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Sample records for adequate measurement techniques

  1. A Model for Touch Technique and Computation of Adequate Cane Length.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plain-Switzer, Karen

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a model for the motion of a long-cane executing the touch technique and presents formulas for the projected length of a cane adequate to protect an individual with blindness against wall-type and pole-type hazards. The paper concludes that the long-cane should reach from the floor to the user's armpit. (JDD)

  2. Evaluation of catheter-manometer systems for adequate intravascular blood pressure measurements in small animals.

    PubMed

    Idvall, J; Aronsen, K F; Lindström, K; Ulmsten, U

    1977-09-30

    Various catheter-manometer systems possible for intravascular blood pressure measurments on rats have been elaborated and tested in vitro and in vivo. Using a pressure-step calibrator, it was observed from in vitro studies that microtransducers had superior frequency response compared to conventional transducers. Of the catheters tested, Pe-90 tapered to a 40 mm tip with an inner diameter of 0.3 mm had the best frequency response as judged from fall and settling times. Because of the damping effect, tapering increased fall time to 1.8 ms, which was still quite acceptable. By the same token settling time was minimized to 22.4 ms. With a special calculation method the theoretical percentile fault of the recordings was estimated to be 9.66%. When the measurement error was calculated from the actual in vivo recordings, it was found to be no more than 2.7%. These results show that the technique described is adequate for continuous intravascular blood pressure recordings on small animals. Finally it is emphasized that careful handling of the catheters and avoidance of stopcocks and air bubbles are essential for obtaining accurate and reproducible values. PMID:928971

  3. Do measures commonly used in body image research perform adequately with African American college women?

    PubMed

    Kashubeck-West, Susan; Coker, Angela D; Awad, Germine H; Stinson, Rebecca D; Bledman, Rashanta; Mintz, Laurie

    2013-07-01

    This study examines reliability and validity estimates for 3 widely used measures in body image research in a sample of African American college women (N = 278). Internal consistency estimates were adequate (α coefficients above .70) for all measures, and evidence of convergent and discriminant validity was found. Confirmatory factor analyses failed to replicate the hypothesized factor structures of these measures. Exploratory factor analyses indicated that 4 factors found for the Sociocultural Attitudes Toward Appearance Questionnaire were similar to the hypothesized subscales, with fewer items. The factors found for the Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire-Appearance Scales and the Body Dissatisfaction subscale of the Eating Disorders Inventory-3 were not similar to the subscales developed by the scale authors. Validity and reliability evidence is discussed for the new factors. PMID:23731233

  4. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  5. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  6. Remote Raman Measurement Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Donald A.

    1981-02-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  7. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  8. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Macarthur, Duncan W; Langner, Diana; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Razinkov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  9. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  10. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  11. OPTIMIZING EXPOSURE MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The research reported in this task description addresses one of a series of interrelated NERL tasks with the common goal of optimizing the predictive power of low cost, reliable exposure measurements for the planned Interagency National Children's Study (NCS). Specifically, we w...

  12. Measurement Techniques for Hypervelocity Impact Test Fragments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to classify the size and shape of individual orbital debris fragments provides a better understanding of the orbital debris environment as a whole. The characterization of breakup fragmentation debris has gradually evolved from a simplistic, spherical assumption towards that of describing debris in terms of size, material, and shape parameters. One of the goals of the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office is to develop high-accuracy techniques to measure these parameters and apply them to orbital debris observations. Measurement of the physical characteristics of debris resulting from groundbased, hypervelocity impact testing provides insight into the shapes and sizes of debris produced from potential impacts in orbit. Current techniques for measuring these ground-test fragments require determination of dimensions based upon visual judgment. This leads to reduced accuracy and provides little or no repeatability for the measurements. With the common goal of mitigating these error sources, allaying any misunderstandings, and moving forward in fragment shape determination, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office recently began using a computerized measurement system. The goal of using these new techniques is to improve knowledge of the relation between commonly used dimensions and overall shape. The immediate objective is to scan a single fragment, measure its size and shape properties, and import the fragment into a program that renders a 3D model that adequately demonstrates how the object could appear in orbit. This information would then be used to aid optical methods in orbital debris shape determination. This paper provides a description of the measurement techniques used in this initiative and shows results of this work. The tradeoffs of the computerized methods are discussed, as well as the means of repeatability in the measurements of these fragments. This paper serves as a general description of methods for the measurement and shape analysis of

  13. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  14. Modified Technique For Chemisorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Schryer, Jacqueline

    1989-01-01

    In measurements of chemisorption of CO on Pt/SnO2 catalyst observed that if small numbers of relatively large volumes of adsorbate gas are passed through sample, very little removal of CO detected. In these cases little or no CO has been chemisorbed on Pt/SnO2. Technique of using large number of small volumes of adsorbate gas to measure chemisorption applicable to many gas/material combinations other than CO on Pt/SnO2. Volume used chosen so that at least 10 percent of adsorbate gas removed during each exposure.

  15. A measurement technique for hydroxyacetone

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C{double{underscore}bond}CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NOx. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water, the authors developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one they reported earlier, namely, derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, they adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island, New York. The authors report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  16. An Examination of Principal Leadership Styles and Their Influence on School Performance as Measured by Adequate Yearly Progress at Selected Title I Elementary Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tammy Faith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine principal leadership styles and their influence on school performance as measured by adequate yearly progress at selected Title I schools in South Carolina. The main focus of the research study was to complete descriptive statistics on principal leadership styles in schools that met or did not meet adequate…

  17. A MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR HYDROXYACETONE.

    SciTech Connect

    KLOTZ,P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C=CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NO{sub x}. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water (it's Henry's law constant being {approx}2 x 10{sup 4} M atm{sup -1} at 20 C, Zhou and Lee, unpublished data), we developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one we reported earlier (Lee and Zhou, 1993), namely, based on derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, we adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island (LI), New York. We report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  18. Assessment of adequate quality and collocation of reference measurements with space-borne hyperspectral infrared instruments to validate retrievals of temperature and water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, X.

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to assess whether a given reference ground-based point observation, typically a radiosonde measurement, is adequately collocated and sufficiently representative of space-borne hyperspectral infrared instrument measurements. Once this assessment is made, the ground-based data can be used to validate and potentially calibrate, with a high degree of accuracy, the hyperspectral retrievals of temperature and water vapour.

  19. a Technique for Biaxial Damping Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooker, R. J.; Foster, C. G.

    1995-11-01

    A description is given of a novel technique by means of which experimental studies may be made of the energy dissipation behaviour of materials subjected to biaxial (i.e., combined stress) loading. A specimen in the form a thin cylinder is subjected to simultaneous but separately controlled fluctuating fluid pressures internally, externally and axially. Pressure control is achieved by electro-hydraulic servo-systems and strain response is measured by miniature electrical resistance strain gauges. The apparatus is believed to be unique in its ability to apply biaxial with uniform stress distribution and uniform ratio of principal stresses over the full range -1 ≤ σ 2/σ 1≤ 1 with adequate control and accuracy and absence of means tress. Hysteresis loops in the two principal directions are recorded. The principles of the apparatus and the special features of its design are discussed. Experimental results are presented. The errors associated with operation of the apparatus correspond to loss factors of the order of 0·001-0·002 and hence the apparatus may be considered satisfactory for studies of materials of loss factor 0·01 and higher.

  20. Simple Techniques for Microclimate Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, D. M.

    1978-01-01

    Describes simple ways of measuring the very local climate near the ground, and explains what these measurements mean. Equipment included a solar radiometer, a dew point instrument, and a thermocouple psychrometer. Examples are given of field measurements taken with some of the equipment and the results and their interpretation are discussed.…

  1. Thermal Measurement Techniques in Analytical Microfluidic Devices.

    PubMed

    Davaji, Benyamin; Lee, Chung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Thermal measurement techniques have been used for many applications such as thermal characterization of materials and chemical reaction detection. Micromachining techniques allow reduction of the thermal mass of fabricated structures and introduce the possibility to perform high sensitivity thermal measurements in the micro-scale and nano-scale devices. Combining thermal measurement techniques with microfluidic devices allows performing different analytical measurements with low sample consumption and reduced measurement time by integrating the miniaturized system on a single chip. The procedures of thermal measurement techniques for particle detection, material characterization, and chemical detection are introduced in this paper. PMID:26066563

  2. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa’n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-10-01

    -only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p < 0.001). As expected, photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy}. The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  3. Measurement Techniques for Clock Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin; Schlesinger, Adam

    2012-01-01

    NASA is in the process of modernizing its communications infrastructure to accompany the development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to replace the shuttle. With this effort comes the opportunity to infuse more advanced coded modulation techniques, including low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes that offer greater coding gains than the current capability. However, in order to take full advantage of these codes, the ground segment receiver synchronization loops must be able to operate at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than supported by equipment currently in use.

  4. Using Math and Reading Curriculum-Based Measurements to Predict State Mathematics Test Performance: Are Simple One-Minute Measures Technically Adequate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiban, Cynthia L.; Deno, Stanley L.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the technical adequacy of 3 simple, 1-min curriculum-based measurements (CBM) for predicting third (n = 35) and fifth (n = 49) graders' performance on a state standards test of mathematics. Measures included 2 numeric CBMs: a traditional basic facts measure and a new "cloze" math facts measure, designed to require deeper…

  5. Liquid crystal quantitative temperature measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Zongshan

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative temperature measurement using wide band thermochromic liquid crystals is an “area” thermal measurement technique. This technique utilizes the feature that liquid crystal changes its reflex light color with variation of temperature and applies an image capturing and processing system to calibrate the characteristic curve of liquid crystal’s color-temperature. Afterwards, the technique uses this curve to measure the distribution of temperature on experimental model. In this paper, firstly, each part of quantitative temperature measurement system using liquid crystal is illustrated and discussed. Then the technique is employed in a long duration hypersonic wind tunnel, and the quantitative result of the heat transfer coefficient along laminar plate is obtained. Additionally, some qualitative results are also given. In the end, comparing the experimental results with reference enthalpy theoretical results, a conclusion of thermal measurement accuracy is drawn.

  6. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques, which involves some investigations related to measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand, is reported. A major part of the activity was devoted to instruction and discussion with Thai radar engineers, technicians, and meteorologists concerning the basic principles of radar meteorology and applications to specific problems, including measurement of rainfall and detection of wind shear/microburst hazards. Weather radar calibration techniques were also considered during this project. Most of the activity took place during two visits to Thailand, in December 1990 and February 1992.

  7. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  8. In-flight aeroelastic measurement technique development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2003-11-01

    The initial concept and development of a low-cost, adaptable method for the measurement of static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation of aircraft during flight testing is presented. The method is adapted from a proven technique used in wind tunnel testing to measure model deformation, often referred to as the videogrammetric model deformation (or VMD) technique. The requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the proposed measurements and differences compared with that used for wind tunnel testing is given. Several error sources and their effects are identified. Measurement examples using the new technique, including change in wing twist and deflection as a function of time, from an F/A-18 research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are presented.

  9. Optical Measurement Technique for Space Column Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Watson, Judith J.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Phelps, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical technique for the structural characterization of lightweight space columns is presented. The technique is useful for determining the coefficient of thermal expansion during cool down as well as the induced strain during tension and compression testing. The technique is based upon object-to-image plane scaling and does not require any photogrammetric calibrations or computations. Examples of the measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion are presented for several lightweight space columns. Examples of strain measured during tension and compression testing are presented along with comparisons to results obtained with Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT) position transducers.

  10. New techniques in measuring nonacidic esophageal reflux.

    PubMed

    Vaezi, M F; Shay, S S

    2001-07-01

    New techniques in esophageal monitoring are allowing for better differentiation in the role of different gastric refluxates in esophageal mucosal damage and patient symptoms. The Bilitec 2001 (Synectics, Stockholm, Sweden) is a portable spectrophotometer that measures bilirubin as a surrogate marker for bile reflux and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) (Sandhill Scientific Inc, Highlands Ranch, CO) is a new technique allowing measurement of esophageal volume refluxate. Both techniques assess the role of nonacidic esophageal reflux. Despite their novel approach in assessing nonacid reflux, both methods have limitations. Future studies in this area, however, will prove beneficial in identifying their role in diagnosis and management of patients with suspected nonacid reflux disease. PMID:11568871

  11. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  12. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the “gold standard” for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in US hospitals. This has led to the proliferation of non-mercury devices and has changed (probably for ever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed. PMID:20937442

  13. Wastewater Sampling Methodologies and Flow Measurement Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Daniel J.; Keffer, William J.

    This document provides a ready source of information about water/wastewater sampling activities using various commercial sampling and flow measurement devices. The report consolidates the findings and summarizes the activities, experiences, sampling methods, and field measurement techniques conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),…

  14. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  15. A discussion of dynamic stability measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the measurement of the dynamic stability of linear systems are discussed. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the errors in the procedures, and to methods for calculating the system damping from the data. The techniques discussed include: transient decay, moving block analysis, spectral analysis, random decrement signatures, transfer function analysis, and parameter identification methods. The special problems of rotorcraft dynamic stability testing are discussed.

  16. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  17. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WDI 5387, 'Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells' was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and the international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  18. Cantilever and capacitor technique for measuring dilatation

    SciTech Connect

    Primak, W.; Monahan, E.

    1983-05-01

    The relationship of EerNisse's technique for measuring small dilatations caused by irradiation with short-range particles, which utilizes a metallized thin plate mounted as a cantilever below whose free end an electrode is placed (forming a capacitor), to a photoelastic technique and to an interferometric technique are derived. The effects of stray capacitance, the fringing field of the capacitor, the clamping stress on the cantilever plate, the electrical resistance of the metallic coating, the charging of the tank circuit of which the capacitor is an element, the flange bolting stress, and the beam heating are assessed, and examples of the manner in which they contaminate the data are given.

  19. An intercomparison of five ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E. J.; Sandholm, S. T.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Schendel, J. S.; Langford, A. O.; Quinn, P. K.; Lebel, P. J.; Vay, S. A.; Roberts, P. D.; Norton, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from five techniques for measuring gas-phase ammonia at low concentration in the atmosphere are compared. These methods are: (1) a photofragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (PF/LIF) instrument; (2) a molybdenum oxide annular denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection technique; (3) a tungsten oxide denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection system; (4) a citric-acid-coated denuder sampling/ion chromatographic analysis (CAD/IC) method; and (5) an oxalic-acid-coated filter pack sampling/colorimetric analysis method. It was found that two of the techniques, the PF/LIF and the CAD/IC methods, measured approximately 90 percent of the calculated ammonia added in the spiking tests and agreed very well with each other in the ambient measurements.

  20. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  1. A comparison of infrared-emittance measurements and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Millard, J P; Streed, E R

    1969-07-01

    Values of directional and hemispherical emittance of twelve coatings were needed in support of a spacecraft experiment. Laboratory measurements were made by two calorimetric and four reflectance techniques and with two portable devices designed for field or laboratory operation. The measurement results are compared, primarily on the basis of hemispherical emittance values deduced from each; and the limitations and uncertainties of each technique are summarized. PMID:20072458

  2. Microwave techniques for physical property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1993-01-01

    Industrial processing of metals and ceramics is now being streamlined by the development of theoretical models. High temperature thermophysical properties of these materials are required to successfully apply these theories. Unfortunately, there is insufficient experimental data available for many of these properties, particularly in the molten state. Microwave fields can be used to measure specific heat, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and dielectric constants at high temperatures. We propose to (1) develop a microwave flash method (analogous to the laser flash technique) that can simultaneously measure the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of insulators and semiconductors at high temperatures, (2) an appropriate theory and experimental apparatus to demonstrate the measurement of the specific heat of a metal using a new microwave ac specific heat technique, and (3) experimental methods for noncontact measurement of the real and imaginary dielectric constants.

  3. Apparatus and techniques for measuring bedload

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbell, David Wellington

    1964-01-01

    The need for accurate determinations of the total sediment discharge of particles of bedload size has prompted this investigation of available and possible measuring apparatus and procedures. The accuracy of measurements of sediment discharge made with trap-type samplers is affected by the variability of sampler efficiency, by the oscillatory variation of bedload discharge, and by sampler placement. Equations that were developed for determining total discharge from measured bedioad discharge and measured suspended-sediment discharge are simplest if the bedload apparatus measures only the true bedload. Early bedload samplers are generally unsatisfactory. Recently developed or suggested apparatus include various improved samplers of the pressure-difference type, a pumping sampler, a magnetic sampler, acoustical instruments that measure the magnitude of the sound of particle collisions, an ultrasonic bedload sampler designed to measure and integrate electronically the concentration and velocity, and a tiltmeter designed to measure the total sediment discharge from the ground tilt that results from the passage of flow. All the pressure-difference samplers are improvements over early samplers, but none are void of the inherent shortcomings of trap-type apparatus; probably the Sphinx (Dutch) and VUV (Hungarian) samplers are the most satisfactory. The acoustical instruments are capable of measuring only the relative discharge. The ultrasonic sampler and the tiltmeter are not adequate without further development. Some new possible apparatus and means for measuring or aiding in measuring bedload discharge are small pit samplers, ultrasonic sounders, pressure transducers, and photography. A small pit sampler for measuring bedload discharge was designed to provide self-placement and portability ; however, its practicability and efficiency are undetermined. Exploratory films show that by using slowmotion photography the discharge of particles larger than about pea size can be

  4. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  5. Heat capacity measurements - Progress in experimental techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmikumar, S. T.; Gopal, E. S. R.

    1981-11-01

    The heat capacity of a substance is related to the structure and constitution of the material and its measurement is a standard technique of physical investigation. In this review, the classical methods are first analyzed briefly and their recent extensions are summarized. The merits and demerits of these methods are pointed out. The newer techniques such as the a.c. method, the relaxation method, the pulse methods, the laser flash calorimetry and other methods developed to extend the heat capacity measurements to newer classes of materials and to extreme conditions of sample geometry, pressure and temperature are comprehensively reviewed. Examples of recent work and details of the experimental systems are provided for each method. The introduction of automation in control systems for the monitoring of the experiments and for data processing is also discussed. Two hundred and eight references and 18 figures are used to illustrate the various techniques.

  6. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    This grant provides for some investigations related to weather radar measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand. Quality data are needed from those systems to support TRMM and other scientific investigations. Activities carried out during a trip to the radar facilities at Phuket are described.

  7. High accuracy radiation efficiency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The relatively large antenna subarrays (tens of meters) to be used in the Solar Power Satellite, and the desire to accurately quantify antenna performance, dictate the requirement for specialized measurement techniques. The error contributors associated with both far-field and near-field antenna measurement concepts were quantified. As a result, instrumentation configurations with measurement accuracy potential were identified. In every case, advances in the state of the art of associated electronics were found to be required. Relative cost trade-offs between a candidate far-field elevated antenna range and near-field facility were also performed.

  8. Validation techniques for quantitative brain tumors measurements.

    PubMed

    Salman, Y; Assal, M; Badawi, A; Alian, S; -M El-Bayome, M

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of tumor volume becomes more realistic with the use of imaging- particularly specially when the tumor have non-ellipsoidal morphology, which remains subtle, irregular and difficult to assess by visual metric and clinical examination. The quantitative measurements depend strongly on the accuracy of the segmentation technique. The validity of brain tumor segmentation methods is an important issue in medical imaging because it has a direct impact on many applications such as surgical planning and quantitative measurements of tumor volume. Our goal was to examine two popular segmentation techniques seeded region growing and active contour "snakes" to be compared against experts' manual segmentations as the gold standard. We illustrated these methods on brain tumor volume cases using MR imaging modality. PMID:17281898

  9. Unsteady measurement techniques for turbomachinery flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffa, Nicholas Andrew

    Accurate unsteady measurements are required for studying the flows in high speed turbomachines, which rely on the interaction between rotating and stationary components. Using statistics of phase locked ensembles simplifies the problem, but accurate frequency response in the 10-100 kHz range significantly limits the applicable techniques. This research advances the state of the art for phase resolved measurement techniques using for high speed turbomachinery flows focusing on the following areas: development, validation, and uncertainty quantification. Four methods were developed and implemented: an unsteady total pressure probe, the multiple overheat hot-wire method, the slanted hot-wire method, and the phase peak yaw hot-wire method. These methods allow for the entire phase locked average flow field to be measured (temperature, pressure, and velocity components, swirl angle, etc.). No trusted reference measurement or representative canonical flow exists for comparison of the phase resolved quantities, making validation challenging. Five different validation exercises were performed to increase the confidence and explore the range of applicability. These exercises relied on checking for consistency with expected flow features, comparing independent measurements, and cross validation with CFD. The combined uncertainties for the measurements were quantified using uncertainty estimates from investigations into the elemental error sources. The frequency response uncertainty of constant temperature hot-wire system was investigated using a novel method of illuminating the wire with a laser pulse. The uncertainty analysis provided estimates for the uncertainty in the measurements as well as showing the sensitivity to various sources of error.

  10. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  11. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Haibin; Shi, Chenbo; Zhang, Xin'ai; Zhang, Zun; Cheng, Jiao

    2011-03-01

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 μN s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 μN s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 μN s with 95% credibility. PMID:21456799

  12. Measurements of Gastric Emptying by Biomagnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, L. A.; Sosa, M.; Córdova, T.; Vargas, F. M.; Huerta, M. R.

    2006-09-01

    In the present work a new method to measure the average time of gastric emptying by using a magnetic tracer is showed, this work shows the application of foundations of the electromagnetic theory in the study of the gastrointestinal system. The presented technique is relatively cheap and can be used it to diagnose of diseases, is a noninvasive method, is a technique that does not use ionizing radiation. In this investigation was possible to measure the average time of gastric emptying with a very high precision. In this investigation measurements of 10 healthy volunteers were made, and an average time of gastric emptying of 36.45 minutes in the space of the time was obtained, in addition with the analysis to the signal by means of the use of a pass-band filter it was possible to measure the peristaltic frequencies of the stomach and an average time of 37.24 minutes in the space of frequencies. With this technique it is possible to obtain data of the walls of the stomach. A peristaltic frequency of 2.79 was obtained cpm (cycles per minute).

  13. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  14. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  15. Measurement Techniques for Cellular Biomechanics In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Addae-Mensah, Kweku A; Wikswo, John P

    2014-01-01

    Living cells and tissues experience mechanical forces in their physiological environments that are known to affect many cellular processes. Also of importance are the mechanical properties of cells, as well as the microforces generated by cellular processes themselves in their microenvironments. The difficulty associated with studying these phenomena in vivo has led to alternatives such as using in vitro models. The need for experimental techniques for investigating cellular biomechanics and mechanobiology in vitro has fueled an evolution in the technology used in these studies. Particularly noteworthy are some of the new biomicroelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) devices and techniques that have been introduced to the field. We describe some of the cellular micromechanical techniques and methods that have been developed for in vitro studies, and provide summaries of the ranges of measured values of various biomechanical quantities. We also briefly address some of our experiences in using these methods and include modifications we have introduced in order to improve them. PMID:18445766

  16. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakalyar, D.M.; James, J.V.; Wang, C.C.

    1982-08-15

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions we have been able to obtain routinely a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 10/sup 6/ over absorption paths <1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approx.6 parts in 10/sup 5/ over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3 x 10/sup 6/ OH molecules/cm/sup 3/, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration of our fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  17. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; James, J. V.; Wang, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions it has been possible to routinely obtain a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 1,000,000 over absorption paths less than 1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approximately 6 parts in 100,000 over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3,000,000 OH molecules/cu cm, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration the fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  18. Techniques for measurement of thoracoabdominal asynchrony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Hammer, J.; Newth, Christopher J L.

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory motion measured by respiratory inductance plethysmography often deviates from the sinusoidal pattern assumed in the traditional Lissajous figure (loop) analysis used to determine thoraco-abdominal asynchrony, or phase angle phi. We investigated six different time-domain methods of measuring phi, using simulated data with sinusoidal and triangular waveforms, phase shifts of 0-135 degrees, and 10% noise. The techniques were then used on data from 11 lightly anesthetized rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; 7.6 +/- 0.8 kg; 5.7 +/- 0.5 years old), instrumented with a respiratory inductive plethysmograph, and subjected to increasing levels of inspiratory resistive loading ranging from 5-1,000 cmH(2)O. L(-1). sec(-1).The best results were obtained from cross-correlation and maximum linear correlation, with errors less than approximately 5 degrees from the actual phase angle in the simulated data. The worst performance was produced by the loop analysis, which in some cases was in error by more than 30 degrees. Compared to correlation, other analysis techniques performed at an intermediate level. Maximum linear correlation and cross-correlation produced similar results on the data collected from monkeys (SD of the difference, 4.1 degrees ) but all other techniques had a high SD of the difference compared to the correlation techniques.We conclude that phase angles are best measured using cross-correlation or maximum linear correlation, techniques that are independent of waveform shape, and robust in the presence of noise. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Phase Retrieval Techniques In Coordinates Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Harizanova, J. I.; Stoykova, E. V.; Sainov, V. C.

    2007-04-23

    A precise pattern projection profilometry for three-dimensional shape measurements with different methods of fringe generation is presented. The application of phase-shifting algorithm along with two-spacing illumination allow for phase retrieval and estimation of relative and absolute coordinates of the tested samples. The following experimental approaches for fringe generation are investigated: interferometric approach based on a classical Michelson interferometer, digital computation with a DMD projection and light modulation by a sinusoidal phase grating. The theoretical background, experimental results as well as comparison of the applied generation methods are analyzed. The obtained outcomes successfully display the applicability of this technique for surface profile measurement. The application of the proposed techniques for remote, non-destructive in-situ inspection of real objects from cultural heritage is discussed.

  20. Investigation of a noncontact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.; Talarico, L.J.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new noncontact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components; however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  1. UF6 enrichment measurements using TDLS techniques.

    PubMed

    Berezin, A G; Malyugin, S L; Nadezhdinskii, A I; Namestnikov, D Yu; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Stavrovskii, D B; Shapovalov, Yu P; Vyazov, I E; Zaslavskii, V Ya; Selivanov, Yu G; Gorshunov, N M; Grigoriev, G Yu; Nabiev, Sh Sh

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this work was investigation of possibility of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) technique application for gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) isotope measurement. Spectra of uranium hexafluoride gas mixture were investigated using two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers Vector 22 and Bruker 66v. Observed spectral features were identified and model spectra of different gas mixture components were developed. Optimal spectral range for measurements was determined near maximum of UF6 combination band nu1+nu3. Laboratory prototype of multi-channel instrument under consideration based on tunable diode lasers was built and algorithms were developed to measure gaseous UF6 isotopic ratios. Diode laser used operated at the wavelengths near lambda=7.68 microm. It was placed in a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat. Three instrument channels were used for laser frequency calibration and spectra recording. Instrument was tested in measurements of real UF6 gas mixtures. Measurement accuracy was analyzed and error sources were identified. The root-mean-square random error in the 235U isotopic content is characterized by a spread of about 0.27% for quick measurements (at times less than 1 min) and 1% for periods of more than an hour. It was estimated that the measurement accuracy could be improved by at least an order of magnitude by minimizing the error sources. PMID:17142093

  2. UF 6 enrichment measurements using TDLS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, A. G.; Malyugin, S. L.; Nadezhdinskii, A. I.; Namestnikov, D. Yu.; Ponurovskii, Ya. Ya.; Stavrovskii, D. B.; Shapovalov, Yu. P.; Vyazov, I. E.; Zaslavskii, V. Ya.; Selivanov, Yu. G.; Gorshunov, N. M.; Grigoriev, G. Yu.; Nabiev, Sh. Sh.

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this work was investigation of possibility of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) technique application for gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF 6) isotope measurement. Spectra of uranium hexafluoride gas mixture were investigated using two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers Vector 22 and Bruker 66v. Observed spectral features were identified and model spectra of different gas mixture components were developed. Optimal spectral range for measurements was determined near maximum of UF 6 combination band ν1 + ν3. Laboratory prototype of multi-channel instrument under consideration based on tunable diode lasers was built and algorithms were developed to measure gaseous UF 6 isotopic ratios. Diode laser used operated at the wavelengths near λ = 7.68 μm. It was placed in a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat. Three instrument channels were used for laser frequency calibration and spectra recording. Instrument was tested in measurements of real UF 6 gas mixtures. Measurement accuracy was analyzed and error sources were identified. The root-mean-square random error in the 235U isotopic content is characterized by a spread of about 0.27% for quick measurements (at times less than 1 min) and 1% for periods of more than an hour. It was estimated that the measurement accuracy could be improved by at least an order of magnitude by minimizing the error sources.

  3. Human lens modeling and biometric measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanqiao

    This dissertation conducts theoretical and instrumental aspects of research aiming at extending knowledge and understanding of the optical design of the human eye. The first part of the thesis describes a newly constructed dynamic eye model that includes a gradient index (GRIN) lens to simulate eye accommodation. The GRIN profile of the crystalline lens is defined by a single continuous GRIN equation with optical power variability. In describing the lens accommodation process, different expansion coefficients are given to the lens nucleus and cortex to mimic lens dynamics. A relaxed state eye, a 4-D accommodated eye and a 10-D accommodated eye are simulated on a computer for studying and analyzing the first order and third order properties. This eye model can be further improved if giving accurate biometric measurement data on accommodating eyes. The second part of the thesis proposes an original interferometric technique that has potential for non-invasive ocular biometric measurements. This technique, termed spatial coherence interferometry, utilizes spatially incoherent monochromatic light as the illumination source, and employs the principle of low coherence interferometry to perform optical sectioning. Generalized coherence function for a multi-layer sample is derived and the theoretical axial longitudinal resolution is formulated. A spatial coherence interferometer with tunable coherence length is built, and detailed instrumental design and specifications are illustrated. Factors affecting system longitudinal resolution are examined. The instrument is first tested on plane mirrors for characterizing the longitudinal resolution. Various experiments are conducted including target searching, curved surface profiling and multi-layer sample sectioning. Finally en face surface profiling is performed on a pair of life size model eyes, and full field interferograms from various ocular surfaces are generated sequentially due to optical sectioning. In future research

  4. Thermoluminescence measurement technique using millisecond temperature pulses.

    PubMed

    Manfred, Michael E; Gabriel, Nicholas T; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Talghader, Joseph J

    2010-06-01

    A measurement technique, pulsed thermoluminescence, is described which uses short thermal pulses to excite trapped carriers leading to radiative recombination. The pulses are obtained using microstructures with approximately 500 micros thermal time constants. The technique has many of the advantages of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence without the need for optical sources and filters to isolate the luminescent signal. Charge carrier traps in alpha-Al(2)O(3):C particles on microheaters were filled using 205 nm light. Temperature pulses of 10 and 50 ms were applied to the heaters and compared with a standard thermoluminescence curve taken at a ramp rate of 5 K s(-1). This produced curves of intensity verses temperature similar to standard thermoluminescence except shifted to higher temperatures. The luminescence of single particles was read multiple times with negligible loss of population. The lower limit of the duration of useful pulses appears to be limited by particle size and thermal contact between the particle and heater. PMID:20522565

  5. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  6. A comparison of two swirl measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. J.; Jambunathan, K.; Button, B. L.; Rhine, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Two experimental techniques for quantifying swirling airflow in the entrance region of annular ducts are presented. Swirl numbers derived from measurements of the torque on a pivoted honeycomb structure are compared with those obtained from the fringes on the inner surface of the duct sprayed with liquid crystals. The primary flow angles measured from the fringe patterns have been verified by using a Pitot tube and smoke trials. The swirl numbers range from 0.7 to 1.4 for Reynolds numbers of 4000-15,000. Data were obtained up to 11 hydraulic diameters from the entrance of two annular ducts that had diameter ratios of 0.66 and 0.79. The results show that the liquid crystal technique is an easy-to-use and attractive low-cost alternative to the more traditional approach, although the authors recognize that more expensive, nonintrusive, full-field velocity measurements, such as laser-Doppler anemometry, are superior to either of the methods considered here.

