed on workshops (58.13% and 58%) and reinforcement by colleagues (51% and 54%) but not on on-job training (51% and 34%) and part of curriculum (48% and 40%) for teaching–learning infection control. Conclusion Tackling disconnect between students and faculty perceptions and empowering students with knowledge and skills in infection control is important. Approach needs to be researched and formulated as current methods seem to be inadequate. PMID:24600081

  7. Infection Control Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Healthcare Workers in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Tenna, Admasu; Stenehjem, Edward A.; Margoles, Lindsay; Kacha, Ermias; Blumberg, Henry M.; Kempker, Russell R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To better understand hospital infection control practices in Ethiopia. Design A cross-sectional evaluation of healthcare worker (HCW) knowledge, attitudes and practices about hand hygiene and tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures. Methods An anonymous, 76-item questionnaire was administered to HCWs at two university hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Knowledge items were scored as correct/incorrect. Attitude and practice items were assessed using a Likert scale. Results 261 surveys were completed by physicians (51%) and nurses (49%). Fifty-one percent of respondents were male; mean age was 30 years. While hand hygiene knowledge was fair, self-reported practice was suboptimal. Physicians reported performing hand hygiene 7% and 48% before and after patient contact, respectively. Barriers for performing hand hygiene included lack of hand hygiene agents (77%), sinks (30%), proper training (50%), and irritation and dryness (67%) caused by hand sanitizer made per WHO formulation. TB infection control knowledge was excellent (>90% correct). Most HCWs felt at high risk for occupational acquisition of TB (71%) and that proper TB infection control can prevent nosocomial transmission (92%). Only 12% of HCWs regularly wore a mask when caring for TB patients. Only 8% of HCWs reported masks were regularly available and 76% cited a lack of infrastructure to isolate suspected/known TB patients. Conclusions Training HCWs about the importance and proper practice of hand hygiene along with improving hand sanitizer options may improve patient safety. Additionally, enhanced infrastructure is needed to improve TB infection control practices and allay HCW concerns about acquiring TB in the hospital. PMID:24225614

  8. Haplotype Analysis of Hemochromatosis Gene Polymorphisms in Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerayli, Sina; Pasdar, Alireza; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Sepahi, Samaneh; Hoseini, Seyed Mousalreza; Ahadi, Mitra; Rostami, Sina; Meshkat, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with elevated serum iron markers. Polymorphisms in the hemochromatosis (HFE) genes are responsible for iron accumulation in most cases of hemochromatosis, and may play a role in HCV infection. Objectives We aimed to assess the prevalence of HFE gene polymorphisms in a group of Iranian HCV-infected patients, and to explore the association of these polymorphisms with HCV infection. Patients and Methods HFE gene polymorphisms were examined in a total of 69 HCV patients and 69 healthy controls using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism techniques. Haplotype and diplotype analyses were performed using PHASE software. Results In a recessive analysis model of the His63Asp (H63D) locus (HH vs. HD + DD), the HH genotype was more common in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.012; OR = 6.42 [95% CI: 1.51 - 27.33]). Also, in a recessive analysis model of the Cys282Tyr (C282Y) locus (CC vs. CY + YY), the CC genotype was more frequent in patients compared to controls (adjusted P = 0.03; OR = 5.06 [95% CI: 1.13 - 22.06]). In addition, there was a significant association between the HC haplotype and the HCDC diplotype and HCV infection. Conclusions Polymorphism in the hemochromatosis gene may confer some degree of risk for HCV infection, and individuals carrying the H and C alleles may be susceptible to this disease; however, a larger sample of HCV patients and healthy individuals may be necessary to further illustrate the role of these polymorphisms in HCV. PMID:27621921

  9. HIV-Infected Adolescent, Young Adult and Pregnant Smokers: Important Targets for Effective Tobacco Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    Escota, Gerome; Önen, Nur

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco use is inextricably linked to a number of health risks both in the general and HIV-infected populations. There is, however, a dearth of research on effective tobacco control programs among people living with HIV, and especially among adolescents, young adults and pregnant women, groups with heightened or increased vulnerability secondary to tobacco use. Adolescents and young adults constitute a growing population of persons living with HIV infection. Early and continued tobacco use in this population living with a disease characterized by premature onset multimorbidity and chronic inflammation is of concern. Additionally, there is an increased acuity for tobacco control among HIV-infected pregnant women to reduce pregnancy morbidity and improve fetal outcome. This review will provide an important summary of current knowledge of tobacco use among HIV-infected adolescents, young adults and pregnant women. The effects of tobacco use in these specific populations will be presented and the current state of tobacco control within these populations, assessed. PMID:23778059

  10. Association Rules and Data Mining in Hospital Infection Control and Public Health Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Brossette, Stephen E.; Sprague, Alan P.; Hardin, J. Michael; Waites, Ken B.; Jones, Warren T.; Moser, Stephen A.

    1998-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The authors consider the problem of identifying new, unexpected, and interesting patterns in hospital infection control and public health surveillance data and present a new data analysis process and system based on association rules to address this problem. Design: The authors first illustrate the need for automated pattern discovery and data mining in hospital infection control and public health surveillance. Next, they define association rules, explain how those rules can be used in surveillance, and present a novel process and system—the Data Mining Surveillance System (DMSS)—that utilize association rules to identify new and interesting patterns in surveillance data. Results: Experimental results were obtained using DMSS to analyze Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection control data collected over one year (1996) at University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital. Experiments using one-, three-, and six-month time partitions yielded 34, 57, and 28 statistically significant events, respectively. Although not all statistically significant events are clinically significant, a subset of events generated in each analysis indicated potentially significant shifts in the occurrence of infection or antimicrobial resistance patterns of P. aeruginosa. Conclusion: The new process and system are efficient and effective in identifying new, unexpected, and interesting patterns in surveillance data. The clinical relevance and utility of this process await the results of prospective studies currently in progress. PMID:9670134

  11. Simulation Shows Hospitals That Cooperate On Infection Control Obtain Better Results Than Hospitals Acting Alone

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bartsch, Sarah M.; Wong, Kim F.; Yilmaz, S. Levent; Avery, Taliser R.; Singh, Ashima; Song, Yeohan; Kim, Diane S.; Brown, Shawn T.; Potter, Margaret A.; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to control life-threatening infections, such as with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), can be complicated when patients are transferred from one hospital to another. Using a detailed computer simulation model of all hospitals in Orange County, California, we explored the effects when combinations of hospitals tested all patients at admission for MRSA and adopted procedures to limit transmission among patients who tested positive. Called “contact isolation,” these procedures specify precautions for health care workers interacting with an infected patient, such as wearing gloves and gowns. Our simulation demonstrated that each hospital’s decision to test for MRSA and implement contact isolation procedures could affect the MRSA prevalence in all other hospitals. Thus, our study makes the case that further cooperation among hospitals—which is already reflected in a few limited collaborative infection control efforts under way—could help individual hospitals achieve better infection control than they could achieve on their own. PMID:23048111

  12. Malaria Parasite Infection Compromises Control of Concurrent Systemic Non-typhoidal Salmonella Infection via IL-10-Mediated Alteration of Myeloid Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Brian P.; Xavier, Mariana N.; Chau, Jennifer Y.; Schaltenberg, Nicola; Begum, Ramie H.; Müller, Werner; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M.

    2014-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) cause a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals, while children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria can develop a life-threatening disseminated infection. This co-infection is a major source of child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the mechanisms by which malaria contributes to increased risk of NTS bacteremia are incompletely understood. Here, we report that in a mouse co-infection model, malaria parasite infection blunts inflammatory responses to NTS, leading to decreased inflammatory pathology and increased systemic bacterial colonization. Blunting of NTS-induced inflammatory responses required induction of IL-10 by the parasites. In the absence of malaria parasite infection, administration of recombinant IL-10 together with induction of anemia had an additive effect on systemic bacterial colonization. Mice that were conditionally deficient for either myeloid cell IL-10 production or myeloid cell expression of IL-10 receptor were better able to control systemic Salmonella infection, suggesting that phagocytic cells are both producers and targets of malaria parasite-induced IL-10. Thus, IL-10 produced during the immune response to malaria increases susceptibility to disseminated NTS infection by suppressing the ability of myeloid cells, most likely macrophages, to control bacterial infection. PMID:24787713

  13. Malaria parasite infection compromises control of concurrent systemic non-typhoidal Salmonella infection via IL-10-mediated alteration of myeloid cell function.

    PubMed

    Lokken, Kristen L; Mooney, Jason P; Butler, Brian P; Xavier, Mariana N; Chau, Jennifer Y; Schaltenberg, Nicola; Begum, Ramie H; Müller, Werner; Luckhart, Shirley; Tsolis, Renée M

    2014-05-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes (NTS) cause a self-limited gastroenteritis in immunocompetent individuals, while children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria can develop a life-threatening disseminated infection. This co-infection is a major source of child mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the mechanisms by which malaria contributes to increased risk of NTS bacteremia are incompletely understood. Here, we report that in a mouse co-infection model, malaria parasite infection blunts inflammatory responses to NTS, leading to decreased inflammatory pathology and increased systemic bacterial colonization. Blunting of NTS-induced inflammatory responses required induction of IL-10 by the parasites. In the absence of malaria parasite infection, administration of recombinant IL-10 together with induction of anemia had an additive effect on systemic bacterial colonization. Mice that were conditionally deficient for either myeloid cell IL-10 production or myeloid cell expression of IL-10 receptor were better able to control systemic Salmonella infection, suggesting that phagocytic cells are both producers and targets of malaria parasite-induced IL-10. Thus, IL-10 produced during the immune response to malaria increases susceptibility to disseminated NTS infection by suppressing the ability of myeloid cells, most likely macrophages, to control bacterial infection. PMID:24787713

  14. An analysis of infection control of varicella-zoster virus infections in Addenbrooke's Hospital Cambridge over a 5-year period, 1987-92.

    PubMed Central

    Wreghitt, T. G.; Whipp, J.; Redpath, C.; Hollingworth, W.

    1996-01-01

    This prospective study analyses infections with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge during 1987-92 and examines the spread of infection. In total, 93 patients and staff experienced VZV infection. Twenty-one patients had varicella and 49 experienced zoster. None of 101 patients and 1 of 625 staff members in contact with varicella cases acquired infection. By contrast, 2 of 227 patients, and 5 of 1039 staff in contact with zoster cases acquired varicella. One out of 28 (3.6%) VZV antibody-negative patients and staff in contact with varicella acquired infection, compared with 5 out of 29 (17.2%) VZV antibody-negative patients and staff in contact with zoster. Thus, zoster was found to be a more frequent cause of nosocomial infection than varicella. Fourteen members of staff had VZV infection during the study period. One of 99 patients and none of 389 staff members in contact with these cases developed varicella. The cost of dealing with infection control for VZV infections in our hospital is estimated to be Pounds 714 per patient case and a total of Pounds 13,204 per year. PMID:8760965

  15. Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Pregnant Women: A Seroprevalence and Case-Control Study in Eastern China

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wei; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Meng, Qing-Feng; Zhou, Na; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Very limited information is available concerning the epidemiology of T. gondii infection in pregnant women in eastern China. Therefore, a case-control study was conducted to estimate the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis in this population group and to identify risk factors and possible routes of contamination. Serum samples were collected from 965 pregnant women and 965 age-matched nonpregnant control subjects in Qingdao and Weihai between October 2011 and July 2013. These were screened with enzyme linked immunoassays for the presence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG and anti-Toxoplasma IgM antibodies. 147 (15.2%) pregnant women and 167 (17.3%) control subjects were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies, while 28 (2.9%) pregnant women and 37 (3.8%) controls were positive for anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies (P = 0.256). There was no significant difference between pregnant women and nonpregnant controls with regard to the seroprevalence of either anti-T. gondii IgG or IgM antibodies. Multivariate analysis showed that T. gondii infection was associated with location, cats in home, contact with cats and dogs, and exposure to soil. The results indicated that the seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in pregnant women is high compared to most other regions of China and other East Asian countries with similar climatic conditions. PMID:26539465

  16. Prevention and Control of Antimicrobial Resistant Healthcare-Associated Infections: The Microbiology Laboratory Rocks!

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Alexandra S.; Couto, Isabel; Toscano, Cristina; Gonçalves, Elsa; Póvoa, Pedro; Viveiros, Miguel; Lapão, Luís V.

    2016-01-01

    In Europe, each year, more than four milion patients acquire a healthcare-associated infection (HAI) and almost 40 thousand die as a direct consequence of it. Regardless of many stategies to prevent and control HAIs, they remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide with a significant economic impact: a recent estimate places it at the ten billion dollars/year. The control of HAIs requires a prompt and efficient identification of the etiological agent and a rapid communication with the clinician. The Microbiology Laboratory has a significant role in the prevention and control of these infections and is a key element of any Infection Control Program. The work of the Microbiology Laboratory covers microbial isolation and identification, determination of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, epidemiological surveillance and outbreak detection, education, and report of quality assured results. In this paper we address the role and importance of the Microbiology Laboratory in the prevention and control of HAI and in Antibiotic Stewardship Programs and how it can be leveraged when combined with the use of information systems. Additionally, we critically review some challenges that the Microbiology Laboratory has to deal with, including the selection of analytic methods and the proper use of communication channels with other healthcare services. PMID:27375577

  17. Using human factors engineering to improve the effectiveness of infection prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Judith; Gosbee, Laura Lin; Bessesen, Mary; Williams, Linda

    2010-08-01

    Human factors engineering is a discipline that studies the capabilities and limitations of humans and the design of devices and systems for improved performance. The principles of human factors engineering can be applied to infection prevention and control to study the interaction between the healthcare worker and the system that he or she is working with, including the use of devices, the built environment, and the demands and complexities of patient care. Some key challenges in infection prevention, such as delayed feedback to healthcare workers, high cognitive workload, and poor ergonomic design, are explained, as is how human factors engineering can be used for improvement and increased compliance with practices to prevent hospital-acquired infections. PMID:20647784

  18. Experimental system, and its evaluation for the control of surgically inducted infections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevebaugh, M. D.; Nelson, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    The effect is reported to design, fabricate, test and evaluate a prototype experimental system for the control of surgically induced infections. The purpose is to provide the cleanest possible environment within a hospital surgery room and eliminate contamination sources that could cause infections during surgery. The system design is described. The system provides for a portable laminar flow clean room, a full bubble helmet system with associated communications and ventilation subsystems for operating room personnel, and surgical gowns that minimize the migration of bacteria. The development test results consisting of portability, laminar flowrate, air flow pattern, electrostatic buildup, noise level, ventilation, human factors, electrical and material compatibility tests are summarized. The conclusions are that the experimental system is effective in reducing the airborne and wound contamination although the helmets and gowns may not be a significant part of this reduction. Definitive conclusions with regard to the infection rate cannot be made at this time.

  19. Strategies to control human cytomegalovirus infection in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Lilleri, Daniele; Gerna, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents the major viral complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. HCMV infection may be controlled by the reconstituting immune system and remain subclinical or can lead to severe systemic and/or organ disease (mainly pneumonia and gastroenteritis) when immune reconstitution is delayed or impaired. In order to prevent the occurrence of HCMV disease, a prompt diagnosis of HCMV infection is mandatory. The adoption of pre-emptive therapy strategies guided by virological monitoring dramatically reduced the occurrence of HCMV disease. However, late-onset end-organ disease may occur in some patients with apparent immune reconstitution. In the near future, introduction of immunological monitoring and immunotherapies could markedly improve management of HCMV infection. PMID:27485084

  20. Optimising Controlled Human Malaria Infection Studies Using Cryopreserved P. falciparum Parasites Administered by Needle and Syringe

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Susanne H.; Spencer, Alexandra J.; Douglas, Alexander D.; Sim, B. Kim Lee; Longley, Rhea J.; Edwards, Nick J.; Poulton, Ian D.; Kimani, Domtila; Williams, Andrew R.; Anagnostou, Nicholas A.; Roberts, Rachel; Kerridge, Simon; Voysey, Merryn; James, Eric R.; Billingsley, Peter F.; Gunasekera, Anusha; Lawrie, Alison M.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) studies have become a routine tool to evaluate efficacy of candidate anti-malarial drugs and vaccines. To date, CHMI trials have mostly been conducted using the bite of infected mosquitoes, restricting the number of trial sites that can perform CHMI studies. Aseptic, cryopreserved P. falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZ Challenge) provide a potentially more accurate, reproducible and practical alternative, allowing a known number of sporozoites to be administered simply by injection. Methodology We sought to assess the infectivity of PfSPZ Challenge administered in different dosing regimens to malaria-naive healthy adults (n = 18). Six participants received 2,500 sporozoites intradermally (ID), six received 2,500 sporozoites intramuscularly (IM) and six received 25,000 sporozoites IM. Findings Five out of six participants receiving 2,500 sporozoites ID, 3/6 participants receiving 2,500 sporozoites IM and 6/6 participants receiving 25,000 sporozoites IM were successfully infected. The median time to diagnosis was 13.2, 17.8 and 12.7 days for 2,500 sporozoites ID, 2,500 sporozoites IM and 25,000 sporozoites IM respectively (Kaplan Meier method; p = 0.024 log rank test). Conclusions 2,500 sporozoites ID and 25,000 sporozoites IM have similar infectivities. Given the dose response in infectivity seen with IM administration, further work should evaluate increasing doses of PfSPZ Challenge IM to identify a dosing regimen that reliably infects 100% of participants. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01465048 PMID:23823332

  1. Optimizing Intradermal Administration of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lyke, Kirsten E.; Laurens, Matthew B.; Strauss, Kathy; Adams, Matthew; Billingsley, Peter F.; James, Eric; Manoj, Anita; Chakravarty, Sumana; Plowe, Christopher V.; Li, Ming Lin; Ruben, Adam; Edelman, Robert; Green, Michael; Dube, Tina J.; Kim Lee Sim, B.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful tool to evaluate malaria vaccine and prophylactic drug efficacy. Until recently CHMI was only carried out by the bite of infected mosquitoes. A parenteral method of CHMI would standardize Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) administration, eliminate the need for expensive challenge facility infrastructure, and allow for use of many P. falciparum strains. Recently, intradermal (ID) injection of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ was shown to induce P. falciparum malaria; however, 100% infection rates were not achieved by ID injection. To optimize ID PfSPZ dosing so as to achieve 100% infection, 30 adults aged 18–45 years were randomized to one of six groups composed of five volunteers each. The parameters of dose (1 × 104 versus 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose per volunteer), number of injections (two versus eight), and aliquot volume per ID injection (10 μL versus 50 μL) were studied. Three groups attained 100% infection: 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 50 μL/2 doses, 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/2 doses, and 5 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/8 doses. The group that received 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose in eight 10 μL injections had a 100% infection rate and the shortest prepatent period (mean of 12.7 days), approaching the prepatent period for the current CHMI standard of five infected mosquitoes. PMID:26416102

  2. HIV-1 Infection and the PPARγ-Dependent Control of Adipose Tissue Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Giralt, Marta; Domingo, Pere; Villarroya, Francesc

    2009-01-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-dependent master transcription factor controlling adipocyte differentiation as well as multiple biological processes taking place in other cells present in adipose tissue depots such as macrophages. Recent research indicates that HIV-1 infection-related events may alter adipose tissue biology through several mechanisms involving PPARγ, ranging from direct effects of HIV-1-encoded proteins on adipocytes to the promotion of a proinflammatory environment that interferes with PPARγ actions. This effect of HIV-1 on adipose tissue cells can occur even in the absence of direct infection of adipocytes, as soluble HIV-1-encoded proteins such as Vpr may enter cells and inhibit PPARγ action. Moreover, repression of PPARγ actions may relieve inhibitory pathways of HIV-1 gene transcription, thus enhancing HIV-1 effects in infected cells. HIV-1 infection-mediated interference of PPARγ-dependent pathways in adipocytes and other cells inside adipose depots such as macrophages is likely to create an altered local environment that, after antiretroviral treatment, leads to lipodystrophy in HIV-1-infected and HAART-treated patients. PMID:19081837

  3. A B cell follicle sanctuary permits persistent productive SIV infection in elite controllers

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Yoshinori; Lum, Richard; Okoye, Afam A.; Park, Haesun; Matsuda, Kenta; Bae, Jin Young; Hagen, Shoko I.; Shoemaker, Rebecca; Deleage, Claire; Lucero, Carissa; Morcock, David; Swanson, Tonya; Legasse, Alfred W.; Axthelm, Michael K.; Hesselgesser, Joseph; Geleziunas, Romas; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Edlefsen, Paul T.; Piatak, Michael; Estes, Jacob D.; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Picker, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic phase HIV/SIV replication is reduced by as much as 10,000-fold in elite controllers (EC) compared to typical progressors, but sufficient viral replication persists in EC tissues to allow viral sequence evolution and induce excess immune activation. Here, we show that productive SIV infection in rhesus monkey EC is strikingly restricted to follicular helper CD4+ T cells (TFH), suggesting that while the potent SIV-specific CD8+ T cells of these monkeys can effectively clear productive infection from extra-follicular sites, their relative exclusion from B cell follicles limits elimination of infected TFH. Indeed, CD8+ lymphocyte depletion of EC monkeys resulted in a dramatic re-distribution of productive SIV infection to non-TFH, with TFH restriction resuming upon CD8+ T cell recovery. Thus, B cell follicles constitute sanctuaries for persistent SIV replication in the presence of potent anti-viral CD8+ T cell responses, potentially complicating efforts to cure HIV infection with therapeutic vaccination or T cell immunotherapy. PMID:25599132

  4. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  5. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  6. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital for... Licensee, and to receive Leverage. (a) You must have enough Regulatory Capital to provide...

