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Sample records for adequate iron stores

  1. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Hemoglobin... discuss blood donor hemoglobin and hematocrit qualification standards in the United States, its impact...

  2. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  3. Electrolytic iron or ferrous sulfate increase body iron in women with moderate to low iron stores.

    PubMed

    Swain, James H; Johnson, LuAnn K; Hunt, Janet R

    2007-03-01

    Commercial elemental iron powders (electrolytic and reduced iron), as well as heme iron supplements, were tested for efficacy in improving the iron status of women. In a randomized, double-blind trial, 51 women with moderate to low iron stores received daily for 12 wk: 1) placebo, 2) 5 mg iron as heme iron or 50 mg iron as 3) electrolytic iron, 4) reduced iron, or 5) FeSO(4). Treatments were provided in 2 capsules (heme carrier) and 3 wheat rolls (other iron sources). Differences in iron status, food nonheme iron absorption, and fecal properties were evaluated. Body iron, assessed from the serum transferrin receptor:ferritin ratio, increased significantly more in subjects administered FeSO(4) (127 +/- 29 mg; mean +/- SEM) and electrolytic (115 +/- 37 mg), but not the reduced (74 +/- 32 mg) or heme (65 +/- 26 mg) iron forms, compared with those given placebo (2 +/- 19 mg). Based on body iron determinations, retention of the added iron was estimated as 3.0, 2.7, 1.8, and 15.5%, in the 4 iron-treated groups, respectively. Iron treatments did not affect food iron absorption. The 50 mg/d iron treatments increased fecal iron and free radical-generating capacity in vitro, but did not affect fecal water cytotoxicity. In subjects administered FeSO(4), fecal water content was increased slightly but significantly more than in the placebo group. In conclusion, electrolytic iron was approximately 86% as efficacious as FeSO(4) for improving body iron, but the power of this study was insufficient to detect any efficacy of the reduced or heme iron within 12 wk. With modification, this methodology of testing higher levels of food fortification for several weeks in healthy women with low iron stores has the potential for economically assessing the efficiency of iron compounds to improve iron status.

  4. Blood donations, iron stores, and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Logroscino, Giancarlo; Chen, Honglei; Wing, Al; Ascherio, Alberto

    2006-06-01

    Iron overload and systemic iron stores may be important in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore examined the association between blood donations, which reduce body iron stores, and risk of PD in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, a large cohort investigation of U.S. men. Our hypothesis was that blood donation reduces the risk of PD by lowering systemic iron stores. Although the number of blood donations was inversely related to the ferritin levels in a subsample of the study population, no association was found between the number of blood donations and risk of PD (P for trend = 0.6). Unexpectedly, the risk of PD was higher among men who reported recent multiple blood donations (P for trend = 0.05). The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that reduced systemic iron stores lower the risk of PD.

  5. Mobilization of Stored Iron in Mammals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Linder, Maria C.

    2013-01-01

    From the nutritional standpoint, several aspects of the biochemistry and physiology of iron are unique. In stark contrast to most other elements, most of the iron in mammals is in the blood attached to red blood cell hemoglobin and transporting oxygen to cells for oxidative phosphorylation and other purposes. Controlled and uncontrolled blood loss thus has a major impact on iron availability. Also, in contrast to most other nutrients, iron is poorly absorbed and poorly excreted. Moreover, amounts absorbed (~1 mg/day in adults) are much less than the total iron (~20 mg/day) cycling into and out of hemoglobin, involving bone marrow erythropoiesis and reticuloendothelial cell degradation of aged red cells. In the face of uncertainties in iron bioavailability, the mammalian organism has evolved a complex system to retain and store iron not immediately in use, and to make that iron available when and where it is needed. Iron is stored innocuously in the large hollow protein, ferritin, particularly in cells of the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Our current understanding of the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms by which this stored iron in ferritin is mobilized and distributed—within the cell or to other organs—is the subject of this review. PMID:24152745

  6. Transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin assayed by serum ferritin kinetics in patients with normal iron stores and iron overload.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Hisao

    2015-11-01

    Ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron, total iron stores and transformation rate were determined by serum ferritin kinetics. The transformation rate between ferritin and hemosiderin is motivated by the potential difference between them. The transformer determines transformation rate according to the potential difference in iron mobilization and deposition. The correlations between transformation rate and iron stores were studied in 11 patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC), 1 patent with treated iron deficiency anemia (TIDA), 9 patients with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH) and 4 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia (TD). The power regression curve of approximation showed an inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron in part and total iron stores in HH. Such an inverse correlation between transformation rate and iron stores implies that the larger the amount of iron stores, the smaller the transformation of iron stores. On the other hand, a minimal inverse correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron and no correlation between transformation rate and hemosiderin iron or total iron stores in CHC indicate the derangement of storage iron metabolism in the cells with CHC. Radio-iron fixation on the iron storing tissue in iron overload was larger than that in normal subjects by ferrokinetics. This is consistent with the inverse correlation between transformation rate and total iron stores in HH. The characteristics of iron turnover between ferritin and hemosiderin were disclosed from the correlation between transformation rate and ferritin iron, hemosiderin iron or total iron stores.

  7. Effect of an intravenous iron dextran regimen on iron stores, hemoglobin, and erythropoietin requirements in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, L; Uhthoff, T; Tierney, M; Nadler, S

    1998-05-01

    Iron deficiency is a common cause of delayed or diminished response to erythropoietin (EPO) in hemodialysis patients. Although oral iron is often prescribed to replete iron stores, this approach to iron supplementation may not be adequate with chronic EPO therapy. Intravenous (IV) iron dextran may be an effective alternative approach to replete iron stores and may facilitate more cost-effective use of EPO. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an IV iron dextran regimen that consisted of a loading dose phase followed by monthly maintenance doses of iron dextran. The effect of this regimen on iron stores, hemoglobin, and EPO doses was evaluated. This was an open prospective study in adult hemodialysis patients who were iron deficient as defined by a serum ferritin less than 100 ng/mL or transferrin saturation (TSAT) of less than 20%. Patients were loaded with 1 g iron dextran in five divided doses and then received monthly maintenance doses of 100 mg for the 4-month study period. Values of serum ferritin, TSAT, hemoglobin, and EPO dose were followed for the 4-month study period. Thirty hemodialysis patients receiving EPO were identified as being iron deficient and were enrolled in the study. The mean serum ferritin increased significantly from 49 ng/mL at baseline to 225 ng/mL at the end of the study period (P < 0.0001). Mean TSAT also increased significantly from 27% to 33% (P = 0.002). Values for hemoglobin did not change significantly during the study period; however, there was a significant reduction in EPO dose from a mean baseline dose of 112 U/kg/wk to 88 U/kg/wk at the end of the study period (P = 0.009). Seventeen patients experienced an increase in hemoglobin or a decrease in EPO dose. Economic analysis showed that approximately $580 (Cdn) per patient per year could be saved by use of IV iron dextran. The administration of the IV iron dextran regimen in the iron-deficient hemodialysis population was effective at repleting and maintaining iron stores

  8. Risk of Oxidative Damage to Bone from Increased Iron Stores During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Iron stores are increased secondary to neocytolysis of red blood cells and a high dietary intake of iron during space flight. This raises concerns about the risk of excess iron causing oxidative damage in many tissues, including bone. Biomarkers of iron status, oxidative damage, and bone resorption during space flight were analyzed for 23 (16 M/7 F) International Space Station crewmembers as part of the Nutrition SMO project. Up to 5 in-flight blood samples and 24-h urine pools were collected over the course of the 4-6 month missions. Serum iron increased slightly during space flight and was decreased at landing (P < 0.0004). An increase in serum ferritin early in flight (217% in women and 68% in men, P < 0.0004), returning to preflight concentrations at landing, and a decrease in transferrin and transferrin receptors during flight indicated that a transient increase in iron stores occurred. No inflammatory response was observed during flight. The oxidative damage markers 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and prostaglandin F(sub 2(alpha)) were positively correlated (both P < 0.001) with serum ferritin. A greater area under the curve for ferritin during flight was correlated with greater changes in bone mineral density of several bone regions after flight (1). In a separate study (2), a ground-based investigation was conducted that examined the combined effects of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury in several physiological systems in 12-wk male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were acclimated to an adequate iron diet (45 mg iron (ferric citrate)/kg diet) for 3 wk and then assigned to one of four groups: adequate iron (Fe) diet/no radiation, adequate Fe diet/ radiation, moderately high Fe diet (650 mg Fe (ferric citrate)/kg diet)/no radiation, and moderately high Fe diet/radiation. Animals remained on the assigned diet for 4 wk. Starting on day 14 of experimental diet treatment, animals were exposed to a fractionated dose (0.375 Gy) of Cs

  9. Assessment of iron stores in anemic geriatric patients.

    PubMed

    Patterson, C; Turpie, I D; Benger, A M

    1985-11-01

    Of patients referred to a geriatric service, 66 were identified who were clearly anemic (hemoglobin less than 12 g in men, less than 11 g in women) but whose cause of anemia was not readily identifiable by noninvasive measures. The difficulty in distinguishing iron deficiency from chronic disease as a cause of anemia by noninvasive means (serum iron, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation ratio, and serum ferritin), is highlighted by the poor power of these investigations when compared with bone marrow iron stores. A transferrin saturation ratio of less than 11% and a serum ferritin of less than 45 pg/L serve better than currently accepted values to identify iron deficiency in this population.

  10. Study of iron stores in regular plateletpheresis donors.

    PubMed

    Page, E A; Coppock, J E; Harrison, J F

    2010-02-01

    Plateletpheresis donors will lose up to 100 mL of blood at each donation, leading to concern that they may become iron deficient, particularly if donating at the maximum allowed frequency under National Blood Service policy of every 2 weeks. The serum ferritin levels of 508 regular plateletpheresis donors and 101 non-donors were measured to indicate the level of their iron stores. About 33.9% (156/460) of platelet donors had depleted iron stores compared with 3.1% (3/97) non-donors. Results for male and post-menopausal female donors were similar with 36.2% (131/362) of males and 37.7% (20/53) of post-menopausal females showing iron depletion. There was clear correlation with donation frequency in males with 63.9% (46/72) of males donating at 2 weekly intervals found to be iron depleted. The percentage of iron depleted male subjects decreased as donation intervals increased. Correlation with lifetime donations of platelets was not demonstrated, although no donor who had given fewer than 14 blood and/or platelet donations was found to be iron depleted. In males there was a clear correlation between iron depletion and frequency of donation. There appeared to be no correlation with lifetime number of platelet donations. As a result of this study, we have advised that volunteers should not donate platelets more than 15 times per year, so that red cell loss is no more than the equivalent of three whole blood donations (1500 mL).

  11. Daily supplementation with iron increases lipid peroxidation in young women with low iron stores.

    PubMed

    King, Sarah M; Donangelo, Carmen M; Knutson, Mitchell D; Walter, Patrick B; Ames, Bruce N; Viteri, Fernando E; King, Janet C

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether women with low iron stores (plasma ferritin iron supplement for 8 wks at a level commonly used to treat poor iron status develop increased lipid peroxidation as measured by ethane exhalation rates and plasma malondialdehyde. The women served as their own control as pre- and post-supplementation periods were compared. Twelve women participated in the study for a 70-day period and consumed daily iron supplements (98 mg of iron as ferrous sulfate) from day 14 to day 70. Baseline blood and expired air samples were obtained on days 1 and 14; measurements during supplementation were performed on days 56 and 70, that is at 6 and 8 weeks of supplementation. Iron status improved during the iron supplementation period; biochemical indicators of lipid peroxidation also increased. After 6 wks of iron supplementation, serum ferritin almost doubled and body iron more than doubled. Hemoglobin levels increased slightly and other indicators of iron status became normal. However, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and breath ethane exhalation rates (BEER) increased by more than 40% between baseline and 6 wks of supplementation; these increases correlated significantly with plasma iron and ferritin levels. MDA was positively correlated with BEER. BEER increased further after 8 wks of iron supplementation. The increased indicators of lipid peroxidation with duration of supplementation and as iron status improved suggest that providing daily nearly 100 mg iron may not be a totally innocuous regimen for correcting iron depletion in women.

  12. Evaluation of iron status: zinc protoporphyrin vis-a-vis bone marrow iron stores.

    PubMed

    Das, Sheila; Philip, Kandathil Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Zinc protoporphyrin (ZPP) in the red cells is an indicator of iron status in the bone marrow (BM) and can be easily measured by Protofluor-Z Hematofluorometer from Helena Laboratories. It is well known that bone marrow iron is a gold standard for the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) even in the pre-latent phase. Hence, it was considered pertinent to evaluate the diagnostic utility of ZPP in comparison with bone marrow iron stores. 107 random BM were selected over a period of 2(1/2) years; in each case, RBC indices where recorded along with ZPP and Perls' Prussian blue reaction for BM iron stores. The specificity and sensitivity were found to be 77.8% and sensitivity 69.8%, respectively. However, the sensitivity increased up to 96.2% when Hb, RBC indices and ZPP were considered for the diagnosis of IDA.

  13. Body iron stores and iron restoration rate in Japanese patients with chronic hepatitis C as measured during therapeutic iron removal revealed neither increased body iron stores nor effects of C282Y and H63D mutations on iron indices.

    PubMed

    Shiono, Y; Hayashi, H; Wakusawa, S; Sanae, F; Takikawa, T; Yano, M; Yoshioka, K; Saito, H

    2001-05-01

    Information on the level of iron stores in chronic hepatitis C is clinically important because its reduction is technically simple and therapeutically effective. This study was performed to measure the levels of iron stores from the total amounts of hemoglobin removed during iron reduction therapy. The C282Y and H63D mutations of HFE gene were analyzed in 94 patients. All of the patients were negative for C282Y mutation. One patient was homozygous, and 4 patients were heterozygous for H63D mutation. The body iron stores and iron restoration rate were measured in 59 patients in serial courses of iron reduction therapy. Mean values of body iron stores in the two groups with and without H63D mutation were 890 and 606 mg, while those of iron restoration rate were 1.85 and 1.52 mg/day, respectively. None of the indices of iron metabolism were different from the reference values measured similarly in healthy subjects, suggesting that the iron deposition in chronic hepatitis C is limited to the liver, probably due to changes in the iron distribution in tissues.

  14. Effect of Maternal Iron Deficiency Anemia on the Iron Store of Newborns in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Birhanu, Asaye; Nigussie, Paulos; Tsegaye, Aster

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia among pregnant women is a widespread problem in developing countries including Ethiopia, though its influence on neonatal iron status was inconsistently reported in literature. This cross-sectional study was conducted to compare hematologic profiles and iron status of newborns from mothers with different anemia status and determine correlation between maternal and neonatal hematologic profiles and iron status in Ethiopian context. We included 89 mothers and their respective newborns and performed complete blood count and assessed serum ferritin and C-reactive protein levels from blood samples collected from study participants. Maternal median hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels were 12.2 g/dL and 47.0 ng/mL, respectively. The median hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels for the newborns were 16.2 g/dL and 187.6 ng/mL, respectively. The mothers were classified into two groups based on hemoglobin and serum ferritin levels as iron deficient anemic (IDA) and nonanemic (NA) and newborns of IDA mothers had significantly lower levels of serum ferritin (P = 0.017) and hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.024). Besides, newborns' ferritin and hemoglobin levels showed significant correlation with maternal hemoglobin (P = 0.018; P = 0.039) and ferritin (P = 0.000; P = 0.008) levels. We concluded that maternal IDA may have an effect on the iron stores of newborns. PMID:25734012

  15. Men with low vitamin A stores respond adequately to primary yellow fever and secondary tetanus toxoid vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shaikh M; Haskell, Marjorie J; Raqib, Rubhana; Stephensen, Charles B

    2008-11-01

    Current recommendations for vitamin A intake and liver stores (0.07 micromol/g) are based on maintaining normal vision. Higher levels may be required for maintaining normal immune function. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between total body vitamin A stores in adult men and measures of adaptive immune function. We conducted an 8-wk residential study among 36 healthy Bangladeshi men with low vitamin A stores. Subjects received a standard diet and were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive vitamin A (240 mg) or placebo during wk 2 and 3. Subjects received Yellow Fever Virus (YFV) and tetanus toxoid (TT) vaccines during wk 5. Vitamin A stores were estimated by isotopic dilution during wk 8. Vaccine-specific lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and serum antibody responses were evaluated before and after vaccination. Vitamin A supplementation increased YFV- and TT-specific lymphocyte proliferation and YFV-specific interleukin (IL)-5, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production but inhibited development of a TT-specific IL-10 response. Both groups developed protective antibody responses to both vaccines. Some responses correlated positively with vitamin A stores. These findings indicate that the currently recommended vitamin A intake is sufficient to sustain a protective response to YFV and TT vaccination. However, YFV-specific lymphocyte proliferation, some cytokine responses, and neutralizing antibody were positively associated with liver vitamin A stores > 0.084 micromol/g. Such increases may enhance vaccine protection but raise the question of whether immune-mediated chronic diseases may by exacerbated by high-level dietary vitamin A.

  16. Men with Low Vitamin A Stores Respond Adequately to Primary Yellow Fever and Secondary Tetanus Toxoid Vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current recommendations for vitamin A intake and liver stores (20 mg/g) are based on maintaining normal vision. Higher levels may be required for maintaining normal immune function. To test this hypothesis, we conducted an 8 wk residential study among 36 healthy Bangladeshi men with low serum retino...

  17. Cultural and environmental barriers to adequate iron intake among northern Kenyan schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Shell-Duncan, Bettina; McDade, Thomas

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the context of iron deficiency and feeding patterns of iron-rich foods among northern Kenyan school-aged children. A nutrition survey was conducted among 300 subjects in two Rendille communities, Korr and Karare. The objectives were to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency as it relates to parasitic infection, dietary intake, and sociodemographic factors, as well as cultural food proscriptions influencing child feeding. Sociodemographic and qualitative data on food beliefs and child-feeding practices were obtained from the primary caretaker of each subject. From pediatric subjects, 24-hour dietary recall data were obtained with the help of the primary caretaker, and capillary blood from a fingerstick was used to detect iron deficiency based on measures of hemoglobin, the zinc protoporphyrin-to-heme ratio, C-reactive protein, and transferrin receptor. With an overall prevalence of 31.2%, iron deficiency was found to be associated with dietary iron intakes constrained by diverse economic, cultural, and environmental factors among Rendille children. In Karare, where children's iron intake approached recommended levels, iron deficiency was found to be attributable to low bioavailability of iron (only 4.3% of total iron intake), rather than low dietary intake per se. By contrast, in Korr the average daily iron intake was estimated at only 65% of recommended allowances, indicating that iron deficiency was the outcome not merely of low bioavailability, but rather of overall inadequate iron intake. Sociodemographic analysis showed a significant interaction between sex and economic status, revealing that girls in economically sufficient households were 2.4 times as likely to have iron deficiency as boys. This difference in risk parallels culturally defined gender-based proscriptions for child feeding: girls are believed to benefit from "soft foods," including rice, maize porridge, and tea, whereas boys benefitfrom "hard foods

  18. Distribution and quantitation of skin iron in primary haemochromatosis: correlation with total body iron stores in patients undergoing phlebotomy.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Teresa; Silva, Raquel; Fleming, Rita; Gonçalves, Afonso; Barreiros, Maria A; Silva, João N; Morlière, Patrice; Santus, René; Filipe, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the concentration of iron in the skin, if correlated with total body iron stores, may enable better informed decisions on when to initiate, change or stop therapy in hereditary heamochromatosis. Naïve haemochromatosis patients with iron overload and with C282Y and/or H63D HFE mutations were evaluated at the following time-points: disease diagnosis, end of the therapy programme, and 6 months after the end of therapy. The distribution and concentration of iron in the skin were assessed by quantitative nuclear microscopy methods, in parallel with serum and plasma iron concentration. Iron content in the liver was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Iron accumulated in the epidermis; its concentration increased from outer to inner layers, being maximal in the basal layer (7.33 ± 0.98 µmol/g). At all 3 time-points, most of the iron was associated with the extracellular space. During the phlebotomy programme the iron content of the skin and the liver decreased by a factor of 2. These data suggest that measurements of iron concentration in the epidermis, which is a readily accessible tissue, reflect iron overload in the liver.

  19. Hepcidin is a Better Predictor of Iron Stores in Premenopausal Women than Blood Loss or Dietary Intake

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Karen H. C.; Booth, Alison O.; Nowson, Caryl A.; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A.; Irving, David O.; Riddell, Lynn J.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between dietary intake, circulating hepcidin and iron status in free-living premenopausal women has not been explored. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify dietary determinants of iron stores after accounting for blood loss and to determine whether iron intake predicts iron stores independently of hepcidin in a sample of Australian women. Three hundred thirty eight women aged 18–50 years were recruited. Total intake and food sources of iron were determined via food frequency questionnaire; the magnitude of menstrual losses was estimated by self-report; and blood donation volume was quantified using blood donation records and self-reported donation frequency. Serum samples were analysed for ferritin, hepcidin and C-reactive protein concentrations. Linear regression was used to investigate associations. Accounting for blood loss, each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron was associated with a 3% increase in iron stores (p = 0.027); this association was not independent of hepcidin. Hepcidin was a more influential determinant of iron stores than blood loss and dietary factors combined (R2 of model including hepcidin = 0.65; R2 of model excluding hepcidin = 0.17, p for difference <0.001), and increased hepcidin diminished the positive association between iron intake and iron stores. Despite not being the biggest contributor to dietary iron intake, unprocessed meat was positively associated with iron stores, and each 10% increase in consumption was associated with a 1% increase in iron stores (p = 0.006). No other dietary factors were associated with iron stores. Interventions that reduce hepcidin production combined with dietary strategies to increase iron intake may be important means of improving iron status in women with depleted iron stores. PMID:27598194

  20. Hepcidin is a Better Predictor of Iron Stores in Premenopausal Women than Blood Loss or Dietary Intake.

    PubMed

    Lim, Karen H C; Booth, Alison O; Nowson, Caryl A; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Irving, David O; Riddell, Lynn J

    2016-09-02

    The relationship between dietary intake, circulating hepcidin and iron status in free-living premenopausal women has not been explored. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify dietary determinants of iron stores after accounting for blood loss and to determine whether iron intake predicts iron stores independently of hepcidin in a sample of Australian women. Three hundred thirty eight women aged 18-50 years were recruited. Total intake and food sources of iron were determined via food frequency questionnaire; the magnitude of menstrual losses was estimated by self-report; and blood donation volume was quantified using blood donation records and self-reported donation frequency. Serum samples were analysed for ferritin, hepcidin and C-reactive protein concentrations. Linear regression was used to investigate associations. Accounting for blood loss, each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron was associated with a 3% increase in iron stores (p = 0.027); this association was not independent of hepcidin. Hepcidin was a more influential determinant of iron stores than blood loss and dietary factors combined (R² of model including hepcidin = 0.65; R² of model excluding hepcidin = 0.17, p for difference <0.001), and increased hepcidin diminished the positive association between iron intake and iron stores. Despite not being the biggest contributor to dietary iron intake, unprocessed meat was positively associated with iron stores, and each 10% increase in consumption was associated with a 1% increase in iron stores (p = 0.006). No other dietary factors were associated with iron stores. Interventions that reduce hepcidin production combined with dietary strategies to increase iron intake may be important means of improving iron status in women with depleted iron stores.

  1. Serum ferritin concentrations and body iron stores in a multicenter, multiethnic primary-care population

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R.; Reboussin, David M.; McLaren, Christine E.; Barton, James C.; Acton, Ronald T.; McLaren, Gordon D.; Harris, Emily L.; Reiss, Jacob A.; Adams, Paul C.; Speechley, Mark; Phatak, Pradyumna D.; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Eckfeldt, John H.; Chen, Wen-Pin; Passmore, Leah; Dawkins, Fitzroy W.

    2013-01-01

    How often elevated serum ferritin in primary-care patients reflects increased iron stores (normally 0.8 g in men, 0.4 g in women) is not known. The Hereditary Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) study screened 101,168 primary-care participants (44% Caucasians, 27% African-Americans, 14% Asians/Pacific Islanders, 13% Hispanics, 2% others). Follow-up clinical evaluation was performed in 302 of 333 HFE C282Y homozygotes regardless of iron measures and 1,375 of 1,920 nonhomozygotes with serum ferritin >300 μg/L (men), >200 μg/L (women) and transferrin saturation >50% (men), >45% (women). Quantitative phlebotomy was conducted in 122 of 175 C282Y homozygotes and 122 of 1,102 nonhomozygotes with non-transfusional serum ferritin elevation at evaluation. The estimated prevalence in the Caucasian population of C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 20 per 10,000 men and 4 per 10,000 women; this constellation was predictive of iron stores >4 g in men and >2 g in women. The estimated prevalence per 10,000 of non-C282Y homozygotes with serum ferritin >900 μg/L at evaluation was 7 among Caucasians, 13 among Hispanics, 20 among African Americans, and 38 among Asians and Pacific Islanders, and this constellation was predictive of iron stores >2 g but <4 g. In conclusion, serum ferritin >900 μg/L after initial elevations of both serum ferritin and transferrin saturation is predictive of mildly increased iron stores in multiple ethnic populations regardless of HFE genotype. Serum ferritin >900 μg/L in male C282Y homozygotes is predictive of moderately increased iron stores. PMID:18429050

  2. Paving the way for adequate myelination: The contribution of galectin-3, transferrin and iron.

    PubMed

    Franco, Paula G; Pasquini, Laura A; Pérez, María J; Rosato-Siri, María V; Silvestroff, Lucas; Pasquini, Juana M

    2015-11-14

    Considering the worldwide incidence of well characterized demyelinating disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and the increasing number of pathologies recently found to involve hypomyelinating factors such as micronutrient deficits, elucidating the molecular basis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, remyelination and hypomyelination becomes essential to the development of future neuroregenerative therapies. In this context, this review discusses novel findings on the contribution of galectin-3 (Gal-3), transferrin (Tf) and iron to the processes of myelination and remyelination and their potentially positive regulation of oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) differentiation. Studies were conducted in cuprizone (CPZ)-induced demyelination and iron deficiency (ID)-induced hypomyelination, and the participation of glial and neural stem cells (NSC) in the remyelination process was evaluated by means of both in vivo and in vitro assays on primary cell cultures.

  3. Iron

    MedlinePlus

    Iron is a mineral that our bodies need for many functions. For example, iron is part of hemoglobin, a protein which carries ... It helps our muscles store and use oxygen. Iron is also part of many other proteins and ...

  4. Timing of clamping and factors associated with iron stores in full-term newborns

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Fabiana de Cássia Carvalho; Assis, Karine Franklin; Martins, Mariana Campos; do Prado, Mara Rúbia Maciel Cardoso; Ribeiro, Andréia Queiroz; Sant’Ana, Luciana Ferreira da Rocha; Priore, Silvia Eloiza; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the impact of timing of clamping and obstetric, biological and socioeconomic factors on the iron stores of full-term newborns. METHODS Cross-sectional study between October 2011 and July 2012 in which hematological parameters were evaluated for newborns in Viçosa, MG, Southeastern Brazil. It involved collecting 7 mL of umbilical cord blood from 144 full-term not underweight newborns. The parameters investigated were complete blood count, serum iron, ferritin and C-reactive protein. The time of umbilical cord clamping was measured using a digital timer without interfering in the procedures of childbirth. The birth data were collected from Live Birth Certificates and other information was obtained from the mother through a questionnaire applied in the first month postpartum. Analysis of multiple linear regression was then used to estimate the influence of biological, obstetrics and socioeconomic factors on the ferritin levels at birth. RESULTS The median ferritin was 130.3 µg/L (n = 129, minimum = 16.4; maximum = 420.5 µg/L), the mean serum iron was 137.9 μg/dL (n = 144, SD = 39.29) and mean hemoglobin was 14.7 g/dL (n = 144, SD = 1.47). The median time of cord clamping was 36 seconds, ranging between 7 and 100. The bivariate analysis detected an association between ferritin levels and color of the child, timing clamping of 60 seconds, type of delivery, the presence of gestational diabetes and per capita family income. In multivariate analysis, the variables per capita income, number of antenatal visits and length at birth accounted for 22.0% of variation in ferritin levels. CONCLUSIONS Iron stores at birth were influenced by biological, obstetric and social characteristics. Tackling anemia should involve creating policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, improving the quality of antenatal care, as well as implementing a criterion of delayed clamping of the umbilical cord within the guidelines of labor. PMID:24789632

  5. Iron fortification of whole wheat flour reduces iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia and increases body iron stores in Indian school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, Sumithra; Thankachan, Prashanth; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Amalrajan, Vani; Thomas, Tinku; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Hurrell, Richard F; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-11-01

    Wheat is the primary staple food for nearly one-third of the world's population. NaFeEDTA is the only iron (Fe) compound suitable for fortifying high extraction flours. We tested the hypothesis that NaFeEDTA-fortified, whole wheat flour reduces Fe deficiency (ID) and improves body Fe stores (BIS) and cognitive performance in Indian children. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, school feeding trial, 6- to 15-y-old, Fe-depleted children (n = 401) were randomly assigned to either a daily wheat-based lunch meal fortified with 6 mg of Fe as NaFeEDTA or an otherwise identical unfortified control meal. Hemoglobin (Hb) and Fe status were measured at baseline, 3.5 mo, and 7 mo. Cognitive performance was evaluated at baseline and 7 mo in children (n = 170) at one of the study sites. After 7 mo, the prevalence of ID and ID anemia in the treatment group significantly decreased from 62 to 21% and 18 to 9%, respectively. There was a time x treatment interaction for Hb, serum ferritin, transferrin receptor, zinc protoporphyrin, and BIS (all P < 0.0001). Changes in BIS differed between the groups; it increased in the treatment group (0.04 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) and decreased in the control group (-0.02 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) (P < 0.0001). In sensory tests, NaFeEDTA-fortified flour could not be differentiated from unfortified flour. There were no significant differences in cognitive performance tests between the groups. NaFeEDTA-fortified wheat flour markedly improved BIS and reduced ID in Fe-depleted children. It may be recommended for wider use in national school feeding programs.

  6. Therapeutic Depletion of Iron Stores Is Not Associated with a Reduced Hemoglobin Mass in a Hemochromatosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Wrobel, Nina; Pottgiesser, Torben; Birkner, Philipp; Deibert, Peter; Ahlgrim, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hereditary hemochromatosis features a dysregulated iron absorption leading to iron overload and organ damage. The regulation of total hemoglobin mass during depletion of iron deposits by therapeutic phlebotomy has not been studied. Case Presentation The initial ferritin level of the 52-year-old male subject was 1,276 μg/l. Despite successful depletion of iron stores (ferritinmin: 53 μg/l) through phlebotomies, total hemoglobin mass stabilized at the pretherapy level. However, regeneration of total hemoglobin mass was accelerated (up to 10.8 g/day). Conclusion In this hemochromatosis patient, the total hemoglobin mass was not altered in the long term, but regeneration was accelerated, possibly due to elevated body iron content. PMID:27721733

  7. Comparison of plasma ferritin concentration versus the ratio of plasma transferrin receptor to ferritin in estimating body iron stores: results of 4 intervention trials

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: To develop global programs for the control of iron deficiency, simple, low-cost, accurate indicators of iron status are needed. Objectives: To compare estimates of body iron stores, as calculated from either plasma ferritin concentration alone (BI-ferritin) or the ratio of plasma transf...

  8. Blood withdrawal affects iron store dynamics in primates with consequences on monoaminergic system function.

    PubMed

    Hyacinthe, C; De Deurwaerdere, P; Thiollier, T; Li, Q; Bezard, E; Ghorayeb, I

    2015-04-02

    Iron homeostasis is essential for the integrity of brain monoaminergic functions and its deregulation might be involved in neurological movement disorders such as the restless legs syndrome (RLS). Although iron metabolism breakdown concomitantly appears with monoaminergic system dysfunction in iron-deficient rodents and in RLS patients, the direct consequences of peripheral iron deficiency in the central nervous system (CNS) of non-human primates have received little attention. Here, we evaluated the peripheral iron-depletion impact on brain monoamine levels in macaque monkeys. After documenting circadian variations of iron and iron-related proteins (hemoglobin, ferritin and transferrin) in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of normal macaques, repeated blood withdrawals (RBW) were used to reduce peripheral iron-related parameter levels. Decreased serum iron levels were paradoxically associated with increased CSF iron concentrations. Despite limited consequences on tissue monoamine contents (dopamine - DA, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid - DOPAC, homovanillic acid, L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine - L-DOPA, 5-8 hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid - 5-HIAA and noradrenaline) measured with post-mortem chromatography, we found distinct and region-dependent relationships of these tissue concentrations with CSF iron and/or serum iron and/or blood hemoglobin. Additionally, striatal extracellular DA, DOPAC and 5-HIAA levels evaluated by in vivo microdialysis showed a substantial increase, suggesting an overall increase in both DA and 5-HT tones. Finally, a trending increase in general locomotor activity, measured by actimetry, was observed in the most serum iron-depleted macaques. Taken together, our data are compatible with an increase in nigrostriatal DAergic function in the event of iron deficiency and point to a specific alteration of the 5-HT/DA interaction in the CNS that is possibly involved in the etiology of RLS.

  9. Transfusion of human volunteers with older, stored red blood cells produces extravascular hemolysis and circulating non-transferrin-bound iron.

    PubMed

    Hod, Eldad A; Brittenham, Gary M; Billote, Genia B; Francis, Richard O; Ginzburg, Yelena Z; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Jhang, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Joseph; Sharma, Shruti; Sheth, Sujit; Sireci, Anthony N; Stephens, Hannah L; Stotler, Brie A; Wojczyk, Boguslaw S; Zimring, James C; Spitalnik, Steven L

    2011-12-15

    Transfusions of RBCs stored for longer durations are associated with adverse effects in hospitalized patients. We prospectively studied 14 healthy human volunteers who donated standard leuko-reduced, double RBC units. One unit was autologously transfused "fresh" (3-7 days of storage), and the other "older" unit was transfused after 40 to 42 days of storage. Of the routine laboratory parameters measured at defined times surrounding transfusion, significant differences between fresh and older transfusions were only observed in iron parameters and markers of extravascular hemolysis. Compared with fresh RBCs, mean serum total bilirubin increased by 0.55 mg/dL at 4 hours after transfusion of older RBCs (P = .0003), without significant changes in haptoglobin or lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, only after the older transfusion, transferrin saturation increased progressively over 4 hours to a mean of 64%, and non-transferrin-bound iron appeared, reaching a mean of 3.2μM. The increased concentrations of non-transferrin-bound iron correlated with enhanced proliferation in vitro of a pathogenic strain of Escherichia coli (r = 0.94, P = .002). Therefore, circulating non-transferrin-bound iron derived from rapid clearance of transfused, older stored RBCs may enhance transfusion-related complications, such as infection.

  10. Dietary and stored iron as predictors of breast cancer risk: A nested case–control study in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amber B.; Shannon, Jackilen; Chen, Chu; Lampe, Johanna W.; Ray, Roberta M.; Lewis, Sharon K.; Lin, Minggang; Stalsberg, Helge; Thomas, David B.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in risk of breast cancer in successive generations of migrants to the United States from China and rapid temporal changes in incidence rates in China following social and economic changes clearly implicate environmental factors in the etiology of this disease. Case–control and cohort studies have provided evidence that at least some of these factors may be dietary. Iron, an essential element necessary for cell function, has also been demonstrated to have potential carcinogenic and co-carcinogenic activities. Iron overload, which was previously uncommon, has become more common in the United States than iron deficiency and may be increasing in China concurrently with dramatic increases in meat consumption. A case–control study nested in a cohort of women in Shanghai, China, was conducted to evaluate possible associations between risk of proliferative and nonproliferative fibrocystic changes as well as breast cancer and dietary iron intake and plasma ferritin levels. Plasma ferritin levels and reported dietary iron intake were compared in 346 women with fibrocystic changes, 248 breast cancer cases and 1,040 controls. Increasing ferritin levels were significantly associated with increasing risk of nonproliferative fibrocystic changes (OR: 2.51, 95% CI: 1.16–5.45, p trend = 0.04). Similar, but weaker, trends were observed for proliferative changes and for breast cancer. Risk of breast cancer relative to the risk of fibrocystic changes was associated with dietary iron intake in women with nonproliferative fibrocystic changes (OR: 2.63, 95% CI: 1.04–6.68, p = 0.02). In conclusion, this study finds significant associations between iron (stored and dietary) and fibrocystic disease and breast cancer. PMID:19444907

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure serum ferritin and the relationship between serum ferritin and nonheme iron stores in cats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, G A; Chavey, P S; Smith, J E

    1994-11-01

    Serum ferritin concentration correlates with tissue iron stores in humans, horses, calves, dogs, and pigs but not in rats. Because serum iron and total iron-binding capacity can be affected by disorders unrelated to iron adequacy (such as hypoproteinemia, chronic infection, hemolytic anemia, hypothyroidism, and renal disease), serum ferritin is probably the most reliable indicator of total body iron stores in larger species. To test the hypothesis that serum ferritin might be correlated with tissue iron levels in cats, we developed a quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses two monoclonal antibodies in a sandwich arrangement to measure feline serum ferritin. The recovery of purified ferritin added to feline sera ranged from 94% to 104%; the within-assay coefficient of variability was 8.4%, and the assay-to-assay variability was 13.2%. Mean serum ferritin from 40 apparently healthy cats was 76 ng/ml (SD = 24 ng/ml). Serum ferritin concentration was significantly correlated (P < 0.001, n = 101, r = 0.365) with the nonheme iron in the liver and spleen (expressed as milligrams of iron per kilogram of body weight), as determined by Pearson product-moment correlation analysis. Because serum iron can decrease in diseases other than iron deficiency, the combination of serum iron and serum ferritin should provide sufficient evidence to differentiate anemia of chronic inflammation from anemia of iron deficiency in the cat.

  12. Proposal for the standardization of the serum unsaturated iron binding capacity assay, and results in groups of subjects with normal iron stores and with prelatent, latent, and manifest iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gabbe, E E; Heinrich, H C; Icagić, F

    1982-02-26

    An effort has been made to standardize the indirect iron saturation excess method for the determination of the serum unsaturated iron binding capacity (UIBC) and thus to relinquish the direct adsorption methods for the assay of the serum total iron binding capacity (TIBC) which give falsely high results due to unspecific binding of the saturating iron to serum proteins. In order to eliminate the interfering effects of hydrolytic polymerization of iron(III) on the saturation of apotransferrin in serum and on the colorimetric determination of the unbound iron excess at pH 8.3, conditions have been studied for the preparation of the iron-nitrilotriacetate-complex (Fe(NTA)2) solution at pH 8.3 with respect to its reactivity with the reductant sodium ascorbate and with the chromogen bathophenanthroline-disulfonate in photometric standards and in samples containing iron-saturated serum. The validity of the results for the UIBC thus obtained has been investigated (1) by direct spectrophotometric titration with Fe(NTA)2 of the apotransferrin in serum by measuring the absorbance of transferrin at 470 nm in 50-mm cuvettes, and of the UIBC using the modified indirect iron saturation excess assay, both of which gave the same saturation points, and (2) by the correlation of the TIBC obtained from serum iron determinations and the UIBC, with the transferrin concentration measured by the radial immunodiffusion assay. Results of UIBC determinations are presented along with serum iron concentration, TIBC, and transferrin saturation in groups of subjects with normal iron stores and prelatent, latent, and manifest iron deficiency.

  13. A virus capsid-like nanocompartment that stores iron and protects bacteria from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Colleen A; Fontana, Juan; Nemecek, Daniel; Cheng, Naiqian; Aksyuk, Anastasia A; Heymann, J Bernard; Winkler, Dennis C; Lam, Alan S; Wall, Joseph S; Steven, Alasdair C; Hoiczyk, Egbert

    2014-01-01

    Living cells compartmentalize materials and enzymatic reactions to increase metabolic efficiency. While eukaryotes use membrane-bound organelles, bacteria and archaea rely primarily on protein-bound nanocompartments. Encapsulins constitute a class of nanocompartments widespread in bacteria and archaea whose functions have hitherto been unclear. Here, we characterize the encapsulin nanocompartment from Myxococcus xanthus, which consists of a shell protein (EncA, 32.5 kDa) and three internal proteins (EncB, 17 kDa; EncC, 13 kDa; EncD, 11 kDa). Using cryo-electron microscopy, we determined that EncA self-assembles into an icosahedral shell 32 nm in diameter (26 nm internal diameter), built from 180 subunits with the fold first observed in bacteriophage HK97 capsid. The internal proteins, of which EncB and EncC have ferritin-like domains, attach to its inner surface. Native nanocompartments have dense iron-rich cores. Functionally, they resemble ferritins, cage-like iron storage proteins, but with a massively greater capacity (˜30,000 iron atoms versus ˜3,000 in ferritin). Physiological data reveal that few nanocompartments are assembled during vegetative growth, but they increase fivefold upon starvation, protecting cells from oxidative stress through iron sequestration. PMID:25024436

  14. Increased Body Mass Index may lead to Hyperferritinemia Irrespective of Body Iron Stores

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Faiza; Memon, Abdul Shakoor; Fatima, Syeda Sadia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Obesity causes subclinical inflammation which results in the secretion of various bioactive peptides that are key players in metabolic regulation of iron homeostasis. We sought to establish correlation of one such peptide (ferritin) with marker of subclinical inflammation (CRP) in various BMI. Methods: Total 150 subjects between the ages of 20-60 years were included in the cross-sectional study conducted at Basic Medical Sciences Institute, Jinnah Post Graduate Medical Centre, Karachi, Pakistan. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated by weight (kg) /height (m2). The given values were used as reference for Group A: normal weight (18.0-22.9 kg/m2), Group B: overweight (23.0-24.9 kg/m2), Group C: obese (>25.0 kg/m2) according to South Asian criteria. Serum Iron, Total Iron Binding Capacity, serum Transferrin Saturation, serum Ferritin and C-reactive protein were measured by commercially available kits. ANNOVA with Tukey’s minimum significant difference and Spearman Rho correlation were used considering p<0.05 significant. Results: The results identified an increased serum Ferritin and CRP in obese versus lean subjects (p < 0.001). BMI showed significantly positive correlation with serum CRP (r = 0.815; p-value < 0.01) and Ferritin (r = 0.584; p-value < 0.01). However, serum Iron levels and Transferrin saturation decreased in obese versus normal weight individuals (p < 0.001). Conclusion: This integrated new data reveals that individuals with high BMI had high levels of Serum Ferritin despite low levels of iron with high levels of C- reactive protein. This might be caused due to inflammatory conditions prevailing in the presence of increased adipose tissue. PMID:26870128

  15. Impairment of short-term memory associated with low iron stores in a volunteer multidose plateletpheresis donor.

    PubMed

    Page, E A; Harrison, J F; Jaldow, E J; Kopelman, M

    2008-10-01

    A platelet donor may lose 80-100 mL of blood both in the harness and by blood sampling at each donation, the equivalent of four to five whole blood donations per annum for a donor attending at 2-weekly intervals. A 54-year-old male multidose platelet donor had donated platelets at regular 2-weekly intervals for 6 years. He developed an impairment of anterograde memory (new learning). A self-rating scale revealed a moderate degree of depression [Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score 22]. Memory testing (Doors and People Memory Battery) showed low scores, particularly for verbal recall and verbal recognition memory. He was found to have a normal haemoglobin of 157 g L(-1) with normal red blood cell indices, but a low serum ferritin (15 ng mL(-1)) and a low serum iron (8.1 mmol L(-1)). Following iron therapy and a return of his iron stores to normal levels, there was an improved BDI score of 13 (minimal level of depression) and a marked improvement in memory test scores. This has been maintained even though he has resumed platelet donation but at reduced intervals.

  16. Nordic walking training attenuation of oxidative stress in association with a drop in body iron stores in elderly women.

    PubMed

    Kortas, Jakub; Kuchta, Agnieszka; Prusik, Krzysztof; Prusik, Katarzyna; Ziemann, Ewa; Labudda, Sandra; Ćwiklińska, Agnieszka; Wieczorek, Ewa; Jankowski, Maciej; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej

    2017-02-22

    Excess body iron accumulation and oxidative stress has been associated with ageing. Regular exercise has been shown to reduce oxidative stress and induce some changes in iron metabolism. However, the effects of exercise on both of these parameters have been poorly investigated. In our study, 35 elderly women participated in 12 weeks of Nordic walking (NW) training (three times a week). We demonstrated that the training caused a significant reduction in malondialdehyde advanced oxidation protein products-markers of oxidative stress but had no effects on paraoxonase 1 activity. These changes were associated with the decrease of blood ferritin (99.4 ± 62.7 vs. 81.4 ± 61.7 ng/ml p < 0.05). Measurement of physical fitness revealed that the training caused a significant improvement in performance and a negative correlation between the blood ferritin and endurance test was recorded (r = -0.34, p = 0.03). In addition, a significant correlation between blood ferritin and fasting glucose level was noted. The training induced a rise of HDL cholesterol from 70.8 ± 19.3-75.3 ± 21.1, p < 0.05, whereas other lipid parameters remained unchanged. In conclusion, NW training reduced body iron stores and it was associated with lower oxidative stress and better endurance.