  7. Techniques for beam impedance measurements above cutoff

    SciTech Connect

    Lambertson, G.R.; Jacob, A.F.; Rimmer, R.A.; Voelker, F.

    1990-08-01

    Methods for measuring beam impedance above cutoff have been very limited. For design work on the ALS we have developed two techniques that yield data in the frequency domain with high sensitivity. The first is an extension of the wire method; the second utilizes traveling TM waves to simulate the beam's fields at the wall, and thus avoids the mechanical difficulties of mounting the wire. It is also more sensitive than the other method but the interpretation is complicated by the presence of higher order modes. With either method we were able to detect resonant peaks smaller than 1 Ohm at 10 GHz.

  8. Ion composition measurement techniques for space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, George

    1990-01-01

    Plasmas found in space range from the solar wind with a typical temperature of 100,000-1,000,000 K, about 400 km/s bulk flow speed, and high ionization (charge states) of ions, to the hot, slowly moving plasmas in the outer magnetospheres of the giant planets, to the cold, corotating plasmas in inner magnetospheres. Space plasma instruments and techniques are reviewed, with an emphasis on hot plasma composition measurements. Starting with Faraday Cup detectors some 30 years ago, plasma instruments have evolved to the present time-of-flight systems with excellent mass resolution and three-dimensional viewing capabilities.

  9. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  10. Measurement and characterization techniques for thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tritt, T.M.

    1997-07-01

    Characterization of thermoelectric materials can pose many problems. A temperature difference can be established across these materials as an electrical current is passed due to the Peltier effect. The thermopower of these materials is quite large and thus large thermal voltages can contribute to many of the measurements necessary to investigate these materials. This paper will discuss the chracterization techniques necessary to investigate these materials and provide an overview of some of the potential systematic errors which can arise. It will also discuss some of the corrections one needs to consider. This should provide an introduction to the characterization and measurement of thermoelectric materials and provide references for a more in depth discussion of the concepts. It should also serve as an indication of the care that must be taken while working with thermoelectric materials.

  11. Measurement of Physicians' Performance Using Existing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sanazaro, Paul J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing techniques permit objective and valid measurement of limited elements of physicians' performance. These limited aspects, however, are of considerable importance to patients. The basic components of performance in medicine and surgery can be defined and used as the basis of organized programs for such evaluation. Interhospital comparisons can provide an effective impetus for assessing and improving performance of individual staff members when this is indicated. Professional auspices are needed for the development and application of methods that can provide continuing assurance that the clinical activity of physicians corresponds to contemporary standards. A system of incentives should be provided to physicians to promote their participation in voluntary programs of self-assessment. The incentives should be in the form of performance assessment credits, comparable in definition to continuing medical education credits, but granted for participation in an accredited program that objectively measures physicians' performance against national standards of the respective specialty. PMID:7222656

  12. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H; Schneider, M

    2010-05-07

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  13. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurements

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-10-15

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  14. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  15. Weathering: methods and techniques to measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, P.; Zornoza-Indart, A.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Surface recession takes place when weathered material is removed from the rocks. In order to know how fast does weathering and erosion occur, a review of several methods, analyses and destructive and non-destructive techniques to measure weathering of rocks caused by physico-chemical changes that occur in bedrocks due to salt crystallization, freezing-thaw, thermal shock, influence of water, wind, temperature or any type of environmental agent leading to weathering processes and development of soils, in-situ in the field or through experimental works in the laboratory are addressed. From micro-scale to macro-scale, from the surface down to more in depth, several case studies on in-situ monitoring of quantification of decay on soils and rocks from natural landscapes (mountains, cliffs, caves, etc) or from urban environment (foundations or facades of buildings, retaining walls, etc) or laboratory experimental works, such as artificial accelerated ageing tests (a.a.e.e.) or durability tests -in which one or more than one weathering agents are selected to assess the material behaviour in time and in a cyclic way- performed on specimens of these materials are summarised. Discoloration, structural alteration, precipitation of weathering products (mass transfer), and surface recession (mass loss) are all products of weathering processes. Destructive (SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, drilling resistance measurement, flexural and compression strength) and Non-destructive (spectrophotocolorimetry, 3D optical surface roughness, Schmidt hammer rebound tester, ultrasound velocity propagation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR, X ray computed micro-tomography or CT-scan, geo-radar differential global positioning systems) techniques and characterization analyses (e.g. water absorption, permeability, open porosity or porosity accessible to water) to assess their morphological, physico-chemical, mechanical and hydric weathering; consolidation products or

  16. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  17. Innovative measurement techniques in surface science.

    PubMed

    Freund, Hans-Joachim; Nilius, Niklas; Risse, Thomas; Schauermann, Swetlana; Schmidt, Thomas

    2011-01-17

    We describe four new experimental techniques advanced during the last decade in the authors' laboratory. The techniques include photon scanning tunneling microscopy; aberration-corrected low-energy electron microscopy in combination with photoelectron emission microscopy, microcalorimetry, and electron-spin resonance spectroscopy. It is demonstrated how those techniques may be applied to solve fundamental problems in surface science with growing demands to tackle complex nanoscopic systems, and, in particular in catalysis science, which, without the availability of those techniques, would be difficult if not impossible to address. PMID:21226183

  18. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  19. Measurement techniques for analysis of fission fragment excited gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Carroll, E. E.; Davis, J. F.; Davie, R. N.; Maguire, T. C.; Shipman, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of fission fragment excited He, Ar, Xe, N2, Ne, Ar-N2, and Ne-N2 have been conducted. Boltzmann plot analysis of He, Ar and Xe have indicated a nonequilibrium, recombining plasma, and population inversions have been found in these gases. The observed radiating species in helium have been adequately described by a simple kinetic model. A more extensive model for argon, nitrogen and Ar-N2 mixtures was developed which adequately describes the energy flow in the system and compares favorably with experimental measurements. The kinetic processes involved in these systems are discussed.

  20. Validation of Three Early Ejaculation Diagnostic Tools: A Composite Measure Is Accurate and More Adequate for Diagnosis by Updated Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Jern, Patrick; Piha, Juhana; Santtila, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To validate three early ejaculation diagnostic tools, and propose a new tool for diagnosis in line with proposed changes to diagnostic criteria. Significant changes to diagnostic criteria are expected in the near future. Available screening tools do not necessarily reflect proposed changes. Materials and Methods Data from 148 diagnosed early ejaculation patients (Mage = 42.8) and 892 controls (Mage = 33.1 years) from a population-based sample were used. Participants responded to three different questionnaires (Premature Ejaculation Profile; Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool; Multiple Indicators of Premature Ejaculation). Stopwatch measured ejaculation latency times were collected from a subsample of early ejaculation patients. We used two types of responses to the questionnaires depending on the treatment status of the patients 1) responses regarding the situation before starting pharmacological treatment and 2) responses regarding current situation. Logistic regressions and Receiver Operating Characteristics were used to assess ability of both the instruments and individual items to differentiate between patients and controls. Results All instruments had very good precision (Areas under the Curve ranging from .93-.98). A new five-item instrument (named CHecklist for Early Ejaculation Symptoms – CHEES) consisting of high-performance variables selected from the three instruments had validity (Nagelkerke R2 range .51-.79 for backwards/forwards logistic regression) equal to or slightly better than any individual instrument (i.e., had slightly higher validity statistics, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance). Importantly, however, this instrument was more in line with proposed changes to diagnostic criteria. Conclusions All three screening tools had good validity. A new 5-item diagnostic tool (CHEES) based on the three instruments had equal or somewhat more favorable validity statistics compared to the other three tools, but is

  1. Measuring Cognitive Ability with the Overclaiming Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulhus, Delroy L.; Harms, P. D.

    2004-01-01

    The overclaiming technique requires respondents to rate their familiarity with a list of general knowledge items (persons, places, things). Because 20[percent] of the items are foils (i.e., do not exist), the response pattern can be analyzed with signal detection methods to yield the accuracy and bias scores for each respondent. In Study 1, the…

  2. The EEG measurement technique under exercising.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Naoya; Tanaka, Junya; Koyama, Akira; Magatani, Kazushige

    2006-01-01

    Our purpose of the research is a development of the detecting method of EEG under exercising. Usually, measuring EEG is done in the quiet state. In case of the measuring EEG under exercising, a movement of the body causes vibration of electrodes and artifact for the EEG. Therefore, generally detection of the EEG under exercising is said to be difficult. So, we developed the measuring method of EEG under exercising by using algorithm that we designed. Five normal subjects were tested with our method, and EEG without artifact was able to be measured in all cases. PMID:17945632

  3. A Simple Technique for High Resistance Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguia; Landin, Ramon Ochoa

    2012-01-01

    A simple electronic system for the measurement of high values of resistance is shown. This system allows the measurement of resistance in the range of a few megohm up to 10[superscript 9] [omega]. We have used this system for the evaluation of CdS thin film resistance, but other practical uses in the basic physics laboratory are presented.…

  4. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The ideal cryogenic instrumentation for the colliding beam accelerator helium distribution system does not add pressure drop to the system, functions over the entire temperature range, has high resolution, and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. The design and testing of an ultrasonic flowmeter which measures helium flow under different temperatures are described.

  5. A Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently developed wireless measurement acquisition system to fluid-level measurement. This type of fluid-level measurement system alleviates many shortcomings of fluid-level measurement methods currently being used, including limited applicability of any one fluid-level sensor design. Measurement acquisition shortcomings include the necessity for power to be supplied to each sensor and for the measurement to be extracted from each sensor via a physical connection to the sensor. Another shortcoming is existing measurement systems require that a data channel and signal conditioning electronics be dedicated to each sensor. Use of wires results in other shortcomings such as logistics needed to add or replace sensors, weight, potential for electrical arcing and wire degradations. The fluid level sensor design is a simple passive inductor-capacitor circuit that is not subject to mechanical failure that is possible when float and lever-arm systems are used. Methods are presented for using the sensor in caustic, acidic or cryogenic fluids. Oscillating magnetic fields are used to power the sensor. Once electrically excited, the sensor produces a magnetic field response. The response frequency corresponds to the amount to fluid within the capacitor s electric field. The sensor design can be modified for measuring the level of any fluid or fluent substance that can be stored in a non-conductive reservoir. The interrogation method for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency is also presented.

  6. Liquidus temperature and optical properties measurement by containerless techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Collin D.

    1993-01-01

    Reactive alloy liquidus temperatures measured by conventional, contained techniques are often in error due to reactions with containers and gaseous impurities. This paper describes a new liquidus temperature measurement technique that avoids these problems by employing containerless processing. This technique relies on precise and accurate noncontact temperature measurements (NCTM), which are made possible by spectral emissivity values. The spectral emissivities, epsilon(sub lambda), are measured along with the optical properties (real, n, and imaginary, k, components of the index of refraction) using polarimetric techniques on electromagnetically levitated specimens. Results from work done at Vanderbilt University and Intersonics on the Ti-Al system are presented to demonstrate the above techniques.

  7. Development of techniques for measuring pilot workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyker, D. A.; Stackhouse, S. P.; Khalafalla, A. S.; Mclane, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    An objective method of assessing information workload based on physiological measurements was developed. Information workload, or reserve capacity, was measured using a visual discrimination secondary task and subjective rating of task difficulty. The primary task was two axis (pitch and roll) tracking, and the independent variables in this study were aircraft pitch dynamics and wind gust disturbances. The study was structured to provide: (1) a sensitive, nonloading measure of reserve capacity, and (2) an unencumbering reliable measurement of the psychophysiological state. From these, a measured workload index (MWI) and physiological workload index (PWI) were extracted. An important measure of the success of this study was the degree to which the MWI and PWI agreed across the 243 randomly-presented, four-minute trials (9 subjects X 9 tasks X 3 replications). The electrophysiological data collected included vectorcardiogaram, respiration, electromyogram, skin impedance, and electroencephalogram. Special computer programs were created for the analysis of each physiological variable. The digital data base then consisted of 82 physiological features for each of the 243 trials. A prediction of workload based on physiological observations was formulated as a simultaneous least-squares prediction problem. A best subset of 10 features was chosen to predict the three measures of reserve capacity. The cannonical correlation coefficient was .754 with a chi squared value of 91.3 which allows rejection of the null hypothesis with p of .995.

  8. Technique for measuring gas conversion factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining hydrocarbon conversion factors for a flowmeter. A mixture of air, O2 and C sub x H sub y is burned and the partial paressure of O2 in the resulting gas is forced to equal the partial pressure of O2 in air. The flowrate of O2 flowing into the mixture is measured by flowmeter and the flowrate of C sub x H sub y flowing into the mixture is measured by the flowmeter conversion factor is to be determined. These measured values are used to calculate the conversion factor.

  9. New technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, Ohio, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.A. was measured. Small size clean silicon wafers as contamination sensors placed at all desired measurement sites were used. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet uniformly the silicon substrate, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: continuous, homogeneous film and islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models for our case shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on samples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  10. Electromagnetic probe technique for fluid flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constant of the fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow stream. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  11. The rising bubble technique for discharge measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luxemburg, W.; Hilgersom, K.; van Eekelen, M.

    2010-12-01

    The rising bubble technique is an elegant method to determine the full discharge of a river or a canal in a short moment of time. The method is not new [Sargent, 1982], but hardly applied so far. The method applies air bubbles released from the bottom of a river or canal. While the bubbles rise to the surface they are dragged along by the current. The deeper the stream and the faster the current the longer will be the distance they are dragged along. The horizontal displacement L, of the bubbles can be observed at the surface of the stream. To obtain a discharge, the rising velocity vr, of the bubble is required additionally. When the rising velocity is assumed constant the discharge per unit width amounts to q= Lvr. Placing a tube on the bottom of the stream and releasing bubbles at regular intervals results in a complete discharge profile. The ongoing research is focusing on factors affecting the rising velocity, solving practicalities in applying the method in the field and how modern image processing techniques can enhance determining in a glance the distance travelled by the bubbles. Surfacing of air bubbles in a canal

  12. Measurement techniques in animal locomotion analysis.

    PubMed

    Schamhardt, H C; van den Bogert, A J; Hartman, W

    1993-01-01

    Animal performance can be determined by subjective observations or objective measurements. Numerical data are only then superior to results of subjective observations when they are the result of measurements carried out to test a well-defined hypothesis or to give the answer to a clear, precisely formulated question. In the analysis of kinematics a careful evaluation of the set-up of the measurement equipment and the resulting accuracy in the data is required. Measurements in three dimensions (3D) are theoretically better than those in 2D. Practically, however, collection, analysis, interpretation and presentation of 3D data are so much more complicated that frequently 2D analysis appears to be more useful. The minimal size of markers necessary to obtain a certain accuracy in kinematic data is usually too big for practical use. Smaller markers impair accuracy. Reduction of measurement noise is obligatory when time derivatives are to be calculated. Skin movement artefacts cannot be removed by data smoothing. Forces occurring between the digits and the ground can be determined using a force plate or an instrumented shoe. A force plate is accurate, but repeated trials are necessary. Using a force shoe each ground contact results in useful data. However, the shoe itself may affect locomotion. Surface strains on long bones can be recorded relatively easily. Determination of loading forces from surface strains is complicated but can be carried out using multiple strain gauges and a post-mortem calibration test. Strain in tendons is difficult to measure due to problems in defining a'zero' or reference length.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8470454

  13. AN EXPERIMENTALLY ROBUST TECHNIQUE FOR HALO MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, J.; Pellico, W.; Spentzouris, P.; Sullivan, T.; Spentzouris, Linda; /IIT, Chicago

    2006-03-01

    We propose a model-independent quantity, L/G, to characterize non-Gaussian tails in beam profiles observed with the Fermilab Booster Ion Profile Monitor. This quantity can be considered a measure of beam halo in the Booster. We use beam dynamics and detector simulations to demonstrate that L/G is superior to kurtosis as an experimental measurement of beam halo when realistic beam shapes, detector effects and uncertainties are taken into account. We include the rationale and method of calculation for L/G in addition to results of the experimental studies in the Booster where we show that L/G is a useful halo discriminator.

  14. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  15. IMAGE-BASED EROSION MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two and three - dimensional analysis using close range digital photographs can be very useful in measuring changes in erosion on the landscape. Computer software exists for conducting photographic analysis but is often either cost prohibitive or very labor intensive to use. This paper describes a ...

  16. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  17. Large antenna measurement and compensation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmatsamii, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Antennas in the range of 20 meters or larger will be an integral part of future satellite communication and scientific payloads. In order to commercially use these large, low sidelobe and multiple-beam antennas, a high level of confidence must be established as to their performance in the 0-g and space environment. It is also desirable to compensate for slowly varying surface distortions which could results from thermal effects. An overview of recent advances in performing rf measurements on large antennas is presented with emphasis given to the application of a space-based far-field range utilizing the Space Shuttle. The concept of surface distortion compensation is discussed by providing numerical and measurement results.

  18. THz techniques for human skin measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yu; Mizukoshi, Koji; Suizu, Koji; Kawase, Kodo

    2011-03-01

    Metal meshes work as band-pass filters in the terahertz (THz) region, with their transmission spectra acutely affected by the refractive index of the material inside and above the metal mesh openings. We used a metal mesh for high-sensitivity observations by focusing on the "dip", that is, a sudden change in transmittance that only appeared when the THz wave was obliquely incident onto the metal mesh. Here we report a measurement of stratum corneum to inspect the feasibility of applying the metal mesh sensor to observations of human skin.

  19. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  20. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy`s treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation.

  1. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  2. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  3. An isotope technique for measuring lactose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, P. R.; Read, A. E.; McCarthy, C. F.

    1969-01-01

    Expired radiocarbon dioxide has been collected by a simple autotitration method following the ingestion of lactose-1-14C. With this method, which is suitable for clinical use, 12 subjects with alactasia have been readily separated from 24 normals, both groups being defined by strict criteria. This test, which may be used to measure the absorption of other sugars, is especially suitable for population surveys and may be used to investigate the distribution of disaccharidase deficiency. A further advantage is that false low readings resulting from rapid plasma clearance of absorbed sugar do not occur with this method although they may do so in up to one in three lactose tolerance tests, thereby overestimating the prevalence of alactasia. PMID:5810982

  4. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  5. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study.

  6. New portable pipe wall thickness measuring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascente, Joseph E.

    1998-03-01

    One of the biggest inspection challenges facing many of the process industries; namely the petrochemical, refining, fossil power, and pulp and paper industries is: How to effectively examine their insulated piping? While there are a number of failure mechanisms involved in various process piping systems, piping degradation through corrosion and erosion are by far the most prevalent. This degradation can be in the form of external corrosion under insulation, internal corrosion through a variety of mechanisms, and internal erosion caused by the flow of the product through the pipe. Refineries, chemical plants and electrical power plants have MANY thousands of miles of pipe that are insulated to prevent heat loss or heat absorption. This insulation is often made up of several materials, with calcium based material being the most dense. The insulating material is usually wrapped with an aluminum or stainless steel outer wrap. Verification of wall thickness of these pipes can be accomplished by removing the insulation and doing an ultrasound inspection or by taking x- rays at a tangent to the edge of the pipe through the insulation. Both of these processes are slow and expensive. The time required to obtain data is measured in hours per meter. The ultrasound method requires that the insulation be plugged after the inspection. The surface needs to be cleaned or the resulting data will not be accurate. The tangent x-ray only shows two thicknesses and requires that the area be roped off because of radiation safety.

  7. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  8. Precision compliance techniques for slow crack growth measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for using simple electronic components to obtain the high sensitivity needed to measure very slow crack growth rates. The technique presented can reduce the experimental time considerably and also yield a greater amount of data more accurately than optical techniques for measuring crack growth rates.

  9. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation: current measurement techniques and prospects for noninvasive optical methods.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Sergio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T; Kornbluth, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral autoregulation (CA) are critically important to maintain proper brain perfusion and supply the brain with the necessary oxygen and energy substrates. Adequate brain perfusion is required to support normal brain function, to achieve successful aging, and to navigate acute and chronic medical conditions. We review the general principles of CBF measurements and the current techniques to measure CBF based on direct intravascular measurements, nuclear medicine, X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound techniques, thermal diffusion, and optical methods. We also review techniques for arterial blood pressure measurements as well as theoretical and experimental methods for the assessment of CA, including recent approaches based on optical techniques. The assessment of cerebral perfusion in the clinical practice is also presented. The comprehensive description of principles, methods, and clinical requirements of CBF and CA measurements highlights the potentially important role that noninvasive optical methods can play in the assessment of neurovascular health. In fact, optical techniques have the ability to provide a noninvasive, quantitative, and continuous monitor of CBF and autoregulation. PMID:27403447

  10. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management. PMID:26608759

  11. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for image sensor arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hui; Jiang, Huilin; Zhang, XiaoHui

    2010-08-01

    A new technique is demonstrated for measurement of modulation transfer function (MTF) on image sensor arrays. Fourier analysis of a low frequency bar target pattern is used to extract MTF at odd harmonics of a target pattern frequency up to and beyond Nyquist. The technique is particularly useful for linear image arrays (either conventional linescan or time-delay- integration devices) where conventional slanted-edge technique is not always applicable. The technique is well suited to simple implementation and can provide live presentation of the MTF curve, which helps to ensure optimal alignment conditions are achieved. Detailed analysis of the technique and demonstration of experimental results are presented.

  12. Companding technique for high dynamic range measurements using Gafchromic films

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Heuvel, Frank; Crijns, Wouter; Defraene, Gilles

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: To introduce a methodology to perform dose measurements using Gafchromic films which can span several decades of dose levels. Methods: The technique is based on a rescaling approach using different films irradiated at different dose levels. This is combined with a registration protocol correcting positioning and scaling factors for each film. The methodology is validated using TLD's for out-of-field doses. Furthermore, two examples are provided using the technique to characterize small sized radiosurgery cones and compared with measurements made with a pinpoint chamber. Results: Excellent agreement with TLD, planning systems and measurement was found. The superior resolution of the film technique was apparent. Conclusions: The authors have introduced a new technique allowing users to quantify very low doses in conjunction with commissioning measurements. The use of film also provides 2D information on beam characteristics in high resolution measurements.

  13. Comorbidity Structure of Psychological Disorders in the Online e-PASS Data as Predictors of Psychosocial Adjustment Measures: Psychological Distress, Adequate Social Support, Self-Confidence, Quality of Life, and Suicidal Ideation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Britt; Meyer, Denny

    2014-01-01

    Background A relative newcomer to the field of psychology, e-mental health has been gaining momentum and has been given considerable research attention. Although several aspects of e-mental health have been studied, 1 aspect has yet to receive attention: the structure of comorbidity of psychological disorders and their relationships with measures of psychosocial adjustment including suicidal ideation in online samples. Objective This exploratory study attempted to identify the structure of comorbidity of 21 psychological disorders assessed by an automated online electronic psychological assessment screening system (e-PASS). The resulting comorbidity factor scores were then used to assess the association between comorbidity factor scores and measures of psychosocial adjustments (ie, psychological distress, suicidal ideation, adequate social support, self-confidence in dealing with mental health issues, and quality of life). Methods A total of 13,414 participants were assessed using a complex online algorithm that resulted in primary and secondary Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision) diagnoses for 21 psychological disorders on dimensional severity scales. The scores on these severity scales were used in a principal component analysis (PCA) and the resulting comorbidity factor scores were related to 4 measures of psychosocial adjustments. Results A PCA based on 17 of the 21 psychological disorders resulted in a 4-factor model of comorbidity: anxiety-depression consisting of all anxiety disorders, major depressive episode (MDE), and insomnia; substance abuse consisting of alcohol and drug abuse and dependency; body image–eating consisting of eating disorders, body dysmorphic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorders; depression–sleep problems consisting of MDE, insomnia, and hypersomnia. All comorbidity factor scores were significantly associated with psychosocial measures of adjustment (P<.001). They were

  14. Measurement techniques and applications of charge transfer to aerospace research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, A.

    1978-01-01

    A technique of developing high-velocity low-intensity neutral gas beams for use in aerospace research problems is described. This technique involves ionization of gaseous species with a mass spectrometer and focusing the resulting primary ion beam into a collision chamber containing a static gas at a known pressure and temperature. Equations are given to show how charge-transfer cross sections are obtained from a total-current measurement technique. Important parameters are defined for the charge-transfer process.

  15. TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING REDUCED FORMS OF SULFUR IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique for measuring low concentrations of volatile sulfur compounds in ambient air is discussed. The technique consists of preconcentration of sulfur compounds by chemisorption on gold metal coated sand or gold foil surface followed by thermal desorption, separation, an...

  16. Measuring Speed Using a Computer--Several Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jon M.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces three different techniques to facilitate the measurement of speed and the associated kinematics and dynamics using a computer. Discusses sensing techniques using optical or ultrasonic sensors, interfacing with a computer, software routines for the interfaces, and other applications. Provides circuit diagrams, pictures, and a program to…

  17. Tone-burst technique measures high-intensity sound absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. G.; Van Houten, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Tone-burst technique, in which narrow-bandwidth, short-duration sonic pulse is propagated down a standing-wave tube, measures sound absorbing capacity of materials used in jet engine noise abatement. Technique eliminates effects of tube losses and yields normal-incidence absorption coefficient of specimen.

  18. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  19. Calibration technique for the neutron surface moisture measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Shreve, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for calibrating the response of a surface neutron moisture measurement probe to material moisture concentration has been devised. Tests to ensure that the probe will function in the expected in-tank operating environment are also outlined.

  20. The evolution of dielectric properties measurement techniques for agricultural products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The important applications for dielectric properties, or electric permittivities, of agricultural products are described and the evolution of techniques used for their measurement over frequencies ranging from audio to microwave ranges are described briefly. References are cited for further informat...

  1. Turbine engine hot-part temperature measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.G.; Prufert, M.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The paper identifies altitude test facility techniques for nonintrusive acquisition of hot-part temperatures using IR radiance measurements. The techniques discussed are applicable for turbojet and low-bypass turbofan engines. Constraints limiting IR measurements in the altitude ground test facility are discussed. Methods for evaluating altitude ground test data are outlined including review of predictive capabilities which enable the determination of the influence of turbine engine hot-part temperatures on IR emissions. 7 refs.

  2. Measuring elastic constants using non-contact ultrasonic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Perry, R.; Cleanthous, D.; Backhouse, D. J.; Moore, I. J.; Clough, A. R.; Stone, D. I.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasound for measuring elastic constants and phase transitions is well established. Standard measurements use piezoelectric transducers requiring couplant and contact with the sample. Recently, non-destructive testing (NDT) has seen an increase in the use of non-contact ultrasonic techniques, for example electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) and laser ultrasound, due to their many benefits. For measurements of single crystals over a range of temperatures non-contact techniques could also bring many benefits. These techniques do not require couplant, and hence do not suffer from breaking of the bond between transducer and sample during thermal cycling, and will potentially lead to a simpler and more adaptable measurement system with lower risk of sample damage. We present recent work adapting EMAT advances from NDT to measurements of single crystals at cryogenic temperatures and illustrate this with measurements of magnetic phase transitions in Gd64Sc36 using both contact and non-contact transducers. We discuss the measurement techniques implemented to overcome noise problems, and a digital pulse-echo-overlap technique, using data analysis in the frequency domain to measure the velocity.

  3. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  4. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-25

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  5. Synopsis of timing measurement techniques used in telecommunications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zampetti, George

    1993-01-01

    Historically, Maximum Time Interval Error (MTIE) and Maximum Relative Time Interval Error (MRTIE) have been the main measurement techniques used to characterize timing performance in telecommunications networks. Recently, a new measurement technique, Time Variance (TVAR) has gained acceptance in the North American (ANSI) standards body. TVAR was developed in concurrence with NIST to address certain inadequacies in the MTIE approach. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches are described. Real measurement examples are presented to illustrate the critical issues in actual telecommunication applications. Finally, a new MTIE measurement is proposed (ZTIE) that complements TVAR. Together, TVAR and ZTIE provide a very good characterization of network timing.

  6. Emerging measurement techniques for studies of mesoscopic superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Rydh, A.; Tagliati, S.; Nilsson, R. A.; Xie, R.; Pearson, J. E.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.; Divan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental research on mesoscopic systems puts high demands on the measurement infrastructure, including measurement system with associated sample preparation, experimental design, measurement electronics, and data collection. Successful experiments require both the ability to manufacture small samples and to successfully and accurately study their novel properties. Here, we discuss some aspects and recent advancements of general measurement techniques that should benefit several characterization methods such as thermodynamic, magnetic, and transport studies of mesoscopic superconductors.

  7. The delta Doppler technique for LDV measurements at long distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1976-01-01

    A technique for measuring velocity, referred to as a Delta Doppler technique, was presented. This technique determines scattering source velocities by measuring the difference in Doppler shifts of two different frequencies. By transmitting the two frequencies along the same path, a moving fringe pattern is established such that a nonmoving scatterer at the sensing volume would see an intensity variation exactly equal to the difference in the transmitted frequencies. If the particle has a velocity component along an axis which bisects the angle formed by the transmitter and receiver axes, a Doppler shift in the difference frequency can be measured and the velocity component computed. The frequency measured would correspond to the difference in Doppler frequencies that two laser Doppler velocimeters using separate frequencies (the same frequencies as used previously) would have measured, thus the term Delta Doppler.

  8. Error reduction techniques for measuring long synchrotron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.

    1998-07-01

    Many instruments and techniques are used for measuring long mirror surfaces. A Fizeau interferometer may be used to measure mirrors much longer than the interferometer aperture size by using grazing incidence at the mirror surface and analyzing the light reflected from a flat end mirror. Advantages of this technique are data acquisition speed and use of a common instrument. Disadvantages are reduced sampling interval, uncertainty of tangential position, and sagittal/tangential aspect ratio other than unity. Also, deep aspheric surfaces cannot be measured on a Fizeau interferometer without a specially made fringe nulling holographic plate. Other scanning instruments have been developed for measuring height, slope, or curvature profiles of the surface, but lack accuracy for very long scans required for X-ray synchrotron mirrors. The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) was developed specifically for long x-ray mirror measurement, and still outperforms other instruments, especially for aspheres. Thus, this paper focuses on error reduction techniques for the LTP.

  9. New radiosonde techniques to measure radiation profiles through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Romanens, Gonzague; Levrat, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    Solar and thermal radiation fluxes are usually measured at Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere. Here we show radiosonde techniques that allow measuring radiation flux profiles and the radiation budget from the Earth's surface to above 30 km in the stratosphere. During two-hour flights solar shortwave and thermal longwave irradiance, downward and upward, is measured with four individual sensors at one-second resolution, along with standard PTU radiosonde profiles. Daytime and nighttime shortwave and longwave radiation measurements, and 24 hours surface measurements, allow determining radiation budget- and total net radiation profiles through the atmosphere. We use a double balloon technique to prevent pendulum motion during the ascent and to keep the sonde as horizontal as possible. New techniques using auto controlled airplanes are now investigated to retrieve the sonde after release at a certain altitude and to land it if possible at the launch station.