  7. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  8. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  9. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  10. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  11. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  12. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  13. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  14. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  15. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  16. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  17. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  18. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  19. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  20. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  1. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  2. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must find... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan....

  3. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  4. Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Status of Infection Control among Iranian Dentists and Dental Students: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Khanghahi, Behnam; Jamali, Zahra; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Naghavi Behzad, Mohammad; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Infection control is an important issue in dentistry, and the dentists are primarily responsible for observing the relevant procedures. Therefore, the present study evaluated knowledge, attitude, practice, and status of infection control among Iranian dentists through systematic review of published results. Materials and methods In this systematic review, the required data was collected searching for keywords including infection, infection control, behavior, performance, practice, attitude, knowledge, dent*, prevention, Iran* and their Persian equivalents in PubMed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, SID, Medlib, and Magiran databases with a time limit of 1985 to 2012. Out of 698 articles, 15 completely related articles were finally considered and the rest were excluded due to lake of relev-ance to the study goals. The required data were extracted and summarized in an Extraction Table and were analyzed ma-nually. Results Evaluating the results of studies indicated inappropriate knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding infection control among Iranian dentists and dental students. Using personal protection devices and observing measures required for infection control were not in accordance with global standards. Conclusion The knowledge, attitudes, and practice of infection control in Iranian dental settings were found to be inadequate. Therefore, dentists should be educated more on the subject and special programs should be in place to monitor the dental settings for observing infection control standards. PMID:23875081

  5. Role of Immunoglobulin A Monoclonal Antibodies against P23 in Controlling Murine Cryptosporidium parvum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Enriquez, F. Javier; Riggs, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important diarrhea-causing protozoan parasite of immunocompetent and immunocompromised hosts. Immunoglobulin A (IgA) has been implicated in resistance to mucosal infections with bacteria, viruses, and parasites, but little is known about the role of IgA in the control of C. parvum infection. We assessed the role of IgA during C. parvum infection in neonatal mice. IgA-secreting hybridomas were developed by using Peyer’s patch lymphocytes from BALB/c mice which had been orally inoculated with viable C. parvum oocysts. Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were selected for further study based on indirect immunofluorescence assay reactivity with sporozoite and merozoite pellicles and the antigen (Ag) deposited on glass substrate by gliding sporozoites. Each MAb was secreted in dimeric form and recognized a 23-kDa sporozoite Ag in Western immunoblots. The Ag recognized comigrated in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with P23, a previously defined neutralization-sensitive zoite pellicle Ag. MAbs were evaluated for prophylactic or therapeutic efficacy against C. parvum, singly and in combinations, in neonatal BALB/c mice. A combination of two MAbs given prophylactically prior to and 12 h following oocyst challenge reduced the number of intestinal parasites scored histologically by 21.1% compared to the numbers in mice given an isotype-matched control MAb (P < 0.01). Individual MAbs given therapeutically in nine doses over a 96-h period following oocyst challenge increased efficacy against C. parvum infection. Four MAbs given therapeutically each reduced intestinal infection 34.4 to 42.2% compared to isotype-matched control MAb-treated mice (P < 0.05). One MAb reduced infection 63.3 and 72.7% in replicate experiments compared to isotype-matched control MAb-treated mice (P < 0.0001). We conclude that IgA MAbs directed to neutralization-sensitive P23 epitopes may have utility in passive immunization against murine C. parvum

  6. Impact of organisation and management factors on infection control in hospitals: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, P; Renz, A; Hughes, J; Rafferty, A M

    2009-09-01

    This scoping review sought evidence about organisational and management factors affecting infection control in general hospital settings. A literature search yielded a wide range of studies, systematic reviews and reports, but high quality direct evidence was scant. The majority of studies were observational and the standard of reporting was generally inadequate. Positive leadership at ward level and above appears to be a prerequisite for effective action to control infection, although the benefits of good clinical leadership are diffused by supervision of large numbers of staff. Senior clinical leaders need a highly visible presence and clear role boundaries and responsibilities. Team stability and morale are linked to improved patient outcomes. Organisational mechanisms for supporting training, appraisal and clinical governance are important determinants of effective practice and successful change. Rates of infection have been linked to workload, in terms of nurse staffing, bed occupancy and patient turnover. The organisational characteristics identified in the review should be considered risk factors for infection. They cannot always be eliminated or avoided completely, but appropriate assessment will enable targeted action to protect patients. PMID:19647338

  7. Best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular needle injections.

    PubMed Central

    Hutin, Yvan; Hauri, Anja; Chiarello, Linda; Catlin, Mary; Stilwell, Barbara; Ghebrehiwet, Tesfamicael; Garner, Julia

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To draw up evidence-based guidelines to make injections safer. METHODS: A development group summarized evidence-based best practices for preventing injection-associated infections in resource-limited settings. The development process included a breakdown of the WHO reference definition of a safe injection into a list of potentially critical steps, a review of the literature for each of these steps, the formulation of best practices, and the submission of the draft document to peer review. FINDINGS: Eliminating unnecessary injections is the highest priority in preventing injection-associated infections. However, when intradermal, subcutaneous, or intramuscular injections are medically indicated, best infection control practices include the use of sterile injection equipment, the prevention of contamination of injection equipment and medication, the prevention of needle-stick injuries to the provider, and the prevention of access to used needles. CONCLUSION: The availability of best infection control practices for intradermal, subcutaneous, and intramuscular injections will provide a reference for global efforts to achieve the goal of safe and appropriate use of injections. WHO will revise the best practices five years after initial development, i.e. in 2005. PMID:12973641

  8. IL-4 Induced Innate CD8+ T Cells Control Persistent Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Hee; Kang, Byung Hyun; Park, Seong Hoe; Ha, Sang-Jun; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2015-01-01

    Memory-like CD8+ T cells expressing eomesodermin are a subset of innate T cells initially identified in a number of genetically modified mice, and also exist in wild mice and human. The acquisition of memory phenotype and function by these T cells is dependent on IL–4 produced by PLZF+ innate T cells; however, their physiologic function is still not known. Here we found that these IL-4-induced innate CD8+ T cells are critical for accelerating the control of chronic virus infection. In CIITA-transgenic mice, which have a substantial population of IL-4-induced innate CD8+ T cells, this population facilitated rapid control of viremia and induction of functional anti-viral T-cell responses during infection with chronic form of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Characteristically, anti-viral innate CD8+ T cells accumulated sufficiently during early phase of infection. They produced a robust amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α with enhanced expression of a degranulation marker. Furthermore, this finding was confirmed in wild-type mice. Taken together, the results from our study show that innate CD8+ T cells works as an early defense mechanism against chronic viral infection. PMID:26452143

  9. Ocular infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in vitamin A-deficient and control rats.

    PubMed

    Nauss, K M; Anderson, C A; Conner, M W; Newberne, P M

    1985-10-01

    An experimental model was developed for studying ocular infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in vitamin A-deficient (-A) and pair-fed control (+A) rats. The severity and course of the disease was evaluated by clinical examination, slit lamp biomicroscopy and histopathologic observations. Experimental animals were in good health and were infected in the early stages of vitamin deficiency (either prior to or at the beginning of the weight plateau). In all trials the onset of herpetic keratitis was more rapid and the clinical disease more severe in -A rats compared to +A controls. Mean slit lamp scores (which assessed the severity of the corneal disease) increased from 3 to 10 d after infection and were higher (P less than 0.002) in -A rats at all time points and doses of virus tested. The inflammatory response in the cornea and uveal tract of -A rats was significantly higher than that of +A animals. Since ocular HSV disease is a common cause of blindness, the availability of a rat model should be valuable in studies of the role of nutritional factors in host susceptibility and response to viral challenge. Mild vitamin A deficiency increased the severity of experimental corneal HSV infections and resulted in a high incidence of epithelial ulceration and necrosis. PMID:2995622

  10. The Driving of Immune Response by Th1 Adjuvants in Immunization of Mice with Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei Elicits a Controversial Infection Control.

    PubMed

    Nascentes, Gabriel Antonio Nogueira; Hernández, César Gómez; Rabelo, Rosiley Aparecida de Souza; Coelho, Raquel Fernandes; Morais, Fabiana Rossetto de; Marques, Tatiane; Batista, Lara Rocha; Meira, Wendell Sérgio Ferreira; Oliveira, Carlo José Freire de; Lages Silva, Eliane; Ramírez, Luis Eduardo

    2016-05-01

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that inoculation with a Trypanosoma cruzi marinkellei (avirulent RM1 strain) was able to reduce parasitemia in mice challenged with T. cruzi, although it was not able to prevent histopathological lesions. Th1 response stimulation by immunization is necessary for T. cruzi infection control, but the resistance is also dependent on immunoregulatory mechanisms, which can be induced by adjuvants. Thus, we evaluated whether inoculation of T. cruzi marinkellei associated with administration of different adjuvants would be capable of inducing different patterns of immune response to maximize the immune response against T. cruzi (virulent Romildo strain) infection. Two hundred eighty nonisogenic mice were divided into 14 groups according to the immunization scheme and the subsequent challenge with virulent Romildo T. cruzi strain. Nonimmunized groups and animals inoculated without adjuvants were also included. Immune protection was not observed with Th2 adjuvants (incomplete Freund's adjuvant [IFA] and Alum) due to high parasitemia. Th1/Th2-polarizing adjuvants also did not induce immune protection because inulin was unable to maintain survival, and immune-stimulating complexes induced intense inflammatory processes. Animals sensitized with RM1 strain without adjuvants were able to reduce parasitemia, increase survival, and protect against severe histological lesions, followed by adequate cytokine stimulation. Finally, our results demonstrate that the early and balanced IFN-γ production becomes critical to promote protection and that Th1 adjuvant elicited a controversial infection control due to increased histopathological damage. Therefore, the host's immunomodulation remains one of the most important challenges in the research for effective protection against T. cruzi infection. Similarly, the identification of protective antigens in the RM1 strain of T. cruzi marinkellei may contribute to further studies on vaccine development

  11. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 36 countries, for 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Bijie, Hu; Maki, Dennis G; Mehta, Yatin; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Fisher, Dale; Álvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Khader, Ilham Abu; Del Rocío González Martínez, Marisela; Cuellar, Luis E; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Abouqal, Rédouane; Guanche Garcell, Humberto; Mitrev, Zan; Pirez García, María Catalina; Hamdi, Asma; Dueñas, Lourdes; Cancel, Elsie; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Rasslan, Ossama; Ahmed, Altaf; Kanj, Souha S; Ugalde, Olber Chavarría; Mapp, Trudell; Raka, Lul; Yuet Meng, Cheong; Thu, Le Thi Anh; Ghazal, Sameeh; Gikas, Achilleas; Narváez, Leonardo Pazmiño; Mejía, Nepomuceno; Hadjieva, Nassya; Gamar Elanbya, May Osman; Guzmán Siritt, María Eugenia; Jayatilleke, Kushlani

    2012-06-01

    The results of a surveillance study conducted by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) from January 2004 through December 2009 in 422 intensive care units (ICUs) of 36 countries in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe are reported. During the 6-year study period, using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN; formerly the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system [NNIS]) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infections, we gathered prospective data from 313,008 patients hospitalized in the consortium's ICUs for an aggregate of 2,194,897 ICU bed-days. Despite the fact that the use of devices in the developing countries' ICUs was remarkably similar to that reported in US ICUs in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were significantly higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals; the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection in the INICC ICUs of 6.8 per 1,000 central line-days was more than 3-fold higher than the 2.0 per 1,000 central line-days reported in comparable US ICUs. The overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia also was far higher (15.8 vs 3.3 per 1,000 ventilator-days), as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (6.3 vs. 3.3 per 1,000 catheter-days). Notably, the frequencies of resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates to imipenem (47.2% vs 23.0%), Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to ceftazidime (76.3% vs 27.1%), Escherichia coli isolates to ceftazidime (66.7% vs 8.1%), Staphylococcus aureus isolates to methicillin (84.4% vs 56.8%), were also higher in the consortium's ICUs, and the crude unadjusted excess mortalities of device-related infections ranged from 7.3% (for catheter-associated urinary tract infection) to 15.2% (for ventilator-associated pneumonia). PMID:21908073

  12. A review of health system infection control measures in developing countries: what can be learned to reduce maternal mortality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A functional health system is a necessary part of efforts to achieve maternal mortality reduction in developing countries. Puerperal sepsis is an infection contracted during childbirth and one of the commonest causes of maternal mortality in developing countries, despite the discovery of antibiotics over eighty years ago. Infections can be contracted during childbirth either in the community or in health facilities. Some developing countries have recently experienced increased use of health facilities for labour and delivery care and there is a possibility that this trend could lead to rising rates of puerperal sepsis. Drug and technological developments need to be combined with effective health system interventions to reduce infections, including puerperal sepsis. This article reviews health system infection control measures pertinent to labour and delivery units in developing country health facilities. Organisational improvements, training, surveillance and continuous quality improvement initiatives, used alone or in combination have been shown to decrease infection rates in some clinical settings. There is limited evidence available on effective infection control measures during labour and delivery and from low resource settings. A health systems approach is necessary to reduce maternal mortality and the occurrence of infections resulting from childbirth. Organisational and behavioural change underpins the success of infection control interventions. A global, targeted initiative could raise awareness of the need for improved infection control measures during childbirth. PMID:21595872

  13. Engaging Direct Care Providers in Improving Infection Prevention and Control Practices Using Participatory Visual Methods.

    PubMed

    Backman, Chantal; Bruce, Natalie; Marck, Patricia; Vanderloo, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to determine the feasibility of using provider-led participatory visual methods to scrutinize 4 hospital units' infection prevention and control practices. Methods included provider-led photo walkabouts, photo elicitation sessions, and postimprovement photo walkabouts. Nurses readily engaged in using the methods to examine and improve their units' practices and reorganize their work environment. PMID:26681499

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection in women with Hashimoto thyroiditis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Shmuely, Haim; Shimon, Ilan; Gitter, Limor Azulay

    2016-07-01

    An association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection as environmental risk factors for Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) has been reported. We investigated this hypothesis in women in which HT is more common. Serum immunoglobulin G antibodies against H pylori (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), CagA protein (Western blot assay), circulating antibodies to thyroid antigens, mainly thyroperoxidase (TPOAbs) and thyroglobulin (TgAbs), were tested in 101 females with HT and 111 non-HT control women without a history of autoimmune disease. Thyroid function, socioeconomic status at childhood, and family history of thyroid malfunction were also studied. Forty-seven HT women (46.5%) tested seropositive for H pylori versus 48 controls (43.2%; P = 0.63). The prevalence of anti-CagA antibodies was 21.3% in HT-infected patients and 31.2% in infected controls (P = 0.352). Women with HT were older than the controls at a significance level of 0.03, and higher prevalence of hypothyroidism (69% vs 13.5%, respectively) and family history of thyroid malfunction (59% vs 34%, respectively) (P < 0.001 in both). Body mass index, diaphragmatic hernia, peptic ulcer, heartburn, use of proton pump inhibitors, childhood socioeconomic background, and crowding index showed no significant difference between HT-positive or negative individuals. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that H pylori seropositivity was not associated with HT (odds ratio 1.15, 95% confidence interval 0.57-1.83, P = 0.95) and that family thyroid malfunction was independently associated with an increased risk of HT (odds ratio 3.39, 95% confidence interval 1.86-6.18, P < 0.001). No association was found between H pylori infection and HT in women. Family history of thyroid malfunction is a risk factor for HT. PMID:27442635

  15. A Case-Control Study of Risk Factors Associated with Scrub Typhus Infection in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqin; Dou, Xiangfeng; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Weihong; Zhang, Xiuchun; Sun, Yulan; Guan, Zengzhi; Li, Xinyu; Wang, Quanyi

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the risk factors of scrub typhus infection in Beijing, China, a case-control study was carried out. Cases (n = 56) were defined as persons who were diagnosed by PCR and serological method within three years. Three neighborhood control subjects were selected by matching for age and occupation. Living at the edge of the village, living in the houses near grassland, vegetable field or ditch, house yard without cement floor, piling weeds in the house or yard, all of these were risk factors for scrub typhus infection. Working in vegetable fields and hilly areas, and harvesting in autumn posed the highest risks, with odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of 3.7 (1.1–11.9), 8.2 (1.4–49.5), and 17.2 (5.1–57.9), respectively. These results would be useful for the establishment of a detail control strategy for scrub typhus infection in Beijing, China. PMID:23691083

  16. Ebola Virus Disease: Preparedness and Infection Control Lessons Learned from Two Biocontainment Units

    PubMed Central

    Hewlett, Angela L.; Varkey, Jay B.; Smith, Philip W.; Ribner, Bruce S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This review details infection control issues encountered in the management of patients with Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), with emphasis on how these issues were confronted in two biocontainment patient care units in the United States. Recent Findings There is a notable paucity of medical literature to guide infection control policies and procedures when caring for patients with EVD. Thus, the experience of the Serious Communicable Diseases Unit (SCDU) at Emory University Hospital and the Nebraska Biocontainment Unit (NBU) at the University of Nebraska Medical Center serves as the basis for this review. Facility issues, staffing, transportation logistics, and appropriate use of personal protective equipment is detailed. Other topics addressed include the evaluation of patients under investigation (PUI) and ethical issues concerning the safe utilization of advanced life support. Summary This review intends to serve as a reference for facilities that are in the process of creating protocols for managing patients with EVD. Given the lack of literature to support many of the recommendations discussed, it is important to utilize the available referenced guidelines, along with the practical experiences of biocontainment units, to optimize the care provided to patients with EVD while strictly adhering to infection control principles. PMID:26098504

  17. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hu; Hwang, Suk-Won; Marelli, Benedetto; An, Bo; Moreau, Jodie E.; Yang, Miaomiao; Brenckle, Mark A.; Kim, Stanley; Kaplan, David L.; Rogers, John A.; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G.