  17. Evaluation of hemoglobin performance in the assessment of iron stores in feto-maternal pairs in a high-risk population: receiver operating characteristic curve analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; García-Arellano, Gisela; Méndez-Ramírez, Nereida; González-Llano, Óscar; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2015-01-01

    Objective By applying receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the objective of this study was to see whether hemoglobin levels reflect body iron stores in a group of pregnant women at term who, by using serum ferritin as the reference test, had a high pre-test probability of having iron deficiency anemia. Likewise, we evaluated the ability of hemoglobin and maternal serum ferritin levels to predict iron deficiency anemia in newborns. Methods Hemoglobin and serum ferritin were measured in 187 pregnant women at term belonging to a group with a high pre-test probability of iron deficiency anemia and their newborns. Women with Hb <11.0 g/dL and newborns with cord Hb <13.0 g/dL were classified as anemic. A serum ferritin <12.0 μg/L in women and a cord blood serum ferritin <35.0 μg/L were considered to reflect empty iron stores. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was applied to select the cut-off points that better reflected iron stores. Results The Hb cut-off point selected by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis in women was <11.5 g/dL (sensitivity: 60.82, specificity: 53.33%, Youden Index: 0.450). Most of the newborns had normal Hb which precluded this analysis. Maternal Hb <11.0 g/dL was the cut-off point that best reflected iron deficiency anemia in newborns (sensitivity: 55.88%, specificity: 57.24%, Youden Index: 0.217). The best cut-off point of maternal serum ferritin to reflect empty iron stores in newborns was <6.0 μg/L (sensitivity: 76.47%, specificity: 31.58%, Youden Index: 0.200). Conclusion Hemoglobin concentration performed poorly to detect iron deficiency anemia in women at term with high risk for iron deficiency and their newborns. PMID:26041420

  18. A Survival Strategy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa That Uses Exopolysaccharides To Sequester and Store Iron To Stimulate Psl-Dependent Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shan; Wei, Qing; Zhao, Tianhu; Guo, Yuan; Ma, Luyan Z

    2016-11-01

    Exopolysaccharide Psl is a critical biofilm matrix component in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which forms a fiber-like matrix to enmesh bacterial communities. Iron is important for P. aeruginosa biofilm development, yet it is not clearly understood how iron contributes to biofilm development. Here, we showed that iron promoted biofilm formation via elevating Psl production in P. aeruginosa The high level of iron stimulated the synthesis of Psl by reducing rhamnolipid biosynthesis and inhibiting the expression of AmrZ, a repressor of psl genes. Iron-stimulated Psl biosynthesis and biofilm formation held true in mucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Subsequent experiments indicated that iron bound with Psl in vitro and in biofilms, which suggested that Psl fibers functioned as an iron storage channel in P. aeruginosa biofilms. Moreover, among three matrix exopolysaccharides of P. aeruginosa, Psl is the only exopolysaccharide that can bind with both ferrous and ferric ion, yet with higher affinity for ferrous iron. Our data suggest a survival strategy of P. aeruginosa that uses exopolysaccharide to sequester and store iron to stimulate Psl-dependent biofilm formation.

  19. The relationship between body iron stores and blood and urine cadmium concentrations in US never-smoking, non-pregnant women aged 20-49 years

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, Carolyn M.; Chen, John J.; Kovach, John S.

    2011-07-15

    Background: Cadmium is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant associated with increased risk of leading causes of mortality and morbidity in women, including breast cancer and osteoporosis. Iron deficiency increases absorption of dietary cadmium, rendering women, who tend to have lower iron stores than men, more susceptible to cadmium uptake. We used body iron, a measure that incorporates both serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, as recommended by the World Health Organization, to evaluate the relationships between iron status and urine and blood cadmium. Methods: Serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, urine and blood cadmium values in never-smoking, non-pregnant, non-lactating, non-menopausal women aged 20-49 years (n=599) were obtained from the 2003-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys. Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor, and iron deficiency defined as body iron <0 mg/kg. Robust linear regression was used to evaluate the relationships between body iron and blood and urine cadmium, adjusted for age, race, poverty, body mass index, and parity. Results: Per incremental (mg/kg) increase in body iron, urine cadmium decreased by 0.003 {mu}g/g creatinine and blood cadmium decreased by 0.014 {mu}g/L. Iron deficiency was associated with 0.044 {mu}g/g creatinine greater urine cadmium (95% CI=0.020, 0.069) and 0.162 {mu}g/L greater blood cadmium (95% CI=0.132, 0.193). Conclusions: Iron deficiency is a risk factor for increased blood and urine cadmium among never-smoking, pre-menopausal, non-pregnant US women, independent of age, race, poverty, body mass index and parity. Expanding programs to detect and correct iron deficiency among non-pregnant women merits consideration as a potential means to reduce the risk of cadmium associated diseases. - Highlights: {yields} Body iron was calculated from serum ferritin and soluble transferrin receptor. {yields} Body iron was inversely associated with blood

  20. Adequately Diversified Dietary Intake and Iron and Folic Acid Supplementation during Pregnancy Is Associated with Reduced Occurrence of Symptoms Suggestive of Pre-Eclampsia or Eclampsia in Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Sutapa; Fledderjohann, Jasmine; Vellakkal, Sukumar; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objective Pre-eclampsia or Eclampsia (PE or E) accounts for 25% of cases of maternal mortality worldwide. There is some evidence of a link to dietary factors, but few studies have explored this association in developing countries, where the majority of the burden falls. We examined the association between adequately diversified dietary intake, iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and symptoms suggestive of PE or E in Indian women. Methods Cross-sectional data from India’s third National Family Health Survey (NFHS-3, 2005-06) was used for this study. Self-reported symptoms suggestive of PE or E during pregnancy were obtained from 39,657 women aged 15-49 years who had had a live birth in the five years preceding the survey. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the association between adequately diversified dietary intake, iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy and symptoms suggestive of PE or E after adjusting for maternal, health and lifestyle factors, and socio-demographic characteristics of the mother. Results In their most recent pregnancy, 1.2% (n=456) of the study sample experienced symptoms suggestive of PE or E. Mothers who consumed an adequately diversified diet were 34% less likely (OR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.51-0.87) to report PE or E symptoms than mothers with inadequately diversified dietary intake. The likelihood of reporting PE or E symptoms was also 36% lower (OR: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.47-0.88) among those mothers who consumed iron and folic acid supplementation for at least 90 days during their last pregnancy. As a sensitivity analysis, we stratified our models sequentially by education, wealth, antenatal care visits, birth interval, and parity. Our results remained largely unchanged: both adequately diversified dietary intake and iron and folic acid supplementation during pregnancy were associated with a reduced occurrence of PE or E symptoms. Conclusion Having a adequately diversified dietary

  1. Depleted iron stores and iron deficiency anemia associated with reduced ferritin and hepcidin and elevated soluble transferrin receptors in a multiethnic group of preschool-age children.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Hope A; Jean-Philippe, Sonia; Cohen, Tamara R; Vanstone, Catherine A; Agellon, Sherry

    2015-09-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is prevalent in subgroups of the Canadian population. The objective of this study was to examine iron status and anemia in preschool-age children. Healthy children (n = 430, 2-5 years old, Montreal, Quebec, Canada) were sampled from randomly selected daycares. Anthropometry, demographics, and diet were assessed. Biochemistry included hemoglobin, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR), ferritin index, markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα)), and hepcidin. Iron deficiency and anemia cutoffs conformed to the World Health Organization criteria. Differences among categories were tested using mixed-model ANOVA or χ(2) tests. Children were 3.8 ± 1.0 years of age, with a body mass index z score of 0.48 ± 0.97, and 51% were white. Adjusted intakes of iron indicated <1% were at risk for deficiency. Hemoglobin was higher in white children, whereas ferritin was higher with greater age and female sex. Inflammatory markers and hepcidin did not vary with any demographic variable. The prevalence of iron deficiency was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI), 13.0-20.0). Three percent (95% CI, 1.4-4.6) of children had iron deficiency anemia and 12.8% (95% CI, 9.6-16.0) had unexplained anemia. Children with iron deficiency, with and without anemia, had lower plasma ferritin and hepcidin but higher sTfR, ferritin index, and IL-6, whereas those with unexplained anemia had elevated TNFα. We conclude that iron deficiency anemia is not very common in young children in Montreal. While iron deficiency without anemia is more common than iron deficiency with anemia, the correspondingly reduced circulating hepcidin would have enabled heightened absorption of dietary iron in support of erythropoiesis.

  2. Use of near infrared correlation spectroscopy for quantitation of surface iron, absorbed water and stored electronic energy in a suite of Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Lelia M.; Banin, Amos; Carle, Glenn; Orenberg, James; Scattergood, Thomas

    1989-01-01

    A number of questions concerning the surface mineralogy and the history of water on Mars remain unresolved using the Viking analyses and Earth-based telescopic data. Identification and quantitation of iron-bearing clays on Mars would elucidate these outstanding issues. Near infrared correlation analysis, a method typically applied to qualitative and quantitative analysis of individual constituents of multicomponent mixtures, is adapted here to selection of distinctive features of a small, highly homologous series of Fe/Ca-exchanged montmorillonites and several kalinites. Independently determined measures of surface iron, relative humidity and stored electronic energy were used as constituent data for linear regression of the constituent vs. reflectance data throughout the spectral region 0.68 to 2.5 micrometers. High correlations were found in appropriate regions for all three constituents, though that with stored energy is still considered tenuous. Quantitation was improved using 1st and 2nd derivative spectra. High resolution data over a broad spectral range would be required to quantitatively identify iron-bearing clays by remotely sensed reflectance.

  3. Low iron stores are related to higher blood concentrations of manganese, cobalt and cadmium in non-smoking, Norwegian women in the HUNT 2 study

    SciTech Connect

    Margrete Meltzer, Helle; Lise Brantsaeter, Anne; Borch-Iohnsen, Berit; Ellingsen, Dag G.; Alexander, Jan; Thomassen, Yngvar; Stigum, Hein; Ydersbond, Trond A.

    2010-07-15

    Low iron (Fe) stores may influence absorption or transport of divalent metals in blood. To obtain more knowledge about such associations, the divalent metal ions cadmium (Cd), manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) and parameters of Fe metabolism (serum ferritin, haemoglobin (Hb) and transferrin) were investigated in 448 healthy, menstruating non-smoking women, age 20-55 years (mean 38 years), participating in the Norwegian HUNT 2 study. The study population was stratified for serum ferritin: 257 were iron-depleted (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L) and 84 had iron deficiency anaemia (serum ferritin <12 {mu}g/L and Hb<120 g/L). The low ferritin group had increased blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd but normal concentrations of Cu, Zn and Pb. In multiple regression models, ferritin emerged as the main determinant of Mn, Co and Cd (p<0.001), while no significant associations with Cu, Zn and Pb were found. Adjusted r{sup 2} for the models were 0.28, 0.48 and 0.34, respectively. Strong positive associations between blood concentrations of Mn, Co and Cd were observed, also when controlled for their common association with ferritin. Apart from these associations, the models showed no significant interactions between the six divalent metals studied. Very mild anaemia (110{<=}Hb<120 g/L) did not seem to have any effect independent of low ferritin. Approximately 26% of the women with iron deficiency anaemia had high concentrations of all of Mn, Co and Cd as opposed to 2.3% of iron-replete subjects. The results confirm that low serum ferritin may have an impact on body kinetics of certain divalent metal ions, but not all. Only a fraction of women with low iron status exhibited an increased blood concentration of divalent metals, providing indication of complexities in the body's handling of these metals.

  4. Elective caesarean: does delay in cord clamping for 30 s ensure sufficient iron stores at 4 months of age? A historical cohort control study

    PubMed Central

    Hellström-Westas, Lena; Domellöf, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare iron stores in infants born after elective caesarean section (CS) and a 30 s delay of umbilical cord clamping with those born vaginally after early (≤10 s) or delayed (≥180 s) cord clamping. Design Prospective observational study with historical control. Setting Swedish county hospital. Population 64 infants born after elective CS were compared with a historical control of 166 early clamped and 168 delayed clamped after vaginal birth. Methods Blood and iron status were measured in blood samples collected at birth, 48–96 hours after birth, 4 and 12 months of age. Primary and secondary outcome measures Ferritin at 4 months of age was the primary outcome, second outcome measures were other indicators of iron status, and haemoglobin, at 4 and 12 months of age, as well as respiratory distress at 1 and 6 hours after birth. Results At 4 months infants born by elective CS had better iron status than those born vaginally subjected to early cord clamping, shown by higher adjusted mean difference of ferritin concentration (39 µg/L (95% CI 10 to 60)) and mean cell volume (1.8 fL (95% CI 0.6 to 3.0)); and lower levels of transferrin receptors (−0.39 mg/L (95% CI −0.69 to −0.08)). No differences were seen between infants born after elective CS and delayed clamped vaginally born infants at 4 months. No differences were found between groups at 12 months of age. Conclusions Waiting to clamp the umbilical cord for 30 s after elective CS results in higher iron stores at 4 months of age compared with early cord clamping after vaginal birth, and seems to ensure iron status comparable with those achieved after 180 s delayed cord clamping after vaginal birth. PMID:27807089

  5. Iron supplementation prevents a decline in iron stores and enhances strength performance in elite female volleyball players during the competitive season.

    PubMed

    Mielgo-Ayuso, Juan; Zourdos, Michael C; Calleja-González, Julio; Urdampilleta, Aritz; Ostojic, Sergej

    2015-06-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the effects of 11 weeks of iron supplementation on hematological and strength markers in elite female volleyball players. Twenty-two volleyball players (aged 27.0 ± 5.6 years) from 2 Spanish First National League teams participated and were counterbalanced into 1 of 2 groups based upon iron status: (i) control group (CG, n = 11); or (ii) iron treatment group (ITG, n = 11), which received 325 mg/day of ferrous sulphate daily. Subjects performed their team's regimen of training or match play every day. Both groups were tested for hematological and strength levels at 2 points: (i) baseline (T0, before preseason) and (ii) 11 weeks later (T11, post-testing). Hematological parameters were serum iron (sFe), serum ferritin (FER), transferrin saturation index (TSI), and hemoglobin (Hb); strength assessments were bench press, military press, half-squat, power clean, clean and jerk, and pull-over. CG experienced a significant decrease (p < 0.05) for sFe (T0, 112.7 ± 31.5; T11, 69.0 ± 20.5 μg·dL(-1); -33.9%), FER (T0, 60.2 ± 28.6; T11, 38.2 ± 16.4 ng·mL(-1); -34.6%), TSI (T0, 29.4% ± 9.5%; T11, 17.4% ± 5.1%; -35.3%), and Hb (T0, 14.1 ± 1.0; T11, 13.0 ± 0.8 g·L(-1); -7.44%); however, ITG experienced no changes (p > 0.05). Consequently, in ITG all hematological parameters were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than CG at T11. There was greater (p < 0.05) percent increase in the clean and jerk (CG: +5.1% ± 20.9 vs. ITG: +29.0% ± 21.3%), power clean (CG: -5.8% ± 30.3% vs. ITG: +44.6% ± 56.6%), and total mean strength (CG: +10.9% ± 3.2% vs. ITG: +26.2% ± 3.6%) in ITG. Our findings suggest that oral iron supplementation prevents iron loss and enhances strength in female volleyball players during the competitive season.

  6. Influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in Bangladeshi women

    SciTech Connect

    Kippler, Maria; Ekstroem, Eva-Charlotte; Loennerdal, Bo; Goessler, Walter; Akesson, Agneta; El Arifeen, Shams; Persson, Lars-Ake; Vahter, Marie . E-mail: Marie.Vahter@ki.se

    2007-07-15

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental contaminant present in food. The absorption in the intestine increases in individuals with low iron stores, but the effect of zinc deficiency is not clear. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of iron and zinc status on cadmium accumulation in pregnant Bangladeshi women. We measured cadmium in urine from 890 women using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Further, we also measured ferritin and zinc in plasma. The median cadmium concentration in urine was 0.59 {mu}g/L (adjusted to mean specific gravity of 1.012 g/mL). Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that urinary cadmium was associated with plasma ferritin and plasma zinc via a significant interaction between dichotomized plasma ferritin and plasma zinc. The analysis was adjusted for age and socioeconomic status. Women with low iron stores and adequate zinc status had significantly higher urinary cadmium compared to women with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. There was no difference in urinary cadmium between women with both low iron stores and zinc status compared to those with both adequate iron stores and zinc status. In conclusion, low iron stores were associated with increased cadmium accumulation, but only at adequate zinc status.

  7. Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Koch, Holger M; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Casjens, Swaantje; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Welge, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Behrens, Thomas; Raulf, Monika; Hartwig, Andrea; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores.

  8. C-reactive protein, waist circumference, and family history of heart attack are independent predictors of body iron stores in apparently healthy premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Ortegón, M F; Arbeláez, A; Mosquera, M; Méndez, F; Aguilar-de Plata, C

    2012-08-01

    Ferritin levels have been associated with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prediction of ferritin levels by variables related to cardiometabolic disease risk in a multivariate analysis. For this aim, 123 healthy women (72 premenopausal and 51 posmenopausal) were recruited. Data were collected through procedures of anthropometric measurements, questionnaires for personal/familial antecedents, and dietary intake (24-h recall), and biochemical determinations (ferritin, C reactive protein (CRP), glucose, insulin, and lipid profile) in blood serum samples obtained. Multiple linear regression analysis was used and variables with no normal distribution were log-transformed for this analysis. In premenopausal women, a model to explain log-ferritin levels was found with log-CRP levels, heart attack familial history, and waist circumference as independent predictors. Ferritin behaves as other cardiovascular markers in terms of prediction of its levels by documented predictors of cardiometabolic disease and related disorders. This is the first report of a relationship between heart attack familial history and ferritin levels. Further research is required to evaluate the mechanism to explain the relationship of central body fat and heart attack familial history with body iron stores values.

  9. [The role of iron as a deficient element].

    PubMed

    Schümann, K

    1989-12-01

    Iron is an essential trace element. In its heme-form as well as in its non heme-form it is a part of enzymes and hemoproteins. For a safe and adequate dietary intake 10-18 mg of iron are recommended daily. Frequently, this quantity is not available: approximately 20% of the world population is iron-deficient. In this state the enteral transfer capacity for toxic metals, e.g., Cd and Pb, is increased and the adaptation to physical strain as well as the immunological responses are depressed. Alterations of body iron-stores are almost exclusively balanced by adequate adaptation of the enteral iron-transfer capacity. The mechanism of this adaptation process can neither be satisfactorily explained by the "mucosal block hypothesis", nor by the "mucosal transferrin hypothesis". When the time-course of iron storage and its relation to intestinal iron transfer was investigated after i.v. iron administration to iron-deficient rats, the results indicated that the process of adaptation is located in the intestinal mucosa. Intestinal iron loading is decreased in iron deficiency, whereas the iron transfer into the organism is increased. Further investigation is necessary to find out by which mechanism the iron manages to bypass existing mucosal storage capacity in this situation. The geographical distribution of iron deficiency is influenced by a variety of local factors. Still, the paramount causes of iron-deficiency are unbalanced iron losses and the lack of bioavailable iron in the diet. The bioavailability of non heme iron is influenced by the composition of the diet. The effect of promotors of iron absorption, such as meat, amino acids, polycarbonic acids and ascorbate is opposed by the influence of inhibitors, such as bran, soya products, vegetables and egg-dishes. Iron losses are mainly due to blood losses. Thus, the wide distribution of hookworm diseases in tropical areas contributes significantly to the endemic iron-deficiency in these regions. A more physiological loss

  10. The evaluation of iron deficiency and anemia in male blood donors with other related factors

    PubMed Central

    Yousefinejad, Vahid; Darvishi, Nazila; Arabzadeh, Masoumeh; Soori, Masoumeh; Magsudlu, Mahtab; Shafiayan, Madjid

    2010-01-01

    Aims and Background: Iron deficiency is one of the most common nutritional disorders worldwide and blood donation may cause iron depletion. Limited studies with large sample size have been done on male donors. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among male donors in the Kurdistan Organization of Blood Transfusion in Iran. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Sample size was 1184 blood donors selected by systematic random sampling. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum ferritin, total iron banding capacity (TIBC) and transferin saturation were measured in donors. Iron depletion, lack of iron stores, iron deficiency, iron deficiency anemia and anemia were evaluated among them. Data was analyzed with SPSS software and X2, one-way ANOVA, and LSD test. Results: Iron deficiency, anemia, iron deficiency anemia, iron depletion and lack of iron resources were seen in 2.3, 4.08, 2.14, 22.76 and 4.66 percent respectively. There was a significant relationship of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia with instances of donation and interval from last donation (P < 0.05). A significant relationship was seen between iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among blood donors with more than ten times blood donation (P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study showed regular male donors require especial attention. Therefore, serum ferritin is recommended as a more adequate index to use for iron deficiency screening and planning purposes for iron supplementation among them. PMID:20859513

  11. Achieving target hematocrit in dialysis patients: new concepts in iron management.

    PubMed

    Nissenson, A R

    1997-12-01

    The management of anemia in dialysis patients involves a comprehensive understanding of the role of erythropoietin deficiency and of the importance of adequate available iron. It is clear that iron and recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) in concert allow the clinician to achieve a given target hematocrit in dialysis patients. By first repleting and then maintaining iron stores, and with an appreciation of the concept of functional iron deficiency, the nephrologist can achieve target hematocrits with the lowest necessary dose of rHuEPO. Iron repletion and maintenance is difficult to achieve with oral iron, and parenteral iron is needed in most cases. New protocols for ongoing parenteral maintenance therapy with iron dextran or iron gluconate, a form of iron likely to be available soon in the United States, should lead to achievement of target hematocrits in a greater number of patients and be cost-effective in improving patient outcomes.

  12. Intravenous iron in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; Gómez-Ramírez, Susana; García-Erce, José Antonio

    2009-10-07

    The prevalence of anemia across studies on patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is high (30%). Both iron deficiency (ID) and anemia of chronic disease contribute most to the development of anemia in IBD. The prevalence of ID is even higher (45%). Anemia and ID negatively impact the patient's quality of life. Therefore, together with an adequate control of disease activity, iron replacement therapy should start as soon as anemia or ID is detected to attain a normal hemoglobin (Hb) and iron status. Many patients will respond to oral iron, but compliance may be poor, whereas intravenous (i.v.) compounds are safe, provide a faster Hb increase and iron store repletion, and presents a lower rate of treatment discontinuation. Absolute indications for i.v. iron treatment should include severe anemia, intolerance or inappropriate response to oral iron, severe intestinal disease activity, or use of an erythropoietic stimulating agent. Four different products are principally used in clinical practice, which differ in their pharmacokinetic properties and safety profiles: iron gluconate and iron sucrose (lower single doses), and iron dextran and ferric carboxymaltose (higher single doses). After the initial resolution of anemia and the repletion of iron stores, the patient's hematological and iron parameters should be carefully and periodically monitored, and maintenance iron treatment should be provided as required. New i.v. preparations that allow for giving 1000-1500 mg in a single session, thus facilitating patient management, provide an excellent tool to prevent or treat anemia and ID in this patient population, which in turn avoids allogeneic blood transfusion and improves their quality of life.

  13. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  14. The relationship between the iron isotopic composition of human whole blood and iron status parameters.

    PubMed

    Van Heghe, Lana; Delanghe, Joris; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Vanhaecke, Frank

    2013-11-01

    As the iron status of an individual cannot be adequately assessed on the basis of the (total) Fe concentration in whole blood or serum, in medicine a number of parameters, such as the serum concentrations of ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor and the transferrin saturation, are routinely determined instead. As previous research has shown that also the isotopic composition of Fe in blood and tissues is dependent on the metabolism, the present study assessed whether Fe isotopic composition in whole blood provides information as to an individual's iron status. Fe isotopic analysis of whole blood samples from a reference population (healthy volunteers) was carried out using multi-collector ICP-mass spectrometry (after chromatographic target element isolation) and the results obtained were investigated by statistical means as to their potential relation with the iron status parameters conventionally used in medicine. A low δ(56)Fe value was demonstrated to coincide with high iron status and a high δ(56)Fe value with low iron status, thus reflecting the response of the body to this iron status in terms of iron uptake, distribution between blood and stores and mobilization of storage iron. In a second phase, the iron isotopic composition in blood from patients treated for hemochromatosis type I and from patients with anemia of chronic disease (ACD) was determined. The results for hemochromatosis patients plotted with the values of low iron status, while those for ACD patients plotted with the values of high iron status. By taking a closer look at the aberrant iron metabolism that comes with these diseases, it can be seen that the patient samples confirm the conclusions drawn for the reference population. Patients with hemochromatosis type I have a strongly upregulated iron uptake, like healthy individuals with low iron status. The metabolism of patients suffering from ACD tries to remove iron from the circulation by downregulating the iron uptake

  15. Acute injury with intravenous iron and concerns regarding long-term safety.

    PubMed

    Bishu, Kalkidan; Agarwal, Rajiv

    2006-09-01

    Intravenous iron is widely used to maintain adequate iron stores and prevent iron deficiency anemia in patients with chronic kidney disease, yet concerns remain about its long-term safety with respect to oxidative stress, kidney injury, and accelerated atherosclerosis, which are the subjects of this review. Three parenteral iron formulations are available for use in the United States: Iron dextran, iron gluconate, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, especially the high molecular form, has been linked with anaphylactoid and anaphylactic reactions, and its use has been declining. A portion of intravenous iron preparations is redox-active, labile iron available for direct donation to transferrin. In vitro tests show that commonly available intravenous iron formulations have differing capacities to saturate transferrin directly: Iron gluconate > iron sucrose > iron dextran. Intravenous iron treatment produces oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increases in plasma levels of lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde), at a point that is much earlier than the time to peak concentration of catalytically active iron, suggesting a direct effect of iron sucrose on oxidative stress. Furthermore, iron sucrose infusion produces endothelial dysfunction that seems to peak earlier than the serum level of free iron. Intravenous iron sucrose infusion also has been shown to produce acute renal injury and inflammation as demonstrated by increased urinary albumin, enzyme (N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase), and cytokine (chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) excretions. Although the long-term dangers of intravenous iron are unproved, these data call for examination of effects of intravenous iron on the potential for long-term harm in patients with chronic kidney disease.

  16. Efficacy of a multi micronutrient-fortified drink in improving iron and micronutrient status among schoolchildren with low iron stores in India: A randomised, double-masked placebo-controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A multiple micronutrient-fortified drink could be an effective strategy to combating micronutrient deficiencies in school-going children. Our objective was to assess the efficacy of a multiple micronutrient-fortified drink in reducing iron deficiency (ID), ID anemia (IDA), anemia and improving micro...

  17. Iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy and postpartum: pathophysiology and effect of oral versus intravenous iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Khalafallah, Alhossain A; Dennis, Amanda E

    2012-01-01

    Nutritional iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA) is the most common disorder in the world, affecting more than two billion people. The World Health Organization's global database on anaemia has estimated a prevalence of 14% based on a regression-based analysis. Recent data show that the prevalence of IDA in pregnant women in industrialized countries is 17.4% while the incidence of IDA in developing countries increases significantly up to 56%. Although oral iron supplementation is widely used for the treatment of IDA, not all patients respond adequately to oral iron therapy. This is due to several factors including the side effects of oral iron which lead to poor compliance and lack of efficacy. The side effects, predominantly gastrointestinal discomfort, occur in a large cohort of patients taking oral iron preparations. Previously, the use of intravenous iron had been associated with undesirable and sometimes serious side effects and therefore was underutilised. However, in recent years, new type II and III iron complexes have been developed, which offer better compliance and toleration as well as high efficacy with a good safety profile. In summary, intravenous iron can be used safely for a rapid repletion of iron stores and correction of anaemia during and after pregnancy.

  18. Parenteral iron dextran therapy.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J; Holland, E G

    1990-02-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is indicated in patients with iron-deficiency anemia associated with conditions that interfere with the ingestion or absorption of oral iron. Replacement doses of iron required to replenish iron stores are based on body weight and the observed hemoglobin value. Methods of administering iron dextran are reviewed, including intramuscular and intravenous injections of the undiluted drug, intravenous infusion of a diluted preparation, and as an addition to parenteral nutrition solutions. The overall incidence of adverse reactions associated with the parenteral administration of iron is low, but the potential for an anaphylactic reaction requires that an initial test dose be given followed by careful patient observation.

  19. Perspectives on nutritional iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, L

    2001-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency (ID) is caused by an intake of dietary iron insufficient to cover physiological iron requirements. Studies on iron absorption from whole diets have examined relationships between dietary iron bioavailability/absorption, iron losses, and amounts of stored iron. New insights have been obtained into regulation of iron absorption and expected rates of changes of iron stores or hemoglobin iron deficits when bioavailability or iron content of the diet has been modified and when losses of iron occur. Negative effects of ID are probably related to age, up to about 20 years, explaining some of earlier controversies. Difficulties in establishing the prevalence of mild ID are outlined. The degree of underestimation of the prevalence of mild ID when using multiple diagnostic criteria is discussed. It is suggested that current low-energy lifestyles are a common denominator for the current high prevalence not only of ID but also of obesity, diabetes, and osteoporosis.

  20. [Prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in 12 year old school children from Jujuy].

    PubMed

    Buys, María C; Guerra, Lidia N; Martín, Beatriz; Miranda, Carmen E; Torrejón, Irma; Garrot, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Iron deficiency is highly frequent among adolescents. Its early detection can prevent the development of a ferropenic anemia, a serious condition. The problem has not been well studied in our country. The purpose of this work was to determine the frequency of iron deficiency and anemia in adolescents. The criteria considered were: hematocrit below 38%, b) saturation transferrin below 16%, c) ferritin below 15 ng/ml. The study was carried out in 2265 schoolchildren, 12 years old, of both sexes, in urban and periurban areas in the city of San Salvador de Jujuy (1250 a.s.l.). The following parameters were measured: hematocrit as well as serum iron and total iron binding capacity, both by colorimetric method. Ferritin was measured by ELISA. Anemia was not found. Iron deficiency as estimated by the iron functional component, was found in 25% of girls and 21% of boys and, through iron stores, in 28% of girls and 18% of boys. Iron deficiency stores in both sexes is the more relevant alteration, indicating that the population sample here studied constitutes a highly vulnerable group. The early detection of iron deficiency will help physical and intellectual development so that adequate sanitary policies are necessary for its prevention.

  1. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  2. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  3. Apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, John W.; Wheeler, Michael G.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Sherman, Robert H.

    1985-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas(es) is (are) stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forming at a significantly lower temperature).

  4. Iron deficiency in the young athlete.

    PubMed

    Rowland, T W

    1990-10-01

    Although overt anemia is uncommon, depletion of body iron stores is common among adolescent female athletes. Poor dietary iron intake, menstruation, and increased iron losses associated with physical training all appear to be important factors. Whether nonanemic iron deficiency can impair exercise performance is uncertain. Nonetheless, athletes with low ferritin levels are at risk for impaired erythropoiesis and should receive therapeutic iron supplementation.

  5. A new concept in the control of iron deficiency: community-based preventive supplementation of at-risk groups by the weekly intake of iron supplements.

    PubMed

    Viteri, F E

    1998-03-01

    Iron deficiency (ID), defined as an insufficient supply of iron to the cells of the body after iron reserves have been exhausted, is the most prevalent single nutritional deficiency, affecting over 2,000 million people, mostly in the developing world. Infants, small children, adolescents and pregnant and fertile-age women are most vulnerable. Only about 50% of people with ID develop iron deficiency anemia (IDA), since this is a late manifestation of chronic ID. Based on the average daily iron requirement and on the rate of iron reutilization from red cell hemoglobin destruction, it can be estimated that after iron stores have been depleted, it takes about 4 months of ID erythropoiesis for adult women to have a drop in hemoglobin concentration [Hb] of 10 g/l, if the iron intake is only 70% of requirement. IDA can be defined by a [Hb] below an appropriate cut-off point for age, sex, physiological condition and altitude above sea level, or by a [Hb] increment of more than 10 g/l to the administration of adequate doses of iron. More than 85% of the nutritional anemias are IDA alone, or of iron combined with folate or other nutrient deficiencies.

  6. Convenience Store Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luter, Robert R.

    This self-paced, individualized instructional guide is designed for use by those who are currently working in a convenience store or by those who wish to learn the basics of convenience store marketing and operations. Addressed in the individual units of the guide are the following topics: today's convenience store, regular duties and…

  7. 5 CFR 919.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate evidence. 919.900 Section 919.900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.900 Adequate...

  8. 9. Interior, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Interior, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to south (90mm lens). Note the roof truss system and built-up iron longitudinal roof girders. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  9. 10. Interior detail, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Interior detail, original Boiler and Engine Room, Engine Stores Building, Southern Pacific Railroad Carlin Shops, view to east (90mm lens). Note the pin-connected roof truss system and built-up iron longitudinal roof girders. - Southern Pacific Railroad, Carlin Shops, Engine Stores Building, Foot of Sixth Street, Carlin, Elko County, NV

  10. Light-storing photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Junying; Pan Feng; Hao Weichang; Ge Qi; Wang Tianmian

    2004-12-06

    Light-storing photocatalyst was prepared by coating light-storing phosphor and TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst in sequence on ceramic. The light-storing photocatalyst can store light irradiation and emit slowly. Consequently, the photocatalyst remains active when the irradiation source is cut off. Rhodamine B (RhB) can be decomposed efficiently by this photocatalyst in the dark after it absorbs light irradiation. This photocatalyst is photoreactive in an outdoor environment or can save energy by supplying irradiation intermittently for the photocatalyst.

  11. Leasing the College Store.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Richard M.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of college administrators responsible for supervising college stores found that three factors are strongly considered in deciding whether to lease the college store: available management skills, service orientation, and financial resources. It also found that private and public institutions and large and small institutions rank the…

  12. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  13. Iron studies in hemophilia

    SciTech Connect

    Lottenberg, R.; Kitchens, C.S.; Roessler, G.S.; Noyes, W.D.

    1981-12-01

    Although iron deficiency is not recognized as a usual complication of hemophilia, we questioned whether intermittent occult loss of blood in urine or stool might predispose hemophiliacs to chronic iron deficiency. Seven men with factor VII and one with factor IX deficiency were studied. Blood studied, bone marrow aspirates, urine and stool samples, and ferrokinetics with total-body counting up to five months were examined. These data showed no excessive loss of blood during the study period; however, marrow iron stores were decidedly decreased, being absent in four subjects. We suggest that in some hemophiliacs, iron deposits in tissues such as synovial membranes may form a high proportion of the body's total iron stores.

  14. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  15. Storing your medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000534.htm Storing your medicines To use the sharing features on this page, ... child latch or lock. Do not use Damaged Medicine Damaged medicine may make you sick. DO NOT ...

  16. Provenance Store Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  17. Predicting Commissary Store Success

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    authorized shoppers , who include active duty, reserve and retired military members as well as National Guard members and their families (Defense...that make any retail store successful: the number of shoppers , the price differential between a store and its competition, and the number of...benefits is more efficient and could save significant taxpayer dollars. Dearing (1984) analyzed perceptions of commissary shoppers with regard to the

  18. Physiology of Iron Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Waldvogel-Abramowski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M.; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Summary A revolution occurred during the last decade in the comprehension of the physiology as well as in the physiopathology of iron metabolism. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent knowledge that has accumulated, allowing a better comprehension of the mechanisms implicated in iron homeostasis. Iron metabolism is very fine tuned. The free molecule is very toxic; therefore, complex regulatory mechanisms have been developed in mammalian to insure adequate intestinal absorption, transportation, utilization, and elimination. ‘Ironomics’ certainly will be the future of the understanding of genes as well as of the protein-protein interactions involved in iron metabolism. PMID:25053935

  19. Is Correction of Iron Deficiency a New Addition to the Treatment of the Heart Failure?

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Donald S; Wexler, Dov; Schwartz, Doron

    2015-06-18

    Anemia is present in about 40% of heart failure (HF) patients. Iron deficiency (ID) is present in about 60% of the patients with anemia (about 24% of all HF patients) and in about 40% of patients without anemia (about 24% of all HF patients). Thus ID is present in about half the patients with HF. The ID in HF is associated with reduced iron stores in the bone marrow and the heart. ID is an independent risk factor for severity and worsening of the HF. Correction of ID with intravenous (IV) iron usually corrects both the anemia and the ID. Currently used IV iron preparations are very safe and effective in treating the ID in HF whereas little information is available on the effectiveness of oral iron. In HF IV iron correction of ID is associated with improvement in functional status, exercise capacity, quality of life and, in some studies, improvement in rate of hospitalization for HF, cardiac structure and function, and renal function. Large long-term adequately-controlled intervention studies are needed to clarify the effect of IV iron in HF. Several heart associations suggest that ID should be routinely sought for in all HF patients and corrected if present. In this paper we present our approach to diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency in heart failure.

  20. Evaluation of constitutive iron reductase (AtFRO2) expression on mineral accumulation and distribution in soybean (Glycine max. L)

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Marta W.; Clemente, Thomas E.; Grusak, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an important micronutrient in human and plant nutrition. Adequate iron nutrition during crop production is central for assuring appropriate iron concentrations in the harvestable organs, for human food or animal feed. The whole-plant movement of iron involves several processes, including the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron at several locations throughout the plant, prior to transmembrane trafficking of ferrous iron. In this study, soybean plants that constitutively expressed the AtFRO2 iron reductase gene were analyzed for leaf iron reductase activity, as well as the effect of this transgene’s expression on root, leaf, pod wall, and seed mineral concentrations. High Fe supply, in combination with the constitutive expression of AtFRO2, resulted in significantly higher concentrations of different minerals in roots (K, P, Zn, Ca, Ni, Mg, and Mo), pod walls (Fe, K, P, Cu, and Ni), leaves (Fe, P, Cu, Ca, Ni, and Mg) and seeds (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Ni). Leaf and pod wall iron concentrations increased as much as 500% in transgenic plants, while seed iron concentrations only increased by 10%, suggesting that factors other than leaf and pod wall reductase activity were limiting the translocation of iron to seeds. Protoplasts isolated from transgenic leaves had three-fold higher reductase activity than controls. Expression levels of the iron storage protein, ferritin, were higher in the transgenic leaves than in wild-type, suggesting that the excess iron may be stored as ferritin in the leaves and therefore unavailable for phloem loading and delivery to the seeds. Also, citrate and malate levels in the roots and leaves of transgenic plants were significantly higher than in wild-type, suggesting that organic acid production could be related to the increased accumulation of minerals in roots, leaves, and pod walls, but not in the seeds. All together, these results suggest a more ubiquitous role for the iron reductase in whole-plant mineral accumulation and

  1. Fatal anaphylactic reaction to iron sucrose in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ajay; Dave, Nikhil; Viradiya, Kishor

    2013-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia in pregnancy can have serious deleterious effects for both mother and fetus. Parenteral iron therapy in iron-deficiency anemia is recommended in patients where oral iron therapy is ineffective due to malabsorption states and non-compliance. Compared to oral iron therapy, intravenous iron results in much more rapid resolution of iron-deficiency anemia with minimal adverse reactions. Iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile and is an alternative to other forms of parenteral iron therapy in correction of iron stores depletion. Immune mechanisms and iron agent releasing bioactive, partially unbound iron into the circulation, resulting in oxidative stress appears to cause severe adverse reactions. Although iron sucrose has a favorable safety profile in comparison to other parenteral iron preparations, this report highlights a fatal anaphylactic shock to iron sucrose in a pregnant woman with severe iron deficiency non-compliant to oral iron therapy.

  2. Method and apparatus for storing hydrogen isotopes. [stored as uranium hydride in a block of copper

    DOEpatents

    McMullen, J.W.; Wheeler, M.G.; Cullingford, H.S.; Sherman, R.H.

    1982-08-10

    An improved method and apparatus for storing isotopes of hydrogen (especially tritium) are provided. The hydrogen gas is stored as hydrides of material (for example uranium) within boreholes in a block of copper. The mass of the block is critically important to the operation, as is the selection of copper, because no cooling pipes are used. Because no cooling pipes are used, there can be no failure due to cooling pipes. And because copper is used instead of stainless steel, a significantly higher temperature can be reached before the eutectic formation of uranium with copper occurs, (the eutectic of uranium with the iron in stainless steel forms at a significantly lower temperature).

  3. Small Food Stores and Availability of Nutritious Foods: A Comparison of Database and In-Store Measures, Northern California, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Laraia, Barbara; Kelly, Maggi; Adler, Nancy; Yen, Irene H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Small food stores are prevalent in urban neighborhoods, but the availability of nutritious food at such stores is not well known. The objective of this study was to determine whether data from 3 sources would yield a single, homogenous, healthful food store category that can be used to accurately characterize community nutrition environments for public health research. Methods We conducted in-store surveys in 2009 on store type and the availability of nutritious food in a sample of nonchain food stores (n = 102) in 6 predominantly urban counties in Northern California (Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Sacramento, San Francisco, and Santa Clara). We compared survey results with commercial database information and neighborhood sociodemographic data by using independent sample t tests and classification and regression trees. Results Sampled small food stores yielded a heterogeneous group of stores in terms of store type and nutritious food options. Most stores were identified as convenience (54%) or specialty stores (22%); others were small grocery stores (19%) and large grocery stores (5%). Convenience and specialty stores were smaller and carried fewer nutritious and fresh food items. The availability of nutritious food and produce was better in stores in neighborhoods that had a higher percentage of white residents and a lower population density but did not differ significantly by neighborhood income. Conclusion Commercial databases alone may not adequately categorize small food stores and the availability of nutritious foods. Alternative measures are needed to more accurately inform research and policies that seek to address disparities in diet-related health conditions. PMID:22789445

  4. The Store Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical and robotic technologies are merging to present a wonderful opportunity to develop artificial limbs and prosthetic devices for humans injured on the job, in the military, or due to disease. In this challenge, students will have the opportunity to design a store or online service that specifically dedicates itself to amputees. Described…

  5. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  6. Iron nutrition in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Mesías, Marta; Seiquer, Isabel; Navarro, M Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is an important period of nutritional vulnerability due to increased dietary requirements for growth and development. Iron needs are elevated as a result of intensive growth and muscular development, which implies an increase in blood volume; thus, it is extremely important for the adolescent's iron requirements to be met. Diet, therefore, must provide enough iron and, moreover, nutrients producing adequate iron bioavailability to favor element utilization and thus be sufficient for needs at this stage of life. Currently, many adolescents consume monotonous and unbalanced diets which may limit mineral intake and/or bioavailability, leading to iron deficiency and, consequently, to ferropenic anemia, a nutritional deficit of worldwide prevalence. Iron deficiency, apart from provoking important physiological repercussions, can adversely affect adolescents' cognitive ability and behavior. Accordingly, promoting the consumption of a varied, adjusted, and balanced diet by adolescents will facilitate iron utilization, benefiting their health both at present and in adulthood. This review discusses how physiological changes during adolescence can cause iron requirements to increase. Consequently, it is important that diet should contribute an appropriate amount of this mineral and, moreover, with an adequate bioavailability to satisfy needs during this special period of life.

  7. Iron Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... detect and help diagnose iron deficiency or iron overload. In people with anemia , these tests can help ... also be ordered when iron deficiency or iron overload is suspected. Early iron deficiency often goes unnoticed. ...

  8. Iron deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Anthony; Cacoub, Patrice; Macdougall, Iain C; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2016-02-27

    Anaemia affects roughly a third of the world's population; half the cases are due to iron deficiency. It is a major and global public health problem that affects maternal and child mortality, physical performance, and referral to health-care professionals. Children aged 0-5 years, women of childbearing age, and pregnant women are particularly at risk. Several chronic diseases are frequently associated with iron deficiency anaemia--notably chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Measurement of serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, serum soluble transferrin receptors, and the serum soluble transferrin receptors-ferritin index are more accurate than classic red cell indices in the diagnosis of iron deficiency anaemia. In addition to the search for and treatment of the cause of iron deficiency, treatment strategies encompass prevention, including food fortification and iron supplementation. Oral iron is usually recommended as first-line therapy, but the most recent intravenous iron formulations, which have been available for nearly a decade, seem to replenish iron stores safely and effectively. Hepcidin has a key role in iron homoeostasis and could be a future diagnostic and therapeutic target. In this Seminar, we discuss the clinical presentation, epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and acute management of iron deficiency anaemia, and outstanding research questions for treatment.