  10. Transmittance ratio constrained retrieval technique for lidar cirrus measurements.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M Patrick; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Robert B; Leavor, Kevin R; Lei, Liqiao

    2012-05-01

    This letter describes a lidar retrieval technique that uses the transmittance ratio as a constraint to determine an average lidar ratio as well as extinction and backscatter coefficients of transparent cirrus clouds. The cloud transmittance ratio is directly obtained from two adjacent elastic lidar backscatter signals. The technique can be applied to cirrus measurements where neither the molecular scattering dominant signals above and below the cloud layer are found nor cloudfree reference profiles are available. The technique has been tested with simulated lidar signals and applied to backscatter lidar measurements at Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia. PMID:22555749

  11. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  12. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  13. Measurement techniques for millimeter wave substrate mounted MMW antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouker, M. A.; Campbell, D. P.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    An overview of measurement techniques for millimeter wave substrate mounted antennas is presented. Scattering and pickup of the millimeter wave radiation on the low frequency leads is a significant problem in these measurements. Methods to reduce these effects are discussed, and preliminary work on dipole antennas at 230 GHz is presented.

  14. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  15. Precise measurement techniques of millimeter-wave power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.

    1981-06-01

    Precise power measurement techniques in the millimeter-wave region are described, with attention to a calorimetric method based on thermal balance control, on the basis of which a calorimeter for measuring effective bolometer mount efficiency has been developed. Automatic power measurement systems which incorporate digital techniques are also designed and developed, and two types of circular bolometer mount having high effective efficiency in the 100 GHz band are described. For the case of the 30 GHz band, a method which employs a coupler as a comparator and quarter-wavelength spacer is proposed which significantly reduces the influence of impedance mismatch.

  16. Residual stress measurement and analysis using ultrasonic techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.; Chapman, J. R.; Wert, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A technique which utilizes ultrasonic radiation has been developed to measure residual stresses in metals. This technique makes it possible to detect and measure the magnitude of the principle stresses and also to obtain their direction. The velocities of ultrasonic waves in materials are measured as the time to travel a fixed path length, and the change in transit time is related to the applied stress. The linear relationship obtained allows a procedure based on this principle to be used for the measurement of residual stress using surface waves and shear waves. A method for plotting stress profiles through a material using surface waves uses varying frequencies for the ultrasonic wave. A limitation of the shear wave method is considered. The system used for this technique is called the Modified Time of Flight System.

  17. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  18. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular...

  19. 29 CFR 98.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Adequate evidence. 98.900 Section 98.900 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 98.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a...

  20. A Simplified Rasterstereography Measuring Technique With Application To Biomedical Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elad, D.; Zeltser, R.; Sahar, M.; Avidor, J. M.; Einav, S.; Rosenberg, N.

    1989-04-01

    Noncontact measurements of the topography of irregular biological surfaces are important needs for biological investigators. Direct measurements with a mechanical probe are not recommended or are not feasible, especially when the biological surface interacts with another physical medium. Existing stereophotogrammetric techniques are usually designed for static measurements and are based on complex optical systems, or require lengthy computations to produce accuracies which are beyond the practical biomedical needs. This work presents a novel noncontact technique for dynamic visualization and measurement of three-dimensional surfaces of moving boundaries for applications to biomedical studies. The system is similar to rasterstereography, but involves advanced methods of image processing and linearizations that simplify the geometry reconstruction procedure. The accuracy of the measured three-dimensional geometry is better than most practical applications in biomedical engineering. Measurements of the geometry of a collapsible tube under static and dynamic conditions are presented.

  1. EVALUATION OF HCL MEASUREMENTS TECHNIQUES AT MUNICIPAL AND HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hydrogen chloride (HCl) emission from hazardous waste incinerators are regulated by the EPA, and the Agency is considering HCl regulations for municipal waste combustors. ntil recently, techniques to adequately quantify these emissions using either instrumentation or wet-chemistr...

  2. Microwave techniques for measuring complex permittivity and permeability of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Guillon, P.

    1995-08-01

    Different materials are of fundamental importance to the aerospace, microwave, electronics and communications industries, and include for example microwave absorbing materials, antennas lenses and radomes, substrates for MMIC and microwave components and antennaes. Basic measurements for the complex permittivity and permeability of those homogeneous solid materials in the microwave spectral region are described including hardware, instrumentation and analysis. Elevated temperature measurements as well as measurements intercomparisons, with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of each techniques are also presented.

  3. Thermal properties measurements in biodiesel oils using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M. P. P.; Andrade, A. A.; Franco, R. W. A.; Miranda, P. C. M. L.; Sthel, M.; Vargas, H.; Constantino, R.; Baesso, M. L.

    2005-08-01

    In this Letter, thermal lens and open cell photoacoustic techniques are used to measure the thermal properties of biodiesel oils. The absolute values of the thermal effusivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and the temperature coefficient of the refractive index were determined for samples obtained from soy, castor bean, sunflower and turnip. The results suggest that the employed techniques may be useful as complementary methods for biodiesel certification.

  4. Effects of equipment and technique on peak flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Thomas; O'Driscoll, B Ronan

    2006-01-01

    Background Different lung function equipment and different respiratory manoeuvres may produce different Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) results. Although the PEF is the most common lung function test, there have been few studies of these effects and no previous study has evaluated both factors in a single group of patients. Methods We studied 36 subjects (PEF range 80–570 l/min). All patients recorded PEF measurements using a short rapid expiration following maximal inspiration (PEF technique) or a forced maximal expiration to residual volume (FVC technique). Measurements were made using a Wright's peak flow meter, a turbine spirometer and a Fleisch pneumotachograph spirometer. Results The mean PEF was 8.7% higher when the PEF technique was used (compared with FVC technique, p < 0.0001). The mean PEF recorded with the turbine spirometer was 5.5% lower than the Wright meter reading. The Fleisch spirometer result was 19.5% lower than the Wright reading. However, adjustment of the Wrights measurements from the traditional Wright's scale to the new EU Peak Flow scale produced results that were only 7.2% higher than the Fleisch pneumotachograph measurements. Conclusion Peak flow measurements are affected by the instruction given and by the device and Peak Flow scale used. Patient management decisions should not be based on PEF measurement made on different instruments. PMID:16787543

  5. Synopsis of timing measurement techniques used in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetti, G. P.

    1992-06-01

    Historically, Maximum Time Interval Error (MTIE) and Maximum Relative Time Interval Error (MRTIE) have been the main measurement techniques used to characterize timing performance in telecommunications networks. Recently, a new measurement technique, Time Variance (TVAR) has gained acceptance in the North American (ANSI) standards body. TVAR was developed in concurrence to address certain inadequacies in the MTIE approach. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches are outlined. Real measurement examples are presented to illustrate the critical issues in actual telecommunication applications. An MTIE measurement is proposed (ZTIE) that complements TVAR. The basic concept behind ZTIE is that a peak power measure is needed to complement TVAR. Together, TVAR and ZTIE provide a very good characterization of network timing.

  6. A technique to measure the interfacial bond strength

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, T.A.; Pagano, N.J.; Kerans, R.J.

    1989-08-01

    A technique to measure the bond strength of interfaces that simulate those in brittle matrix/brittle fiber composites is proposed. The technique uses a simple planar geometry for the interface. The Pyrex/SiC system was investigated and it was found that the average interfacial shear stress at failure could be rationalized using data from the fiber pull-out tests. Since the technique does not require composite fabrication before the test, it is suggested as a screening test for prospective composite systems. 11 refs.

  7. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10(-3) g/cm(3) (1%). PMID:26262619

  8. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%). PMID:26262619

  9. Intercomparison of Nitrous Acid (HONO) Measurement Techniques during SHARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Meng, Q.; Dibb, J. E.; Lefer, B. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Ren, X.; Stutz, J.; Zhang, R.

    2010-12-01

    HONO is regarded as a potentially important radical precursor in a number of diverse environments ranging from polar to semi-tropical. As part of the SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by five different measurement techniques. Techniques used were long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), long-path absorption photometry (LoPAP), mist chamber (MC), quantum cascade laser and ionization detection-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Various combinations of techniques were in operation during the whole period from 15 April through 31 May 2009 with a common measurement period extending from 16 to 28 May. All instruments recorded a similar diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher mean values from the in-situ techniques than either the low- or mid-path DOAS. The largest differences among techniques were found during the afternoon with measurements from the in-situ techniques higher than either the low- or mid-path DOAS. Principal components analysis using measurements of trace species was used to identify possible sources of interference in the chemical measurements. Two major components were identified: one associated with primary, mainly traffic related pollutants and the other with photochemical species. The afternoon differences between DOAS and MC and the U Miami LoPAP were found to be most strongly associated with the photochemical component. The results for comparison between DOAS and MC are in accord with those found previously during August-September 2006. All instruments showed some association between measurement differences and the primary component. Further details and associations with air coming from different areas of the Houston airshed will also be presented.

  10. A preliminary study of air-pollution measurement by active remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.; Proctor, E. K.; Gasiorek, L. S.; Liston, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollutants are identified, and the needs for their measurement from satellites and aircraft are discussed. An assessment is made of the properties of these pollutants and of the normal atmosphere, including interactions with light of various wavelengths and the resulting effects on transmission and scattering of optical signals. The possible methods for active remote measurement are described; the relative performance capabilities of double-ended and single-ended systems are compared qualitatively; and the capabilities of the several single-ended or backscattering techniques are compared quantitatively. The differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is shown to be superior to the other backscattering techniques. The lidar system parameters and their relationships to the environmental factors and the properties of pollutants are examined in detail. A computer program that models both the atmosphere (including pollutants) and the lidar system is described. The performance capabilities of present and future lidar components are assessed, and projections are made of prospective measurement capabilities for future lidar systems. Following a discussion of some important operational factors that affect both the design and measurement capabilities of airborne and satellite-based lidar systems, the extensive analytical results obtained through more than 1000 individual cases analyzed with the aid of the computer program are summarized and discussed. The conclusions are presented. Recommendations are also made for additional studies to investigate cases that could not be explored adequately during this study.

  11. Chromaticity measurement using a continuous head-tail kicking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Ranjbar, V.H.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2007-06-01

    In the classical head-tail chromaticity measurement technique, a single large kick is applied transversely to the beam. The resulting phase difference between the head and the tail is measured and the chromaticity extracted. In the continuous head-tail kicking technique, a very small transverse kick is applied to the beam and the asymptotic phase difference between the head and the tail is found to be a function of chromaticity. The advantage of this method is that since the tune tracker PLL already supplies the small transverse kicks, no extra modulation is required.

  12. Percutaneous permeation measurement of topical phthalocyanine by photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Emanoel P. O.; Barja, Paulo R.; Cardoso, Luiz E.; Beltrame, Milton

    2012-11-01

    This investigation have studied photoacoustic (PA) technique to percutaneous permeation of topical hydroxy-(29H,31H-phthalocyaninate) aluminum (PcAlOH) on pig ear skin. The PcAlOH was incorporated in an emulsion (O/W) (1 mg/dl) with assessed stability parameters of: pH, short and long term stability tests (in the several conditions). The skin was prepared through a heat separation technique, and with a scalpel, the outer skin of the cartilage was removed. The skins were then cut into 4 cm2 pieces and treated with sodium bromide 2 mol/L for 6 h at 37 °C. The epidermis layer was washed with purified water, dried, and stored under reduced pressure until use. The skin permeation kinetics was determined by photoacoustic technique in an open photoacoustic cell. Short (after preparation) and long-term stability tests showed no phase separation. The emulsion developed pH 7.6 and after incorporating the pH was unchanged. The typical times for percutaneous permeation of the emulsion base and emulsion + PcAlOH were 182 (±6) and 438 (±3) s, respectively. This study indicated that the formulations containing PcAlOH have stabile characteristics and show promising results in absorption into the skin. The presence of the photosensitive agent in the formulation contributed significantly to the greater absorption time than observed in the base formulation. The used photoacoustic technical to examine the penetration kinetics of PcAlOH in pig ear skin was adequate and may be employed in the determination of the percutaneous permeation of phthalocyanines.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  14. Surveying converter lining erosion state based on laser measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongsheng; Shi, Tielin; Yang, Shuzi

    1998-08-01

    It is very important to survey the eroding state of the steelmaking converter lining real time so as to optimize technological process, extend converter durability and reduce steelmaking production costs. This paper gives one practical method based on the laser measure technique. It presents the basic principle of the measure technique. It presents the basic principle of the measure method, the composition of the measure system and the researches on key technological problems. The method is based on the technique of the laser range finding to net points on the surface of the surveyed converter lining, and the technology of angle finding to the laser beams. The angle signals would be used to help realizing the automatic scanning function also. The laser signals would be modulated and encoded. In the meantime, we would adopt the wavelet analysis and other filter algorithms, to denoise noisy data and extract useful information. And the main idea of some algorithms such as the net point measuring path planning and the measure device position optimal algorithm would also be given in order to improve the measure precision and real time property of the system.

  15. Measurement of ice accretion using ultrasonic pulse echo techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    Many figures are given to illustrate the measurement of ice deposition using ultrasonic pulse echo techniques. The basic concept is to measure the thickness of the ice by relating the pulse echo time to the speed of sound. The measurements are made in an icing research tunnel (IRT), where echo patterns are videotaped during icing exposures under a variety of conditions. Typical echo patterns for different types of ice are illustrated. A table summarizing the icing rates measured in the IRT, along with the presence or absence of surface water is also given.

  16. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  17. A non-contact measurement technique at the micro scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Santaneel

    During their production and normal use, electronic packages experience large temperature excursions, leading to high thermo-mechanical stress gradients that cause fatigue failure of the solder joints. In order to prevent premature failure and prolong the fatigue life of solder joints, there is a pressing need for the characterization of the solder, especially lead-free solder, at the micro-level (joint size). The characterization and modeling of solder behavior at the appropriate scale is a major issue. However, direct measurement techniques are not applicable to characterize the deformation response of solder joints because of their micro scale dimensions. Therefore, a non-contact measurement technique utilizing a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in conjunction with Digital Image Correlation (DIC) has been developed. Validation was achieved by performing a four-point bending test in both an in-house optical system with DIC and inside the SEM. This non-contact measurement technique was then used to extract the stress-strain response of the solder. Mechanical tests were performed on solder joints that were created using the same type of solder balls used in the electronic industry and were representative of normal joint scales. The SEM-DIC technique has been proven to be applicable for the determining the stress-strain response of solder material at the micro-scale. This study resulted in a validated material characterization technique specifically designed for micro-scale material response. One of the main contributions of this study is that the method is a lot simpler and cheaper, yet highly effective, compared to the previous methods. This technique is also readily applicable to the measurement of the stress-strain response of any micro-scale specimen, such as other metals, polymers, etc. Also, the measured displacement field by obtained by DIC can be used as the base for calculating the strain field on the surface of a specimen.

  18. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  19. Modelling of MSM photodetectors using RF measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Cheolung; Huang, Zhaoran

    2006-09-01

    A multi-giga bits circuit-level model of a thin film metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector (MSM PD) for high speed optical receiver (Rx) was obtained using the RF measurement technique and widely used optimization routines in simulation tool such as ADS and SPICE. On-wafer measurement-based modeling technique was employed to exactly characterize DUTs in this paper. On-wafer calibration standard structures such as NiCr 50 Ω of load, short, and open were also fabricated and optimized using laser trimming for exact measurements. The obtained circuit-level model shows good agreement with measured s-parameters and wide eye open up to 20Gbps.

  20. Non-intrusive temperature measurement using microscale visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamarthy, Pramod; Garimella, Suresh V.; Wereley, Steven T.

    2009-07-01

    μPIV is a widely accepted tool for making accurate measurements in microscale flows. The particles that are used to seed the flow, due to their small size, undergo Brownian motion which adds a random noise component to the measurements. Brownian motion introduces an undesirable error in the velocity measurements, but also contains valuable temperature information. A PIV algorithm which detects both the location and broadening of the correlation peak can measure velocity as well as temperature simultaneously using the same set of images. The approach presented in this work eliminates the use of the calibration constant used in the literature (Hohreiter et al. in Meas Sci Technol 13(7):1072-1078, 2002), making the method system-independent, and reducing the uncertainty involved in the technique. The temperature in a stationary fluid was experimentally measured using this technique and compared to that obtained using the particle tracking thermometry method and a novel method, low image density PIV. The method of cross-correlation PIV was modified to measure the temperature of a moving fluid. A standard epi-fluorescence μPIV system was used for all the measurements. The experiments were conducted using spherical fluorescent polystyrene-latex particles suspended in water. Temperatures ranging from 20 to 80°C were measured. This method allows simultaneous non-intrusive temperature and velocity measurements in integrated cooling systems and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  1. TEER measurement techniques for in vitro barrier model systems

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Kolli, Aditya Reddy; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L.; Hickman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Transepithelial/transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely accepted quantitative technique to measure the integrity of tight junction dynamics in cell culture models of endothelial and epithelial monolayers. TEER values are strong indicators of the integrity of the cellular barriers before they are evaluated for transport of drugs or chemicals. TEER measurements can be performed in real-time without cell damage and generally are based on measuring ohmic resistance or measuring impedance across a wide spectrum of frequencies. TEER measurements for various cell types have been reported with commercially available measurement systems and also with custom built microfluidic implementations. Some of the barrier models that have been widely characterized utilizing TEER include the blood-brain barrier (BBB), gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and pulmonary models. Variations in TEER value can arise due to factors such as temperature, medium formulation and passage number of cells. The aim of this paper is to review the different TEER measurement techniques and analyze their strengths and weaknesses, the significance of TEER in drug toxicity studies, examine the various in vitro models and microfluidic organs-on-chips implementations utilizing TEER measurements in some widely studied barrier models (BBB, GI tract and pulmonary), and discuss the various factors that can affect TEER measurements. PMID:25586998

  2. TEER measurement techniques for in vitro barrier model systems.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Kolli, Aditya Reddy; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L; Hickman, James J

    2015-04-01

    Transepithelial/transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely accepted quantitative technique to measure the integrity of tight junction dynamics in cell culture models of endothelial and epithelial monolayers. TEER values are strong indicators of the integrity of the cellular barriers before they are evaluated for transport of drugs or chemicals. TEER measurements can be performed in real time without cell damage and generally are based on measuring ohmic resistance or measuring impedance across a wide spectrum of frequencies. The measurements for various cell types have been reported with commercially available measurement systems and also with custom-built microfluidic implementations. Some of the barrier models that have been widely characterized using TEER include the blood-brain barrier (BBB), gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and pulmonary models. Variations in these values can arise due to factors such as temperature, medium formulation, and passage number of cells. The aim of this article is to review the different TEER measurement techniques and analyze their strengths and weaknesses, determine the significance of TEER in drug toxicity studies, examine the various in vitro models and microfluidic organs-on-chips implementations using TEER measurements in some widely studied barrier models (BBB, GI tract, and pulmonary), and discuss the various factors that can affect TEER measurements. PMID:25586998

  3. Ussing Chamber Technique to Measure Intestinal Epithelial Permeability.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; MacGregor, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are polarized and have tight junctions that contribute to barrier function. Assessment of barrier function typically involves measurement of electrophysiological parameters or movement of nonionic particles across an epithelium. Here, we describe measurement of transepithelial electrical conductance or resistance, determination of dilution potential, and assessment of flux of nonionic particles such as dextran or mannitol, with particular emphasis on Ussing chamber techniques. PMID:27246022

  4. A technique for noise measurement optimization with spectrum analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniti, P.; Cassina, L.; Gotti, C.; Maino, M.; Pessina, G.

    2015-08-01

    Measuring low noise of electronic devices with a spectrum analyzer requires particular care as the instrument could add significant contributions. A Low Noise Amplifier, LNA, is therefore necessary to be connected between the source to be measured and the instrument, to mitigate its effect at the LNA input. In the present work we suggest a technique for the implementation of the LNA that allows to optimize both low frequency noise and white noise, obtaining outstanding performance in a very broad frequency range.

  5. Total body water measurements using resonant cavity perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Darren A.; Robinson, Martin P.

    2004-05-01

    A recent paper proposed a novel technique for determining the total body water (TBW) of patients suffering with abnormal hydration levels, using a resonant cavity perturbation method. Current techniques to measure TBW are limited by resolution and technical constraints. However, this new method involves measuring the dielectric properties of the body, by placing a subject in a large cavity resonator and measuring the subsequent change in its resonant frequency, fres and its Q-factor. Utilizing the relationship that water content correlates to these dielectric properties, it has been shown that the measured response of these parameters enables determination of TBW. Results are presented for a preliminary study using data estimated from anthropometric measurements, where volunteers were asked to lie and stand in an electromagnetic screened room, before and after drinking between 1 and 2 l of water, and in some cases, after voiding the bladder. Notable changes in the parameters were observed; fres showed a negative shift and Q was reduced. Preliminary calibration curves using estimated values of water content have been developed from these results, showing that for each subject the measured resonant frequency is a linear function of TBW. Because the gradients of these calibration curves correlate to the mass-to-height-ratio of the volunteers, it has proved that a system in which TBW can be unequivocally obtained is possible. Measured values of TBW have been determined using this new pilot-technique, and the values obtained correlate well with theoretical values of body water (r = 0.87) and resolution is very good (750 ml). The results obtained are measurable, repeatable and statistically significant. This leads to confidence in the integrity of the proposed technique.

  6. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new "sliding cell technique" to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  7. A technique for determining thermal parameters using measured temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Dincer, I.; Dost, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents a simple but accurate technique for determining thermal parameters during direct cooling of solid objects, in terms of the cooling coefficient, lag factor, thermal diffusivity, and heat transfer coefficient. Solid objects are assumed to be cooled in a fluid medium. In the modeling the objects are approximated to infinite slabs, infinite cylinders or spherical bodies. A one-dimensional unsteady-state heat transfer analysis is carried out under three different conditions: Bi < 0.01, 0.1 < Bi < 100, and Bi > 100. A technique is then developed for determining the thermal parameters during cooling of such objects. The developed technique is illustrated by examples using actual temperature measurements taken from the studies presented previously. Results show that the technique presented here is capable of determining the thermal parameters during such a cooling process accurately.

  8. Developing and Implementing an Assessment Technique to Measure Linked Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ye, Li; Oueini, Razanne; Lewis, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    The links students make among chemistry content is considered essential for a robust, enduring understanding in multiple learning theories. This article describes the development and implementation of an assessment technique, termed a Measure of Linked Concepts, designed to inform instructors on students' understanding of linking content…

  9. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  10. INSTRUMENTS MEASURING PERCEIVED RACISM/RACIAL DISCRIMINATION: REVIEW AND CRITIQUE OF FACTOR ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Rahshida

    2015-01-01

    Several compendiums of instruments that measure perceived racism and/or discrimination are present in the literature. Other works have reviewed the psychometric properties of these instruments in terms of validity and reliability and have indicated if the instrument was factor analyzed. However, little attention has been given to the quality of the factor analysis performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exploratory factor analyses done on instruments measuring perceived racism/racial discrimination using guidelines from experts in psychometric theory. The techniques used for factor analysis were reviewed and critiqued and the adequacy of reporting was evaluated. Internet search engines and four electronic abstract databases were used to identify 16 relevant instruments that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Principal component analysis was the most frequent method of extraction (81%). Sample sizes were adequate for factor analysis in 81 percent of studies. The majority of studies reported appropriate criteria for the acceptance of un-rotated factors (81%) and justified the rotation method (75%). Exactly 94 percent of studies reported partially acceptable criteria for the acceptance of rotated factors. The majority of articles (69%) reported adequate coefficient alphas for the resultant subscales. In 81 percent of the studies, the conceptualized dimensions were supported by factor analysis. PMID:25626225

  11. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  12. Methodology of the Westinghouse dynamic rod worth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Y.A.; Chapman, D.M.; Easter, M.E.; Hill, D.J.; Hoerner, J.A. ); Kurtz, P.N. )

    1992-01-01

    During zero-power physics testing, plant operations personnel use one of various techniques to measure the reactivity worth of the control rods to confirm shutdown margin. A simple and fast procedure for measuring rod worths called dynamic rod worth measurement (DRWM) has been developed at Westinghouse. This procedure was tested at the recent startups of Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 cycle 20 and Unit 2 cycle 18. The results of these tests show that DRWM measures rod worths with accuracy comparable to that of both boron dilution and rod bank exchange measurements. The DRWM procedure is a fast process of measuring the reactivity worth of individual banks by inserting and withdrawing the bank continuously at the maximum stepping speed without changing the boron concentration and recording the signals of the ex-core detectors.

  13. Complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectrics employing composite dielectric resonator technique.

    PubMed

    Krupka, Jerzy; Zychowicz, Tomasz; Bovtun, Viktor; Veljko, Sergiy

    2006-10-01

    Composite cylindrical TE(0n1) mode dielectric resonator has been used for the complex permittivity measurements of ferroelectrics at frequency about 8.8 GHz. Rigorous equations have been derived that allowed us to find a relationship between measured resonance frequency and Q-factor and the complex permittivity. It has been shown that the choice of appropriate diameter of a sample together with rigorous complex angular frequency analysis allows precise measurements of various ferroelectric. Proposed technique can be used for materials having both real and imaginary part of permittivity as large as a few thousand. Variable temperature measurements were performed on a PbMg(1/3)Nb(2/3)O3 (PMN) ceramic sample, and the measured complex permittivity have shown good agreement with the results of measurements obtained on the same sample at lower frequencies (0.1-1.8 GHz). PMID:17036796

  14. Double-incident angle technique for surface plasmon resonance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Wang, Keyi

    2015-09-01

    A new double-incident angle technique for surface plasmon resonance measurement is described. It is based on differential measurements at two chosen incident angles where the slopes are steepest and the reflectance changes are the biggest. The technique is as simple and robust as the conventional SPR detection measuring the reflected intensities using convergent light beam, but it has the advantage of being nonsensitive to variations of the resonance width and providing a higher sensitivity. Different concentrations of NaCl solutions are used to test the method. Compared with traditional single-incident angle method, sensitivity of this new method is improved by approximately 59%. It can be applied in genomics, proteomics, medical diagnostics, and many other fields of science and industry where a real time ultra-sensitive analysis of adsorption or of analyte-receptor binding is of interest.

  15. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchywka, Mike; Socker, Dennis G.

    1992-01-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-micron-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results.

  16. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support the reasonable belief that a particular act or omission has occurred. Authority: E.O. 12549 (3 CFR, 1986 Comp., p. 189); E.O 12689 (3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 235); 20 U.S.C. 1082, 1094, 1221e-3 and 3474; and Sec....

  17. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  18. 29 CFR 452.110 - Adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate safeguards. 452.110 Section 452.110 Labor... DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Election Procedures; Rights of Members § 452.110 Adequate safeguards. (a) In addition to the election safeguards discussed in this part, the Act contains a general mandate in section...

  19. Image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-bin; Wu, Zhi-qun; Zhu, Jian-ping; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Guang-min

    2013-10-01

    The paper proposes a method to measure vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn which is a very important component in the spindle for micro-electrical-chemical discharging machining. The method of image measuring amplitude on high frequency vibration is introduced. Non-contact measurement system based on vision technology is constructed. High precision location algorithm on image centroid, quadratic location algorithm, is presented to find the center of little light spot. Measurement experiments have been done to show the effect of image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn. In the experiments, precise calibration of the vision system is implemented using a normal graticule to obtain the scale factor between image pixel and real distance. The vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn is changed by modifying the voltage amplitude of pulse power supply. The image of feature on ultrasonic horn is captured and image processing is carried out. The vibration amplitudes are got at different voltages.

  20. Airborne eddy correlation gas flux measurements - Design criteria for optical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritter, John A.; Sachse, Glen W.; Anderson, Bruce E.

    1993-01-01

    Although several methods exist for the determination of the flux of an atmospheric species, the airborne eddy correlation method has the advantage of providing direct flux measurements that are representative of regional spatial domains. The design criteria pertinent to the construction of chemical instrumentation suitable for use in airborne eddy correlation flux measurements are discussed. A brief overview of the advantages and limitations of the current instrumentation used to obtain flux measurements for CO, CH4, O3, CO2, and water vapor are given. The intended height of the measurement within the convective boundary layer is also shown to be an important design criteria. The sensitivity, or resolution, which is required in the measurement of a scalar species to obtain an adequate species flux measurement is discussed. The relationship between the species flux resolution and the more commonly stated instrumental resolution is developed and it is shown that the standard error of the flux estimate is a complicated function of the atmospheric variability and the averaging time that is used. The use of the recently proposed intermittent sampling method to determine the species flux is examined. The application of this technique may provide an opportunity to expand the suite of trace gases for which direct flux measurements are possible.

  1. The design of rapid turbidity measurement system based on single photon detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Huanqin; Cao, Yangyang; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Liang; Cao, Huibin; Yu, Tongzhu; You, Hui

    2015-10-01

    A new rapid turbidity measurement system has been developed to measure the turbidity of drinking water. To determinate the turbidity quantitatively, the total intensity of scattering light has been measured and quantified as number of photons by adopting the single photon detection techniques (SPDT) which has the advantage of high sensitivity. On the basis of SPDT, the measurement system has been built and series of experiments have been carried out. Combining then the 90° Mie scattering theory with the principle of SPDT, a turbidity measurement model has been proposed to explain the experimental results. The experimental results show that a turbidity, which is as low as 0.1 NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Units), can be measured steadily within 100 ms. It also shows a good linearity and stability over the range of 0.1-400 NTU and the precision can be controlled within 5% full scale. In order to improve its precision and stability, some key parameters, including the sampling time and incident light intensity, have been discussed. It has been proved that, to guarantee an excellent system performance, a good compromise between the measurement speed and the low power consumption should be considered adequately depending on the practical applications.

  2. Objective techniques for psychological assessment, phase 2. [techniques for measuring human performance during space flight stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortz, E. C.; Saur, A. J.; Nowlis, D. P.; Kendall, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of an initial experiment in a research program designed to develop objective techniques for psychological assessment of individuals and groups participating in long-duration space flights. Specifically examined is the rationale for utilizing measures of attention as an objective assessment technique. Subjects participating in the experiment performed various tasks (eg, playing matrix games which appeared on a display screen along with auditory stimuli). The psychophysiological reactions of the subjects were measured and are given. Previous research of various performance and psychophysiological methods of measuring attention is also discussed. The experiment design (independent and dependent variables) and apparatus (computers and display devices) are described and shown. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  3. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  4. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, William S

    1999-09-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels.

  5. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. A photoacoustic technique to measure the properties of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohm, Eric M.; Berndl, Elizabeth S. L.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a new technique to non-invasively determine the diameter and sound speed of single cells using a combined ultrasonic and photoacoustic technique. Two cell lines, B16-F1 melanoma cells and MCF7 breast cancer cells were examined using this technique. Using a 200 MHz transducer, the ultrasound backscatter from a single cell in suspension was recorded. Immediately following, the cell was irradiated with a 532 nm laser and the resulting photoacoustic wave recorded by the same transducer. The melanoma cells contain optically absorbing melanin particles, which facilitated photoacoustic wave generation. MCF7 cells have negligible optical absorption at 532 nm; the cells were permeabilized and stained with trypan blue prior to measurements. The measured ultrasound and photoacoustic power spectra were compared to theoretical equations with the cell diameter and sound speed as variables (Anderson scattering model for ultrasound, and a thermoelastic expansion model for photoacoustics). The diameter and sound speed were extracted from the models where the spectral shape matched the measured signals. However the photoacoustic spectrum for the melanoma cell did not match theory, which is likely because melanin particles are located around the cytoplasm, and not within the nucleus. Therefore a photoacoustic finite element model of a cell was developed where the central region was not used to generate a photoacoustic wave. The resulting power spectrum was in better agreement with the measured signal than the thermoelastic expansion model. The MCF7 cell diameter obtained using the spectral matching method was 17.5 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 16 μm, while the melanoma cell diameter obtained was 22 μm, similar to the optical measurement of 21 μm. The sound speed measured from the MCF7 and melanoma cell was 1573 and 1560 m/s, respectively, which is within acceptable values that have been published in literature.