    2014-01-01

    A paradigm shift for implantable medical devices lies at the confluence between regenerative medicine, where materials remodel and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms based on biomaterials and bioresorbable technologies such as optics and electronics. The union of materials and technology in this context enables a class of biomedical devices that can be optically or electronically functional and yet harmlessly degrade once their use is complete. We present here a fully degradable, remotely controlled, implantable therapeutic device operating in vivo to counter a Staphylococcus aureus infection that disappears once its function is complete. This class of device provides fully resorbable packaging and electronics that can be turned on remotely, after implantation, to provide the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally controllable, resorbable devices not only obviate the need for secondary surgeries and retrieval, but also have extended utility as therapeutic devices that can be left behind at a surgical or suturing site, following intervention, and can be externally controlled to allow for infection management by either thermal treatment or by remote triggering of drug release when there is retardation of antibiotic diffusion, deep infections are present, or when systemic antibiotic treatment alone is insufficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. After completion of function, the device is safely resorbed into the body, within a programmable period. PMID:25422476

  18. Silk-based resorbable electronic devices for remotely controlled therapy and in vivo infection abatement.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hu; Hwang, Suk-Won; Marelli, Benedetto; An, Bo; Moreau, Jodie E; Yang, Miaomiao; Brenckle, Mark A; Kim, Stanley; Kaplan, David L; Rogers, John A; Omenetto, Fiorenzo G

    2014-12-01

    A paradigm shift for implantable medical devices lies at the confluence between regenerative medicine, where materials remodel and integrate in the biological milieu, and technology, through the use of recently developed material platforms based on biomaterials and bioresorbable technologies such as optics and electronics. The union of materials and technology in this context enables a class of biomedical devices that can be optically or electronically functional and yet harmlessly degrade once their use is complete. We present here a fully degradable, remotely controlled, implantable therapeutic device operating in vivo to counter a Staphylococcus aureus infection that disappears once its function is complete. This class of device provides fully resorbable packaging and electronics that can be turned on remotely, after implantation, to provide the necessary thermal therapy or trigger drug delivery. Such externally controllable, resorbable devices not only obviate the need for secondary surgeries and retrieval, but also have extended utility as therapeutic devices that can be left behind at a surgical or suturing site, following intervention, and can be externally controlled to allow for infection management by either thermal treatment or by remote triggering of drug release when there is retardation of antibiotic diffusion, deep infections are present, or when systemic antibiotic treatment alone is insufficient due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. After completion of function, the device is safely resorbed into the body, within a programmable period. PMID:25422476

  19. Invasion Dynamics of Teratogenic Infections in Light of Rubella Control: Implications for Zika Virus

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, C. Jessica E.; Barrett, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The greatest burden for a subset of pathogens is associated with infection during pregnancy. Evidence for teratogenic effects of Zika Virus have highlighted the importance of understanding the epidemiology of such pathogens. Rubella is perhaps the most classic example, and there is much to be learned from the long history of modelling associated with this virus. Methods: We extended an existing framework for modeling age-specific dynamics of rubella to illustrate how the body of knowledge of rubella dynamics informs the dynamics of teratogenic infections more broadly, and particularly the impact of control on such infections in different transmission settings. Results: During invasion, the burden in women of childbearing age is expected to peak, but then fall to low levels before eventually levelling out. Importantly, as illustrated by rubella dynamics, there is potential for a paradoxical effect, where inadequate control efforts can increase the burden. Conclusions: Drawing on the existing body of work on rubella dynamics highlights key knowledge gaps for understanding the risks associated with Zika Virus. The magnitude and impacts of sterilizing immunity, plus antigenic maps measuring cross-protection with other flaviviruses, and the magnitude of transmission, as well as likely impact of control efforts on transmission are likely to be key variables for robust inference into the outcome of management efforts for Zika Virus. PMID:27617170

  20. From expert data collectors to interventionists: changing the focus for infection control professionals.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Denise M

    2002-04-01

    The current economic and political environments challenge health care organizations in the United States to provide affordable, accessible, and comprehensive health services. However, changes in reimbursement to health care providers can affect their ability to offer access to cutting-edge services while reducing costs. Consequently, organizations are restructuring, re-engineering, right-sizing, downsizing, and redesigning, all in an effort to save money while also hoping to maintain a reputation for quality and customer service. Dr Vicky Fraser, in her keynote address at the APIC conference in 2000, reminded us that ICHE programs are cost centers rather than revenue generators, and are often targets for budget cuts. Although Haley's Study on the Efficacy of Nosocomial Infection Control (SENIC), published in 1985, was a landmark event demonstrating the importance of our profession's mission, it is becoming dated. Infection control professionals (ICPs) must continue Haley's work, finding innovative ways to market or demonstrate the value of ICHE programs to health care executives. Closing the 1999 APIC conference with a symposium entitled "Breaking Out of the Box," Jackson and Massanari challenged ICPs to educate themselves about the changing health care environment, to be proactive, and constructively help organizations "re-engineer" more efficiently, rather than feel victimized and helplessly await being re-engineered out of existence. The threat of downsizing prompted ICPs at BJC HealthCare to realize that the time had come to change their own culture and attitudes and to focus on the business of infection control. This change required challenging the traditional roles of solo practitioner, data collector, and keeper of infection control data and knowledge. The goals now include leading intervention teams committed to reducing health care-associated infections, partnering rather than accepting sole responsibility for lowering infection rates, and learning to

  1. The JAK-STAT Pathway Controls Plasmodium vivax Load in Early Stages of Anopheles aquasalis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bahia, Ana C.; Kubota, Marina S.; Tempone, Antonio J.; Araújo, Helena R. C.; Guedes, Bruno A. M.; Orfanó, Alessandra S.; Tadei, Wanderli P.; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M.; Han, Yeon S.; Secundino, Nágila F. C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Malaria affects 300 million people worldwide every year and 450,000 in Brazil. In coastal areas of Brazil, the main malaria vector is Anopheles aquasalis, and Plasmodium vivax is responsible for the majority of malaria cases in the Americas. Insects possess a powerful immune system to combat infections. Three pathways control the insect immune response: Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT. Here we analyze the immune role of the A. aquasalis JAK-STAT pathway after P. vivax infection. Three genes, the transcription factor Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT), the regulatory Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT (PIAS) and the Nitric Oxide Synthase enzyme (NOS) were characterized. Expression of STAT and PIAS was higher in males than females and in eggs and first instar larvae when compared to larvae and pupae. RNA levels for STAT and PIAS increased 24 and 36 hours (h) after P. vivax challenge. NOS transcription increased 36 h post infection (hpi) while this protein was already detected in some midgut epithelial cells 24 hpi. Imunocytochemistry experiments using specific antibodies showed that in non-infected insects STAT and PIAS were found mostly in the fat body, while in infected mosquitoes the proteins were found in other body tissues. The knockdown of STAT by RNAi increased the number of oocysts in the midgut of A. aquasalis. This is the first clear evidence for the involvement of a specific immune pathway in the interaction of the Brazilian malaria vector A. aquasalis with P. vivax, delineating a potential target for the future development of disease controlling strategies. PMID:22069502

  2. The JAK-STAT pathway controls Plasmodium vivax load in early stages of Anopheles aquasalis infection.

    PubMed

    Bahia, Ana C; Kubota, Marina S; Tempone, Antonio J; Araújo, Helena R C; Guedes, Bruno A M; Orfanó, Alessandra S; Tadei, Wanderli P; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia M; Han, Yeon S; Secundino, Nágila F C; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Pimenta, Paulo F P; Traub-Csekö, Yara M

    2011-11-01

    Malaria affects 300 million people worldwide every year and 450,000 in Brazil. In coastal areas of Brazil, the main malaria vector is Anopheles aquasalis, and Plasmodium vivax is responsible for the majority of malaria cases in the Americas. Insects possess a powerful immune system to combat infections. Three pathways control the insect immune response: Toll, IMD, and JAK-STAT. Here we analyze the immune role of the A. aquasalis JAK-STAT pathway after P. vivax infection. Three genes, the transcription factor Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT), the regulatory Protein Inhibitors of Activated STAT (PIAS) and the Nitric Oxide Synthase enzyme (NOS) were characterized. Expression of STAT and PIAS was higher in males than females and in eggs and first instar larvae when compared to larvae and pupae. RNA levels for STAT and PIAS increased 24 and 36 hours (h) after P. vivax challenge. NOS transcription increased 36 h post infection (hpi) while this protein was already detected in some midgut epithelial cells 24 hpi. Imunocytochemistry experiments using specific antibodies showed that in non-infected insects STAT and PIAS were found mostly in the fat body, while in infected mosquitoes the proteins were found in other body tissues. The knockdown of STAT by RNAi increased the number of oocysts in the midgut of A. aquasalis. This is the first clear evidence for the involvement of a specific immune pathway in the interaction of the Brazilian malaria vector A. aquasalis with P. vivax, delineating a potential target for the future development of disease controlling strategies. PMID:22069502

  3. Potential application of silver nanoparticles to control the infectivity of Rift Valley fever virus in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borrego, Belén; Lorenzo, Gema; Mota-Morales, Josué D; Almanza-Reyes, Horacio; Mateos, Francisco; López-Gil, Elena; de la Losa, Nuria; Burmistrov, Vasily A; Pestryakov, Alexey N; Brun, Alejandro; Bogdanchikova, Nina

    2016-07-01

    In this work we have tested the potential antiviral activity of silver nanoparticles formulated as Argovit™ against Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). The antiviral activity of Argovit was tested on Vero cell cultures and in type-I interferon receptor deficient mice (IFNAR (-/-) mice) by two different approaches: (i) different dilutions of Argovit were added to previously infected cells or administrated to animals infected with a lethal dose of virus; (ii) virus was pre-incubated with different dilutions of Argovit before inoculation in mice or cells. Though the ability of silver nanoparticles to control an ongoing RVFV infection in the conditions tested was limited, the incubation of virus with Argovit before the infection led to a reduction of the infectivity titers both in vitro and in vivo. These results reveal the potential application of silver nanoparticles to control the infectivity of RVFV, which is an important zoonotic pathogen. PMID:26970026

  4. Compendium of measures to control Chlamydia psittaci infection among humans (psittacosis) and pet birds (avian chlamydiosis), 2000. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2000-07-14

    Psittacosis--also known as parrot fever and ornithosis--is spread by a bacterial infection of birds that can cause severe pneumonia and other serious health problems among humans. From 1988 through 1998, 813 cases of psittacosis (infection with Chlamydia psittaci) were reported to CDC, and most resulted from exposure to infected pet birds, usually cockatiels, parakeets, parrots, and macaws. In birds, C. psittaci infection is referred to as avian chlamydiosis (AC). Infected birds shed the bacteria through feces and nasal discharges, and humans become infected from exposure to these materials. This compendium provides information about psittacosis and AC to public health officials, physicians, veterinarians, the pet bird industry, and others concerned about controlling these diseases and protecting public health. The recommendations in this compendium provide standardized procedures for controlling AC in birds, a vital step to protecting human health. PMID:10914931

  5. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  6. Nosocomial urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase uropathogens: Prevalence, pathogens, risk factors, and strategies for infection control

    PubMed Central

    Bouassida, Khaireddine; Jaidane, Mehdi; Bouallegue, Olfa; Tlili, Ghassen; Naija, Habiba; Mosbah, Ali Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Our goal was to investigate the prevalence and antibiogram pattern of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production among uropathogens using isolates from urine samples collected at the Department of Urology in the Sahloul Hospital, Tunisia We also aimed to identify the risk factors for nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the measures for infection control. Methods: Laboratory records of a five-year period from January 2004 to December 2008 were submitted for retrospective analysis to determine the incidence of ESBL infections. A total of 276 isolates were collected. A case-control study involving comparisons between two groups of patients who underwent TURP was performed to determine the risk factors for ESBL infection. Group 1, designated case subjects, included 51 patients with nosocomial UTI after TURP. Group 2, designated control subjects, consisted of 58 randomly selected patients who underwent TURP without nosocomial UTI in the same period. Factors suspected to be implicated in the emergence of ESBL infection were compared between the two groups in order to identify risk factors for infection. A univariate regression analysis was performed, followed by a multivariate one. Results: The annual prevalence of ESBL infection ranged from 1.3–2.5%. After performing univariate and multivariate regression analysis, the main risk factors for ESBL infections were identified as: use of antibiotics the year preceding the admission, duration of catheter use, and bladder washout (p=0.012, p=0.019, and p<0.001. Conclusions: Urologists have to perform a good hemostasis, especially in endoscopic resections, in order to avoid bladder irrigation and bladder washout and to reduce the time of bladder catheterization, which is a strong risk factor of nosocomial UTIs. PMID:27330585

  7. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R.; Roland, Kenneth L.; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors. PMID:24396177

  8. Assessment of attenuated Salmonella vaccine strains in controlling experimental Salmonella Typhimurium infection in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yanlong; Parreira, Valeria R; Roland, Kenneth L; Curtiss, Roy; Prescott, John F

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella hold considerable promise as vaccine delivery vectors for heterologous antigens in chickens. Such vaccines have the potential additional benefit of also controlling Salmonella infection in immunized birds. As a way of selecting attenuated strains with optimal immunogenic potential as antigen delivery vectors, this study screened 20 novel Salmonella Typhimurium vaccine strains, differing in mutations associated with delayed antigen synthesis and delayed attenuation, for their efficacy in controlling colonization by virulent Salmonella Typhimurium, as well as for their persistence in the intestine and the spleen. Marked differences were observed between strains in these characteristics, which provide the basis for selection for further study as vaccine vectors. PMID:24396177

  9. Transmission, Diagnosis, and Recommendations for Control of Pseudoloma neurophilia Infections in Laboratory Zebrafish (Danio rerio) Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Katrina N; Dreska, Mathew; Nasiadka, Andrzej; Rinne, Miranda; Matthews, Jennifer L; Carmichael, Carrie; Bauer, Justin; Varga, Zoltan M; Westerfield, Monte

    2011-01-01

    The microsporidium Pseudoloma neurophilia represents a considerable challenge for laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio) facilities. In 2010, P. neurophilia infections were diagnosed in zebrafish from 74% of the facilities that submitted fish to the Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) pathology service, and this organism remains the most commonly diagnosed pathogen in submitted fish. Accordingly, many of the ZIRC pathology service consultations deal with control and prevention of microsporidiosis. Here we describe observations and experiments performed at the ZIRC elucidating aspects of P. neurophilia transmission in zebrafish colonies. We then review current knowledge about P. neurophilia transmission and diagnosis. Considering this information, we present recommendations for control of P. neurophilia in zebrafish facilities. PMID:22330247

  10. The value of intermittent point-prevalence surveys of healthcare-associated infections for evaluating infection control interventions at Angkor Hospital for Children, Siem Reap, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Stoesser, N; Emary, K; Soklin, S; Peng An, K; Sophal, S; Chhomrath, S; Day, NPJ; Limmathurotsakul, D; Nget, P; Pangnarith, Y; Sona, S; Kumar, V; Moore, CE; Chanpheaktra, N; Parry, CM

    2013-01-01

    Background There are limited data on the epidemiology of paediatric healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) and infection control in low-income countries. We describe the value of intermittent point-prevalence surveys for monitoring HCAI and evaluating infection control interventions in a Cambodian paediatric hospital. Methods Hospital-wide, point-prevalence surveys were performed monthly in 2011. Infection control interventions introduced during this period included a hand hygiene programme and a ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) care bundle. Results Overall HCAI prevalence was 13.8/100 patients at-risk, with a significant decline over time. The highest HCAI rates (50%) were observed in critical care; the majority of HCAIs were respiratory (61%). Klebsiella pneumoniae was most commonly isolated and antimicrobial resistance was widespread. Hand hygiene compliance doubled to 51.6%, and total VAP cases/1000 patient-ventilator days fell from 30 to 10. Conclusion Rates of HCAI were substantial in our institution, and antimicrobial resistance a major concern. Point-prevalence surveys are effective for HCAI surveillance, and in monitoring trends in response to infection control interventions. PMID:23418156

  11. Control of nosocomial infections in an intensive care unit in Guatemala City.

    PubMed

    Berg, D E; Hershow, R C; Ramirez, C A; Weinstein, R A

    1995-09-01

    We tested the effectiveness of specific vs. general infection control interventions in a teaching hospital in Guatemala City. After 3 months of prospective surveillance, we implemented targeted interventions (i.e., modification of respiratory tract care and use of a closed urinary catheter drainage system), an educational program focused on respiratory intervention, and general interventions (i.e., aseptic technique). The rate of nosocomial pneumonia, the most common nosocomial infection, decreased from 33% (41 of 123 patients) before intervention to 16% (21 of 130 patients) after intervention (P = .001). Although the frequency of hand washing increased from 5% to 63% (P < .001), the rates of other types of nosocomial infections did not change significantly. The combination of targeted respiratory intervention and an intense, focused educational campaign reduced the rate of nosocomial pneumonia. General improvements in hygiene and hand washing rates, or even implementation of a closed urinary drainage system without focused education, may not be sufficient to reduce infection rates in intensive care units in developing countries. PMID:8527548

  12. Detecting and controlling foodborne infections in humans: lessons for China from the United States experience.

    PubMed

    Varma, Jay K; Wu, Shuyu; Feng, Zijian

    2012-01-01

    In the past 50 years, the United States has made major advances in human health surveillance, research and outbreak investigation that have helped reduce microbial contamination of food. In China, food safety has emerged as one of the country's most prominent domestic concerns, but there has been limited investment in surveillance, inter-agency coordination, outbreak investigation and data synthesis. After large outbreaks of Salmonella in the 1960s and E. coli O157:H7 in the 1990s, the United States transformed its approach to detecting and investigating foodborne infections, including deployment of a national, laboratory-based surveillance system that uses molecular subtyping. In China, the absence of a national, laboratory-based surveillance system means that it is difficult to rapidly detect a widely dispersed foodborne infection outbreak or the emergence of new foodborne infections. Based on lessons learned in the United States, we propose policy and administrative changes that China can adopt to strengthen detection and control of foodborne infections. PMID:22175805

  13. Astrovirus-Induced Synthesis of Nitric Oxide Contributes to Virus Control during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koci, Matthew D.; Kelley, Laura A.; Larsen, Diane; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2004-01-01

    Astrovirus is one of the major causes of infant and childhood diarrhea worldwide. Our understanding of astrovirus pathogenesis trails behind our knowledge of its molecular and epidemiologic properties. Using a recently developed small-animal model, we investigated the mechanisms by which astrovirus induces diarrhea and the role of both the adaptive and innate immune responses to turkey astrovirus type-2 (TAstV-2) infection. Astrovirus-infected animals were analyzed for changes in total lymphocyte populations, alterations in CD4+/CD8+ ratios, production of virus-specific antibodies (Abs), and macrophage activation. There were no changes in the numbers of circulating or splenic lymphocytes or in CD4+/CD8+ ratios compared to controls. Additionally, there was only a modest production of virus-specific Abs. However, adherent spleen cells from infected animals produced more nitric oxide (NO) in response to ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. In vitro analysis demonstrated that TAstV-2 induced macrophage production of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Studies using NO donors and inhibitors in vivo demonstrated, for the first time, that NO inhibited astrovirus replication. These studies suggest that NO is important in limiting astrovirus replication and are the first, to our knowledge, to describe the potential role of innate immunity in astrovirus infection. PMID:14722310

  14. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact.