  9. Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duzer, Carol; Mansoor, Inaam

    The Convenience Store Workplace Literacy Curriculum was developed for English-as-a-Second-Language classes offered by the Southland Corporation, 7-Eleven stores, through a national workplace literacy grant. It is based on an analysis of the tasks and interactions common to a convenience store worksite. Store employees, managers, field consultants,…

  10. Intravenous iron therapy: well-tolerated, yet not harmless.

    PubMed

    Sengölge, G; Hörl, W H; Sunder-Plassmann, G

    2005-12-01

    In the majority of patients with chronic renal failure, it is essential to substitute erythropoietic agents and iron to maintain a haemoglobin level above 11 g dL-1. Intravenous iron is more effective than oral iron. Substitution of intravenous iron is mainly performed using iron(III)-hydroxide-sucrose complex (iron sucrose) and iron(III)-sodium-gluconate in sucrose (iron gluconate), and is, in general, well-tolerated. Nonetheless, intravenous iron therapy has effects on endothelial cells, polymorphonuclear leucocytes and cytokines which are most likely related to non-transferrin bound labile iron. These effects suggest a role of iron in infection or atherosclerosis. Yet, not all available data support the association of iron with infection and atherosclerosis. A recent trial showed that iron sucrose is safe when given as treatment for iron deficiency or for maintenance of iron stores. Nevertheless, iron therapy should be handled with caution but its use should not be feared whenever indicated.

  11. Storing Blood Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute worked with Goddard Space Flight Center to propose a solution to the blood-cell freezing problem. White blood cells and bone marrow are stored for future use by leukemia patients as a result of Goddard and Jet Propulsion Laboratory expertise in electronics and cryogenics. White blood cell and bone marrow bank established using freezing unit. Freezing unit monitors temperature of cells themselves. Thermocouple placed against polyethylene container relays temperature signals to an electronic system which controls small heaters located outside container. Heaters allow liquid nitrogen to circulate at constant temperature and maintain consistent freezing rate. Ability to freeze, store, and thaw white cells and bone marrow without damage is important in leukemia treatment.

  12. Iron deficiency: definition and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Cook, J D; Skikne, B S

    1989-11-01

    There has been a continuous refinement over the past several decades of methods to detect iron deficiency and assess its magnitude. The optimal combination of measurements differs for clinical and epidemiological assessment. Clinically, the major problem is to distinguish true iron deficiency from other causes of iron-deficient erythropoiesis, such as the anaemia of chronic disease. Epidemiologically, techniques that provide quantified estimates of body iron are preferable. For both purposes, the serum ferritin is the focal point of the laboratory detection of iron deficiency. Serum ferritin measurements provide a reliable index of body iron stores in healthy individuals, a cost-effective method of screening for iron deficiency, and a useful alternative to bone marrow examinations in the evaluation of anaemic patients. Preliminary studies indicate that measurement of the serum transferrin receptor may be the most reliable way to assess deficits in tissue iron supply.

  13. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors.A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L.The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg.In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L.

  14. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors. A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L. The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg. In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L. PMID:27902589

  15. [Iron and performance in elite athletes].

    PubMed

    Romagnoli, Elisa; Cristani, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    The negative relationship between performance and iron deficiency anemia is well known. There is still debate in the literature on the exercise-induced iron loss and if low iron store, even in the absence of frank anemia, can adversely affected performance of elite athletes. We analyse the physiologic changes induced by strong exercise, the diagnostic problems and therapeutic supplementation.

  16. How iron controls iron.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Lukas C

    2009-12-01

    Cells regulate iron homeostasis by posttranscriptional regulation of proteins responsible for iron uptake and storage. This requires RNA-binding activity of iron-regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2. Two studies recently published in Science by Vashisht et al. (2009) and Salahudeen et al. (2009) reveal how cells adjust IRP2 activity.

  17. Iron in fetal and neonatal nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Both iron deficiency and iron excess during the fetal and neonatal period bode poorly for developing organ systems. Maternal conditions such as iron deficiency, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and smoking, and preterm birth are the common causes of perinatal iron deficiency. Long-term neurodevelopmental impairments and predisposition to future iron deficiency that are prevalent in infants with perinatal iron deficiency require early diagnosis, optimal treatment and adequate follow-up of infants at risk for the condition. However, due to the potential for oxidant-mediated tissue injury, iron overload should be avoided in the perinatal period, especially in preterm infants. PMID:17157088

  18. Differential Roles of Iron Storage Proteins in Maintaining the Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Khare, Garima; Nangpal, Prachi; Tyagi, Anil K

    2017-01-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins are iron storage proteins that represent key players in iron homeostasis. Several organisms possess both forms of ferritins, however, their relative physiological roles are less understood. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses both ferritin (BfrB) and bacterioferritin (BfrA), playing an essential role in its pathogenesis as reported by us earlier. This study provides insights into the role of these two proteins in iron homeostasis by employing M. tuberculosis bfr mutants. Our data suggests that BfrA is required for efficient utilization of stored iron under low iron conditions while BfrB plays a crucial role as the major defense protein under excessive iron conditions. We show that these two proteins provide protection against oxidative stress and hypoxia. Iron incorporation study showed that BfrB has higher capacity for storing iron than BfrA, which augurs well for efficient iron quenching under iron excess conditions. Moreover, iron release assay demonstrated that BfrA has 3 times superior ability to release stored iron emphasizing its requirement for efficient iron release under low iron conditions, facilitated by the presence of heme. Thus, for the first time, our observations suggest that the importance of BfrA or BfrB separately might vary depending upon the iron situation faced by the cell.

  19. Differential Roles of Iron Storage Proteins in Maintaining the Iron Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Anil K.

    2017-01-01

    Ferritins and bacterioferritins are iron storage proteins that represent key players in iron homeostasis. Several organisms possess both forms of ferritins, however, their relative physiological roles are less understood. Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses both ferritin (BfrB) and bacterioferritin (BfrA), playing an essential role in its pathogenesis as reported by us earlier. This study provides insights into the role of these two proteins in iron homeostasis by employing M. tuberculosis bfr mutants. Our data suggests that BfrA is required for efficient utilization of stored iron under low iron conditions while BfrB plays a crucial role as the major defense protein under excessive iron conditions. We show that these two proteins provide protection against oxidative stress and hypoxia. Iron incorporation study showed that BfrB has higher capacity for storing iron than BfrA, which augurs well for efficient iron quenching under iron excess conditions. Moreover, iron release assay demonstrated that BfrA has 3 times superior ability to release stored iron emphasizing its requirement for efficient iron release under low iron conditions, facilitated by the presence of heme. Thus, for the first time, our observations suggest that the importance of BfrA or BfrB separately might vary depending upon the iron situation faced by the cell. PMID:28060867

  20. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  1. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers.

  2. Regulation of cellular iron metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    Iron is an essential but potentially hazardous biometal. Mammalian cells require sufficient amounts of iron to satisfy metabolic needs or to accomplish specialized functions. Iron is delivered to tissues by circulating transferrin, a transporter that captures iron released into the plasma mainly from intestinal enterocytes or reticuloendothelial macrophages. The binding of iron-laden transferrin to the cell-surface transferrin receptor 1 results in endocytosis and uptake of the metal cargo. Internalized iron is transported to mitochondria for the synthesis of haem or iron–sulfur clusters, which are integral parts of several metalloproteins, and excess iron is stored and detoxified in cytosolic ferritin. Iron metabolism is controlled at different levels and by diverse mechanisms. The present review summarizes basic concepts of iron transport, use and storage and focuses on the IRE (iron-responsive element)/IRP (iron-regulatory protein) system, a well known post-transcriptional regulatory circuit that not only maintains iron homoeostasis in various cell types, but also contributes to systemic iron balance. PMID:21348856

  3. Iron Chelation

    MedlinePlus

    ... iron overload and need treatment. What is iron overload? Iron chelation therapy is used when you have ... may want to perform: How quickly does iron overload happen? This is different for each person. It ...

  4. Iron nutrition and premenopausal women: effects of poor iron status on physical and neuropsychological performance.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Murray-Kolb, Laura E

    2013-01-01

    Iron is a nutritionally essential trace element that functions through incorporation into proteins and enzymes, many of which contribute to physical and neuropsychological performance. Poor iron status, including iron deficiency (ID; diminished iron stores) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA; poor iron stores and diminished hemoglobin), affects billions of people worldwide. This review focuses on physical and neuropsychological outcomes associated with ID and IDA in premenopausal women, as the prevalence of ID and IDA is often greater in premenopausal women than other population demographics. Recent studies addressing the physiological effects of poor iron status on physical performance, including work productivity, voluntary activity, and athletic performance, are addressed. Similarly, the effects of iron status on neurological performance, including cognition, affect, and behavior, are summarized. Nutritional countermeasures for the prevention of poor iron status and the restoration of decrements in performance outcomes are described.

  5. Next-Generation Biomarkers for Iron Status.

    PubMed

    Drakesmith, Hal

    2016-01-01

    Iron is needed for oxygen transport, muscle activity, mitochondrial function, DNA synthesis, and sensing of hypoxia. The hierarchical master determinant of dietary iron absorption and iron distribution within the body is the peptide hormone hepcidin. Hepcidin itself is regulated by a combination of signals derived from iron stores, inflammation, and erythropoietic expansion. Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common and important conditions that can be treated with iron preparations. However, other factors besides iron deficiency can cause anemia, especially inflammation, which responds poorly to iron treatment, and inherited disorders of red blood cells, which are associated with accumulation of excess pathogenic iron. Assessment of iron status is challenging, and indices such as serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, and zinc protoporphyrin have specific weaknesses. Moreover, a diagnosis of iron deficiency or iron deficiency anemia is most useful if the diagnosis also leads to effective treatment. Low levels of hepcidin allow iron absorption and effective iron incorporation into red blood cells. The best 'biomarker' to guide treatment may therefore be the physiological 'determinant' of iron utilization. Iron is also important in transplantation medicine and influences clinical outcome of arterial pulmonary hypertension; here too, biomarkers including hepcidin may be useful to actively and beneficially manage iron status.

  6. [Use of intravenous iron supplementation in chronic kidney disease: Interests, limits, and recommendations for a better practice].

    PubMed

    Rottembourg, Jacques; Rostoker, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Iron deficiency is an important clinical concern in chronic kidney disease (CKD), giving rise to iron-deficiency anaemia, and various impaired cellular functions. Oral supplementation, in particular with ferrous salts, is associated with a high rate of gastro-intestinal side effects and is poorly absorbed, a problem that is avoided with intravenous (IV) irons. Recently, with the approval of the European Medicines Agency's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use, the French Agence nationale de sécurité du médicament et des produits de santé (ANSM) took adequate measures to minimize the risk of allergic reactions, by correction on the summary of intravenous iron products characteristics. All IV iron products should be prescribed, administered and injected, inside public or private hospitals exclusively, and a clinical follow-up after the infusion for at least 30 minutes is mandatory. The most stable intravenous iron complexes (low molecular weight iron dextran, ferric carboxymaltose, and iron isomaltoside 1000 [under agreement]) can be given in higher single doses and more rapidly than less recent preparations such as iron sucrose (originator or similars). Test doses are advisable for conventional low molecular weight iron dextrans, but are no more mandatory. Iron supplementation is recommended for all CKD patients with iron-deficiency anaemia and those who receive erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, whether or not they require dialysis. Intravenous iron is the preferred route of administration in haemodialysis patients, with randomized trials showing a significantly greater increase in haemoglobin levels for intravenous versus oral iron and a low rate of treatment-related adverse events during these trials. According ANSM, physicians should apply the product's label recommendations especially the posology. In the non-dialysis CKD population, the erythropoietic response is also significantly higher using intravenous versus oral iron, and tolerability is at

  7. Parenteral iron dextran therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Burns, D L; Mascioli, E A; Bistrian, B R

    1995-01-01

    Iron dextran was introduced more than 30 yr ago for the parenteral treatment of iron deficiency anemia that is refractory to oral therapy. Iron dextran is a preparation of ferric hydroxide complexed with a low molecular weight fraction of dextran. Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional deficiency diseases and occurs worldwide secondary to inadequate dietary iron, usually with excessive gastrointestinal blood losses. Repletion of iron stores is often complicated by intolerance to oral iron supplementation and may require parenteral iron. Parenteral iron can be administered via the intramuscular or intravenous route either directly or as an additive to total parenteral nutrition. Both routes of administration can cause various side effects and a test dose is recommended before therapeutic administration to assess the risk for anaphylaxis. Although the efficacy and safety of parenteral iron dextran have been convincingly demonstrated, supplementation may be contraindicated in the setting of infection.

  8. Pharmacodynamic Model of Hepcidin Regulation of Iron Homeostasis in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanski, Wojciech; Xiao, Jim J; Sasu, Barbra; Hinkle, Beth; Perez-Ruixo, Juan Jose

    2016-05-01

    Hepcidin (H25) is a hormone peptide synthesized by the liver that binds to ferroportin and blocks iron export. In this study, H25 was inhibited by administration of single and multiple doses of an anti-H25 monoclonal antibody Ab 12B9m in cynomolgus monkeys. The objective of this analysis was to develop a pharmacodynamic model describing the role of H25 in regulating iron homeostasis and the impact of hepcidin inhibition by Ab 12B9m. Total serum H25 and Ab 12B9m were determined in each animal. Corresponding measurements of serum iron and hemoglobin (Hb) were obtained. The PD model consisted of iron pools in serum (FeS), reticuloendothelial macrophages (FeM), hemoglobin (FeHb), and liver (FeL). The iron was assumed to be transported between the FeS, FeHb, and FeM unidirectionally at rates k S, k Hb, and k M. H25 serum concentrations were described by the previously developed PK model with the parameters fixed at their estimates. The serum iron and Hb data were fitted simultaneously. The corresponding estimates of the rate constants were k S/Fe0 = 0.113 h(-1), k M = 0.00191 h(-1), and k Hb = 0.00817 h(-1). The model-based IC50 value for the H25 inhibitory effect on ferroportin activity was 0.398 nM. The PD model predicted a negligible effect of Ab 12B9m on Hb levels for the tested doses. The presented PD model adequately described the serum iron time courses following single and multiple doses of Ab 12B9m. Ab 12B9m-induced inhibition of H25 resulted in a temporal increase in serum and liver iron and a decrease in the iron stored in reticuloendothelial macrophages.

  9. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    PubMed

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays. Policies dealt primarily with the location of tobacco posters (for example, no ads in the window) and number of product displays. Only 14 shop owners or managers indicated that they had previously displayed antitobacco information; more than half (31 of 61) said that they would be willing to display antitobaccoads.In many

  10. [Iron and invasive fungal infection].

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Florencio; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Aguado, José María

    2013-01-01

    Iron is an essential factor for both the growth and virulence of most of microorganisms. As a part of the innate (or nutritional) immune system, mammals have developed different mechanisms to store and transport this element in order to limit free iron bioavailability. To survive in this hostile environment, pathogenic fungi have specific uptake systems for host iron sources, one of the most important of which is based on the synthesis of siderophores-soluble, low-molecular-mass, high-affinity iron chelators. The increase in free iron that results from iron-overload conditions is a well-established risk factor for invasive fungal infection (IFI) such as mucormycosis or aspergillosis. Therefore, iron chelation may be an appealing therapeutic option for these infections. Nevertheless, deferoxamine -the first approved iron chelator- paradoxically increases the incidence of IFI, as it serves as a xeno-siderophore to Mucorales. On the contrary, the new oral iron chelators (deferiprone and deferasirox) have shown to exert a deleterious effect on fungal growth both in vitro and in animal models. The present review focuses on the role of iron metabolism in the pathogenesis of IFI and summarises the preclinical data, as well as the limited clinical experience so far, in the use of new iron chelators as treatment for mucormycosis and invasive aspergillosis.

  11. Iron status in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.; Wawer, Anna A.; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K.

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload. PMID:24275120

  12. Iron status in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Fairweather-Tait, Susan J; Wawer, Anna A; Gillings, Rachel; Jennings, Amy; Myint, Phyo K

    2014-01-01

    Iron deficiency anaemia is prevalent in older age, particularly after the age of 80. Serum ferritin concentrations also decline, although there is no evidence to suggest that changes in iron stores are an inevitable consequence of ageing. Chronic inflammation is a common condition in older people, making the measurement of iron status difficult, and it is likely that elevated levels of circulating hepcidin are responsible for changes in iron metabolism that result in systemic iron depletion. Other contributory factors are poor diet and some medications, such as aspirin. Anaemia in older age has undesirable health outcomes, including increased susceptibility to falling and depression. However, there are concerns about possible adverse effects of iron supplements, either in relation to pro-inflammatory effects in the gut or inappropriate tissue iron deposition. Brain iron levels are increased with age-related degenerative diseases, but it is not known if this is the cause or a consequence of the disease, and genetic factors are likely to play a role. In order to maintain body iron within the normal range a personalised approach is required, taking into account all of the factors that may affect iron metabolism and the available strategies for preventing iron deficiency or overload.

  13. HENNESSY'S DEPARTMENT STORE (130 NORTH MAIN, 18971898) IS A STEEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HENNESSY'S DEPARTMENT STORE (130 NORTH MAIN, 1897-1898) IS A STEEL FRAME AND BRICK STRUCTURE DESIGNED BY FREDERICK KEES OF MINNEAPOLIS. IT HAS INLAID MARBLE TILES IN THE HALLS, AND PLATE GLASS WINDOWS FRAMED IN COPPER ON THE FIRST AND SECOND FLOORS. THERE IS ALSO A CAST-IRON AND ORNAMENTAL GLASS LOWER LEVEL AND TERRA-COTTA DETAILING AROUND THE WINDOWS. THE ENTRANCE IS AN ELLIPTICAL ARCH WITH IRON GRILL WORK. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  14. 61. Hennessy's Department Store (130 North Main, 18971898) is a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. Hennessy's Department Store (130 North Main, 1897-1898) is a steel frame and brick structure designed by Frederick Kees of Minneapolis. It has inlaid marble tiles in the halls, and plate glass windows framed in copper on the first and second floors. There is also a cast-iron and ornamental glass lower level and terra-cotta detailing around the windows. The entrance is an eliptical arch with iron grill work. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  15. Iron homoeostasis in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joshua F; Ghio, Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    Iron is critical in nearly all cell functions and the ability of a cell, tissue and organism to procure this metal is obligatory for survival. Iron is necessary for normal immune function, and relative iron deficiency is associated with mild immunosuppression. Concentrations of this metal in excess of those required for function can present both an oxidative stress and elevate risks for infection. As a result, the human has evolved to have a complex mechanism of regulating iron and limiting its availability. This homoeostasis can be disrupted. Autoimmune diseases and gout often present with abnormal iron homoeostasis, thus supporting a participation of the metal in these injuries. We review the role of iron in normal immune function and discuss both clinical evidence of altered iron homoeostasis in autoimmune diseases and gout as well as possible implications of both depletion and supplementation of this metal in this patient population. We conclude that altered iron homoeostasis may represent a purposeful response to inflammation that could have theoretical anti-inflammatory benefits. We encourage physicians to avoid routine iron supplementation in those without depleted iron stores.

  16. Current issues in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Baynes, R D; Cook, J D

    1996-03-01

    This brief review of developments relating to iron deficiency during the past year covers three main areas: iron supplementation, the regulation of iron absorption, and the use of the serum transferrin receptor for the assessment of iron status. The intermittent administration of iron supplement once or twice weekly rather than daily has been advocated by international health agencies in recent years, but radioiron absorption studies in human subjects have failed to demonstrate any absorptive advantage of the intermittent schedule. The value of prophylactic iron supplementation in elderly blood donors was evaluated and shown to offer limited benefit in maintaining donation frequency. A recent model of the regulation of iron absorption involving erythropoietic and store regulators is discussed and a recent article indicating a potential non-hematopoietic effect of hematopoietic growth factors on iron absorption by the gastrointestinal mucosal cell is reviewed. A new measure of functional iron deficiency, namely the serum transferrin receptor, is discussed, with particular reference to its mechanism of production and its great value in distinguishing iron deficiency anemia from the anemia of chronic disease.

  17. Increased dietary iron and radiation in rats promote oxidative stress, induce localized and systemic immune system responses, and alter colon mucosal environment.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Jennifer L L; Ritchie, Lauren E; Crucian, Brian E; Theriot, Corey; Wu, Honglu; Sams, Clarence; Smith, Scott M; Turner, Nancy D; Zwart, Sara R

    2014-03-01

    Astronauts are exposed to increased body iron stores and radiation, both of which can cause oxidative damage leading to negative health effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate combined effects of high dietary iron (650 mg/kg diet) and radiation exposure (0.375 Gy cesium-137 every other day for 16 d) on markers of oxidative stress, immune system function, and colon mucosal environment in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Control rats consumed adequate iron (45 mg/kg diet) and were not irradiated. Combined treatments increased liver glutathione peroxidase, serum catalase, and colon myeloperoxidase while decreasing total fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations. The high-iron diet alone increased leukocyte count. Radiation decreased the T-cell CD4:CD8 ratio. Plasma iron was negatively correlated with cytokine production in activated monocytes. Genes involved in colon microbial signaling, immune response, and injury repair were altered by radiation. Genes involved with injury repair and pathogen recognition changed with dietary iron. These data demonstrate that dietary iron and radiation, alone and combined, contribute to oxidative stress that is related to immune system alterations in circulation and the colon. The model presented may help us better understand the changes to these systems that have been identified among astronauts.

  18. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  19. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  20. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo Ndebele's…

  1. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  2. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  3. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  4. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  5. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  6. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  7. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  8. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  9. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  10. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  11. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  12. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  13. Inheritance of seed iron and zinc concentrations in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Micronutrients are essential elements needed in small amounts for adequate human nutrition and include the elements iron and zinc. Both of these minerals are essential to human well-being, and an adequate supply of iron and zinc helps to prevent iron deficiency anemia and zinc deficiency, two preva...

  14. Molecular Mediators Governing Iron-Copper Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gulec, Sukru; Collins, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Given their similar physiochemical properties, it is a logical postulate that iron and copper metabolism are intertwined. Indeed, iron-copper interactions were first documented over a century ago, but the homeostatic effects of one on the other has not been elucidated at a molecular level to date. Recent experimental work has, however, begun to provide mechanistic insight into how copper influences iron metabolism. During iron deficiency, elevated copper levels are observed in the intestinal mucosa, liver, and blood. Copper accumulation and/or redistribution within enterocytes may influence iron transport, and high hepatic copper may enhance biosynthesis of a circulating ferroxidase, which potentiates iron release from stores. Moreover, emerging evidence has documented direct effects of copper on the expression and activity of the iron-regulatory hormone hepcidin. This review summarizes current experimental work in this field, with a focus on molecular aspects of iron-copper interplay and how these interactions relate to various disease states. PMID:24995690

  15. METABOLIC CAPACITY REGULATES IRON HOMEOSTATIS IN ENDOTHELIAL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sensitivity of endothelial cells to oxidative stress and the high concentrations of iron in mitochondria led us to test the hypotheses that (1) changes in respiratory capacity alter iron homeostasis, and (2) lack of aerobic metabolism decreases labile iron stores and attenuat...

  16. Ineffective erythropoiesis and regulation of iron status in iron loading anaemias.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara; Nai, Antonella

    2016-02-01

    The definition 'iron loading anaemias' encompasses a group of inherited and acquired anaemias characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, low hepcidin levels, excessive iron absorption and secondary iron overload. Non-transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia is the paradigmatic example of these conditions that include dyserythropoietic and sideroblastic anaemias and some forms of myelodysplasia. Interrupting the vicious cycle between ineffective erythropoiesis and iron overload may be of therapeutic benefit in all these diseases. Induction of iron restriction by means of transferrin infusions, minihepcidins or manipulation of the hepcidin pathway prevents iron overload, redistributes iron from parenchymal cells to macrophage stores and partially controls anaemia in β-thalassaemic mice. Inhibition of ineffective erythropoiesis by activin ligand traps improves anaemia and iron overload in the same models. Targeting iron loading or ineffective erythropoiesis shows promise in preclinical studies; activin ligand traps are in clinical trials with promising results and may be useful in patients with ineffective erythropoiesis.

  17. Disorders of iron metabolism. Part 1: molecular basis of iron homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel; García-Erce, José Antonio; Remacha, Angel Francisco

    2011-04-01

    IRON FUNCTIONS: Iron is an essential micronutrient, as it is required for satisfactory erythropoietic function, oxidative metabolism and cellular immune response. IRON PHYSIOLOGY: Absorption of dietary iron (1-2 mg/day) is tightly regulated and just balanced against iron loss because there are no active iron excretory mechanisms. Dietary iron is found in haem (10%) and non-haem (ionic, 90%) forms, and their absorption occurs at the apical surface of duodenal enterocytes via different mechanisms. Iron is exported by ferroportin 1 (the only putative iron exporter) across the basolateral membrane of the enterocyte into the circulation (absorbed iron), where it binds to transferrin and is transported to sites of use and storage. Transferrin-bound iron enters target cells-mainly erythroid cells, but also immune and hepatic cells-via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Senescent erythrocytes are phagocytosed by reticuloendothelial system macrophages, haem is metabolised by haem oxygenase, and the released iron is stored as ferritin. Iron will be later exported from macrophages to transferrin. This internal turnover of iron is essential to meet the requirements of erythropoiesis (20-30 mg/day). As transferrin becomes saturated in iron-overload states, excess iron is transported to the liver, the other main storage organ for iron, carrying the risk of free radical formation and tissue damage. REGULATION OF IRON HOMOEOSTASIS: Hepcidin, synthesised by hepatocytes in response to iron concentrations, inflammation, hypoxia and erythropoiesis, is the main iron-regulatory hormone. It binds ferroportin on enterocytes, macrophages and hepatocytes triggering its internalisation and lysosomal degradation. Inappropriate hepcidin secretion may lead to either iron deficiency or iron overload.

  18. Iron Deficiency Anemia in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Breymann, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Anemia is a common problem in obstetrics and perinatal care. Any hemoglobin below 10.5 g/dL can be regarded as true anemia regardless of gestational age. Reasons for anemia in pregnancy are mainly nutritional deficiencies, parasitic and bacterial diseases, and inborn red blood cell disorders such as thalassemias. The main cause of anemia in obstetrics is iron deficiency, which has a worldwide prevalence between estimated 20%-80% and consists of a primarily female population. Stages of iron deficiency are depletion of iron stores, iron-deficient erythropoiesis without anemia, and iron deficiency anemia, the most pronounced form of iron deficiency. Pregnancy anemia can be aggravated by various conditions such as uterine or placental bleedings, gastrointestinal bleedings, and peripartum blood loss. In addition to the general consequences of anemia, there are specific risks during pregnancy for the mother and the fetus such as intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity, feto-placental miss ratio, and higher risk for peripartum blood transfusion. Besides the importance of prophylaxis of iron deficiency, the main therapy options for the treatment of pregnancy anemia are oral iron and intravenous iron preparations.

  19. A comparison of physical properties, screening procedures and a human efficacy trial for predicting the bioavailability of commercial elemental iron powders used for food fortification.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Sean R; Bothwell, Thomas

    2007-03-01

    agreement with the other measures of predicted bioavailability, they did not provide information that would have improved the precision of bioavailability estimates based on physical properties, dissolution in HCl and/or RBV in rats. Our observations indicate that the dissolution rate in 0.1 mol/L HCI under standardized conditions is highly predictive of potential bioavailability and that it would be the most practical approach to developing a reliable and sensitive screening procedure for predicting and monitoring the bioavailability of commercial elemental iron powder products. Some, but not all, of the carbonyl and electrolytic iron powders had the highest predicted bioavailability values. The predicted bioavailability for the reduced iron products was lower and variable, with the lowest values being recorded for the carbon monoxide and other reduced iron products. Two powder types were selected for a human efficacy trial, electrolytic (because it is the iron powder type recommended by WHO) and hydrogen-reduced (because of its widespread use). Electrolytic/A131 and H-reduced/AC-325 had relative efficacies compared with ferrous sulfate monohydrate of 77% and 49%, respectively, based on the change in body iron stores in Thai women with low iron stores, who received an additional 12 mg iron per day, six days per week for 35 weeks in wheat-based snacks. We conclude that there is significant variability in the bioavailability of the commercial iron powders that we evaluated (those used for food fortification at the time that our studies were initiated), and that bioavailability is related in part to production method. The bioavailability of some carbonyl and electrolytic iron powders may be adequate for effective food fortification. The reduced iron powders that we tested are unlikely to have an adequate impact on iron nutrition at the fortification levels currently employed, although preliminary analysis of a new H-reduced product indicates that it may be possible to improve

  20. Rethinking iron regulation and assessment in iron deficiency, the anemia of chronic disease, and obesity: introducing Hepcidin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adequate iron availability is essential to human development and overall health. Iron is a key component of oxygen-carrying proteins; a vital player in cellular metabolism, and essential to cell growth and differentiation. Tight regulation of iron at the systemic and cytosolic level is necessary bec...

  1. Region 9: Arizona Adequate Letter (10/14/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Jack P. Broadben,. Director, to Nancy Wrona and Dennis Smith informing them that Maricopa County's motor vehicle emissions budgets in the 2003 MAGCO Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  2. Region 6: Texas Adequate Letter (4/16/2010)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality determined 2021 motor vehicle emission budgets for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for Beaumont/Port Arthur area adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  3. Region 2: New Jersey Adequate Letter (5/23/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This April 22, 2002 letter from EPA to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection determined 2007 and 2014 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mobile Source Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal

  4. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (10/29/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  5. Region 1: New Hampshire Adequate Letter (8/12/2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This July 9, 2008 letter from EPA to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, determined the 2009 Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets (MVEBs) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal Register (FR).

  6. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (1/20/2004)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Greeleys' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the FR.

  7. Region 8: Utah Adequate Letter (6/10/2005)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Utah Department of Environmental Quality determined Salt Lake Citys' and Ogdens' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  8. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  9. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  10. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  11. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  12. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  13. Region 6: New Mexico Adequate Letter (8/21/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Carl Edlund, Director, to Alfredo Santistevan regarding MVEB's contained in the latest revision to the Albuquerque Carbon Monoxide State Implementation Plan (SIP) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  14. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  15. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  16. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  17. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  18. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  19. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  20. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  1. Region 9: Nevada Adequate Letter (3/30/2006)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Deborah Jordan, Director, to Leo M. Drozdoff regarding Nevada's motor vehicle emissions budgets in the 2005 Truckee Meadows CO Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity decisions.

  2. Laboratory and Genetic Assessment of Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Over 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the US. Between 200 to 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. This amount represents approximately 25% of the average iron stores in men and almost 75% of the iron stores in women. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion, especially in frequent blood donors (e. g., more than 2 times per year). In large epidemiologic studies, donation frequency, female gender, and younger age (reflecting menstrual status), are particularly associated with iron depletion. Currently, a minimum capillary hemoglobin of 12.5 gm/dl is the sole requirement for donor qualification in the US as far as iron levels are concerned, yet it is known that hemoglobin level is a poor surrogate for low iron. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss, including changes in acceptable hemoglobin level, donation interval, donation frequency, testing of iron status, and iron supplementation. This chapter highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation. PMID:25676373

  3. Quality of drug stores: Storage practices & Regulatory compliance in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Syed Shaukat Ali Muttaqi; Naqvi, Baqar Shyum; Fatima, Mashhad; Khaliq, Asif; Sheikh, Abdul Latif; Baqar, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess and evaluate the drug storage quality and regulatory compliance among privately operated drug stores of Karachi Pakistan. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of drug stores located in Karachi was conducted from May to December 2013. A total of 1003 drug stores that were involved in the sales, purchase and dispensing of pharmaceutical products were approached by non-probability purposive sampling technique, and the information was collected using a close ended, structured questionnaire. Results: Out of 1003 drug stores inspected only 4.1%(n=41) were found compliant to regulatory requirements. Most of the stores 74.9%(n=752) were selling general items along with the drugs. Only 12%(n=124) stores were having qualified person working on the store, out of which 33% were pharmacist. 47.4%(n=400) of the stores had drug sales license displayed in the premises and 33.4%(n=282) of the stores had expired drug sales license. 11.4%(n=94) stores were found selling vaccines without proper refrigerator and only 11.7% stores had the power backup for the refrigerator. Only 40.2%(n=403) of stores were protected from direct sunlight and 5.4%(n=54) having air conditioning in the premises. Conclusion: The regulatory compliance of majority of the drug stores operated privately in different areas of Karachi is below standard. Only a few drugs stores have adequate facilities to protect the drugs from extreme temperature, sunlight and provision of refrigeration. Very few of the drug stores carry out drug sales under the supervision of qualified pharmacist. There is a dire need to improve the storage practices in the drug stores by complying with the regulatory standards/laws as specified by the Drug Regulatory Authority of Pakistan. PMID:27881996

  4. Significance of tests of iron nutrition in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Metz, J.; Turchetti, L.; Combrink, B.; Krawitz, S.

    1966-01-01

    Tests of iron and folate nutrition have been carried out in early pregnancy and at delivery in 63 Bantu females. Accepted normal values for serum iron, and percentage saturation of transferrin, but not for unsaturated iron-binding capacity, for non-pregnant subjects were found to apply equally well in pregnancy. Concomitant folate deficiency in early pregnancy did not render tests of iron deficiency less valid. The unsaturated iron-binding capacity, percentage saturation, and marrow iron stores in early pregnancy all showed a significant correlation with the haemoglobin value at term. Patients with normal marrow iron stores and a percentage saturation of transferrin of 20 or more at or before the 24th week are unlikely to become anaemic from iron deficiency during pregnancy. PMID:5909700

  5. A micronutrient-fortified beverage prevents iron deficiency, reduces anemia and improves the hemoglobin concentration of pregnant Tanzanian women.

    PubMed

    Makola, Diklar; Ash, Deborah M; Tatala, Simon R; Latham, Michael C; Ndossi, Godwin; Mehansho, Haile

    2003-05-01

    Maternal malnutrition continues to be a major contributor to adverse reproductive outcomes in developing countries, despite longstanding efforts to fortify foods or to distribute medicinal supplements to pregnant women. The objective of this study was to test the effect of a micronutrient-fortified beverage containing 11 micronutrients (iron, iodine, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin C, niacin, riboflavin, folate, vitamin B-12, vitamin B-6 and vitamin E) on the hemoglobin, iron and vitamin A status of pregnant women in Tanzania. A group of 259 pregnant women with gestational ages of 8 to 34 wk were enrolled in a randomized double-blind controlled trial in which study women received 8 wk of supplementation. Hemoglobin, ferritin and dried blood spot retinol were measured at baseline and at the end of the supplementation period. The supplement resulted in a 4.16 g/L increase in hemoglobin concentration and a 3 micro g/L increase in ferritin and reduced the risk of anemia and iron deficiency anemia by 51 and 56%, respectively. The risk of iron deficiency was reduced by 70% among those who had iron deficiency at baseline and by 92% among those who had adequate stores. The micronutrient-fortified beverage may be a useful and convenient preventative measure, one that could help improve the nutritional status of women both before and during pregnancy and thereby help avoid some of the potential maternal and fetal consequences of micronutrient deficiencies.

  6. The copper-iron connection: hereditary aceruloplasminemia.

    PubMed

    Nittis, Thalia; Gitlin, Jonathan D

    2002-10-01

    Hereditary aceruloplasminemia is an autosomal recessive disorder of iron homeostasis due to loss-of-function mutations in the ceruloplasmin gene. Affected individuals may present in adulthood with evidence of hepatic iron overload, diabetes, peripheral retinal degeneration, dystonia, dementia, or dysarthria. Laboratory studies demonstrate microcytic anemia, elevated serum ferritin, and a complete absence of serum ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity. Consistent with the observed neurologic findings, magnetic resonance imaging reveals iron accumulation within the basal ganglia. Histologic studies detect abundant iron in hepatocytes, reticuloendothelial cells of the liver and spleen, beta cells of the pancreas, and astrocytes and neurons throughout the central nervous system. Characterization of this disorder reveals an essential role for ceruloplasmin in determining the rate of iron efflux from cells with mobilizable iron stores and provides new insights into the mechanisms of human iron metabolism.

  7. Store Security: Internal Shrinkage Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everhardt, Richard M.

    The document presents a 10-week training program designed to provide helpful and proven methods for controlling internal shrinkage in retail stores. Shrinkage includes the three problems of shoplifting, employee theft, and errors, each of which is addressed by the course. Ohio's laws are also discussed. The format for the course content section is…

  8. Storing Peanuts in Grain Bags

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was executed to determine the potential of storing farmers stock peanuts and shelled peanuts for crushing in hermetically sealed grain bags. The objectives of the study were to evaluate equipment for loading and unloading the grain bags, the capacity of the grain bags, and the changes in qu...

  9. Murine macrophages response to iron.

    PubMed

    Polati, Rita; Castagna, Annalisa; Bossi, Alessandra Maria; Alberio, Tiziana; De Domenico, Ivana; Kaplan, Jerry; Timperio, Anna Maria; Zolla, Lello; Gevi, Federica; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Brunch, Ryan; Olivieri, Oliviero; Girelli, Domenico

    2012-12-05

    Macrophages play a critical role at the crossroad between iron metabolism and immunity, being able to store and recycle iron derived from the phagocytosis of senescent erythrocytes. The way by which macrophages manage non-heme iron at physiological concentration is still not fully understood. We investigated protein changes in mouse bone marrow macrophages incubated with ferric ammonium citrate (FAC 10 μM iron). Differentially expressed spots were identified by nano RP-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Transcriptomic, metabolomics and western immunoblotting analyses complemented the proteomic approach. Pattern analysis was also used for identifying networks of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. FAC treatment resulted in higher abundance of several proteins including ferritins, cytoskeleton related proteins, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) at the membrane level, vimentin, arginase, galectin-3 and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Interestingly, GAPDH has been recently proposed to act as an alternative transferrin receptor for iron acquisition through internalization of the GAPDH-transferrin complex into the early endosomes. FAC treatment also induced the up-regulation of oxidative stress-related proteins (PRDX), which was further confirmed at the metabolic level (increase in GSSG, 8-isoprostane and pentose phosphate pathway intermediates) through mass spectrometry-based targeted metabolomics approaches. This study represents an example of the potential usefulness of "integarated omics" in the field of iron biology, especially for the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis in normal and disease conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics.

  10. Prevalence of blood donor iron deficiency and feasibility ferritin-based iron replacement: a blood collection agency-based study.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, J; Katz, L; Elsmore, D; Kirbach, K; Erickson, Y; Hove, A; Black, C; Walsh-Jahnke, R

    2016-08-01

    Iron depletion is high in frequent whole-blood donors. It is of interest to blood centres to develop ways to mitigate this risk while maintaining the current blood supply. Our feasibility study shows that blood collection agencies can measure iron stores and safely offer iron replacement in frequent blood donors with low ferritin to reduce the risk of iron depletion and future donor deferrals for low haemoglobin.

  11. Iron therapy in the pediatric hemodialysis population.

    PubMed

    Warady, Bradley A; Kausz, Annamaria; Lerner, Gary; Brewer, Eileen D; Chadha, Vimal; Brugnara, Carlo; Dahl, Naomi V; Watkins, Sandra L

    2004-06-01

    Iron therapy maintains iron stores and optimizes the response to recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) in patients with end-stage renal failure. Information is limited, however, regarding the preferential route of iron administration in pediatric patients receiving hemodialysis. Therefore, we prospectively randomized 35 iron-replete patients (aged >1 to <20 years) to receive up to 16 weeks of maintenance i.v. ( n=17) or daily oral ( n=18) iron. Eligible patients had received hemodialysis for >2 months, had a baseline transferrin saturation [TSAT] >20%, and were receiving maintenance r-HuEPO. Treatment arms were evenly distributed with respect to baseline demographic and clinical characteristics, with no statistically significant differences in baseline hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), reticulocyte Hb content (CHr), serum ferritin (SF), TSAT, or r-HuEPO dose. In the 35 patients, i.v. iron dextran and not oral iron was associated with a significant increase (138.5 to 259.1 ng/ml, P=0.003) in SF. A comparison of the change in SF between the i.v. iron group and the oral iron group was also significant ( P=0.001). Whereas only i.v. iron was associated with a significant decrease in the dose of r-HuEPO (234.0 to 157.6 U/kg per week, P=0.046) and an increase of the CHr (29.2 to 30.1 pg, P=0.049), these changes were not significantly different from those experienced by patients in the oral iron group. In both groups, the Hct remained stable and in neither group was there a significant change in the TSAT. In summary, although both oral and i.v. iron maintained patients in an iron-replete state in this short-term study, only i.v. therapy allowed for a significant improvement in iron stores.

  12. Laboratory and genetic assessment of iron deficiency in blood donors.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Joseph E

    2015-03-01

    More than 9 million individuals donate blood annually in the United States. Between 200 and 250 mg of iron is removed with each whole blood donation, reflecting losses from the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Replenishment of iron stores takes many months, leading to a high rate of iron depletion. In an effort to better identify and prevent iron deficiency, blood collection centers are now considering various strategies to manage donor iron loss. This article highlights laboratory and genetic tests to assess the iron status of blood donors and their applicability as screening tests for blood donation.

  13. Regulatory requirements for providing adequate veterinary care to research animals.

    PubMed

    Pinson, David M

    2013-09-01

    Provision of adequate veterinary care is a required component of animal care and use programs in the United States. Program participants other than veterinarians, including non-medically trained research personnel and technicians, also provide veterinary care to animals, and administrators are responsible for assuring compliance with federal mandates regarding adequate veterinary care. All program participants therefore should understand the regulatory requirements for providing such care. The author provides a training primer on the US regulatory requirements for the provision of veterinary care to research animals. Understanding the legal basis and conditions of a program of veterinary care will help program participants to meet the requirements advanced in the laws and policies.

  14. Fate of blood meal iron in mosquitos

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guoli; Kohlhepp, Pete; Geiser, Dawn; Frasquillo, Maria del Carmen; Vazquez-Moreno, Luz; Winzerling, Joy J.

    2007-01-01

    Iron is an essential element of living cells and organisms as a component of numerous metabolic pathways. Hemoglobin and ferric-transferrin in vertebrate host blood are the two major iron sources for female mosquitoes. We used inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and radioisotope-labeling to quantify the fate of iron supplied from hemoglobin or as transferrin in Aedes aegypti. At the end of the first gonotrophic cycloe, ~87% of the ingested total meal heme iron was excreted, while 7% was distributed into the eggs and 6% was stored in different tissues. In contrast, ~8% of the iron provided as transferrin was excreted and of that absorbed, 77% was allocated to the eggs and 15% distributed in the tissues. Further analyses indicate that of the iron supplied in a blood meal, ~7% appears in the eggs and of this iron 98% is from hemoglobin and 2% from ferric-transferrin. Whereas of iron from a blood meal retained in body of the female, ~97% is from heme and <1 % is from transferrin. Evaluation of iron-binding proteins in hemolymph and egg following intake of 59Fe-transferrin revealed that ferritin is iron loaded in these animals, and indicate that this protein plays a critical role in meal iron transport and iron storage in eggs in A. aegypti. PMID:17689557

  15. The diagnostic value of bone marrow iron.

    PubMed

    Wulfhekel, U; Düllmann, J

    1990-01-01

    The light and electronmicroscopic representation of non-haemiron in the bone-marrow provides the unique opportunity of extensively evaluating the iron metabolism. In the bone-marrow, macrophages represent the physiological place of iron storage. The iron in the cytoplasma is stored in them in the form of free ferritin molecules and lysomally as aggregated ferritin and/or haemosiderin in siderosomes. In an equal iron balance and unimpaired internal iron exchange only erythroblasts (sideroblasts) and erythrocytes (siderocytes) of the bone-marrow besides macrophages possess siderosomes. In addition to this physiological or orthotopic iron storage a heterotopic iron storage can be observed under pathological conditions, particularly with iron overloading of the organism, in the endothelial cells of sinusoids and plasma cells. In detail, the patterns of iron storage in the bone-marrow are described in the different stages of iron deficiency, disturbance of iron utilization in chronically inflammatory processes or tumour diseases, condition after intravenous iron administration, transfusion siderosis, hereditary haemochromatosis and sideroblastic anaemia.

  16. Bigger Stores, More Stores, or No Stores: Paths of Retail Restructuring in Rural America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vias, Alexander C.