  7. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  8. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  9. Time-of-flight measurement techniques for airborne ultrasonic ranging.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joseph C; Summan, Rahul; Dobie, Gordon I; Whiteley, Simon M; Pierce, S G; Hayward, Gordon

    2013-02-01

    Airborne ultrasonic ranging is used in a variety of different engineering applications for which other positional metrology techniques cannot be used, for example in closed-cell locations, when optical line of sight is limited, and when multipath effects preclude electromagnetic-based wireless systems. Although subject to fundamental physical limitations, e.g., because of the temperature dependence of acoustic velocity in air, these acoustic techniques often provide a cost-effective solution for applications in mobile robotics, structural inspection, and biomedical imaging. In this article, the different techniques and limitations of a range of airborne ultrasonic ranging approaches are reviewed, with an emphasis on the accuracy and repeatability of the measurements. Simple time-domain approaches are compared with their frequency-domain equivalents, and the use of hybrid models and biologically inspired approaches are discussed. PMID:23357908

  10. A new technique to measure the differential XAFS spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wu; Li-Rong, Zheng; Sheng-Qi, Chu; Ai-Yu, Zhou; Jing, Zhang; Tian-Dou, Hu

    2016-04-01

    A new technique has been developed for direct measurement of the differential X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectrum by the energy-modulation method. To acquire the energy-oscillating incident X-ray beam, a piezoelectric actuator is used to control the double-crystal monochromator. A logarithmic converter circuit and a lock-in amplifier are used to extract the modulated signals. The normal and differential XAFS spectra of the Mn K-edge of Li2MnO3 have been collected. The X-ray-absorption near-edge-structure (XANES) spectra verify that the signal-to-noise ratio has been greatly improved by the new technique, and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra demonstrate that this new technique can efficiently enhance the signals of the backscattering atoms. Supported by NSFC (11175202)

  11. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  12. Double threshold ultrasonic distance measurement technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weihua; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-04-01

    The double threshold method realized by hardware circuits and high performance timing chip TDC-GP21 was successfully adapted to solve the key problem of ultrasonic distance measurement, the accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of ultrasonic wave. Compared with other techniques of TOF measurement, the double threshold method presented in this work can suppress noise in the received signal, and achieve a time resolution of around 22 ps and real-time. This method is easy to realize and pertains the advantage of low cost. To compensate temperature and pressure deviations, a temperature measurement module of 10 mK in precision as well as a pressure measurement module of 0.01% in accuracy was developed. The system designed in this work can be exactly used as a two paths ultrasonic gas flowmeter without any adjustment of the hardware circuit. The double threshold method was further corroborated using experiment results of both the ultrasonic distance measurement and ultrasonic gas flow measurement. In distance measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the maximum relative error are 0.69 mm and 0.28%, respectively, for a target distance range of 100-600 mm. In flow measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the worst repeatability are 1.16% and 0.65% for a flow in the range of 50-700 m3/h.

  13. Double threshold ultrasonic distance measurement technique and its application.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihua; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-04-01

    The double threshold method realized by hardware circuits and high performance timing chip TDC-GP21 was successfully adapted to solve the key problem of ultrasonic distance measurement, the accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of ultrasonic wave. Compared with other techniques of TOF measurement, the double threshold method presented in this work can suppress noise in the received signal, and achieve a time resolution of around 22 ps and real-time. This method is easy to realize and pertains the advantage of low cost. To compensate temperature and pressure deviations, a temperature measurement module of 10 mK in precision as well as a pressure measurement module of 0.01% in accuracy was developed. The system designed in this work can be exactly used as a two paths ultrasonic gas flowmeter without any adjustment of the hardware circuit. The double threshold method was further corroborated using experiment results of both the ultrasonic distance measurement and ultrasonic gas flow measurement. In distance measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the maximum relative error are 0.69 mm and 0.28%, respectively, for a target distance range of 100-600 mm. In flow measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the worst repeatability are 1.16% and 0.65% for a flow in the range of 50-700 m(3)/h. PMID:24784646

  14. Techniques for the measurement of body composition: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Jebb, S A; Elia, M

    1993-11-01

    This paper discusses some of the practical aspects of both reference body composition methods (densitometry, isotope dilution methods, in vivo neutron activation analysis, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, computerized tomographic scanning and magnetic resonance imaging) and bedsides or field techniques (weight and height indices, skinfold thicknesses impedance/resistance, near infra-red interactance and 24 hour creatinine excretion). Some techniques measure gross composition, in terms of fat and fat-free mass, or the components of fat-free tissue, such as water, mineral and protein, while other methods measure the mass of individual tissues, organs or body segments. The choice of a specific method for a particular study depends on various considerations including accuracy, precision, subject acceptability, convenience, cost, radiation exposure, and the need for observer training. The relative advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed with these considerations in mind. PMID:8281219

  15. High reflector absorptance measurements by the surface thermal lensing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R.; Taylor, J.R.; Wu, Z.L.; Krupka, R.; Yang, T.

    1996-11-01

    Surface thermal lensing is an alternate configuration of a photothermal deflection system that was used to measure low levels of optical absorption. The thermal lensing configuration facilitated the alignment of the pump and probe laser beams by using a larger diameter probe beam. This technique was applied to high performance optical coatings, specifically high reflectors at 511 nm, zero degrees angle of incidence. The absorptance of these coatings was previously measured using a high power copper vapor laser system. A high power copper laser beam is focused onto a -2 mm diameter spot. A thermal camera senses the temperature rise with respect to the rest of the coating. The temperature change, power density and beam diameter were used with an empirical formula that yields optical absorption. The surface thermal lensing technique was able to resolve absorption levels lower than that achieved with the copper laser method.

  16. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity and direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An anemometer utilizing a radionuclide counting technique for measuring both the velocity and the direction of wind is described. A pendulum consisting of a wire and a ball with a source of radiation on the lower surface of the ball is positioned by the wind. Detectors and are located in a plane perpendicular to pendulum (no wind). The detectors are located on the circumferene of a circle and are equidistant from each other as well as the undisturbed (no wind) source ball position.

  17. Experimental Methods Using Photogrammetric Techniques for Parachute Canopy Shape Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Downey, James M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Desabrais, Kenneth J.; Noetscher, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in partnership with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center has collaborated on the development of a payload instrumentation package to record the physical parameters observed during parachute air drop tests. The instrumentation package records a variety of parameters including canopy shape, suspension line loads, payload 3-axis acceleration, and payload velocity. This report discusses the instrumentation design and development process, as well as the photogrammetric measurement technique used to provide shape measurements. The scaled model tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Plum Brook Space Propulsion Facility, OH.

  18. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-11-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  19. Measurements of residual stresses and surface topography using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baishi

    The dissertation presents two breakthrough optical interferometric techniques for the measurements of both whole-field residual stresses and surface topography. First, the whole-field residual stress measurement technique is developed for the first time using moire interferometry and Twyman/Green interferometry coupled high temperature resistant grating technique and thermal annealing. In the measurement, a special high temperature resistant cross grating is firstly made on the sample surface, and the whole-field residual stress relief is achieved by thermal annealing. Moire interferometry and Twyman/Green interferometry are then utilized to measure both in-plane and out-of-plane deformations generated by the residual stress relaxation, and then to obtain the whole-field strain redistribution due to the residual stress relief. The technique has been successfully applied to the measurement of the whole-field generalized 2-D residual stresses (i.e. both in-plane stresses and the out-of-plane normal stresses) in the rail using a transverse rail slice based on plausible assumptions. Its comparison to hole-drilling method with moire interferometry shows good quantitative agreement. Some key issues for further development are identified and discussed. Second, a novel polarization phase-stepping shearing interferometry (PPSSI) is presented for the calibration-free measurement of surface topography regardless of any surface reflectivity variation. The PPSSI incorporates the polarization phase modulation and Nomarski shearing interferometry to measure wavefront phase difference, or surface slope, irrespective of any wavefront amplitude change. The principle and theory of the PPSSI are described using Jones matrix method. Experimental results and its applications to the topographic measurements and flat wafers and speckle samples are shown. In addition, the modulation transfer function (MTF) and impulse response of a PPSSI system are studied both analytically and

  20. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  1. Critical field measurements in superconductors using ac inductive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S. A.; Ketterson, J. B.; Crabtree, G. W.

    1983-09-01

    The ac in-phase and out-of-phase response of type II superconductors is discussed in terms of dc magnetization curves. Hysteresis in the dc magnetization is shown to lead to a dependence of the ac response on the rate at which an external field is swept. This effect allows both Hc1 and Hc2 to be measured by ac techniques. A relatively simple mutual inductance bridge for making such measurements is described in the text, and factors affecting bridge sensitivity are discussed in the Appendix. Data for the magnetic superconductor ErRh4B4 obtained using this bridge are reported.

  2. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  3. Measurement technique of the Giotto radio science experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edenhofer, P.; Buschert, H.; Bird, M. K.; Esposito, P. B.; Porsche, H.

    1987-06-01

    The paper describes the technique used to record time delay and waveform measurements for the Giotto radio science experiment of ESA's mission to comet Halley. The data were taken by using either two-way measurements (during pre- and post-encounter) or one-way measurements (during encounter with comet Halley), the downlink of the radio signal of the Giotto spacecraft being received at 8.4 GHz by the 64 m tracking stations of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The waveform measurements were obtained at a sampling frequency of 50 kHz with an open-loop receiver assembly at DSN station Canberra as recently used for the Voyager/Uranus fly-by. Performance and calibration data are given as relevant to the radio subsystems on the ground and aboard Giotto.

  4. Optical coherence tomography as film thickness measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manallah, Aissa; Bouafia, Mohamed; Meguellati, Said

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful optical method, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method. Although it is usually used for medical examinations, particularly in ocular exploration; it can also be used in optical metrology as measure technique. In this work, we use OCT to measure thicknesses of films. In OCT, depth profiles are constructed by measuring the time delay of back reflected light by interferometry measurements. Frequency in k-space is proportional to optical path difference. Then the reflectivity profile is obtained by a Fourier transformation, and the difference between two successive peaks of the resulting spectrum gives the film thickness. Several films, food-type, of different thicknesses were investigated and the results were very accurate.

  5. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  6. Non-intrusive measurement techniques for hydroelectric applicants

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, R.; Lemon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Non-intrusive acoustic methods for measuring flows, originally developed for oceanographic applications, are being used in and around hydroelectric dams. The acoustic methods can be categorized as either back-scattering or forward-scattering. The first, using the back-scattered signal, measures the Doppler shift of the returning echo to determine the along-beam component of flow. These instruments are generally called Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). Three beam solutions allow computation of the velocity components. Time gating the return provides a velocity profile with bin segments as small as 0.25 in. In areas of strong magnetic deviation, often the case beside large dams, a gyrocompass can be used to provide directional orientation. The velocity data can also be used to quickly compute river or channel discharge. Typical applications and several case studies are presented. The second acoustic technique is based on a forward-scattering phenomenon known as scintillation. This technique has been used on the Fraser River to monitor flows, and properties of the signal have recently been correlated with the biomass of upstream-migrating salmon. Acoustic scintillation flow measurements are well suited to applications with limited space in the along-flow direction. Applications to hydroelectric dams include turbine intake flow measurements, and a system has been developed to measure flow along fish diversion screens.

  7. A growing-drop technique for measuring dynamic interfacial tension

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C.A.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    A novel, growing-drop technique is described for measuring dynamic interfacial tension due to sorption of surface-active solutes. The proposed method relates the instantaneous pressure and size of expanding liquid drops to interfacial tension and is useful for measuring both liquid/gas and liquid/liquid tensions over a wide range of time scales, currently from 10 ms to several hours. Growing-drop measurements on surfactant-free water/air and water/octanol interfaces yield constant tensions equal to their known literature values. For surfactant-laden, liquid drops, the growing-drop technique captures the actual transient tension evolution of a single interface, rather than interval times as with the classic maximum-drop-pressure and drop.-volume tension measurements. Dynamic tensions measured for 0.25 mM aqueous 1-decanol solution/air and 0.02 kg/m{sup 3} aqueous Triton X-100 solution/dodecane interfaces show nonmonotonic behavior, indicating slow surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of interfacial dilatation. The dynamic tension of a purified and fresh 6 mM aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution/air interface shows only a monotonic decrease, indicating rapid surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of dilatation. ConverselY, an aged SDS solution, naturally containing trace dodecanol impurities, exhibits dynamic tensions which reflect a superposition of the rapidly equilibrating SDS and the slowly adsorbing dodecanol.

  8. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekdash, O.; Norcross, J.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, and dizziness. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device, would not impede suit ventilation delivery, and is placed directly in the breathing path of the user.

  9. Investigation of a non-contact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; Damiano, B.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new non-contact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components, however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  10. Impact of sampling techniques on measured stormwater quality data for small streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmel, R.D.; Slade, R.M., Jr.; Haney, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Science-based sampling methodologies are needed to enhance water quality characterization for setting appropriate water quality standards, developing Total Maximum Daily Loads, and managing nonpoint source pollution. Storm event sampling, which is vital for adequate assessment of water quality in small (wadeable) streams, is typically conducted by manual grab or integrated sampling or with an automated sampler. Although it is typically assumed that samples from a single point adequately represent mean cross-sectional concentrations, especially for dissolved constituents, this assumption of well-mixed conditions has received limited evaluation. Similarly, the impact of temporal (within-storm) concentration variability is rarely considered. Therefore, this study evaluated differences in stormwater quality measured in small streams with several common sampling techniques, which in essence evaluated within-channel and within-storm concentration variability. Constituent concentrations from manual grab samples and from integrated samples were compared for 31 events, then concentrations were also compared for seven events with automated sample collection. Comparison of sampling techniques indicated varying degrees of concentration variability within channel cross sections for both dissolved and particulate constituents, which is contrary to common assumptions of substantial variability in particulate concentrations and of minimal variability in dissolved concentrations. Results also indicated the potential for substantial within-storm (temporal) concentration variability for both dissolved and particulate constituents. Thus, failing to account for potential cross-sectional and temporal concentration variability in stormwater monitoring projects can introduce additional uncertainty in measured water quality data. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  11. Double-Edge Molecular Technique for Doppler Lidar Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence

    1998-01-01

    The double-edge lidar technique for measuring the wind using molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution edge filters are located in the wings of the Rayleigh-Brillouin profile. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift, the sensitivity, and gives nearly a factor of two improvement in measurement accuracy. The use of a crossover region is described where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering over a frequency range of +/- 100 m/s. We give methods for correcting for short-term frequency jitter and drift using a laser reference frequency measurement and methods for long-term frequency correction using a servo control system. The effects of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering on the measurement are shown to be significant and are included in the analysis. Simulations for a conical scanning satellite-based lidar at 355 nm show an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2 to 15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km and a 200 km x 200 km spatial resolution. Results of ground based wind measurements are presented.

  12. A sensitive technique for measuring hydroxyl radicals, atmospheric cleansing molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kleoppel, J.E.

    1993-06-01

    Despite its diminutive size, the hydroxyl radical (OH) is probably the single most important cleansing agent in the earth's atmosphere. These molecules continually purge the atmosphere of a wide variety of pollutants, including carbon monoxide, methane, and nitrogen dioxide. As more and more compounds are released into the atmosphere, an accurate understanding of the role played by OH becomes increasingly important. Accurately measuring the hydroxyl radical has been a problem because it lasts only a few seconds before reacting with some other chemical species, thus concentrations are extremely low at any given place and time. A researcher at Georgia Tech Research Institute has successfully demonstrated a powerful new OH measurement technique which uses extremely sensitive mass spectrometry, a radical concept that could revolutionize OH measurement methodology. The technique relies on the inherent sensitivity of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometry by converting the hydroxyl into an ion that can be detected. By reacting with sulfur dioxide, the OH is converted to isotopically labelled sulfuric acid which can be measured to obtain the ambient OH concentration. The new system is fast, accurate, reliable, and highly portable. This article describes the development and initial field testing of the methodology.

  13. A novel assessment technique for measuring ankle orientation and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Nandakumar, Anoop; Quan Xie, Sheng

    2015-09-18

    The measurement of ankle orientation and stiffness can provide insight into improvements and allows for effective monitoring during a rehabilitation program. Existing assessment techniques have a variety of limitations. Dynamometer based methods rely on manual manipulation. The use of torque meter is usually for single degree-of-freedom (DOF) devices. This study proposes a novel ankle assessment technique that can be used for multiple DOFs devices working in both manual and automatic modes using the position sensor and the multi-axis load cell. As a preliminary evaluation, an assessment device for ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion was constructed. Nine subjects participated to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment device in determining ankle orientation and stiffness. The measured ankle orientation was consistent with that from the NDI Polaris optical tracking system. The measured ankle torque and stiffness compared well with published data. The test-retest reliability was high with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) values greater than 0.846 and standard error of measurement (SEM) less than 1.38. PMID:26159061

  14. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  15. Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158510.html Americans Getting Adequate Water Daily, CDC Finds Men take in an average ... new government report finds most are getting enough water each day. The data, from the U.S. National ...

  16. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  17. Discrete filtering techniques applied to sequential GPS range measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vangraas, Frank

    1987-01-01

    The basic navigation solution is described for position and velocity based on range and delta range (Doppler) measurements from NAVSTAR Global Positioning System satellites. The application of discrete filtering techniques is examined to reduce the white noise distortions on the sequential range measurements. A second order (position and velocity states) Kalman filter is implemented to obtain smoothed estimates of range by filtering the dynamics of the signal from each satellite separately. Test results using a simulated GPS receiver show a steady-state noise reduction, the input noise variance divided by the output noise variance, of a factor of four. Recommendations for further noise reduction based on higher order Kalman filters or additional delta range measurements are included.

  18. Electrical measurement techniques for pulsed high current electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1986-04-01

    The advent of high current (1 to 100 kA), moderate energy (>10 MeV), short pulse (1 to 100 ns) electron accelerators used for charged particle beam research has motivated a need to complement standard diagnostics with development of new diagnostic techniques to measure electron beam parameters. A brief survey is given of the diagnostics for measuring beam current, position, size, energy, and emittance. While a broad scope of diagnostics will be discussed, this survey will emphasize diagnostics used on the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). Focus is placed on diagnostics measuring beam current, position and size. Among the diagnostics discussed are resistive wall current monitors, B/sub theta/ loops, Rogowski coils, Faraday cups, and x-ray wire diagnostics. Operation at higher current levels also increases radiation and electromagnetic pulse interference. These difficulties and methods for circumventing them are also discussed.

  19. Key techniques for vision measurement of 3D object surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huachao; Zhang, Shubi; Guo, Guangli; Liu, Chao; Yu, Ruipeng

    2006-11-01

    Digital close-range photogrammetry system and machine vision are widely used in production control, quality inspection. The main aim is to provide accurate 3D objects or reconstruction of an object surface and give an expression to an object shape. First, the key techniques of camera calibration and target image positioning for 3D object surface vision measurement were briefly reviewed and analyzed in this paper. Then, an innovative and effect method for precise space coordinates measurements was proposed. Test research proved that the thought and methods we proposed about image segmentation, detection and positioning of circular marks were effective and valid. A propriety weight value for adding parameters, control points and orientation elements in bundle adjustment with self-calibration are advantageous to gaining high accuracy of space coordinates. The RMS error of check points is less than +/-1 mm, which can meet the requirement in industrial measurement with high accuracy.

  20. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  1. Flow mediated endothelium function: advantages of an automatic measuring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Yamila; Casciaro, Mariano E.; José Urcola y, Maria; Craiem, Damian

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this work is to show the advantages of a non invasive automated method for measuring flow mediated dilation (FMD) in the forearm. This dilation takes place in answer to a shear tension generated by the increase of blood flow, sensed by the endothelium, after the liberation of an occlusion sustained in the time. The method consists of three stages: the continuous acquisition of images of the brachial artery using ultrasound techniques, the pulse to pulse measurement of the vessel's diameter by means of a border detection algorithm, and the later analysis of the results. By means of this technique one cannot only obtain the maximum dilation percentage (FMD%), but a continuous diameter curve that allows to evaluate other relevant aspects such as dilation speed, dilation sustain in time and general maneuver performance. The simplicity of this method, robustness of the technique and accessibility of the required elements makes it a viable alternative of great clinical value for diagnosis in the early detection of numerous cardiovascular pathologies.

  2. Can imaging techniques measure neuroprotection and remyelination in multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2007-05-29

    MRI is the most important paraclinical measure for assessing and monitoring the pathologic changes implicated in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI sequences, such as T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced and spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, are unable to provide full details about the degree of inflammation and underlying neurodegenerative changes. Newer nonconventional MRI techniques have the potential to detect clinical impairment, disease progression, accumulation of disability, and the neuroprotective effects of treatment. Unenhanced T1-weighted imaging can reveal hypointense black holes, a measure of chronic neurodegeneration. Two- and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences allow better identification of cortical lesions. Ultrahigh-field strength MRI has the potential to detect subpial cortical and deep gray matter lesions. Magnetization transfer imaging is increasingly used to characterize the evolution of MS lesions and normal-appearing brain tissue. Evidence suggests that the dynamics of magnetization transfer changes correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides details on tissue biochemistry, metabolism, and function, also has the capacity to reveal neuroprotective mechanisms. By measuring the motion of water, diffusion imaging can provide information about the orientation, size, and geometry of tissue damage in white and gray matter. Functional MRI may help clarify the brain's plasticity-dependent compensatory mechanisms in patients with MS. High-resolution microautoradiography and new contrast agents are proving to be sensitive means for characterizing molecular markers of disease activity, such as activated microglia and macrophages. Optical coherence tomography, a new research technique, makes it possible to investigate relevant physiologic systems that provide accurate measures of tissue changes secondary to the MS disease process

  3. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  4. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  5. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-01

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  6. Application of Sensing Techniques to Cellular Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Wang, James H.-C.

    2010-01-01

    Cell traction forces (CTFs) are the forces produced by cells and exerted on extracellular matrix or an underlying substrate. CTFs function to maintain cell shape, enable cell migration, and generate and detect mechanical signals. As such, they play a vital role in many fundamental biological processes, including angiogenesis, inflammation, and wound healing. Therefore, a close examination of CTFs can enable better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of such processes. To this end, various force-sensing techniques for CTF measurement have been developed over the years. This article will provide a concise review of these sensing techniques and comment on the needs for improved force-sensing technologies for cell mechanics and biology research. PMID:22163449

  7. Photon-counting technique for rapid fluorescence-decay measurement.

    PubMed

    Pack, S D; Renfro, M W; King, G B; Laurendeau, N M

    1998-08-01

    We report on a novel laser-induced fluorescence triple-integration method (LIFTIME) that is capable of making rapid, continuous fluorescence lifetime measurements by a unique photon-counting technique. The LIFTIME has been convolved with picosecond time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence, which employs a high-repetition-rate mode-locked laser, permitting the eventual monitoring of instantaneous species concentrations in turbulent flames. We verify the technique by application of the LIFTIME to two known fluorescence media, diphenyloxazole (PPO) and quinine sulfate monohydrate (QSM). PPO has a fluorescence lifetime of 1.28 ns, whereas QSM has a fluorescence lifetime that can be varied from 1.0 to 3.0 ns. From these liquid samples we demonstrate that fluorescence lifetime can currently be monitored at a sampling rate of up to 500 Hz with less than 10% uncertainty (1 sigma) . PMID:18087478

  8. Modulation transfer function measurement technique for small-pixel detectors.

    PubMed

    Marchywka, M; Socker, D G

    1992-12-01

    A modulation transfer function (MTF) measurement technique suitable for large-format, small-pixel detector characterization has been investigated. A volume interference grating is used as a test image instead of the bar or sine wave target images normally used. This technique permits a high-contrast, large-area, sinusoidal intensity distribution to illuminate the device being tested, avoiding the need to deconvolve raw data with imaging system characteristics. A high-confidence MTF result at spatial frequencies near 200 cycles/mm is obtained. We present results at several visible light wavelengths with a 6.8-microm-pixel CCD. Pixel response functions are derived from the MTF results. PMID:20802584

  9. Comparisons between different techniques for measuring mass segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard J.; Goodwin, Simon P.

    2015-06-01

    We examine the performance of four different methods which are used to measure mass segregation in star-forming regions: the radial variation of the mass function {M}_MF; the minimum spanning tree-based ΛMSR method; the local surface density ΣLDR method; and the ΩGSR technique, which isolates groups of stars and determines whether the most massive star in each group is more centrally concentrated than the average star. All four methods have been proposed in the literature as techniques for quantifying mass segregation, yet they routinely produce contradictory results as they do not all measure the same thing. We apply each method to synthetic star-forming regions to determine when and why they have shortcomings. When a star-forming region is smooth and centrally concentrated, all four methods correctly identify mass segregation when it is present. However, if the region is spatially substructured, the ΩGSR method fails because it arbitrarily defines groups in the hierarchical distribution, and usually discards positional information for many of the most massive stars in the region. We also show that the ΛMSR and ΣLDR methods can sometimes produce apparently contradictory results, because they use different definitions of mass segregation. We conclude that only ΛMSR measures mass segregation in the classical sense (without the need for defining the centre of the region), although ΣLDR does place limits on the amount of previous dynamical evolution in a star-forming region.

  10. Bioluminescence-based imaging technique for pressure measurement in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    The dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula emits light in response to water motion. We developed a new imaging technique for measuring pressure using plankton that emits light in response to mechanical stimulation. The bioluminescence emitted by P. lunula was used to measure impact water pressure produced using weight-drop tests. The maximum mean luminescence intensity correlated with the maximum impact pressure that the cells receive when the circadian and diurnal biological rhythms are appropriately controlled. Thus, with appropriate calibration of experimentally determined parameters, the dynamic impact pressure can be estimated by measuring the cell-flash distribution. Statistical features of the evolution of flash intensity and the probability distribution during the impacting event, which are described by both biological and mechanical response parameters, are also discussed in this paper. The practical applicability of this bioluminescence imaging technique is examined through a water drop test. The maximum dynamic pressure, occurring at the impact of a water jet against a wall, was estimated from the flash intensity of the dinoflagellate.

  11. CD-measurement technique for hole patterns on stencil mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Mikio; Yusa, Satoshi; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sano, Hisatake; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya

    2004-12-01

    EB lithography has a potential to successfully form hole patterns as small as 80 nm with a stencil mask. In a previous paper we proposed a technique using a HOLON dual-mode critical dimension (CD) SEM ESPA-75S in the transmission mode for CD measurement of line-and-space patterns on a stencil mask. In this paper we extend our effort of developing a CD measurement technique to contact hole features and determine it in comparison of measured values between features on mask and those printed on wafer. We have evaluated the width method and the area methods using designed 80-500 nm wide contact hole patterns on a large area membrane mask and their resist images on wafer printed by a LEEPL3000. We find that 1) the width method and the area methods show an excellent mask-wafer correlation for holes over 110 nm, and 2) the area methods show a better mask-wafer correlation than the width method does for holes below 110 nm. We conclude that the area calculated from the transmission SEM image is more suitable in defining the hole dimensions than the width for contact holes on a stencil mask.

  12. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown. PMID:24113712

  13. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  14. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  15. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  16. Measurement of interfacial tension by use of pendant drop video techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, M.D.; Thomas, C.P.; Bala, G.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes an instrument to measure the interfacial tension (IFT) of aqueous surfactant solutions and crude oil. The method involves injection of a drop of fluid (such as crude oil) into a second immiscible phase to determine the IFT between the two phases. The instrument is composed of an AT-class computer, optical cell, illumination, video camera and lens, video frame digitizer board, monitor, and software. The camera displays an image of the pendant drop on the monitor, which is then processed by the frame digitizer board and non-proprietary software to determine the IFT. Several binary and ternary phase systems were taken from the literature and used to measure the precision and accuracy of the instrument in determining IFTs. A copy of the software program is included in the report. A copy of the program on diskette can be obtained from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center, P.O. Box 1020, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-1020. The accuracy and precision of the technique and apparatus presented is very good for measurement of IFTs in the range from 72 to 10{sup {minus}2} mN/m, which is adequate for many EOR applications. With modifications to the equipment and the numerical techniques, measurements of ultralow IFTs (<10{sup {minus}3} mN/m) should be possible as well as measurements at reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The instrument has been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to support the research program on microbial enhanced oil recovery. Measurements of IFTs for several bacterial supernatants and unfractionated acid precipitates of microbial cultures containing biosurfactants against medium to heavy crude oils are reported. These experiments demonstrate that the use of automated video imaging of pendant drops is a simple and fast method to reliably determine interfacial tension between two immiscible liquid phases, or between a gas and a liquid phase.

  17. Prevalence and correlates of adequate performance on a measure of abilities related to decisional capacity: differences among three standards for the MacCAT-CR in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Laura B; Palmer, Barton W; Appelbaum, Paul S; Saks, Elyn R; Aarons, Gregory A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2007-01-01

    Despite the availability of structured decision-making capacity assessment tools, insufficient guidance exists for applying their results. Investigators often use cutpoints on these instruments to identify potential subjects in need of further assessment or education. Yet, information is lacking regarding the effects of different cutpoints on the proportion and characteristics of individuals categorized as possessing adequate or impaired decisional abilities for consent to research. To demonstrate the potential impact of different standards, we informed 91 individuals, aged 50 or older with a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, about a hypothetical clinical trial, and assessed their decisional abilities with the MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool for Clinical Research (MacCAT-CR). Three published MacCAT-CR-based standards were applied to participants' scores to examine the rates and correlates of categorical determinations of adequate performance. The three standards ranged in stringency: the most stringent incorporated cutpoints on all three of the major MacCAT-CR subscales (Understanding, Appreciation, and Reasoning); the other two standards required threshold performance only on the Understanding subscale. The most stringent standard resulted in a 57% rate of impaired performance; the intermediate standard, 19%; and the least stringent standard, 8%. Nearly half of the participants (n=45) were classified as having performed adequately by the least stringent standard yet inadequately by the most stringent. The majority of these 45 were impaired on the Appreciation subscale (n=9), Reasoning (n=15), or both (n=18). Cognitive functioning was correlated with performance status for the more stringent standards. These findings underscore the need for refinement of capacity assessment procedures and for improvements in the use of capacity assessment tools for screening purposes and to assist in categorical capacity determinations. PMID:17020803

  18. A Comparison of Stellar Elemental Abundance Techniques and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D.; Desch, Steven J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Adibekyan, Vardan; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Delgado Mena, Elisa; Liu, Fan; Nordlander, Thomas; Sousa, Sergio G.; Korn, Andreas; Gruyters, Pieter; Heiter, Ulrike; Jofré, Paula; Santos, Nuno C.; Soubiran, Caroline

    2016-09-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond the quoted error for the same elements within the same stars. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) to calculate 10 element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD 361, HD 10700, HD 121504, and HD 202206). Each group produced measurements for each star using (1) their own autonomous techniques, (2) standardized stellar parameters, (3) a standardized line list, and (4) both standardized parameters and a line list. We present the resulting stellar parameters, absolute abundances, and a metric of data similarity that quantifies the homogeneity of the data. We conclude that standardization of some kind, particularly stellar parameters, improves the consistency between methods. However, because results did not converge as more free parameters were standardized, it is clear there are inherent issues within the techniques that need to be reconciled. Therefore, we encourage more conversation and transparency within the community such that stellar abundance determinations can be reproducible as well as accurate and precise.