    PubMed

    Yassi, Annalee; Bryce, Elizabeth A; Breilh, Jaime; Lavoie, Marie-Claude; Ndelu, Lindiwe; Lockhart, Karen; Spiegel, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT) tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work.The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into "toolkits" used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international collaboration between occupational

  15. Collaboration between infection control and occupational health in three continents: a success story with international impact

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Globalization has been accompanied by the rapid spread of infectious diseases, and further strain on working conditions for health workers globally. Post-SARS, Canadian occupational health and infection control researchers got together to study how to better protect health workers, and found that training was indeed perceived as key to a positive safety culture. This led to developing information and communication technology (ICT) tools. The research conducted also showed the need for better workplace inspections, so a workplace audit tool was also developed to supplement worker questionnaires and the ICT. When invited to join Ecuadorean colleagues to promote occupational health and infection control, these tools were collectively adapted and improved, including face-to-face as well as on-line problem-based learning scenarios. The South African government then invited the team to work with local colleagues to improve occupational health and infection control, resulting in an improved web-based health information system to track incidents, exposures, and occupational injury and diseases. As the H1N1 pandemic struck, the online infection control course was adapted and translated into Spanish, as was a novel skill-building learning tool that permits health workers to practice selecting personal protective equipment. This tool was originally developed in collaboration with the countries from the Caribbean region and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Research from these experiences led to strengthened focus on building capacity of health and safety committees, and new modules are thus being created, informed by that work. The products developed have been widely heralded as innovative and interactive, leading to their inclusion into “toolkits” used internationally. The tools used in Canada were substantially improved from the collaborative adaptation process for South and Central America and South Africa. This international collaboration between

  16. Novel bacteriophage therapy for controlling metallo-beta-lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in Catfish

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The bacteriophage therapy is an effective antimicrobial approach with potentially important applications in medicine and biotechnology which can be seen as an additional string in the bow. Emerging drug resistant bacteria in aquaculture industry due to unrestricted use of antibiotics warrants more sustainable and environmental friendly strategies for controlling fish infections. The isolated bacteria from fish lesions was characterised based on isolation on selective and differential medium like Pseudomonas agar, gram staining, biochemical tests and 16SrRNA sequencing. The metallo-beta-lactamase (MBL) producing bacterial isolate was evaluated using Imipenem - Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) disk method. The specific bacteriophage was isolated and concentrated using coal bed developed in our lab at CSIR-NEERI. The isolated and enriched bacteriophage was characterised by nucleotide sequencing and electron microscopy. The phage therapy was applied for treating ulcerative lesion in fish. Results The pathogenic bacterium responsible for causing ulcerative lesions in catfish species (Clarias gariepinus) was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. One out of twenty P. aeruginosa isolate showing multi drug resistance (MDR) was incidentally found to be MBL producing as determined by Imipenem-EDTA disk method. The phage therapy effectively cured the ulcerative lesions of the infected fish in 8–10 days of treatment, with a sevenfold reduction of the lesion with untreated infection control. Conclusion Bacteriophage therapy can have potential applications soon as an alternative or as a complement to antibiotic treatment in the aquaculture. We present bacteriophage therapy as a treatment method for controlling MDR P. aeruginosa infection in C. gariepinus. To the best of our knowledge this is a first report of application of phage therapy against MBL producing P. aeruginosa isolated from aquatic ecosystem. PMID:24369750

  17. Supporting Tablet Configuration, Tracking, and Infection Control Practices in Digital Health Interventions: Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Furberg, Robert D; Zulkiewicz, Brittany A; Hudson, Jordan P; Taylor, Olivia M; Lewis, Megan A

    2016-01-01

    Background Tablet-based health care interventions have the potential to encourage patient care in a timelier manner, allow physicians convenient access to patient records, and provide an improved method for patient education. However, along with the continued adoption of tablet technologies, there is a concomitant need to develop protocols focusing on the configuration, management, and maintenance of these devices within the health care setting to support the conduct of clinical research. Objective Develop three protocols to support tablet configuration, tablet management, and tablet maintenance. Methods The Configurator software, Tile technology, and current infection control recommendations were employed to develop three distinct protocols for tablet-based digital health interventions. Configurator is a mobile device management software specifically for iPhone operating system (iOS) devices. The capabilities and current applications of Configurator were reviewed and used to develop the protocol to support device configuration. Tile is a tracking tag associated with a free mobile app available for iOS and Android devices. The features associated with Tile were evaluated and used to develop the Tile protocol to support tablet management. Furthermore, current recommendations on preventing health care–related infections were reviewed to develop the infection control protocol to support tablet maintenance. Results This article provides three protocols: the Configurator protocol, the Tile protocol, and the infection control protocol. Conclusions These protocols can help to ensure consistent implementation of tablet-based interventions, enhance fidelity when employing tablets for research purposes, and serve as a guide for tablet deployments within clinical settings. PMID:27350013

  18. High seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in inmates: A case control study in Durango City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Tinoco, J.; Sánchez-Anguiano, L. F.; Ramos-Nevárez, A.; Cerrillo-Soto, S. M.; Sáenz-Soto, L.; Liesenfeld, O.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The seroprevalence of infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and the association with risk factors has not been determined in inmates. Through a case-control study, 166 inmates from a state correctional facility in Durango City, Mexico and 166 age- and gender-matched non-incarcerated subjects were examined for the presence of anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies using enzyme-linked immunoassays. Results Seroprevalence of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies was higher in inmates (35, 21.1%) than in controls (14, 8.4%) (OR = 2.90; 95% CI: 1.43–5.94; P = 0.001). Anti-T. gondii IgM antibodies were detected in two (1.2%) inmates and in seven (4.2%) controls (P = 0.17). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, incarceration, and behavioral characteristics of inmates revealed that T. gondii seropositivity was associated with being born out of Durango State (OR = 3.91; 95% CI: 1.29–11.79; P = 0.01). In addition, T. gondii seroprevalence was higher (P = 0.03) in inmates that had suffered from injuries (17/56: 30.4%) than those without such history (18/110: 16.4%). Conclusions The seroprevalence of T. gondii infection in inmates in Durango City is higher than the seroprevalences found in the general population in the same city, indicating that inmates may represent a new risk group for T. gondii infection. Further research on T. gondii infection in inmates is needed. PMID:24678408

  19. A case-control study of domestic kitchen microbiology and sporadic Salmonella infection.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, S. M.; Slader, J.; Humphrey, T.; Holmes, B.; Guildea, Z.; Palmer, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    The microbiology of domestic kitchens in the homes of subjects who had suffered sporadic Salmonella infection (cases) was compared with control domestic kitchens. Case and control dishcloths and refrigerator swabs were examined for the presence of Salmonella spp., total Enterobacteriaceae counts and total aerobic colony counts. Salmonella spp. were isolated from both case and control dishcloths and refrigerators but there were no significant differences between the two groups. Colony counts were similar in case and control dishcloths and refrigerator swabs. There was no relationship between the total counts and presence of Salmonella . There was no evidence that cases of Salmonella infection were more likely to have kitchens which were contaminated with these bacteria or have higher bacterial counts than controls. Total bacterial counts were poor indicators of Salmonella contamination of the domestic kitchen environment. Further factors which could not be identified by a study of this design may increase risk of Salmonella food poisoning. These factors may include individual susceptibility of the patient. Alternatively, sporadic cases of Salmonella food poisoning may arise from food prepared outside the home. PMID:16181502

  20. Peri-operative glycaemic control regimens for preventing surgical site infections in adults

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Lillian S; Meeks, Derek; Moyer, Virginia A; Lally, Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and resource utilization and are potentially preventable. Peri-operative hyperglycaemia has been associated with increased SSIs and previous recommendations have been to treat glucose levels above 200 mg/dL. However, recent studies have questioned the optimal glycaemic control regimen to prevent SSIs. Whether the benefits of strict or intensive glycaemic control with insulin infusion as compared to conventional management outweigh the risks remains controversial. Objectives To summarise the evidence for the impact of glycaemic control in the peri-operative period on the incidence of surgical site infections, hypoglycaemia, level of glycaemic control, all-cause and infection-related mortality, and hospital length of stay and to investigate for differences of effect between different levels of glycaemic control. Search strategy A search strategy was developed to search the following databases: Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 25 March 2009), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1; Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to March Week 2 2009); Ovid EMBASE (1980 to 2009 Week 12) and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to March Week 3 2009). The search was not limited by language or publication status. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were eligible for inclusion if they evaluated two (or more) glycaemic control regimens in the peri-operative period (within one week pre-, intra-, and/or post-operative) and reported surgical site infections as an outcome. Data collection and analysis The standard method for conducting a systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane Wounds Group was used. Two review authors independently reviewed the results from the database searches and identified relevant studies. Two review authors extracted study data and outcomes from each study and reviewed each study for methodological quality. Any

  1. A focus on intra-abdominal infections

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Complicated intra-abdominal infections are an important cause of morbidity and are frequently associated with poor prognosis, particularly in higher risk patients. Well defined evidence-based recommendations for intra-abdominal infections treatment are partially lacking because of the limited number of randomized-controlled trials. Factors consistently associated with poor outcomes in patients with intra-abdominal infections include increased illness severity, failed source control, inadequate empiric antimicrobial therapy and healthcare-acquired infection. Early prognostic evaluation of complicated intra-abdominal infections is important to select high-risk patients for more aggressive therapeutic procedures. The cornerstones in the management of complicated intra-abdominal infections are both source control and antibiotic therapy. The timing and the adequacy of source control are the most important issues in the management of intra-abdominal infections, because inadequate and late control of septic source may have a negative effect on the outcomes. Recent advances in interventional and more aggressive techniques could significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality of physiologically severe complicated intra-abdominal infections, even if these are still being debated and are yet not validated by limited prospective trials. Empiric antimicrobial therapy is nevertheless important in the overall management of intra-abdominal infections. Inappropriate antibiotic therapy may result in poor patient outcomes and in the appearance of bacterial resistance. Antimicrobial management is generally standardised and many regimens, either with monotherapy or combination therapy, have proven their efficacy. Routine coverage especially against Enterococci and candida spp is not always recommended, but can be useful in particular clinical conditions. A de escalation approach may be recommended in patients with specific risk factors for multidrug resistant infections such as

  2. Risk Factors of Streptococcus suis Infection in Vietnam. A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Dang Trung Nghia; Le, Thi Phuong Tu; Wolbers, Marcel; Cao, Quang Thai; Nguyen, Van Minh Hoang; Tran, Vu Thieu Nga; Le, Thi Phuong Thao; Nguyen, Hoan Phu; Tran, Thi Hong Chau; Dinh, Xuan Sinh; To, Song Diep; Hoang, Thi Thanh Hang; Hoang, Truong; Campbell, James; Nguyen, Van Vinh Chau; Nguyen, Tran Chinh; Nguyen, Van Dung; Ngo, Thi Hoa; Spratt, Brian G.; Tran, Tinh Hien; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis infection, an emerging zoonosis, is an increasing public health problem across South East Asia and the most common cause of acute bacterial meningitis in adults in Vietnam. Little is known of the risk factors underlying the disease. Methods and Findings A case-control study with appropriate hospital and matched community controls for each patient was conducted between May 2006 and June 2009. Potential risk factors were assessed using a standardized questionnaire and investigation of throat and rectal S. suis carriage in cases, controls and their pigs, using real-time PCR and culture of swab samples. We recruited 101 cases of S. suis meningitis, 303 hospital controls and 300 community controls. By multivariate analysis, risk factors identified for S. suis infection as compared to either control group included eating “high risk” dishes, including such dishes as undercooked pig blood and pig intestine (OR1 = 2.22; 95%CI = [1.15–4.28] and OR2 = 4.44; 95%CI = [2.15–9.15]), occupations related to pigs (OR1 = 3.84; 95%CI = [1.32–11.11] and OR2 = 5.52; 95%CI = [1.49–20.39]), and exposures to pigs or pork in the presence of skin injuries (OR1 = 7.48; 95%CI = [1.97–28.44] and OR2 = 15.96; 95%CI = [2.97–85.72]). S. suis specific DNA was detected in rectal and throat swabs of 6 patients and was cultured from 2 rectal samples, but was not detected in such samples of 1522 healthy individuals or patients without S. suis infection. Conclusions This case control study, the largest prospective epidemiological assessment of this disease, has identified the most important risk factors associated with S. suis bacterial meningitis to be eating ‘high risk’ dishes popular in parts of Asia, occupational exposure to pigs and pig products, and preparation of pork in the presence of skin lesions. These risk factors can be addressed in public health campaigns aimed at preventing S. suis infection

  3. Guidelines for the control of infection with Vero cytotoxin producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). Subcommittee of the PHLS Advisory Committee on Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    2000-03-01

    Increasing numbers of cases of Vero cytotoxin producing Escherichia coli (VTEC) O157 infection, well published incidents, and new scientific evidence make it appropriate to produce new guidelines for their control. This document reviews the clinical and epidemiological features of VTEC O157 infection, describes the principles of microbiological investigation and laboratory safety, and presents recommendations for the prevention of spread of VTEC) O157. The recommendations consider direct spread of infection from animals, foodborne spread, the institutions in which spread is more likely to occur (nursing homes, schools, and children's day nurseries), and groups at particular risk of acquiring and transmitting infection (in essence, food handlers, and those unable to maintain high standards of hygiene for themselves and their carers). PMID:10743313

  4. The Automated Alert System for the Hospital Infection Control and the Safety of Medical Staff Based on EMR Data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eunmi

    2016-01-01

    This report is about planning, developing, and implementing the automated alert system for the Hospital infection control and the safety of medical staffs about information on patients exposed to infection based on EMR Data in a tertiary hospital in Korea. PMID:27332375

  5. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF

    PubMed Central

    Olleros, Maria L.; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L.; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A.; Drutskaya, Marina S.; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V.; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V.; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F. J.; Nedospasov, Sergei A.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  6. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF. PMID:26123801

  7. Strategies for Controlling Non-Transmissible Infection Outbreaks Using a Large Human Movement Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Penelope A.; Rehman, Yasmin; Hall, Ian M.; Edeghere, Obaghe; Danon, Leon; House, Thomas A.; Keeling, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Prediction and control of the spread of infectious disease in human populations benefits greatly from our growing capacity to quantify human movement behavior. Here we develop a mathematical model for non-transmissible infections contracted from a localized environmental source, informed by a detailed description of movement patterns of the population of Great Britain. The model is applied to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophilia. We use case-report data from three recent outbreaks that have occurred in Great Britain where the source has already been identified by public health agencies. We first demonstrate that the amount of individual-level heterogeneity incorporated in the movement data greatly influences our ability to predict the source location. The most accurate predictions were obtained using reported travel histories to describe movements of infected individuals, but using detailed simulation models to estimate movement patterns offers an effective fast alternative. Secondly, once the source is identified, we show that our model can be used to accurately determine the population likely to have been exposed to the pathogen, and hence predict the residential locations of infected individuals. The results give rise to an effective control strategy that can be implemented rapidly in response to an outbreak. PMID:25211122

  8. Strategies for controlling non-transmissible infection outbreaks using a large human movement data set.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Penelope A; Rehman, Yasmin; Hall, Ian M; Edeghere, Obaghe; Danon, Leon; House, Thomas A; Keeling, Matthew J

    2014-09-01

    Prediction and control of the spread of infectious disease in human populations benefits greatly from our growing capacity to quantify human movement behavior. Here we develop a mathematical model for non-transmissible infections contracted from a localized environmental source, informed by a detailed description of movement patterns of the population of Great Britain. The model is applied to outbreaks of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria Legionella pneumophilia. We use case-report data from three recent outbreaks that have occurred in Great Britain where the source has already been identified by public health agencies. We first demonstrate that the amount of individual-level heterogeneity incorporated in the movement data greatly influences our ability to predict the source location. The most accurate predictions were obtained using reported travel histories to describe movements of infected individuals, but using detailed simulation models to estimate movement patterns offers an effective fast alternative. Secondly, once the source is identified, we show that our model can be used to accurately determine the population likely to have been exposed to the pathogen, and hence predict the residential locations of infected individuals. The results give rise to an effective control strategy that can be implemented rapidly in response to an outbreak. PMID:25211122

  9. Biological Control of the Nematode Infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae Family With Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Rahdar, Mahmoud; Gholamian, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biological control of parasitic nematodes by microorganisms is a promising approach to control such parasites. Microorganisms such as fungi, viruses and bacteria are recognized as biocontrol agents of nematodes. Objectives: The current study mainly aimed to evaluate the in vitro Potential of various saprophyte soil-fungi in reducing the infective larvae stage of parasitic nematode Trichostrongylidae family. Materials and Methods: Sheep feces were employed to provide the required third stage larvae source for the experiments. The nematode infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae family including three species of Ostertagia circumcincta, Marshalgia marshali and Heamonchos contortus were collected by Berman apparatus. Fifteen isolates of filamentous fungi were tested in the current study. One milliliter suspension containing 200 third stage larvae of Trichostrongylidae family was separately added to the fungal cultures in 2% water-agar medium Petri-dishes. Every day the live larvae were counted with light microscope (10X) and the number of captured larvae was recorded on different days. Results: Significant differences were observed in the results of co-culture of nematodes larva and fungi after seven days. The most effective fungi against the nematodes larvae were Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp., Fusarium equisetti, after seven days of incubation. Conclusions: The studies on fungi could be applied as suitable tools in biocontrol of nematode infections. However, additional surveys are required to select efficient with the ability to reduce the nematode larvae in the environment. PMID:25893084

  10. A Randomized Controlled Study Comparing Reverse Hybrid Therapy and Standard Triple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ping-I; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Wen-Chi; Peng, Nan-Jing; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Wang, Huay-Min; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Chen, Angela; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Tsay, Feng-Woei

    2015-12-01

    Reverse hybrid therapy is an 1-step 2-phase treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with less cost than standard triple therapy. We conducted a randomized, controlled study to compare the efficacies of standard triple therapy and reverse hybrid therapy in the treatment of H. pylori infection. From October 2012 to March 2015, consecutive H. pylori-infected subjects were randomly allocated to receive either a reverse hybrid therapy (pantoprazole plus amoxicillin for 12 days and clarithromycin plus metronidazole for the initial 7 days) or a standard triple therapy (pantoprazole plus amoxicillin and clarithromycin for 12 days). H. pylori status was assessed 6 weeks after treatment. Additionally, antibiotic resistances and host CYP2C19 genotypes were examined and analyzed. A total of 440 H. pylori-infected patients were randomly assigned to receive either a reverse hybrid (n = 220) or a standard triple therapy (n = 220). The reverse hybrid group had a higher eradication rate than standard triple group either by intention-to-treat (93.6% vs. 86.8%; P = 0.016) or per-protocol analysis (95.7% vs. 88.3%; P = 0.005). The 2 patient groups exhibited similar frequencies of overall adverse events (14.1% vs. 9.5%) and drug compliance (96.8% vs. 98.6%). Clarithromycin resistance was an independent risk factor predicting eradication failure in standard triple group (P < 0.001), but not in reverse hybrid group. CYP2C19 genotypes did not affect the eradication rates in both groups. Reverse hybrid therapy can be considered for first-line treatment of H. pylori infection since the new therapy achieves a higher eradication rate than standard triple therapy with similar tolerability and less pharmaceutical cost. PMID:26632893

  11. A Randomized Controlled Study Comparing Reverse Hybrid Therapy and Standard Triple Therapy for Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ping-I; Kao, Sung-Shuo; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Wen-Chi; Peng, Nan-Jing; Yu, Hsien-Chung; Wang, Huay-Min; Lai, Kwok-Hung; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Chen, Angela; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Tsay, Feng-Woei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reverse hybrid therapy is an 1-step 2-phase treatment for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with less cost than standard triple therapy. We conducted a randomized, controlled study to compare the efficacies of standard triple therapy and reverse hybrid therapy in the treatment of H. pylori infection. From October 2012 to March 2015, consecutive H. pylori-infected subjects were randomly allocated to receive either a reverse hybrid therapy (pantoprazole plus amoxicillin for 12 days and clarithromycin plus metronidazole for the initial 7 days) or a standard triple therapy (pantoprazole plus amoxicillin and clarithromycin for 12 days). H. pylori status was assessed 6 weeks after treatment. Additionally, antibiotic resistances and host CYP2C19 genotypes were examined and analyzed. A total of 440 H. pylori-infected patients were randomly assigned to receive either a reverse hybrid (n = 220) or a standard triple therapy (n = 220). The reverse hybrid group had a higher eradication rate than standard triple group either by intention-to-treat (93.6% vs. 86.8%; P = 0.016) or per-protocol analysis (95.7% vs. 88.3%; P = 0.005). The 2 patient groups exhibited similar frequencies of overall adverse events (14.1% vs. 9.5%) and drug compliance (96.8% vs. 98.6%). Clarithromycin resistance was an independent risk factor predicting eradication failure in standard triple group (P < 0.001), but not in reverse hybrid group. CYP2C19 genotypes did not affect the eradication rates in both groups. Reverse hybrid therapy can be considered for first-line treatment of H. pylori infection since the new therapy achieves a higher eradication rate than standard triple therapy with similar tolerability and less pharmaceutical cost. PMID:26632893

  12. Biapenem versus meropenem in the treatment of bacterial infections: a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiaoke; Zong, Zhiyong; Yu, Rujia; Lv, Xiaoju; Xin, Jianbao; Tong, Chaohui; Hao, Qinglin; Qin, Zhiqiang; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Hong; Ding, Guohua; Hu, Chengping