    2004-01-01

    Changes such as the development of large international retail chains, retail concentration, locational changes, technological innovation, new labor practices, and the increasing scale of individual stores, have revolutionized the retail sector. This broad restructuring will have profound impacts in rural America because employment in retail is a…

  17. Catecholamine Stress Hormones Regulate Cellular Iron Homeostasis by a Posttranscriptional Mechanism Mediated by Iron Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tapryal, Nisha; Vivek G, Vishnu; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate availability of iron is important for cellular energy metabolism. Catecholamines such as epinephrine and norepinephrine promote energy expenditure to adapt to conditions that arose due to stress. To restore the energy balance, epinephrine/norepinephrine-exposed cells may face higher iron demand. So far, no direct role of epinephrine/norepinephrine in cellular iron homeostasis has been reported. Here we show that epinephrine/norepinephrine regulates iron homeostasis components such as transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H in hepatic and skeletal muscle cells by promoting the binding of iron regulatory proteins to iron-responsive elements present in the UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H transcripts. Increased transferrin receptor-1, decreased ferritin-H, and increased iron-responsive element-iron regulatory protein interaction are also observed in liver and muscle tissues of epinephrine/norepinephrine-injected mice. We demonstrate the role of epinephrine/norepinephrine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in converting cytosolic aconitase (ACO1) into iron regulatory protein-1 to bind iron-responsive elements present in UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H. Our study further reveals that mitochondrial iron content and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2) activity are elevated by epinephrine/norepinephrine that are blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and iron regulatory protein-1 siRNA, suggesting involvement of reactive oxygen species and iron regulatory protein-1 in this mechanism. This study reveals epinephrine and norepinephrine as novel regulators of cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:25572399

  18. Model/School Store Management Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota State Board for Vocational Education, Bismarck.

    This teacher-coordinator manual assists in planning, organizing, directing, and evaluating student learning experiences associated with either a model store, school store, or combination. (A model store in a marketing laboratory simulates marketing functions; the school store markets merchandise to fellow students, faculty, and/or the public.)…

  19. Importance of pre-pregnancy and pregnancy iron status: can long-term weekly preventive iron and folic acid supplementation achieve desirable and safe status?

    PubMed

    Viteri, Fernando E; Berger, Jacques

    2005-12-01

    Most women worldwide enter pregnancy without adequate iron reserves or are already iron deficient. Estimates of iron needs during pregnancy are markedly reduced when iron reserves are available. The needs of absorbed iron to correct mild to moderate anemia in the last two trimesters are estimated. Pre-pregnancy and prenatal weekly supplementation can improve iron reserves effectively and safely, preventing excess iron and favoring better pregnancy outcomes. We explain how the weekly supplementation idea was developed, why current hemoglobin norms may be inadequately high (especially in pregnancy), and why excess iron as recommended by many agencies for developing populations can be undesirable.

  20. Decoupler pylon: wing/store flutter suppressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, W. H., III (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for suspending a store from a support such as an aircraft wing and more specifically for increasing the flutter speed of an aircraft flying with attached store and reducing the sensitivity of flutter to changes in the pitch inertia and center of gravity location of the store is described. It comprises softspring where the store pitch mode is decoupled from support modes and a low frequency active control mechanism which maintains store alignment. A pneumatic suspension system both isolates the store in pitch and, under conditions of changing mean load, aligns the store with the wing to which it is attached.

  1. Iron deficiency: new insights into diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Camaschella, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia are common conditions worldwide affecting especially children and young women. In developing countries, iron deficiency is caused by poor iron intake and/or parasitic infection, whereas vegetarian dietary choices, poor iron absorption, and chronic blood loss are common causes in high-income countries. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents can result in functional iron deficiency for erythropoiesis even when stores are iron-replete. Diagnosis of iron deficiency is straightforward, except when it occurs in the context of inflammatory disorders. Oral iron salts correct absolute iron deficiency in most patients, because low hepcidin levels facilitate iron absorption. Unfortunately frequent side effects limit oral iron efficacy. Intravenous iron is increasingly utilized, because currently available preparations allow rapid normalization of total body iron even with a single infusion and are effective also in functional iron deficiency and in iron deficiency associated with inflammatory disorders. The evidence is accumulating that these preparations are safe and effective. However, long-term safety issues of high doses of iron need to be further explored.

  2. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  3. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  4. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  5. Is the Stock of VET Skills Adequate? Assessment Methodologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Richard; Freeland, Brett

    In Australia and elsewhere, four approaches have been used to determine whether stocks of vocational education and training (VET) skills are adequate to meet industry needs. The four methods are as follows: (1) the manpower requirements approach; (2) the international, national, and industry comparisons approach; (3) the labor market analysis…

  6. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  7. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  8. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  9. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  10. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  11. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  12. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation…

  13. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  14. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  15. Region 9: Arizona Adequate Letter (11/1/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Jack P. Broadbent, Director, Air Division to Nancy Wrona and James Bourney informing them of the adequacy of Revised MAG 1999 Serious Area Carbon Monoxide Plan and that the MAG CO Plan is adequate for Maricopa County.

  16. Store-Operated Calcium Channels.

    PubMed

    Prakriya, Murali; Lewis, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca(2+) sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca(2+) from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca(2+) depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease.

  17. Store-Operated Calcium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca2+ sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca2+ from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca2+ depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease. PMID:26400989

  18. Is iron and zinc nutrition a concern for vegetarian infants and young children in industrialized countries?

    PubMed

    Gibson, Rosalind S; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

    2014-07-01

    Well-planned vegetarian diets are considered adequate for all stages of the life cycle, despite limited data on the zinc status of vegetarians during early childhood. The bioavailability of iron and zinc in vegetarian diets is poor because of their higher content of absorption inhibitors such as phytate and polyphenols and the absence of flesh foods. Consequently, children as well as adult vegetarians often have lower serum ferritin concentrations than omnivores, which is indicative of reduced iron stores, despite comparable intakes of total iron; hemoglobin differences are small and rarely associated with anemia. However, data on serum zinc concentrations, the recommended biomarker for identifying population groups at elevated risk of zinc deficiency, are sparse and difficult to interpret because recommended collection and analytic procedures have not always been followed. Existing data indicate no differences in serum zinc or growth between young vegetarian and omnivorous children, although there is some evidence of low serum zinc concentrations in vegetarian adolescents. Some vegetarian immigrants from underprivileged households may be predisposed to iron and zinc deficiency because of nondietary factors such as chronic inflammation, parasitic infections, overweight, and genetic hemoglobin disorders. To reduce the risk of deficiency, the content and bioavailability of iron and zinc should be enhanced in vegetarian diets by consumption of fortified cereals and milk, by consumption of leavened whole grains, by soaking dried legumes before cooking and discarding the soaking water, and by replacing tea and coffee at meals with vitamin C-rich drinks, fruit, or vegetables. Additional recommended practices include using fermented soy foods and sprouting at least some of the legumes consumed. Fortified foods can reduce iron deficiency, but whether they can also reduce zinc deficiency is less certain. Supplements may be necessary for vegetarian children following very

  19. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Hepatic Storage Iron in Transfusional Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiying; Jensen, Jens H.; Sammet, Christina L.; Sheth, Sujit; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Hultman, Kristi; Kim, Daniel; Wu, Ed X.; Brown, Truman R.; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the two principal forms of hepatic storage iron, diffuse, soluble iron (primarily ferritin), and aggregated, insoluble iron (primarily hemosiderin) using a new MRI method in patients with transfusional iron overload. Materials and Methods Six healthy volunteers and twenty patients with transfusion-dependent thalassemia syndromes and iron overload were examined. Ferritin- and hemosiderin-like iron were determined based on the measurement of two distinct relaxation parameters: the “reduced” transverse relaxation rate, RR2 and the “aggregation index,” A, using three sets of Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) datasets with different interecho spacings. Agarose phantoms, simulating the relaxation and susceptibility properties of tissue with different concentrations of dispersed (ferritin-like) and aggregated (hemosiderin-like) iron, were employed for validation. Results Both phantom and in vivo human data confirmed that transverse relaxation components associated with the dispersed and aggregated iron could be separated using the two-parameter (RR2, A) method. The MRI-determined total hepatic storage iron was highly correlated (r = 0.95) with measurements derived from biopsy or biosusceptometry. As total hepatic storage iron increased, the proportion stored as aggregated iron became greater. Conclusion This method provides a new means for non-invasive MRI determination of the partition of hepatic storage iron between ferritin and hemosiderin in iron overload disorders. PMID:23720394

  20. Absorption and loss of iron in toddlers are highly correlated.

    PubMed

    Fomon, Samuel J; Nelson, Steven E; Serfass, Robert E; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2005-04-01

    For estimating the requirements for dietary iron, it is important to know the amount of iron that is lost from the body. Inevitable losses of iron have been determined in adult humans but not in infants or children. We administered (58)Fe, the least abundant stable isotope of iron, to free-living infants at 168 d of age (5.6 mo) and followed them to age 26 mo. There was no dietary restriction after isotope administration. Blood was obtained at regular intervals for determination of isotopic enrichment and indices of iron status. We estimated the quantity of circulating iron, noncirculating active iron, and storage iron at each age. The administered isotope equilibrated with total body iron by 13 mo of age. From 13 to 26 mo of age, we estimated inevitable loss and absorption of iron from the change in tracer abundance in circulating iron. The rate of decrease of tracer abundance was proportional to addition of tracee, i.e., absorption of iron. Conversely, the rate of decrease in quantity of tracer was proportional to removal of tracee, i.e., loss of iron. From 13 to 26 mo of age, iron absorption was (mean +/- SD) 0.49 +/- 0.13 mg/d and inevitable iron loss was 0.25 +/- 0.12 mg/d. Intersubject variability of iron loss and iron absorption was high, and iron loss and absorption were highly correlated (r = 0.789, P < 0.001). Iron stores were low throughout the study and decreased significantly from 13 to 26 mo of age, suggesting that iron absorption from the diet was inadequate to maintain or increase iron nutritional status. The data suggest that, in this cohort, which may be representative, the intake of bioavailable iron from 13 to 26 mo of age was insufficient to maintain iron nutritional status.

  1. SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SCRAP STEEL AND FOUNDRY SCRAP IRON, USED AS THE PRIMARY METAL SOURCES, ARE STORED IN THESE BINS AND LIFTED TO SCALES BY AN ELECTRIC MAGNET. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  2. Role of iron in Trypanosoma cruzi infection of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lalonde, R G; Holbein, B E

    1984-01-01

    The role of iron in experimental infection of mice with Trypanosoma cruzi was investigated. B6 mice had a transient parasitemia and a transient anemia, both of maximal intensity 28 d after the inoculation of T. cruzi. There was a biphasic hypoferremic host response to infection with T. cruzi with the peak hypoferremia also occurring 28 d after inoculation of the parasite. The mortality rate from infection was increased from 23% in phosphate-buffered saline-treated B6 mice to 50% in a group of B6 mice receiving iron-dextran (P less than or equal to 0.025), whereas depletion of iron stores with the iron chelator desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet provided complete protection of B6 mice (P less than or equal to 0.05). The mortality rate in the highly susceptible C3H strain was reduced from 100% in the control group to 45% (P less than or equal to 0.025) in the iron-depleted group. The tissue iron stores were altered in mice receiving either iron-dextran or desferrioxamine B and an iron-deficient diet. In vitro, T. cruzi was shown to require both a heme and a nonheme iron source for an optimal growth rate. The effects of iron excess or depletion on the outcome of infection with T. cruzi correlated both with the growth requirements of the parasite for iron and with the availability of intracellular iron. Thus, it was suggested that the hypoferremic response, by sequestering iron within intracellular stores, potentially enhanced the pathogenicity of the intracellular parasites. Furthermore, the in vivo effects of iron excess and depletion correlated with an effect of iron on the growth rate and pathogenicity of the parasite. PMID:6421877

  3. Mössbauer investigation of iron uptake in wheat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Fodor, F.; Cseh, E.; Homonnay, Z.; Vértes, A.

    2008-07-01

    Iron uptake and distribution in wheat roots were studied with 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Plants were grown both in iron sufficient and in iron deficient nutrient solutions. Mössbauer spectra of the frozen iron sufficient roots exhibited three iron(III) components with the typical average Mössbauer parameters of δ = 0.50 mm s - 1, Δ = 0.43 mm s - 1, δ = 0.50 mm s - 1, Δ = 0.75 mm s - 1 and δ = 0.50 mm s - 1, Δ = 1.20 mm s - 1 at 80 K. These doublets are very similar to those obtained earlier for cucumber [0], which allows us to suppose that iron is stored in a very similar way in different plants. No ferrous iron could be identified in any case, not even in the iron deficient roots, which confirms the mechanism proposed for iron uptake in the graminaceous plants.

  4. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-26

    statements were unreliable and lacked an adequate audit trail. Furthermore, DoD and Army managers could not rely on the data in their accounting...risk that AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army will not achieve audit readiness by the congressionally mandated...and $6.5 trillion in yearend adjustments made to Army General Fund data during FY 2015 financial statement compilation. We conducted this audit in

  5. Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    De Falco, Luigia; Sanchez, Mayka; Silvestri, Laura; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Iolascon, Achille; Gouya, Laurent; Camaschella, Clara; Beaumont, Carole

    2013-01-01

    Iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is a hereditary recessive anemia due to a defect in the TMPRSS6 gene encoding Matriptase-2. This protein is a transmembrane serine protease that plays an essential role in down-regulating hepcidin, the key regulator of iron homeostasis. Hallmarks of this disease are microcytic hypochromic anemia, low transferrin saturation and normal/high serum hepcidin values. The anemia appears in the post-natal period, although in some cases it is only diagnosed in adulthood. The disease is refractory to oral iron treatment but shows a slow response to intravenous iron injections and partial correction of the anemia. To date, 40 different Matriptase-2 mutations have been reported, affecting all the functional domains of the large ectodomain of the protein. In vitro experiments on transfected cells suggest that Matriptase-2 cleaves Hemojuvelin, a major regulator of hepcidin expression and that this function is altered in this genetic form of anemia. In contrast to the low/undetectable hepcidin levels observed in acquired iron deficiency, in patients with Matriptase-2 deficiency, serum hepcidin is inappropriately high for the low iron status and accounts for the absent/delayed response to oral iron treatment. A challenge for the clinicians and pediatricians is the recognition of the disorder among iron deficiency and other microcytic anemias commonly found in pediatric patients. The current treatment of iron refractory iron deficiency anemia is based on parenteral iron administration; in the future, manipulation of the hepcidin pathway with the aim of suppressing it might become an alternative therapeutic approach. PMID:23729726

  6. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency.

  7. Prediction of iron deficiency in chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease anaemia.

    PubMed

    Baumann Kurer, S; Seifert, B; Michel, B; Ruegg, R; Fehr, J

    1995-12-01

    We prospectively studied 45 anaemic patients (37 women, 8 men) with chronic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The combination of serum ferritin and CRP (as well as ESR) in its predictive capacity for bone marrow iron stores was examined. The relationship between other iron-related measurements (transferrin, transferrin saturation, soluble transferrin receptor, erythrocyte porphyrins and percentage of hypochromic/microcytic erythrocytes) and bone marrow iron stores was also investigated. Stainable bone marrow iron was taken as the most suitable standard to separate iron-deficient from iron-replete patients. 14 patients (31%) were lacking bone marrow iron. Regression analysis showed a good correlation between ferritin and bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.721, P < 0.0001). The combination of ferritin and CRP (ESR) did not improve the predictive power for bone marrow iron (adjusted R2 = 0.715) in this cohort of patients with low systemic inflammatory activity. With respect to the bone marrow iron content the best predictive cut-off value of ferritin was 30 micrograms/l (86% sensitivity, 90% specificity). The other iron-related parameters both individually and when combined were less powerful in predicting bone marrow iron than ferritin alone. Only zinc bound erythrocyte protoporphyrin in combination with ferritin slightly improved prediction (adjusted R2 = 0.731). A cut-off point of 11% hypochromic erythrocytes reached a high specificity (90%), but was less sensitive (77%).

  8. 7 CFR 1170.6 - Store.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.6 Store. (a) Store... of 50 degrees Fahrenheit or lower and hold these dairy products for 30 days or more; or (b) Store..., or shipment in transit. Dairy Product Reporting Programs...

  9. Genetic modification of preimplantation embryos: toward adequate human research policies.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects.

  10. Elements for adequate informed consent in the surgical context.

    PubMed

    Abaunza, Hernando; Romero, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    Given a history of atrocities and violations of ethical principles, several documents and regulations have been issued by a wide variety of organizations. They aim at ensuring that health care and clinical research adhere to defined ethical principles. A fundamental component was devised to ensure that the individual has been provided the necessary information to make an informed decision regarding health care or participation in clinical research. This article summarizes the history and regulations for informed consent and discusses suggested components for adequate consent forms for daily clinical practice in surgery as well as clinical research.

  11. Iron Status in Toddlerhood Predicts Sensitivity to Psychostimulants in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Catharyn A.; Xie, Diqiong; Zimmerman, Bridget M.; Calarge, Chadi A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Iron deficiency is associated with impaired dopaminergic signaling and externalizing behavior. The authors examine, whether iron stores in toddlerhood influence later response to psychostimulants. Method: Youth participating in a study monitoring the long-term safety of risperidone were included in this analysis if they had received…

  12. Comparison of two doses of elemental iron in the treatment of latent iron deficiency: efficacy, side effects and blinding capabilities.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Alecia J; Chalmers, Kerry A; Collins, Clare E; Patterson, Amanda J

    2014-04-04

    Adherence to iron supplementation can be compromised due to side effects, and these limit blinding in studies of iron deficiency. No studies have reported an efficacious iron dose that allows participants to remain blinded. This pilot study aimed to determine a ferrous sulfate dose that improves iron stores, while minimising side effects and enabling blinding. A double-blinded RCT was conducted in 32 women (18-35 years): 24 with latent iron deficiency (serum ferritin < 20 µg/L) and 8 iron sufficient controls. Participants with latent iron deficiency were randomised to 60 mg or 80 mg elemental iron or to placebo, for 16 weeks. The iron sufficient control group took placebo. Treatment groups (60 mg n = 7 and 80 mg n = 6) had significantly higher ferritin change scores than placebo groups (iron deficient n = 5 and iron sufficient n = 6), F(1, 23) = 8.46, p ≤ 0.01. Of the 24 who completed the trial, 10 participants (77%) on iron reported side effects, compared with 5 (45%) on placebo, but there were no differences in side effects (p = 0.29), or compliance (p = 0.60) between iron groups. Nine (69%) participants on iron, and 11 (56%) on placebo correctly guessed their treatment allocation. Both iron doses were equally effective in normalising ferritin levels. Although reported side-effects were similar for both groups, a majority of participants correctly guessed their treatment group.

  13. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  14. Reversing Sports-Related Iron and Zinc Deficiencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loosli, Alvin R.

    1993-01-01

    Many active athletes do not consume enough zinc or iron, which are important for oxygen activation, electron transport, and injury healing. Subclinical deficiencies may impair performance and impair healing times. People who exercise regularly need counseling about the importance of adequate dietary intake of iron and zinc. (SM)

  15. Prostate cancer between prognosis and adequate/proper therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grozescu, T; Popa, F

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the indolent, non-invasive nature of most types of prostate cancer, as well as the simple fact that the disease seems more likely to be associated with age rather than with other factors (50% of men at the age of 50 and 80% at the age of 80 have it [1], with or without presenting any symptom), the big challenge of this clinical entity was to determine severity indicators (so far insufficient) to guide the physician towards an adequate attitude in the clinical setting. The risk of over-diagnosing and over-treating many prostate cancer cases (indicated by all the major European and American studies) is real and poses many question marks. The present paper was meant to deliver new research data and to reset the clinical approach in prostate cancer cases. PMID:28255369

  16. The cerebellopontine angle: does the translabyrinthine approach give adequate access?

    PubMed

    Fagan, P A; Sheehy, J P; Chang, P; Doust, B D; Coakley, D; Atlas, M D

    1998-05-01

    A long-standing but unfounded criticism of the translabyrinthine approach is the misperception that this approach does not give adequate access to the cerebellopontine angle. Because of what is perceived as limited visualization and operating space within the cerebellopontine angle, some surgeons still believe that the translabyrinthine approach is inappropriate for large acoustic tumors. In this study, the surgical access to the cerebellopontine angle by virtue of the translabyrinthine approach is measured and analyzed. The parameters are compared with those measured for the retrosigmoid approach. This series objectively confirms that the translabyrinthine approach offers the neurotologic surgeon a shorter operative depth to the tumor, via a similar-sized craniotomy. This permits superior visualization by virtue of a wider angle of surgical access. Such access is achieved with the merit of minimal cerebellar retraction.

  17. Barriers to adequate prenatal care utilization in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Nicola L; Brown, Carolyn; Nu’usolia, Ofeira; Ah-Ching, John; Muasau-Howard, Bethel; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the utilization of prenatal care in American Samoan women and to identify socio-demographic predictors of inadequate prenatal care utilization. Methods Using data from prenatal clinic records, women (n=692) were categorized according to the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index as having received adequate plus, adequate, intermediate or inadequate prenatal care during their pregnancy. Categorical socio-demographic predictors of the timing of initiation of prenatal care (week of gestation) and the adequacy of received services were identified using one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and independent samples t-tests. Results Between 2001 and 2008 85.4% of women received inadequate prenatal care. Parity (P=0.02), maternal unemployment (P=0.03), and both parents being unemployed (P=0.03) were negatively associated with the timing of prenatal care initation. Giving birth in 2007–2008, after a prenatal care incentive scheme had been introduced in the major hospital, was associated with earlier initiation of prenatal care (20.75 versus 25.12 weeks; P<0.01) and improved adequacy of received services (95.04% versus 83.8%; P=0.02). Conclusion The poor prenatal care utilization in American Samoa is a major concern. Improving healthcare accessibility will be key in encouraging women to attend prenatal care. The significant improvements in the adequacy of prenatal care seen in 2007–2008 suggest that the prenatal care incentive program implemented in 2006 may be a very positive step toward addressing issues of prenatal care utilization in this population. PMID:24045912

  18. Dysregulation of iron and copper homeostasis in nonalcoholic fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Aigner, Elmar; Weiss, Günter; Datz, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Elevated iron stores as indicated by hyperferritinemia with normal or mildly elevated transferrin saturation and mostly mild hepatic iron deposition are a characteristic finding in subjects with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Excess iron is observed in approximately one third of NAFLD patients and is commonly referred to as the “dysmetabolic iron overload syndrome”. Clinical evidence suggests that elevated body iron stores aggravate the clinical course of NAFLD with regard to liver-related and extrahepatic disease complications which relates to the fact that excess iron catalyses the formation of toxic hydroxyl-radicals subsequently resulting in cellular damage. Iron removal improves insulin sensitivity, delays the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus, improves pathologic liver function tests and likewise ameliorates NAFLD histology. Several mechanisms contribute to pathologic iron accumulation in NAFLD. These include impaired iron export from hepatocytes and mesenchymal Kupffer cells as a consequence of imbalances in the concentrations of iron regulatory factors, such as hepcidin, cytokines, copper or other dietary factors. This review summarizes the knowledge about iron homeostasis in NAFLD and the rationale for its therapeutic implications. PMID:25729473

  19. Iron, phytoplankton growth, and the carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Street, Joseph H; Paytan, Adina

    2005-01-01

    Iron is an essential nutrient for all living organisms. Iron is required for the synthesis of chlorophyll and of several photosynthetic electron transport proteins and for the reduction of CO2, SO4(2-), and NO3(-) during the photosynthetic production of organic compounds. Iron concentrations in vast areas of the ocean are very low (<1 nM) due to the low solubility of iron in oxic seawater. Low iron concentrations have been shown to limit primary production rates, biomass accumulation, and ecosystem structure in a variety of open-ocean environments, including the equatorial Pacific, the subarctic Pacific and the Southern Ocean and even in some coastal areas. Oceanic primary production, the transfer of carbon dioxide into organic carbon by photosynthetic plankton (phytoplankton), is one process by which atmospheric CO2 can be transferred to the deep ocean and sequestered for long periods of time. Accordingly, iron limitation of primary producers likely plays a major role in the global carbon cycle. It has been suggested that variations in oceanic primary productivity, spurred by changes in the deposition of iron in atmospheric dust, control atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and hence global climate, over glacial-interglacial timescales. A contemporary application of this "iron hypothesis" promotes the large-scale iron fertilization of ocean regions as a means of enhancing the ability of the ocean to store anthropogenic CO2 and mitigate 21st century climate change. Recent in situ iron enrichment experiments in the HNLC regions, however, cast doubt on the efficacy and advisability of iron fertilization schemes. The experiments have confirmed the role of iron in regulating primary productivity, but resulted in only small carbon export fluxes to the depths necessary for long-term sequestration. Above all, these experiments and other studies of iron biogeochemistry over the last two decades have begun to illustrate the great complexity of the ocean system. Attempts to

  20. Iron bioavailability in low phytate pea

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds have high nutritional value but also contain potential anti-nutritional factors, such as phytate and polyphenols. Phytate can store up to 80% of the phosphorus in seeds. In the seed and during digestion it can complex minerals such as iron and zinc and make them un...

  1. Residual triose phosphate isomerase activity and color measurements to determine adequate cooking of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Sair, A I; Booren, A M; Berry, B W; Smith, D M

    1999-02-01

    The objectives were to (i) compare the use of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) activity and internal color scores for determination of cooking adequacy of beef patties and (ii) determine the effect of frozen storage and fat content on residual TPI activity in ground beef. Ground beef patties (24.4% fat) were cooked to five temperatures ranging from 60.0 to 82.2 degrees C. TPI activity decreased as beef patty cooking temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, no difference (P > 0.05) in activity (6.3 U/kg meat) was observed in patties cooked to 71.1 degrees C and above. Degree of doneness color scores, a* values and b* values, of ground beef patties decreased as internal temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, temperature had no effect on L* values. TPI activity in raw ground beef after five freeze-thaw cycles did not differ from the control. Three freeze-thaw cycles of raw ground beef resulted in a 57.2% decrease in TPI activity after cooking. TPI activity of cooked beef increased during 2 months of frozen storage, but TPI activity in ground beef stored for 3 months or longer did not differ from the unfrozen control. While past research has shown color to be a poor indicator of adequate thermal processing, our results suggest that undercooked ground beef patties could be distinguished from those that had been adequately cooked following U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines using residual TPI activity as a marker.

  2. Cooking-related PM2.5 and acrolein measured in grocery stores and comparison with other retail types.

    PubMed

    Chan, W R; Sidheswaran, M; Sullivan, D P; Cohn, S; Fisk, W J

    2016-06-01

    We measured particulate matter (PM), acrolein, and other indoor air contaminants in eight visits to grocery stores in California. Retail stores of other types (hardware, furniture, and apparel) were also sampled on additional visits. Based on tracer gas decay data, most stores had adequate ventilation according to minimum ventilation rate standards. Grocery stores had significantly higher concentrations of acrolein, fine and ultrafine PM, compared to other retail stores, likely attributable to cooking. Indoor concentrations of PM2.5 and acrolein exceeded health guidelines in all tested grocery stores. Acrolein emission rates to indoors in grocery stores had a mean estimate about 30 times higher than in other retail store types. About 80% of the indoor PM2.5 measured in grocery stores was emitted indoors, compared to only 20% for the other retail store types. Calculations suggest a substantial increase in outdoor air ventilation rate by a factor of three from current level is needed to reduce indoor acrolein concentrations. Alternatively, acrolein emission to indoors needs to be reduced 70% by better capturing of cooking exhaust. To maintain indoor PM2.5 below the California annual ambient standard of 12 μg/m(3) , grocery stores need to use air filters with an efficiency rating higher than the MERV 8 air filters commonly used today.

  3. Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.

    PubMed

    Casjens, Swaantje; Henry, Jana; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Welge, Peter; Lotz, Anne; Gelder, Rainer Van; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Stiegler, Hugo; Eisele, Lewin; Weiss, Tobias; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2014-11-01

    Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 μg l(-1) in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 μg l(-1) in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 μg l(-1) in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 μg l(-1)), those with excess body iron (SF ≥ 400 μg l(-1)) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 μg m(-3) versus 148 μg m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with

  4. Adaptation of iron requirement to hypoxic conditions at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Gassmann, Max; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2015-12-15

    Adequate acclimatization time to enable adjustment to hypoxic conditions is one of the most important aspects for mountaineers ascending to high altitude. Accordingly, most reviews emphasize mechanisms that cope with reduced oxygen supply. However, during sojourns to high altitude adjustment to elevated iron demand is equally critical. Thus in this review we focus on the interaction between oxygen and iron homeostasis. We review the role of iron 1) in the oxygen sensing process and erythropoietin (Epo) synthesis, 2) in gene expression control mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-2 (HIF-2), and 3) as an oxygen carrier in hemoglobin, myoglobin, and cytochromes. The blood hormone Epo that is abundantly expressed by the kidney under hypoxic conditions stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow, a process requiring high iron levels. To ensure that sufficient iron is provided, Epo-controlled erythroferrone that is expressed in erythroid precursor cells acts in the liver to reduce expression of the iron hormone hepcidin. Consequently, suppression of hepcidin allows for elevated iron release from storage organs and enhanced absorption of dietary iron by enterocytes. As recently observed in sojourners at high altitude, however, iron uptake may be hampered by reduced appetite and gastrointestinal bleeding. Reduced iron availability, as observed in a hypoxic mountaineer, enhances hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and may contribute to other hypoxia-related diseases. Overall, adequate systemic iron availability is an important prerequisite to adjust to high-altitude hypoxia and may have additional implications for disease-related hypoxic conditions.

  5. Dietary iron intake and serum ferritin concentration in 213 patients homozygous for the HFEC282Y hemochromatosis mutation

    PubMed Central

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Lovato, Laura; Barton, James C; Vitolins, Mara; McLaren, Gordon; Acton, Ronald T; McLaren, Christine; Harris, Emily L; Speechley, Mark; Eckfeldt, John H; Diaz, Sharmin; Sholinsky, Phyliss; Adams, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: HFEC282Y homozygotes have an increased risk for developing increased iron stores and related disorders. It is controversial whether dietary iron restrictions should be recommended to such individuals. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary iron content influences iron stores in HFEC282Y homozygotes as assessed by serum ferritin concentration. DESIGN: Serum ferritin concentration was measured and a dietary iron questionnaire was completed as part of the evaluation of 213 HFEC282Y homozygotes who were identified through screening of >100,000 primary care patients at five HEmochromatosis and IRon Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study Field Centers in the United States and Canada. RESULTS: No significant relationships between serum ferritin concentration and dietary heme iron content, dietary nonheme iron content or reports of supplemental iron use were found. CONCLUSION: These results do not support recommending dietary heme or nonheme iron restrictions for HFEC282Y homozygotes diagnosed through screening in North America. PMID:22720276

  6. Energy-storing prosthetic feet.

    PubMed

    Wing, D C; Hittenberger, D A

    1989-04-01

    At least six brands of energy-storing prosthetic feet (ESPF) are now commercially available in the US. These are designed to permit lower extremity amputees to participate in a wide variety of activities, such as running and jumping sports, as well as vigorous walking. Although kinesiologic studies of these devices have not been completed, clinical experience suggests that the Flex-Foot provides the highest performance, followed by the Carbon Copy II and the Seattle Foot. The S.A.F.E. Foot, the STEN Foot, and the Dynamic Foot provide less energy storage and may be suitable for less active patients or those with special needs such as walking on uneven ground. All of the ESPF except the Flex-Foot may be attached to a realigned conventional prosthesis. The Flex-Foot incorporates a pylon and foot in one unit and requires special fabrication technologies. The additional cost of most of the ESPF (compared to a Solid Ankle Cushion Heel Foot) may add little to the cost of a finished prosthesis although it provides greatly increased function. The Flex-Foot, however, is significantly more expensive. Advances in kinesiology and materials science are being applied in the design of prosthetic components that are lighter, stronger, and more resilient. Clinicians can now choose from a variety of innovative commercially available devices but have been hampered by a lack of published information. This paper will review the design philosophy, materials, and applications of ESPF, and will supplement the information available from individual manufacturers and the prosthetic literature.

  7. Model of reticuloendothelial iron metabolism in humans: Abnormal behavior in idiopathic hemochromatosis and in inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Fillet, G.; Beguin, Y.; Baldelli, L. )

    1989-08-01

    Iron transport in the reticuloendothelial (RE) system plays a central role in iron metabolism, but its regulation has not been characterized physiologically in vivo in humans. In particular, why serum iron is elevated and RE cells are much less iron-loaded than parenchymal cells in idiopathic hemochromatosis is not known. The processing of erythrocyte iron by the RE system was studied after intravenous (IV) injection of 59Fe heat-damaged RBCs (HDRBCs) and 55Fe transferrin in normal subjects and in patients with iron deficiency, idiopathic hemochromatosis, inflammation, marrow aplasia, or hyperplastic erythropoiesis. Early release of 59Fe by the RE system was calculated from the plasma iron turnover and the 59Fe plasma reappearance curve. Late release was calculated from the ratio of 59Fe/55Fe RBC utilization in 2 weeks. The partitioning of iron between the early (release from heme catabolism) and late (release from RE stores) phases depended on the size of RE iron stores, as illustrated by the inverse relationship observed between early release and plasma ferritin (P less than .001). There was a strong correlation between early release and the rate of change of serum iron levels during the first three hours in normal subjects (r = .85, P less than .001). Inflammation produced a blockade of the early release phase, whereas in idiopathic hemochromatosis early release was considerably increased as compared with subjects with similar iron stores. Based on these results, we describe a model of RE iron metabolism in humans. We conclude that the RE system appears to determine the diurnal fluctuations in serum iron levels through variations in the immediate output of heme iron. In idiopathic hemochromatosis, a defect of the RE cell in withholding iron freed from hemoglobin could be responsible for the high serum iron levels and low RE iron stores.

  8. Signature-based store checking buffer

    DOEpatents

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  9. Systemic Crisis of Civilization: In Search for Adequate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozin, Grigori

    In December 1972 a jumbo jet crashed in the Florida Everglades with the loss of 101 lives. The pilot, distracted by a minor malfunction, failed to note until too late the warning signal that - correctly - indicated an impending disaster. His sudden, astonished cry of Hey, what happening here? were his last words 1. Three decades after this tragic episode, as the Humankind approaches the threshold of the third Millennium, the problem of adequate reaction to warning signals of different nature and of distinguishing minor malfunctions in everyday life of society, in economy and technology as well as in evolution of biosphere from grave threats to the world community and the phenomenon of life on our planet remains crucial to human survival and the future of Civilization. Rational use of knowledge and technology available to the world community remains in this context the corner stone of discussions on the destiny of the intelligent life both on the planet Earth and in the Universe (the fact of intelligent life in the Universe is to be detected by the Humankind)…

  10. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  11. DARHT -- an adequate EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    In April 1996 the US District Court in Albuquerque ruled that the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), prepared by the Los Alamos Area Office, US Department of Energy (DOE), was adequate. The DARHT EIS had been prepared in the face of a lawsuit in only 10 months, a third of the time usually allotted for a DOE EIS, and for only a small fraction of the cost of a typical DOE EIS, and for only a small fraction of the cost of a typical DOE EIS. It subject was the first major facility to be built in decades for the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. It was the first EIS to be prepared for a proposal at DOE`s Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1979, and the first ever prepared by the Los Alamos Area Office. Much of the subject matter was classified. The facility had been specially designed to minimize impacts to a nearby prehistoric Native American ruin, and extensive consultation with American Indian Pueblos was required. The week that the draft EIS was published Laboratory biologists identified a previously unknown pair of Mexican spotted owls in the immediate vicinity of the project, bringing into play the consultation requirements of the Endangered Species Act. In spite of these obstacles, the resultant DARHT EIS was reviewed by the court and found to meet all statutory and regulatory requirements; the court praised the treatment of the classified material which served as a basis for the environmental analysis.

  12. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  13. Effect of dietary iron and copper on performance and oxidative stability in broiler leg meat.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, J A; Pérez-Vendrell, A M; Esteve-Garcia, E

    2000-05-01

    1. An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of removal of supplemental iron and copper from broiler diets during the last 3 weeks before slaughter on broiler performance, tissue vitamin E concentrations and oxidation values in raw; cooked and stored broiler leg meat. 2. Removal of supplemental iron and copper from the diet slightly decreased food efficiency; the differences were significant only when both minerals were removed simultaneously 3. Effect of iron withdrawal on iron concentration in tissue was low. However, total copper concentration in tissue was reduced in animals deprived of iron or both minerals simultaneously. 4. Removal of dietary iron and copper did not affect vitamin E concentration in raw and cooked meat, while stored meat showed lower concentrations in animals deprived of iron and copper simultaneously. 5. The removal of iron and copper from the diet reduced oxidation values in cooked broiler leg meat as measured by the thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances method (TBARS).

  14. Disposal of iron by a mutant form of lipocalin 2

    PubMed Central

    Barasch, Jonathan; Hollmen, Maria; Deng, Rong; Hod, Eldad A.; Rupert, Peter B.; Abergel, Rebecca J.; Allred, Benjamin E.; Xu, Katherine; Darrah, Shaun F.; Tekabe, Yared; Perlstein, Alan; Wax, Rebecca; Bruck, Efrat; Stauber, Jacob; Corbin, Kaitlyn A.; Buchen, Charles; Slavkovich, Vesna; Graziano, Joseph; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Bao, Guanhu; Strong, Roland K.; Qiu, Andong

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload damages many organs. Unfortunately, therapeutic iron chelators also have undesired toxicity and may deliver iron to microbes. Here we show that a mutant form (K3Cys) of endogenous lipocalin 2 (LCN2) is filtered by the kidney but can bypass sites of megalin-dependent recapture, resulting in urinary excretion. Because K3Cys maintains recognition of its cognate ligand, the iron siderophore enterochelin, this protein can capture and transport iron even in the acidic conditions of urine. Mutant LCN2 strips iron from transferrin and citrate, and delivers it into the urine. In addition, it removes iron from iron overloaded mice, including models of acquired (iron-dextran or stored red blood cells) and primary (Hfe−/−) iron overload. In each case, the mutants reduce redox activity typical of non-transferrin-bound iron. In summary, we present a non-toxic strategy for iron chelation and urinary elimination, based on manipulating an endogenous protein:siderophore:iron clearance pathway. PMID:27796299

  15. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia with Ferro-Folgamma.

    PubMed

    Ghinea, Mihaela Maria

    2004-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a hypochromic anemia in which hemoglobin poor synthesis is due to a decrease in the amount of iron in the body. The decrease of iron quantity has many causes: insufficient intake of aliments rich in iron (meat, viscera, green vegetables), increased necessities during growth period, pregnancy, erythrocytes hyperregeneration, high-performance sportsmen, increased loss by digestive way, genito-urinary way, respiratory, hemorrhagic syndromes. Clinically, symptoms and signs specific to all types of anemia and those specific to lack of iron occur besides the symptoms and signs of the underlying disease: atrophic glositis, angular stomatitis, sideropenic dysphagia, pica, skin and nails changes. Laboratory investigations useful for diagnosis are: microcytic, hypochromic anemia, decreased serum iron level, total capacity of iron binding increased, medullar iron store absent, good response to iron therapy. Ferro-Folgamma is one of the most indicated medicines in iron deficiency anemia. Due to its components this medicine has many indications: insufficient alimentary intake concerning iron, folic acid, B12 vitamin, vegetarian alimentation, increased needs during growth period, iron deficiency anaemia secondary to chronic hemorrhages, malnutrition, anemias associated with chronic alcohol intake, preventive treatment of iron deficiency anemia and megaloblastic anemia during pregnancy and lactation.

  16. Acquisition, transport, and storage of iron by pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Howard, D H

    1999-07-01

    Iron is required by most living systems. A great variety of means of acquisition, avenues of uptake, and methods of storage are used by pathogenic fungi to ensure a supply of the essential metal. Solubilization of insoluble iron polymers is the first step in iron assimilation. The two methods most commonly used by microorganisms for solubilization of iron are reduction and chelation. Reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron by enzymatic or nonenzymatic means is a common mechanism among pathogenic yeasts. Under conditions of iron starvation, many fungi synthesize iron chelators known as siderophores. Two classes of compounds that function in iron gathering are commonly observed: hydroxamates and polycarboxylates. Two major responses to iron stress in fungi are a high-affinity ferric iron reductase and siderophore synthesis. Regulation of these two mechanisms at the molecular level has received attention. Uptake of siderophores is a diverse process, which varies among the different classes of compounds. Since free iron is toxic, it must be stored for further metabolic use. Polyphosphates, ferritins, and siderophores themselves have been described as storage molecules. The iron-gathering mechanisms used by a pathogen in an infected host are largely unknown and can only be posited on the basis of in vitro studies at present.

  17. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  18. Iron increases the susceptibility of multiple myeloma cells to bortezomib

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Paolo; Fontana, Francesca; Frenquelli, Michela; Cenci, Simone; Marcatti, Magda; Sitia, Roberto; Tonon, Giovanni; Camaschella, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant still incurable plasma cell disorder. Pharmacological treatment based on proteasome inhibition has improved patient outcome; however, bortezomib-resistance remains a major clinical problem. Inhibition of proteasome functionality affects cellular iron homeostasis and iron is a potent inducer of reactive oxygen species and cell death, unless safely stored in ferritin. We explored the potential role of iron in bortezomib-resistance. We analyzed iron proteins, oxidative status and cell viability in 7 multiple myeloma cell lines and in plasma cells from 5 patients. Cells were treated with increasing bortezomib concentrations with or without iron supplementation. We reduced ferritin levels by both shRNA technology and by drug-induced iron starvation. Multiple myeloma cell lines are characterized by distinct ferritin levels, which directly correlate with bortezomib resistance. We observed that iron supplementation upon bortezomib promotes protein oxidation and cell death, and that iron toxicity inversely correlates with basal ferritin levels. Bortezomib prevents ferritin upregulation in response to iron, thus limiting the ability to buffer reactive oxygen species. Consequently, reduction of basal ferritin levels increases both bortezomib sensitivity and iron toxicity. In patients’ cells, we confirmed that bortezomib prevents ferritin increase, that iron supplementation upon bortezomib increases cell death and that ferritin reduction overcomes bortezomib resistance. Bortezomib affects iron homeostasis, sensitizing cells to oxidative damage. Modulation of iron status is a strategy worth exploring to improve the efficacy of proteasome inhibition therapies. PMID:23242599

  19. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  20. Iron Sucrose Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Iron sucrose injection is used treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due ... and may cause the kidneys to stop working). Iron sucrose injection is in a class of medications called iron ...

  1. Cellular distribution of orally and intramuscularly administered iron dextran in newborn piglets.

    PubMed Central

    Thorén-Tolling, K; Jönsson, L

    1977-01-01

    Histochemical studies were performed on tissues from piglets of different ages treated orally with iron dextran soon after birth. The mucosal cells in the distal region of the small intestine were heavily laden with stainable iron granules during the first three days after the iron administration. The absorptive epithelial cells are desquamated within seven to ten days after birth. Consequently, the number of iron granules gradually diminishes during the first seven days after treatment and no iron granules are demonstrated 12 days after the administration of iron. The iron dextran complex is pinocytosed in newborn piglets and then transported via the lymphatic system. Thus the sinusoidal lining cells of the body and mesenteric lymph nodes are already heavily laden with iron granules 24 hours after oral treatment. This iron store is released only slowing during the first weeks of life. Great amounts of iron granules are demonstrated in the liver and spleen macrophages during the first week after the administration of iron. Due to the rapid utilization of iron in growing piglets these iron stores diminish sharply during the weeks following birth. The distribution of stainable iron in the lymph nodes, liver and spleen seven days after intramuscular injection of iron dextran in newborn piglets was comparable to that for oral administration at that stage of the experiment. Images Fig. 1a-e. Fig. 2a-e. Fig. 3a-d. Fig. 4a-d. Fig. 5a-d. PMID:907907

  2. Supplementary iron dose in pregnancy anemia prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Reddaiah, V P; Raj, P P; Ramachandran, K; Nath, L M; Sood, S K; Madan, N; Rusia, U

    1989-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the optimum dose of supplemental iron for prophylaxis against pregnancy anemia. One hundred and ten pregnant women were randomly allocated to three groups: Group A receiving equivalent of 60 mg, group B 120 mg and Group C 240 mg, elemental iron as ferrous sulphate daily; the content of folic acid was constant in all the three groups (0.5 mg). These women had at least consumed 90 tablets in 100 +/- 10 days. Blood was drawn at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Fifty percent were anemic (less than 11 g/100 ml). The hemoglobin levels rose similarly in all groups and the differences were statistically not significant. Fifty-six percent had depleted iron stores (serum ferritin value less than 12 micrograms/l) at the beginning of the study. Following therapy a statistically significant increase in iron stores was observed in group B and C as compared to group A. The difference between group B and C was not significant. The side effects increased with increasing doses of iron; 32.4%, 40.3% and 72% in group A, B and C respectively. Based on these findings, the authors advocate that optimum dose of iron should be 120 mg instead of 60 mg as is currently being used in the National Nutritional Anemia Prophylaxis Programme.