  19. Acoustic Techniques for Thin Film Thickness Measurement in Semiconductor Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Sanjay

    In modern semiconductor manufacturing, process monitoring and control are important issues limited at the present time by a lack of sensors and instrumentation capable of measuring process parameters like film thickness. In order to address this problem, two novel systems for thin film thickness measurement in semiconductor processing based upon contacting acoustic techniques have been developed. Both of these systems couple acoustic energy into the wafer via a nondestructive Hertzian contact and achieve high resolution by exciting and receiving ultrasonic signals from a ZnO transducer with microwave frequency electronics. The basic physical mechanism for film thickness determination is to analyze reflected waves due to acoustic impedance mismatches between various material layers on a silicon substrate. The first system requires frontside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to an opaque film deposited on a silicon wafer and involves the use of broadband, high frequency pulse-echo electronics in the 0.5-5 GHz range. With this system, ex-situ measurements of aluminum and gold thin films on a silicon substrate have been done in the 0.25-2.5 mum. range with 3-6% accuracy as compared to surface profilometer measurements. Possible applications for this system include using it as a post -deposition process monitor, generating film thickness contour maps, or examining multilayer structures. The second system requires backside contacting of a sapphire buffer rod to a silicon wafer, which is in a vacuum station, and involves monitoring the changes in phase of CW 1-2 GHz acoustic waves as a function of frontside film growth. Using this technique, in-situ indium and aluminum film thickness monitoring has been done in both evaporator and sputtering environments with a resolution of 40 A. Temperature experiments in an oven have shown a resolution of 0.05 K for the sapphire buffer rod. Finally, multistep processing has been done and a multilayer film structure has been measured

  20. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  1. Development of Nondestructive Measuring Technique of Environmental Radioactive Strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Tatsuru; Murata, Jiro

    The Fukushima first nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the Japanese big earthquake in 2011. The main radioactivity concerned after the accident are I-131 (half-life 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years) and 137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days) and 90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new detection technique which enables us to realize quantitative evaluation of the strontium radioactivity by means of nondestructive measurement without chemical separation processing, which is concerned to be included inside foods, environmental water and soil around us, in order to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to the radiation.

  2. Apparent thermal conductivity measurements by an unguarded technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, R. S.; Yarbrough, D. W.; McElroy, D. L.

    An unguarded longitudinal heat flow apparatus for measuring the apparent thermal conductivity (lambda/sub a) of insulations was tested. Heat flow is provided by a horizontal electrically heated Nichrome screen sandwiched between test samples that are bounded by temperature controlled copper plates and 9 cm of mineral fiber insulation. A determinate error analysis shows lambda/sub a/ measurement uncertainty to be less than + or - 1.7% for insulating materials as thin as 3 cm. Three-dimensional thermal modeling indicates negligible error in lambda/sub a/ due to edge loss for insulations up to 7.62 cm thick when the temperature difference across the sample is measured at the screen center. System repeatability and reproducibility were determined to be + or - 0.2%. Differences of lambda/sub a/ results from the screen tester and results from the National Bureau of Standards were 0.1% for a 10-kg/m(3) Calibration Transfer Standard and 0.9% for 127-kg/m(3) fibrous glass board (SRM 1450b). Measurements on fiberglass and rock wool batt insulations showed the dependence of lambda/sub a/ on density, temperature, temperature difference, plate emittance, and heat flow direction. Results obtained for lambda/sub a/ as a function of density at 240C differed by less than 2% from values obtained with a guarded hot plate. It is demonstrated that this simple technique has the accuracy and sensitivity needed for useful lambda/sub a/ measurements on thermal insulating materials.

  3. Principles and techniques for measuring optical parameters of biotissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shusen; Li, Hui; Zheng, Wei; Chia, Teck-Chee; Lee, Sing; Huang, Zhiwei

    1996-09-01

    In this paper, the principles of light propagation in tissue and techniques for measuring the optical parameters of tissues are briefly described. A new approach to measure optical parameters has been developed. We combine the solution of the diffusion theory with a result of Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the optical parameters of several mammalian tissue. This indirect approach might be used to determine the optical properties of human tissue. In addition, we also believe that the refractive index of bio- tissue is another important optical parameter in tissue optics. Recently, we have developed a new simple method based on total-internal-reflection to measure the refractive index of tissue. The main advantages of the method are its elimination of multiscattering effects, suitability to a small sample, and excellent accuracy of measurement. The refractive indices of skin from people of different age, sex and skin color in vivo was recently measured. We believe that it is the first set of data of index of refraction of human tissue in vivo.

  4. Magnetic field measurement techniques with heavy ion beam probes

    SciTech Connect

    Crowley, T.P.

    1988-08-01

    Spatially (0.1 cm/sup 3/) and temporally (1 ..mu..s) resolved magnetic field measurement techniques using a heavy ion beam probe as a test particle source are described. The measurement of both steady-state and time-varying fields is discussed. The plasma flux function can be determined by measuring the toroidal velocity of the beam ion in an axisymmetric device, because the canonical angular momentum of a particle, P/sub phi/ = qpsi+M..nu../sub phi/R, is conserved in an axisymmetric system. Corrections due to nonaxisymmetry can be significant in tokamaks and must be taken into account for the current profile and fluctuation measurements. The requirements and design of a toroidal velocity detector are discussed. The signals expected in experiments using the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT) heavy ion beam probe with a velocity detector have been calculated, and they are at least two orders of magnitude higher than the amplifier noise for dc measurements of poloidal and ergodic magnetic limiter fields and for sawtooth and MHD oscillations. Low-level turbulence is expected to produce signals below the noise level.

  5. Tritium measurement technique using ``in-bed`` calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium ``heels`` from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and ``in-bed`` tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus_minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

  6. Tritium measurement technique using in-bed'' calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium heels'' from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and in-bed'' tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

  7. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described. The measurement was made using an automatic network analyzer with the microstrip line terminated in a short circuit. Experimental data for two microstrip lines on 10 and 30 mil Cuflon substrates were recorded over a frequency range of 2 to 20 GHz. Agreement with theoretical results computed by the spectral domain approach is good. Possible sources of error for the discrepancy are discussed.

  8. The Electron Drift Technique for Measuring Electric and Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paschmann, G.; McIlwain, C. E.; Quinn, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Whipple, E. C.; Christensen, John (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The electron drift technique is based on sensing the drift of a weak beam of test electrons that is caused by electric fields and/or gradients in the magnetic field. These quantities can, by use of different electron energies, in principle be determined separately. Depending on the ratio of drift speed to magnetic field strength, the drift velocity can be determined either from the two emission directions that cause the electrons to gyrate back to detectors placed some distance from the emitting guns, or from measurements of the time of flight of the electrons. As a by-product of the time-of-flight measurements, the magnetic field strength is also determined. The paper describes strengths and weaknesses of the method as well as technical constraints.

  9. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  10. Determination of Probe Volume Dimensions in Coherent Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Weikl, Markus C.; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    When investigating combustion phenomena with pump-probe techniques, the spatial resolution is given by the overlapping region of the laser beams and thus defines the probe volume size. The size of this probe volume becomes important when the length scales of interest are on the same order or smaller. In this work, we present a new approach to measure the probe volume in three dimensions (3-D), which can be used to determine the probe volume length, diameter, and shape. The optical arrangement and data evaluation are demonstrated for a dual-pump dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) setup which is used for combustion diagnostics. This new approach offers a simple, quick alternative with more capabilities than formerly used probe volume measurement methods.

  11. Solids concentration measurements in molten wax by an ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Blackwell, A.G.; Schehl, R.R.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The application of the three-phase slurry reactor system to coal liquefaction processing and chemical industries has recently received considerable attention. To design and efficiently operate a three-phase slurry reactor, the degree of dispersion of the solid (catalyst) in the reactor should be understood. The solids distribution within the reactor greatly affects its performance. An ultrasonic technique is under development for measuring solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 189 C. The data show that the velocity and attenuation of the sound are well-defined functions of the solid and gas concentrations in the molten wax.

  12. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  13. Inflight application of three pilot workload measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Hauser, Jan R.

    1987-01-01

    Three inflight techniques for workload measurement were tested in nine pilots flying the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory: subjective ratings, heart rate, and communication performance. The activities that contributed to the crew-member workload varied; the commander was responsible for aircraft control and navigation whereas the copilot handled communications. The three workload measures were found to provide different information. Pilot ratings of workload, effort, and stress were sensitive to variations in flight-related task demands across flight segments but did not reflect specific differences in the type of demands imposed on the commander and the copilot. The heart rate was sensitive to the differential impact of duties, being higher for the commander than for the copilot. The rate of communications per minute of flight proved to be the most sensitive indicator. It was related to workload, stress, effort rating, and average heart rate across flight segments.

  14. Diagnostic techniques for measuring suprathermal electron dynamics in plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.

    2008-10-15

    Plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space, are often not in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the plasma electron distribution function is accordingly non-Maxwellian. Suprathermal electron tails can be generated by external drives, such as rf waves and electric fields, or internal ones, such as instabilities and magnetic reconnection. The variety and importance of the phenomena in which suprathermal electrons play a significant role explains an enduring interest in diagnostic techniques to investigate their properties and dynamics. X-ray bremsstrahlung emission has been studied in hot magnetized plasmas for well over two decades, flanked progressively by electron-cyclotron emission in geometries favoring the high-energy end of the distribution function (high-field-side, vertical, oblique emission), by electron-cyclotron absorption, by spectroscopic techniques, and at lower temperatures, by Langmuir probes and electrostatic analyzers. Continuous progress in detector technology and in measurement and analysis techniques, increasingly sophisticated layouts (multichannel and tomographic systems, imaging geometries), and highly controlled suprathermal generation methods (e.g., perturbative rf modulation) have all been brought to bear in recent years on an increasingly detailed, although far from complete, understanding of suprathermal electron dynamics.

  15. Interferometric phase measurement techniques for coherent beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, Marie; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Larat, Christian; Lallier, Eric; Primot, Jérôme; Brignon, Arnaud

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining of fiber amplifiers provides an attractive mean of reaching high power laser. In an interferometric phase measurement the beams issued for each fiber combined are imaged onto a sensor and interfere with a reference plane wave. This registration of interference patterns on a camera allows the measurement of the exact phase error of each fiber beam in a single shot. Therefore, this method is a promising candidate toward very large number of combined fibers. Based on this technique, several architectures can be proposed to coherently combine a high number of fibers. The first one based on digital holography transfers directly the image of the camera to spatial light modulator (SLM). The generated hologram is used to compensate the phase errors induced by the amplifiers. This architecture has therefore a collective phase measurement and correction. Unlike previous digital holography technique, the probe beams measuring the phase errors between the fibers are co-propagating with the phase-locked signal beams. This architecture is compatible with the use of multi-stage isolated amplifying fibers. In that case, only 20 pixels per fiber on the SLM are needed to obtain a residual phase shift error below λ/10rms. The second proposed architecture calculates the correction applied to each fiber channel by tracking the relative position of the interference finges. In this case, a phase modulator is placed on each channel. In that configuration, only 8 pixels per fiber on the camera is required for a stable close loop operation with a residual phase error of λ/20rms, which demonstrates the scalability of this concept.

  16. A Balloon Sounding Technique for Measuring SO2 Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Gary A.; Komhyr, Walter D.; Hirokawa, Jun; Lefer, Barry; Krotkov, Nicholay; Ngan, Fong

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new technique for inexpensive measurements of SO2 profiles using a modified dual-ozonesonde instrument payload. The presence of SO2 interferes with the standard electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde measurement, resulting in -1 molecule of O3 reported for each molecule of SO2 present (provided [O3] > [SO2]). In laboratory tests, an SO2 filter made with Cr03 placed on the inlet side of the sonde removes nearly 100% of the SO2 present for concentrations up to 60 ppbv and remained effective after exposure to 2.8 X 10(exp 16) molecules of SO2 [equivalent to a column approximately 150 DU (1 DU = 2.69 X 10(exp 20) molecules m(exp -2))]. Flying two ECC instruments on the same payload with one filtered and the other unfiltered yields SO2 profiles, inferred by subtraction. Laboratory tests and field experience suggest an SO2 detection limit of approximately 3 pbb with profiles valid from the surface to the ozonopause [i.e., approximately (8-10 km)]. Two example profiles demonstrate the success of this technique for both volcanic and industrial plumes.

  17. Pattern recognition techniques and the measurement of solar magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Ariste, Arturo; Rees, David E.; Socas-Navarro, Hector; Lites, Bruce W.

    2001-11-01

    Measuring vector magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere using the profiles of the Stokes parameters of polarized spectral lines split by the Zeeman effect is known as Stokes Inversion. This inverse problem is usually solved by least-squares fitting of the Stokes profiles. However least-squares inversion is too slow for the new generation of solar instruments (THEMIS, SOLIS, Solar-B, ...) which will produce an ever-growing flood of spectral data. The solar community urgently requires a new approach capable of handling this information explosion, preferably in real-time. We have successfully applied pattern recognition and machine learning techniques to tackle this problem. For example, we have developed PCA-inversion, a database search technique based on Principal Component Analysis of the Stokes profiles. Search is fast because it is carried out in low dimensional PCA feature space, rather than the high dimensional space of the spectral signals. Such a data compression approach has been widely used for search and retrieval in many areas of data mining. PCA-inversion is the basis of a new inversion code called FATIMA (Fast Analysis Technique for the Inversion of Magnetic Atmospheres). Tests on data from HAO's Advanced Stokes Polarimeter show that FATIMA isover two orders of magnitude faster than least squares inversion. Initial tests on an alternative code (DIANNE - Direct Inversion based on Artificial Neural NEtworks) show great promise of achieving real-time performance. In this paper we present the latest achievements of FATIMA and DIANNE, two powerful examples of how pattern recognition techniques can revolutionize data analysis in astronomy.

  18. An Assessment of a Technique for Modeling Lidar Background Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. A.; Hunt, W. H.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hair, J. W.; Butler, C. F.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    A high-fidelity lidar simulation tool has been developed to generate synthetic lidar backscatter data that closely matches the expected performance of various lidars, including the noise characteristics inherent to analog detection and uncertainties related to the measurement environment. This tool supports performance trade studies and scientific investigations for both the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), which flies aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The simulation tool models the lidar instrument characteristics, the backscatter signals generated from aerosols, clouds, ocean surface and subsurface, and the solar background signals. The background signals are derived from the simulated aerosol and cloud characteristics, the surface type, and solar zenith angle, using a look-up table of upwelling radiance vs scene type. The upwelling radiances were derived from the CALIOP RMS background noise and were correlated with measurements of the particulate intensive and extensive optical properties, including surface scattering for transparent layers. Tests were conducted by tuning the tool for both HSRL and CALIOP instrument settings and the atmospheres were defined using HSRL measurements from underflights of CALIPSO. For similar scenes, the simulated and measured backgrounds were compared. Overall, comparisons showed good agreement, verifying the accuracy of the tool to support studies involving instrument characterization and advanced data analysis techniques.

  19. Application of Lorentz force techniques for flow rate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Reschad Johann; Resagk, Christian

    2014-11-01

    We report on the progress of the Lorentz force velocimetry (LFV): a contactless non-invasive flow velocity measurement technique. This method has been developed and demonstrated for various applications in our institute and in industry. At applications for weakly conducting fluids such as electrolytes with conductivities in the range of 1 - 10 S/m the challenging bottleneck is the detection of the tiny Lorentz forces in the noisy environment of the test channel. For the force measurement a state-of-the-art electromagnetic force compensation balance is used. Due to this device the mass of the Lorentz force generating magnets is limited. For enabling larger magnet systems and for higher force signals we have developed and tested a buoyancy based weight force compensation method which will be presented here. Additionally, results of LFV measurements at non-symmetric fluid profiles will be shown. By that an evaluation of the feasibility of this measurement principle for disturbed fluid profiles that are relevant for developing the LFV for weakly conducting fluids towards industrial applications can be made. Additionally a prospective setup for using the LFV for molten salt flows will be explained.

  20. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  1. Non-contact measurement technique for enzymatic reaction of glucokinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staforelli, Juan P.; Gallardo, María. J.; Meza, Pablo; Torres, Sergio; Mella, Héctor; Reyes, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    A non-contact infrared imaging-based measurement technique is applied to quantify the enzymatic reaction of glucokinase. The method is implemented by a long-wave (8-12 [μm]) infrared microbolometer imaging array and a germanium-based infrared optical vision system adjusted to the size of a small biological sample. The enzymatic reaction is carried out by the glucokinase enzyme, which is representative of the internal dynamics of the cell. Such reactions produce a spontaneous exothermal release of energy detected by the infrared imaging system as a non-contact measurement technique. It is shown by stoichiometry computations and infrared thermal resolution metrics that the infrared imaging system can detect the energy release at the [mK] range. This allows to quantify the spontaneity of the enzymatic reaction in a three dimensional (surface and time) single and noncontact real- time measurement. The camera is characterized for disclosing its sensibility, and the fixed pattern noise is compensated by a two point calibration method. On the other hand, the glucokinase enzyme is isolated from Pyrococcus furiosus. Therefore, the experiment is carried out by manual injection with graduated micropipettes using 40 [μl] of glucokinase at the surface of the substrate contained in an eppendorf tube. For recording, the infrared camera is adjusted in-focus at 25.4 [mm] from the superficial level of the substrate. The obtained values of energy release are 139 +/- 22 [mK] at room temperature and 274 +/- 22 [mK] for a bath temperature of 334 [K].

  2. Optical coherence-based techniques for motional Stark effect measurements of magnetic field pitch angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, John

    1999-02-01

    The motional Stark effect measurement of magnetic field pitch angle in tokamaks is a mature and powerful technique for estimating plasma current density in tokamaks. However, its range of applicability is limited by the requirement that 0741-3335/41/2/012/img3 and 0741-3335/41/2/012/img4 manifolds are spectrally sufficiently well separated (high magnetic fields, high beam energies) to ensure adequate net polarization for a successful measurement. This paper proposes alternative schemes based on the optical coherence properties of the Stark multiplet that are somewhat more versatile than the standard method and better suited to measurements on low-field toroidal confinement devices. An interference filter is used to transmit the Stark multiplet to a polarimeter (which uses a single photoelastic plate) that modulates the light temporal coherence and/or its first spectral moment. This light is subsequently processed using a novel electro-optically modulated solid-state interferometer that is sensitive to low-order spectral moments. The modulation of these quantities conveys information about the orientation of the light polarization and hence the magnetic field pitch angle.

  3. Adequate supervision for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Anderst, James; Moffatt, Mary

    2014-11-01

    Primary care providers (PCPs) have the opportunity to improve child health and well-being by addressing supervision issues before an injury or exposure has occurred and/or after an injury or exposure has occurred. Appropriate anticipatory guidance on supervision at well-child visits can improve supervision of children, and may prevent future harm. Adequate supervision varies based on the child's development and maturity, and the risks in the child's environment. Consideration should be given to issues as wide ranging as swimming pools, falls, dating violence, and social media. By considering the likelihood of harm and the severity of the potential harm, caregivers may provide adequate supervision by minimizing risks to the child while still allowing the child to take "small" risks as needed for healthy development. Caregivers should initially focus on direct (visual, auditory, and proximity) supervision of the young child. Gradually, supervision needs to be adjusted as the child develops, emphasizing a safe environment and safe social interactions, with graduated independence. PCPs may foster adequate supervision by providing concrete guidance to caregivers. In addition to preventing injury, supervision includes fostering a safe, stable, and nurturing relationship with every child. PCPs should be familiar with age/developmentally based supervision risks, adequate supervision based on those risks, characteristics of neglectful supervision based on age/development, and ways to encourage appropriate supervision throughout childhood. PMID:25369578

  4. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  5. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  6. Assessment of a bone biopsy technique for measuring tiludronate in horses: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Delguste, Catherine; Doucet, Michèle; Gabriel, Annick; Guyonnet, Jérôme; Lepage, Olivier M; Amory, Hélène

    2011-04-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of measuring tiludronate in horses using a minimally invasive bone biopsy technique. Eight horses were treated with intravenous (IV) tiludronate [1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW)], either once (n = 4) or twice, 28 d apart (n = 4). The horses that were treated once were euthanized on days 1, 43, 57, or 92 and those that were treated twice, were euthanized on days 112, 154, 194, or 364. Bone samples were taken bilaterally from each horse at 4 sites: the third metacarpal bone (MCIII), the 13th rib (R13), the tuber coxae (TC), and the cuboid bone (CB). Test samples were taken with a 5-mm diameter dental drill, while larger reference samples were taken with an osteotome. The concentrations of tiludronate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. The TC was the easiest site to sample, and no technical difficulties were encountered for extraction and measurement. Drill sampling at the MCIII was difficult. Moreover, both the extraction and measurement caused technical problems and results were unreliable in most cases (93%). Drill samples obtained from the R13 were very small and access to the CB required considerable dissection, which would not be feasible in vivo. Forty-six percent and 36% of the tiludronate measurements performed on the R13 and CB samples, respectively, were unreliable. The ratio of tiludronate concentrations ranged from 73% to 185% (median: 118%) in the TC, 65% to 208% (median: 81%) in the R13, and 26% to 110% (median: 57%) in the CB. In all but 1 horse, the highest concentrations of tiludronate were found in the TC. It was concluded that bone biopsies performed at the TC were adequate for measuring tiludronate in horses and should be considered in future for repeated measurements over time in living animals. PMID:21731184

  7. Assessment of a bone biopsy technique for measuring tiludronate in horses: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Delguste, Catherine; Doucet, Michèle; Gabriel, Annick; Guyonnet, Jérôme; Lepage, Olivier M.; Amory, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of measuring tiludronate in horses using a minimally invasive bone biopsy technique. Eight horses were treated with intravenous (IV) tiludronate [1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW)], either once (n = 4) or twice, 28 d apart (n = 4). The horses that were treated once were euthanized on days 1, 43, 57, or 92 and those that were treated twice, were euthanized on days 112, 154, 194, or 364. Bone samples were taken bilaterally from each horse at 4 sites: the third metacarpal bone (MCIII), the 13th rib (R13), the tuber coxae (TC), and the cuboid bone (CB). Test samples were taken with a 5-mm diameter dental drill, while larger reference samples were taken with an osteotome. The concentrations of tiludronate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. The TC was the easiest site to sample, and no technical difficulties were encountered for extraction and measurement. Drill sampling at the MCIII was difficult. Moreover, both the extraction and measurement caused technical problems and results were unreliable in most cases (93%). Drill samples obtained from the R13 were very small and access to the CB required considerable dissection, which would not be feasible in vivo. Forty-six percent and 36% of the tiludronate measurements performed on the R13 and CB samples, respectively, were unreliable. The ratio of tiludronate concentrations ranged from 73% to 185% (median: 118%) in the TC, 65% to 208% (median: 81%) in the R13, and 26% to 110% (median: 57%) in the CB. In all but 1 horse, the highest concentrations of tiludronate were found in the TC. It was concluded that bone biopsies performed at the TC were adequate for measuring tiludronate in horses and should be considered in future for repeated measurements over time in living animals. PMID:21731184

  8. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Measured by an Automated Electrical Impedance Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical impedance measurements are used to investigate the rates of sulfate reduction by pure cultures of and sediments containing sulfur-reducing bacteria. Changes in the electrical impedance ratios of pure cultures of Desulfovibrio aestuarii and samples of reduced sediments from San Francisco Bay were measured by a Bactometer 32, and sulfate reduction was followed by measuring the incorporation of (S-35) sulfate into metal sulfides. The growth of the bacteria in pure culture is found to result in an increase of 0.2200 in the impedance ratio within 24 h, accompanied by increases in protein, ATP, sulfide and absorptance at 660 nm, all of which are inhibited by the addition of molybdate. Similar responses were observed in the sediments, although impedance ratio responses were not completely inhibited upon the addition of molybdate, due to the presence of nonsulfate-respiring microorganisms. Experiments conducted with sterile media and autoclaved sediments indicate that the presence of H2S together with iron is responsible for the impedance effect, and sulfate reduction rates ranging between 0.85 and 1.78 mmol/l per day are estimated for the sediments by the impedance technique.

  9. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  10. Airflow measurement techniques applied to radon mitigation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Harrje, D.T.; Gadsby, K.J.

    1989-01-01

    During the past decade a multitude of diagnostic procedures associated with the evaluation of air infiltration and air leakage sites have been developed. The spirit of international cooperation and exchange of ideas within the AIC-AIVC conferences has greatly facilitated the adoption and use of these measurement techniques in the countries participating in Annex V. But wide application of such diagnostic methods are not limited to air infiltration alone. The subject of this paper concerns the ways to evaluate and improve radon reduction in buildings using diagnostic methods directly related to developments familiar to the AIVC. Radon problems are certainly not unique to the United States, and the methods described here have to a degree been applied by researchers of other countries faced with similar problems. The radon problem involves more than a harmful pollutant of the living spaces of our buildings -- it also involves energy to operate radon removal equipment and the loss of interior conditioned air as a direct result. The techniques used for air infiltration evaluation will be shown to be very useful in dealing with the radon mitigation challenge. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Viscosity measurements of metallic melts using the oscillating drop technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzmann, P.; Yang, F.; Schneider, S.; Lohöfer, G.; Meyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    By means of benchmarking reduced gravity experiments, we have verified the measured viscosity of binary Zr-Ni glass forming liquids utilizing the oscillating drop technique combined with ground-based electrostatic levitation (ESL). Reliable viscosity data can be obtained as long as internal viscous damping of a single oscillation mode of a levitated drop dominates external perturbations. This can be verified by the absence of a sample mass dependence of the results. Hence, ESL is an excellent tool for studying the viscosity of metallic glass forming melts in the range of about 10-250 mPa s, with sample masses below 100 mg. To this end, we show that, for binary Zr-Ni melts, the viscosity is qualitatively controlled by the packing density.

  12. Moire technique utilization for detection and measurement of scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawieska, Dorota; Podlasiak, Piotr

    1993-02-01

    Moire projection method enables non-contact measurement of the shape or deformation of different surfaces and constructions by fringe pattern analysis. The fringe map acquisition of the whole surface of the object under test is one of the main advantages compared with 'point by point' methods. The computer analyzes the shape of the whole surface and next user can selected different points or cross section of the object map. In this paper a few typical examples of an application of the moire technique in solving different medical problems will be presented. We will also present to you the equipment the moire pattern analysis is done in real time using the phase stepping method with CCD camera.

  13. Water induced geohazards measured with spaceborne interferometry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncos, V.; Serban, F.; Teleaga, D.; Ciocan, V.; Sorin, M.; Caranda, D.; Zamfirescu, F.; Andrei, M.; Copaescu, S.; Radu, M.; Raduca, V.

    2012-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic occurrence of groundwater is inducing surficial crustal deformation processes that can be accurately measured with high spatial density from space, regardless of the ground access conditions. The detection of the surface deformation allows uncovering spatial and temporal patterns of subsurface processes such as land subsidence, cave-ins and differential ground settlement related to water content. InSAR measurements combined with ground truth data permit estimation of the mechanical properties of the rocks and the development of models and scenarios to predict disaster events such as cave-ins, landslides and soil liquefaction in the case of an Earthquake. A number of three sites in Romania that suffer of ground instability because of the water component will be presented. The DInSAR, Interferograms Stacking and Persistent Scatterers Interferometry techniques were applied to retrieve as accurate as possible the displacement information. The first studied site is the city of Bucharest; using 7 years of ERS data ground instability was detected on a large area that represents the historical watershed of the Dambovita river. A network of water wells shows that the ground instability is directly proportional to the groundwater depth. The second site is the Ocnele Mari brine extraction area. The exploitation of the Ocnele Mari salt deposit started from the Roman Empire time using the mining technology and from 1954 the salt dissolution technology which involves injecting water into the ground using a well and extracting the brine (water and salt) through another well. The extraction of salt through dissolution led to slow ground subsidence but the flooding and dissolution of the Roman caves led to catastrophic cave-ins and the relocation of an entire village. The water injection technique is still applied and the Roman cave system is an unknown, therefore further catastrophic events are expected. The existing theoretical simulations of the

  14. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  15. Flap noise characteristics measured by pressure cross correlation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, W. R.

    1980-03-01

    The aerodynamic sound generated by a realistic aircraft flap system was investigated through the use of cross correlations between surface pressure fluctuations and far field sound. Measurements were conducted in two subsonic wind tunnel studies to determine the strength, distribution, and directivity of the major sources of flap noise at speeds up to 79.0 m/sec. A pilot study was performed on a single flap model to test the measurement technique and provide initial data on the characteristics of flap noise. The major portion of this investigation studied the sound radiated by a realistic large scale model of a triple slotted flap system mounted on a sweptback 6.7 meter semispan model wing. The results of this investigation have identified the major sources of flap generated noise and their dependence of flow defining parameters. In addition, a possible avenue toward the reduction of flap generated noise has been identified via the placement of the flap actuator fairings on the flap system.

  16. A magnetic field measurement technique using a miniature transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, C. L., Jr.; Breckenridge, R. A.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and application of a magnetometer are described. The magnetometer has a miniature transducer and is capable of automatic scanning. The magnetometer described here is capable of detecting static magnetic fields as low as 1.6 A/m and its transducer has an active area 0.64 mm by 0.76 mm. Thin and rugged, the transducer uses wire, 0.05 mm in diameter, which is plated with a magnetic film, enabling measurement of transverse magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from a surface. The magnetometer, which is simple to operate and has a fast response, uses an inexpensive clip-on milliammeter (commonly found in most laboratories) for driving and processing the electrical signals and readout. A specially designed transducer holding mechanism replaces the XY recorder ink pen; this mechanism provides the basis for an automatic scanning technique. The instrument has been applied to the measurements of magnetic fields arising from remanent magnetization in experimental plated-wire memory planes and regions of magnetic activity in geological rock specimens.

  17. Measurement of Automotive Catalyst Washcoat Loading Parameters by Microscopy Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, H. K.; J., R., Jr.; Baird, R. H.; Hammerle, A. A.; Adamczyk, J. D.

    1999-07-01

    : Washcoat loading on automotive exhaust catalysts is normally determined, in production, by a weight gain procedure, which gives an accurate measure of washcoat weight present on an individual catalyst but does not address such parameters as uniformity of washcoat loading and geometric surface area within the monolith. Both issues are important factors that affect the catalytic activity (especially during catalyst lightoff) and catalyst cost (due to a thick, less functional washcoat) in an automotive exhaust system. Washcoat loading also plays a role in post-use analysis to determine possible reasons for changes (i.e., loss) in catalytic activity. For the post-use examinations weighing techniques are not useful since the washcoat cannot be preferentially removed and part of the weight gain is due to contamination from the combustion process. In the present work a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) X-ray mapping, light microscopy, and digital image processing was used. Two methods have been demonstrated for the determination of the density of calcined alumina washcoats. Additionally, a method has been developed to determine catalyst washcoat loading, either on a sampling basis after manufacture or in studies of catalysts after use. Methods also have been developed to determine other important parameters such as monolith wall thickness, percent open area in a catalyst monolith, geometric surface area, and hydraulic diameter. A linear correlation has been shown between hydrocarbon conversion efficiency and measured geometric surface area, with a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.84.