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Biapenem is a newly developed carbapenem to treat moderate and severe bacterial infections. This multicenter, randomized, parallel-controlled clinical trial was conducted to compare the clinical efficacy, bacterial eradication rates and safety of biapenem and meropenem in the treatment of bacterial lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections (UTIs) at nine centres in China. Methods: Patients diagnosed with bacterial lower respiratory tract infections or UTIs were randomly assigned to receive either biapenem (300 mg every 12 h) or meropenem (500 mg every 8 h) by intravenous infusion for 7 to 14 days according to their disease severity. The overall clinical efficacy, bacterial eradication rates and drug-related adverse reactions of biapenem and meropenem were analyzed. Results: A total of 272 enrolled cases were included in the intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis and safety analysis. There were no differences in demographics and baseline medical characteristics between biapenem group and meropenem group. The overall clinical efficacies of biapenem and meropenem were not significantly different, 94.70 per cent (125/132) vs. 93.94 per cent (124/132). The overall bacterial eradication rates of biapenem and meropenem showed no significant difference, 96.39 per cent (80/83) vs. 93.75 per cent (75/80). Drug-related adverse reactions were comparable in biapenem and meropenem groups with the incidence of 11.76 per cent (16/136) and 15.44 per cent (21/136), respectively. The most common symptoms of biapenem-related adverse reactions were rash (2.2%) and gastrointestinal distress (1.5%). Interpretation & conclusions: Biapenem was non-inferior to meropenem and was well-tolerated in the treatment of moderate and severe lower respiratory tract infections and UTIs. PMID:24521647

  13. Gene control of tyrosine kinase TIE2 and vascular manifestations of infections.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Chandra C; David, Sascha; Zhang, Ruyang; Berghelli, Anthony; Milam, Katelyn; Higgins, Sarah J; Hunter, Jon; Mukherjee, Aditi; Wei, Yongyue; Tran, Mei; Suber, Freeman; Kobzik, Lester; Kain, Kevin C; Lu, Shulin; Santel, Ansgar; Yano, Kiichiro; Guha, Prajna; Dumont, Daniel J; Christiani, David C; Parikh, Samir M

    2016-03-01

    Ligands of the endothelial-enriched tunica interna endothelial cell kinase 2 (Tie2) are markedly imbalanced in severe infections associated with vascular leakage, yet regulation of the receptor itself has been understudied in this context. Here, we show that TIE2 gene expression may constitute a novel vascular barrier control mechanism in diverse infections. Tie2 expression declined rapidly in wide-ranging models of leak-associated infections, including anthrax, influenza, malaria, and sepsis. Forced Tie2 suppression sufficed to attenuate barrier function and sensitize endothelium to permeability mediators. Rapid reduction of pulmonary Tie2 in otherwise healthy animals attenuated downstream kinase signaling to the barrier effector vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and induced vascular leakage. Compared with wild-type littermates, mice possessing one allele of Tie2 suffered more severe vascular leakage and higher mortality in two different sepsis models. Common genetic variants that influence TIE2 expression were then sought in the HapMap3 cohort. Remarkably, each of the three strongest predicted cis-acting SNPs in HapMap3 was also associated with the risk of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in an intensive care unit cohort of 1,614 subjects. The haplotype associated with the highest TIE2 expression conferred a 28% reduction in the risk of ARDS independent of other major clinical variables, including disease severity. In contrast, the most common haplotype was associated with both the lowest TIE2 expression and 31% higher ARDS risk. Together, the results implicate common genetic variation at the TIE2 locus as a determinant of vascular leak-related clinical outcomes from common infections, suggesting new tools to identify individuals at unusual risk for deleterious complications of infection. PMID:26884170

  14. Sustained generation of nitric oxide and control of mycobacterial infection requires argininosuccinate synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Qualls, Joseph E.; Subramanian, Chitra; Rafi, Wasiulla; Smith, Amber M.; Balouzian, Liza; DeFreitas, Ashley A.; Shirey, Kari Ann; Reutterer, Benjamin; Kernbauer, Elisabeth; Stockinger, Silvia; Decker, Thomas; Miyairi, Isao; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Salgame, Padmini; Rock, Charles O.; Murray, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) defends against intracellular pathogens but its synthesis must be regulated due to cell and tissue toxicity. During infection, macrophages import extracellular arginine to synthesize NO, generating the byproduct citrulline. Accumulated intracellular citrulline is thought to fuel arginine synthesis catalyzed by argininosuccinate synthase (Ass1) and argininosuccinate lyase (Asl), which would lead to abundant NO production. Instead, we find that citrulline is exported from macrophages during early stages of NO production with < 2% retained for recycling via the Ass1-Asl pathway. Later, extracellular arginine is depleted, and Ass1 expression allows macrophages to synthesize arginine from imported citrulline to sustain NO output. Ass1-deficient macrophages fail to salvage citrulline in arginine-scarce conditions, leading to their inability to control mycobacteria infection. Thus, extracellular arginine fuels rapid NO production in activated macrophages, and citrulline recycling via Ass1 and Asl is a fail-safe system that sustains optimum NO production. PMID:22980328

  15. Caspase-12 controls West Nile virus infection via the viral RNA receptor RIG-I

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Penghua; Arjona, Alvaro; Zhang, Yue; Sultana, Hameeda; Dai, Jianfeng; Yang, Long; LeBlanc, Philippe M; Doiron, Karine; Saleh, Maya; Fikrig, Erol

    2013-01-01

    Caspase-12 has been shown to negatively modulate inflammasome signaling during bacterial infection. Its function in viral immunity, however, has not been characterized. We now report an important role for caspase-12 in controlling viral infection via the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I. After challenge with West Nile virus (WNV), caspase-12-deficient mice had greater mortality, higher viral burden and defective type I interferon response compared with those of challenged wild-type mice. In vitro studies of primary neurons and mouse embryonic fibroblasts showed that caspase-12 positively modulated the production of type I interferon by regulating E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM25–mediated ubiquitination of RIG-I, a critical signaling event for the type I interferon response to WNV and other important viral pathogens. PMID:20818395

  16. The irreducible minimum in cross-infection control and isolation nursing

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W. Howard

    1970-01-01

    This is a survey of 10 years experience in trying to find out how to control hospital sepsis economically. We appear to have obtained reasonable improvements in hygiene by applying the teaching which has been given to students since the time of Leonard Colebrook. For our investigations we used only routine methods. The order of importance of the factors in reducing cross-infection would appear to be: (1) single rooms for all septic cases and for those requiring protective isolation; (2) a sister supported in complete authority over anyone entering the unit; (3) a simple, inflexible drill to introduce an impermeable layer between the nurse or doctor and the patient—gloves and apron provide this; (4) overshoes and barrier mats; (5) hygienic disposal of linen; (6) an efficient wet dusting and floor cleaning system. Anything beyond this must be justified by saving of nursing time or some factor other than prevention of infection. PMID:5272343

  17. Epidemiological Study and Control Trial of Taeniid Cestode Infection in Farm Dogs in Qinghai Province, China

    PubMed Central

    GUO, Zhihong; LI, Wei; PENG, Mao; DUO, Hong; SHEN, Xiuying; FU, Yong; IRIE, Takao; GAN, Tiantian; KIRINO, Yumi; NASU, Tetsuo; HORII, Yoichiro; NONAKA, Nariaki

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT An epidemiological study and control trial were conducted to assess taeniid infection in farm dogs in Qinghai Province, China. To improve egg detection by fecal examination, a deworming step with praziquantel was incorporated into the sampling methodology. As a result, a marked increase in the number of egg-positive samples was observed in samples collected at 24 hr after deworming. Then, the fecal examination and barcoding of egg DNA were performed to assess the prevalence of taeniid species in dogs from Xinghai, Haiyan, Gangcha and Chengduo counties. Analysis of 277 dog feces revealed that taeniid cestodes, including Taenia spp. and Echinococcus granulosus, were highly prevalent in Xinghai (34.4%), but eggs were not found in Haiyan where a control trial on canine echinococcosis had been conducted 20 years previously. A control trial involving the administration of 5–10 mg/kg praziquantel to 90 farm dogs at 45-day intervals was conducted in Xinghai. The prevalence of taeniid cestodes in the dogs was reduced to 9.6% and 4.9% after one and two years, respectively, indicating that some dogs were not administered praziquantel properly. A questionnaire survey of farmers in Xinghai and Haiyan revealed that most farmers in Xinghai were not familiar with echinococcosis or the transmission route of the disease, while most farmers in Haiyan had a more thorough understanding of the disease. The findings implied that a program for educating local farmers would be important for efficiently controlling canine taeniid infection in the region. PMID:24257329

  18. Hospital-acquired Legionella infections: an update on the procedures for controlling environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Borella, P; Bargellini, A; Marchegiano, P; Vecchi, E; Marchesi, I

    2016-01-01

    The waterborne healthcare-associated infections are mainly sustained by Legionella and Pseudomonas spp. Various water factors and plumbing characteristics, and the interaction with other water microorganisms are considered to be predictive of Legionella contamination. It is therefore mandatory to organize plans of surveillance, prevention and control in order to avoid disease appearance in immunosuppressed patients, with higher risk of death. Guidelines for the prevention of Legionnaires' disease have been published, benefiting those who face this problem, but definitive standardized solutions do not exist yet. Here we describe fifteen years of activity, during which our study group gathered interesting data on the control of Legionella contamination. Water disinfection is not generally sufficient to control the risk of infection, but a complex water safety plan should be developed, including system maintenance, training of staff and implementation of a clinical surveillance system aimed at early detection of cases. Concerning the control measures, we evaluated the effectiveness of different treatments suggested to reduce Legionella spp contamination, comparing our results with the current literature data. The performance ranking was highest for the filter, followed by boilers at high temperature, monochloramine and, at a lower level, chlorine dioxide; the effectiveness of hyperchlorination was limited, and thermal shock was even more ineffective. PMID:27071320

  19. Novel praziquantel treatment regime for controlling Asian tapeworm infections in pond-reared fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iles, Alison C.; Archdeacon, Thomas P.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The Asian tapeworm Bothriocephalus achelognathii is an intestinal fish parasite that is nonnative to but widespread throughout the southwestern United States. Praziquantel is an anthelminthic drug commonly used to treat fish for Asian tapeworm; however, it does not kill tapeworm eggs, so the water in ponds used for fish rearing must be exchanged after treatment. Our objective was to determine whether a system containing both an intermediate copepod host and a definitive fish host for Asian tapeworm could be treated without exchanging the water by using a follow-up treatment for any tapeworms that developed from eggs released before or during the first treatment. Here, we have described a new praziquantel treatment regimen to control Asian tapeworm infections in freshwater-reared fish. To evaluate the efficacy of this regimen, we stocked 50 red shiners Cyprinella lutrensis and an intermediate copepod host, Cyclops vernalis, into each of six pond mesocosms containing artificial macrophytes, sand, and gravel to simulate natural pools and provide suitable substrate for the copepod's life history. The test fish population had been naturally infected with B. achelognathii and had an initial infection prevalence of 14% and an infection intensity of 2.14 ± 2.19 (mean ± SD) worms per fish. Three mesocosms were treated twice, each with 2.5 mg/L praziquantel; 19 d passed between treatments to allow for possible reinfection to occur. After a 2.5-month posttreatment period to allow any remaining tapeworms to reestablish themselves, we killed and dissected all of the remaining fish. No worms were found in treated fish; however, the control group had an infection prevalence of 18 ± 6% and an infection intensity of 3.45 ± 2.1 worms per fish. Based on these results, we concluded that the praziquantel treatment regime administered was efficacious and suggest testing it on a larger scale. We caution that praziquantel has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  20. Remote screening and direct control of the bacterial infection of gardens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Nickolaj F.; Shavanova, Kateryna E.; Son'ko, Roman V.

    2014-10-01

    In last time gardens are often at the dangerous of viruses and bacteria infections. To preserve not only the coming harvest, but, in generally, to provide stability and growing horticultures the development of new generation of the analytical techniques for remote express screening vegetative state arrays and direct control of the appropriate infection if appearance of its maybe expected on the basis of previous surveys are very actually and important. For continuous monitoring we propose the application of the complex of the optical analytical devices as "Floratest" and "Plasmatest" (both produced in Ukraine) which is able to control step by step general situation with vegetable state and verify concrete situation with infection. General screening is accomplished on the control of the intensity of chlorophyll induction (IChF), namely, registration of so called Kautsky curve which testifies about physiological mechanisms of energy generation, accumulation and effective ways of its realization in cells. The measuring may be done by direct way on the number of individual vegetables and remote screening of massive with transferring registered signal direct in the laboratory. Next step of control connected with the application of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) based immune biosensor which is able to determine concrete bacteria (for example, Erwinia amilovora) with the limit detection about 0.2 μg/ml, the overall time of the analysis within 30 min (5 min of the duration of one measurement). The traditional ELISA-method showed the sensitivity to this pathogen about 0.5 μg/ml, overall time of the analysis several hours and obligatory using additional expensive reagents.

  1. Use of probiotics in HIV-infected children: a randomized double-blind controlled study.

    PubMed

    Trois, Lívia; Cardoso, Edmundo Machado; Miura, Ernani

    2008-02-01

    HIV/AIDS is an infection characterized by immune cell dysfunction and subsequent immunodeficiency, as well as intestinal disorder. Probiotics are live microbial feed supplements that beneficially affect the host animal by improving intestinal microbial balance and promoting health benefits. The goals of this study were to determine whether the use of probiotics could improve the immune response determined by CD4 cells mm(-3) counts and reduce liquid stool episodes. A randomized double-blind controlled trial with 77 HIV-infected children (2-12 years), divided into two groups: one receiving probiotics (formula containing Bifidobacterium bifidum with Streptococcus thermophilus -2.5 x 10(10) colony forming units) and the other, a standard formula (control group), for 2 months. The CD4 counts (cells mm(-3)) were collected at the beginning and end of the study. The quality and number of stools were assessed by a questionnaire (watery to normal stool consistency). There was an increase in the mean CD4 count in the probiotics group (791 cells mm(-3)) and a small decrease in the control group (538 cells mm(-3)). The change from baseline in mean CD4 cell count was +118 cells mm(-3) vs. -42 cells mm(-3) for children receiving the probiotic formula and control formula, respectively (p = 0.049). A similar reduction in liquid stool consistency in both the groups (p < 0.06), with a slight enhancement in the probiotics group, was observed, but without significant difference (p < 0.522). The incidence of loose-soft stools showed a small decrease in both groups (p < 0.955) and there was an increase in the incidence of normal stool consistency in both the groups (p < 0.01). Our study showed that probiotics have immunostimulatory properties and might be helpful in the treatment of HIV-infected children. PMID:17878180

  2. JC Polyomavirus Infection of Primary Human Renal Epithelial Cells Is Controlled by a Type I IFN-Induced Response

    PubMed Central

    Assetta, Benedetta; De Cecco, Marco; O’Hara, Bethany

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The JC and BK human polyomaviruses (JCPyV and BKPyV, respectively) establish lifelong persistent infections in the kidney. In immunosuppressed individuals, JCPyV causes progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, and BKPyV causes polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PVN). In this study, we compared JCPyV and BKPyV infections in primary human renal proximal tubule epithelial (HRPTE) cells. JCPyV established a persistent infection, but BKPyV killed the cells in 15 days. To identify the cellular factors responsible for controlling JCPyV infection and promoting viral persistence, we profiled the transcriptomes of JCPyV- and BKPyV-infected cells at several time points postinfection. We found that infection with both viruses induced interferon production but that interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) were only activated in the JCPyV-infected cells. Phosphorylated STAT1 and IRF9, which are responsible for inducing ISGs, translocated to the nucleus of JCPyV-infected cells but did not in BKPyV-infected cells. In BKPyV-infected cells, two critical suppressors of cytokine signaling, SOCS3 and SOCS1, were induced. Infection with BKPyV but not JCPyV caused reorganization of PML bodies that are associated with inactivating antiviral responses. Blockade of the interferon receptor and neutralization of soluble interferon alpha (IFN-α) and IFN-β partially alleviated the block to JCPyV infection, leading to enhanced infectivity. Our results show that a type I IFN response contributes to the establishment of persistent infection by JCPyV in HRPTE cells. PMID:27381292

  3. Compliance with infection control recommendations in South African dental practices: a review of studies published between 1990 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Oosthuysen, J; Potgieter, E; Blignaut, E

    2010-06-01

    In a country where the prevalence of infectious diseases ranks among the highest in the world, infection control in health care facilities should not be debatable. This unfortunately does not seem to be the case in South African oral health care facilities. This study is a systematic review of available literature on the adherence of South African oral health care professionals to infection control recommendations. Nine focus areas were investigated with regard to infection control practices: knowledge of infectious occupational hazards; personal hygiene and care of hands; correct application of personal protective equipment; use of environmental barriers and disposable items; sterilisation (recirculation) of instruments and handpieces; disinfection (surfaces) and sound housekeeping; management of waste disposal; quality control of dental unit waterlines, biofilms and water; as well as other special considerations. Although South African studies are limited and most of them relied on self-reports, which could have resulted in a serious overestimation of compliance, even these studies indicate serious shortcomings with regard to infection control practices in oral health care facilities in this country. This review highlights opportunity for improvement. Furthermore, it identifies possibilities for future research in infection control and also opportunities to improve infection control education for all oral health care workers in the country. PMID:20684444

  4. Comparison of Total Hospital-Acquired Bloodstream Infections to Central Line-Associated Bloodstream Infections and Implications for Outcome Measures in Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Leekha, Surbhi; Li, Shanshan; Thom, Kerri A.; Anne Preas, Michael; Caffo, Brian S.; Morgan, Daniel J.; Harris, Anthony D.

    2014-01-01

    Validity of the central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) measure is compromised by subjectivity. We observed significant decreases in both CLABSI and total hospital-acquired bloodstream infection (BSI) following a CLABSI prevention intervention in adult intensive care units. Total hospital-acquired BSI could be explored as an adjunct, objective CLABSI measure. PMID:23917916

  5. Tracking Pertussis and Evaluating Control Measures through Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance, Emerging Infections Program, United States.

    PubMed

    Skoff, Tami H; Baumbach, Joan; Cieslak, Paul R

    2015-09-01

    Despite high coverage with pertussis-containing vaccines, pertussis remains endemic to the United States. There have been increases in reported cases in recent years, punctuated by striking epidemics and shifting epidemiology, both of which raise questions about current policies regarding its prevention and control. Limited data on pertussis reported through the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System have proved insufficient to answer these questions. To address shortcomings of national pertussis data, the Emerging Infections Program at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance (EPS), which is characterized by systematic case ascertainment, augmented data collection, and collection of Bordetella pertussis isolates. Data collected through EPS have been instrumental in understanding the rapidly evolving epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of pertussis and have contributed essential information regarding pertussis vaccines. EPS also serves as a platform for conducting critical and timely evaluations of pertussis prevention and control strategies, including targeting of vaccinations and antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26291475

  6. Tracking Pertussis and Evaluating Control Measures through Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance, Emerging Infections Program, United States

    PubMed Central

    Baumbach, Joan; Cieslak, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite high coverage with pertussis-containing vaccines, pertussis remains endemic to the United States. There have been increases in reported cases in recent years, punctuated by striking epidemics and shifting epidemiology, both of which raise questions about current policies regarding its prevention and control. Limited data on pertussis reported through the National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System have proved insufficient to answer these questions. To address shortcomings of national pertussis data, the Emerging Infections Program at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention launched Enhanced Pertussis Surveillance (EPS), which is characterized by systematic case ascertainment, augmented data collection, and collection of Bordetella pertussis isolates. Data collected through EPS have been instrumental in understanding the rapidly evolving epidemiology and molecular epidemiology of pertussis and have contributed essential information regarding pertussis vaccines. EPS also serves as a platform for conducting critical and timely evaluations of pertussis prevention and control strategies, including targeting of vaccinations and antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26291475

  7. Compendium of measures to control Chlamydophila psittaci (formerly Chlamydia psittaci) infection among humans (psittacosis) and pet birds, 2005.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kathleen A; Bradley, Kristy K; Stobierski, Mary G; Tengelsen, Leslie A

    2005-02-15

    Psittacosis, also known as parrot fever and ornithosis, is a bacterial infection of humans that can cause severe pneumonia and other serious health problems. It is caused by Chlamydophila psittaci, formerly known as Chlamydia psittaci. From 1988 through 2003, 935 human cases of psittacosis were reported to the CDC and most resulted from exposure to infected pet birds, usually cockatiels, parakeets, parrots, and macaws. In birds, C. psittaci infection is referred to as avian chlamydiosis. Infected birds shed the bacteria through feces and nasal discharges, and humans become infected from exposure to these materials. This compendium provides information about psittacosis and avian chlamydiosis to public health officials, physicians, veterinarians, the pet bird industry, and others concerned with controlling these diseases and protecting public health. The recommendations in this compendium provide standardized procedures for controlling avian chlamydiosis in birds, a vital step to protecting human health. This document will be reviewed and revised as necessary. PMID:15742693

  8. Continuous Effector CD8(+) T Cell Production in a Controlled Persistent Infection Is Sustained by a Proliferative Intermediate Population.