  3. Determination of the need for selenium by chicks fed practical diets adequate in vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, G.F. Jr.; Su, Q.; Liu, C.H.; Sinisalo, M.; Combs, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the dietary needs for selenium (Se) by chicks fed either purified (amino acid-based) or practical (corn- and soy-based) diets that were adequate with respect to vitamin E (i.e., contained 100 IU/kg) and all other known nutrients with the single exception of Se (i.e., contained only 0.10 ppm Se). Studies were conducted in Ithaca using Single Comb White Leghorn chicks fed the purified basal diet and in Beijing using chicks of the same breed fed either the same purified basal diet or the practical diet formulated to be similar to that used in poultry production in some parts of China and the US. Results showed that each basal diet produced severe depletion of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) in plasma, liver and pancreas according to the same time-course, but that other consequences of severe uncomplicated Se deficiency were much more severe among chicks fed the purified diet (e.g., growth depression, pancreatic dysfunction as indicated by elevated plasma amylase and abnormal pancreatic histology). Chicks fed the practical Se-deficient diet showed reduced pancreas levels of copper, zinc and molybdenum and elevated plasma levels of iron; they required ca. 0.10 ppm dietary Se to sustain normal SeGSHpx in several tissues and to prevent elevated amylase in plasma. The dietary Se requirement of the chick is, therefore, estimated to be 0.10 ppm.

  4. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  5. Iron and alloys of iron. [lunar resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastri, Sankar

    1992-01-01

    All lunar soil contains iron in the metallic form, mostly as an iron-nickel alloy in concentrations of a few tenths of 1 percent. Some of this free iron can be easily separated by magnetic means. It is estimated that the magnetic separation of 100,000 tons of lunar soil would yield 150-200 tons of iron. Agglutinates contain metallic iron which could be extracted by melting and made into powder metallurgy products. The characteristics and potential uses of the pure-iron and iron-alloy lunar products are discussed. Processes for working iron that might be used in a nonterrestrial facility are also addressed.

  6. Are Vancomycin Trough Concentrations Adequate for Optimal Dosing?

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Gilmer; Jones, Brenda; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Drusano, George L.; Rodvold, Keith A.; Lodise, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The current vancomycin therapeutic guidelines recommend the use of only trough concentrations to manage the dosing of adults with Staphylococcus aureus infections. Both vancomycin efficacy and toxicity are likely to be related to the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). We assembled richly sampled vancomycin pharmacokinetic data from three studies comprising 47 adults with various levels of renal function. With Pmetrics, the nonparametric population modeling package for R, we compared AUCs estimated from models derived from trough-only and peak-trough depleted versions of the full data set and characterized the relationship between the vancomycin trough concentration and AUC. The trough-only and peak-trough depleted data sets underestimated the true AUCs compared to the full model by a mean (95% confidence interval) of 23% (11 to 33%; P = 0.0001) and 14% (7 to 19%; P < 0.0001), respectively. In contrast, using the full model as a Bayesian prior with trough-only data allowed 97% (93 to 102%; P = 0.23) accurate AUC estimation. On the basis of 5,000 profiles simulated from the full model, among adults with normal renal function and a therapeutic AUC of ≥400 mg · h/liter for an organism for which the vancomycin MIC is 1 mg/liter, approximately 60% are expected to have a trough concentration below the suggested minimum target of 15 mg/liter for serious infections, which could result in needlessly increased doses and a risk of toxicity. Our data indicate that adjustment of vancomycin doses on the basis of trough concentrations without a Bayesian tool results in poor achievement of maximally safe and effective drug exposures in plasma and that many adults can have an adequate vancomycin AUC with a trough concentration of <15 mg/liter. PMID:24165176

  7. Is clinical measurement of anatomic axis of the femur adequate?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2017-03-23

    Background and purpose - The accuracy of using clinical measurement from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the knee to determine an anatomic axis of the femur has rarely been studied. A radiographic technique with a full-length standing scanogram (FLSS) was used to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement. Patients and methods - 100 consecutive young adult patients (mean age 34 (20-40) years) with chronic unilateral lower extremity injuries were studied. The pelvis and intact contralateral lower extremity images in the FLSS were selected for study. The angles between the tibial axis and the femoral shaft anatomic axis (S-AA), the piriformis anatomic axis (P-AA), the clinical anatomic axis (C-AA), and the mechanical axis (MA) were compared between sexes. Results - Only the S-AA and C-AA angles were statistically significantly different in the 100 patients (3.6° vs. 2.8°; p = 0.03). There was a strong correlation between S-AA, P-AA, and C-AA angles (r > 0.9). The average intersecting angle between MA and S-AA in the femur in the 100 patients was 5.5°, and it was 4.8° between MA and C-AA. Interpretation - Clinical measurement of an anatomic axis from the ASIS to the center of the knee may be an adequate and acceptable method to determine lower extremity alignment. The optimal inlet for antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing may be the lateral edge of the piriformis fossa.

  8. Iron homeostasis: a new job for macrophages in adipose tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Hubler, Merla J.; Peterson, Kristin R.; Hasty, Alyssa H.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum ferritin and increased cellular iron concentrations are risk factors for diabetes; however, the etiology of this association is unclear. Metabolic tissues such as pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue (AT), as well as the immune cells resident in these tissues, may be involved. Recent studies demonstrate that the polarization status of macrophages has important relevance to their iron handling capabilities. Furthermore, a subset of macrophages in AT have elevated iron concentrations and a gene expression profile indicative of iron handling, a capacity diminished in obesity. Because iron overload in adipocytes increases systemic insulin resistance, iron handling by AT macrophages may have relevance not only to adipocyte iron stores but also to local and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:25600948

  9. Storing Peanuts in Flexible Hermetically Sealed Containers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In-shell peanuts stored in large bulk warehouses lose approximately 1.5-2% of their value. However, peanuts stored as long as nine months may lose as much as 5% of their value due to excessive moisture loss, a reduction of peanut kernel size and damage due to insects or microbial growth. Research h...

  10. Optimal Strategies for Dealing with Store Discounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croucher, John S.

    2004-01-01

    Despite the assurances of store employees, whenever a deal is on offer it always pays to apply a little logic (and mathematics) to see just how to use it most effectively. In this article, the author displays how to employ this technique by using the example of a shoe store that advertised "second pair half price" (with the fine print stating that…

  11. Prospects for stored ion frequency standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    Fundamental limitations of possible frequency standards based on stored ions are examined. Practical limitations are also addressed but without regard to size, power consumption, and cost. With these guidelines, one can anticipate that a stored ion frequency standard with accuracy and stability better than 10 to the -15th power is now possible.

  12. Gauging triple stores with actual biological data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Semantic Web technologies have been developed to overcome the limitations of the current Web and conventional data integration solutions. The Semantic Web is expected to link all the data present on the Internet instead of linking just documents. One of the foundations of the Semantic Web technologies is the knowledge representation language Resource Description Framework (RDF). Knowledge expressed in RDF is typically stored in so-called triple stores (also known as RDF stores), from which it can be retrieved with SPARQL, a language designed for querying RDF-based models. The Semantic Web technologies should allow federated queries over multiple triple stores. In this paper we compare the efficiency of a set of biologically relevant queries as applied to a number of different triple store implementations. Results Previously we developed a library of queries to guide the use of our knowledge base Cell Cycle Ontology implemented as a triple store. We have now compared the performance of these queries on five non-commercial triple stores: OpenLink Virtuoso (Open-Source Edition), Jena SDB, Jena TDB, SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. We examined three performance aspects: the data uploading time, the query execution time and the scalability. The queries we had chosen addressed diverse ontological or biological questions, and we found that individual store performance was quite query-specific. We identified three groups of queries displaying similar behaviour across the different stores: 1) relatively short response time queries, 2) moderate response time queries and 3) relatively long response time queries. SwiftOWLIM proved to be a winner in the first group, 4Store in the second one and Virtuoso in the third one. Conclusions Our analysis showed that some queries behaved idiosyncratically, in a triple store specific manner, mainly with SwiftOWLIM and 4Store. Virtuoso, as expected, displayed a very balanced performance - its load time and its response time for all the

  13. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example. PMID:26358557

  14. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-09-11

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example.

  15. Store-operate-coherence-on-value

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2014-11-18

    A system, method and computer program product for performing various store-operate instructions in a parallel computing environment that includes a plurality of processors and at least one cache memory device. A queue in the system receives, from a processor, a store-operate instruction that specifies under which condition a cache coherence operation is to be invoked. A hardware unit in the system runs the received store-operate instruction. The hardware unit evaluates whether a result of the running the received store-operate instruction satisfies the condition. The hardware unit invokes a cache coherence operation on a cache memory address associated with the received store-operate instruction if the result satisfies the condition. Otherwise, the hardware unit does not invoke the cache coherence operation on the cache memory device.

  16. Iron and iron derived radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, D.C.; Schaich, K.M.

    1987-04-01

    We have discussed some reactions of iron and iron-derived oxygen radicals that may be important in the production or treatment of tissue injury. Our conclusions challenge, to some extent, the usual lines of thought in this field of research. Insofar as they are born out by subsequent developments, the lessons they teach are two: Think fastexclamation Think smallexclamation In other words, think of the many fast reactions that can rapidly alter the production and fate of highly reactive intermediates, and when considering the impact of competitive reactions on such species, think how they affect the microenvironment (on the molecular scale) ''seen'' by each reactive molecule. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Parenteral iron use in the management of anemia in end-stage renal disease patients.

    PubMed

    Bailie, G R; Johnson, C A; Mason, N A

    2000-01-01

    Intravenous iron is required by most dialysis patients receiving erythropoietin (EPO) to maintain an adequate hematocrit. In the United States, there are currently two parenteral iron preparations, iron dextran and iron gluconate, approved for such use, and a third product, iron sucrose, is under development. This article reviews each of these products. Each of the iron products increases the efficacy of EPO use in anemia management. There is considerable experience in the United States and elsewhere with the use of iron dextran. Although it is clinically effective, iron dextran is also associated with significant morbidity from both dose-dependent and -independent side effects. The slow release of iron from this complex necessitates a delay in monitoring iron indices after the administration of large doses of iron dextran. Recommended doses of iron sucrose appear very safe with little risk of anaphylactic reactions. Adverse effects are uncommon and not life threatening. If approved for use in the United States, iron sucrose may be a safe and effective alternative to iron dextran. Iron dissociates from iron gluconate quite rapidly and may increase the production of ionized free iron. Iron gluconate may be a safe alternative to iron dextran for patients with severe reactions, including anaphylaxis. The risk of allergic reactions to iron gluconate is very low. The exact place in therapy for the newer iron complexes remains unclear. Currently available data suggest that iron sucrose and iron gluconate may have diminished adverse effect profiles when compared with iron dextran. Additional clinical experience will establish the role for these new iron products.

  18. Iron Indices in Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaro, Lisa M; Johnson, Shawn P; Fair, Patricia A; Bossart, Greg; Carlin, Kevin P; Jensen, Eric D; Smith, Cynthia R; Andrews, Gordon A; Chavey, Patricia S; Venn-Watson, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Bottlenose dolphins can have iron overload (that is, hemochromatosis), and managed populations of dolphins may be more susceptible to this disease than are wild dolphins. Serum iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation, and ferritin were measured in 181 samples from 141 dolphins in 2 managed collections and 2 free-ranging populations. Although no iron indices increased with age among free-ranging dolphins, ferritin increased with age in managed collections. Dolphins from managed collections had higher iron, ferritin, and transferrin saturation values than did free-ranging dolphins. Dolphins with high serum iron (exceeding 300 μg/dL) were more likely to have elevated ferritin but not ceruloplasmin or haptoglobin, demonstrating that high serum levels of iron are due to a true increase in total body iron. A time-series study of 4 dolphins with hemochromatosis that were treated with phlebotomy demonstrated significant decreases in serum ferritin, iron, and TIBC between pre- and posttreatment samples; transferrin saturation initially fell but returned to prephlebotomy levels by 6 mo after treatment. Compared with those in managed collections, wild dolphins were 15 times more likely to have low serum iron (100 μg/dL or less), and this measure was associated with lower haptoglobin. In conclusion, bottlenose dolphins in managed collections are more likely to have greater iron stores than are free-ranging dolphins. Determining why this situation occurs among some dolphin populations and not others may improve the treatment of hemochromatosis in dolphins and provide clues to causes of nonhereditary hemochromatosis in humans. PMID:23561885

  19. Iron Treatment Strategies in Dialysis-Dependent CKD.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Richa; Daloul, Reem; Coyne, Daniel W

    2016-03-01

    Iron deficiency is common in patients on chronic dialysis, and most require iron-replacement therapy. In addition to absolute iron deficiency, many patients have functional iron deficiency as shown by a suboptimal response to the use of erythropoietin-stimulating agents. Both absolute and functional iron-deficiency anemia have been shown to respond to intravenous (IV) iron replacement. Although parenteral iron is an efficacious method and superior to standard doses of oral iron in patients on hemodialysis, there are ongoing safety concerns about repeated exposure potentially enhancing infection risk and cardiovascular disease. Each IV iron product is composed of an iron core with a carbohydrate shell. The avidity of iron binding and the type of carbohydrate shell play roles in the safe maximal dose and the frequency and severity of acute infusion reactions. All IV iron products are taken up into the reticuloendothelial system where the shell is metabolized and the iron is stored within tissue ferritin or exported to circulating transferrin. IV iron can be given as large intermittent doses (loading therapy) or in smaller doses at frequent intervals (maintenance dosing regimen). Limited trial data and observational data suggest that a maintenance dosing regimen is more efficacious and possibly safer than loading therapy. There is no consensus regarding the preferred method of iron repletion in patients on peritoneal dialysis, although small studies comparing oral and parenteral iron regimens in these patients have shown the latter to be more efficacious. Use of IV iron in virtually all hemodialysis and many peritoneal dialysis patients remains the standard of care.

  20. Iron deficiency in sports - definition, influence on performance and therapy.

    PubMed

    Clénin, German; Cordes, Mareike; Huber, Andreas; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Noack, Patrick; Scales, John; Kriemler, Susi

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is frequent among athletes. All types of iron deficiency may affect physical performance and should be treated. The main mechanisms by which sport leads to iron deficiency are increased iron demand, elevated iron loss and blockage of iron absorption due to hepcidin bursts. As a baseline set of blood tests, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean cellular volume, mean cellular haemoglobin and serum ferritin levels help monitor iron deficiency. In healthy male and female athletes >15 years, ferritin values <15 mcg are equivalent to empty, values from 15 to 30 mcg/l to low iron stores. Therefore a cut-off of 30 mcg/l is appropriate. For children aged from 6-12 years and younger adolescents from 12-15 years, cut-offs of 15 and 20 mcg/l, respectively, are recommended. As an exception in adult elite sports, a ferritin value of 50 mcg/l should be attained in athletes prior to altitude training, as iron demands in these situations are increased. Treatment of iron deficiency consists of nutritional counselling, oral iron supplementation or, in specific cases, by intravenous injection. Athletes with repeatedly low ferritin values benefit from intermittent oral substitution. It is important to follow up the athletes on an individual basis, repeating the baseline blood tests listed above twice a year. A long-term daily oral iron intake or i.v. supplementation in the presence of normal or even high ferritin values does not make sense and may be harmful.

  1. The efficiency of fractionated parenteral iron treatment in CAPD patients.

    PubMed

    Akcicek, F; Ozkahya, M; Cirit, M; Ok, E; Unsal, A; Toz, H; Celik, A; Atabay, G; Basci, A

    1997-01-01

    Some chronic renal failure patients respond poorly to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO). In continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients, such a poor response may indicate inadequate dialysis or low body iron stores. To correct iron deficiency, once-a-week intravenous iron supplementation is recommended. However, hemodialysis patients receive iron supplements three times a week. This study was designed to compare the efficacy of iron supplementation between once-weekly and twice-weekly regimens. In both groups, rHuEPO doses were similar. Seventeen CAPD patients were studied. All had hemoglobin levels less than 10 g/dL. Ten patients were given 100 mg intravenous iron once weekly, and 7 were given 50 mg intravenous iron twice weekly until a total iron dose of 600 mg was achieved (stage I). The patients were crossed over to receive another 600 mg iron (stage II). Hematocrit increased significantly in patients receiving twice-a-week iron supplementation (+3.8% and 6%) compared to those receiving once-a-week iron supplementation (+1.3% and 1.4%) during stages I and II. The ferritin levels were not different between the groups. In conclusion, rHuEPO is more effective when administered with intravenous iron.

  2. A four-helix bundle stores copper for methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vita, Nicolas; Platsaki, Semeli; Baslé, Arnaud; Allen, Stephen J; Paterson, Neil G; Crombie, Andrew T; Murrell, J Colin; Waldron, Kevin J; Dennison, Christopher

    2015-09-03

    Methane-oxidizing bacteria (methanotrophs) require large quantities of copper for the membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase. Certain methanotrophs are also able to switch to using the iron-containing soluble methane monooxygenase to catalyse methane oxidation, with this switchover regulated by copper. Methane monooxygenases are nature's primary biological mechanism for suppressing atmospheric levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Furthermore, methanotrophs and methane monooxygenases have enormous potential in bioremediation and for biotransformations producing bulk and fine chemicals, and in bioenergy, particularly considering increased methane availability from renewable sources and hydraulic fracturing of shale rock. Here we discover and characterize a novel copper storage protein (Csp1) from the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b that is exported from the cytosol, and stores copper for particulate methane monooxygenase. Csp1 is a tetramer of four-helix bundles with each monomer binding up to 13 Cu(I) ions in a previously unseen manner via mainly Cys residues that point into the core of the bundle. Csp1 is the first example of a protein that stores a metal within an established protein-folding motif. This work provides a detailed insight into how methanotrophs accumulate copper for the oxidation of methane. Understanding this process is essential if the wide-ranging biotechnological applications of methanotrophs are to be realized. Cytosolic homologues of Csp1 are present in diverse bacteria, thus challenging the dogma that such organisms do not use copper in this location.

  3. NASA Armstrong's Approach to Store Separation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuff, Chris; Bui, Trong

    2015-01-01

    Presentation will an overview of NASA Armstrong's store separation capabilities and how they have been applied recently. Objective of the presentation is to brief Generation Orbit and other potential partners on NASA Armstrong's store separation capabilities. It will include discussions on the use of NAVSEP and Cart3D, as well as some Python scripting work to perform the analysis, and a short overview of this methodology applied to the Towed Glider Air Launch System. Collaboration with potential customers in this area could lead to funding for the further development of a store separation capability at NASA Armstrong, which would boost the portfolio of engineering expertise at the center.

  4. Emergency Destruction of Information Storing Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Copy 8 of 17 copies SFILE COP N IDA REPORT R-321 0 (N t EMERGENCY DESTRUCTION OF INFORMATION STORING MEDIA M. M. G. Slusarczuk W. T. Mayfield DT IC S...ACCESSION NO.I T-ZS-341 ii TILE - -s Cieuwdbu)o Emergency Destruction of Information Storing Media (U) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(I) * M.M.G. Slusarczuk, W.T...analyzing the appropriateness of various destruction technologies in the emergency destruction of information storing media . The support task was

  5. [The plague and iron - or why didn't everybody die?].

    PubMed

    Palmblad, J

    1994-01-01

    In the years of the Black Death, contemporary observers noted that wealthy men were more likely to die from plague than women and the poor. One hypothesis, seeking an explanation for this phenomenon, is that the iron stores of an individual are a significant virulence factor for Yersina pestis, since this microorganism is dependent on iron for its multiplication. Thus, iron deficiency might confer some protection, whereas sufficient or even overabundant body iron stores contribute to the mortality in plague as well as in some other infectious diseases.

  6. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA).

    PubMed

    Heeney, Matthew M; Finberg, Karin E

    2014-08-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is a common global problem whose etiology is typically attributed to acquired inadequate dietary intake and/or chronic blood loss. However, in several kindreds multiple family members are affected with iron deficiency anemia that is unresponsive to oral iron supplementation and only partially responsive to parenteral iron therapy. The discovery that many of these cases harbor mutations in the TMPRSS6 gene led to the recognition that they represent a single clinical entity: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA). This article reviews clinical features of IRIDA, recent genetic studies, and insights this disorder provides into the regulation of systemic iron homeostasis.

  7. Beyond efficacy and safety—the need for convenient and cost-effective iron therapy in health care

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Sunil

    2011-01-01

    The National Service Framework advocates correction of anaemia in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Oral iron is insufficient, while intravenous (IV) supplementation replenishes and maintains iron stores. Previously, effective delivery of iron therapy using available parenteral preparations has been hampered by dosing schedules and the need in some cases of a test dose. The introduction in Europe of newer iron preparations, including iron isomaltoside 1000 (Monofer) and iron carboxymaltose (Ferinject), now offers a potentially safe, effective and time-efficient method of outpatient iron repletion. This may potentially lead to better cost-effectiveness in a resource-limited service. PMID:27045221

  8. Shelf life of ostrich (Struthio camelus) liver stored under different packaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Fernández-López, Juana; Yelo, Ana; Sayas-Barberá, Estrella; Sendra, Esther; Navarro, Casilda; Pérez-Alvarez, José Angel

    2006-08-01

    Ostrich (Struthio camelus) liver is an important edible meat by-product. However, it has a low commercial value, and it is underutilized. The present study was conducted to establish the shelf life of ostrich liver, stored at 2 +/- 1 degrees C for 18 days, under different packing conditions. Fresh livers were sliced and packed under air exposure, vacuum, and modified atmosphere (MA: 80% CO2 plus 20% N2). Shelf-life evaluation was based on color, lipid and hemopigment oxidation, microbial counts, and sensory assessment of odor and color. Samples stored under air exposure showed the highest lipid and hemopigment oxidation rate, which was detected by higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values and metmyoglobin percentage and lower heme iron content than livers stored under vacuum or MA. On the basis of aerobic bacteria counts, the shelf life of ostrich liver stored under aerobic conditions would be 7 days, whereas under vacuum or MA, it would be 14 days. In livers stored under anaerobic conditions (vacuum or MA packed), lactic acid bacteria represented a significant proportion of the spoilage microbiota. Minimal changes in color perception were also obtained in vacuum-packed samples at the end of the storage period. In air-packed samples, high levels of off-odors were already perceived during the first 6 days of storage, whereas in livers stored under anaerobic conditions (vacuum and MA), these levels of off-odor were not yet perceived at that time.

  9. Infant Formula - Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000806.htm Infant Formula – Buying, Preparing, Storing, and Feeding To use the sharing features on this page, ... brush to get at hard-to-reach places. Feeding Formula to Baby Here is a guide to ...

  10. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  11. Dating of iron gall ink using the dissolution-diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Li, Biao; Xie, Peng

    2015-03-01

    In many criminal and civil cases, some questioned documents are written with iron gall ink. Determining the date when an iron gall ink entry was written can be important to assess the authenticity of a document. A dissolution-diffusion method was successfully employed to draw aging curves of iron gall ink entries stored in controlled conditions over 40 months. Calibration curves were created to indicate the relationship between the average dissolution-diffusion rate of ink components and the age of ink entries stored under natural aging conditions. As preliminary findings of this study, the mixed solution of dimethyl formamide (DMF) and anhydrous ethanol was suitable to dissolve the dye of iron gall ink strokes made at different time. It was also determined that brands of iron gall inks, types of paper, and thickness of iron gall ink strokes had varying impacts on estimating the dates of iron gall ink strokes.

  12. Ferritin Mutants of Escherichia coli Are Iron Deficient and Growth Impaired, and fur Mutants are Iron Deficient

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Tehrani, Hossein; Hudson, Aaron J.; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Timms, Andrew R.; Hawkins, Chris; Williams, John M.; Harrison, Pauline M.; Guest, John R.; Andrews, Simon C.

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains at least two iron storage proteins, a ferritin (FtnA) and a bacterioferritin (Bfr). To investigate their specific functions, the corresponding genes (ftnA and bfr) were inactivated by replacing the chromosomal ftnA and bfr genes with disrupted derivatives containing antibiotic resistance cassettes in place of internal segments of the corresponding coding regions. Single mutants (ftnA::spc and bfr::kan) and a double mutant (ftnA::spc bfr::kan) were generated and confirmed by Western and Southern blot analyses. The iron contents of the parental strain (W3110) and the bfr mutant increased by 1.5- to 2-fold during the transition from logarithmic to stationary phase in iron-rich media, whereas the iron contents of the ftnA and ftnA bfr mutants remained unchanged. The ftnA and ftnA bfr mutants were growth impaired in iron-deficient media, but this was apparent only after the mutant and parental strains had been precultured in iron-rich media. Surprisingly, ferric iron uptake regulation (fur) mutants also had very low iron contents (2.5-fold less iron than Fur+ strains) despite constitutive expression of the iron acquisition systems. The iron deficiencies of the ftnA and fur mutants were confirmed by Mössbauer spectroscopy, which further showed that the low iron contents of ftnA mutants are due to a lack of magnetically ordered ferric iron clusters likely to correspond to FtnA iron cores. In combination with the fur mutation, ftnA and bfr mutations produced an enhanced sensitivity to hydroperoxides, presumably due to an increase in production of “reactive ferrous iron.” It is concluded that FtnA acts as an iron store accommodating up to 50% of the cellular iron during postexponential growth in iron-rich media and providing a source of iron that partially compensates for iron deficiency during iron-restricted growth. In addition to repressing the iron acquisition systems, Fur appears to regulate the demand for iron, probably by controlling

  13. Optical Memory Stores 10 12sup. Bits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Optical Mass Memory has separate recorder (write) and reproducer (read) modules. Data are recorded on fiches and stored in a carrousel. Fische is retrieved from carrousel by transporter in under 10 seconds. Input to optical memory is standard TV camera. TV monitor at memory output displays stored video images when they are retrieved from fisches. Input to the optical memory can also be taken from pseudorandom sequence generator.

  14. Safety aspects of parenteral iron in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Sunder-Plassmann, G; Hörl, W H

    1997-10-01

    Absolute and functional iron deficiency is the most common cause of epoetin (recombinant human erythropoietin) hyporesponsiveness in renal failure patients. Diagnostic procedures for determining iron deficiency include measurement of serum iron levels, serum ferritin levels, saturation of transferrin and percentage of hypochromic red blood cells. Patients with iron deficiency should receive supplemental iron, either orally or intravenously. Adequate intravenous iron supplementation allows reduction of epoetin dosage by approximately 40%. Intravenous iron supplementation is recommended for all patients undergoing haemodialysis and for pre-dialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients with severe iron deficiency. During the maintenance phase (period of epoetin therapy after correction of iron deficiency), the use of low-dose intravenous iron supplementation (10 to 20 mg per haemodialysis treatment or 100 mg every second week) avoids iron overtreatment and minimises potential adverse effects. Depending on the degree of pre-existing iron deficiency, markedly higher iron doses are necessary during the correction phase (period of epoetin therapy after correction of iron deficiency) [e.g. intravenous iron 40 to 100 mg per haemodialysis session up to a total dose of 1000 mg]. The iron status should be monitored monthly during the correction phase and every 3 months during the maintenance phase to avoid overtreatment with intravenous iron.

  15. Iron Deficiency in Blood Donors: The REDS-II Donor Iron Status Evaluation (RISE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Ritchard G.; Glynn, Simone A.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Mast, Alan E.; Steele, Whitney R.; Murphy, Edward L.; Wright, David J.; Sacher, Ronald A.; Gottschall, Jerry L.; Tobler, Leslie H.; Simon, Toby L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Blood donors are at risk of iron deficiency. We evaluated the effects of blood donation intensity on iron and hemoglobin in a prospective study. Methods Four cohorts of frequent and first time or reactivated blood donors (no donation in 2 years), female and male, totaling 2425 were characterized and followed as they donated blood frequently. At enrollment and the final visit, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and hemoglobin were determined. Models to predict iron deficiency and hemoglobin deferral were developed. Iron depletion was defined at two levels: Iron Deficient Erythropoiesis (IDE) [log (soluble transferrin receptor/ferritin ≥ 2.07)] and Absent Iron Stores (AIS) (ferritin < 12 ng/mL). Results Among returning female first time/reactivated donors, 20% and 51% had AIS and IDE at their final visit, respectively; corresponding proportions for males were 8% and 20%. Among female frequent donors who returned, 27% and 62% had AIS and IDE, respectively, while corresponding proportions for males were 18% and 47%. Predictors of IDE and/or AIS included a higher frequency of blood donation in the last 2 years, a shorter interdonation interval, and being female and young; conversely, taking iron supplements reduced the risk of iron depletion. Predictors of hemoglobin deferral included female gender, Black race and a shorter interdonation interval. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of iron depletion in frequent blood donors. Increasing the interdonation interval would reduce the prevalence of iron depletion and hemoglobin deferral. Alternatively, replacement with iron supplements may allow frequent donation without the adverse outcome of iron depletion. PMID:22023513

  16. Transdermal iron replenishment therapy.

    PubMed

    Modepalli, Naresh; Shivakumar, H N; Kanni, K L Paranjothy; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is one of the major nutritional deficiency disorders. Iron deficiency anemia occurs due to decreased absorption of iron from diet, chronic blood loss and other associated diseases. The importance of iron and deleterious effects of iron deficiency anemia are discussed briefly in this review followed by the transdermal approaches to deliver iron. Transdermal delivery of iron would be able to overcome the side effects associated with conventional oral and parenteral iron therapy and improves the patient compliance. During preliminary investigations, ferric pyrophosphate and iron dextran were selected as iron sources for transdermal delivery. Different biophysical techniques were explored to assess their efficiency in delivering iron across the skin, and in vivo studies were carried out using anemic rat model. Transdermal iron delivery is a promising approach that could make a huge positive impact on patients suffering with iron deficiency.

  17. [Iron dysregulation and anemias].

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Katsuya

    2015-10-01

    Most iron in the body is utilized as a component of hemoglobin that delivers oxygen to the entire body. Under normal conditions, the iron balance is tightly regulated. However, iron dysregulation does occasionally occur; total iron content reductions cause iron deficiency anemia and overexpression of the iron regulatory peptide hepcidin disturbs iron utilization resulting in anemia of chronic disease. Conversely, the presence of anemia may ultimately lead to iron overload; for example, thalassemia, a common hereditary anemia worldwide, often requires transfusion, but long-term transfusions cause iron accumulation that leads to organ damage and other poor outcomes. On the other hand, there is a possibility that iron overload itself can cause anemia; iron chelation therapy for the post-transfusion iron overload observed in myelodysplastic syndrome or aplastic anemia improves dependency on transfusions in some cases. These observations reflect the extremely close relationship between anemias and iron metabolism.

  18. Iron chelation therapy in thalassemia syndromes.

    PubMed

    Cianciulli, Paolo

    2009-12-29

    Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron) the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients.

  19. Iron Chelation Therapy in Thalassemia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Cianciulli, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Transfusional hemosiderosis is a frequent complication in patients with transfusion dependent chronic diseases such as thalassemias and severe type of sickle cell diseases. As there are no physiological mechanisms to excrete the iron contained in transfused red cells (1 unit of blood contains approximately 200 mg of iron) the excess of iron is stored in various organs. Cardiomyopathy is the most severe complication covering more than 70% of the causes of death of thalassemic patients. Although the current reference standard iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) has been used clinically for over four decades, its effectiveness is limited by a demanding therapeutic regimen that leads to poor compliance. Despite poor compliance, because of the inconvenience of subcutaneous infusion, DFO improved considerably the survival and quality of life of patients with thalassemia. Deferiprone since 1998 and Deferasirox since 2005 were licensed for clinical use. The oral chelators have a better compliance because of oral use, a comparable efficacy to DFO in iron excretion and probably a better penetration to myocardial cells. Considerable increase in iron excretion was documented with combination therapy of DFO and Deferiprone. The proper use of the three chelators will improve the prevention and treatment of iron overload, it will reduce complications, and improve survival and quality of life of transfused patients. PMID:21415999

  20. Pharmacology of iron transport.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Shaina L; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors.

  1. Pharmacology of Iron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Shaina L.; Krishnamurthy, Divya; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating the molecular basis for the regulation of iron uptake, storage, and distribution is necessary to understand iron homeostasis. Pharmacological tools are emerging to identify and distinguish among different iron transport pathways. Stimulatory or inhibitory small molecules with effects on iron uptake can help characterize the mechanistic elements of iron transport and the roles of the transporters involved in these processes. In particular, iron chelators can serve as potential pharmacological tools to alleviate diseases of iron overload. This review focuses on the pharmacology of iron transport, introducing iron transport membrane proteins and known inhibitors. PMID:23020294

  2. The rat adequately reflects human responses to exercise in blood biochemical profile: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Goutianos, Georgios; Tzioura, Aikaterini; Kyparos, Antonios; Paschalis, Vassilis; Margaritelis, Nikos V; Veskoukis, Aristidis S; Zafeiridis, Andreas; Dipla, Konstantina; Nikolaidis, Michalis G; Vrabas, Ioannis S

    2015-01-01

    Animal models are widely used in biology and the findings of animal research are traditionally projected to humans. However, recent publications have raised concerns with regard to what extent animals and humans respond similar to physiological stimuli. Original data on direct in vivo comparison between animals and humans are scarce and no study has addressed this issue after exercise. We aimed to compare side by side in the same experimental setup rat and human responses to an acute exercise bout of matched intensity and duration. Rats and humans ran on a treadmill at 86% of maximal velocity until exhaustion. Pre and post exercise we measured 30 blood chemistry parameters, which evaluate iron status, lipid profile, glucose regulation, protein metabolism, liver, and renal function. ANOVA indicated that almost all biochemical parameters followed a similar alteration pattern post exercise in rats and humans. In fact, there were only 2/30 significant species × exercise interactions (in testosterone and globulins), indicating different responses to exercise between rats and humans. On the contrary, the main effect of exercise was significant in 15/30 parameters and marginally nonsignificant in other two parameters (copper, P = 0.060 and apolipoprotein B, P = 0.058). Our major finding is that the rat adequately mimics human responses to exercise in those basic blood biochemical parameters reported here. The physiological resemblance of rat and human blood responses after exercise to exhaustion on a treadmill indicates that the use of blood chemistry in rats for exercise physiology research is justified. PMID:25677548

  3. Performance of a metal hydride store on the "Ross Barlow" hydrogen powered canal boat.

    PubMed

    Bevan, A I; Züttel, A; Book, D; Harris, I R

    2011-01-01

    This project involved the conversion of a British Waterways maintenance craft to a canal boat, powered by a combination of a solid-state hydrogen store, Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, lead-acid battery pack and a high-efficiency, permanent magnet (NdFeB) electric motor. These replaced the conventional diesel engine thus eliminating water, noise, local and general atmospheric pollution. The "Protium" project applies modern technologies to a traditional mode of transportation. The TiMn2-based metal hydride store exhibited excellent performance as an effective means of storing 4 kg of hydrogen with a suitable desorption flow rate and temperature adequate for the operation of a 1 kW PEM fuel cell in a water-based environment.

  4. Iron supplementation in athletes--first do no harm.

    PubMed

    Zoller, Heinz; Vogel, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Although it generally does not improve performance, iron is often used by elite athletes. The physiologic changes induced by exercise can mimic iron deficiency and decrease hemoglobin and ferritin concentrations. Determination of serum transferrin receptor concentrations may identify true iron deficiency, which occurs particularly in young athletes. In contrast, increased iron stores in the body are a frequent finding in elite athletes who have used long-term iron supplementation. Elite runners have increased intestinal blood loss, but this usually can be compensated by enhanced absorption of dietary iron. The combination of exercise-induced hemolysis with enhanced intestinal blood loss in various endurance sports leads to severe abnormalities of routine tests, and extreme physical activity may be responsible for positive fecal occult blood determinations. Indiscriminate iron supplementation carries the risk of inducing hemochromatosis in individuals homozygous for the widespread C282Y allele of the HFE gene. This polymorphism is common and can be found in about 1% of individuals of Northern European descent; moreover, iron supplementation can modify the presentation of important underlying diseases such as celiac disease or colon carcinoma. In conclusion, iron supplements should be prescribed for athletes with iron-deficiency anemia and carefully monitored if given for prophylaxis; unless a therapeutic response occurs, investigations to establish the cause of iron deficiency should be initiated.

  5. Intestinal ferritin H is required for an accurate control of iron absorption.

    PubMed

    Vanoaica, Liviu; Darshan, Deepak; Richman, Larry; Schümann, Klaus; Kühn, Lukas C

    2010-09-08

    To maintain appropriate body iron levels, iron absorption by the proximal duodenum is thought to be controlled by hepcidin, a polypeptide secreted by hepatocytes in response to high serum iron. Hepcidin limits basolateral iron efflux from the duodenal epithelium by binding and downregulating the intestinal iron exporter ferroportin. Here, we found that mice with an intestinal ferritin H gene deletion show increased body iron stores and transferrin saturation. As expected for iron-loaded animals, the ferritin H-deleted mice showed induced liver hepcidin mRNA levels and reduced duodenal expression of DMT1 and DcytB mRNA. In spite of these feedback controls, intestinal ferroportin protein and (59)Fe absorption were increased more than 2-fold in the deleted mice. Our results demonstrate that hepcidin-mediated regulation alone is insufficient to restrict iron absorption and that intestinal ferritin H is also required to limit iron efflux from intestinal cells.

  6. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E

    2016-11-18

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  7. Morphology of the ferritin iron core by aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Nan; Dowle, Miriam; Horniblow, Richard D.; Tselepis, Chris; Palmer, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    As the major iron storage protein, ferritin stores and releases iron for maintaining the balance of iron in fauna, flora, and bacteria. We present an investigation of the morphology and iron loading of ferritin (from equine spleen) using aberration-corrected high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Atom counting method, with size selected Au clusters as mass standards, was employed to determine the number of iron atoms in the nanoparticle core of each ferritin protein. Quantitative analysis shows that the nuclearity of iron atoms in the mineral core varies from a few hundred iron atoms to around 5000 atoms. Moreover, a relationship between the iron loading and iron core morphology is established, in which mineral core nucleates from a single nanoparticle, then grows along the protein shell before finally forming either a solid or hollow core structure.

  8. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  9. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  10. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  11. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  12. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  13. Influence of cross-rolling on the micro-texture and biodegradation of pure iron as biodegradable material for medical implants.

    PubMed

    Obayi, Camillus Sunday; Tolouei, Ranna; Paternoster, Carlo; Turgeon, Stephane; Okorie, Boniface Adeleh; Obikwelu, Daniel Oray; Cassar, Glenn; Buhagiar, Joseph; Mantovani, Diego

    2015-04-01

    Iron-based biodegradable metals have been shown to present high potential in cardiac, vascular, orthopaedic and dental in adults, as well as paediatric, applications. These require suitable mechanical properties, adequate biocompatibility while guaranteeing a low toxicity of degradation products. For example, in cardiac applications, stents need to be made by homogeneous and isotropic materials in order to prevent sudden failures which would impair the deployment site. Besides, the presence of precipitates and pores, chemical inhomogeneity or other anisotropic microstructural defects may trigger stress concentration phenomena responsible for the early collapse of the device. Metal manufacturing processes play a fundamental role towards the final microstructure and mechanical properties of the materials. The present work assesses the effect of mode of rolling on the micro-texture evolution, mechanical properties and biodegradation behaviour of polycrystalline pure iron. Results indicated that cross-rolled samples recrystallized with lower rates than the straight-rolled ones due to a reduction in dislocation density content and an increase in intensity of {100} crystallographic plane which stores less energy of deformation responsible for primary recrystallization. The degradation resulted to be more uniform for cross-rolled samples, while the corrosion rates of cross-rolled and straight-rolled samples did not show relevant differences in simulated body solution. Finally, this work shows that an adequate compromise between biodegradation rate, strength and ductility could be achieved by modulating the deformation mode during cold rolling.

  14. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... get iron by eating foods like meat and dark green leafy vegetables. Iron is also added to ... tofu dried beans and peas dried fruits leafy dark green vegetables iron-fortified breakfast cereals, breads, and ...

  15. Iron metabolism and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Papanikolaou, G.; Pantopoulos, K. . E-mail: kostas.pantopoulos@mcgill.ca

    2005-01-15

    Iron is an essential nutrient with limited bioavailability. When present in excess, iron poses a threat to cells and tissues, and therefore iron homeostasis has to be tightly controlled. Iron's toxicity is largely based on its ability to catalyze the generation of radicals, which attack and damage cellular macromolecules and promote cell death and tissue injury. This is lucidly illustrated in diseases of iron overload, such as hereditary hemochromatosis or transfusional siderosis, where excessive iron accumulation results in tissue damage and organ failure. Pathological iron accumulation in the liver has also been linked to the development of hepatocellular cancer. Here we provide a background on the biology and toxicity of iron and the basic concepts of iron homeostasis at the cellular and systemic level. In addition, we provide an overview of the various disorders of iron overload, which are directly linked to iron's toxicity. Finally, we discuss the potential role of iron in malignant transformation and cancer.

  16. SOC and now also SIC: store-operated and store-inhibited channels.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Claudia; Vaca, Luis

    2011-10-01

    There is a specialized form of calcium influx that involves a close communication between endoplasmic reticulum and the channels at the plasma membrane. In one side store depletion activates channels known as store-operated channels (SOC), which are responsible of the well-studied store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). SOC comprises two different types of channels. Orai, which is exclusively activated by store depletion being the channel responsible of the calcium release-activated calcium current, and transient receptor potential canonical channel, which in contrast, is activated by store depletion only under specific conditions and carries nonselective cationic currents. On the other hand, it has been recently shown that store depletion also inhibits calcium channels. The first member identified, of what we named as store-inhibited channels (SIC), is the L-type voltage-gated calcium channel. Stores control both SOC and SIC by means of the multifunctional protein STIM1. The identification of SOC and SIC opens a new scenario for the role of store depletion in the modulation of different calcium entry pathways, which may satisfy different cellular processes.

  17. Ferritin trends do not predict changes in total body iron in patients with transfusional iron overload.

    PubMed

    Puliyel, Mammen; Sposto, Richard; Berdoukas, Vasilios A; Hofstra, Thomas C; Nord, Anne; Carson, Susan; Wood, John; Coates, Thomas D

    2014-04-01

    Ferritin levels and trends are widely used to manage iron overload and assess the efficacy of prescribed iron chelation in patients with transfusional iron loading. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 134 patients with transfusion-dependent anemia, over a period of up to 9 years. To determine whether the trends in ferritin adequately reflect the changes in total body iron, changes in ferritin between consecutive liver iron measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were compared to changes in liver iron concentrations (LIC), a measure of total body iron. The time period between two consecutive LIC measurements was defined as a segment. Trends in ferritin were considered to predict the change in LIC within a segment if the change in one parameter was less than twofold that of the other, and was in the same direction. Using the exclusion criteria detailed in methods, the trends in ferritin were compared to changes in LIC in 358 segments. An agreement between ferritin trends and LIC changes was found in only 38% of the 358 segments examined. Furthermore, the change in ferritin was in opposite direction to that of LIC in 26% of the segments. Trends in ferritin were a worse predictor of changes in LIC in sickle cell disease than in thalassemia (P < 0.01). While ferritin is a convenient measure of iron status; ferritin trends were unable to predict changes in LIC in individual patients. Ferritin trends need to be interpreted with caution and confirmed by direct measurement of LIC.

  18. Red blood cell and iron metabolism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight anemia is a widely recognized phenomenon in astronauts. Reduction in circulating red blood cells and plasma volume results in a 10% to 15% decrement in circulatory volume. This effect appears to be a normal physiologic adaptation to weightlessness and results from the removal of newly released blood cells from the circulation. Iron availability increases, and (in the few subjects studied) iron stores increase during long-duration space flight. The consequences of these changes are not fully understood.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... refractory iron deficiency anemia iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia is one of many types of anemia , which ...

  20. Parenteral iron therapy options.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, Scott B; Rodgers, George M

    2004-05-01

    Parenteral iron therapy is occasionally necessary for patients intolerant or unresponsive to oral iron therapy, for receiving recombinant erythropoietin therapy, or for use in treating functional iron deficiency. There are now three parenteral iron products available: iron dextran, ferric gluconate, and iron sucrose. We summarize the advantages and disadvantages of each product, including risk of anaphylaxis and hypersensitivity, dosage regimens, and costs. The increased availability of multiple parenteral iron preparations should decrease the need to use red cell transfusions in patients with iron-deficiency anemia.