  18. Measurement of Automotive Catalyst Washcoat Loading Parameters by Microscopy Techniques.

    PubMed

    Plummer; Baird; Hammerle; Adamczyk; Pakko

    1999-07-01

    : Washcoat loading on automotive exhaust catalysts is normally determined, in production, by a weight gain procedure, which gives an accurate measure of washcoat weight present on an individual catalyst but does not address such parameters as uniformity of washcoat loading and geometric surface area within the monolith. Both issues are important factors that affect the catalytic activity (especially during catalyst lightoff) and catalyst cost (due to a thick, less functional washcoat) in an automotive exhaust system. Washcoat loading also plays a role in post-use analysis to determine possible reasons for changes (i.e., loss) in catalytic activity. For the post-use examinations weighing techniques are not useful since the washcoat cannot be preferentially removed and part of the weight gain is due to contamination from the combustion process. In the present work a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) X-ray mapping, light microscopy, and digital image processing was used. Two methods have been demonstrated for the determination of the density of calcined alumina washcoats. Additionally, a method has been developed to determine catalyst washcoat loading, either on a sampling basis after manufacture or in studies of catalysts after use. Methods also have been developed to determine other important parameters such as monolith wall thickness, percent open area in a catalyst monolith, geometric surface area, and hydraulic diameter. A linear correlation has been shown between hydrocarbon conversion efficiency and measured geometric surface area, with a coefficient of determination (r(2)) of 0.84. PMID:10421811

  19. Trace element measurement in Saliva by NAA and PIXE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidian, M.R.; Vahid Golpayegani, M.; Shojai, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The activity of salivary glands and the chemical and physical properties of saliva, especially in some illnesses in which the activity of salivary glands and the chemical and physical properties alter, sometimes have severe effects on sedimentation and tooth decay. Long-standing investigations have shown the relationship between salivary gland activity and saliva composition in dental carries. Many modern techniques have been employed to measure important elements in saliva. The major elements in saliva include sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, phosphorus, iodine, and fluorine. It should be pointed out that the amount of minerals changes when the diet changes. The major constituent of saliva is water with a density of 1.007 g/cm[sup 3] in which 0.6% is solid, 0.3% organic material and 0.3% inorganic material. In addition to other effects, the acidity (pH) of saliva has a strong effect on tooth sedimentation. Type of work, degree of stress, and mental condition affect salivary gland activity. When the acidity of salivary fluid in the mouth and consequently over the teeth drops, sedimentation increases. In this paper, the results of trace element measurement in saliva are presented.

  20. Intercomparison of six ambient [CH2O] measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilpin, Tim; Apel, Eric; Fried, Alan; Wert, Bryan; Calvert, Jack; Genfa, Zhang; Dasgupta, Purnendu; Harder, Jerry W.; Heikes, Brian; Hopkins, Brian; Westberg, Hal; Kleindienst, Tad; Lee, Yin-Nan; Zhou, Xianliang; Lonneman, William; Sewell, Scott

    1997-09-01

    From May 29 to June 3, 1995 a blind intercomparison of six ambient formaldehyde measurement techniques took place at a field site near the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado. The continuous measurement methods intercompared were tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, (TDLAS); coil/2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine, (CDNPH); 1,3-cyclohexanedione-diffusion scrubber (CHDDS); and the coil enzyme method (CENZ). In addition, two different cartridge methods were compared: silica gel-2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DPNH) systems and a C-18-DNPH system. The intercomparison was conducted with spiked zero air (part 1) and ambient air (part 2). The CH2O standards for part 1 were calibrated by several independent methods and delivered to participants via a common glass manifold with potential trace gas interférants common to ambient air (O3, SO2, NO2, isoprene, H2O). The TDLAS system was used to confirm the absolute accuracy of the standards and served as a mission reference for part 1. The ambient phase lasted 44 hours with all participants sampling from a common glass tower. Differences between the ambient [CH2O] observed by the TDLAS and the other continuous methods were significant in some cases. For matched ambient measurement times the average ratios (±1σ) [CH2O]measured/[CH2O]TDLAS were: 0.89±0.12 (CDNPH); 1.30±0.02 (CHDDS); 0.63±0.03 (CENZ). The methods showed similar variations but different absolute values and the divergences appeared to result largely from calibration differences (no gas phase standards were used by groups other than NCAR). When the regressions of the participant [CH2O] values versus the TDLAS values, (measured in part 1), were used to normalize all of the results to the common gas phase standards of the NCAR group, the average ratios (±1σ), [CH2O]corrected/[CH2O]TDLAS for the first measurement period were much closer to unity: 1.04±0.14 (CDNPH), 1.00±0.11 (CHDDS), and 0.82±0.08 (CENZ). With the continuous methods

  1. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. PMID:25169978

  2. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  3. Measuring Verbal Psychotherapeutic Techniques-A Systematic Review of Intervention Characteristics and Measures.

    PubMed

    Gumz, Antje; Treese, Barbara; Marx, Christopher; Strauss, Bernhard; Wendt, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Language is one of the most important "tools" of psychotherapists. The working mechanisms of verbal therapeutic techniques, however, are still marginally understood. In part, this is due to the lack of a generally acknowledged typology as well as a gold standard for the assessment of verbal techniques, which limits the possibility of conducting studies focusing this topic. The present study reviews measures used in clinical research which assess directly observable dimensions of verbal interventions in a reliable manner. All measures were evaluated with respect to their theoretical foundation, research goals, assessment modes, and various psychometric properties. A systematic search in databases (PubMed, PsycInfo, PsycArticles, PSYNDEX, Web of Science, Embase) followed by an additional "snowballing" search covering the years 1940-2013 yielded n = 179 publications eligible for review. Within these publications, 34 measures were identified showing great heterogeneity regarding the aspects under study. Only two measures reached the highest psychometric standards and can be recommended for clinical use without any reservation. Central problems include deficiencies in the systematization of techniques as well as their partly ambiguous and inconsistent definitions. To promote this field of research, it will be important to achieve a consensus concerning the terminology, conceptions and measures of verbal interventions. PMID:26617543

  4. Ultrasonic techniques for imaging and measurements in molten aluminum.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yuu; Moisan, Jean-François; Jen, Cheng-Kuei

    2003-12-01

    In order to achieve net shape forming, processing of aluminum (Al) in the molten state is often necessary. However, few sensors and techniques have been reported in the literature due to difficulties associated with molten Al, such as high temperature, corrosiveness, and opaqueness. In this paper, development of ultrasonic techniques for imaging and measurements in molten Al using buffer rods operated at 10 MHz is presented. The probing end of the buffer rod, having a flat surface or an ultrasonic lens, was immersed into molten Al while the other end with an ultrasonic transducer was air-cooled to room temperature. An ultrasonic image of a character "N", engraved on a stainless steel plate immersed in molten Al, and its corrosion have been observed at 780 degrees C using the focused probe in ultrasonic pulse-echo mode. Because cleanliness of molten Al is crucial for part manufacturing and recycling in Al processing, inclusion detection experiments also were carried out using the nonfocused probe in pitch-catch and pulse-echo modes. Backscattered ultrasonic signals from manually added silicon carbide particles, with an average diameter of 50 microm, in molten Al have been successfully observed at 780 degrees C. For optimal image quality, the spatial resolution of the focused probe was crucial, and the high signal-to-noise ratio of the nonfocused probe was the prime factor responsible for the inclusion detection sensitivity using backscattered ultrasonic signals. In addition, it was found that ultrasound could provide an alternative method for evaluating the degree of wetting between a solid material and a molten metal. Our experimental results showed that there was no ultrasonic coupling at the interface between an alumina rod and molten Al up to 1000 degrees C; therefore, no wetting existed at this interface. Also because ultrasonic velocity in alumina is temperature dependent, this rod proved to be able to be used as an in-line temperature monitoring sensor under

  5. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  6. Momentum--"Evaluating Your Marketing Program: Measuring and Tracking Techniques."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meservey, Lynne D.

    1990-01-01

    Suggests 10 tracking techniques for evaluating marketing performance. Techniques involve utilization rate, inquiry and source of inquiry tracking, appointment and interview tracking, enrollment conversion, cost per inquiry and per enrollment, retention rate, survey results, and "mystery shopper." (RJC)

  7. Optimized measurement strategy for multiple-orientation technique on coordinate-measuring machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Yohan; Sasajima, Kazuyuki; Osawa, Sonko; Sato, Osamu; Watanabe, Tsukasa; Komori, Masaharu

    2009-10-01

    Coordinate-measuring machines (CMMs) are widely used to measure the characteristics of various geometrical features. The measurement results using CMMs include systematic errors. To eliminate the systematic errors, the multiple-orientation technique is effective for rotationally symmetric workpieces such as cylinders or gears. However, there are Fourier components of the calibration curve that cannot be analyzed on the basis of the number of orientations; therefore, the number of orientations was set to be larger than the number of required Fourier components. Such a method takes, however, a very long time and it is difficult to maintain a stable environment during the measurement. In this paper, we propose a new measurement strategy for reducing the total number of orientations by compensating the deficient Fourier components using the measurement result with another number of orientations. When the lowest common multiple of integers m and n is set to be larger than the number of required Fourier components, the calibration result can be obtained from m + n - 1 orientations. To select m and n most efficiently, the combination should not include a common prime number. The effectiveness of the combination measurement strategy for the multiple-orientation technique was demonstrated by calibrating a multiball artifact and a gear.

  8. Airborne measurements of peroxy radicals using the PERCA technique.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Reeves, Claire E; Brough, Neil; Edwards, Gavin D; Monks, Paul S; Penkett, Stuart A

    2003-02-01

    The Peroxy Radical Chemical Amplifier (PERCA) technique is a proven method for measurement of ambient levels of peroxy radicals at ground level, but there are no published instances of the technique being used on an aerial platform. Here we describe deployment of a PERCA on the former UK Meteorological Office C-130 Hercules research aircraft. The instrument uses the established method of chemical amplification and conversion of peroxy radicals to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by doping the sample air-flow matrix with CO and NO, subsequently measuring the NO2 yield with an improved 'Luminox' LMA-3 NO2 detector. NO2 from the amplification chemistry is distinguished from other sources of NO2 reaching the detector by periodically injecting CO approximately 1 s downstream of the NO injection point (termination mode). Chain lengths (CL's) for the amplification chemistry were typically approximately 260 (ground level) to approximately 200 (7,000 m). This variation with altitude is less than the variation associated with the 'age' of the PFA inlet material where the amplification chemistry occurs; CL's of approximately 200 with old tubing to approximately 300 with new clean tubing were typical (ground level values). The CL determinations were made in-flight using an onboard calibration unit based on the 254 nm photolysis of 7.5 to 10 parts per billion (by volume, ppbv) of CH3I in air, producing CH3O2 in a quantitative manner. The noise-equivalent detection limit for peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) is 2 parts per trillion (by volume, pptv) at 3,650 m when the background ambient ozone levels are stable, based on a 5 min average of five 30 s amplification cycles and five 30 s termination cycles. This detection limit is a function of several factors but is most seriously degraded when there is large variability in the ambient ozone concentration. This paper describes the instrument design, considers its performance and proposes design improvements. It concludes that the performance of an

  9. Comparison of ozone measurement techniques using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Reck, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to verify the ultraviolet absorption technique used in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, two flight experiments were conducted employing several techniques, both in situ and remote, for measuring atmospheric ozone. The first experiment used the NASA CV-990 equipped with an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor and an ultraviolet spectrophotometer, a balloon ozonesonde, and a Dobson station for determining and comparing the ozone concentration data. A second experiment compared ozone data from an automated sampling system aboard a B-747 with data from a manned system installed on the NASA CV-990 during a cross-country flight with both aircraft following the same flight path separated by 32 kilometers.

  10. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  11. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  12. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  13. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected. PMID:25273746

  14. A LIDAR POLARIMETER TECHNIQUE FOR MEASURING SUSPENDED SOLIDS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the capability of the lidar polarimeter to measure the concentration of suspended solids in water for a variety of measurement conditions. Previous laboratory and field measurements have demonstrated the potential of the system to measure turbidity, transm...

  15. Techniques for measuring vitamin A activity from β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Tang, Guangwen

    2012-11-01

    Dietary β-carotene is the most important precursor of vitamin A. However, the determination of the efficiency of in vivo conversion of β-carotene to vitamin A requires sensitive and safe techniques. It presents the following challenges: 1) circulating β-carotene concentration cannot be altered by eating a meal containing ≤6 mg β-carotene; 2) because retinol concentrations are homeostatically controlled, the conversion of β-carotene into vitamin A cannot be estimated accurately in well-nourished humans by assessing changes in serum retinol after supplementation with β-carotene. In the past half-century, techniques using radioisotopes of β-carotene and vitamin A, depletion-repletion with vitamin A and β-carotene supplements, measurement of postprandial chylomicron fractions after consumption of a β-carotene dose, and finally, stable isotopes as tracers to follow the absorption and conversion of β-carotene in humans have been developed. The reported values for β-carotene to vitamin A conversion showed a wide variation from 2 μg β-carotene to 1 μg retinol (for synthetic pure β-carotene in oil) and 28 μg β-carotene to 1 μg retinol (for β-carotene from vegetables). In recent years, a stable isotope reference method (IRM) was developed that used labeled synthetic β-carotene. The IRM method provided evidence that the conversion of β-carotene to vitamin A is likely dose dependent. With the development of intrinsically labeled plant foods harvested from a hydroponic system with heavy water, vitamin A activity of stable isotope-labeled biosynthetic β-carotene from various foods consumed by humans was studied. The efficacy of plant foods rich in β-carotene, such as natural (spinach, carrots, spirulina), hybrid (high-β-carotene yellow maize), and bioengineered (Golden Rice) foods, to provide vitamin A has shown promising results. The results from these studies will be of practical importance in recommendations for the use of pure β-carotene and foods

  16. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  17. Measuring nitrification in sediments--comparison of two techniques and three 15NO(-)3 measurement methods.

    PubMed

    Jäntti, Helena; Leskinen, Elina; Stange, Claus Florian; Hietanen, Susanna

    2012-06-01

    Nitrification is a crucial process in sediment nitrogen cycling. We compared two (15)N tracer-based nitrification measurement techniques (isotope pairing technique (IPT) combined with (15)N nitrate pool dilution and (15)N ammonium oxidation) and three different (15)N analyses from bottom water nitrate (ammonia diffusion, denitrifier and SPINMAS) in a sediment mesocosm. The (15)N nitrate pool dilution technique combined with IPT can be used to quantify the in situ nitrification, but the minimum detection limit for the total nitrification is higher than that in the (15)N ammonium oxidation technique. The (15)N ammonium oxidation technique, however, is not applicable for sediments that have high ammonium content. If nitrate concentration and the amount of (15)N label in the sample are low, the (15)N nitrate analysis should be done with the denitrifier method. In higher (15)N concentrations, the less sensitive SPINMAS method can also be applied. The ammonia diffusion method is not suitable for bottom water (15)N nitrate analyses. PMID:22288425

  18. Optical and acoustical measuring techniques. [for Doppler measurement of flow velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the techniques of laser and acoustic Doppler measurement of fluid velocities in confined and free flows. The main mathematical relations are presented, and some systems are studied. Resolution properties of coaxial, bistatic, and pulsed CO2 laser Doppler velocimeter systems are compared. Schematics for pulsed and continuous wave acoustic Doppler systems are discussed. Both of these types of systems benefit from using a bistatic configuration instead of a coaxial system. The pulsed systems avoid contamination of source noise by not sampling until after the source noise has passed the receiver. Comparison of wind velocity measured with a pulsed acoustic Doppler and with a boundary layer profile is made.

  19. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-01-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  20. TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF AEROSOL CARBON CONTENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes two different techniques for total and elemental carbon analysis developed under this grant. Both methods are totally instrumental, automated, and non-destructive. Total carbon is determined using the gamma ray analysis of light elements (GRALE) technique. Th...

  1. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  2. High-temperature strain measurement techniques: Current developments and challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1987, a very substantial amount of R&D has been conducted in an attempt to develop reliable strain sensors for the measurements of structural strains during ground testing and hypersonic flight, at temperatures up to at least 2000 deg F. Much of the effort has been focused on requirements of the NASP Program. This presentation is limited to the current sensor development work and characterization studies carried out within that program. It is basically an assessment as to where we are now and what remains to be done in the way of technical accomplishments to meet the technical challenges posed by the requirements and constraints established for the NASP Program. The approach for meeting those requirements and constraints has been multi-disciplinary in nature. It was recognized early on that no one sensor could meet all these requirements and constraints, largely because of the large temperature range (cryogenic to at least 2000 deg F) and many other factors, including the most challenging requirement that the sensor system be capable of obtaining valid 'first cycle data'. Present candidate alloys for resistance-type strain gages include Fe-Cr-Al and Pd-Cr. Although they have superior properties regarding withstanding very high temperatures, they exhibit large apparent strains that must either be accounted for or cancelled out by various techniques, including the use of a dual-element, half-bridge dummy gage, or electrical compensation networks. A significant effort is being devoted to developing, refining, and evaluating the effectiveness of those techniques over a broad range in temperature and time. In the quest to obtain first-cycle data, ways must be found to eliminate the need to prestabilize or precondition the strain gage, before it is attached to the test article. It should be noted that present NASP constraints do not permit prestabilization of the sensor, in situ. Gages are currently being 'heat treated' during manufacture in both the wire- and foil

  3. High-temperature strain measurement techniques: Current developments and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1992-09-01

    Since 1987, a very substantial amount of R&D has been conducted in an attempt to develop reliable strain sensors for the measurements of structural strains during ground testing and hypersonic flight, at temperatures up to at least 2000 deg F. Much of the effort has been focused on requirements of the NASP Program. This presentation is limited to the current sensor development work and characterization studies carried out within that program. It is basically an assessment as to where we are now and what remains to be done in the way of technical accomplishments to meet the technical challenges posed by the requirements and constraints established for the NASP Program. The approach for meeting those requirements and constraints has been multi-disciplinary in nature. It was recognized early on that no one sensor could meet all these requirements and constraints, largely because of the large temperature range (cryogenic to at least 2000 deg F) and many other factors, including the most challenging requirement that the sensor system be capable of obtaining valid 'first cycle data'. Present candidate alloys for resistance-type strain gages include Fe-Cr-Al and Pd-Cr. Although they have superior properties regarding withstanding very high temperatures, they exhibit large apparent strains that must either be accounted for or cancelled out by various techniques, including the use of a dual-element, half-bridge dummy gage, or electrical compensation networks. A significant effort is being devoted to developing, refining, and evaluating the effectiveness of those techniques over a broad range in temperature and time. In the quest to obtain first-cycle data, ways must be found to eliminate the need to prestabilize or precondition the strain gage, before it is attached to the test article. It should be noted that present NASP constraints do not permit prestabilization of the sensor, in situ. Gages are currently being 'heat treated' during manufacture in both the wire- and foil

  4. Consideration on Isochronal Anneal Technique: From Measurement to Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Flament, O.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Leray, J.L.; Paillet, P.

    1999-03-09

    The isochronal anneal technique used to predict isothermal anneal behavior of MOS devices is analyzed as a function of experimental parameters. The effects of detrapping of trapped holes and compensating electrons are discussed.

  5. A technique for quantitatively measuring microstructurally induced ultrasonic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, F. J.; Gray, T. A.; Thompson, R. B.

    A method for quantifying backscattered grain noise amplitudes in pulse/echo inspections is presented. The technique employs positional averaging to extract the rms grain noise as a function of time, or equivalently, as a function of depth in the specimen. This technique has been demonstrated for focussed transducer inspections of titanium alloys. A simple grain noise model that assumes incoherent single scattering by the individual metal grains is presented as a first step toward the development of a comprehensive theory.

  6. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  7. Techniques for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectrics and dielectric properties of materials are defined generally, and methods for measuring dielectric properties of agricultural products are described for several frequency ranges from audio frequencies through microwave frequencies. These include measurement with impedance and admittance...

  8. Technique for extending the range of a signal measuring circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chaprnka, Anthony G.; Sun, Shan C.; Vercellotti, Leonard C.

    1978-01-01

    An input signal supplied to a signal measuring circuit is either amplified or attenuated as necessary to establish the magnitude of the input signal within the defined dynamic range of the measuring circuit and the output signal developed by the measuring circuit is subsequently readjusted through amplification or attenuation to develop an output signal which corresponds to the magnitude of the initial input signal.

  9. Multi-angle technique for measurement of ground source emission

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, J.R.

    1995-04-01

    TAISIR, the Temperature and Imaging System Infrared, is a nominally satellite based platform for remote sensing of the earth. One of its design features is to acquire atmospheric data simultaneous with ground data, resulting in minimal dependence on external atmospheric models for data correction. One technique we employ to acquire atmospheric data is a true multi-angle data acquisition technique. Previous techniques have used only two angles. Here we demonstrate the advantage of using a large number of viewing angles to overconstrain the inversion problem for critical atmospheric and source parameters. For reasonable data acquisition scenarios, simulations show source temperature errors of less than 1K should be possible. Tradeoffs between flight geometry, number of look angles,, and system signal-to-noise are given for typical parameter ranges.

  10. Advanced techniques for the measurement of multiple recombination parameters in solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, M.; Wolf, M.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of bulk recombination measurement techniques was presented. Classical methods were reviewed along with their limiting assumptions and simplifications. A modulated light measurement system was built and showed the large effects of junction capacitance. Techniques for extension of classical methods for measurement of multiparameter multiregression measurements were identified and analyzed.

  11. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise. PMID:9670174

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF ULTRATRACE LASER SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of Arsenic Speciation Techniques Based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    J.B. Simeonsson, H.D. Beach and D.J. Thomas
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Resear...

  13. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  14. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  15. Development of the EEG measurement technique under exercising.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junya; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Hosaka, Naoya; Sawaji, Hiroyuki; Sakakura, Kenichi; Magatani, Kazushige

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose of this research is a development of the method that detects EEG of an athlete under exercising. If EEG under exercising can be measured, we can assess the mental condition of the athlete. Usually, EEG is measured in the shield room, and a subject is required rest in bed while measurement. And it is said that measuring EEG under exercising is difficult. In this paper, we will discus about our new measuring method that can detect EEG under exercising by using independent component analysis. Five normal subjects were tested with our method, and EEG without artifact was able to measured. So, we think our new method will be useful for the research of mental condition of the athlete. PMID:17281621

  16. Measurement techniques investigated for detection of hydrogen chloride gas in ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nine basic techniques are discussed, ranging from concentration (parts per million) to dosage only (parts per million-seconds) measurement techniques. Data for each technique include lower detection limit, response time, instrument status, and in some cases, specificity. Several techniques discussed can detect ambient hydrogen chloride concentrations below 1 part per million with a response time of seconds.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF SOIL RESPIRATION IN SITU: CHAMBER TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chambers temporarily sealed to the soil surface are important and often the only means of measuring trace gas emissions to the atmosphere. However, such chamber measurements are not exempt from methodological problems. This review article identifies known sources of chamber-induced errors encounte...

  18. MEASUREMENT OF SOIL RESPIRATION IN SITU: CHAMBER TECHNIQUES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamber methods depend exclusively on headspace gas concentration measurements or determining the unused capacity of a known chemical trap, they provide only an indirect measure of the CO2 flux across the soil surface, which is in turn equal to the soil respiration rate only under steady-state condi...

  19. A new technique for measuring sputtering yields at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Griffith, J. E.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of thin, self-supporting carbon catcher foils allows one to measure sputtering yields in a broad range of materials with high sensitivity. Analyzing the foils with Rutherford forward scattering, sputtered Al, Si and P surface densities down to 5 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm with uncertainties of about 20 percent have been measured.

  20. The delimitation of the workspace accuracy in coordinate measuring technique.

    PubMed

    Swornowski, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    Dimensional measurements based on coordinate metrology are widely used for product verification, process control and dimensional faults root causes diagnostics of various manufacturing processes. In this study, the results of the measuring surface scanning of coordinate measuring machine with the prototype of optoelectronic device have been presented. The presented device is able to determine actual (real) inaccuracy of the CMM in two axes (X, Y). The prototype scanning device is installed in the measuring probe place. The method makes possible scanning with the established accuracy (max. 0.1 µm). A short description of the new method and the device is added, and some initial results are discussed. The results concern the inaccuracy of the CMMs example measuring area. PMID:21370236

  1. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  2. Surface moisture measurement system electromagnetic induction probe calibration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-08

    The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) is designed to measure the moisture concentration near the surfaces of the wastes located in the Hanford Site tank farms. This document describes a calibration methodology to demonstrate that the Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) moisture probe meets relevant requirements in the `Design Requirements Document (DRD) for the Surface Moisture Measurement System.` The primary purpose of the experimental tests described in this methodology is to make possible interpretation of EMI in-tank surface probe data to estimate the surface moisture.

  3. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  4. Advances in measuring techniques for turbine cooling test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.

    1972-01-01

    Surface temperature distribution measurements for turbine vanes and blades were obtained by measuring the infrared energy emitted by the airfoil. The IR distribution can be related to temperature distribution by suitable calibration methods and the data presented in the form of isotherm maps. Both IR photographic and real time electro-optical methods are being investigated. The methods can be adapted to rotating as well as stationary targets, and both methods can utilize computer processing. Pressure measurements on rotating components are made with a rotating system incorporating 10 miniature transducers. A mercury wetted slip ring assembly was used to supply excitation power and as a signal transfer device. The system was successfully tested up to speeds of 9000 rpm and is now being adapted to measure rotating blade airflow quantities in a spin rig and a research engine.

  5. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum. PMID:27217264

  6. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement and interpretation of geochemical redox parameters are key components of ground water remedial investigations. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is perhaps the most robust geochemical parameter in redox characterization; however, recent work has indicated a need for proper da...

  7. The measurement technique of human's bio-signals.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Yasuhiro; Takamura, Komin; Magatani, Kazushige

    2006-01-01

    A disaster like a big earthquake usually brings many destroyed buildings and many sufferers are generated in the disaster area. In this situation, sometimes a rescue person encounters a second disaster. This is the big problem to rescue sufferers. In order to avoid a second disaster, many kind of rescue robots are being developed. These robots can find sufferers and rescue them. However, they cannot measure the sufferer's condition at the disaster area. If the sufferer's condition becomes clear before rescue, the rescue efficiency will improve. Therefore, we are developing a rescue robot that can measure some vital signs of sufferer and send measured data to the medical doctor who is in safety place. In this paper, we will describe about a developed method that can measure the pulse and the arterial blood oxygen saturation degree (SPO2) by easy way. We think that these methods will be powerful and useful to rescue sufferers. PMID:17945638

  8. Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Erwin

    2010-05-28

    The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

  9. Measurements of neutral constituents using far infrared remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carli, B.; Harries, J. E.

    1985-06-01

    Since 1977 much progress has occured both in the direction of improvements in experimental measurement from balloons and in the area of theoretical studies of the far infrared spectrum. Recent experimental results of balloon measurements are discussed as is theoretical calculations and spectroscopic data of the far infrared spectrum. A dictorial representation of the far infrared spectrum of a selection of stratospheric constituents is presented and analyzed.

  10. A new technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination was measured in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, OH, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.. Small clean silicon wafers placed at all desired measurement sites were used as contamination sensors. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet the silicon substrate uniformly, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: (1) continuous, homogeneous film; and (2) islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on examples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  11. [The research advance of measuring techniques on corneoscleral constitutive parameters].

    PubMed

    Bao, Fangjun; Deng, Manli; Wang, Qinmei

    2015-11-01

    The occurrence and development of myopia and keratoconus is closely related to the changes of scleral and corneal biomechanical properties. The accurate measurement of biomechanical properties for corneoscleral tissure is very important on diagnosis of eye diseases, improvement of ocular operation, ocular biological parameter measurement and invention of ophthalmic instrument. Corneoscleral tissue, composed of bundles of compact and staggered collagen fiber and extracellular matrix, constitute the outer surface of the eyeball. The inhomogeneous distribution of the diameter, gap and amount of collagen fiber, makes its biomechanical characteristics really complex, characterized by nonlinear, viscoelastic, anisotropic, regional variation and age-related variation and etc. With the development of medical diagnostic technology, the importance of the ocular biomechanical property measurement is increasingly recognized. Nevertheless, measuring technology on ocular biomechanics properties are still not well understood by the majority of ophthalmologists. In order to facilitate the researchers to select a suitable measuring platform and method, the development of international corneoscleral biomechanical propertiy measuring technology was reviewed in this article. PMID:26850590

  12. A study of radar cross section measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Malcolm W.

    1986-11-01

    Past, present, and proposed future technologies for the measurement of radar cross section were studied. The purpose was to determine which method(s) could most advantageously be implemented in the large microwave anechoic chamber facility which is operated at the antenna test range site. The progression toward performing radar cross section measurements of space vehicles with which the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle will be called upon to rendezvous and dock is a natural outgrowth of previous work conducted in recent years of developing a high accuracy range and velocity sensing radar system. The radar system was designed to support the rendezvous and docking of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle with various other space vehicles. The measurement of radar cross sections of space vehicles will be necessary in order to plan properly for Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle rendezvous and docking assignments. The methods which were studied include: standard far-field measurements; reflector-type compact range measurements; lens-type compact range measurement; near field/far field transformations; and computer predictive modeling. The feasibility of each approach is examined.

  13. A study of radar cross section measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1986-01-01

    Past, present, and proposed future technologies for the measurement of radar cross section were studied. The purpose was to determine which method(s) could most advantageously be implemented in the large microwave anechoic chamber facility which is operated at the antenna test range site. The progression toward performing radar cross section measurements of space vehicles with which the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle will be called upon to rendezvous and dock is a natural outgrowth of previous work conducted in recent years of developing a high accuracy range and velocity sensing radar system. The radar system was designed to support the rendezvous and docking of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle with various other space vehicles. The measurement of radar cross sections of space vehicles will be necessary in order to plan properly for Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle rendezvous and docking assignments. The methods which were studied include: standard far-field measurements; reflector-type compact range measurements; lens-type compact range measurement; near field/far field transformations; and computer predictive modeling. The feasibility of each approach is examined.

  14. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-05-22

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed.

  15. Measurement techniques for use with technique/exposure guides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Manny, E.F.; Burkhardt, R.L.

    1985-08-01

    Recommendations from the Center for Devices and Radiological Health have encouraged diagnostic radiology facilities to evaluate the radiation exposures received by their patients. This publication discusses the technical factors which must be taken into consideration in instituting a radiation exposure measurement program as a basis for this evaluation. Center radiation exposure measurement methods are also described.

  16. A reevaluation of the interrupter technique for airway resistance measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, A. C.; Milhorn, H. T., Jr.; Norman, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    An attempt was made to obtain a better insight into the actual transient response of airway opening pressure (Pao) following rapid occlusion. With this knowledge it was hoped to be able to clarify the reason for the overestimations found by other investigators, and possibly to obtain a more accurate method of estimating alveolar pressure just prior to interruption. This would result in an improved method for estimating airway resistance. Use of an extrapolation method was found to provide an improved correlation between resistances determined by the interruptor technique and those found by the plethysmograph in normal subjects.