    PubMed

    Chu, H Hamlet; Chan, Shiao-Wei; Gosling, John Paul; Blanchard, Nicolas; Tsitsiklis, Alexandra; Lythe, Grant; Shastri, Nilabh; Molina-París, Carmen; Robey, Ellen A

    2016-07-19

    Highly functional CD8(+) effector T (Teff) cells can persist in large numbers during controlled persistent infections, as exemplified by rare HIV-infected individuals who control the virus. Here we examined the cellular mechanisms that maintain ongoing T effector responses using a mouse model for persistent Toxoplasma gondii infection. In mice expressing the protective MHC-I molecule, H-2L(d), a dominant T effector response against a single parasite antigen was maintained without a contraction phase, correlating with ongoing presentation of the dominant antigen. Large numbers of short-lived Teff cells were continuously produced via a proliferative, antigen-dependent intermediate (Tint) population with a memory-effector hybrid phenotype. During an acute, resolved infection, decreasing antigen load correlated with a sharp drop in the Tint cell population and subsequent loss of the ongoing effector response. Vaccination approaches aimed at the development of Tint populations might prove effective against pathogens that lead to chronic infection. PMID:27421704

  9. Control of intramammary infections in goats: impact on somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Poutrel, B; de Crémoux, R; Ducelliez, M; Verneau, D

    1997-02-01

    Udder-half infections were recorded throughout a lactation for 1,060 goats belonging to eight commercial herds. Bacteriological examination from aseptic milk samples and somatic cell counts (SCC) determined by Fossomatic cell counting were performed at the beginning, the middle, and the end of lactation. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were the prevalent microorganisms isolated. Geometric means of SCC for uninfected halves or halves infected by CNS or major pathogens were 272 x 10(3) cells/mL, 932,000 x 10(3) cells/mL and 2,443,000 x 10(3) cells/mL, respectively. Two field trials were carried out for evaluation of effectiveness of systematic treatment at drying-off (1 syringe by half) by a combination of penicillin, nafcillin, and dihydrostreptomycin labeled for bovines. In the first trial, all goats (n = 217) of two herds were treated immediately after the last milking, and two herds (n = 196) were used as untreated controls. In the second trial, 215 goats were treated at drying-off. There were no untreated controls. Dry period cures were determined by bacteriological examination of udder-half milk samples collected aseptically at drying-off and 2 wk after parturition. Impact of treatment on SCC was determined from composite milk samples collected monthly after kidding. At parturition, in the first trial, 40 of 202 (19.8%) udder halves were spontaneously cured in the control group vs 169 of 217 (77.9%) in the treatment group. In the second trial, 141 out of 215 treated halves were cured. During the first 75 d in lactation, geometric mean SCC was significantly lower for treated goats than for control goats. After 75 d, SCC for treated and control goats were similar. These data suggest that other methods are required to prevent new intramammary infections throughout the lactation in order to keep a low SCC in goat milk. To determine whether this could be accomplished through teat dipping, half of the goats in five commercial herds were dipped (n = 294) after

  10. A prospective case-control study to investigate retinal microvascular changes in acute dengue infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Petrina; Lye, David C.; Yeo, Tun Kuan; Cheung, Carol Y.; Thein, Tun-Linn; Wong, Joshua G.; Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Ling-Jun; Wong, Tien-Yin; Gan, Victor C.; Leo, Yee-Sin; Teoh, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can affect the microcirculation by direct viral infection or activation of inflammation. We aimed to determine whether measured retinal vascular parameters were associated with acute dengue infection. Patients with acute dengue were recruited from Communicable Diseases Center, Singapore and age-gender-ethnicity matched healthy controls were selected from a population-based study. Retinal photographs were taken on recruitment and convalescence. A spectrum of quantitative retinal microvascular parameters (retinal vascular caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity and branching angle) was measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. (Singapore I Vessel Assessment, version 3.0). We included 62 dengue patients and 127 controls. Dengue cases were more likely to have wider retinal arteriolar and venular calibers (158.3 μm vs 144.3 μm, p < 0.001; 227.7 μm vs 212.8 μm, p < 0.001; respectively), higher arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions (1.271 vs 1.249, p = 0.002; 1.268 vs. 1.230, p < 0.001, respectively), higher arteriolar and venular tortuosity (0.730 vs 0.546 [x104], p < 0.001; 0.849 vs 0.658 [x104], p < 0.001; respectively), compared to controls. Resolution of acute dengue coincided with decrease in retinal vascular calibers and venular fractal dimension. Dengue patients have altered microvascular network in the retina; these changes may reflect pathophysiological processes in the immune system. PMID:26603217

  11. Importance of Multifaceted Approaches in Infection Control: A Practical Experience from an Outbreak Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Petráš, Petr; Melter, Oto; Kapounová, Gabriela; Vopalková, Petra; Kubele, Jan; Vaniš, Václav; Tkadlec, Jan; Bukáčková, Eva; Machová, Ivana; Jindrák, Vlastimil

    2016-01-01

    Background This study presents the results of a multidisciplinary, nosocomial MRSA outbreak investigation in an 8-bed medical intensive care unit (ICU). The identification of seven MRSA positive patients in the beginning of 2014 led to the closure of the ward for several weeks. A multidisciplinary, retrospective investigation was initiated in order to identify the reason and the source for the outbreak, describe MRSA transmission in the department and identify limitations in infection control. Methods The investigation comprised an epidemiological description of MRSA cases from 2012 to 2014 and a characterization of MRSA isolates, including phage-, spa- and PFGE-typing. Additionally, MRSA screening was performed from the hospital staff and the environment. To identify the reason for the outbreak, work-related, psychological and behavioral factors were investigated by impartial audits and staff interviews. Results Thirty-one MRSA cases were registered during the study period, and 36 isolates were investigated. Molecular typing determined the outbreak strain (phage type 54/812, PFGE type A4, spa type t003) and identified the probable index case. Nasal carriage in one employee and a high environmental contamination with the outbreak strain was documented. Important gaps in nursing procedures and general management were identified. Elevated stress levels and communication problems preceded the outbreak. Compliance with hand hygiene and isolation procedures was evaluated as appropriate. Conclusion This study demonstrates the complexity of controlling hospital-associated infections. The combined use of different typing methods is beneficial for outbreak investigations. Psychological, behavioral and other work-related factors have an important impact on the spread of nosocomial pathogens. These factors should be addressed and integrated in routine infection control practice. PMID:27322433

  12. Preoperative hair removal and surgical site infections: network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, A; Saliou, P; Lucet, J C; Mimoz, O; Keita-Perse, O; Grandbastien, B; Bruyère, F; Boisrenoult, P; Lepelletier, D; Aho-Glélé, L S

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative hair removal has been used to prevent surgical site infections (SSIs) or to prevent hair from interfering with the incision site. We aimed to update the meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials about hair removal for the prevention of SSIs, and conduct network meta-analyses to combine direct and indirect evidence and to compare chemical depilation with clipping. The PubMed, ScienceDirect and Cochrane databases were searched for randomized controlled trials analysing different hair removal techniques and no hair removal in similar groups. Paired and network meta-analyses were conducted. Two readers independently assessed the study limitations for each selected article according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method. Nineteen studies met the inclusion criteria. No study compared clipping with chemical depilation. Network meta-analyses with shaving as the reference showed significantly fewer SSIs with clipping, chemical depilation, or no depilation [relative risk 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.79; 0.60, 0.36-0.97; and 0.56, 0.34-0.96, respectively]. No significant difference was observed between the absence of depilation and chemical depilation or clipping (1.05, 0.55-2.00; 0.97, 0.51-1.82, respectively] or between chemical depilation and clipping (1.09, 0.59-2.01). This meta-analysis of 19 randomized controlled trials confirmed the absence of any benefit of depilation to prevent surgical site infection, and the higher risk of surgical site infection when shaving is used for depilation. Chemical depilation and clipping were compared for the first time. The risk of SSI seems to be similar with both methods. PMID:26320612

  13. A prospective case-control study to investigate retinal microvascular changes in acute dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Petrina; Lye, David C; Yeo, Tun Kuan; Cheung, Carol Y; Thein, Tun-Linn; Wong, Joshua G; Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Ling-Jun; Wong, Tien-Yin; Gan, Victor C; Leo, Yee-Sin; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can affect the microcirculation by direct viral infection or activation of inflammation. We aimed to determine whether measured retinal vascular parameters were associated with acute dengue infection. Patients with acute dengue were recruited from Communicable Diseases Center, Singapore and age-gender-ethnicity matched healthy controls were selected from a population-based study. Retinal photographs were taken on recruitment and convalescence. A spectrum of quantitative retinal microvascular parameters (retinal vascular caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity and branching angle) was measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. (Singapore I Vessel Assessment, version 3.0). We included 62 dengue patients and 127 controls. Dengue cases were more likely to have wider retinal arteriolar and venular calibers (158.3 μm vs 144.3 μm, p < 0.001; 227.7 μm vs 212.8 μm, p < 0.001; respectively), higher arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions (1.271 vs 1.249, p = 0.002; 1.268 vs. 1.230, p < 0.001, respectively), higher arteriolar and venular tortuosity (0.730 vs 0.546 [x10(4)], p < 0.001; 0.849 vs 0.658 [x10(4)], p < 0.001; respectively), compared to controls. Resolution of acute dengue coincided with decrease in retinal vascular calibers and venular fractal dimension. Dengue patients have altered microvascular network in the retina; these changes may reflect pathophysiological processes in the immune system. PMID:26603217

  14. Case-control study of vulvar vestibulitis risk associated with genital infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elaine M; Ritchie, Justine M; Galask, Rudolph; Pugh, Erica E; Jia, Jian; Ricks-McGillan, Joan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) associated with genital infections in a case-control study. METHODS: Diagnosed cases with VVS (n = 69) and age-frequency-matched healthy controls (n = 65) were enrolled from gynecology clinics in a university medical hospital during 1999. They were compared for potential risk factors and symptoms of disease. RESULTS: VVS cases had a significantly higher risk of physician-reported bacterial vaginosis (BV) (odds ratio, OR = 9.4), Candida albicans (OR = 5.7), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) (OR = 11.2), trichomoniasis (OR = 20.6), and vulvar dysplasia (OR = l5.7) but no risk associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), ASCUS, cervical dysplasia, genital warts, chlamydia, genital herpes or gonorrhea. Genital symptoms reported significantly more often with VVS included vulvar burning (91 vs. 12%), dyspareunia (81 vs. 15%), vulvar itching (68 vs. 23%) and dysuria (54 vs. 19%) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: A history of genital infections is associated with an increased risk of VVS. Long-term follow-up case-control studies are needed to elucidate etiologic mechanisms, methods for prevention and effective treatment. PMID:12648313

  15. Ebola infection control in Sierra Leonean health clinics: A large cross-agency cooperative project.

    PubMed

    Levy, Benjamin; Rao, Carol Y; Miller, Laura; Kennedy, Ngozi; Adams, Monica; Davis, Rosemary; Hastings, Laura; Kabano, Augustin; Bennett, Sarah D; Sesay, Momodu

    2015-07-01

    The Ebola virus disease outbreak occurring in West Africa has resulted in at least 199 cases of Ebola in Sierra Leonean health care workers, many as a result of transmission occurring in health facilities. The Ministry of Health and Sanitation of Sierra Leone recognized that improvements in infection prevention and control (IPC) were necessary at all levels of health care delivery. To this end, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, United Nations Children's Fund, and multiple nongovernmental organizations implemented a national IPC training program in 1,200 peripheral health units (PHUs) in Sierra Leone. A tiered training of trainers program was used. Trainers conducted multiday trainings at PHUs and coordinated the delivery of personal protective equipment (gloves, gowns, masks, boots) and infection control supplies (chlorine, buckets, disposable rags, etc) to all PHU staff. Under the ongoing project, 4,264 health workers have already been trained, and 98% of PHUs have received their first shipment of supplies. PMID:25891979

  16. Questionnaire-based survey on structural quality of hospitals and nursing homes for the elderly, their staffing with infection control personal, and implementation of infection control measures in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kramer, A; Assadian, O; Helfrich, J; Krüger, C; Pfenning, I; Ryll, S; Perner, A; Loczenski, B

    2013-01-01

    From January to May 2012, 1,860 hospitals throughout Germany received a questionnaire encompassing 77 items. Additionally, 300 outpatient care services and 310 nursing homes for elderly in Berlin also received a 10-item questionnaire asking on their implemented infection control practices. All questionnaires were anonymous. A total of 229 completed questionnaires from hospitals, 14 questionnaires from outpatient care services, and 16 questionnaires from nursing homes were eligible for further analysis. The lack of Infection Control physicians was identified as the largest issue. In hospitals sized 400-999 beds a gap of 71%, and in hospitals sized ≥1,000 beds a gap of 17% was reported. Depending on the number of hospital beds, 13-29% of hospitals sized ≥100 beds reported not havening one infection control nurse. Since based on the number of beds in larger institutions or in facilities caring for high-risk patients several infection control nurses may be required, the deficiency in infection control nurses may even be higher, particularly in secondary and tertiary care facilities. Furthermore, the analysis revealed that the legal requirements for surveillance and reporting of notifiable infectious diseases have not yet been implemented in 11% of the facilities. The implementation of antibiotic strategies did show significant gaps. However, deficiencies in the implemented measures for the prevention of surgical site infections were less frequent. Yet 12% of the participants did not have a dedicated infection control concept for their surgical services. Eight percent of hospitals were not prepared for an outbreak management and 10% did not have established regulations for wearing surgical scrubs. Deficiencies in waste disposal and the control of air-conditioning systems were also noted. Based on the results of this survey, conclusions on the optimal resource allocation for further improvement of patient safety may be drawn. While all participating nursing homes had

  17. Common Infection Control Practices in the Emergency Department: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Eileen J.; Pouch, Stephanie M.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare associated infections (HAIs) are a major health concern, despite being largely avoidable. The emergency department (ED) is an essential component of the healthcare system and subject to workflow challenges, which may hinder ED personnel adherence to guideline based infection prevention practices. Aim The purpose of this review was to examine published literature regarding adherence rates among ED personnel to selected infection control practices, including hand hygiene (HH) and aseptic technique during the placement of central venous catheters and urinary catheters. We also reviewed studies reporting rates of ED equipment contamination. Methods PubMed was searched for studies that included adherence rates among ED personnel to HH during routine patient care, aseptic technique during the placement of central venous catheters and urinary catheters, and rates of equipment contamination. Findings A total of 853 studies were screened and 589 abstracts reviewed. The full texts of 36 papers were examined and 22 articles were identified as meeting inclusion criteria. Eight studies used various scales to measure HH compliance, which ranged from 7.7–89.7%. Seven articles examined central venous catheters inserted in the ED or by emergency medicine residents. Detail of aseptic technique practices during urinary catheterization was lacking. Four papers described equipment contamination in the ED. Conclusion Standardized methods and definitions of compliance monitoring are needed in order to compare results across settings. PMID:25179326

  18. Advanced trends in controlling Helicobacter pylori infections using functional and therapeutically supplements in baby milk.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Gamal M; Taha, Tarek H; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Alshehri, Ali M A

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen infecting about 30 % of children and 60 % of adults worldwide. It is responsible for diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. H. pylori treatment based on antibiotics with proton pump inhibitor, but therapy failure is shown to be higher than 20 % and is essentially due to an increasing in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which has led to the search for alternative therapies. In this study, we discuss the usage of natural extracts mixture as alternative or complementary agents in controlling H. pylori infection so here, we focused on the plant extracts of (Cloves, Pepper, Cumin, Sage, Pomegranate peel, Ginger, Myrrh and Licorice). To that end, Phytochemical constituents detection like Tannins, Glycosides, Alkaloids, Flavonoids, Terpenoids, Saponins, Phenolic compounds, Reducing sugars, Volatile oils, Amino acids and Proteins was demonstrated. Each plant extract was examined individually or in combination for its antimicrobial activity against H. pylori. Out of the used extracts, four mixes were prepared and tested against H. pylori. The antibacterial activities of the four mixes, represented by the diameter of inhibition clear zone, recorded 21, 39, 23 and 28 mm. The most potent mix (mix2) was chosen and mixed with baby milk as a new combination for H. pylori infections treatment in babies. PMID:26604389

  19. [Thiabendazole for the control of Strongyloides stercoralis infection in a hyperendemic area in Peru].

    PubMed

    Marcos, Luis; Terashima, Angélica; Samalvides, Frine; Alvarez, Héctor; Lindo, Felipe; Tello, Raúl; Canales, Marco; Demarini, Julio; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis infection is a disease caused by an intestinal parasite. This helminth is highly prevalent in tropical and subtropical areas. The preferred treatment is ivermectin, and thiabendazole as a second option available in certain Peruvian institutions. The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy and tolerability of thiabendazole (25 mg/kg/day) administered twice a day (after meals) for three days in individuals with S. stercoralis chronic infection. The study was conducted at Hospital de La Merced, Province of Chanchamayo, Peru (endemic area), during a 90 day period. The study included 32 individuals (22 female and 10 male, average age +/- SD = 9.31 +/- 8.11 years) with a diagnosed S. stercoralis infection. Follow up tests were eosinophil count, hematocrit, agar plate feces culture, and Baermann technique modified by Lumbreras. Healing rate was 90.6%. The average eosinophil count in healed patients significantly decreased (1168 to 665 eosinophils/cc, p=0.006) as compared to the treatment failure group, which showed a slight increase (618 to 897 eosinophils/cc, p=0.125). Hematocrit increased in both groups (2% and 3%, respectively). Adverse effects were headache, dizziness, and epigastralgia in 6.2% of individuals. It was concluded that the studied scheme showed a high effectiveness rate and was well tolerated. Therefore this scheme may be taken into account for control programs of this parasite in hyperendemic areas. PMID:16333389

  20. Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Compounds in Controlling Infection by Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens through Pruning Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Rebeca; Mateos, Rosa María; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Olego, Miguel Angel; Sevillano, Silvia; González-García, Sandra; Garzón-Jimeno, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine trunk fungal pathogens, such as Diplodia seriata and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, can infect plants through pruning wounds. They cause grapevine trunk diseases and are involved in grapevine decline. Accordingly, the protection of pruning wounds is crucial for the management of grapevine trunk diseases. The efficacy of different natural antifungals in inhibiting the growth of several fungi causing grapevine trunk diseases was evaluated in vitro. The fungi showing greater in vitro efficacy were tested on autoclaved grape wood assays against D. seriata and P. chlamydospora. Based on results from these assays, chitosan oligosaccharide, vanillin, and garlic extract were selected for further evaluation on pruning wounds inoculated with D. seriata and P. chlamydospora in field trials. A significant decrease in plant mortality was observed after 2 years of growth in the plants treated with the different natural antifungals compared to the mortality rate observed in infected plants that were not treated with antifungals. Also, the infection rate for the inoculated pathogens was significantly reduced in plants treated with the selected natural antifungals. Therefore, natural antifungals represent a promising alternative for disease control and could provide significant economic benefits for the grape-growing industry. PMID:26162882

  1. Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Compounds in Controlling Infection by Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens through Pruning Wounds.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Rebeca; Mateos, Rosa María; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Olego, Miguel Angel; Sevillano, Silvia; González-García, Sandra; Garzón-Jimeno, Enrique; Coque, Juan José R