  1. Cascade models of synaptically stored memories.

    PubMed

    Fusi, Stefano; Drew, Patrick J; Abbott, L F

    2005-02-17

    Storing memories of ongoing, everyday experiences requires a high degree of plasticity, but retaining these memories demands protection against changes induced by further activity and experience. Models in which memories are stored through switch-like transitions in synaptic efficacy are good at storing but bad at retaining memories if these transitions are likely, and they are poor at storage but good at retention if they are unlikely. We construct and study a model in which each synapse has a cascade of states with different levels of plasticity, connected by metaplastic transitions. This cascade model combines high levels of memory storage with long retention times and significantly outperforms alternative models. As a result, we suggest that memory storage requires synapses with multiple states exhibiting dynamics over a wide range of timescales, and we suggest experimental tests of this hypothesis.

  2. Storing data encoded DNA in living organisms

    DOEpatents

    Wong; Pak C. , Wong; Kwong K. , Foote; Harlan P.

    2006-06-06

    Current technologies allow the generation of artificial DNA molecules and/or the ability to alter the DNA sequences of existing DNA molecules. With a careful coding scheme and arrangement, it is possible to encode important information as an artificial DNA strand and store it in a living host safely and permanently. This inventive technology can be used to identify origins and protect R&D investments. It can also be used in environmental research to track generations of organisms and observe the ecological impact of pollutants. Today, there are microorganisms that can survive under extreme conditions. As well, it is advantageous to consider multicellular organisms as hosts for stored information. These living organisms can provide as memory housing and protection for stored data or information. The present invention provides well for data storage in a living organism wherein at least one DNA sequence is encoded to represent data and incorporated into a living organism.

  3. System for handling and storing radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, John K.; Lindemann, Paul E.

    1984-01-01

    A system and method for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

  4. Storing Fluorine In Graphitelike Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1995-01-01

    Fluorine stored in graphite or graphitelike carbon fibers for later release and/or use in chemical reactions. Storage in carbon fibers eliminates difficulty and risk of using high-pressure tanks and pipes to hold corrosive gas. Storage in carbon fibers makes fluorine more readily accessible than does storage as constituent of metal fluoride. Carbon fibers heated to release stored fluorine, which draws away to vessel where reacts with material to be fluorinated, possibly at temperature other than release temperature. Alternatively, material to be fluorinated mixed or otherwise placed in contact with fibers and entire mass heated to or beyond release temperature.

  5. System for handling and storing radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, J.K.; Lindemann, P.E.

    1982-07-19

    A system and method are claimed for handling and storing spent reactor fuel and other solid radioactive waste, including canisters to contain the elements of solid waste, storage racks to hold a plurality of such canisters, storage bays to store these racks in isolation by means of shielded doors in the bays. This system also includes means for remotely positioning the racks in the bays and an access tunnel within which the remotely operated means is located to position a rack in a selected bay. The modular type of these bays will facilitate the construction of additional bays and access tunnel extension.

  6. Storing Astronomical Information on the Romanian Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magda; Mioc, Vasile

    The Romanian astronomy has a more than 2000-year old tradition which is however too little known abroad. The first known archive of astronomical information is the Dacian sanctuary at Sarmizegetusa Regia very similar to that of Stonehenge. After a gap of more than 1000 years sources of astronomical information became to be recovered. They consist mainly of records of astronomical events seen on the Romanian territory. The most safe places to store these genuine archives were the monasteries. We present a classification of the manners of storing astronomical information along with characteristic examples.

  7. Lightweight Tanks for Storing Liquefied Natural Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLay, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled, jacketed aluminum tanks have been conceived for storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in LNG-fueled motor vehicles. Heretofore, doublewall steel tanks with vacuum between the inner and outer walls have been used for storing LNG. In comparison with the vacuum- insulated steel tanks, the jacketed aluminum tanks weigh less and can be manufactured at lower cost. Costs of using the jacketed aluminum tanks are further reduced in that there is no need for the vacuum pumps heretofore needed to maintain vacuum in the vacuum-insulated tanks.

  8. Spin flipping a stored polarized proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caussyn, D. D.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Ellison, T. J.; Lee, S. Y.; Rinckel, T.; Schwandt, P.; Sperisen, F.; Stephenson, E. J.; von Przewoski, B.; Blinov, B. B.; Chu, C. M.; Courant, E. D.; Crandell, D. A.; Kaufman, W. A.; Krisch, A. D.; Nurushev, T. S.; Phelps, R. A.; Ratner, L. G.; Wong, V. K.; Ohmori, C.

    1994-11-01

    We recently studied the spin flipping of a vertically polarized, stored 139-MeV proton beam. To flip the spin, we induced an rf depolarizing resonance by sweeping our rf solenoid magnet's frequency through the resonance frequency. With multiple spin flips, we found a polarization loss of 0.0000+/-0.0005 per spin flip under the best conditions; this loss increased significantly for small changes in the conditions. Minimizing the depolarization during each spin flip is especially important because frequent spin flipping could significantly reduce the systematic errors in stored polarized-beam experiments.

  9. Iron status biomarkers in iron deficient women consuming oily fish versus red meat diet.

    PubMed

    Navas-Carretero, S; Pérez-Granados, A M; Schoppen, S; Sarria, B; Carbajal, A; Vaquero, M P

    2009-06-01

    Specific recommendations for anemic individuals consist in increasing red meat intake, but the population at large is advised to reduce consumption of red meat and increase that of fish, in order to prevent the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This study aimed to determine the effects of consuming an oily fish compared to a red meat diet on iron status in women with low iron stores. The study was designed attending the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement guidelines. It was a randomised crossover dietary intervention study of two 8-week periods. Twenty-five young women with low iron stores completed the study. Two diets containing a total of 8 portions of fish, meat and poultry per week were designed differing only in their oily fish or red meat content (5 portions per week). At the beginning and the end of each period blood samples were taken and hemoglobin, hematocrit, serum ferritin, serum iron, serum transferrin, serum transferrin receptor-2 and the Zn-protoporphyrin/free-protoporphyrin ratio were determined. Food intake and body weight were monitored. During the oily fish diet, PUFA intake was significantly higher (p=0.010) and iron intake lower (mean+/-SD, 11.5+/-3.4 mg/day vs. 13.9+/-0.1 mg/day, p=0.008), both diets providing lower mean daily iron intake than recommended for menstruating women. Although there were no significant differences after 16 weeks, serum ferritin moderately decreased and soluble transferrin receptor increased with the oily fish, while changes with the red meat diet were the opposite. In conclusion, an oily fish diet compared to a red meat diet does not decrease iron status after 8 weeks in iron deficient women.

  10. Iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-03-05

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the "atypical" microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field.

  11. Iron-Refractory Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz Keskin, Ebru; Yenicesu, İdil

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential for life because it is indispensable for several biological reactions, such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. Over the past few years, our understanding of iron metabolism and its regulation has changed dramatically. New disorders of iron metabolism have emerged, and the role of iron as a cofactor in other disorders has begun to be recognized. The study of genetic conditions such as hemochromatosis and iron-refractory iron deficiency anemia (IRIDA) has provided crucial insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis. In the future, these advances may be exploited to improve treatment of both genetic and acquired iron disorders. IRIDA is caused by mutations in TMPRSS6, the gene encoding matriptase-2, which downregulates hepcidin expression under conditions of iron deficiency. The typical features of this disorder are hypochromic, microcytic anemia with a very low mean corpuscular volume of erythrocytes, low transferrin saturation, no (or inadequate) response to oral iron, and only a partial response to parenteral iron. In contrast to classic iron deficiency anemia, serum ferritin levels are usually low-normal, and serum or urinary hepcidin levels are inappropriately high for the degree of anemia. Although the number of cases reported thus far in the literature does not exceed 100, this disorder is considered the most common of the “atypical” microcytic anemias. The aim of this review is to share the current knowledge on IRIDA and increase awareness in this field. PMID:25805669

  12. Effects of Radiation and a High Iron Load on Bone Mineral Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, E.; Morgan, J. L. L.; Zwart, S. R.; Gonzales, E.; Camp, K.; Smith, S. M.; Bloomfield, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Astronauts on long duration space flight missions to the moon or mars are exposed to radiation and have increase iron (Fe) stores, both of which can independently induce oxidative stress and may exacerbate bone mass loss and strength. We hypothesize a high Fe diet and a fractionated gamma radiation exposure would increase oxidative stress and lower bone mass. Three mo-old, SD rats (n=32) were randomized to receive an adequate Fe diet (45 mg Fe/kg diet) or a high Fe diet (650 mg Fe/kg diet) for 4 wks and either a cumulative 3 Gy dose (fractionated 8 x 0.375 Gy) of gamma radiation (Cs-137) or sham exposure starting on day 14. Elisa kit assessed serum catalase, clinical analyzer assessed serum Fe status and ex vivo pQCT scans measured bone parameters in the proximal/midshaft tibia and femoral neck. Mechanical strength was assessed by 3-pt bending and femoral neck test. There is a significant decrease in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) from radiation (p less than 0.05) and a trend in diet (p=0.05) at the proximal tibia. There is a significant interaction in cortical BMD from the combined treatments at the midshaft tibia (p less than 0.05). There is a trending decrease in total BMD from diet (p=0.07) at the femoral neck. In addition, high serum Fe was correlated to low trabecular BMD (p less than 0.05) and high serum catalase was correlated to low BMD at all 3 bone sites (p less than 0.05). There was no difference in the max load of the tibia or femoral neck. Radiation and a high iron diet increases iron status and catalase in the serum and decreases BMD.

  13. Effects of High Dietary HEME Iron and Radiation on Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Brown, A. K.; Platts, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The radiation related health risks to astronauts is of particular concern to NASA. Data support that exposure to radiation is associated with a number of disorders including a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases. Independent of radiation, altered nutrient status (e.g. high dietary iron) also increases ones risk for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether exposure to radiation in combination with high dietary iron further increases ones cardiovascular risk. The intent of our proposal is to generate compulsory data examining the combined effect of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury to address HRP risks: 1) Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition; 2) Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems; and 3) Risk of Degenerative Tissue or other Health Effects from Space Radiation. Towards our goal we propose two distinct pilot studies using the following specific aims: Vascular Aim 1: To determine the short-term consequences of the independent and combined effects of exposure to gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on measures of endothelial function and cell viability and integrity. We hypothesize that animals that have high body iron stores and are exposed to gamma radiation will show a greater reduction in endothelial dependent nitric oxid production and larger pathological changes in endothelial integrity than animals that have only 1 of those treatments (either high iron stores or exposure to gamma radiation). Vascular Aim 2: Identify and compare the effects of gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on the genetic and epigenetic regulation of proteins associated with endothelial cell function. We hypothesize that modifications of epigenetic control and posttranslational expression of proteins associated with endothelial cell function will be differentially altered in rats with high body iron stores and exposed to gamma radiation compared to rats with only 1 type of treatment. Cardiac Aim 1: To determine the

  14. Monocyte transferrin-iron uptake in hereditary hemochromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sizemore, D.J.; Bassett, M.L.

    1984-05-01

    Transferrin-iron uptake by peripheral blood monocytes was studied in vitro to test the hypothesis that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hereditary hemochromatosis results from a defect in uptake of iron from transferrin. Monocytes from nine control subjects and 17 patients with hemochromatosis were cultured in the presence of 59Fe-labelled human transferrin. There was no difference in 59Fe uptake between monocytes from control subjects and monocytes from patients with hemochromatosis who had been treated by phlebotomy and who had normal body iron stores. However, 59Fe uptake by monocytes from iron-loaded patients with hemochromatosis was significantly reduced compared with either control subjects or treated hemochromatosis patients. It is likely that this was a secondary effect of iron loading since iron uptake by monocytes from treated hemochromatosis patients was normal. Assuming that monocytes in culture reflect mononuclear phagocyte iron metabolism in vivo, this study suggests that the relative paucity of mononuclear phagocyte iron loading in hemochromatosis is not related to an abnormality in transferrin-iron uptake by these cells.

  15. Maximizing the erythropoietin response: iron strategies.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Mayoor V; Nayak, Aditi; Sridhar, G; Subhramanyam, S V; Nayak, K S

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is a significant cause of morbidity and lowers the quality of life of patients suffering from chronic kidney disease (CKD). Iron deficiency is the most important cause of erythropoietin (EPO) hyporesponsiveness in CKD. EPO administration significantly increases the costs of CKD management. It follows that paramount importance must be given to enhancing responsiveness to EPO thereby ensuring that the patient derives maximum benefit. Intravenous iron (IVI) administration has been used for decades to replenish body iron stores. Multiple preparations of Iron are available in the market. However, IVI administration is fraught with dangers like adverse drug reactions, susceptibility to infection, and, as recently postulated, direct cellular toxicity. Traditional approaches to IVI administration have focused on multiple administrations of lower doses for fear of adverse reactions. However, recent studies have demonstrated that higher doses can be safely administered in a single infusion, thereby reducing hospitalization costs and patient inconvenience. Newer preparations of IVI are relatively safer, easier to administer and efficacious. Preparations like Iron sucrose, ferumoxytol, ferric carboxymaltose and iron isomaltoside do not require test doses and allow higher doses to be administered at a time with cost and effect benefits.

  16. A four-helix bundle stores copper for methane oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Vita, Nicolas; Platsaki, Semeli; Baslé, Arnaud; Allen, Stephen J.; Paterson, Neil G.; Crombie, Andrew T.; Murrell, J. Colin; Waldron, Kevin J.; Dennison, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Methane-oxidising bacteria (methanotrophs) require large quantities of copper for the membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO)1,2. Certain methanotrophs are also able to switch to using the iron-containing soluble MMO (sMMO) to catalyse methane oxidation, with this switchover regulated by copper3,4. MMOs are Nature’s primary biological mechanism for suppressing atmospheric levels of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Furthermore, methanotrophs and MMOs have enormous potential in bioremediation and for biotransformations producing bulk and fine chemicals, and in bioenergy, particularly considering increased methane availability from renewable sources and hydraulic fracturing of shale rock5,6. We have discovered and characterised a novel copper storage protein (Csp1) from the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b that is exported from the cytosol, and stores copper for pMMO. Csp1 is a tetramer of 4-helix bundles with each monomer binding up to 13 Cu(I) ions in a previously unseen manner via mainly Cys residues that point into the core of the bundle. Csp1 is the first example of a protein that stores a metal within an established protein-folding motif. This work provides a detailed insight into how methanotrophs accumulate copper for the oxidation of methane. Understanding this process is essential if the wide-ranging biotechnological applications of methanotrophs are to be realised. Cytosolic homologues of Csp1 are present in diverse bacteria thus challenging the dogma that such organisms do not use copper in this location. PMID:26308900

  17. Design of Chemical Stores--Or Not!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggott, Andy

    2010-01-01

    When science departments are designed for new builds, or are to be refurbished or moved to other parts of the school, design of preparation areas should be a major feature. It is vital that the brief contains everything that is needed including, in particular, a chemical store. But no matter how well a brief is specified, the people who actually…

  18. Fuels and Lubricants. Selecting and Storing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parady, W. Harold; Colvin, Thomas S.

    The manual presents basic information for the person who plans to operate or service tractors, trucks, industrial engines, and automobiles. It tells how to select the proper fuels and lubricants and how to store them properly. Although there are no prerequisites to the study of the text, a general knowledge of engines and mobile-type vehicles is…

  19. Method for storing nuclear fuel in respositories

    DOEpatents

    Schweitzer, D.G.; Sastre, C.

    A method for storing radioactive spent fuel in repositories containing polyphenyl or silicon oil as the storage medium is disclosed. Polyphenyls and silicon oils are non-corrosive and are not subject to radiation damage. Thus, storage periods of up to 100 years are possible.

  20. 7 CFR 1170.6 - Store.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Store. 1170.6 Section 1170.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND... means to place nonfat dry milk or dry whey in a manufacturing plant, packaging plant, distribution...

  1. 7 CFR 1170.6 - Store.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Store. 1170.6 Section 1170.6 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... means to place nonfat dry milk or dry whey in a manufacturing plant, packaging plant, distribution...

  2. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2013-03-27

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  3. 19 CFR 122.47 - Stores list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stores list. 122.47 Section 122.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for...

  4. Overview of North American stored product research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major locations for stored product research in North America are in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and Manhattan, Kansas, USA. Recent personnel changes and research areas are reviewed. One of the pressing research areas in the U.S. is reducing the need for fumigations in flour mills and evaluating alte...

  5. 19 CFR 122.47 - Stores list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Stores list. 122.47 Section 122.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for...

  6. 19 CFR 122.47 - Stores list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Stores list. 122.47 Section 122.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for...

  7. 19 CFR 122.47 - Stores list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Stores list. 122.47 Section 122.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for...

  8. 19 CFR 122.47 - Stores list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Stores list. 122.47 Section 122.47 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for...

  9. Storing Data and Video on One Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, J. H.; Cater, J. P.

    1985-01-01

    Microprocessor-based system originally developed for anthropometric research merges digital data with video images for storage on video cassette recorder. Combined signals later retrieved and displayed simultaneously on television monitor. System also extracts digital portion of stored information and transfers it to solid-state memory.

  10. The Changing Face of the College Store

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halligan, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Increased competition from Internet merchants, coupled with the swelling popularity of electronic books and skyrocketing textbook prices, is forcing the nation's college stores to get creative, find new ways to boost revenues, and drive sales of books and other merchandise to students and faculty. To make up for lost revenue as a result of…

  11. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Lorenzo, D.K.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    1980-04-23

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  12. Canister arrangement for storing radioactive waste

    DOEpatents

    Lorenzo, Donald K.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    The subject invention relates to a canister arrangement for jointly storing high level radioactive chemical waste and metallic waste resulting from the reprocessing of nuclear reactor fuel elements. A cylindrical steel canister is provided with an elongated centrally disposed billet of the metallic waste and the chemical waste in vitreous form is disposed in the annulus surrounding the billet.

  13. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    ScienceCinema

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2016-07-12

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  14. Walmart Experimental Store Performance Stories: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deru, M.; Kozubal, E.; Norton, P.

    2010-08-01

    Walmart opened two experimental stores--one in Colorado and one in Texas--in 2005 to serve as test beds for several advanced building systems. Each embodied more than 50 experiments covering materials, water systems, energy systems, and renewable energy production. Walmart worked for three years with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the Colorado Store and Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Texas store to monitor, analyze, and report on their performance. HVAC experiments included waste oil boilers, a microturbine/absorption chiller combined heat and power system, evaporative cooling, and a transpired solar collector. The refrigeration systems integrated a medium-temperature secondary loop, evaporatively cooled condenser, doors on medium-temperature cases, and light-emitting diodes on cases. Experiments in the lighting systems included a redesigned roof for clerestory daylighting and T-5 fluorescent lamps. Three photovoltaic systems for a total of 135 kW and a 50-kW wind turbine are also included. The energy system performance was compared to the measured performance of a prototypical Walmart store and to other benchmarks.

  15. Key Findings of AAP Store Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melendes, Bob; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Results of the Association of American Publishers "College Bookstore Marketing Survey" in the fall of 1976 are summarized. The intent was to improve college textbook publisher services to college stores in the areas of order fulfillment, publication scheduling, print quantities, shipping, billing, and processing of returns. (LBH)

  16. Charge and Energy Stored in a Capacitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2012-01-01

    Using a data-acquisition system, the charge and energy stored in a capacitor are measured and displayed during the charging/discharging process. The experiment is usable as a laboratory work and/or a lecture demonstration. (Contains 3 figures.)

  17. Determination of serum iron and the total iron-binding capacity with a new chromogen, 4-aminophenazone.

    PubMed

    Marsili, G; Tacconi, R; Cipriani, S

    1980-01-01

    A colorimetric procedure is described for the determination of serum iron and TIBC, utilizing the action of the iron on the oxidation reaction of 4-aminophenazone with H2O2. The chromogen oxidized has maximum absorption at 540 nm. The method is interesting because it has important advantages over other methods: no deproteinization is needed, microsamples are used, it is simple, gives adequate precision, and the results correlate well with those obtained with the standard bathophenanthroline method.

  18. Clinical efficacy of two forms of intravenous iron--saccharated ferric oxide and cideferron--for iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Araki, T; Takaai, M; Miyazaki, A; Ohshima, S; Shibamiya, T; Nakamura, T; Yamamoto, K

    2012-12-01

    Over 90% of iron deficiency anemia cases are due to iron deficiency associated with depletion of stored iron or inadequate intake. Parenteral iron supplementation is an important part of the management of anemia, and some kinds of intravenous iron are used. However, few studies have evaluated the clinical efficacy of these drugs. The purpose of this study was to compare and assess the clinical efficacy of two types of intravenous iron injection, saccharated ferric oxide (SFO) and cideferron (CF). Medical records were obtained for 91 unrelated Japanese anemia patients treated with SFO (n = 37) or CF (n = 54) from May 2005 to May 2010 at Gunma University Hospital. Patients treated with blood transfusion, erythropoietin or oral iron were excluded. Hemoglobin (Hb) values measured on day 0, 7 and 14 were used to assess the efficacy of intravenous irons. A significant increase was observed in the mean Hb value by day 14 of administration in both the CF group and SFO group, and the mean Hb increase due to administration of CF for 7 days was comparable to that of SFO for 14 days. Age and sex did not affect improvement of Hb value. CF is fast acting and highly effective compared with SFO for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The use of CF may shorten a therapeutic period for iron deficiency anemia, and CF may be feasible for reducing the hospitalization period.

  19. Associations between dietary iron and zinc intakes, and between biochemical iron and zinc status in women.

    PubMed

    Lim, Karen; Booth, Alison; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A; Gibson, Rosalind S; Bailey, Karl B; Irving, David; Nowson, Caryl; Riddell, Lynn

    2015-04-20

    Iron and zinc are found in similar foods and absorption of both may be affected by food compounds, thus biochemical iron and zinc status may be related. This cross-sectional study aimed to: (1) describe dietary intakes and biochemical status of iron and zinc; (2) investigate associations between dietary iron and zinc intakes; and (3) investigate associations between biochemical iron and zinc status in a sample of premenopausal women aged 18-50 years who were recruited in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a 154-item food frequency questionnaire (n = 379). Iron status was assessed using serum ferritin and hemoglobin, zinc status using serum zinc (standardized to 08:00 collection), and presence of infection/inflammation using C-reactive protein (n = 326). Associations were explored using multiple regression and logistic regression. Mean (SD) iron and zinc intakes were 10.5 (3.5) mg/day and 9.3 (3.8) mg/day, respectively. Median (interquartile range) serum ferritin was 22 (12-38) μg/L and mean serum zinc concentrations (SD) were 12.6 (1.7) μmol/L in fasting samples and 11.8 (2.0) μmol/L in nonfasting samples. For each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron intake, zinc intake increased by 0.4 mg/day. Each 1 μmol/L increase in serum zinc corresponded to a 6% increase in serum ferritin, however women with low serum zinc concentration (AM fasting < 10.7 μmol/L; AM nonfasting < 10.1 μmol/L) were not at increased risk of depleted iron stores (serum ferritin <15 μg/L; p = 0.340). Positive associations were observed between dietary iron and zinc intakes, and between iron and zinc status, however interpreting serum ferritin concentrations was not a useful proxy for estimating the likelihood of low serum zinc concentrations and women with depleted iron stores were not at increased risk of impaired zinc status in this cohort.

  20. Associations between Dietary Iron and Zinc Intakes, and between Biochemical Iron and Zinc Status in Women

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Karen; Booth, Alison; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A.; Gibson, Rosalind S.; Bailey, Karl B.; Irving, David; Nowson, Caryl; Riddell, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Iron and zinc are found in similar foods and absorption of both may be affected by food compounds, thus biochemical iron and zinc status may be related. This cross-sectional study aimed to: (1) describe dietary intakes and biochemical status of iron and zinc; (2) investigate associations between dietary iron and zinc intakes; and (3) investigate associations between biochemical iron and zinc status in a sample of premenopausal women aged 18–50 years who were recruited in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. Usual dietary intakes were assessed using a 154-item food frequency questionnaire (n = 379). Iron status was assessed using serum ferritin and hemoglobin, zinc status using serum zinc (standardized to 08:00 collection), and presence of infection/inflammation using C-reactive protein (n = 326). Associations were explored using multiple regression and logistic regression. Mean (SD) iron and zinc intakes were 10.5 (3.5) mg/day and 9.3 (3.8) mg/day, respectively. Median (interquartile range) serum ferritin was 22 (12–38) μg/L and mean serum zinc concentrations (SD) were 12.6 (1.7) μmol/L in fasting samples and 11.8 (2.0) μmol/L in nonfasting samples. For each 1 mg/day increase in dietary iron intake, zinc intake increased by 0.4 mg/day. Each 1 μmol/L increase in serum zinc corresponded to a 6% increase in serum ferritin, however women with low serum zinc concentration (AM fasting < 10.7 μmol/L; AM nonfasting < 10.1 μmol/L) were not at increased risk of depleted iron stores (serum ferritin <15 μg/L; p = 0.340). Positive associations were observed between dietary iron and zinc intakes, and between iron and zinc status, however interpreting serum ferritin concentrations was not a useful proxy for estimating the likelihood of low serum zinc concentrations and women with depleted iron stores were not at increased risk of impaired zinc status in this cohort. PMID:25903453

  1. The Strategic Management of Store Brand Perceived Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Defeng

    Store brand plays a vital role in the success of retailers. Perceived quality is one of important factors influencing consumers' store brand purchase intention. Store brand perceived quality is lower compared with objective quality or national brand. For this end, the purpose of this article is to examine how to manage store brand perceived quality in strategic level. This article firstly discusses how consumers evaluate product quality, and the theoretical background of the reason that store brand perceived quality is lower from the view of cue related theories. Then, consumers' store brand quality evaluation is explored. Finally, this article presents several strategic tactics to increase store brand perceived quality. These tactics include choosing store's name as store brand name, making large advertising investment, improving store brand product package, and strengthening the relationship with store brand product suppliers.

  2. Proanthocyanidins inhibit iron absorption from soybean (Glycine max) seed ferritin in rats with iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Yun, Shaojun; Zhang, Tuo; Li, Meiliang; Chen, Bin; Zhao, Guanghua

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of proanthocyanidins (PAs) on iron uptake from soybean seed ferritin (SSF) crude by rats with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) for the first time. Six groups of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (n = 10) were used, which contain (1) SSF crude group; (2) SSF crude + PAs group; (3) PAs group; (4) FeSO(4) group; (5) iron deficiency control group; and (6) control group. The bioavailability of iron was examined by measuring hemoglobin (Hb) concentration value, red blood cell (RBC) numbers, and serum iron stores. After 8 weeks, Hb concentration was almost recovered to the normal level upon feeding SSF crude or FeSO(4) to rats. In contrast, Hb concentration was recovered to less extent when SSF crude plus PAs was used instead of SSF crude alone (P < 0.05). A similar profile was observed with these three sample groups when serum iron and RBC were used as parameters. All rats in PAs group died at the 8th week. Taken together, all these results demonstrated that PAs inhibited iron uptake of rats from SSF, and are toxic for rats with IDA.

  3. The Effect of Iron Fortification on Iron (Fe) Status and Inflammation: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jingqiu; Sun, Qianqian; Liu, Jinrong; Hu, Yanqi; Liu, Shanshan; Zhang, Jie; Sheng, Xiaoyang; Hambidge, K. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Iron deficiency (ID) is common in toddlers in developing countries. Iron fortified or meat-based complementary foods may be effective to prevent ID. Objective Our objective was to compare iron status at 18 months and growth from 6 to 18 months in rural poor toddlers fed 3 different complementary foods. Methods The study was nested within a larger trial in which 6-month-old infants were randomized to receive 50g/d meat (MG), an equi-caloric fortified cereal supplement (FG) or local cereal supplement (LG) for 1 year. Hb, sTfR, HsCRP, ferritin and AGP were measured in 410 blood samples collected by a random sampling (MG, 137; FG, 140; LG, 133); calprotectin was measured in feces. Body iron = -[log (sTfR ×1000/ferritin)-2.8229] /0.1207. ID = ferritin<12ug/L. Results The toddlers in FG had the significantly highest levels in serum ferritin and body iron (P = 0.043, 0.004), and the rates of both ID and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) were the lowest in FG (P = 0.010, 0.021). The rate of systemic inflammation in FG was 30.71%, which was the highest among three groups (P = 0.042). No intervention effects on either the rates of ID and IDA or iron stores (serum ferritin and body iron) were shown in MG. The change in length-for-age z scores (LAZ) from 6 to 18 months among three groups was significantly different (P = 0.021) and a smaller decrease of LAZ in MG and a larger decrease of LAZ in FG were observed. Conclusion Iron fortified cereal improved iron status of poor rural toddlers but was also associated with systemic inflammation which was likely to impair their growth. PMID:27923057

  4. Iron and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... sure to teach kids that iron is an important part of a healthy diet. Foods rich in iron include: beef, pork, poultry, and seafood tofu dried beans and peas dried fruits leafy dark green vegetables iron-fortified breakfast cereals, breads, and pastas (Note: Iron from animal ...

  5. Iron stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Erin L; Guerinot, Mary

    2002-07-30

    Although iron is an essential nutrient for plants, its accumulation within cells can be toxic. Plants, therefore, respond to both iron deficiency and iron excess by inducing expression of different gene sets. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of iron homeostasis in plants gained through functional genomic approaches

  6. Parenteral iron supplementation.

    PubMed

    Kumpf, V J

    1996-08-01

    Indications for the use of parenteral iron are limited to conditions in which the oral supplementation of iron is not possible or fails. An overview of iron balance and iron requirements is presented to describe situations in which iron supplementation may be required. When parenteral iron supplementation is required, careful attention to proper dosing and administration is necessary to optimize efficacy and safety. The purpose of this article is to review the literature regarding the clinical use of parenteral iron therapy and provide guidelines on dosing and administration. Methods of iron dextran administration, including the IV and intramuscular injection of undiluted drug and total dose infusion, are compared. Complications associated with the use of parenteral iron are also be reviewed. Finally, the use of iron supplementation in patients receiving parenteral nutrition care explored.

  7. The Organization of Controller Motifs Leading to Robust Plant Iron Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, Oleg; Selstø, Christina Helen; Thorsen, Kristian; Xu, Xiang Ming; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element needed by all organisms for growth and development. Because iron becomes toxic at higher concentrations iron is under homeostatic control. Plants face also the problem that iron in the soil is tightly bound to oxygen and difficult to access. Plants have therefore developed special mechanisms for iron uptake and regulation. During the last years key components of plant iron regulation have been identified. How these components integrate and maintain robust iron homeostasis is presently not well understood. Here we use a computational approach to identify mechanisms for robust iron homeostasis in non-graminaceous plants. In comparison with experimental results certain control arrangements can be eliminated, among them that iron homeostasis is solely based on an iron-dependent degradation of the transporter IRT1. Recent IRT1 overexpression experiments suggested that IRT1-degradation is iron-independent. This suggestion appears to be misleading. We show that iron signaling pathways under IRT1 overexpression conditions become saturated, leading to a breakdown in iron regulation and to the observed iron-independent degradation of IRT1. A model, which complies with experimental data places the regulation of cytosolic iron at the transcript level of the transcription factor FIT. Including the experimental observation that FIT induces inhibition of IRT1 turnover we found a significant improvement in the system's response time, suggesting a functional role for the FIT-mediated inhibition of IRT1 degradation. By combining iron uptake with storage and remobilization mechanisms a model is obtained which in a concerted manner integrates iron uptake, storage and remobilization. In agreement with experiments the model does not store iron during its high-affinity uptake. As an iron biofortification approach we discuss the possibility how iron can be accumulated even during high-affinity uptake.

  8. The Organization of Controller Motifs Leading to Robust Plant Iron Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Oleg; Selstø, Christina Helen; Thorsen, Kristian; Xu, Xiang Ming; Drengstig, Tormod; Ruoff, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential element needed by all organisms for growth and development. Because iron becomes toxic at higher concentrations iron is under homeostatic control. Plants face also the problem that iron in the soil is tightly bound to oxygen and difficult to access. Plants have therefore developed special mechanisms for iron uptake and regulation. During the last years key components of plant iron regulation have been identified. How these components integrate and maintain robust iron homeostasis is presently not well understood. Here we use a computational approach to identify mechanisms for robust iron homeostasis in non-graminaceous plants. In comparison with experimental results certain control arrangements can be eliminated, among them that iron homeostasis is solely based on an iron-dependent degradation of the transporter IRT1. Recent IRT1 overexpression experiments suggested that IRT1-degradation is iron-independent. This suggestion appears to be misleading. We show that iron signaling pathways under IRT1 overexpression conditions become saturated, leading to a breakdown in iron regulation and to the observed iron-independent degradation of IRT1. A model, which complies with experimental data places the regulation of cytosolic iron at the transcript level of the transcription factor FIT. Including the experimental observation that FIT induces inhibition of IRT1 turnover we found a significant improvement in the system’s response time, suggesting a functional role for the FIT-mediated inhibition of IRT1 degradation. By combining iron uptake with storage and remobilization mechanisms a model is obtained which in a concerted manner integrates iron uptake, storage and remobilization. In agreement with experiments the model does not store iron during its high-affinity uptake. As an iron biofortification approach we discuss the possibility how iron can be accumulated even during high-affinity uptake. PMID:26800438

  9. Evaluating the use of in-store measures in retail food stores and restaurants in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Ana Clara; Lock, Karen; Latorre, Maria do Rosario D O; Jaime, Patricia Constante

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess inter-rater reliability, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of retail food store, open-air food market, and restaurant observation tools adapted to the Brazilian urban context. METHODS This study is part of a cross-sectional observation survey conducted in 13 districts across the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil in 2010-2011. Food store and restaurant observational tools were developed based on previously available tools, and then tested it. They included measures on the availability, variety, quality, pricing, and promotion of fruits and vegetables and ultra-processed foods. We used Kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients to assess inter-rater and test-retest reliabilities in samples of 142 restaurants, 97 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), and of 62 restaurants and 45 retail food stores (including open-air food markets), respectively. Construct validity as the tool’s abilities to discriminate based on store types and different income contexts were assessed in the entire sample: 305 retail food stores, 8 fruits and vegetable markets, and 472 restaurants. RESULTS Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were generally high, with most Kappa values greater than 0.70 (range 0.49-1.00). Both tools discriminated between store types and neighborhoods with different median income. Fruits and vegetables were more likely to be found in middle to higher-income neighborhoods, while soda, fruit-flavored drink mixes, cookies, and chips were cheaper and more likely to be found in lower-income neighborhoods. CONCLUSIONS The measures were reliable and able to reveal significant differences across store types and different contexts. Although some items may require revision, results suggest that the tools may be used to reliably measure the food stores and restaurant food environment in urban settings of middle-income countries. Such studies can help .inform health promotion interventions and policies in these

  10. Iron retention in preterm infants fed low iron intakes: a metabolic balance study.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Ian; Cooke, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    There is little data on iron retention in healthy preterm infants. Twenty-four metabolic balance studies were carried out in 13 preterm infants between 17 and 63 days of age, in 11 cases 2 balance were carried out 7d apart. Iron intake was 1.11 mg/kg/day (SD 0.06), less than the 2 mg/kg/d typically recommended for preterm infants. Iron retention was positive in the majority (3/13) of the first balances, and in all 11 of the second balances. Iron retention increased significantly between the two balances (from 0.095 mg/kg/d (SD 0.178) to 0.270 (SD 0.209)). Iron retention was significantly related to the time that the infant had been on enteral feeds at the time the balance was carried out. Iron retention was significantly greater than the requirement estimated to be needed to meet the needs for growth and expansion of the circulating red cell mass. Iron intakes of about 1mg/kg/d seem to be adequate to support the requirements for growth in preterm infants during this time period, but are significantly less than the estimated in utero accretion rate of the fetus.

  11. The Human Right to Adequate Housing: A Tool for Promoting and Protecting Individual and Community Health

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Bret

    2002-01-01

    The human right to adequate housing is enshrined in international law. The right to adequate housing can be traced to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was unanimously adopted by the world community in 1948. Since that time, the right to adequate housing has been reaffirmed on numerous occasions and further defined and elaborated. A key component of this right is habitability of housing, which should comply with health and safety standards. Therefore, the right to adequate housing provides an additional tool for advocates and others interested in promoting healthful housing and living conditions and thereby protecting individual and community health. PMID:11988432

  12. Daily oral iron supplementation during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Iron and folic acid supplementation has been the preferred intervention to improve iron stores and prevent anaemia among pregnant women, and it may also improve other maternal and birth outcomes. Objectives To assess the effects of daily oral iron supplements for pregnant women, either alone or in conjunction with folic acid, or with other vitamins and minerals as a public health intervention. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (2 July 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (2 July 2012) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating the effects of oral preventive supplementation with daily iron, iron + folic acid or iron + other vitamins and minerals during pregnancy. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results We included 60 trials. Forty-three trials, involving more than 27,402 women, contributed data and compared the effects of daily oral supplements containing iron versus no iron or placebo. Overall, women taking iron supplements were less likely to have low birthweight newborns (below 2500 g) compared with controls (8.4% versus 10.2%, average risk ratio (RR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68 to 0.97, 11 trials, 8480 women) and mean birthweight was 30.81 g greater for those infants whose mothers received iron during pregnancy (average mean difference (MD) 30.81; 95% CI 5.94 to 55.68, 14 trials, 9385 women). Preventive iron supplementation reduced the risk of maternal anaemia at term by 70% (RR 0.30; 95% CI 0.19 to 0.46, 14 trials, 2199 women) and iron deficiency at term by 57% (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.66, seven trials, 1256 women

  13. 19. View of southwest corner of corner store, Crystal Bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View of southwest corner of corner store, Crystal Bridge connection to east side of 1946/1948 store for homes and south side of 1946/1948 store for homes, and 1958 service building addition, from south looking northwest. - Rich's Downtown Department Store, 45 Broad Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  14. Iron status in female endurance athletes and in non-athletes.

    PubMed

    Malczewska, J; Raczynski, G; Stupnicki, R

    2000-09-01

    Iron status was studied in 126 female endurance athletes and 52 control subjects, all aged 16-20 years. The study aimed at identifying factors responsible for iron deficiency. Twenty-six percent of athletes and 50% of controls had latent iron-deficiency without anemia symptoms. A too low intake of iron (especially heme iron: 0.3 mg daily), and of nutrients influencing iron metabolism, were identified as main causes of iron deficiency in control subjects. In athletes, whose iron intake was sufficient (14.6 mg), the principal cause of iron deficiency were blood losses due to menstruation. High level of physical activity, expressed as training volume and experience, did not adversely affect iron stores, as these were higher than in control subjects and the incidence of iron deficiency was much lower than in the control group. It was concluded that an increased intake of iron and of dietary factors involved in iron metabolism prevented possible exercise-induced losses of iron in young athletes.

  15. Polarization dictates iron handling by inflammatory and alternatively activated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Corna, Gianfranca; Campana, Lara; Pignatti, Emanuele; Castiglioni, Alessandra; Tagliafico, Enrico; Bosurgi, Lidia; Campanella, Alessandro; Brunelli, Silvia; Manfredi, Angelo A.; Apostoli, Pietro; Silvestri, Laura; Camaschella, Clara; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    Background Macrophages play a key role in iron homeostasis. In peripheral tissues, they are known to polarize into classically activated (or M1) macrophages and alternatively activated (or M2) macrophages. Little is known on whether the polarization program influences the ability of macrophages to store or recycle iron and the molecular machinery involved in the processes. Design and Methods Inflammatory/M1 and alternatively activated/M2 macrophages were propagated in vitro from mouse bone-marrow precursors and polarized in the presence of recombinant interferon-γ or interleukin-4. We characterized and compared their ability to handle radioactive iron, the characteristics of the intracellular iron pools and the expression of molecules involved in internalization, storage and export of the metal. Moreover we verified the influence of iron on the relative ability of polarized macrophages to activate antigen-specific T cells. Results M1 macrophages have low iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 binding activity, express high levels of ferritin H, low levels of transferrin receptor 1 and internalize – albeit with low efficiency -iron only when its extracellular concentration is high. In contrast, M2 macrophages have high iron regulatory protein binding activity, express low levels of ferritin H and high levels of transferrin receptor 1. M2 macrophages have a larger intracellular labile iron pool, effectively take up and spontaneously release iron at low concentrations and have limited storage ability. Iron export correlates with the expression of ferroportin, which is higher in M2 macrophages. M1 and M2 cells activate antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cells. In the absence of the metal, only M1 macrophages are effective. Conclusions Cytokines that drive macrophage polarization ultimately control iron handling, leading to the differentiation of macrophages into a subset which has a relatively sealed intracellular iron content (M1) or into a subset endowed with

  16. Management of Iron-Deficiency Anemia in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Ainsworth, Mark; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anemia is the most frequent complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but anemia, mostly due to iron deficiency, has long been neglected in these patients. The aim was to briefly present the pathophysiology, followed by a balanced overview of the different forms of iron replacement available, and subsequently, to perform a systematic review of studies performed in the last decade on the treatment of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD. Given that intravenous therapies have been introduced in the last decade, a systematic review performed in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and the websites of WHO, FDA, and EMA covered prospective trials investigating the management of iron-deficiency anemia in IBD published since 2004. A total of 632 articles were reviewed, and 13 articles (2906 patients) with unique content were included. In general, oral supplementation in iron-deficiency anemia should be administered with a target to restore/replenish the iron stores and the hemoglobin level in a suitable way. However, in patients with IBD flares and inadequate responses to or side effects with oral preparations, intravenous iron supplementation is the therapy of choice. Neither oral nor intravenous therapy seems to exacerbate the clinical course of IBD, and intravenous iron therapy can be administered even in active disease stages and concomitantly with biologics. In conclusion, because many physicians are in doubt as to how to manage anemia and iron deficiency in IBD, there is a clear need for the implementation of evidence-based recommendations on this matter. Based on the data presented, oral iron therapy should be preferred for patients with quiescent disease stages and trivial iron deficiency anemia unless such patients are intolerant or have an inadequate response, whereas intravenous iron supplementation may be of advantage in patients with aggravated anemia or flares of IBD because inflammation hampers intestinal absorption of iron. PMID:26061331

  17. Intravenous Iron Repletion Does Not Significantly Decrease Platelet Counts in CKD Patients with Iron Deficiency Anemia.

    PubMed

    Dossabhoy, Neville R; Gascoyne, Rebecca; Turley, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to investigate the effect of IV iron repletion on platelet (PLT) counts in CKD patients with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Methods. We conducted a retrospective chart review, including all patients with CKD and IDA who were treated with iron dextran total dose infusion (TDI) between 2002 and 2007. Patient demographics were noted, and laboratory values for creatinine, hemoglobin (Hgb), iron stores and PLT were recorded pre- and post-dose. Results. 153 patients received a total of 251 doses of TDI (mean ± SD = 971 ± 175 mg); age 69 ± 12 years and Creatinine 3.3 ± 1.9 mg/dL. All CKD stages were represented (stage 4 commonest). Hgb and Fe stores improved post-TDI (P ≪ 0.001). There was a very mild decrease in PLT (pre-TDI 255 versus post-TDI 244, P = 0.30). The mild reduction in PLT after TDI remained non-significant (P > 0.05) when data was stratified by molecular weight (MW) of iron dextran used (low versus high), as well as by dose administered (<1000 versus ≥1000 mg). Linear regression analysis between pre-dose PLT and Tsat and Fe showed R2 of 0.01 and 0.04, respectively. Conclusion. Correction of iron deficiency did not significantly lower PLT in CKD patients, regardless of MW or dose used. Correlation of PLT to severity of iron deficiency was very weak.

  18. 146. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING STRAIGHT ON, OF CAST IRON LAMP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    146. DETAIL VIEW, LOOKING STRAIGHT ON, OF CAST IRON LAMP STANDARD. THIS AND OTHER LAMP STANDARDS WERE REMOVED FROM THE LAMP COLUMNS ON THE PARAPET WALLS DURING WORLD WAR II AND STORED INSIDE THE DAM (January 1991) - Coolidge Dam, Gila River, Peridot, Gila County, AZ

  19. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR FLASHING MERCURY OFF OF GOLD TO CREATE SOFT INGOTS CALLED "SPONGES." AT RIGHT ARE SAFES FOR STORING 22-POUND SPONGES WORTH OVER $60,000 EACH, CA. 1985. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  20. The Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.D.; Ward, C.R.