  17. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  18. A poloidal field measurement technique: Pitch angle measurements via injected He/sup +/ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.

    1989-07-01

    The poloidal field of a tokamak can be determined by observing the light emitted by He/sup +/ ions injected into the plasma by a perpendicular He/sup 0/ beam. These ions will orbit in small circles located where the neutral atom became ionized, and they will remain there for a few microseconds. During this time, some of these ions will also emit light at various spectral lines. The observed spectrum of any of these lines will have a peculiar and very wide shape, and it will be offset (Doppler shifted) with respect to the natural line location. The location and width of the spectral pattern provide independent information about the components of the poloidal field which are parallel and perpendicular to the beam velocity, and this information is local to the point where the light is emitted. For a horizontal beam, these components are b/sub x/ and b/sub y/, respectively. The difference in Doppler shift between two measurement points above one another (at the top and bottom of the beam) is directly proportional to /delta/b/sub x/, which in turn is proportional to the transform on that flux surface. Thus, this technique provides a means to measure directly local values of q(r). Simulation studies indicate that accurate measurements can be made in milliseconds. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  19. Review of measurement techniques for the neutron radiative-capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The experimental techniques applied in measurements of the neutron capture process are reviewed. The emphasis is on measurement techniques used in neutron capture cross section measurements. The activation technique applied mainly in earlier work has still its use in some cases, specifically for measurements of technologically important cross sections (/sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th) with high accuracy. Three major prompt neutron radioactive capture detection techniques have evolved: the total gamma radiation energy detection technique (mainly with large liquid scintillation detectors), the gamma-energy proportional detectors (with proportional counters or Moxon-Rae detectors), and the pulse-height weighting technique. These measurement techniques are generally applicable, however, shortcomings limit the achievable accuracy to a approx. = 5 to 15% uncertainty level.

  20. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meginnis, I; Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to provide adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout in a space suit to reduce the risks associated with manned operations in space suits. Symptoms of elevated CO2 levels range from reduced cognitive performance and headache to unconsciousness and death at high levels of CO2. Because of this, NASA imposes limits on inspired CO2 levels for space suits when they are used in space and for ground testing. Testing and/or analysis must be performed to verify that a space suit meets CO2 washout requirements. Testing for developmental space suits has traditionally used an oronasal mask that collects CO2 samples at the left and rights sides of the mouth. Testing with this mask resulted in artificially elevated CO2 concentration measurements, which is most likely due to the dead space volume at the front of the mask. The mask also extends outward and into the supply gas stream, which may disrupt the washout effect of the suit supply gas. To mitigate these problems, a nasal cannula was investigated as a method for measuring inspired CO2 based on the assumptions that it is low profile and would not interfere with the designed suit gas flow path, and it has reduced dead space. This test series compared the performance of a nasal cannula to the oronasal mask in the Mark III space suit. Inspired CO2 levels were measured with subjects at rest and at metabolic workloads of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Workloads were achieved by use of an arm ergometer or treadmill. Test points were conducted at air flow rates of 2, 4, and 6 actual cubic feet per minute, with a suit pressure of 4.3 psid. Results from this test series will evaluate the accuracy and repeatability across subjects of the nasal cannula collection method, which will provide rationale for using a nasal cannula as the new method for measuring inspired CO2 in a space suit. Proper characterization of sampling methods and of suit CO2 washout capability will better inform requirements definition and verification

  1. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Harley, N H; Lippmann, M

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and "mini hi-volume" samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. We conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages. PMID:6720582

  2. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Harley, N.H.; Lippmann, M.

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and mini hi-volume samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. The authors conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  3. A technique to measure eyelid pressure using piezoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alyra J; Davis, Brett A; Collins, Michael J; Carney, Leo G

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, novel procedures were developed using a thin (0.17 mm) tactile piezoresistive pressure sensor mounted on a rigid contact lens to measure upper eyelid pressure. A hydrostatic calibration system was constructed, and the influence of conditioning (prestressing), drift (continued increasing response with a static load), and temperature variations on the response of the sensor were examined. To optimally position the sensor-contact lens combination under the upper eyelid margin, an in vivo measurement apparatus was constructed. Calibration gave a linear relationship between raw sensor output and actual pressure units for loads between 1 and 10 mmHg ( R(2) = 0.96 ). Conditioning the sensor prior to use regulated the measurement response, and sensor output stabilized about 10 s after loading. While sensor output drifts slightly over several hours, it was not significant beyond the measurement time of 1 min used for eyelid pressure. The error associated with calibrating at room temperature but measuring at ocular surface temperature led to a very small overestimation of pressure. Eyelid pressure readings were observed when the upper eyelid was placed on the sensor, and removed during a recording. When the eyelid pressure was increased by pulling the lids tighter against the eye, the readings from the sensor significantly increased. PMID:19457740

  4. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    2002-11-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  5. Investigation of remote sensing techniques of measuring soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Blanchard, A. J.; Nieber, J. L.; Lascano, R.; Tsang, L.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1981-01-01

    Major activities described include development and evaluation of theoretical models that describe both active and passive microwave sensing of soil moisture, the evaluation of these models for their applicability, the execution of a controlled field experiment during which passive microwave measurements were acquired to validate these models, and evaluation of previously acquired aircraft microwave measurements. The development of a root zone soil water and soil temperature profile model and the calibration and evaluation of gamma ray attenuation probes for measuring soil moisture profiles are considered. The analysis of spatial variability of soil information as related to remote sensing is discussed as well as the implementation of an instrumented field site for acquisition of soil moisture and meteorologic information for use in validating the soil water profile and soil temperature profile models.

  6. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  7. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  8. GRI-sponsored research tests gas measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, K.M.; Gregor, J.G. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the Gas Research Institute (GRI) which is managing a comprehensive research and development (R and D) program in gas flow measurement to improve gas metering accuracy and to reduce operation and maintenance costs. A portion of the program is centered on construction of a Metering Research Facility (MRF) and collecting experimental data over a range of Reynolds numbers to determine the effects of upstream flow conditions on orifice and turbine meters. In addition, GRI is sponsoring the development of new concepts for energy content and energy rate measurement: a low-cost, low-power electronic flow measurement device and accurate gas mixtures for use with gas chromatographs and calorimeters.

  9. Work function measurements using a field emission retarding potential technique.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, M H M O; Dall'Agnol, F F; Pimentel, V L; Mammana, V P; Tatsch, P J; den Engelsen, D

    2016-03-01

    Herein we describe the measurement of the work function of a metal with advanced equipment based on the field emission retarding potential (FERP) method using a carbon nanotube (CNT) as cathode. The accuracy of the FERP method using a CNT emitter is described and a comparison between measurements of the work functions of aluminum, barium, calcium, gold, and platinum with published data will be presented. Our FERP equipment could be optimized with the aid of particle tracing simulations. These simulations led us to insert a magnetic collimator to improve the collection efficiency at the anode. PMID:27036828

  10. Work function measurements using a field emission retarding potential technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamanaka, M. H. M. O.; Dall'Agnol, F. F.; Pimentel, V. L.; Mammana, V. P.; Tatsch, P. J.; den Engelsen, D.

    2016-03-01

    Herein we describe the measurement of the work function of a metal with advanced equipment based on the field emission retarding potential (FERP) method using a carbon nanotube (CNT) as cathode. The accuracy of the FERP method using a CNT emitter is described and a comparison between measurements of the work functions of aluminum, barium, calcium, gold, and platinum with published data will be presented. Our FERP equipment could be optimized with the aid of particle tracing simulations. These simulations led us to insert a magnetic collimator to improve the collection efficiency at the anode.

  11. Laser speckle technique for burner liner strain measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stetson, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal and mechanical strains were measured on samples of a common material used in jet engine burner liners, which were heated from room temperature to 870 C and cooled back to 220 C, in a laboratory furnance. The physical geometry of the sample surface was recorded at selected temperatures by a set of 12 single exposure speckle-grams. Sequential pairs of specklegrams were compared in a heterodyne interferometer which give high precision measurement of differential displacements. Good speckle correlation between the first and last specklegrams is noted which allows a check on accumulate errors.

  12. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  13. Grain size measurements using the point-sampled intercept technique

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivasan, S. ); Russ, J.C.; Scattergood, R.O. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of stereology and measurement of three-dimensional size scales from two-dimensional sections have emanated from the medical field, particularly in the area of pathology. Here, the measurement of biological cell sizes and their distribution are critical for diagnosis and treatment of such deadly diseases as cancer. The purpose of this paper is to introduce these new methods to the materials science community and to illustrate their application using a series of typical microstructures found in polycrystalline ceramics. As far as the current authors are aware, these methods have not been applied in materials-science related applications.

  14. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  15. GIFS Imaging Fabry--Perot Spectrometer: Measurement Technique and Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demajistre, R.; Yee, J.; Swartz, W. H.; Kelly, M. A.; Pitts, M. C.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2008-05-01

    A Geostationary Imaging Fabry--Perot Spectrometer (GIFS) prototype instrument has been developed and tested during a recent NASA P3B aircraft field campaign based at NASA/Wallops (Jan--Feb 2008). GIFS is a very high- resolution imaging spectrometer that resolves individual molecular oxygen lines for the inference of cloud height and other properties. Cloud properties are inferred by accurate measurement of the line shape of the backscattered light incident on the instrument. In particular, the line shape contains a record of the pressure broadening that occurs along the multiply scattered path of the light reaching the instrument. We present our initial analysis of the data collected during this campaign. We have identified several representative cases of cloud scenes in the dataset to validate the measurement concept. These cases include cloud-free measurements made over open ocean and thick unbroken cloud decks in areas where coincident high-precision cloud measurements are available from the NASA/Langley LIDAR onboard the Langley B200 research aircraft and CALIPSO. The data for these cases are analyzed in the context of standard radiation field modeling and instrument optical performance taken both during the flight and on the ground.

  16. SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT MEASUREMENTS IN LABORATORY FLUMES USING ACOUSTIC TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Automated measurement of suspended sediments is crucial to the study of sediment transport. The short duration, high-intensity flows that are responsible for a large fraction of sediment movement are best observed by continuous monitoring systems. Acoustic systems are ideal for continuous monitori...

  17. Corruption in Higher Education: Conceptual Approaches and Measurement Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2007-01-01

    Corruption is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. Forms of corruption are multiple. Measuring corruption is necessary not only for getting ideas about the scale and scope of the problem, but for making simple comparisons between the countries and conducting comparative analysis of corruption. While the total impact of corruption is indeed…

  18. Computer-Aided Techniques for Providing Operator Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Edward M.; And Others

    This report documents the theory, structure, and implementation of a performance processor (written in FORTRAN IV) that can accept performance demonstration data representing various levels of operator's skill and, under user control, analyze data to provide candidate performance measures and validation test results. The processor accepts two…

  19. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  20. Elbow Radiographic Anatomy: Measurement Techniques and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Charles A.; Patterson, J. Megan M.; Sutter, Melanie; Krauss, Melissa; Steffen, Jennifer A.; Galatz, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    Background An increase in elbow pathology in adolescents has paralleled an increase in sports participation. Evaluation and classification of these injuries is challenging because of limited information regarding normal anatomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate normal radiographic anatomy in adolescents to establish parameters for diagnosing abnormal development. Established and new measurements were evaluated for reliability and variance based on age and sex. Methods Three orthopaedic surgeons independently and in a standardized fashion evaluated the normal anteroposterior and lateral elbow radiographs of 178 adolescent and young adult subjects. Fourteen measurements were performed including radial neck- shaft angle, articular surface angle, articular surface morphologic assessment (subjective and objective evaluation of the patterns of ridges and sulci), among others. We performed a statistical analysis by age and sex for each measure and assessed for inter and intra-observer reliability. Results The distal humerus articular surface was relatively flat in adolescence and became more contoured with age as objectively demonstrated by increasing depth of the trochlear and trochleocapitellar sulci, and decreasing trochlear notch angle. Overall measurements were similar between males and females, with an increased carrying angle in females. There were several statistically significant differences based on age and sex but these were small and unlikely to be clinically significant. Inter and intra-observer reliability were variable; some commonly utilized tools had poor reliability. Conclusions Most commonly utilized radiographic measures were consistent between sexes, across the adolescent age group, and between adolescents and young adults. Several commonly used assessment tools show poor reliability. Level of evidence Basic Science Study, Anatomic Study, Imaging PMID:22329911

  1. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    The core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines were measured using a technique which requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine vore. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an Avco Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  2. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines. [YF 102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines were measured using a technique which requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine vore. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an Avco Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  3. Accuracy of dilution techniques for access flow measurement during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Krivitski, N M; MacGibbon, D; Gleed, R D; Dobson, A

    1998-03-01

    Access flow is now widely measured by creating artificial recirculation with the dialysis lines reversed and using dilution methods that sense either ultrasound velocity, electrical impedance, optical, or thermal changes. This study identifies and quantifies factors that influence the accuracy of access flow measurements and recommends ways to reduce these errors. Two major sources of access flow measurement error are identified, arising firstly from the second pass of the indicator by recirculation through the cardiopulmonary system (cardiopulmonary recirculation, CPR), and secondly from changes in venous line blood flow (Qb) and vascular access flow induced by the pressure of venous bolus injections. These errors are considered from theory, by direct measurement of access flow in a sheep model, and by analysis of clinical data. Two extremes for the venous introduction of indicator can be considered in access flow measurements, a slow infusion, which perturbs neither the venous line flow nor access flow but increases the error attributable to the second pass of the indicator by recirculation through cardiopulmonary system, or rapid injection, which eases separation of the second pass of the indicator signal but generates changes in the venous flow and access flow. If CPR is not eliminated, the area added to that of the first pass of indicator ranges up to 40%. Good time resolution could permit the separation of the areas generated by the first and second passage of the indicator. In sheep experiments, injections of 5 or 10 mL into a venous port close to the vascular access caused Qb to change by 20% to 40%. Both the animal experiments and analysis of raw data collected during routine clinical dialysis showed that moving the injection site sufficiently far from the patient, before or into the venous bubble trap, reduced the increase in Qb to only approximately 5% during the critical time when the concentration curve is changing for most tubing brands (Baxter, Belco

  4. Improving optical measurement accuracy using multi-technique nested uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, R. M.; Zhang, N. F.; Barnes, B. M.; Zhou, H.; Heckert, A.; Dixson, R.; Germer, T. A.; Bunday, B.

    2009-03-01

    This paper compares and contrasts different combinations of scatterfield and scatterometry optical configurations as well as introduces a new approach to embedding atomic force microscopy (AFM) or other reference metrology results directly in the uncertainty analysis and library-fitting process to reduce parametric uncertainties. We present both simulation results and experimental data demonstrating this new method, which is based on the application of a Bayesian analysis to library-based regression fitting of optical critical dimension (OCD) data. We develop the statistical methods to implement this approach of nested uncertainty analysis and give several examples, which demonstrate reduced uncertainties in the final combined measurements. The approach is also demonstrated through a combined reference metrology application using several independent measurement methods.

  5. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The principal gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes, produced in the body of astronauts by cosmic-ray bombardment, which have half-lives long enough to be useful for radiation dose evaluation, are Be-7, Na-22, and Na-24. The sodium isotopes were measured in the preflight and postflight urine and feces, and those feces specimens collected during the manned Apollo missions, by analysis of the urine salts and the raw feces in large crystal multidimensional gamma-ray spectrometers. The Be-7 was chemically separated, and its concentration measured in an all NaI (TL), anticoincidence shielded, scintillation well crystal. The astronaut radiation dose in millirads, as determined for the Apollo 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 missions, was 330, 160, smaller than 315, 870 plus or minus 550, 31, 110, and smaller than 250, respectively.

  6. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  7. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-05-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determinetemperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle,that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gasvolume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple,rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process controlapplications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outsidetemperature profile is tranferred to a chosen gas contained inside theguide.

  8. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  9. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Jackson, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    A paper discusses the need to perform accurate dielectric property measurements on larger sized samples, particularly liquids at microwave frequencies. These types of measurements cannot be obtained using conventional cavity perturbation methods, particularly for liquids or powdered or granulated solids that require a surrounding container. To solve this problem, a model has been developed for the resonant frequency and quality factor of a cylindrical microwave cavity containing concentric cylindrical samples. This model can then be inverted to obtain the real and imaginary dielectric constants of the material of interest. This approach is based on using exact solutions to Maxwell s equations for the resonant properties of a cylindrical microwave cavity and also using the effective electrical conductivity of the cavity walls that is estimated from the measured empty cavity quality factor. This new approach calculates the complex resonant frequency and associated electromagnetic fields for a cylindrical microwave cavity with lossy walls that is loaded with concentric, axially aligned, lossy dielectric cylindrical samples. In this approach, the calculated complex resonant frequency, consisting of real and imaginary parts, is related to the experimentally measured quantities. Because this approach uses Maxwell's equations to determine the perturbed electromagnetic fields in the cavity with the material(s) inserted, one can calculate the expected wall losses using the fields for the loaded cavity rather than just depending on the value of the fields obtained from the empty cavity quality factor. These additional calculations provide a more accurate determination of the complex dielectric constant of the material being studied. The improved approach will be particularly important when working with larger samples or samples with larger dielectric constants that will further perturb the cavity electromagnetic fields. Also, this approach enables the ability to have a

  10. Noninvasive technique for measurement of glucose content in body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapiou, George; Theofanous, N. G.

    1998-07-01

    This work is focused on the measurement of glucose in various diluted solutions and aims to be implemented in testing the glucose content in the anterior chamber of the eye by means of an electro-optic modulation method. By using solutions containing only glucose concentrations, a calibration curve displaying the dependence of the glucose concentration on a DC field, applied to a modulator, was obtained.

  11. Measurement techniques for the verification of excess weapons materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Yates, M.A.

    1998-12-01

    The end of the superpower arms race has resulted in an unprecedented reduction in stockpiles of deployed nuclear weapons. Numerous proposals have been put forward and actions have been taken to ensure the irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions, including unilateral initiatives such as those made by President Clinton in September 1993 to place fissile materials no longer needed for a deterrent under international inspection, and bilateral and multilateral measures currently being negotiated. For the technologist, there is a unique opportunity to develop the technical means to monitor nuclear materials that have been declared excess to nuclear weapons programs, to provide confidence that reductions are taking place and that the released materials are not being used again for nuclear explosive programs. However, because of the sensitive nature of these materials, a fundamental conflict exists between the desire to know that the bulk materials or weapon components in fact represent evidence of warhead reductions, and treaty commitments and national laws that require the protection of weapons design information. This conflict presents a unique challenge to technologists. The flow of excess weapons materials, from deployed warheads through storage, disassembly, component storage, conversion to bulk forms, and disposition, will be described in general terms. Measurement approaches based on the detection of passive or induced radiation will be discussed along with the requirement to protect sensitive information from release to unauthorized parties. Possible uses of measurement methods to assist in the verification of arms reductions will be described. The concept of measuring attributes of items rather than quantitative mass-based inventory verification will be discussed along with associated information-barrier concepts required to protect sensitive information.

  12. Experimental validation of tilt measurement technique with a laser beacon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belen'kii, Mikhail S.; Karis, Stephen J.; Brown, James M.; Fugate, Robert Q.

    1999-09-01

    We have experimentally demonstrated for the first time a method for sensing wavefront tilt with a laser guide star (LGS). The tilt components of wavefronts were measured synchronously from the LGS using a telescope with 0.75 m effective aperture and from Polaris using a 1.5 m telescope. The Rayleigh guide star was formed at the altitude of 6 km and at a corresponding range of 10.5 km by projecting a focused beam at Polaris from the full aperture at the 1.5 m telescope. Both telescope mounts were unpowered and bottled down in place allowing us to substantially reduce the telescope vibration. The maximum value of the measured cross-correlation coefficient between the tilt for Polaris and the LGS is 0.71. The variations of the measured cross- correlation coefficient in the range from 0.22 to 0.71 are caused by turbulence at altitudes above 6 km, which was not sampled by the laser beacon, but affected the tilt for Polaris. It is also caused by the cone effect for turbulence below 6 km, residual mount jitter of the telescopes, and variations of the S/N. The experimental results support our concept of sensing atmospheric tilt by observing a LGS with an auxiliary telescope and indicate that this method is a possible solution for the tip-tilt problem.

  13. A Split-Root Technique for Measuring Root Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Kingsley B.; Rawlins, Stephen L.

    1981-01-01

    Water encounters various resistances in moving along a path of decreasing potential energy from the soil through the plant to the atmosphere. The reported relative magnitudes of these pathway resistances vary widely and often these results are conflicting. One reason for such inconsistency is the difficulty in measuring the potential drop across various segments of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The measurement of water potentials at the soil-root interface and in the root xylem of a transpiring plant remains a challenging problem. In the divided root experiment reported here, the measured water potential of an enclosed, nonabsorbing branch of the root system of young corn (Bonanza) plants to infer the water potential of the remaining roots growing in soil was used. The selected root branch of the seedling was grown in a specially constructed Teflon test tube into which a screen-enclosed thermocouple psychrometer was inserted and sealed to monitor the root's water potential. The root and its surrounding atmosphere were assumed to be in vapor equilibrium. Images PMID:16661886

  14. Measurement techniques for characterizing and using low background germanium detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, William H.; Wagner, Sanford E.

    1984-06-01

    An investigation has been undertaken to determine whether an order of magnitude background reduction from present typical cryostat-detector systems can be obtained through the use of low background components. In order to measure progress in this task, a standard, ten-centimeter lead shield was fitted with a five-centimeter, oxygen-free high-conductivity copper liner and a borated polyethylene neutron absorber. This reduced the contribution of uranium-238, thorium daughters, and radium daughters from the shield as seen by the detector by 1.3, 0.02, and 0.1 Bq respectively. The methodology of determining very low net photon peak areas in the presence of high continuum levels to assure maximum accuracy was verified and is presented. By these means the background activities of detectors are being measured at the -10 2 Bq per nuclide and detector component materials at the Bq per gram level, both with total uncertainties of less than 50% 1σ. The hardware and software developed is being used to measure the background activity of the detectors and for the analysis of low activity samples.

  15. Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

    2010-04-21

    A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

  16. Ionospheric response to tidal waves measured by dynasonde techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terence; Codrescu, Mihail; Fuller-Rowell, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric tides are known to have a dramatic influence on thermospheric and ionospheric structure and variability. Considerable effort goes into understanding characteristics of tidal modes, their interactions with planetary and gravity waves and other tidal modes, as well as their influence on the background state of the thermosphere-ionosphere system. For the altitude interval between roughly 120 and 400 km, this effort is somewhat hindered by the lack of global observations. We propose a new method of determining tidal variability by making use of dynasonde measurements. The NeXtYZ inversion procedure produces altitude profiles of the ionospheric parameters with a vertical resolution typically better than 1 km. This, together with the typical 2 min cadence of the instrument, results in extensive data sets with wide temporal and altitude coverage. At any given altitude we have nonuniform sampling due to the natural ionospheric variability. A Lomb-Scargle implementation is used to obtain equivalent results at all altitudes and locations. We report height profiles of the first three tidal harmonics derived from dynasonde measurements. The data analyzed include the vertical electron density profiles, the ionospheric X (east-west) "tilt" measurement, and the derived zonal plasma density gradient. Both the tilt and the gradient are shown to be sensitive tracers of atmospheric waves. We use data from Wallops Island and San Juan, for two time intervals: 6 May- 6 June and 9 October- 8 November 2013, thus capturing seasonal, latitudinal, and altitude variations of tidal amplitude and phase. This proves the potential of using dynasonde-capable instruments as a data source for tidal studies in the thermosphere.

  17. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Chato, D. J.; Jurns, J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates a turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  18. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  19. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Pogany, A.; Junninen, H.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2010-01-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in Southern Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system; DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system; c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux; Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) Spectrometer. The instruments were compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the main factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  20. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Junninen, H.; Pogany, A.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2009-08-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in S. Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system, DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system, c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux, Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. Each instrument was compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the overruling factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  1. Neutron spectrum measurements in DT discharges using activation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, B.; Bertalot, L.; Loughlin, M.; Roquemore, A. L.

    1999-01-01

    The JET activation system has eight irradiation ends where samples may be irradiated in the neutron flux from the plasma. There is one end, re-entrant into the top of the vessel, for which there is little intervening material between it and the plasma; the other ends, including two beneath the divertor coils, have increasingly larger amounts of intervening structure. The local neutron spectrum at each irradiation end was measured by simultaneously activating several elemental foils (Al, Au, Co, Fe, In, Mg, Nb, Ni, Ti, Zr). There were 15 activation reactions in the energy range of 0.5-16 MeV which were used as input to the SNL-SAND-II code to determine the neutron energy spectrum. The results are compared with neutron transport calculations both from the MCNP and FURNACE codes: the average standard deviation between measured to SNL-SAND-II calculated activity ratios was as low as 5%. The results demonstrate the reliability of the neutronics calculations and have implications for the design of diagnostics and blankets for the next generation of large tokamaks such as ITER. The 377.9 keV line of the 54Fe(n,2n)53Fe reaction (threshold ˜13.9 MeV, not a dosimetric standard) has also been measured in different plasma conditions. The ratio of the saturated activity from this reaction to that from the 56Fe(n,p)56Mn reaction (threshold ˜4.5 MeV) provides information on the broadening of the 14 MeV fusion peak.

  2. HONO Measurements in Barrow, Alaska; using LOPAP technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villena Tapia, G.; Wiesen, P.; Flocke, F. M.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Knapp, D. J.; Hall, S. R.; Ullmann, K.; Mauldin, L.; Kosciuch, E.; McGrath, J.; Beine, H. J.; Staebler, R. M.; Kleffmann, J.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH) the “cleaning detergent” of the atmosphere. Recent polar studies indicate the existence of a strong surface source of HONO over snow and ice surfaces which can affect the oxidation capacity of the polar atmosphere. However, the mechanism of nitrous acid formation is still under discussion. In addition, from modeling of experimental field data it was recently proposed that high measured HONO levels may be caused, at least in part, by strong interferences of chemical instruments used in polar studies. These high interferences were recently also observed by a LOPAP instrument under simulated polar conditions on the mountain “Jungfraujoch” in the Swiss Alps. In the present study mixing ratios of HONO were measured during the OASIS campaign in Barrow, Alaska from 13th March - 14th April, 2009. The measurements were done with an optimized ultra sensitive Long Path Absorption Photometer (LOPAP), which has two channels in series, correcting for interferences. In addition, sampling artifacts in sampling lines are minimized by the use of an external sampling unit. Mixing ratios were in the range from below detection limit (DL= 0.4 pptV) to ~500 pptV with an average of 27 pptV. The very high concentrations observed were caused by strong emissions from combustion sources close to the field site (City of Barrow and the BARC research complex). For typical clean days the diurnal profile during the campaign was as expected, i.e. low mixing ratios during the night and high mixing ratios during the day which can be explained by photochemical sources.

  3. Measurement of soil moisture using remote sensing multisensor radiation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical modeling as well as laboratory and field measurement were coupled with analysis of aircraft data obtained from controlled sites in an effort to enhance understanding of the microwave response due to soil moisture so as to specify sensor parameters and develop inversion algorithms. Models to predict the complex dielectric constant were produced which led to the interpretation of the results in terms of a matrix potential rather than simply moisture content. Similar advances were made in the development of coherent and incoherent radiative transfer models and rough surface scattering models.

  4. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  5. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  6. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method, system, apparatus, and computer readable medium has been provided with the ability to obtain a complex permittivity dielectric or a complex permeability micron of a sample in a cavity. One or more complex-valued resonance frequencies f(sub m) of the cavity, wherein each f(sub m) is a measurement, are obtained. Maxwell's equations are solved exactly for dielectric, and/or micron, using the f(sub m) as known quantities, thereby obtaining the dielectric and/or micron of the sample.

  7. Ultimate strain measurement of micromachined membranes using a potentiometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goforth, R. C.; Ulrich, R. K.; Leong, Y. K.; Zhao, G.

    A potentiometric method for the measurement of ultimate strain of thin films is presented. In this method, an electric potential is applied between two electrodes located one on each side of the thin film under investigation. The electrodes are immersed in an electrolytic solution. The thin film acts as an electrical current barrier. To determine the ultimate strain, a controlled load is applied to the film. Cracking of the film causes a sharp rise in the current from an initial small leakage value. The applied load at the onset of cracking is used to calculate the ultimate strain. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of the method for thin silicon nitride films deposited on aluminum strips. The method is very sensitive and can detect cracks too small to be observed with a microscope. We discuss extension of the method to the measurement of the ultimate strain of micromachined membranes. The load is applied by pressuring one side of the membrane. Micromachined structures are used to determine residual stresses.

  8. Sounding depth measurements: a method for evaluating various surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yehouda, A; Machtei, E E

    1991-09-01

    Fourteen patients undergoing periodontal treatment for moderate to severe adult-type periodontitis were included in the study. Seven patients (a total of 210 sites) were treated with modified Widman flap surgery while the other 7 patients (the same number of sites) were treated with apically-positioned flap surgery. The 2 modalities were compared using sounding depth measurements before and immediately after surgery. The mean sounding depth decreased from 4.89 mm to 3.42 mm in the modified Widman flap group, compared to a drop from 4.77 mm to 2.46 mm in the apically-positioned flap group. Neither of these procedures resulted in the total eradication of all periodontal pockets. The final outcome of modified Widman flap surgery may, at times, result in zero sounding depth (placement of the flap at the crest of the bone); on the other hand, very often the flap was placed far supra-crestally in an intended apically-positioned flap procedure. This lack of consistency between intended and actual flap placement would suggest that studies which try to compare different treatment modalities using a flap approach should include sounding depth measurements immediately post-surgery. This is needed to assure that the intended procedure has actually been carried out. PMID:1941496

  9. Measuring Technique of Bubble Size Distributions in Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Tsuta, Mizuki

    A novel technique to recognize bubbles in bread dough and analyze their size distribution was developed by using a Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS). Samples were taken from the final stage of the mixing process of bread dough which generally consists of four distinctive stages. Also, to investigate the effect of freeze preservation on the size distribution of bubbles, comparisons were made between fresh dough and the dough that had been freeze preserved at .30°C for three months. Bubbles in the dough samples were identified in the images of MSIPS as defocusing spots due to the difference in focal distance created by vacant spaces. In case of the fresh dough, a total of 910 bubbles were recognized and their maximum diameter ranged from 0.4 to 70.5μm with an average of 11.1μm. On the other hand, a total of 1,195 bubbles were recognized from the freeze-preserved sample, and the maximum diameter ranged from 0.9 to 32.7μm with an average of 6.7μm. Small bubbles with maximum diameters less than 10μm comprised approximately 59% and 78% of total bubbles for fresh and freeze-preserved dough samples, respectively. The results indicated that the bubble size of frozen dough is smaller than that of unfrozen one. The proposed method can provide a novel tool to investigate the effects of mixing and preservation treatments on the size, morphology and distribution of bubbles in bread dough.