    2015-09-01

    Grapevine trunk fungal pathogens, such as Diplodia seriata and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, can infect plants through pruning wounds. They cause grapevine trunk diseases and are involved in grapevine decline. Accordingly, the protection of pruning wounds is crucial for the management of grapevine trunk diseases. The efficacy of different natural antifungals in inhibiting the growth of several fungi causing grapevine trunk diseases was evaluated in vitro. The fungi showing greater in vitro efficacy were tested on autoclaved grape wood assays against D. seriata and P. chlamydospora. Based on results from these assays, chitosan oligosaccharide, vanillin, and garlic extract were selected for further evaluation on pruning wounds inoculated with D. seriata and P. chlamydospora in field trials. A significant decrease in plant mortality was observed after 2 years of growth in the plants treated with the different natural antifungals compared to the mortality rate observed in infected plants that were not treated with antifungals. Also, the infection rate for the inoculated pathogens was significantly reduced in plants treated with the selected natural antifungals. Therefore, natural antifungals represent a promising alternative for disease control and could provide significant economic benefits for the grape-growing industry. PMID:26162882

  2. SAMHD1 controls cell cycle status, apoptosis and HIV-1 infection in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Bonifati, Serena; Daly, Michele B; St Gelais, Corine; Kim, Sun Hee; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A; Shepard, Caitlin; Kennedy, Edward M; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek; Wu, Li

    2016-08-01

    SAMHD1 limits HIV-1 infection in non-dividing myeloid cells by decreasing intracellular dNTP pools. HIV-1 restriction by SAMHD1 in these cells likely prevents activation of antiviral immune responses and modulates viral pathogenesis, thus highlighting a critical role of SAMHD1 in HIV-1 physiopathology. Here, we explored the function of SAMHD1 in regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in monocytic THP-1 cells. Using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, we generated THP-1 cells with stable SAMHD1 knockout. We found that silencing of SAMHD1 in cycling cells stimulates cell proliferation, redistributes cell cycle population in the G1/G0 phase and reduces apoptosis. These alterations correlated with increased dNTP levels and more efficient HIV-1 infection in dividing SAMHD1 knockout cells relative to control. Our results suggest that SAMHD1, through its dNTPase activity, affects cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis, and emphasize a key role of SAMHD1 in the interplay between cell cycle regulation and HIV-1 infection. PMID:27183329

  3. Diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of infections caused by Rhodococcus equi in foals.

    PubMed

    Giguère, S; Cohen, N D; Chaffin, M Keith; Slovis, N M; Hondalus, M K; Hines, S A; Prescott, J F

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi, a gram-positive facultative intracellular pathogen, is one of the most common causes of pneumonia in foals. Although R. equi can be cultured from the environment of virtually all horse farms, the clinical disease in foals is endemic at some farms, sporadic at others, and unrecognized at many. On farms where the disease is endemic, costs associated with morbidity and mortality attributable to R. equi may be very high. The purpose of this consensus statement is to provide recommendations regarding the diagnosis, treatment, control, and prevention of infections caused by R. equi in foals. PMID:22092608

  4. A Chronic Respiratory Pasteurella multocida Infection Is Well-Controlled by Long-Term Macrolide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Sakata, Tomomi; Toyokawa, Masahiro; Nishi, Isao; Tomono, Kazunori

    2016-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman with severe bronchiectasis frequently received antibiotics, including penicillin, for acute exacerbations due to Pasteurella multocida. Although the bacteria showed a decrease in antibiotic susceptibility, her symptoms and X-ray findings became stable, and severe exacerbations were not observed for the last few years after a low-dose erythromycin treatment was started. The development of a respiratory infection with Pasteurella multocida is relatively uncommon, but it can be controlled by immunomodulation which is associated with long-term macrolide therapy. PMID:26831030

  5. Emergence of viral diseases: mathematical modeling as a tool for infection control, policy and decision making.

    PubMed

    Louz, Derrick; Bergmans, Hans E; Loos, Birgit P; Hoeben, Rob C

    2010-08-01

    Mathematical modeling can be used for the development and implementation of infection control policy to combat outbreaks and epidemics of communicable viral diseases. Here an outline is provided of basic concepts and approaches used in mathematical modeling and parameterization of disease transmission. The use of mathematical models is illustrated, using the 2001 UK foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemic, the 2003 global severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, and human influenza pandemics, as examples. This provides insights in the strengths, limitations, and weaknesses of the various models, and demonstrates their potential for supporting policy and decision making. PMID:20218764

  6. Quantitative assessment of organizational culture within hospitals and its relevance to infection prevention and control strategies.

    PubMed

    Borg, M A; Waisfisz, B; Frank, U

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that organizational culture (OC) is an important driver of infection prevention and control (IPC) behaviour among healthcare workers. This study examined OC in seven European hospitals using a validated assessment tool based on Hofstede's model, and identified significant variations in OC scores. Hospitals with low prevalence of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) exhibited high scores for change facilitation and change readiness, whereas hospitals with high prevalence of MRSA exhibited low scores for these determinants. It is possible to use tools, available outside health care, to study OC within hospitals and gain better insight into IPC behaviour change strategies. PMID:25676113

  7. Arabidopsis: An Adequate Model for Dicot Root Systems?

    PubMed

    Zobel, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis root system is frequently considered to have only three classes of root: primary, lateral, and adventitious. Research with other plant species has suggested up to eight different developmental/functional classes of root for a given plant root system. If Arabidopsis has only three classes of root, it may not be an adequate model for eudicot plant root systems. Recent research, however, can be interpreted to suggest that pre-flowering Arabidopsis does have at least five (5) of these classes of root. This then suggests that Arabidopsis root research can be considered an adequate model for dicot plant root systems. PMID:26904040

  8. Latent tuberculosis infection in a Malaysian prison: implications for a comprehensive integrated control program in prisons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prisons continue to fuel tuberculosis (TB) epidemics particularly in settings where access to TB screening and prevention services is limited. Malaysia is a middle-income country with a relatively high incarceration rate of 138 per 100,000 population. Despite national TB incidence rate remaining unchanged over the past ten years, data about TB in prisons and its contribution to the overall national rates does not exist. This survey was conducted to address the prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI) in Malaysia’s largest prison. Methods From July to December 2010, all HIV-infected and a comparative group of HIV-uninfected prisoners housed separately in Kajang prison were asked to participate in the survey after explaining the study protocol. Subjects providing informed consent were interviewed using a structured questionnaire followed by the placement of tuberculin skin test (TST) with 2 TU of PPD RT-23 to subjects not being treated for active TB. TST was read after 48-72 hours and indurations of ≥ 5 mm and ≥ 10 mm were considered positive among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected subjects, respectively. Additionally, HIV-infected inmates underwent phlebotomy for CD4 lymphocyte count assessment. A logistic regression model was explored to determine factors associated with TST positivity. Results Overall, 286 subjects (138 HIV-infected and 148 HIV-uninfected) had complete data and TST results. The majority were men (95.1%), less than 40 years old (median age 36.0, SD 7.87), and Malaysians (93.3%). Most (82.5%) had been previously incarcerated and more than half (53.1%) reported sharing needles just prior to their incarceration. TST was positive in 88.8% (84.7% among HIV-infected and 92.5% among HIV-uninfected subjects) and was independently associated with being HIV-uninfected (AOR = 2.97, p = 0.01) and with frequent previous incarcerations (AOR = 1.22 for every one previous incarceration, p = 0.01) after adjusting for other

  9. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study of Dexlansoprazole MR-Based Triple Therapy for Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Tsay, Feng-Woei; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chen, Angela; Hsu, Ping-I

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dexlansoprazole MR is the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole that is delivered by a dual delayed release formulation. It is effective for symptom control of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, its efficacy in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection remains unclear. This pilot, randomized, controlled, head-to-head study was conducted to investigate whether the efficacy of single-dose dexlansoprazole MR-based triple therapy was noninferior to double-dose rabeprazole-based triple therapy in the treatment of H pylori infection. Consecutive H pylori-infected subjects were randomly allocated to either 7-day dexlansoprazole MR-based standard triple therapy (dexlansoprazole MR 60 mg once daily, clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily, and amoxicillin 1 g twice daily) or rabeprazole-based triple therapy (rabeprazole 20 mg twice daily, clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily, and amoxicillin 1 g twice daily). H pylori status was assessed 6 weeks after the end of treatment. A total of 177 H pylori-infected patients were randomized to receive dexlansoprazole MR-based (n = 90) or rabeprazole-based (n = 87) triple therapy. Intention-to-treat analysis demonstrated no differences between eradication rates of the 2 study groups (83.3% vs 81.6%; P = 0.736). Per-protocol analysis yielded comparable results (85.1% vs 81.2%; P = 0.497). Both groups exhibited similar frequencies of adverse events (7.8% vs 4.6%; P = 0.536) and drug compliance (98.9% vs 97.7%; P = 0.496). Multivariate analysis disclosed that the presence of clarithromycin resistance was the only independent factors predictive of treatment failure with an odds ratio of 6.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.2–37.6). This work demonstrates that single-dose dexlansoprazole MR-based triple therapy yields a similar eradication rate as double-dose rabeprazole-based therapy. Since the pharmaceutical cost of the single-dose dexlansoprazole MR regime is lower than that of the double

  10. A Pilot Randomized Controlled Study of Dexlansoprazole MR-Based Triple Therapy for Helicobacter Pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Tsay, Feng-Woei; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chen, Angela; Hsu, Ping-I

    2016-03-01

    Dexlansoprazole MR is the R-enantiomer of lansoprazole that is delivered by a dual delayed release formulation. It is effective for symptom control of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, its efficacy in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection remains unclear. This pilot, randomized, controlled, head-to-head study was conducted to investigate whether the efficacy of single-dose dexlansoprazole MR-based triple therapy was noninferior to double-dose rabeprazole-based triple therapy in the treatment of H pylori infection. Consecutive H pylori-infected subjects were randomly allocated to either 7-day dexlansoprazole MR-based standard triple therapy (dexlansoprazole MR 60 mg once daily, clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily, and amoxicillin 1 g twice daily) or rabeprazole-based triple therapy (rabeprazole 20 mg twice daily, clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily, and amoxicillin 1 g twice daily). H pylori status was assessed 6 weeks after the end of treatment. A total of 177 H pylori-infected patients were randomized to receive dexlansoprazole MR-based (n = 90) or rabeprazole-based (n = 87) triple therapy. Intention-to-treat analysis demonstrated no differences between eradication rates of the 2 study groups (83.3% vs 81.6%; P = 0.736). Per-protocol analysis yielded comparable results (85.1% vs 81.2%; P = 0.497). Both groups exhibited similar frequencies of adverse events (7.8% vs 4.6%; P = 0.536) and drug compliance (98.9% vs 97.7%; P = 0.496). Multivariate analysis disclosed that the presence of clarithromycin resistance was the only independent factors predictive of treatment failure with an odds ratio of 6.8 (95% confidence interval: 1.2-37.6). This work demonstrates that single-dose dexlansoprazole MR-based triple therapy yields a similar eradication rate as double-dose rabeprazole-based therapy. Since the pharmaceutical cost of the single-dose dexlansoprazole MR regime is lower than that of the double-dose rabeprazole

  11. The correlation between Toxoplasma gondii infection and Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mahami Oskouei, Mahmoud; Hamidi, Faezeh; Talebi, Mahnaz; Farhoudi, Mehdi; Taheraghdam, Ali Akbar; Kazemi, Tohid; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Fallah, Esmaeil

    2016-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all nucleate cells of vertebrates. Human infected by vertical transmission and also using raw or undercooked meat or food and water that contaminated with mature oocysts. Parkinson's disease as neurodegenerative disease affects people above 60 years. Due to high prevalence of toxoplasmosis in Iran and evidence about effects of T. gondii on neurodegenerative diseases, this study has been conducted to investigate possible correlation between Toxoplasma and Parkinson's disease in Iran. Seventy five Parkinson's patients and equal healthy volunteers were enrolled. After obtaining informed consent and sociodemographic features, 5 ml blood sample were collected and then anti-Toxoplasma IgG and IgM levels were examined by ELISA method. Data was analyzed with Chi-squre and Fisher's test by usig stata 11 software. Binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis in assessing the correlation between toxoplasmosis and Parkinson. Eighty five percent of Parkinson's group and 90.3 % of control group were positive for anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody. In this investigation no statically differences were observed between groups and age, gender, residency and using raw or undercooked meat. There is no significant association between IgG positive titer and Parkinson's disease. However, statistically significant association was found between Parkinson and keeping cat (P = 0.03) as well as the using of undercooked egg (P = 0.004). Although there is high level of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibody in Parkinson's patients which reflects chronic Toxoplasma infection; we couldn't detect any statistical association between T. gondii infection and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27605800

  12. Multiple Immune Factors Are Involved in Controlling Acute and Chronic Chikungunya Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Poo, Yee Suan; Rudd, Penny A.; Gardner, Joy; Wilson, Jane A. C.; Larcher, Thibaut; Colle, Marie-Anne; Le, Thuy T.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Warrilow, David; Allcock, Richard; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Schroder, Wayne A.; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Lopez, José A.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA) in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells) in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection) was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA. PMID:25474568

  13. Multiple immune factors are involved in controlling acute and chronic chikungunya virus infection.

    PubMed

    Poo, Yee Suan; Rudd, Penny A; Gardner, Joy; Wilson, Jane A C; Larcher, Thibaut; Colle, Marie-Anne; Le, Thuy T; Nakaya, Helder I; Warrilow, David; Allcock, Richard; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Schroder, Wayne A; Khromykh, Alexander A; Lopez, José A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    The recent epidemic of the arthritogenic alphavirus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has prompted a quest to understand the correlates of protection against virus and disease in order to inform development of new interventions. Herein we highlight the propensity of CHIKV infections to persist long term, both as persistent, steady-state, viraemias in multiple B cell deficient mouse strains, and as persistent RNA (including negative-strand RNA) in wild-type mice. The knockout mouse studies provided evidence for a role for T cells (but not NK cells) in viraemia suppression, and confirmed the role of T cells in arthritis promotion, with vaccine-induced T cells also shown to be arthritogenic in the absence of antibody responses. However, MHC class II-restricted T cells were not required for production of anti-viral IgG2c responses post CHIKV infection. The anti-viral cytokines, TNF and IFNγ, were persistently elevated in persistently infected B and T cell deficient mice, with adoptive transfer of anti-CHIKV antibodies unable to clear permanently the viraemia from these, or B cell deficient, mice. The NOD background increased viraemia and promoted arthritis, with B, T and NK deficient NOD mice showing high-levels of persistent viraemia and ultimately succumbing to encephalitic disease. In wild-type mice persistent CHIKV RNA and negative strand RNA (detected for up to 100 days post infection) was associated with persistence of cellular infiltrates, CHIKV antigen and stimulation of IFNα/β and T cell responses. These studies highlight that, secondary to antibodies, several factors are involved in virus control, and suggest that chronic arthritic disease is a consequence of persistent, replicating and transcriptionally active CHIKV RNA. PMID:25474568

  14. Control of Giardia infections with ronidazole and intensive hygiene management in a dog kennel.

    PubMed

    Fiechter, Ruth; Deplazes, Peter; Schnyder, Manuela

    2012-06-01

    Infections with the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia in dogs and cats are common. Clinical signs vary from asymptomatic to small bowel diarrhea and associated discomfort. The control of infections in dogs is frequently a frustrating issue for animal owners and veterinarians. Drugs with antiprotozoal activity such as fenbendazole and metronidazole are recommended, however, they do not show 100% efficacy and superinfections occur regularly. Ronidazole is currently the drug of choice for the treatment of Tritrichomonas foetus in cats and there is now limited information available about its efficacy against Giardia spp. In the kennel investigated, dogs regularly showed loose feces and the presence of Giardia (assemblage C, renamed as G. canis) cysts. An elimination strategy of this parasite involving strict hygiene management and disinfection of the enclosures with 4-chlorine-M-cresol, oral treatment with ronidazole (30-50mg/kg BW bid for 7 days) and two shampooings (containing chlorhexidine) at the beginning and the end of the treatments was implemented for a group of 6 dogs. As a control another group of 7 dogs was transferred to the disinfected enclosures and shampooed, but left untreated. Dog feces were tested for the presence of Giardia cysts (SAF concentration technique) or Giardia antigen with a commercial ELISA (NOVITEC(®)) and a quick immunochromatography-based test (SensPERT(®)) before and between 5 and 40 days after the last treatment. All ronidazole-treated dogs were negative for Giardia cysts and antigen up to 26 days after the last treatment, while between 1 and 5 of the control animals tested positive in each of the test series. At this point, also dogs of the control group were again moved into clean enclosures, shampooed twice and treated with ronidazole. Five, 12 and 19 days after the last treatment, the dogs in the control group tested negative for Giardia cysts and antigen. However, all animals had again positive results at later time points

  15. Infection Control for Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Early Diagnosis and Treatment Is the Key.

    PubMed

    van Cutsem, Gilles; Isaakidis, Petros; Farley, Jason; Nardell, Ed; Volchenkov, Grigory; Cox, Helen

    2016-05-15

    Multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis, "Ebola with wings," is a significant threat to tuberculosis control efforts. Previous prevailing views that resistance was mainly acquired through poor treatment led to decades of focus on drug-sensitive rather than drug-resistant (DR) tuberculosis, driven by the World Health Organization's directly observed therapy, short course strategy. The paradigm has shifted toward recognition that most DR tuberculosis is transmitted and that there is a need for increased efforts to control DR tuberculosis. Yet most people with DR tuberculosis are untested and untreated, driving transmission in the community and in health systems in high-burden settings. The risk of nosocomial transmission is high for patients and staff alike. Lowering transmission risk for MDR tuberculosis requires a combination approach centered on rapid identification of active tuberculosis disease and tuberculosis drug resistance, followed by rapid initiation of appropriate treatment and adherence support, complemented by universal tuberculosis infection control measures in healthcare facilities. It also requires a second paradigm shift, from the classic infection control hierarchy to a novel, decentralized approach across the continuum from early diagnosis and treatment to community awareness and support. A massive scale-up of rapid diagnosis and treatment is necessary to control the MDR tuberculosis epidemic. This will not be possible without intense efforts toward the implementation of decentralized, ambulatory models of care. Increasing political will and resources need to be accompanied by a paradigm shift. Instead of focusing on diagnosed cases, recognition that transmission is driven largely by undiagnosed, untreated cases, both in the community and in healthcare settings, is necessary. This article discusses this comprehensive approach, strategies available, and associated challenges. PMID:27118853

  16. Consumption of groundwater as an independent risk factor of Salmonella choleraesuis infection: a case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Wan-Ching; Chen, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2009-12-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) in humans can be considered as an endemic disease in certain regions of Taiwan, and the number of cases has increased in recent years. The goal of the case-control study discussed in this article was to identify the possible demographic and environmental risk factors associated with S. Choleraesuis infection in Taiwan. During the period of December 2005 to March 2007, the case-control study was conducted in human patients with Salmonella infection from two medical centers. Structured questionnaires were applied to collect information of relevant risk factors after interviewing 13 culture-confirmed S. Choleraesuis cases and 84 controls with other Salmonella serotype infection. After evaluation by univariate and multivariate statistical models, the results suggested that consumption of groundwater could be an independent risk factor associated with S. Choleraesuis in Taiwan. Therefore, appropriate health education needs to be conducted especially in areas where groundwater is used. PMID:20063610

  17. Identifying components for programmatic latent tuberculosis infection control in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Sandgren, Andreas; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Jannigje M; Oordt-Speets, Anouk M; van Kessel, Gerarda B; de Vlas, Sake J; van der Werf, Marieke J

    2016-08-25

    Individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are the reservoir of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a population and as long as this reservoir exists, elimination of tuberculosis (TB) will not be feasible. In 2013, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) started an assessment of benefits and risks of introducing programmatic LTBI control, with the aim of providing guidance on how to incorporate LTBI control into national TB strategies in European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States and candidate countries. In a first step, experts from the Member States, candidate countries, and international and national organisations were consulted on the components of programmatic LTBI control that should be considered and evaluated in literature reviews, mathematical models and cost-effectiveness studies. This was done through a questionnaire and two interactive discussion rounds. The main components identified were identification and targeting of risk groups, determinants of LTBI and progression to active TB, optimal diagnostic tests for LTBI, effective preventive treatment regimens, and to explore the potential for combining LTBI control with other health programmes. Political commitment, a solid healthcare infrastructure, and favourable economic situation in specific countries were identified as essential to facilitate the implementation of programmatic LTBI control. PMID:27589214

  18. Identification of Immune Effectors Essential to the Control of Primary and Secondary Intranasal Infection with Brucella melitensis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hanot Mambres, Delphine; Machelart, Arnaud; Potemberg, Georges; De Trez, Carl; Ryffel, Bernhard; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Muraille, Eric

    2016-05-01

    The mucosal immune system represents the first line of defense against Brucella infection in nature. We used genetically deficient mice to identify the lymphocytes and signaling pathways implicated in the control of primary and secondary intranasal infection with B. melitensis Our analysis of primary infection demonstrated that the effectors implicated differ at the early and late stages and are dependent on the organ. TCR-δ, TAP1, and IL-17RA deficiency specifically affects early control of Brucella in the lungs, whereas MHC class II (MHCII) and IFN-γR deficiency impairs late control in the lungs, spleen, and liver. Interestingly, IL-12p35(-/-) mice display enhanced Brucella growth in the spleen but not in the lungs or liver. Secondary intranasal infections are efficiently contained in the lung. In contrast to an i.p. infectious model, in which IL-12p35, MHCII, and B cells are strictly required for the control of secondary infection, we observed that only TCR-β deficiency or simultaneous neutralization of IL-12p35- and IL-17A-dependent pathways impairs the memory protective response against a secondary intranasal infection. Protection is not affected by TCR-δ, MHCII, TAP1, B cell, IL-17RA, or IL-12p35 deficiency, suggesting that CD4(+) and CD8(+) α/β(+) T cells are sufficient to mount a protective immune response and that an IL-17A-mediated response can compensate for the partial deficiency of an IFN-γ-mediated response to control a Brucella challenge. These findings demonstrate that the nature of the protective memory response depends closely on the route of infection and highlights the role of IFN-γ-and IL-17RA-mediated responses in the control of mucosal infection by Brucella. PMID:27036913

  19. Is the Marketing Concept Adequate for Continuing Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenburg, Terri L.