    1995-12-31

    A mobile robot system called Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is under development by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Robotics Group of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform mandated inspections of waste drums stored in warehouse facilities. The system will reduce personnel exposure to potential hazards and create accurate, high-quality documentation to ensure regulatory compliance and enhance waste management operations. Development work is coordinated among several Department of Energy (DOE), academic, and commercial entities in accordance wit DOE`s technology transfer initiative. The prototype system, SWAMI I, was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) in November, 1993. SWAMI II is now under development for field trails at the Fernald site.

  1. A Summary Report on Store Heating Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-09-01

    Edney (Ref. 5) classified shock interference patterns and the associated heating amplification factors into six types. However, the specific ... constant St - (I PooVooCp(To - T w) . p voo.x Rein, x Poo m i i m m m m m I l I Turbulent Heat -Transfer Predictions Based on Spalding-Chi...AEDO-TR-78-46 A SUMMARY REPORT ON STORE HEATING TECHNOLOGY R. K. Matthews ARO, Inc., a Sverdrup Coporation Company VON KARM~,N GAS DYNAMICS

  2. Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Rubinstein, Herbert J.; Clark, Philip M.; Gilcrest, James D.

    1978-06-20

    A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

  3. Schedulers with load-store queue awareness

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Tong; Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; Jacob, Arpith C.; Sura, Zehra N.

    2017-01-24

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes tracking a size of a load-store queue (LSQ) during compile time of a program. The size of the LSQ is time-varying and indicates how many memory access instructions of the program are on the LSQ. The method further includes scheduling, by a computer processor, a plurality of memory access instructions of the program based on the size of the LSQ.

  4. Schedulers with load-store queue awareness

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Tong; Eichenberger, Alexandre E.; Jacob, Arpith C.; Sura, Zehra N.

    2017-02-07

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes tracking a size of a load-store queue (LSQ) during compile time of a program. The size of the LSQ is time-varying and indicates how many memory access instructions of the program are on the LSQ. The method further includes scheduling, by a computer processor, a plurality of memory access instructions of the program based on the size of the LSQ.

  5. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  6. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  7. Storing and Predicting Dynamic Attributes in a World Model Knowledge Store

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Walt Disney 4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First I would like to thank my family for their unending support of every endeavor I’ve ever dreamt up. A long...is that the nature of the real world is to exhibit many dynamic characteristics. Historically, most mobile robot systems have assumed the world to...AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2009-4515 STORING AND PREDICTING DYNAMIC ATTRIBUTES IN A WORLD MODEL KNOWLEDGE STORE Daniel A. Kent University of

  8. Storing and Predicting Dynamic Attributes in a World Model Knowledge Store

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    myself. “All our dreams can come true… if we have the courage to pursue them.” Walt Disney 4 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS First I would like to thank my...constraints of that world . One of these constraints which have not historically been dealt with is that the nature of the real world is to exhibit many...1 STORING AND PREDICTING DYNAMIC ATTRIBUTES IN A WORLD MODEL KNOWLEDGE STORE By DANIEL ADAM KENT

  9. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... and Adequate Veterinary Care § 2.40 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and... veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section. (1) Each dealer and exhibitor shall employ...

  10. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  11. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  12. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  13. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  14. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  15. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  16. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  17. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  18. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  19. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  20. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  1. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  2. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  3. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  4. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  5. The evaluation of iron status in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, S; Kowalski, E A; Imbriano, L J; Maesaka, J K

    1996-12-01

    Effective treatment of anemia in hemodialysis patients requires ongoing monitoring of iron status. The purpose of this study was to determine levels of commonly used iron indices predictive of iron deficiency in this population. Forty-seven patients with baseline serum ferritin levels < 600 ng/mL were treated with intravenous iron dextran (INFeD; Schein Pharmaceutical Inc., Florham Park, NJ), 1000 mg over ten hemodialysis treatments. Patients whose hematocrit value increased by 5% or who had a 10% decrease in their erythropoietin dose by 2 months were classified as having iron deficiency (N = 31; 66%). All other subjects were classified as having adequate iron (N = 16; 34%). There was no statistically significant difference in baseline serum ferritin, transferrin saturation, mean cell volume, mean cell hemoglobin content, or red cell distribution width between the two groups. Receiver operator curves demonstrated that none of the iron indices had a high level of utility (both sensitivity and specificity > 80%). Two tests had marginal utility, serum ferritin at a level of < 150 ng/mL, and transferrin saturation < 21%. It was concluded that because of the tests' marginal utility, they should only be interpreted in the context of the patient's underlying erythropoietin, responsiveness. In patients who are responsive to erythropoietin, a transferrin saturation value < 18% or serum ferritin level < 100 ng/mL should be used to indicate inadequate iron. When erythropoietin resistance is present, transferrin saturation of < 27% or serum ferritin < 300 ng/mL should be used to guide iron management.

  6. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  7. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  8. Determination of stores pointing error due to wing flexibility under flight load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lokos, William A.; Bahm, Catherine M.; Heinle, Robert A.

    1995-01-01

    The in-flight elastic wing twist of a fighter-type aircraft was studied to provide for an improved on-board real-time computed prediction of pointing variations of three wing store stations. This is an important capability to correct sensor pod alignment variation or to establish initial conditions of iron bombs or smart weapons prior to release. The original algorithm was based upon coarse measurements. The electro-optical Flight Deflection Measurement System measured the deformed wing shape in flight under maneuver loads to provide a higher resolution database from which an improved twist prediction algorithm could be developed. The FDMS produced excellent repeatable data. In addition, a NASTRAN finite-element analysis was performed to provide additional elastic deformation data. The FDMS data combined with the NASTRAN analysis indicated that an improved prediction algorithm could be derived by using a different set of aircraft parameters, namely normal acceleration, stores configuration, Mach number, and gross weight.

  9. Utilization of iron from an animal-based iron source is greater than that of ferrous sulfate in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    PubMed

    Young, Melissa F; Griffin, Ian; Pressman, Eva; McIntyre, Allison W; Cooper, Elizabeth; McNanley, Thomas; Harris, Z Leah; Westerman, Mark; O'Brien, Kimberly O

    2010-12-01

    Heme iron absorption during pregnancy and the role of hepcidin in regulating dietary heme iron absorption remains largely unexplored. The objective of this research was to examine relative differences in heme (animal based) and nonheme (ferrous sulfate) iron utilization. This study was undertaken in 18 pregnant (ages 16-32 y; wk 32-35 of gestation) and 11 nonpregnant women (ages 18-27 y). Women were randomly assigned to receive both an animal-based heme meal (intrinsically labeled (58)Fe pork) and labeled ferrous sulfate ((57)Fe) fed on alternate days. Blood samples obtained 2 wk postdosing were used to assess iron status indicators and serum hepcidin and iron utilization based on RBC incorporation of iron isotopes. Heme iron utilization was significantly greater than nonheme iron utilization in the pregnant (47.7 ± 14.4 vs. 40.4 ± 13.2%) and nonpregnant women (50.1 ± 14.8 vs. 15.3 ± 9.7%). Among pregnant women, utilization of nonheme iron was associated with iron status, as assessed by the serum transferrin receptor concentration (P = 0.003; r(2) = 0.43). In contrast, heme iron utilization was not influenced by maternal iron status. In the group as a whole, women with undetectable serum hepcidin had greater nonheme iron utilization compared with women with detectable serum hepcidin (P = 0.02; n = 29); however, there were no significant differences in heme iron utilization. Our study suggests that iron utilization from an animal-based food provides a highly bioavailable source of dietary iron for pregnant and nonpregnant women that is not as sensitive to hepcidin concentrations or iron stores compared with ferrous sulfate.

  10. Objectives and Methods of Iron Chelation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, C.; Abrahamov, A.; Konijn, A. M.; Breuer, W.; Cabantchik, I. Z.; Pootrakul, P.; Link, G.

    2003-01-01

    and L1 has already been shown to result in successful depletion of iron stores in patients previously failing to respond to single drug therapy, and to lead to improved compliance with treatment. It may also result in a “shuttle effect” between weak intracellular chelators and powerful extracellular chelators or exploit the entero-hepatic cycle to promote fecal iron excretion. All of these innovative ways of chelator usage are now awaiting evaluation in experimental models and in the clinical setting. PMID:18365050

  11. Stored human tissue: an ethical perspective on the fate of anonymous, archival material.

    PubMed

    Jones, D G; Gear, R; Galvin, K A

    2003-12-01

    The furore over the retention of organs at postmortem examination, without adequate consent, has led to a reassessment of the justification for, and circumstances surrounding, the retention of any human material after postmortem examinations and operations. This brings into focus the large amount of human material stored in various archives and museums, much of which is not identifiable and was accumulated many years ago, under unknown circumstances. Such anonymous archival material could be disposed of, used for teaching, used for research, or remain in storage. We argue that there are no ethical grounds for disposing of the material, or for storing it in the absence of a teaching or research rationale. Nevertheless, with stringent safeguards, it can be used even in the absence of consent in research and teaching. Regulations are required to control the storage of all such human material, along the lines of regulations governing anatomy body bequests.

  12. Maternal iron – infection interactions and neonatal mortality, with an emphasis on developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Brabin, Loretta; Brabin, Bernard J.; Gies, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a major cause of neonatal death in developing countries. We address the question whether host iron status affects maternal and/or neonatal infection risk, potentially contributing to neonatal death. We summarize the iron acquisition mechanisms described for pathogens causing stillbirth, preterm birth, and congenital infection. There is in vitro evidence that iron availability influences severity and chronicity of infections that cause these outcomes. The risk in vivo is unknown as relevant studies of maternal iron supplementation have not assessed infection risk. Reducing iron deficiency anemia among women is beneficial and should improve the iron stores of babies, but there is evidence that iron status in young children predicts malaria risk and possibly invasive bacterial diseases. Caution with maternal iron supplementation is indicated in iron-replete women who have high infection exposure, although distinguishing iron-replete and iron-deficient women is currently difficult. Further research is indicated to investigate infection risk in relation to iron status in mothers and babies in order to avoid iron intervention strategies that result in detrimental birth outcomes for some groups of women. PMID:23865798

  13. Iron metabolism and related genetic diseases: A cleared land, keeping mysteries.

    PubMed

    Brissot, Pierre; Loréal, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    Body iron has a very close relationship with the liver. Physiologically, the liver synthesizes transferrin, in charge of blood iron transport; ceruloplasmin, acting through its ferroxidase activity; and hepcidin, the master regulator of systemic iron. It also stores iron inside ferritin and serves as an iron reservoir, both protecting the cell from free iron toxicity and ensuring iron delivery to the body whenever needed. The liver is first in line for receiving iron from the gut and the spleen, and is, therefore, highly exposed to iron overload when plasma iron is in excess, especially through its high affinity for plasma non-transferrin bound iron. The liver is strongly involved when iron excess is related either to hepcidin deficiency, as in HFE, hemojuvelin, hepcidin, and transferrin receptor 2 related haemochromatosis, or to hepcidin resistance, as in type B ferroportin disease. It is less involved in the usual (type A) form of ferroportin disease which targets primarily the macrophagic system. Hereditary aceruloplasminemia raises important pathophysiological issues in light of its peculiar organ iron distribution.

  14. [Parenteral iron therapy in chronic kidney disease or chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Eisenga, Michele F; Diepenbroek, Adry; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bakker, Stephan J L; van der Meer, Peter; Gaillard, Carlo A J M

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency and anaemia occur frequently in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or chronic heart failure (CHF) and are associated with lower quality of life and higher mortality. Treating anaemia with erythropoietic growth factors produces no improvement. In recent years, the focus has therefore shifted to correction of iron deficiency. Chronic inflammation in CKD increases the production of hepcidin, which blocks iron absorption from the intestine and leads to less efficient re-use of iron from the macrophages. In absolute iron deficiency the body's iron stores are depleted, whereas in functional iron deficiency the supply of iron is not sufficient to meet demand from the bone marrow. Normal or high ferritin levels do not exclude iron deficiency at tissue level. The iron saturation fraction is a more useful indicator. Parenteral iron therapy ameliorates in CHF the symptoms of iron deficiency, irrespective of the effect on haemoglobin levels. The long-term effects of intravenous iron on mortality and morbidity are still unknown.

  15. Stored energy release behaviour of disordered carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, K.; Barat, P.; Sarkar, A.; Mukherjee, P.; Sathiyamoorthy, D.

    2007-06-01

    The use of graphite as a moderator in a low temperature thermal nuclear reactor is restricted due to accumulation of energy caused by displacement of atoms by neutrons and high energetic particles. Thermal transients may lead to a release of stored energy that may raise the temperature of the fuel clad above the design limit. Disordered carbon is thought to be an alternative choice for this purpose. Two types of disordered carbon composites, namely, CB (made up of 15 wt. % carbon black dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin) and PAN (made up of 20 vol. % chopped polyacrylonitrile carbon fibre dispersed in carbonized phenolic resin matrix) have been irradiated with 145 MeV Ne6+ ions at three fluence levels of 1.0×1013, 5.0×1013 and 1.5×1014 Ne6+/cm2, respectively. The XRD patterns revealed that both the samples remained disordered even after irradiation. The maximum release of stored energy for CB was 212 J/g and that of PAN was 906 J/g. For CB, the release of stored energy was a first order reaction with activation energy of 2.79 eV and a frequency factor of 3.72×1028 per second. 13% of the defects got annealed by heating up to 700 °C. PAN showed a third-order release rate with activation energy of 1.69 eV and a frequency factor of 1.77×1014 per second. 56% of the total defects got annealed by heating it up to 700 °C. CB seems to be the better choice than PAN as it showed less energy release with a slower rate.

  16. Storing wind energy into electrical accumulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dordescu, M.; Petrescu, D. I.; Erdodi, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    Shall be determined, in this work, the energy stored in the accumulators electrical, AE, at a wind system operating at wind speeds time-varying. mechanical energy caught in the turbine from the wind, (TV), is transformed into electrical energy by the generator synchronous with the permanent magnets, GSMP. The Generator synchronous with the permanent magnets saws, via a rectifier, energy in a battery AE, finished in a choice of two: variant 1-unregulated rectifier and variant of the 2-controlled rectifier and task adapted. Through simulation determine the differences between the two versions

  17. Storing Astronomical Information on the Romanian Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, M.; Mioc, V.

    2004-12-01

    Romanian astronomy has a more than 2000-year old tradition, which is, however, little known abroad. The first known archive of astronomical information is the Dacian sanctuary at Sarmizegetusa Regia, erected in the first century AD, having similarities with that of Stonehenge. After a gap of more than 1000 years, more sources of astronomical information become available, mainly records of astronomical events. Monasteries were the safest storage places of these genuine archives. We present a classification of the ways of storing astronomical information, along with characteristic examples.

  18. Experiences of Users from Online Grocery Stores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Mark

    Grocery shopping, traditionally considered as the pinnacle of the self-service industry, is used as the case study in this chapter. As the Internet has become widely used by many segments of the population, the opportunity to shop online for groceries has been presented to consumers. This chapter considers issues that need to be addressed to make online grocery shopping systems more usable for these consumers, based on feedback from individuals who participated in a study of user interactions with Australian online grocery stores.

  19. Cricket: A Mapped, Persistent Object Store

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shekita, Eugene; Zwilling, Michael

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes Cricket, a new database storage system that is intended to be used as a platform for design environments and persistent programming languages. Cricket uses the memory management primitives of the Mach operating system to provide the abstraction of a shared, transactional single-level store that can be directly accessed by user applications. In this paper, we present the design and motivation for Cricket. We also present some initial performance results which show that, for its intended applications, Cricket can provide better performance than a general-purpose database storage system.

  20. Aging of platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smethurst, Peter A

    2016-09-01

    A goal of platelet storage is to maintain the quality of platelets from the point of donation to the point of transfusion - to suspend the aging process. This effort is judged by clinical and laboratory measures with varying degrees of success. Recent work gives encouragement that platelets can be maintained ex vivo beyond the current 5 -7 day shelf life whilst maintaining their quality, as measured by posttransfusion recovery and survival. However, additional measures are needed to validate the development of technologies that may further reduce the aging of stored platelets, or enhance their hemostatic properties.

  1. Iron Therapy for Preterm Infants

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Raghavendra; Georgieff, Michael K.

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Preterm infants are at risk for both iron deficiency and iron overload. The role of iron in multiple organ functions suggests that iron supplementation is essential for the preterm infant. Conversely, the potential for iron overload and the poorly developed anti-oxidant measures in the preterm infant argues against indiscriminate iron supplementation in this population. The purpose of this article is to review the predisposing factors and consequences of iron deficiency and iron overload in the preterm infant, the current recommendation for iron supplementation and its appropriateness, and describe potential management strategies that strike a balance between iron deficiency and iron toxicity. PMID:19161863

  2. Hepcidin: an emerging biomarker for iron disorders, inflammatory diseases, and infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerman, Mark E.; Olbina, Gordana; Ostland, Vaughn E.; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Ganz, Tomas

    2010-04-01

    The peptide hormone hepcidin, has emerged as the master regulator of iron homeostasis. Dysregulation of hepcidin is a principal or contributing factor in most genetic and acquired systemic iron disorders, including anemia of inflammation (anemia of chronic disease). Hepcidin maintains healthy blood iron levels by regulating dietary iron absorption and transport from body iron stores to plasma. High serum hepcidin levels observed in chronic and acute inflammatory conditions can cause anemia by limiting plasma iron available for erythropoiesis. Chronically low serum hepcidin levels cause iron-overload and ultimately, accumulation of iron in liver and heart. We recently validated the first immunoassay for serum hepcidin and established the normal ranges in adults. Hepcidin has excellent potential as a biomarker and has a known mechanism of action, good stability, and rapid response to iron stores, inflammatory stimuli, and bacterial infections. Hepcidin can be measured in blood, urine, and saliva, and is generally not measurable in iron deficient/anemic patients and highly elevated in inflammatory diseases and infections. Intrinsic LifeSciences (ILS) is developing second generation hepcidin immunoassays and lateral-flow POC devices for hepcidin, a well characterized multi-purpose biomarker with applications in global health security.

  3. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David J.; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance (ANOVA) were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6–12 (n = 1203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in comprehension. Results suggest that there is considerable growth across the middle and high school years, particularly for adequate comprehenders in those text integration processes that maintain local coherence. Accuracy in text consistency judgments accounted for significant unique variance for passage-level, but not sentence-level comprehension, particularly for adequate comprehenders. PMID:26166946

  4. Using Multitheory Model of Health Behavior Change to Predict Adequate Sleep Behavior.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj; Nahar, Vinayak K

    The purpose of this article was to use the multitheory model of health behavior change in predicting adequate sleep behavior in college students. A valid and reliable survey was administered in a cross-sectional design (n = 151). For initiation of adequate sleep behavior, the construct of behavioral confidence (P < .001) was found to be significant and accounted for 24.4% of the variance. For sustenance of adequate sleep behavior, changes in social environment (P < .02), emotional transformation (P < .001), and practice for change (P < .001) were significant and accounted for 34.2% of the variance.

  5. Iron losses in sweat

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, M.; Magnusson, B.; Persson, H.; Hallberg, L.

    1986-03-01

    The losses of iron in whole body cell-free sweat were determined in eleven healthy men. A new experimental design was used with a very careful cleaning procedure of the skin and repeated consecutive sampling periods of sweat in a sauna. The purpose was to achieve a steady state of sweat iron losses with minimal influence from iron originating from desquamated cells and iron contaminating the skin. A steady state was reached in the third sauna period (second sweat sampling period). Iron loss was directly related to the volume of sweat lost and amounted to 22.5 micrograms iron/l sweat. The findings indicate that iron is a physiological constituent of sweat and derived not only from contamination. Present results imply that variations in the amount of sweat lost will have only a marginal effect on the variation in total body iron losses.

  6. Iron in diet

    MedlinePlus

    The best sources of iron include: Dried beans Dried fruits Eggs (especially egg yolks) Iron-fortified cereals Liver Lean red meat (especially beef) Oysters Poultry, dark red meat Salmon Tuna Whole ...

  7. Serum iron test

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  8. Total iron binding capacity

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  9. Iron deficiency anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... GM. Disorders of iron homeostasis: iron deficiency and overload. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, ... to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A. ...

  10. Iron supplements (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The mineral iron is an essential nutrient for humans because it is part of blood cells, which carry oxygen to all body cells. There is no conclusive evidence that iron supplements contribute to heart attacks.

  11. Reactive iron transport in an acidic mountain stream in Summit County, Colorado: A hydrologic perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKnight, Diane M.; Bencala, K.E.

    1989-01-01

    A pH perturbation experiment was conducted in an acidic, metal-enriched, mountain stream to identify relative rates of chemical and hydrologic processes as they influence iron transport. During the experiment the pH was lowered from 4.2 to 3.2 for three hours by injection of sulfuric acid. Amorphous iron oxides are abundant on the streambed, and dissolution and photoreduction reactions resulted in a rapid increase in the dissolved iron concentration. The increase occurred simultaneously with the decrease in pH. Ferrous iron was the major aqueous iron species. The changes in the iron concentration during the experiment indicate that variation exists in the solubility properties of the hydrous iron oxides on the streambed with dissolution of at least two compartments of hydrous iron oxides contributing to the iron pulse. Spatial variations of the hydrologic properties along the stream were quantified by simulating the transport of a coinjected tracer, lithium. A simulation of iron transport, as a conservative solute, indicated that hydrologie transport had a significant role in determining downstream changes in the iron pulse. The rapidity of the changes in iron concentration indicates that a model based on dynamic equilibrium may be adequate for simulating iron transport in acid streams. A major challenge for predictive solute transport models of geochemical processes may be due to substantial spatial and seasonal variations in chemical properties of the reactive hydrous oxides in such streams, and in the physical and hydrologic properties of the stream. ?? 1989.

  12. Iron and Prochlorococcus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    iron deprivation in cyanobacteria include loss of pigmentation (chlorosis), changes in the fluorescence/ absorbance wavelengths of chlorophyll a...77 Figure 3: MED4 photosynthetic efficiency and isiB expression during iron stress. ……………………….79 Figure 4: Global expression response of...cyanobacteria, iron is best known for its role as a cofactor in photosynthetic electron transfer. In fact, 22 atoms of iron are considered necessary for the

  13. Bioprocessing of a stored mixed liquid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, J.H.; Rogers, R.D.; Finney, R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and results of a demonstration for a continuous bioprocess for mixed waste treatment. A key element of the process is an unique microbial strain which tolerates high levels of aromatic solvents and surfactants. This microorganism is the biocatalysis of the continuous flow system designed for the processing of stored liquid scintillation wastes. During the past year a process demonstration has been conducted on commercial formulation of liquid scintillation cocktails (LSC). Based on data obtained from this demonstration, the Ohio EPA granted the Mound Applied Technologies Lab a treatability permit allowing the limited processing of actual mixed waste. Since August 1994, the system has been successfully processing stored, {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} LSC waste. The initial LSC waste fed into the system contained 11% pseudocumene and detectable quantities of plutonium. Another treated waste stream contained pseudocumene and tritium. Data from this initial work shows that the hazardous organic solvent, and pseudocumene have been removed due to processing, leaving the aqueous low level radioactive waste. Results to date have shown that living cells are not affected by the dissolved plutonium and that 95% of the plutonium was sorbed to the biomass. This paper discusses the bioprocess, rates of processing, effluent, and the implications of bioprocessing for mixed waste management.

  14. Arousal and consumer in-store behavior.

    PubMed

    Groeppel-Klein, Andrea

    2005-11-15

    From a psychophysiological point of view, arousal is a fundamental feature of behavior. As reported in different empirical studies based on insights from theories of consumer behavior, store atmosphere should evoke phasic arousal reactions to attract consumers. Most of these empirical investigations used verbal scales to measure consumers' perceived phasic arousal at the point-of-sale (POS). However, the validity of verbal arousal measurement is questioned; self-reporting methods only allow a time-lagged measurement. Furthermore, the selection of inappropriate items to represent perceived arousal is criticized, and verbal reports require some form of cognitive evaluation of perceived arousal by the individual, who might (in a non-measurement condition) not even be aware of the arousal. By contrast, phasic electrodermal reaction (EDR) has proven to be the most appropriate and valid indicator for measuring arousal [W. Boucsein, Physiologische Grundlagen und Messmethoden der dermalen Aktivität. In: F. Rösler (Ed.), Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, Bereich Psychophysiologie, Band 1: Grundlagen and Methoden der Psychophysiologie, Kapitel, Vol. 7, Hogrefe, Göttingen, 2001, pp. 551-623] that could be relevant to behavior. EDR can be recorded simultaneously to the perception of stimuli. Furthermore, telemetric online device can be used, which enables physiological arousal measurement while participants can move freely through the store and perform the assigned task in the experiments. The present paper delivers insights on arousal theory and results from empirical studies using EDR to measure arousal at the POS.

  15. Iron release analyses from ferritin by visible light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ohishi, Kentaro; Zhang, Xiao Mei; Moriwaki, Shinichi; Hiramitsu, Tadahisa; Matsugo, Seiichi

    2005-08-01

    We investigated the iron release from ferritin by irradiation from a white fluorescent light in the absence or presence of ADP. Irradiation of a ferritin solution at 17,000 lx in the absence of ADP slightly induces iron release from ferritin but only at acidic pH conditions (pH 5.0 or pH 6.0). Irradiation in the presence of ADP markedly enhances iron release from ferritin under the same conditions. In the absence of irradiation, the iron release from ferritin was low even in the presence of ADP. The induction of the iron release by irradiation in the presence of ADP was also affected by various factors such as irradiation dose and acidity, but not temperature (4-47 degrees C), oxygen concentration, or free radical generations during the irradiation. The iron release during the irradiation ceased to increase by turning off the light and was found to increase again after additional irradiation. These results suggest that visible light directly induces iron release from ferritin via the photoreduction of iron stored inside ferritin.

  16. Treatment of anemia in heart failure: potential risks and benefits of intravenous iron therapy in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Jelani, Qurat-ul-ain; Katz, Stuart D

    2010-01-01

    Iron-deficiency anemia is common in patients with heart failure (HF), but the optimum diagnostic tests to detect iron deficiency and the treatment options to replete iron have not been fully characterized. Recent studies in patients with HF indicate that intravenous iron can rapidly replenish iron stores in patients having iron-deficiency anemia, with resultant increased hemoglobin levels and improved functional capacity. Preliminary data from a subgroup analysis also suggest that supplemental intravenous iron therapy can improve functional capacity even in those subjects without anemia. The mechanisms responsible for this observation are not fully characterized, but may be related to beneficial effects of iron supplementation on mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. The long-term safety of using intravenous iron supplementation in HF populations is not known. Iron is a known pro-oxidant factor that can inhibit nitric oxide signaling and irreversibly injury cells. Increased iron stores are associated with vascular endothelial dysfunction and increased risk of coronary heart disease events. Additional clinical trials are needed to more fully characterize the therapeutic potential and safety of intravenous iron in HF patients.

  17. Region 8: Colorado Lamar and Steamboat Springs Adequate Letter (11/12/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Lamar and Steamboat Springs particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  18. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency... floodplain management regulations meeting minimum requirements under the National Flood Insurance Program... they have brought their floodplain management regulations into compliance with the NFIP...

  19. Region 9: California Adequate / Inadequate Letter Attachment (5/30/2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a document that states that it has been found adequate for transportation conformitypurposes certain 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 motor vehicleemissions budgets in the 2007 South Coast StateImplementation Plan.

  20. Mechanisms of alleviation of Zn, Cd, V, Ni and Co toxicities by dietary iron

    SciTech Connect

    Blalock, T.L.; Hill, C.H.

    1986-03-01

    Previous studies from this laboratory have demonstrated that supplemental dietary iron (Fe), i.e. 1000 ppm, ameliorated zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), vanadium (V), nickel (Ni), and cobalt (Co) toxicities in chicks. Investigations into the mechanisms of this detoxification have been conducted. Chicks were fed diets containing 10, 110 or 1010 ppm iron along with 0 or 4000 ppm Zn, 0 or 40 ppm Cd, 0 or 40 ppm V, 0 or 400 ppm Ni or 0 or 400 ppm Co. In every case the Fe supplemented chicks were less susceptible to the toxicities of these elements as measured by reduction in growth rate than were the iron deficient chicks. The effects of iron on the absorption and distribution of these elements were measured by using radioactive isotopes of the elements. The absorption of Co and Ni was significantly reduced when the diet was adequate in iron. Significantly more vanadium was found in the bone of the iron supplemented chicks and less in liver and kidneys. Significantly more Cd and Zn was found in the liver and less in the blood when dietary iron was adequate. Gel filtration revealed that less Cd and Zn was found on the peak eluting in the volume of metallothionein in those chicks receiving the iron deficient diet. These results suggest the possibility that iron may be essential for the formation of metallothionein. The results also indicate that the protective effect of iron on these toxicities in brought about by several mechanisms.

  1. Silent store detection and recording in memory storage

    DOEpatents

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Nair, Ravi

    2017-03-07

    An aspect includes receiving a write request that includes a memory address and write data. Stored data is read from a memory location at the memory address. Based on determining that the memory location was not previously modified, the stored data is compared to the write data. Based on the stored data matching the write data, the write request is completed without writing the write data to the memory and a corresponding silent store bit, in a silent store bitmap is set. Based on the stored data not matching the write data, the write data is written to the memory location, the silent store bit is reset and a corresponding modified bit is set. At least one of an application and an operating system is provided access to the silent store bitmap.

  2. Silent store detection and recording in memory storage

    DOEpatents

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Nair, Ravi

    2017-03-14

    An aspect includes receiving a write request that includes a memory address and write data. Stored data is read from a memory location at the memory address. Based on determining that the memory location was not previously modified, the stored data is compared to the write data. Based on the stored data matching the write data, the write request is completed without writing the write data to the memory and a corresponding silent store bit, in a silent store bitmap is set. Based on the stored data not matching the write data, the write data is written to the memory location, the silent store bit is reset and a corresponding modified bit is set. At least one of an application and an operating system is provided access to the silent store bitmap.

  3. 18. View of corner store, south side of Crystal Bridge, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View of corner store, south side of Crystal Bridge, 1939/1940 addition, and 1951/1953 addition from south looking northeast. - Rich's Downtown Department Store, 45 Broad Street, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  4. 30. Photocopy of lithograph showing Empire Stores at corner (Baker, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of lithograph showing Empire Stores at corner (Baker, Ostheimer and Co.) from Everts, Ensign & Everts, Combination Atlas Map of Erie County, 1876 - Empire Stores, 501-505 State Street, Erie, Erie County, PA

  5. 17 CFR 256.163 - Stores expense undistributed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... materials handled through stores. (2) Purchasing department activities in checking material needs... extent applicable to materials handled through stores. (3) Unloading from shipping facility and putting in storage. (4) Inspecting and testing materials and supplies when not assignable to specific...

  6. 7. West and south facades of the store's two outbuildings: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. West and south facades of the store's two outbuildings: a fertilizer shed at the left of the view and the outhouse on the right - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  7. Silent store detection and recording in memory storage

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Nair, Ravi

    2016-09-20

    An aspect includes receiving a write request that includes a memory address and write data. Stored data is read from a memory location at the memory address. Based on determining that the memory location was not previously modified, the stored data is compared to the write data. Based on the stored data matching the write data, the write request is completed without writing the write data to the memory and a corresponding silent store bit, in a silent store bitmap is set. Based on the stored data not matching the write data, the write data is written to the memory location, the silent store bit is reset and a corresponding modified bit is set. At least one of an application and an operating system is provided access to the silent store bitmap.

  8. 1. South approach to the horse pasture store, looking north; ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. South approach to the horse pasture store, looking north; U.S. Highway 58 (toward Martinsville) is in the foreground - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  9. 19 CFR 122.133 - Stores list required on arrival.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... or taxes assessed for any shortage shall be set at the highest rate available for the alcoholic beverages in the kit. (b) Disposition of stores list copies. One copy of the incoming stores list shall...

  10. Mammalian siderophores, siderophore-binding lipocalins, and the labile iron pool.

    PubMed

    Correnti, Colin; Strong, Roland K

    2012-04-20

    Bacteria use tight-binding, ferric-specific chelators called siderophores to acquire iron from the environment and from the host during infection; animals use proteins such as transferrin and ferritin to transport and store iron. Recently, candidate compounds that could serve endogenously as mammalian siderophore equivalents have been identified and characterized through associations with siderocalin, the only mammalian siderophore-binding protein currently known. Siderocalin, an antibacterial protein, acts by sequestering iron away from infecting bacteria as siderophore complexes. Candidate endogenous siderophores include compounds that only effectively transport iron as ternary complexes with siderocalin, explaining pleiotropic activities in normal cellular processes and specific disease states.

  11. Individual and contextual determinants of adequate maternal health care services in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Achia, Thomas N O; Mageto, Lillian E

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine individual and community level factors associated with adequate use of maternal antenatal health services in Kenya. Individual and community level factors associated with adequate use of maternal health care (MHC) services were obtained from the 2008-09 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey data set. Multilevel partial-proportional odds logit models were fitted using STATA 13.0 to quantify the relations of the selected covariates to adequate MHC use, defined as a three-category ordinal variable. The sample consisted of 3,621 women who had at least one live birth in the five-year period preceding this survey. Only 18 percent of the women had adequate use of MHC services. Greater educational attainment by the woman or her partner, higher socioeconomic status, access to medical insurance coverage, and greater media exposure were the individual-level factors associated with adequate use of MHC services. Greater community ethnic diversity, higher community-level socioeconomic status, and greater community-level health facility deliveries were the contextual-level factors associated with adequate use of MHC. To improve the use of MHC services in Kenya, the government needs to design and implement programs that target underlying individual and community level factors, providing focused and sustained health education to promote the use of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care.

  12. DETERMINATION OF MATERNAL SERUM ZINC, IRON, CALCIUM AND MAGNESIUM DURING PREGNANCY IN PREGNANT WOMEN AND UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD AND THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH OUTCOME OF PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Khoushabi, Fahimeh; Shadan, Mohammad Reza; Miri, Ali; Sharifi-Rad, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trace elements and specially minerals are critical for the development of fetus. Many minerals are transferred to the fetus for fetal stores in the latter part of the pregnancy. It has been shown that various trace elements such as Zinc, Iron, Calcium and Magnesium are metabolically interrelated and there is alteration in their concentration during pregnancy. Beyond pregnancy is associated with increased demand of all the nutrients and deficiency of any of these could affect pregnancy, delivery and outcome of pregnancy. Aim: To study the levels of trace elements namely zinc, iron, magnesium and calcium in maternal and umbilical cord blood and their association with pregnancy outcome. Methods: Sixty pregnant women in Zabol, Iran were selected from those who had registered their names for the prenatal care and who had followed up till the 3rd trimester of pregnancy ending in child birth. Biochemical parameters analyzed with help of the biochemical laboratory. Data were analyzed by SPSS software. Results: The mean biochemical profile such, serum calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron in the pregnant women were as follow: in the 1st trimester 8.3, 1.9, 74.9 and 74.4 µg/dl respectively; in the 2nd trimester 8.5, 1.9, 73.1 and 79.3 µg/dl, respectively; in the 3rd trimester 8.6, 1.9, 68.4, and 82.2 µg/dl, respectively. In the umbilical cord blood, the mean serum calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron were 8.5, 1.9, 84.1, and 89.8 µg/dl, respectively. The mean serum calcium and magnesium during the three trimesters of pregnancy were not significantly different from that in the umbilical cord blood, while the mean serum zinc and iron in the umbilical cord blood were significantly different (p<0.05) in the three trimester of pregnancy. The mean birth weight of neonates was 3.1 kg and 12% of neonates showed low birth weight. Our findings showed that, except magnesium, the profile of other biochemical variables, namely, calcium, zinc and iron in the umbilical cord blood

  13. Differences in healthy food supply and stocking practices between small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies and dollar stores

    PubMed Central

    Caspi, Caitlin Eicher; Pelletier, Jennifer E.; Harnack, Lisa; Erikson, Darin J.; Laska, Melissa N.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the practices for stocking and procuring healthy food in non-traditional food retailers (e.g., gas-marts, pharmacies). This study aimed to: (i) compare availability of healthy food items across small food store types, and (ii) examine owner/manager perceptions and stocking practices for healthy food across store types. Design Descriptive analyses were conducted among corner/small grocery stores, gas-marts, pharmacies, and dollar stores. Data from store inventories were used to examine availability of 12 healthy food types and an overall healthy food supply score. Interviews with managers assessed stocking practices and profitability. Setting Small stores in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN not participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Subjects 119 small food retailers and 71 store managers Results Availability of specific items varied across store types. Only corner/small grocery stores commonly sold fresh vegetables (63%, versus 8% of food-gas marts, 0% dollar stores, and 23% pharmacies). More than half of managers stocking produce relied on cash and carry practices to stock fresh fruit (53%) and vegetables (55%), instead of direct store delivery. Most healthy foods were perceived by managers to have at least average profitability. Conclusions Interventions to improve healthy food offerings in small stores should consider the diverse environments, stocking practices and supply mechanisms of small stores, particularly non-traditional food retailers. Improvements may require technical support, customer engagement, and innovative distribution practices. PMID:26411535

  14. Iron, radiation, and cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, R G; Kalkwarf, D R

    1990-01-01

    Increased iron content of cells and tissue may increase the risk of cancer. In particular, high available iron status may increase the risk of a radiation-induced cancer. There are two possible mechanisms for this effect: iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals, and it may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and development of a transformed cell in vivo. Given the high available iron content of the western diet and the fact that the world is changing to the western model, it is important to determine if high iron increases the risk of cancer. PMID:2269234

  15. "There is iron and iron…" Burkinabè women's perceptions of iron supplementation: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Compaore, A; Gies, S; Brabin, B; Tinto, H; Brabin, L

    2014-10-01

    Most pregnant women in Burkina Faso are iron deficient and many are anemic. This study assessed women's understanding of anemia and the role of iron in preventing and treating this condition. A qualitative study was conducted within a randomized controlled trial of weekly iron supplementation in a rural malaria endemic area. Focus groups with women of similar age, parity, and marital status took place in 12 of 24 study villages. Two additional focus groups were conducted with female field workers. Tape-recorded transcripts were translated into French and analyzed using Framework analysis. Anemia, for which no Mooré term or traditional treatment for anemia was evident, was described in terms of blood volume. Moderate blood loss (diminished blood) could be easily replaced by eating well and was not considered serious. Massive blood loss (finished blood) was a rare, life-threatening illness. Iron tablets could increase blood volume and help women withstand massive blood loss at delivery, but for the latter, transfusion was indicated. Women had no knowledge of iron's role and did not readily concede that iron supplements contained elemental iron. Neither adolescents nor field workers were convinced of the benefits of supplementing non-pregnant adolescents, who were incorrectly considered to be at low risk of anemia. Young women's knowledge of anemia did not provide an adequate explanatory framework to motivate anemia prevention. Improving information on the role of iron is especially important for adolescent girls who may be incorrectly considered at low risk of anemia as they have not yet experienced pregnancy.

  16. A Competency-Based Marriage of School and Model Stores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strate, James

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the trend toward the use of competency-based model/school stores in teaching entry-level job skills to distributive education students. A model/school store curriculum is described and illustrations of model store use in the classroom, laboratory, and in Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA) are provided. (SH)

  17. In-Store Experimental Approach to Pricing and Consumer Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Foxall, Gordon; Saevarsson, Hugi

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed how, and to what extent, it is possible to use behavioral experimentation and relative sales analysis to study the effects of price on consumers' brand choices in the store environment. An in-store experiment was performed in four stores to investigate the effects of different prices of a target brand on consumers' relative…

  18. 41 CFR 109-27.5004 - Sub-stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sub-stores. 109-27.5004...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.50-Inventory Management Policies, Procedures, and Guidelines § 109-27.5004 Sub-stores. (a) Sub-stores shall be established when necessary to expedite delivery of materials and...

  19. 7 CFR 278.2 - Participation of retail food stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Participation of retail food stores. 278.2 Section 278..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PARTICIPATION OF RETAIL FOOD STORES, WHOLESALE FOOD CONCERNS AND INSURED FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS § 278.2 Participation of retail food stores....

  20. The College Store of the 1980's: Meeting the Challenge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Harold E.

    Approaches to help achieve a professional college store operation in the 1980s are outlined for the benefit of the college store staff member, supervisor, or manager, as well as administrators responsible for the review of the college store. The following areas are addressed: objectives of the service, organization, equipment and layout, the…

  1. 30 CFR 56.6100 - Separation of stored explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Separation of stored explosive material. 56.6100 Section 56.6100 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL... Explosives Storage § 56.6100 Separation of stored explosive material. (a) Detonators shall not be stored...

  2. 30 CFR 56.6100 - Separation of stored explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of stored explosive material. 56.6100 Section 56.6100 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL... Explosives Storage § 56.6100 Separation of stored explosive material. (a) Detonators shall not be stored...

  3. 30 CFR 56.6100 - Separation of stored explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Separation of stored explosive material. 56.6100 Section 56.6100 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL... Explosives Storage § 56.6100 Separation of stored explosive material. (a) Detonators shall not be stored...

  4. 30 CFR 56.6100 - Separation of stored explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Separation of stored explosive material. 56.6100 Section 56.6100 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL... Explosives Storage § 56.6100 Separation of stored explosive material. (a) Detonators shall not be stored...

  5. 30 CFR 56.6100 - Separation of stored explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Separation of stored explosive material. 56.6100 Section 56.6100 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL... Explosives Storage § 56.6100 Separation of stored explosive material. (a) Detonators shall not be stored...

  6. 46 CFR 194.05-3 - Chemical stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Stowage and Marking § 194.05-3 Chemical stores. (a) Chemical stores are those chemicals which possess one or more of the following properties and... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Chemical stores. 194.05-3 Section 194.05-3...

  7. 46 CFR 194.05-3 - Chemical stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Chemical stores. 194.05-3 Section 194.05-3 Shipping..., AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Stowage and Marking § 194.05-3 Chemical stores. (a) Chemical stores are those chemicals which possess one or more of the following properties...

  8. 46 CFR 194.05-3 - Chemical stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Chemical stores. 194.05-3 Section 194.05-3 Shipping..., AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Stowage and Marking § 194.05-3 Chemical stores. (a) Chemical stores are those chemicals which possess one or more of the following properties...

  9. 46 CFR 194.05-3 - Chemical stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Chemical stores. 194.05-3 Section 194.05-3 Shipping..., AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Stowage and Marking § 194.05-3 Chemical stores. (a) Chemical stores are those chemicals which possess one or more of the following properties...

  10. 46 CFR 194.05-3 - Chemical stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Chemical stores. 194.05-3 Section 194.05-3 Shipping..., AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Stowage and Marking § 194.05-3 Chemical stores. (a) Chemical stores are those chemicals which possess one or more of the following properties...

  11. 46 CFR 2.75-60 - Hazardous ships' stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores. 2.75-60 Section 2.75-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL... Personnel § 2.75-60 Hazardous ships' stores. Hazardous ships' stores, as defined in § 147.3 of this...

  12. 46 CFR 2.75-60 - Hazardous ships' stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores. 2.75-60 Section 2.75-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL... Personnel § 2.75-60 Hazardous ships' stores. Hazardous ships' stores, as defined in § 147.3 of this...

  13. 78 FR 27984 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303). This is.... Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number: 1651-0018. Form Number: CBP Form 1303. Abstract: CBP...

  14. 46 CFR 2.75-60 - Hazardous ships' stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores. 2.75-60 Section 2.75-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL... Personnel § 2.75-60 Hazardous ships' stores. Hazardous ships' stores, as defined in § 147.3 of this...

  15. 46 CFR 2.75-60 - Hazardous ships' stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores. 2.75-60 Section 2.75-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL... Personnel § 2.75-60 Hazardous ships' stores. Hazardous ships' stores, as defined in § 147.3 of this...

  16. 76 FR 13655 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store Declaration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Ship's Store... approval in accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act: Ship's Stores Declaration (CBP Form 1303). This is.... Title: Ship's Stores Declaration. OMB Number: 1651-0018. Form Number: CBP Form 1303. Abstract: CBP...

  17. 46 CFR 2.75-60 - Hazardous ships' stores.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hazardous ships' stores. 2.75-60 Section 2.75-60 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC VESSEL... Personnel § 2.75-60 Hazardous ships' stores. Hazardous ships' stores, as defined in § 147.3 of this...

  18. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-3 - Stores inventories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stores inventories. 109....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-3 Stores inventories. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for stores inventory items....

  19. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-3 - Stores inventories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stores inventories. 109....51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-3 Stores inventories. Perpetual inventory records are to be maintained for stores inventory items....