    1984-01-01

    Because educators have a social responsibility to those they teach, the marketing concept may not be adequate as a philosophy for continuing education. In attempting to broaden the audience for continuing education, educators should consider a societal marketing concept to meet the needs of the educationally disadvantaged. (SK)

  20. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  1. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION...

  2. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  3. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  4. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  5. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED...

  6. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  7. Chlamydia pneumoniae infection induced allergic airway sensitization is controlled by regulatory T-cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Crother, Timothy R; Schröder, Nicolas W J; Karlin, Justin; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Slepenkin, Anatoly; Alsabeh, Randa; Peterson, Ellena; Arditi, Moshe

    2011-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae (CP) is associated with induction and exacerbation of asthma. CP infection can induce allergic airway sensitization in mice in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Allergen exposure 5 days after a low dose (mild-moderate), but not a high dose (severe) CP infection induces antigen sensitization in mice. Innate immune signals play a critical role in controlling CP infection induced allergic airway sensitization, however these mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Wild-type, TLR2-/-, and TLR4-/- mice were infected intranasally (i.n.) with a low dose of CP, followed by i.n. exposure to human serum albumin (HSA) and challenged with HSA 2 weeks later. Airway inflammation, immunoglobulins, eosinophils, and goblet cells were measured. Low dose CP infection induced allergic sensitization in TLR2-/- mice, but not in TLR4-/- mice, due to differential Treg responses in these genotypes. TLR2-/- mice had reduced numbers of Tregs in the lung during CP infection while TLR4-/- mice had increased numbers. High dose CP infection resulted in an increase in Tregs and pDCs in lungs, which prevented antigen sensitization in WT mice. Depletion of Tregs or pDCs resulted in allergic airway sensitization. We conclude that Tregs and pDCs are critical determinants regulating CP infection-induced allergic sensitization. Furthermore, TLR2 and TLR4 signaling during CP infection may play a regulatory role through the modulation of Tregs. PMID:21695198

  8. Infections due to Carbapenem Resistant Enterobacteriaceae among Saudi Arabian Hospitalized Patients: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Garbati, M. A.; Sakkijha, H.; Abushaheen, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. We conducted this case-control study to determine the risk factors and treatment outcome of infections due to carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae in our institution. Methods. This is a matched case-control study of patients with infection due to carbapenem resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and carbapenem susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CSE), from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March 2012 and December 2013. Results. During this period, 29 cases and 58 controls were studied. The mean ages of the cases (55.4 years) and controls (54.7 years) were similar (p = 0.065). Cases had higher mean Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) (3.1) than controls (1.9), p = 0.026. Several factors contributed to infection among the studied population. Prior uses of piperacillin-tazobactam, a carbapenem, a quinolone, and metronidazole were significantly associated with CRE infections. Nine of the cases died compared with 7 of the controls, p = 0.031. Mortality was associated with advanced age, the presence of comorbidities, ICU stay, and receipt of invasive procedures. Conclusions. Infections due to CRE resulted in a significantly increased mortality. Combination antibiotic therapy was associated with reduced mortality. Properly designed randomized controlled studies are required to better characterize these findings. PMID:27144165

  9. QTc interval prolongation in HIV-infected patients: a case–control study by 24-hour Holter ECG recording

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aim of the study was to assess QTc interval by a 24-hour ECG recording in a group of HIV-infected individuals with a basal prolonged QTc. The risk factors associated with QTc prolongation and the indices of cardiovascular autonomic control were also evaluated. Methods A case–control study was performed using as cases 32 HIV-infected patients with prolonged (>440 msec) QTc interval as assessed by Holter ECG, and as controls 64 HIV-infected subjects with normal QTc interval. Autonomic function was evaluated by heart rate variability analysis during 24-hour recording. Results Duration of HIV disease was significantly longer among cases than among controls (p=0.04). Waist/hip ratio was also higher among cases than among controls (p=0.05). Frequency domain analysis showed the absence of physiologic decrease of low frequency (LF) in the night period in both cases and controls. The LF night in cases showed a statistically significant reduction when compared with controls (p=0.007). Conclusions In our study group, QTc interval prolongation was associated with a longer duration of HIV infection and with a greater waist/hip ratio. HIV patients with QTc interval prolongation and with a longer duration of HIV infection were more likely to have an impairment of parasympathetic and sympathetic cardiac component. PMID:23259665

  10. Antibiotic-releasing Porous Polymethylmethacrylate Constructs for Osseous Space Maintenance and Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Meng; Kretlow, James D.; Nguyen, Anson; Young, Simon; Baggett, L. Scott; Wong, Mark E.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    The use of a strategy involving space maintenance as the initial step of a two-stage regenerative medicine approach toward reconstructing significant bony or composite tissue defects in the craniofacial area, preserves the void volume of bony defects and could promote soft tissue healing prior to the subsequent definitive repair. One of the complications with a biomaterial-based space maintenance approach is local infection, which requires early, effective eradication, ideally through local antibiotic delivery. The purpose of this study is to develop a dual function implant material for maintaining osseous space and releasing an antibiotic to eliminate local infection in bony defects. Colistin, a polymyxin antibiotic, was chosen specifically to address infections with Acinetobacter species, the most common pathogen associated with combat-related traumatic craniofacial injuries. Porous polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) constructs incorporating poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were fabricated by mixing a clinically used bone cement formulation of PMMA powder and methylmethacrylate liquid with a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) hydrogel (40 or 50 wt%) to impart porosity and PLGA microspheres (10 or 15 wt%) loaded with colistin to control drug release. The PMMA/CMC/PLGA construct featured mild setting temperature, controllable surface/bulk porosity by incorporation of the CMC hydrogel, reasonably strong compressive properties, and continuous drug release over a period of 5 weeks with total drug release of 68.1-88.3%, depending on the weight percentage of CMC and PLGA incorporation. The concentration of released colistin was well above its reported minimum inhibitory concentration against susceptible species for 5 weeks. This study provides information on the composition parameters that enable viable porosity characteristics/drug release kinetics of the PMMA/CMC/PLGA construct for the initial space maintenance as part of a two-stage regenerative medicine

  11. A randomized controlled trial of a tailored group smoking cessation intervention for HIV-infected smokers

    PubMed Central

    Moadel, Alyson B.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Mermelstein, Robin J.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Dolce, Eileen H.; Shuter, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Background More than half of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in the US smoke cigarettes, and tobacco use is responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality in this group. Little is known about the efficacy of tobacco treatment strategies in PLWH. Design Randomized controlled trial comparing Positively Smoke Free (PSF), an intensive group therapy intervention targeting HIV-infected smokers, to standard care. Methods A cohort of 145 PLWH smokers, recruited from an HIV-care center in the Bronx, New York, were randomized 1:1 into the PSF program or standard care. All were offered a 3-month supply of nicotine replacement therapy. PSF is an eight session program tailored to address the needs and concerns of HIV-infected smokers. Sessions were co-facilitated by a graduate student and an HIV-infected peer. The primary outcome was biochemically-confirmed, seven-day point-prevalence abstinence at three months. Results In the intention to treat analysis, PSF condition subjects had nearly double the quit rate of controls (19.2% vs 9.7%, P=0.11). In the complete case, as-treated analysis, assignment to PSF was associated with increased odds of quitting (ORadj 3.55, 95% CI: 1.04– 12.0). Latino ethnicity and lower loneliness score were predictive of abstinence. Subjects in the PSF condition exhibited significant decreases in daily cigarette consumption and significant increases in self-efficacy and in motivation to quit. Attendance of ≥7 sessions was associated with higher quit rates. Conclusions These findings suggest a positive effect of PSF on cessation rates in PLWH smokers. Loneliness and self-efficacy are influential factors in the smoking behaviors of PLWH. PMID:22732470

  12. Serum Micronutrient Status of Haart-Naïve, HIV Infected Children in South Western Nigeria: A Case Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Anyabolu, H. C.; Adejuyigbe, E. A.; Adeodu, O. O.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Though micronutrients are vital in the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus infection, most studies have been conducted in adults. Knowledge of the status of key micronutrients in HIV infected African children will indicate if supplementation may be beneficial to these children living in this resource-poor region. Objectives. We sought to determine the micronutrient status and associated factors of HAART-naïve HIV infected children and compare them with those of the HIV negative controls. Methods. We enrolled 70 apparently stable HAART naïve HIV infected children. Seventy age and sex matched HIV negative children were equally enrolled as the controls. Their social class, anthropometry, clinical stage, CD4 counts, serum zinc, selenium, and vitamin C were determined. Results. The prevalence of zinc, selenium, and vitamin C deficiency in HIV infected subjects was 77.1%, 71.4%, and 70.0%, respectively, as compared to 44.3%, 18.6%, and 15.7% in HIV negative controls. Among the HIV infected subjects, 58.6% were deficient in the three micronutrients. Micronutrient status was related to the weight, clinical, and immunological stages but not BMI or social class. Conclusion. Deficiency of these key micronutrients is widely prevalent in HAART naïve HIV infected children irrespective of social class. This suggests that supplementation trial studies may be indicated in this population. PMID:25180086

  13. Albendazole treatment of HIV-1 and helminth co-infection: A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Walson, Judd L.; Otieno, Phelgona A.; Mbuchi, Margaret; Richardson, Barbra A.; Lohman-Payne, Barbara; Macharia, Steve Wanyee; Overbaugh, Julie; Berkley, James; Sanders, Eduard J.; Chung, Michael; John-Stewart, Grace C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Several co-infections have been shown to impact the progression of HIV-1 infection. We sought to determine if treatment of helminth co-infection in HIV-1 infected adults impacted markers of HIV-1 disease progression. DESIGN To date there have been no randomized trials to examine the effects of soil-transmitted helminth eradication on markers of HIV-1 progression. METHODS A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of albendazole (400mg daily for three days) in antiretroviral-naïve HIV-1 infected adults (CD4 >200 cells/mm3) with soil-transmitted helminth infection was conducted at ten sites in Kenya (Clinical Trials.gov NCT00130910). CD4 and plasma HIV-1 RNA levels at 12 weeks following randomization were compared in the trial arms using linear regression, adjusting for baseline values. RESULTS Of 1,551 HIV-1 infected individuals screened for helminth-infection, 299 were helminth-infected. 234 adults were enrolled and underwent randomization and 208 individuals were included in intent-to-treat analyses. Mean CD4 count was 557 cells/mm3 and mean plasma viral load was 4.75 log10 copies/mL at enrolment. Albendazole therapy resulted in significantly higher CD4 counts among individuals with Ascaris lumbricoides infection after 12 weeks of follow up (+109 cells/mm3; 95% CI +38.9 to +179.0, p=0.003) and a trend for 0.54 log10 lower HIV-1 RNA levels (p=0.09). These effects were not seen with treatment of other species of soil-transmitted helminths. CONCLUSIONS Treatment of A. lumbricoides with albendazole in HIV-1 co-infected adults resulted in significantly increased CD4 counts during 3-month follow-up. Given the high prevalence of A. lumbricoides infection worldwide, deworming may be an important potential strategy to delay HIV-1 progression. PMID:18670219

  14. Use of bacteriophage for biological control of Salmonella Enteritidis infection in chicken.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Seob; Lee, Dong-Hun; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Jae-Keun; Youn, Ha-Na; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Yang, Si-Yong; Cho, Young-Wook; Lee, Joong-Bok; Park, Seung-Yong; Choi, In-Soo; Song, Chang-Seon

    2012-12-01

    Bacteriophage ΦCJ07 with broad host ranges for Salmonella strains isolated from sewage effluent were used to reduce Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) infection in chickens. One-day-old chicks challenged with 5×10(7) colony-forming units/bird of SE were cohabitated with contact chicks and treated with three concentrations (10(5), 10(7) and 10(9) plaque forming units (PFU)/g) of bacteriophage prepared as a feed additive for 21days after challenge. Salmonella in the intestine was quantified and environmental contamination level was examined at 1, 2 and 3weeks after challenge. All treatments reduced intestinal SE colonization in challenged and contact chickens and reduced the environmental contamination level, but the reductions produced by 10(7) and 10(9)PFU/g of bacteriophage were significant (P<0.05) as compared with untreated controls. In addition, seven out of 10 (70%) contact chickens treated with 10(9)PFU/g of bacteriophage had no detectable intestinal Salmonella at 3weeks after treatment, suggesting that bacteriophage therapy significantly prevented the horizontal transmission of SE. These results provide important insights into preventive and control strategies against SE infection in poultry and indicate that the use of bacteriophage could reduce the incidence of Salmonella food poisoning. PMID:22795674

  15. Characterizing and controlling the inflammatory network during influenza A virus infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Suoqin; Li, Yuanyuan; Pan, Ruangang; Zou, Xiufen

    2014-01-01

    To gain insights into the pathogenesis of influenza A virus (IAV) infections, this study focused on characterizing the inflammatory network and identifying key proteins by combining high-throughput data and computational techniques. We constructed the cell-specific normal and inflammatory networks for H5N1 and H1N1 infections through integrating high-throughput data. We demonstrated that better discrimination between normal and inflammatory networks by network entropy than by other topological metrics. Moreover, we identified different dynamical interactions among TLR2, IL-1β, IL10 and NFκB between normal and inflammatory networks using optimization algorithm. In particular, good robustness and multistability of inflammatory sub-networks were discovered. Furthermore, we identified a complex, TNFSF10/HDAC4/HDAC5, which may play important roles in controlling inflammation, and demonstrated that changes in network entropy of this complex negatively correlated to those of three proteins: TNFα, NFκB and COX-2. These findings provide significant hypotheses for further exploring the molecular mechanisms of infectious diseases and developing control strategies.

  16. Honey and microbial infections: a review supporting the use of honey for microbial control.

    PubMed

    Al-Waili, Noori S; Salom, Khelod; Butler, Glenn; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A

    2011-10-01

    Honey has been used as a medicine throughout the ages and has recently been reintroduced to modern medical practice. Much of the research to date has addressed honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. Honey antimicrobial action explains the external and internal uses of honey. Honey has been used to treat adult and neonatal postoperative infection, burns, necrotizing fasciitis, infected and nonhealing wounds and ulcers, boils, pilonidal sinus, venous ulcers, and diabetic foot ulcers. These effects are ascribed to honey's antibacterial action, which is due to acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidants content, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. When ingested, honey also promotes healing and shows antibacterial action by decreasing prostaglandin levels, elevating nitric oxide levels, and exerting prebiotic effects. These factors play a major role in controlling inflammation and promoting microbial control and healing processes. This article reviews data supporting the effectiveness of natural honey in eradicating human pathogens and discusses the mechanism of actions. PMID:21859350

  17. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project

    PubMed Central

    Ljungqvist, I.; Davidavičiene, E.; Mikaityte, J.; van der Werf, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan. PMID:27051607

  18. Tuberculosis infection control in health facilities in Lithuania: lessons learnt from a capacity support project.

    PubMed

    Turusbekova, N; Ljungqvist, I; Davidavičiene, E; Mikaityte, J; van der Werf, M J

    2016-03-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control (IC) is key in controlling TB transmission in health facilities in Lithuania. This article presents a project that aimed at supporting health care facilities in Lithuania in implementing TB-IC. The project consisted of 1) facility TB-IC assessments, 2) development of facility TB-IC plans, 3) TB-IC training and 4) site visits. We assessed the impact of these activities through a self-assessment questionnaire. The project resulted in limited improvements. Most progress was seen in administrative and managerial activities. Possible reasons for the limited improvements are challenges with funding and the lack of supportive legislation and a national TB-IC plan. PMID:27051607

  19. An Agent-based Simulation Model for C. difficile Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Codella, James; Safdar, Nasia; Heffernan, Rick; Alagoz, Oguzhan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Control of C. difficile infection (CDI) is an increasingly difficult problem for healthcare institutions. There are commonly recommended strategies to combat CDI transmission such as oral vancomycin for CDI treatment, increased hand hygiene with soap and water for healthcare workers, daily environmental disinfection of infected patient rooms, and contact isolation of diseased patients. However, the efficacy of these strategies, particularly for endemic CDI, has not been well studied. The objective of this research is to develop a valid agent-based simulation model (ABM) to study C. difficile transmission and control in a mid-sized hospital. Methods. We develop an ABM of a mid-sized hospital with agents such as patients, healthcare workers, and visitors. We model the natural progression of CDI in a patient using a Markov chain and the transmission of CDI through agent and environmental interactions. We derive input parameters from aggregate patient data from the 2007-2010 Wisconsin Hospital Association and published medical literature. We define a calibration process, which we use to estimate transition probabilities of the Markov model by comparing simulation results to benchmark values found in published literature. Results. Comparing CDI control strategies implemented individually, routine bleach disinfection of CDI+ patient rooms provides the largest reduction in nosocomial asymptomatic colonizations (21.8%) and nosocomial CDIs (42.8%). Additionally, vancomycin treatment provides the largest reduction in relapse CDIs (41.9%), CDI-related mortalities (68.5%), and total patient LOS (21.6%). Conclusion. We develop a generalized ABM for CDI control that can be customized and further expanded to specific institutions and/or scenarios. Additionally, we estimate transition probabilities for a Markov model of natural CDI progression in a patient through calibration. PMID:25112595

  20. Optimal control of vancomycin-resistant enterococci using preventive care and treatment of infections.

    PubMed

    Lowden, Jonathan; Miller Neilan, Rachael; Yahdi, Mohammed

    2014-03-01

    The rising prevalence of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is a major health problem in intensive care units (ICU) because of its association with increased mortality and high health care costs. We present a mathematical framework for determining cost-effective strategies for prevention and treatment of VRE in the ICU. A system of five ordinary differential equations describes the movement of ICU patients in and out of five VRE-related states. Two control variables representing the prevention and treatment of VRE are incorporated into the system. The basic reproductive number is derived and calculated for different levels of the two controls. An optimal control problem is formulated to minimize VRE-related deaths and costs associated with prevention and treatment controls over a finite time period. Numerical solutions illustrate optimal single and dual allocations of the controls for various cost values. Results show that preventive care has the greatest impact in reducing the basic reproductive number, while treatment of VRE infections has the most impact on reducing VRE-related deaths. PMID:24480735