  20. 4. West and south elevations of the horse pasture store, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. West and south elevations of the horse pasture store, looking northeast; a "Greenhouse" structure can be seen extending to the west of the store at the left of the view - Horsepasture Store, U.S. Route 58 & State Route 687, Horse Pasture, Henry County, VA

  1. Iatrogenic Iron Overload in Dialysis Patients at the Beginning of the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Rostoker, Guy; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Fishbane, Steven

    2016-05-01

    Iron overload used to be considered rare in hemodialysis patients but its clinical frequency is now increasingly realized. The liver is the main site of iron storage and the liver iron concentration (LIC) is closely correlated with total iron stores in patients with secondary hemosideroses and genetic hemochromatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging is now the gold standard method for LIC estimation and monitoring in non-renal patients. Studies of LIC in hemodialysis patients by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic susceptometry have demonstrated a strong relation between the risk of iron overload and the use of intravenous (IV) iron products prescribed at doses determined by the iron biomarker cutoffs contained in current anemia management guidelines. These findings have challenged the validity of both iron biomarker cutoffs and current clinical guidelines, especially with respect to recommended IV iron doses. Three long-term observational studies have recently suggested that excessive IV iron doses may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events and death in hemodialysis patients. We postulate that iatrogenic iron overload in the era of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents may silently increase complications in dialysis patients without creating frank clinical signs and symptoms. High hepcidin-25 levels were recently linked to fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular events in dialysis patients. It is therefore tempting to postulate that the main pathophysiological pathway leading to these events may involve the pleiotropic master hormone hepcidin (synergized by fibroblast growth factor 23), which regulates iron metabolism. Oxidative stress as a result of IV iron infusions and iron overload, by releasing labile non-transferrin-bound iron, might represent a 'second hit' on the vascular bed. Finally, iron deposition in the myocardium of patients with severe iron overload might also play a role in the pathogenesis of sudden death in some patients.

  2. Effect of Nordic Walking training on iron metabolism in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Kortas, Jakub; Prusik, Katarzyna; Flis, Damian; Prusik, Krzysztof; Ziemann, Ewa; Leaver, Neil; Antosiewicz, Jedrzej

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite several, well-documented pro-healthy effects of regular physical training, its influence on body iron stores in elderly people remains unknown. At the same time, body iron accumulation is associated with high risk of different morbidities. Purpose We hypothesized that Nordic Walking training would result in pro-healthy changes in an elderly group of subjects by reducing body iron stores via shifts in iron metabolism-regulating proteins. Methods Thirty-seven women aged 67.7±5.3 years participated in this study. They underwent 32 weeks of training, 1-hour sessions three times a week, between October 2012 and May 2013. Fitness level, blood morphology, CRP, vitamin D, ferritin, hepcidin, and soluble Hjv were assessed before and after the training. Results The training program caused a significant decrease in ferritin, which serves as a good marker of body iron stores. Simultaneously, the physical cardiorespiratory fitness had improved. Furthermore, blood hepcidin was positively correlated with the ferritin concentration after the training. The concentration of blood CRP dropped, but the change was nonsignificant. The applied training resulted in a blood Hjv increase, which was inversely correlated with the vitamin D concentration. Conclusion Overall the Nordic Walking training applied in elderly people significantly reduced blood ferritin concentration, which explains the observed decrease in body iron stores. PMID:26664101

  3. IL-22 regulates iron availability in vivo through the induction of hepcidin.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carole L; Arvedson, Tara L; Cooke, Keegan S; Dickmann, Leslie J; Forte, Carla; Li, Hongyan; Merriam, Kimberly L; Perry, V Kristina; Tran, Linh; Rottman, James B; Maxwell, Joseph R

    2013-08-15

    Iron is a trace element important for the proper folding and function of various proteins. Physiological regulation of iron stores is of critical importance for RBC production and antimicrobial defense. Hepcidin is a key regulator of iron levels within the body. Under conditions of iron deficiency, hepcidin expression is reduced to promote increased iron uptake from the diet and release from cells, whereas during conditions of iron excess, induction of hepcidin restricts iron uptake and movement within the body. The cytokine IL-6 is well established as an important inducer of hepcidin. The presence of this cytokine during inflammatory states can induce hepcidin production, iron deficiency, and anemia. In this study, we show that IL-22 also influences hepcidin production in vivo. Injection of mice with exogenous mouse IgG1 Fc fused to the N terminus of mouse IL-22 (Fc-IL-22), an IL-22R agonist with prolonged and enhanced functional potency, induced hepcidin production, with a subsequent decrease in circulating serum iron and hemoglobin levels and a concomitant increase in iron accumulation within the spleen. This response was independent of IL-6 and was attenuated in the absence of the IL-22R-associated signaling kinase, Tyk2. Ab-mediated blockade of hepcidin partially reversed the effects on iron biology caused by IL-22R stimulation. Taken together, these data suggest that exogenous IL-22 regulates hepcidin production to physiologically influence iron usage.

  4. Iron and cancer risk--a systematic review and meta-analysis of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Jakszyn, Paula; Agudo, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Iron has been suggested as a risk factor for different types of cancers mainly due to its prooxidant activity, which can lead to oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, subjects with hemochromatosis or iron overload have been shown to have a higher risk of developing liver cancer. We have systematically reviewed 59 epidemiologic studies, published between 1995 and 2012, reporting information on total iron, dietary iron, heme iron, and biomarkers of iron status and cancer risk. Furthermore we conducted meta-analysis for colorectal [relative risk (RR), 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.00-1.17], colon (RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.22), breast (RR = 1.03; 95% CI, 0.97-1.09), and lung cancer (RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 0.98-1.29), for an increase of 1 mg/day of heme iron intake. Globally, on the basis of the systematic review and the meta-analysis results, a higher intake of heme iron has shown a tendency toward a positive association with cancer risk. Evidence regarding high levels of biomarkers of iron stores (mostly with serum ferritin) suggests a negative effect toward cancer risk. More prospective studies combining research on dietary iron intake, iron biomarkers, genetic susceptibility, and other relevant factors need to be conducted to clarify these findings and better understand the role of iron in cancer development.

  5. Pathogenic implications of distinct patterns of iron and zinc in chronic MS lesions.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Bogdan F; Frischer, Josa M; Webb, Samuel M; Tham, Mylyne; Adiele, Reginald C; Robinson, Christopher A; Fitz-Gibbon, Patrick D; Weigand, Stephen D; Metz, Imke; Nehzati, Susan; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J; Brück, Wolfgang; Hametner, Simon; Lassmann, Hans; Parisi, Joseph E; Yong, Guo; Lucchinetti, Claudia F

    2017-03-22

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in which oligodendrocytes, the CNS cells that stain most robustly for iron and myelin are the targets of injury. Metals are essential for normal CNS functioning, and metal imbalances have been linked to demyelination and neurodegeneration. Using a multidisciplinary approach involving synchrotron techniques, iron histochemistry and immunohistochemistry, we compared the distribution and quantification of iron and zinc in MS lesions to the surrounding normal appearing and periplaque white matter, and assessed the involvement of these metals in MS lesion pathogenesis. We found that the distribution of iron and zinc is heterogeneous in MS plaques, and with few remarkable exceptions they do not accumulate in chronic MS lesions. We show that brain iron tends to decrease with increasing age and disease duration of MS patients; reactive astrocytes organized in large astrogliotic areas in a subset of smoldering and inactive plaques accumulate iron and safely store it in ferritin; a subset of smoldering lesions do not contain a rim of iron-loaded macrophages/microglia; and the iron content of shadow plaques varies with the stage of remyelination. Zinc in MS lesions was generally decreased, paralleling myelin loss. Iron accumulates concentrically in a subset of chronic inactive lesions suggesting that not all iron rims around MS lesions equate with smoldering plaques. Upon degeneration of iron-loaded microglia/macrophages, astrocytes may form an additional protective barrier that may prevent iron-induced oxidative damage.

  6. Greater hippocampal neuronal recruitment in food-storing than in non-food-storing birds.

    PubMed

    Hoshooley, Jennifer S; Sherry, David F

    2007-03-01

    Previous research has shown heightened recruitment of new neurons to the chickadee hippocampus in the fall. The present study was conducted to determine whether heightened fall recruitment is associated with the seasonal onset of food-storing by comparing neurogenesis in chickadees and a non-food-storing species, the house sparrow. Chickadees and house sparrows were captured in the wild in fall and spring and received multiple injections of the cell birth marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). Birds were held in captivity and the level of hippocampal neuron recruitment was assessed after 6 weeks. Chickadees showed significantly more hippocampal neuronal recruitment than house sparrows. We found no seasonal differences in hippocampal neuronal recruitment in either species. In chickadees and in house sparrows, one-third of new cells labeled for BrdU also expressed the mature neuronal protein, NeuN. In a region adjacent to the hippocampus, the hyperpallium apicale, we observed no significant differences in neuronal recruitment between species or between seasons. Hippocampal volume and total neuron number both were greater in spring than in fall in chickadees, but no seasonal differences were observed in house sparrows. Enhanced neuronal recruitment in the hippocampus of food-storing chickadees suggests a degree of neurogenic specialization that may be associated with the spatial memory requirements of food-storing behavior.

  7. Competition among species of stored-product psocids (Psocoptera) in stored grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the competition of stored-product psocid species, by conducting two series of laboratory experiments. In the first series, three Liposcelididae were used: Liposcelis bostrychophila, L. decolor and L. paeta. Five adult females of these species were placed in vials, either alone or in all...

  8. Iron acquisition in Bacillus cereus: the roles of IlsA and bacillibactin in exogenous ferritin iron mobilization.

    PubMed

    Segond, Diego; Abi Khalil, Elise; Buisson, Christophe; Daou, Nadine; Kallassy, Mireille; Lereclus, Didier; Arosio, Paolo; Bou-Abdallah, Fadi; Nielsen Le Roux, Christina

    2014-02-01

    In host-pathogen interactions, the struggle for iron may have major consequences on the outcome of the disease. To overcome the low solubility and bio-availability of iron, bacteria have evolved multiple systems to acquire iron from various sources such as heme, hemoglobin and ferritin. The molecular basis of iron acquisition from heme and hemoglobin have been extensively studied; however, very little is known about iron acquisition from host ferritin, a 24-mer nanocage protein able to store thousands of iron atoms within its cavity. In the human opportunistic pathogen Bacillus cereus, a surface protein named IlsA (Iron-regulated leucine rich surface protein type A) binds heme, hemoglobin and ferritin in vitro and is involved in virulence. Here, we demonstrate that IlsA acts as a ferritin receptor causing ferritin aggregation on the bacterial surface. Isothermal titration calorimetry data indicate that IlsA binds several types of ferritins through direct interaction with the shell subunits. UV-vis kinetic data show a significant enhancement of iron release from ferritin in the presence of IlsA indicating for the first time that a bacterial protein might alter the stability of the ferritin iron core. Disruption of the siderophore bacillibactin production drastically reduces the ability of B. cereus to utilize ferritin for growth and results in attenuated bacterial virulence in insects. We propose a new model of iron acquisition in B. cereus that involves the binding of IlsA to host ferritin followed by siderophore assisted iron uptake. Our results highlight a possible interplay between a surface protein and a siderophore and provide new insights into host adaptation of B. cereus and general bacterial pathogenesis.

  9. Impact of inflammation on iron stores in involved and non-involved psoriatic skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, T.; Ynsa, M. D.; Alves, L. C.; Teixeira, P.; Ferreira, J.; Filipe, P.

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role for cellular Fe in cell proliferation, inflammation, and disease tolerance. Psoriasis is a severe inflammatory and hyper proliferative condition of human skin whose aetiology remains poorly understood. Herein, we performed nuclear microscopy techniques to quantify with cellular resolution and high sensitivity the concentration of Fe in lesional (psoriatic plaques) and non-lesional adjacent skin of psoriatic patients. Fe contents were measured across skin depth and along epidermal strata either by quantitatively imaging Fe distribution in regions of interest, or by determining Fe profiles through analysis of sequential points along selected transepts. Both procedures require deconvolution of spectra to project quantitative elemental data through the application of different software codes. Using these approaches a detailed quantitative distribution of Fe was resolved. We show that in both lesional and non-lesional skin, the epidermal profiles of Fe contents showed a peak at the basal layer and that Fe concentration along the basal layer was not uniformly distributed. Typically, Fe levels were significantly higher in epidermal ridges relative to regions above dermal papillae. Lesional skin displayed excess Fe over extended regions above basal layer. In conclusion, we found significantly increased Fe deposits in the epidermis of psoriatic patients, particularly in areas of epidermal hyper proliferation. These findings suggest an important role for Fe in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. They also raise the possibility that manipulation of Fe levels in the skin may become relevant for the clinical management of psoriasis.

  10. Stored RBC Transfusions: Iron, Inflammation, Immunity, Infection 2013 Emily Cooley Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    Emily Cooley was a highly-regarded medical technologist and morphologist. The “Emily Cooley Lectureship and Award” was established to honor her, in particular, and medical technologists, in general. This article reviews some basic concepts about the “life of a red blood cell” and uses these to discuss the actual and potential consequences that occur in patients following clearance of transfused refrigerator storage-damaged red blood cells by extravascular hemolysis. PMID:25196845

  11. Low Prevalence of Iron and Vitamin A Deficiency among Cambodian Women of Reproductive Age

    PubMed Central

    Wieringa, Frank T.; Sophonneary, Prak; Whitney, Sophie; Mao, Bunsoth; Berger, Jacques; Conkle, Joel; Dijkhuizen, Marjoleine A.; Laillou, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of women of reproductive age (WRA) in Cambodia are anemic. To guide interventions, national data on nutritional causes of anemia, including iron deficiency and vitamin A deficiency, are needed. In 2012, a national household survey in WRA on antibodies to routine vaccine-preventable disease immunity was performed. We used serum samples from this survey to estimate the prevalence of iron and vitamin A deficiency in 2112 Cambodian WRA, aged 15 to 39 years. Iron deficiency was classified as low or marginal iron stores (ferritin concentrations corrected for inflammation <15 μg/L and <50 μg/L respectively; Fer), iron deficient erythropoiesis (soluble transferrin receptor concentrations >8.3 mg/L; sTfR), or low total body iron (TBI) derived from Fer and sTfR concentrations (<0 mg/kg). Vitamin A status was classified using retinol binding protein (RBP) concentrations corrected for inflammation as deficient (<0.70 μmol/L) or marginal (<1.05 μmol/L. Overall, the prevalence of low iron stores, low TBI and iron deficient erythropoiesis was 8.1%, 5.0% and 9.3% respectively. Almost 40% of the women had marginal iron stores. Iron status was better in women living in urban areas compared to rural areas (p < 0.05 for TBI and sTfR). The prevalence of vitamin A deficiency was <1%. These findings suggest that the contribution of iron and vitamin A deficiency to the high prevalence of anemia in Cambodian WRA may be limited. The etiology of anemia in Cambodia needs to be elucidated further to guide current policies on anemia. PMID:27043624

  12. New rat models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload.

    PubMed

    Vu'o'ng Lê, Bá; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida; Villegier, Anne-Sophie; Bach, Véronique; Gay-Quéheillard, Jérôme

    2011-07-01

    The majority of murine models of iron sucrose-induced iron overload were carried out in adult subjects. This cannot reflect the high risk of iron overload in children who have an increased need for iron. In this study, we developed four experimental iron overload models in young rats using iron sucrose and evaluated different markers of iron overload, tissue oxidative stress and inflammation as its consequences. Iron overload was observed in all iron-treated rats, as evidenced by significant increases in serum iron indices, expression of liver hepcidin gene and total tissue iron content compared with control rats. We also showed that total tissue iron content was mainly associated with the dose of iron whereas serum iron indices depended essentially on the duration of iron administration. However, no differences in tissue inflammatory and antioxidant parameters from controls were observed. Furthermore, only rats exposed to daily iron injection at a dose of 75 mg/kg body weight for one week revealed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation in iron-treated rats compared with their controls. The present results suggest a correlation between iron overload levels and the dose of iron, as well as the duration and frequency of iron injection and confirm that iron sucrose may not play a crucial role in inflammation and oxidative stress. This study provides important information about iron sucrose-induced iron overload in rats and may be useful for iron sucrose therapy for iron deficiency anemia as well as for the prevention and diagnosis of iron sucrose-induced iron overload in pediatric patients.

  13. Are Grocery Store Tours Capturing the Right Audience? Characteristics of Students Who Volunteer to Receive a Grocery Store Tour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilliard, Elizabeth; Brunt, Ardith; Stangl, Christa; Borr, Mari

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to examine the demographics of students volunteering to receive a grocery store tour in order to assess if these students represent those most in need of the information. Dietetics students trained in giving grocery store tours through a Produce for Better Health grant provided store tours to college student…

  14. [Iron deficiency and anemia in female athletes--causes and risks].

    PubMed

    Portal, Shawn; Epstein, Muli; Dubnov, Gal

    2003-10-01

    Iron deficiency is probably the most common nutrient deficiency in the western world. Low levels of iron in the body are caused by several mechanisms, and become symptomatic with the onset of iron deficiency anemia. Athletes are a special group with additional reasons for iron or blood loss, such as plasma expansion, increase perspiration, 'foot strike hemolysis, and occasionally--malnutrition. Female athletes have yet another source of blood loss--menstruation. However, the most common cause for low hemoglobin levels in an athlete is dilutional pseudoanemia, which is caused by exercise-induced fluid retention. Athletes are more sensitive to the effects of anemia and iron deficiency, as exercise performance depends on maximal oxygen carrying capacity to the active muscle, and efficient oxygen utilization. Iron deficiency without anemia can also reduce athletic performance. Diagnosis is ultimately made by a blood count and red blood cell parameters, with ferritin serving as an index of body iron stores. Treatment requires iron supplements, as it is nearly impossible to refill the iron stores through diet alone.

  15. Iron biomineralization of brain tissue and neurodegenerative disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylova (Mikhailova), Albina

    The brain is an organ with a high concentration of iron in specific areas, particularly in the globus pallidus, the substantia nigra, and the red nucleus. In certain pathological states, such as iron overload disease and neurodegenerative disorders, a disturbed iron metabolism can lead to increased accumulation of iron not only in these areas, but also in the brain regions that are typically low in iron content. Recent studies of the physical and magnetic properties of metalloproteins, and in particular the discovery of biogenic magnetite in human brain tissue, have raised new questions about the role of biogenic iron formations in living organisms. Further investigations revealed the presence of magnetite-like crystalline structures in human ferritin, and indicated that released ferritin iron might act as promoter of oxidative damage to tissue, therefore contributing to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. The purpose of this work was to examine the elemental composition and structure of iron deposits in normal brain tissue as well as tissue affected by neurodegenerative disorders. Employing the methods of X-ray microfocus fluorescence mapping, X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy (XAFS), and light and electron microscopic examinations allows one to obtain qualitative as well as quantitative data with respect to the cellular distribution and chemical state of iron at levels not detected previously. The described tissue preparation technique allows not only satisfactory XAS iron elemental imaging in situ but also multimodal examination with light and electron microscopes of the same samples. The developed protocol has assured consistent and reproducible results on relatively large sections of flat-embedded tissue. The resulting tissue samples were adequate for XAS examination as well as sufficiently well-preserved for future microscopy studies

  16. Iron and the risk of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.G.

    1989-09-01

    Four epidemiological studies have been performed that are generally consistent with the hypothesis that increased available body iron stores increase the risk of cancer or of general mortality. In a study based on the First National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in the United States (NHANES), 232 men who developed cancer over a ten year period had a mean transferrin saturation of 33.1% at least 4 years before diagnosis, whereas 3113 men who did not develop cancer had a transferrin saturation of 30.7% (p = 0.002). The hypothesis is based on two possible biological mechanisms. First, iron can catalyze the production of oxygen radicals and these may be proximate carcinogens. Second, iron may be a limiting nutrient to the growth and replication of a cancer cell. There are at least five areas of potential research related to iron and cancer based on these biological mechanisms: etiology of cancer; etiology of radiation-induced cancer; prognosis after cancer diagnosis; cancer risk resulting from therapy; and interactions with other biochemical factors. An unexpected finding of the human studies done to date has been a highly significant negative association of serum albumin and long term cancer risk. Serum albumin is lower in smokers and older people, however, the negative association persists after controlling for these factors. 25 refs., 3 tabs.

  17. The ubiquity of iron.

    PubMed

    Frey, Perry A; Reed, George H

    2012-09-21

    The importance of iron in living systems can be traced to the many complexes within which it is found, to its chemical mobility in undergoing oxidation-reduction reactions, and to the abundance of iron in Earth's crust. Iron is the most abundant element, by mass, in the Earth, constituting about 80% of the inner and outer cores of Earth. The molten outer core is about 8000 km in diameter, and the solid inner core is about 2400 km in diameter. Iron is the fourth most abundant element in Earth's crust. It is the chemically functional component of mononuclear iron complexes, dinuclear iron complexes, [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters, [Fe-Ni-S] clusters, iron protophorphyrin IX, and many other complexes in protein biochemistry. Metals such as nickel, cobalt, copper, and manganese are present in the crust and could in principle function chemically in place of iron, but they are scarce in Earth's crust. Iron is plentiful because of its nuclear stability in stellar nuclear fusion reactions. It seems likely that other solid planets, formed by the same processes as Earth, would also foster the evolution of life and that iron would be similarly important to life on those planets as it is on Earth.

  18. Iron content and acid phosphatase activity in hepatic parenchymal lysosomes of patients with hemochromatosis before and after phlebotomy treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Cleton, M.I.; de Bruijn, W.C.; van Blokland, W.T.; Marx, J.J.; Roelofs, J.M.; Rademakers, L.H.

    1988-03-01

    Lysosomal structures in liver parenchymal cells of 3 patients with iron overload and of 3 subjects without iron-storage disorders were investigated. A combination of enzyme cytochemistry--with cerium as a captive ion to demonstrate lysosomal acid phosphatase activity--and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) was used. We were able (1) to define and quantify lysosomal structures as lysosomes, siderosomes, or residual bodies, (2) to quantify the amount of iron and cerium simultaneously in these structures, and (3) to evaluate a possible relation between iron storage and enzyme activity. With histopathologically increased iron storage, the number of siderosomes had increased at the cost of lysosomes, with a corresponding increase in acid phosphatase activity in both organelles. In histopahtologically severe iron overload, however, acid phosphatase activity was low or not detectable and most of the iron was stored in residual bodies. After phlebotomy treatment, the number of siderosomes had decreased in favor of the lysosomes, approaching values obtained in control subjects, and acid phosphatase activity was present in all iron-containing structures. In this way a relationship between iron storage and enzyme activity was established. The iron content of the individual lysosomal structures per unit area had increased with histopathologically increased iron storage and had decreased after phlebotomy treatment. From this observation, it is concluded that the iron status of the patient is not only reflected by the amount of iron-containing hepatocytes but, as well, by the iron content lysosomal unit area.

  19. Intravenous iron dextran as a component of anemia management in chronic kidney disease: a report of safety and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Yessayan, Lenar; Sandhu, Ankur; Besarab, Anatole; Yessayan, Alexy; Frinak, Stan; Zasuwa, Gerard; Yee, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to demonstrate safety and efficacy of intravenous (IV) low molecular weight iron dextran (LMWID) during treatment of anemic stage 3 and 4 chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Methods. Efficacy data was obtained by retrospective chart review of 150 consecutively enrolled patients. Patients were assigned per protocol to oral or IV iron, with IV iron given to those with lower iron stores and/or hemoglobin. Iron and darbepoetin were administered to achieve and maintain hemoglobin at 10-12 g/dL. Efficacy endpoints were mean hemoglobin and change in iron indices approximately 30 and 60 days after enrollment. Safety data was obtained by retrospective review of reported adverse drug events (ADEs) following 1699 infusions of LMWID (0.5-1.0 g). Results. Mean hemoglobin, iron saturation, and ferritin increased significantly from baseline to 60 days in patients assigned to LMWID (hemoglobin: 11.3 versus 9.4 g/dL; iron saturation: 24% versus 12.9%; ferritin: 294.7 versus 134.7 ng/mL; all P  values < 0.0001). Iron stores and hemoglobin were maintained in the group assigned to oral iron. Of 1699 iron dextran infusions, three ADEs occurred. Conclusions. Treatment of anemia in CKD stages 3 and 4 with LMWID and darbepoetin is efficacious. The serious ADE rate was 0.06% per infusion.

  20. Iron deficiency and anaemia in bariatric surgical patients: causes, diagnosis and proper management.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M; Botella-Romero, F; Gómez-Ramírez, S; Campos, A; García-Erce, J A

    2009-01-01

    Obesity-induced chronic inflammation leads to activation of the immune system that causes alterations of iron homeostasis including hypoferraemia, iron-restricted erythropoiesis, and finally mild-to-moderate anaemia. Thus, preoperative anaemia and iron deficiency are common among obese patients scheduled for bariatric surgery (BS). Assessment of patients should include a complete haematological and biochemical laboratory work-up, including measurement of iron stores, vitamin B12 and folate. In addition, gastrointestinal evaluation is recommended for most patients with iron-deficiency anaemia. On the other hand, BS is a long-lasting inflammatory stimulus in itself and entails a reduction of the gastric capacity and/or exclusion from the gastrointestinal tract which impair nutrients absorption, including dietary iron. Chronic gastrointestinal blood loss and iron-losingenteropathy may also contribute to iron deficiency after BS. Perioperative anaemia has been linked to increased postoperative morbidity and mortality and decreased quality of life after major surgery, whereas treatment of perioperative anaemia, and even haematinic deficiency without anaemia, has been shown to improve patient outcomes and quality of life. However, long-term follow-up data in regard to prevalence, severity, and causes of anaemia after BS are mostly absent. Iron supplements should be administered to patients after BS, but compliance with oral iron is no good. In addition, once iron deficiency has developed, it may prove refractory to oral treatment. In these situations, IV iron (which can circumvent the iron blockade at enterocytes and macrophages) has emerged as a safe and effective alternative for perioperative anaemia management. Monitoring should continue indefinitely even after the initial iron repletion and anaemia resolution, and maintenance IV iron treatment should be provided as required. New IV preparations, such ferric carboxymaltose, are safe, easy to use and up to 1000 mg can

  1. Importance of adequate exercise in the detection of coronary heart disease by radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Lo, K.; Pitt, B.

    1980-12-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained on 77 symptomatic patients without prior documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease was present by angiograms in 48. Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was abnormal in 41 patients (overall sensitivity 85%). In 29 patients with normal coronary arteries, RNV was normal in 24 (specificity 83%). To determine if the exercise level affects sensitivity, the studies were graded for adequacy of exercise. It was considered adequate if patients developed (a) chest pain, or (b) ST segment depression of at least 1 mm, or (c) if they achieved a pressure rate product greater than 250. Among the 48 patients with coronary artery disease, 35 achieved adequate exercise. Thirty-three had an abnormal RNV (sensitivity 94%). In 13 patients who failed to achieve adequate exercise, RNV was abnormal in eight (sensitivity of only 62%). Some patients with coronary artery disease may have a normal ventricular response at inadequate levels of stress.

  2. [Prevention of ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus by adequate treatment with acyclovir].

    PubMed

    Borruat, F X; Buechi, E R; Piguet, B; Fitting, P; Zografos, L; Herbort, C P

    1991-05-01

    We compared the frequency of severe ocular complications secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (HZO) in 232 patients. They were divided into three groups: 1) patients without treatment (n = 164); 2) patients treated adequately (n = 48) with acyclovir (ACV; 5 x 800 mg/d orally and ophthalmic ointment 5 x /d for a minimum of 7 days, given within three days after skin eruption); and, 3) patients treated inadequately (n = 20) with ACV (only topical treatment, insufficient doses, interrupted treatment, delayed treatment). Patients with no treatment or with inadequate treatments showed the same frequency of severe ocular complications (21% (34/164) and 25% (5/20), respectively). In contrast, when adequate treatment of ACV was given complications occurred in only 4% (2/48) of cases. This study emphasizes the need for prompt (within three days after skin eruption) and adequate (5 x 800 mg/d for at least 7 days) treatment of ACV to prevent the severe complications of HZO.

  3. Comprehensive Sports Medicine Treatment of an Athlete Who Runs Cross-Country and is Iron Deficient

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Linda; Rutt, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Background Optimal athletic performance may be dependent upon an athlete maintaining adequate iron levels through the consumption of dietary forms of iron and subsequent metabolism. Endurance athletes, especially female distance runners, have been identified as being at risk for developing iron deficiency. While iron deficiency is treatable, early diagnosis may be delayed if an adequate medical history and evaluation is not conducted. Objective To describe the evaluation, diagnosis, and comprehensive sports medicine treatment of a collegiate cross-country athlete with a medical diagnosis of iron deficiency with anemia and sports-related musculoskeletal pain. Case Description A 21-year-old female collegiate cross-country athlete experienced a decline in her running performance beginning her freshman year of school. She continued to experience degradation in sports performance despite medical intervention. Two-and-a-half years after initially seeking medical attention she was diagnosed with iron deficiency with anemia by a primary care medical doctor. Additionally, the subject required rehabilitation due to the onset of sports-related musculoskeletal symptoms. Outcomes Comprehensive treatment for this patient consisted of iron supplementation, therapeutic exercises, manual therapy, and modalities. The athlete was able to compete during her entire cross-country season and earn All-American status at the Division-III level. Discussion Sports medicine professionals must consider iron deficiency as a possible differential diagnosis when evaluating endurance athletes. Subtle signs of iron deficiency may, unfortunately, be overlooked ultimately delaying treatment. PMID:21509116

  4. Brain iron homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moos, Torben

    2002-11-01

    Iron is essential for virtually all types of cells and organisms. The significance of the iron for brain function is reflected by the presence of receptors for transferrin on brain capillary endothelial cells. The transport of iron into the brain from the circulation is regulated so that the extraction of iron by brain capillary endothelial cells is low in iron-replete conditions and the reverse when the iron need of the brain is high as in conditions with iron deficiency and during development of the brain. Whereas there is good agreement that iron is taken up by means of receptor-mediated uptake of iron-transferrin at the brain barriers, there are contradictory views on how iron is transported further on from the brain barriers and into the brain extracellular space. The prevailing hypothesis for transport of iron across the BBB suggests a mechanism that involves detachment of iron from transferrin within barrier cells followed by recycling of apo-transferrin to blood plasma and release of iron as non-transferrin-bound iron into the brain interstitium from where the iron is taken up by neurons and glial cells. Another hypothesis claims that iron-transferrin is transported into the brain by means of transcytosis through the BBB. This thesis deals with the topic "brain iron homeostasis" defined as the attempts to maintain constant concentrations of iron in the brain internal environment via regulation of iron transport through brain barriers, cellular iron uptake by neurons and glia, and export of iron from brain to blood. The first part deals with transport of iron-transferrin complexes from blood to brain either by transport across the brain barriers or by uptake and retrograde axonal transport in motor neurons projecting beyond the blood-brain barrier. The transport of iron and transport into the brain was examined using radiolabeled iron-transferrin. Intravenous injection of [59Fe-125]transferrin led to an almost two-fold higher accumulation of 59Fe than of

  5. Broadband inversion of 1J(CC) responses in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra.

    PubMed

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Establishing the carbon skeleton of a molecule greatly facilitates the process of structure elucidation, both manual and computer-assisted. Recent advances in the family of ADEQUATE experiments demonstrated their potential in this regard. 1,1-ADEQUATE, which provides direct (13)C-(13)C correlation via (1)J(CC), and 1,n-ADEQUATE, which typically yields (3)J(CC) and (1)J(CC) correlations, are more sensitive and more widely applicable experiments than INADEQUATE and PANACEA. A recently reported modified pulse sequence that semi-selectively inverts (1)J(CC) correlations in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra provided a significant improvement, allowing (1)J(CC) and (n)J(CC) correlations to be discerned in the same spectrum. However, the reported experiment requires a careful matching of the amplitude transfer function with (1)J(CC) coupling constants in order to achieve the inversion, and even then some (1)J(CC) correlations could still have positive intensity due to the oscillatory nature of the transfer function. Both shortcomings limit the practicality of the method. We now report a new, dual-optimized inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment, which provides more uniform inversion of (1)J(CC) correlations across the range of 29-82 Hz. Unlike the original method, the dual optimization experiment does not require fine-tuning for the molecule's (1)J(CC) coupling constant values. Even more usefully, the dual-optimized version provides up to two-fold improvement in signal-to-noise for some long-range correlations. Using modern, cryogenically-cooled probes, the experiment can be successfully applied to samples of ~1 mg under favorable circumstances. The improvements afforded by dual optimization inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment make it a useful and practical tool for NMR structure elucidation and should facilitate the implementation and utilization of the experiment.

  6. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Melody S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2012-09-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent's race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth.

  7. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Darrell J.; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D.; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent’s race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth. PMID:22658579

  8. Erythropoietin and iron.

    PubMed

    Kaltwasser, J P; Gottschalk, R

    1999-03-01

    Serum ferritin concentration is most informative in estimating the amount of storage iron available for a particular individual. The serum transferrin receptor concentration, in contrast to serum ferritin, provides direct information about any deficit in the adequacy of iron supply to the erythropoiesis. The combination of serum transferrin receptor and serum ferritin provides complete information about storage and functional iron compartments. Using this combination along with the hemoglobin concentration, it is possible to define the iron nutritional status completely. Inflammatory conditions as well as parenteral iron administration interfere, however, with the direct and quantitative ferritin to storage iron relationship and, therefore, have to be considered carefully with respect to diagnostic purposes. The diagnostic use of the serum transferrin receptor is presently limited because of limitations in methodology and definition (standardization) of reference ranges.

  9. High-Iron Consumption Impairs Growth and Causes Copper-Deficiency Anemia in Weanling Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Jung-Heun; Doguer, Caglar; Wang, Xiaoyu; Flores, Shireen R.; Collins, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Iron-copper interactions were described decades ago; however, molecular mechanisms linking the two essential minerals remain largely undefined. Investigations in humans and other mammals noted that copper levels increase in the intestinal mucosa, liver and blood during iron deficiency, tissues all important for iron homeostasis. The current study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that dietary copper influences iron homeostasis during iron deficiency and iron overload. We thus fed weanling, male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6-11/group) AIN-93G-based diets containing high (~8800 ppm), adequate (~80) or low (~11) iron in combination with high (~183), adequate (~8) or low (~0.9) copper for 5 weeks. Subsequently, the iron- and copper-related phenotype of the rats was assessed. Rats fed the low-iron diets grew slower than controls, with changes in dietary copper not further influencing growth. Unexpectedly, however, high-iron (HFe) feeding also impaired growth. Furthermore, consumption of the HFe diet caused cardiac hypertrophy, anemia, low serum and tissue copper levels and decreased circulating ceruloplasmin activity. Intriguingly, these physiologic perturbations were prevented by adding extra copper to the HFe diet. Furthermore, higher copper levels in the HFe diet increased serum nonheme iron concentration and transferrin saturation, exacerbated hepatic nonheme iron loading and attenuated splenic nonheme iron accumulation. Moreover, serum erythropoietin levels, and splenic erythroferrone and hepatic hepcidin mRNA levels were altered by the dietary treatments in unanticipated ways, providing insight into how iron and copper influence expression of these hormones. We conclude that high-iron feeding of weanling rats causes systemic copper deficiency, and further, that copper influences the iron-overload phenotype. PMID:27537180

  10. Storing Renewable Energy in the Hydrogen Cycle.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas; Callini, Elsa; Kato, Shunsuke; Atakli, Züleyha Özlem Kocabas

    2015-01-01

    An energy economy based on renewable energy requires massive energy storage, approx. half of the annual energy consumption. Therefore, the production of a synthetic energy carrier, e.g. hydrogen, is necessary. The hydrogen cycle, i.e. production of hydrogen from water by renewable energy, storage and use of hydrogen in fuel cells, combustion engines or turbines is a closed cycle. Electrolysis splits water into hydrogen and oxygen and represents a mature technology in the power range up to 100 kW. However, the major technological challenge is to build electrolyzers in the power range of several MW producing high purity hydrogen with a high efficiency. After the production of hydrogen, large scale and safe hydrogen storage is required. Hydrogen is stored either as a molecule or as an atom in the case of hydrides. The maximum volumetric hydrogen density of a molecular hydrogen storage is limited to the density of liquid hydrogen. In a complex hydride the hydrogen density is limited to 20 mass% and 150 kg/m(3) which corresponds to twice the density of liquid hydrogen. Current research focuses on the investigation of new storage materials based on combinations of complex hydrides with amides and the understanding of the hydrogen sorption mechanism in order to better control the reaction for the hydrogen storage applications.

  11. Polymeric Bladder for Storing Liquid Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Harvey, Andrew C.; Leary, William

    2009-01-01

    A proposed system for storing oxygen in liquid form and dispensing it in gaseous form is based on (1) initial subcooling of the liquid oxygen; (2) containing the liquid oxygen in a flexible vessel; (3) applying a gas spring to the flexible vessel to keep the oxygen compressed above the saturation pressure and, thus, in the liquid state; and (4) using heat leakage into the system for vaporizing the oxygen to be dispensed. In a typical prior system based on these principles, the flexible vessel is a metal bellows housed in a rigid tank, and the gas spring consists of pressurized helium in the tank volume surrounding the bellows. Unfortunately, the welds in the bellows corrugations are subject to fatigue, and, because bellows have large ullage, a correspondingly large fraction of the oxygen content cannot be expelled. In the proposed system, the flexible vessel would be a bladder made of a liquid- crystal polymer (LCP). (LCPs are strong and compatible with liquid oxygen.) In comparison with a metal bellows, a polymeric bladder would have less ullage and would weigh less. In experiments involving fatigue cycling at liquid-nitrogen temperatures, two LCPs were found to be suitable for this application.

  12. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  13. Making Activated Carbon for Storing Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A.; Serio, Michael A.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2005-01-01

    Solid disks of microporous activated carbon, produced by a method that enables optimization of pore structure, have been investigated as means of storing gas (especially hydrogen for use as a fuel) at relatively low pressure through adsorption on pore surfaces. For hydrogen and other gases of practical interest, a narrow distribution of pore sizes <2 nm is preferable. The present method is a variant of a previously patented method of cyclic chemisorption and desorption in which a piece of carbon is alternately (1) heated to the lower of two elevated temperatures in air or other oxidizing gas, causing the formation of stable carbon/oxygen surface complexes; then (2) heated to the higher of the two elevated temperatures in flowing helium or other inert gas, causing the desorption of the surface complexes in the form of carbon monoxide. In the present method, pore structure is optimized partly by heating to a temperature of 1,100 C during carbonization. Another aspect of the method exploits the finding that for each gas-storage pressure, gas-storage capacity can be maximized by burning off a specific proportion (typically between 10 and 20 weight percent) of the carbon during the cyclic chemisorption/desorption process.

  14. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  15. Carpal tunnel syndrome among grocery store workers.

    PubMed

    Osorio, A M; Ames, R G; Jones, J; Castorina, J; Rempel, D; Estrin, W; Thompson, D

    1994-02-01

    The California Department of Health Services evaluated carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), a median nerve entrapment condition associated with forceful and repetitive wrist motion, among grocery store workers at a large California supermarket where a CTS cluster had been reported. Forceful and repetitive wrist motion was measured, in three exposure levels, through a job classification scheme based upon type of work tasks and average time per week spent performing these tasks. A medical questionnaire and measurements of median sensory nerve conduction were used to measure CTS. CTS prevalence was 23% based upon a sample of 56 participants drawn from a workforce of 69 employees. A relative risk of 8.3 (95% confidence interval 2.6-26.4) for a history of CTS-like symptoms between the high and low exposure level groups held up after adjustment for the potential confounders of age, sex, alcohol consumption, and high-risk medical history. It was concluded that the basic principles of good ergonomic design should be used to prevent or diminish the risk of musculoskeletal injury in the workplace.

  16. Iron sensors and signals in response to iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takanori; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2014-07-01

    The transcription of genes involved in iron acquisition in plants is induced under iron deficiency, but our understanding of iron sensors and signals remains limited. Iron Deficiency-responsive Element-binding Factor 1 (IDEF1) and Hemerythrin motif-containing Really Interesting New Gene- and Zinc-finger proteins (HRZs)/BRUTUS (BTS) have recently emerged as candidate iron sensors because of their functions as potent regulators of iron deficiency responses and their iron-binding properties. IDEF1 is a central transcriptional regulator of graminaceous genes involved in iron uptake and utilization, predominantly during the early stages of iron deficiency. HRZs/BTS are E3 ubiquitin ligases and negative regulators of iron deficiency responses in both graminaceous and non-graminaceous plants. Rice OsHRZ1 and OsHRZ2 are also potent regulators of iron accumulation. Characterizing these putative iron sensors also provides clues to understanding the nature of iron signals, which may involve ionized iron itself, other metals, oxygen, redox status, heme and iron-sulfur clusters, in addition to metabolites affected by iron deficiency. Systemic iron responses may also be regulated by phloem-mobile iron and its chelators such as nicotianamine. Iron sensors and signals will be identified by demonstration of signal transmission by IDEF1, HRZs/BTS, or unknown factors.

  17. Seasonal hippocampal plasticity in food-storing birds

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, David F.; Hoshooley, Jennifer S.

    2010-01-01

    Both food-storing behaviour and the hippocampus change annually in food-storing birds. Food storing increases substantially in autumn and winter in chickadees and tits, jays and nutcrackers and nuthatches. The total size of the chickadee hippocampus increases in autumn and winter as does the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis. The hippocampus is necessary for accurate cache retrieval in food-storing birds and is much larger in food-storing birds than in non-storing passerines. It therefore seems probable that seasonal change in caching and seasonal change in the hippocampus are causally related. The peak in recruitment of new neurons into the hippocampus occurs before birds have completed food storing and cache retrieval for the year and may therefore be associated with spacing caches, encoding the spatial locations of caches, or creating a neuronal architecture involved in the recollection of cache sites. The factors controlling hippocampal plasticity in food-storing birds are not well understood. Photoperiodic manipulations that produce change in food-storing behaviour have no effect on either hippocampal size or neuronal recruitment. Available evidence suggests that changes in hippocampal size and neurogenesis may be a consequence of the behavioural and cognitive involvement of the hippocampus in storing and retrieving food. PMID:20156817

  18. Seasonal hippocampal plasticity in food-storing birds.

    PubMed

    Sherry, David F; Hoshooley, Jennifer S

    2010-03-27

    Both food-storing behaviour and the hippocampus change annually in food-storing birds. Food storing increases substantially in autumn and winter in chickadees and tits, jays and nutcrackers and nuthatches. The total size of the chickadee hippocampus increases in autumn and winter as does the rate of hippocampal neurogenesis. The hippocampus is necessary for accurate cache retrieval in food-storing birds and is much larger in food-storing birds than in non-storing passerines. It therefore seems probable that seasonal change in caching and seasonal change in the hippocampus are causally related. The peak in recruitment of new neurons into the hippocampus occurs before birds have completed food storing and cache retrieval for the year and may therefore be associated with spacing caches, encoding the spatial locations of caches, or creating a neuronal architecture involved in the recollection of cache sites. The factors controlling hippocampal plasticity in food-storing birds are not well understood. Photoperiodic manipulations that produce change in food-storing behaviour have no effect on either hippocampal size or neuronal recruitment. Available evidence suggests that changes in hippocampal size and neurogenesis may be a consequence of the behavioural and cognitive involvement of the hippocampus in storing and retrieving food.

  19. Development of Iron Aluminides.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-03-01

    IRON ALUMINIDES G. Culbertson C. S. Kortovich TRW Inc. Materials & Manufacturing Center 23555 Euclid Avenue Euclid, Ohio 44117 March 1986 Final Report...NO. N I 1 Ti TILE Inciuav Securty ltassificafton, 621 02F 2420 02 1 flevelonment of Iron Aluminides 12 PERSONAL AUJTHOR(S) rl Cul bertson, C~r...rnumber) nrceqrarl w.as conducted to develop improved iron- aluminide alloys with higher qlevated ernerature strength and room temperature ductility

  20. Iron and the athlete.

    PubMed

    Suedekum, Natalie A; Dimeff, Robert J

    2005-08-01

    Iron is an important mineral necessary for many biologic pathways. Different levels of deficiency can occur in the athlete, resulting in symptoms that range from none to severe fatigue. Iron deficiency without anemia may adversely affect athletic performance. Causes of iron deficiency include poor intake, menstrual losses, gastrointestinal and genitourinary losses due to exercise-induced ischemia or organ movement, foot strike hemolysis, thermohemolysis, and sweat losses. A higher incidence of deficiency occurs in female athletes compared with males.