  10. Measurements of combustion dynamics with laser-based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dal Mo

    Since the early days of gas turbine engines, combustion/flow instability inside the combustor has been an issue in many engines, but little has been understood as to how the dynamics of the system involved contribute to the instability. The primary objective of this work is to provide general experimental procedures and to validate methods for examining the dynamic behaviors of combustion systems, and to provide accurate measurements of the combustion dynamics for use as a foundation for further theoretical and numerical research. Knowledge of the fundamental dynamics of combustion systems is crucial in understanding and modeling the flame behavior and enabling the use of insights in design process and for creating robust active control of combustors. Since mixing plays significant roles in combustion processes, the dynamics of fuel/air mixing were studied. A non-premixed burner was examined with acoustic excitations at 22˜55 Hz to assess the mixing and its relation to the thermo-acoustic coupling. Phase-resolved acetone-PLIF was used to image the mixing, and from this the unmixedness was calculated, which quantifies the degree of mixing. The results show that (1) the acoustic waves induce periodicity in the degree of mixing; (2) the way the unmixedness behaves coincides well with the behavior of the Rayleigh index, implying the degree of mixing is a major factor in determining the stability of the combustion system; (3) the two-dimensional measurements of temporal unmixedness effectively visualize the shear mixing zone. A second low-swirl premixed burner was studied to examine the impact of acoustic waves on the combustion dynamics. Measurements were performed with OH-PLIF, with acoustic forcing up to 400 Hz. Swirl burners at higher pressure are industry standard, and this study examined the dynamics at elevated combustor pressure. The results show that (1) the thermo-acoustic coupling seems to be closely coupled to the vortices generated at the flame boundary

  11. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  12. Direct, Robust Technique for the Measurement of Friction between Microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Cayer-Barrioz, Juliette; Isa, Lucio; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2015-08-18

    Friction between microscopic objects controls many macroscopic phenomena. For instance, the friction between microasperities determines the tribology of rough surfaces in contact and in relative motion. Additionally, the friction between microparticles is responsible for many aspects of the rheological response of granular media, ranging from microscale contacts at the single-particle level to macroscopic flow properties of sheared, dry granular systems and non-Brownian suspensions. We propose a new, precise, and robust method, based on lateral force microscopy, to measure the coefficient of friction between microspheres quantitatively and without complex data processing. We have successfully applied this method to the contact between silica spheres in liquid with and without a polymer coating. PMID:26196157

  13. Measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A cosmic radiation dose to the Apollo 17 crew of 1.3 R was calculated from the specific activities of Na-24 in their postflight urine specimens. The specific activities of K-42, Cr-51, Co60, and Sb-124, introduced by injection into the astronauts, are extremely high in these specimens. The Fe-59 and Cs-137 levels are also reported and appear to be normal. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, Cr, Fe, Co, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Sn, As, Sb, Se, Br, Sc, La, Sm, Eu, Tb, Hf, Ta, and Th were measured in urine specimens from the Apollo 17 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. Strontium, barium, gold, cadmium, lanthanum, samarium, europium, terbium, thorium, and tin are reported for the first time. The concentrations or excretion rates of bromine and the alkali metals exhibit singificantly reduced postflight levels and are generally lower than values observed for previous missions. Chromium concentrations reflect radiochromium injections.

  14. Advanced measurements and techniques in high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Rickel, D.G.; Lacerda, A.H.; Kim, Y.

    1997-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). High magnetic fields present a unique environment for studying the electronic structure of materials. Two classes of materials were chosen for experiments at the national high Magnetic Field Laboratory at Los Alamos: highly correlated electron systems and semiconductors. Magnetotransport and thermodynamic experiments were performed on the renormalized ground states of highly correlated electron systems (such as heavy fermion materials and Kondo insulators) in the presence of magnetic fields that are large enough to disrupt the many-body correlations. A variety of optical measurements in high magnetic fields were performed on semiconductor heterostructures including GaAs/AlGaAs single heterojunctions (HEMT structure), coupled double quantum wells (CDQW), asymmetric coupled double quantum wells (ACDQW), multiple quantum wells and a CdTe single crystal thin film.

  15. Human monocyte adherence measured by the nylon fibre microcolumn technique.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M K; Thong, Y H

    1984-11-30

    A simple rapid method for the measurement of human monocyte adherence using nylon fibre microcolumns is described. The kinetics indicate the optimal contact time to be 30 min for monocytes, compared with 10 min for neutrophils. The optimal temperature is 37 degrees C; significantly low values were obtained for 4 degrees C and 45 degrees C, while intermediate values were obtained for 25 degrees C. Monocyte adherence was more sensitive to inhibition by fluoride than cyanide, suggesting that energy for adherence is mainly derived from the glycolytic pathway. The addition of phorbol myristate acetate enhances monocyte adherence. Significant decay in monocyte adherence occurred after isolation from whole blood for 24 h or longer. PMID:6501891

  16. Comparison of techniques for measuring +Gz tolerance in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krutz, R. W., Jr.; Rositano, S. A.; Mancini, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Two objective methods and one subjective method for measuring +Gz tolerance (inertial vector in a head-to-foot direction) were compared on the human centrifuge. Direct eye-level blood pressure (Pa), blood flow velocity in the superficial temporal artery (Qta), and subjective visual symptoms were used to determine tolerance to rapid-onset acceleration (1 G/s) on the USAFSAM human centrifuge. Seven 'relaxed' subjects with extensive centrifuge experience were exposed to gradually increasing +Gz plateaus until the subject reported 100% loss of peripheral centrifuge gondola lights (PLL) and 50% loss of central light (CLD); viz., blackout. Zero forward Qta occurred 6 s (range 4-9 s) before subjective blackout and when mean eye-level blood pressure had reached 20 + or - 1 mm Hg (SE). The results of this study indicate that flow changes in the superficial temporal artery reflect flow changes in the retinal circulation during +Gz stress.

  17. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  18. Some laser measurement techniques used in aero engine research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. G.

    Holographic flow visualization and laser anemometry are described. Flow within a fan blade passage can be visualized in three dimensions by recording two superimposed holograms on the same film, using a double pulse laser. Interferometric fringes formed by the images represent a shearing of the density field with respect to itself, caused by rotor movement during the separation of the double pulse laser. Shocks, overtip vortices, wakes, shock interaction with the boundary layer, and separated boundary layers can be observed. The anemometer measures the time taken for particles to cross between two focused laser beams separated by a known amount. The backscattered light from each beam is recorded by two photomultipliers and the discriminated events from the two beams are cross correlated. Correlograms of events for selected angles of orientation of the two spots at gated positions in rotor passage provide a spatially localized, but time averaged, value of flow velocity.

  19. Extensional bundle waveguide techniques for measuring flow of hot fluids.

    PubMed

    Lynnworth, Lawrence C; Liu, Yi; Umina, John A

    2005-04-01

    A bundle of acoustically slender metal rods, each thin compared to wavelength, tightly packed within a sheath, and welded closed at each end, provides a dispersion-free waveguide assembly that acts as a thermal buffer between a transducer and the hot fluid medium the flow of which is to be measured. Gas and steam flow applications have ranged up to 600 degrees C. Liquid applications have ranged from cryogenic (-160 degrees C) to 500 degrees C and include intermittent two-phase flows. The individual rods comprising the bundle usually are approximately one millimeter in diameter. The sheath, made of a pipe or tube, typically has an outside diameter of 12.7 to about 33 mm and usually is about 300 mm long. Materials for the sheath and bundle are selected to satisfy requirements of compatibility with the fluid as well as for acoustic properties. Corrosion-resistant alloys such as 316SS and titanium are commonly used. The buffers are used with transducers that are metal-encapsulated and certified for use in hazardous areas. They operate at a frequency in the range of 0.1 to 1 MHz. The radiating end of the buffer is usually flat and perpendicular to the buffer's main axis. In some cases the end of the buffer is stepped or angled. Angling the radiating faces at approximately 2 degrees to overcome beam drift at Mach 0.1 recently contributed to solving a high-temperature high-velocity flow measurement problem. The temperature in this situation was 300 degrees C, and the gas molecular weight was about 95, with pressure 0.9 to 1.1 bar. PMID:16060500

  20. Comparison of two sediment oxygen demand measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Truax, D.D.; Sindala, A.; Sartain, H.

    1995-09-01

    Measuring the sediment oxygen demand rate in deep water can be difficult. Yet this parameter can be a significant component in ecological models of deep water systems. The results of a study to characterize the oxygen demand in the benthos of more than 210 km (130 mi) of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway are presented here. Sampling was performed with a modified Shelby tube apparatus, which allowed the collection of samples at depths of more than 7 m (25 ft) without the use of divers. Results of in-situ analyses performed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are correlated with data from a sampling and laboratory methodology developed for this project. The laboratory setup used a sealed, cylindrical chamber through which water was continuously recirculated. The results of both procedures were statistically equivalent throughout the majority of the waterway. Only in areas where the channel bottom consisted of extremely porous media did the sampling and laboratory methodology yield questionable results. The results obtained indicate that sediment oxygen demand of the section of the waterway studied ranged between 0.5 g O{sub 2}/m{sup 2}-day and 1.5 g O{sub 2}/m{sup 2}-day.

  1. Requirements and Techniques for Developing and Measuring Simulant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Owens, Charles; Howard, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The 1989 workshop report entitled Workshop on Production and Uses of Simulated Lunar Materials and the Lunar Regolith Simulant Materials: Recommendations for Standardization, Production, and Usage, NASA Technical Publication identify and reinforced a need for a set of standards and requirements for the production and usage of the lunar simulant materials. As NASA need prepares to return to the moon, a set of requirements have been developed for simulant materials and methods to produce and measure those simulants have been defined. Addressed in the requirements document are: 1) a method for evaluating the quality of any simulant of a regolith, 2) the minimum Characteristics for simulants of lunar regolith, and 3) a method to produce lunar regolith simulants needed for NASA's exploration mission. A method to evaluate new and current simulants has also been rigorously defined through the mathematics of Figures of Merit (FoM), a concept new to simulant development. A single FoM is conceptually an algorithm defining a single characteristic of a simulant and provides a clear comparison of that characteristic for both the simulant and a reference material. Included as an intrinsic part of the algorithm is a minimum acceptable performance for the characteristic of interest. The algorithms for the FoM for Standard Lunar Regolith Simulants are also explicitly keyed to a recommended method to make lunar simulants.

  2. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic radiation doses to the crews of the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions of 142 + or - 80, 340 + or - 80, and 210 + or - 130 mR respectively were calculated from the specific activities of Na-22 and Na-24 in the postflight urine specimens of the astronauts. The specific activity of Fe-59 was higher in the urine than in the feces of the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts, and a possible explanation is given. The concentrations of K-40, K-42, Cr-51, Co-60, and Cs-137 in the urine are also reported for these astronauts. The radiation doses received by pilots and navigators flying high altitude missions during the solar flare of March 27 to 30, 1972 were calculated from the specific activity of Na-24 in their urine. These values are compared with the expected radiation dose calculated from the known shape and intensity of the proton spectrum and demonstrate the magnitude of atmospheric shielding. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Fe, Co, Ag, Zn, Hg, As, Sb, Se, and Br were measured in the urine specimens from the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. The mercury and arsenic levels were much higher than expected.

  3. A straightforward radiometric technique for measuring IMP dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Cooney, D A; Wilson, Y; McGee, E

    1983-04-15

    [2-3H]Inosinic acid ([2-3H]IMP) has been biosynthesized in good yield from [2-3H]hypoxanthine and PRPP via the action of a partially purified preparation of hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyl transferase from mouse brain. The product was purified in one step by ascending paper chromatography, and used to assess the activity of IMP dehydrogenase. To conduct the assay, tritiated substrate is admixed with enzyme in a final volume of 10 microliters; NAD is present to serve as cofactor for the reaction, and allopurinol to inhibit the oxidation of any hypoxanthine generated as a consequence of side reactions. After an appropriate period of incubation, the 3H2O arising from the oxidation of tritiated IMP via [3H]NAD is isolated by quantitative microdistillation. Performed as described, the assay is facile, sensitive, and accurate, with the capability of detecting the dehydrogenation of as little as 1 pmol of [3H]IMP. Using it, measurements have been made of IMP dehydrogenase in a comprehensive array of mouse organs. Of these, pancreas contained the enzyme at the highest specific activity. PMID:6135372

  4. Intracellular Calcium Gradients in Single Living Cells: Measurement and Analysis by Optical and Digital Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao Viswanadha

    Intracellular calcium (Ca^{2+ }) has been considered as a regulator of many cellular processes. In addition, Ca^{2+ } also plays a key role in mediating actions of many hormones, growth factors, and drugs. This thesis describes two general approaches, digital video and photomultiplier (PMT) based fluorescence microscopic systems, to measure such Ca^{2+} changes throughout the cell. They reveal the heterogeneous spatial and fast temporal changes of Ca^{2+} within a single isolated living cell. In order to measure spatial Ca^ {2+} in three dimensions (3-D), optical section microscopy (OSM) coupled to digital video imaging is introduced. With this approach, an increase in nuclear Ca^{2+} compared to cytosolic Ca^{2+} is detected in human erythroblasts and rat hepatocytes under the addition of growth factors: erythropoietin and epidermal growth factor respectively. In addition, the primary effect of non growth-promoting hormone vasopressin, raise in cytosolic Ca^{2+}, is also observed. These observations are the first to underscore the importance of nuclear Ca^{2+} increase in cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, to track fast Ca^ {2+} transients (mesc) during excitation -contraction (EC) cycle and then examine alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in healthy and diseased (hypertensive) heart cells, a PMT based system is implemented. Significant alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in hypertensive heart cells were observed. This finding is compatible with the clinical finding that patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy suffer a lack of adequate relaxation. Finally, to correlate the Ca^{2+} dynamics in an EC cycle with mechanical activity, a hybrid optical digital processor was developed. The performance of the hybrid processor is analyzed and applied simultaneously with the PMT based system. The mechanical contraction and relaxation of a single cardiac cell closely paralleled that of Ca^{2+} dynamics during an EC cycle. In summary, this thesis illustrates

  5. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  6. Solid Earth science in the 1990s. Volume 3: Measurement techniques and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Reports are contained from the NASA Workshop on Solid Earth Science in the 1990s. The techniques and technologies needed to address the program objectives are discussed. The Measurement Technique and Technology Panel identified (1) candidate measurement systems for each of the measurements required for the Solid Earth Science Program that would fall under the NASA purview; (2) the capabilities and limitations of each technique; and (3) the developments necessary for each technique to meet the science panel requirements. In nearly all cases, current technology or a development path with existing technology was identified as capable of meeting the requirements of the science panels. These technologies and development paths are discussed.

  7. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  8. Field-aligned electric currents and their measurement by the incoherent backscatter technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P.; Cole, K. D.; Lejeume, G.

    1975-01-01

    Field aligned electric currents flow in the magnetosphere in many situations of fundamental geophysical interest. It is shown here that the incoherent backscatter technique can be used to measure these currents when the plasma line can be observed. The technique provides a ground based means of measuring these currents which complements the rocket and satellite ones.

  9. Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Deringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories - chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and other physicals. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life prediction tests of arrays were selected.

  10. Detection techniques in low-coherence interferometry and their impact on overall measurement accuracy.

    PubMed

    Pikálek, Tomáš; Fořt, Tomáš; Buchta, Zdeněk

    2014-12-20

    This paper deals with interference fringe center detection techniques used in low-coherence interferometry for contactless 3D inspection of macroscopic objects. It presents a complex analysis of several frequently used detection techniques and shows their impact on the measurement accuracy. The analysis compares those techniques in terms of computational complexity, measurement accuracy, and resistance to optical dispersion caused by wedge-shaped optical components. PMID:25608195

  11. The time-shift technique for measurement size of non-transparent spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Walter; Tropea, Cameron

    2014-08-01

    In this study we introduce the time-shift technique, also known as the pulsed-displacement technique, as a means of measuring size and velocity of spherical particles. The measurement technique is not new, it has been introduced by Semidetnov[1] in 1985 and more generally discussed by Hess and Wood[2], Lin et al[3], Damaschke et al.[4] and Albrecht et al[5]. The novelty introduced in this study is the application of the technique to measure non-transparent particles, which are quite common for example in spray drying processes or in paint sprays. In this contribution the basic working principle of the time-shift technique will be reviewed and an optical configuration suitable for the measurement of non-transparent droplets will be presented. The signal generation and processing will be discussed. Example measurements in a milk spray are presented.

  12. Overview of Selected Measurement Techniques for Aerodynamics Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is. therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a around-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  13. Application of Replica Technique and SEM in Accuracy Measurement of Ceramic Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifkovic, B.; Budak, I.; Todorovic, A.; Hodolic, J.; Puskar, T.; Jevremovic, D.; Vukelic, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of the measuring values of the marginal gap related to the ceramic crowns made by dental CAD/CAM system using the replica technique and SEM. The study was conducted using three experimental groups, which consisted of ceramic crowns manufactured by the Cerec CAD/CAM system. The scanning procedure was carried out using three specialized dental 3D digitization systems from the Cerec family - two types of extraoral optical scanning systems and an intraoral optical scanner. Measurements of the marginal gap were carried out using the replica technique and SEM. The comparison of aggregate values of the marginal gap using the replica technique showed a statistically significant difference between the systems. The measured values of marginal gaps of ceramic crowns using the replica technique were significantly lower compared to those measured by SEM. The results indicate that the choice of technique for measuring the accuracy of ceramic crowns influences the final results of investigation.

  14. Are shear force methods adequately reported?

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Fowler, Stephanie M; Hopkins, David L

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the detail to which shear force (SF) protocols and methods have been reported in the scientific literature between 2009 and 2015. Articles (n=734) published in peer-reviewed animal and food science journals and limited to only those testing the SF of unprocessed and non-fabricated mammal meats were evaluated. It was found that most of these SF articles originated in Europe (35.3%), investigated bovine species (49.0%), measured m. longissimus samples (55.2%), used tenderometers manufactured by Instron (31.2%), and equipped with Warner-Bratzler blades (68.8%). SF samples were also predominantly thawed prior to cooking (37.1%) and cooked sous vide, using a water bath (50.5%). Information pertaining to blade crosshead speed (47.5%), recorded SF resistance (56.7%), muscle fibre orientation when tested (49.2%), sub-section or core dimension (21.8%), end-point temperature (29.3%), and other factors contributing to SF variation were often omitted. This base failure diminishes repeatability and accurate SF interpretation, and must therefore be rectified. PMID:27107727

  15. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  16. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a drug safely and for the purposes...

  17. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200.14 Section 200.14 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and...

  18. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  19. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security...

  20. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 200....14 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure...

  1. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, dizziness, and in severe cases can lead to unconsciousness and death. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Prior work conducted by the EPL examined several different wearable, respirator style, masks that could be used to sample air from the vicinity surround the nose and mouth of a suited test subject. Previously published studies utilized these masks, some being commercial products and some novel designs, to monitor CO2 under various exercise and flow conditions with mixed results for repeatability and/or consistency between subjects. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device that is placed directly in the flow path of the user as they breathe. A nasal cannula was used to sample air inhaled by the test subjects during both rest and exercise conditions. Eight subjects were tasked with walking on a treadmill or operating an arm ergometer to reach target metabolic rates of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid for all tests, with supply flow rates of 6, 4, and 2 actual cubic feet per minute depending on the test condition. Each test configuration was conducted twice with subjects breathing

  2. A transient liquid crystal thermography technique for gas turbine heat transfer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekkad, Srinath V.; Han, Je-Chin

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents in detail the transient liquid crystal technique for convective heat transfer measurements. A historical perspective on the active development of liquid crystal techniques for convective heat transfer measurement is also presented. The experimental technique involves using a thermochromic liquid crystal coating on the test surface. The colour change time of the coating at every pixel location on the heat transfer surface during a transient test is measured using an image processing system. The heat transfer coefficients are calculated from the measured time responses of these thermochromic coatings. This technique has been used for turbine blade internal coolant passage heat transfer measurements as well as turbine blade film cooling heat transfer measurements. Results can be obtained on complex geometry surfaces if visually accessible. Some heat transfer results for experiments with jet impingement, internal cooling channels with ribs, flow over simulated TBC spallation, flat plate film cooling, cylindrical leading edge and turbine blade film cooling are presented for demonstration.

  3. Uncertainty analysis on the design of thermal conductivity measurement by a guarded cut-bar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Changhu; Jensen, Colby; Ban, Heng; Phillips, Jeffrey

    2011-07-01

    A technique adapted from the guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow method was selected for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a nuclear fuel compact over a temperature range characteristic of its usage. This technique fulfills the requirement for non-destructive measurement of the composite compact. Although numerous measurement systems have been created based on the guarded-comparative method, comprehensive systematic (bias) and measurement (precision) uncertainty associated with this technique have not been fully analyzed. In addition to the geometric effect in the bias error, which has been analyzed previously, this paper studies the working condition which is another potential error source. Using finite element analysis, this study showed the effect of these two types of error sources in the thermal conductivity measurement process and the limitations in the design selection of various parameters by considering their effect on the precision error. The results and conclusions provide valuable reference for designing and operating an experimental measurement system using this technique.

  4. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-07-01

    A new technique is presented for directly measuring the core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines. The technique requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far-field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross-spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine core. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an AVCO Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  5. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique is presented for directly measuring the core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines. The technique requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far-field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross-spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine core. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an AVCO Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  6. Analysis and correction of ground reflection effects in measured narrowband sound spectra using cepstral techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Stevens, G. H.; Leininger, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflections generate undesirable effects on acoustic measurements such as those conducted outdoors for jet noise research, aircraft certification, and motor vehicle regulation. Cepstral techniques developed in speech processing are adapted to identify echo delay time and to correct for ground reflection effects. A sample result is presented using an actual narrowband sound pressure level spectrum. The technique can readily be adapted to existing fast Fourier transform type spectrum measurement instrumentation to provide field measurements/of echo time delays.

  7. Capacitance measurements. An analysis of the phase detector technique used to study exocytosis and endocytosis.

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, C; Fernandez, J M

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the admittance of patch-clamped mast cells during exocytosis and found that they are adequately described by a four parameter equivalent circuit. On the basis of these measurements, we show that, contrary to current belief, when using a phase sensitive detector, small capacitance changes due to exocytosis or endocytosis should be studied by measuring current 90 degrees out of phase, relative to the component that corresponds to changes in series resistance. We have extended the theory on phase-detectors to include the errors in the estimation of step changes of membrane capacitance. We show that the measured capacitance of a secretory granule can be up to 80% smaller than its true value, during the course of a typical mast cell degranulation. We also describe a software-based phase-detector that simplifies capacitance measurements. PMID:3395658

  8. Assessment of microsphere technique for measurement of capillary blood flow in random skin flaps in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, C.Y.; Neligan, P.; Nakatsuka, T.

    1984-10-01

    In this technical paper, we reviewed the theory and methodology of the radioactive microsphere technique for determination of cardiac output and regional blood flow. Furthermore, we described two experiments conducted to assess this technique for measurement of capillary blood flow in skin-flap research. Our experimental data thus far indicated that the radioactive microsphere technique provided highly reproducible measurements for determination of capillary blood flow in 4 X 10 cm acute and delayed random skin flaps constructed in pigs. The advantages and disadvantages of this laboratory technique were also discussed.

  9. Dynamic measurement of bulk modulus of dielectric materials using a microwave phase shift technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, B. J.; Strand, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    A microwave Doppler shift technique was developed for measuring the dynamic bulk modulus of dielectric materials such as solid propellants. The system has a demonstrated time resolution on the order of milliseconds and a theoretical spatial resolution of a few microns. Accuracy of the technique is dependent on an accurate knowledge of the wavelength of the microwave in the sample being tested. Such measurement techniques are discussed. Preliminary tests with two solid propellants, one non-aluminized and one containing 16% aluminum, yielded reasonable, reproducible results. It was concluded that with refinements the technique holds promise as a practical means for obtaining accurate dynamic bulk modulus data over a variety of transient conditions.

  10. Nondestructive Measurement Material Characterization of Thermal Sprayed Nickel Aluminum Coatings by using Laser Ultrasound Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Cheng Hung; Wu, Tai Chieh; Yang, Che Hua

    This research focused on characterization of mechanical properties in Nickel-Aluminum coating with different thermal technique and processing parameters at high temperature environment up to 295°C. With the laser ultrasound technique (LUT), guided acoustic waves are generated to propagate on the Ni-Al sprayed coatings. By measuring dispersive phase velocity followed by SCE-UA inversion algorithm. The Young's modulus of coatings which fabricated by HVOF technique is higher than APS technique. This technique is potentially useful to probe the material characterization at high temperature environment in a remote and non-destructive way.

  11. Proposal of a new measurement technique for hand-arm vibration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Gianluca L.; Tomasini, Enrico P.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper a new measurement technique to analyze hand-arm vibration is proposed. The methodology is based on a laser scanning vibrometer, a new instrument that measures, without contact, vibration on grid points on a surface. The technique can be applied in laboratory tests and also to perform in field tests on hand-guided vibrating tools, vehicles, machine. Tests with sinusoidal vibrations up to 250 Hz have been performed on different subjects with their hand on three test devices, designed accordingly to ISO standards, has been used to verify the measurement technique. Further work has been started in order to develop a measurement system for mapping the mechanical impedance measurements in some points of the hand of different subjects are illustrated. These techniques prove to be very powerful to analyze hand-arm dynamic characteristics.

  12. In situ attosecond pulse characterization techniques to measure the electromagnetic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanner, M.; Bertrand, J. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to characterize the attosecond emission from high-order-harmonic sources. These techniques are broadly classified as ex situ, where the attosecond pulse train photoionizes a target gas in the presence of an infrared field, and in situ, where the measurement takes place in the medium in which the attosecond pulses are generated. It is accepted that ex situ techniques measure the characteristics of the electromagnetic field, including the phase of the recombination transition moment of the emitting atom or molecule, when the phase of the second medium is known. However, there is debate about whether in situ techniques measure the electromagnetic field, or only the characteristics of the recolliding electron before recombination occurs. We show numerically that in situ measurements are not sensitive to the recombination phase, when implemented in the perturbative regime as originally envisioned, and that they do not measure the electromagnetic phase of the emission.

  13. Introduction of measurement techniques in ultrasonic electronics: Basic principles and recent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Ebihara, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    Measurement — the act of measuring physical properties that we perform — has the potential to contribute to the successful advancement of sciences and society. To open doors in physics and other sciences, various measurement methods and related applications have been developed, and ultrasound has remained a useful probe, power source, and interesting measurement object for the past two centuries. In this paper, we first summarize the basic principles of ultrasound from the viewpoint of measurement techniques for readers who just have started studying or are interested in the field of ultrasonic electronics. Moreover, we also introduce recent studies — ultrasonic properties of materials, measurement techniques, piezoelectric devices, nonlinear acoustics, biomedical ultrasound, and ocean acoustics — and their trends related to measurement techniques in ultrasonic electronics to provide some ideas for related applications.

  14. Assessment of the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer technique for measuring enteric methane emissions from cattle.

    PubMed

    McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A; Iwaasa, A D; McAllister, T A

    2006-01-01

    A commonly used method of measuring enteric methane (CH4) emissions from ruminants is the SF6 tracer technique that measures respired and eructated CH4. However, within the animal, a small proportion of CH4 is produced post-ruminally and some of this may escape through the rectum. The comparison of emissions using a chamber technique that measures all enteric CH4 losses, and the SF6 tracer technique, could give some insight into the magnitude of post-ruminal emission. The objective of our study was to assess the precision and accuracy of the SF6 tracer technique against a chamber technique for cattle fed a range of diets. Using a repeated-measures design, eight beef heifers were offered a high grain or high forage diet for ad libitum or restricted (65% of ad libitum) feed intake to vary the site of digestion within the gastrointestinal tract (n = 24). The SF6 tracer technique underestimated CH4 emissions on average by 4% relative to the chamber technique. This difference was not significant (P > 0.05) and suggests low post-ruminal CH4 emissions. There was a trend for greater accuracy and precision of the SF6 tracer technique when used with cattle fed a high forage diet at a restricted level of intake. The high forage diet corresponds to the conditions of cattle grazing pasture, suggesting the SF6 tracer technique is most reliable for the grazing system. PMID:16899740

  15. The effect of data analysis techniques on the interpretation of wide-angle longwave radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.

    1981-01-01

    Three different data analysis techniques - shape factor, parameter estimation, and deconvolution - have been applied to the same set of satellite radiation measurements to determine their effect on the estimated radiation field. The measurements are from a wide-angle, horizon-to-horizon, nadir-pointing sensor. The shape factor technique reduces each measurement to a radiant exitance at the top of the atmosphere by simple division by a constant. The parameter estimation technique processes all measurements together as a batch and defines the radiant exitance as a least-squares fit to the data. The deconvolution technique takes advantage of the fact that spherical harmonics are the eigenfunctions of the measurement operator. All three techniques are derived, and their assumptions, advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Their results are compared globally, zonally, regionally and on a spatial spectrum basis. All three techniques give comparable results for global parameters; however, results on a regional scale were quite different. The standard deviations of the regional differences in radiant exitance varied from 7.4 to 13.5 W/sq m. Of the three techniques, the parameter estimation technique produced the best regional results and is the choice of the author.

  16. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  17. Investigation of laser Doppler anemometry in developing a velocity-based measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ki Won

    2009-12-01

    Acoustic properties, such as the characteristic impedance and the complex propagation constant, of porous materials have been traditionally characterized based on pressure-based measurement techniques using microphones. Although the microphone techniques have evolved since their introduction, the most general form of the microphone technique employs two microphones in characterizing the acoustic field for one continuous medium. The shortcomings of determining the acoustic field based on only two microphones can be overcome by using numerous microphones. However, the use of a number of microphones requires a careful and intricate calibration procedure. This dissertation uses laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) to establish a new measurement technique which can resolve issues that microphone techniques have: First, it is based on a single sensor, thus the calibration is unnecessary when only overall ratio of the acoustic field is required for the characterization of a system. This includes the measurements of the characteristic impedance and the complex propagation constant of a system. Second, it can handle multiple positional measurements without calibrating the signal at each position. Third, it can measure three dimensional components of velocity even in a system with a complex geometry. Fourth, it has a flexible adaptability which is not restricted to a certain type of apparatus only if the apparatus is transparent. LDA is known to possess several disadvantages, such as the requirement of a transparent apparatus, high cost, and necessity of seeding particles. The technique based on LDA combined with a curvefitting algorithm is validated through measurements on three systems. First, the complex propagation constant of the air is measured in a rigidly terminated cylindrical pipe which has very low dissipation. Second, the radiation impedance of an open-ended pipe is measured. These two parameters can be characterized by the ratio of acoustic field measured at multiple

  18. [Application of near infrared spectroscopy technique to nondestructive measurement of vegetable quality].

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Juan; Ying, Yi-Bin; Yu, Hai-Yan; Fu, Xia-Ping

    2007-06-01

    Nondestructive detection techniques of vegetable include electrical properties, optical reflectance and transmission, sonic vibration, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), machine vision, aromatic volatile emission, vibration characteristics and others. The most widely employed and successful technique is to use its optical property. Near infrared spectroscopy technique is extremely fast, highly efficient, cheap to implement, of good recurrence and no sample preparation, and is a rapid and non-destructive modern measuring technique that has been widely used in many fields. In the present paper, the application of near infrared spectroscopy technique to nondestructive measurement of vegetable quality was briefly introduced. Some considerable aspects existing in the application were also discussed, and it is pointed out that because of vegetable's diversity and rot-proneness, automation analysis machine should be developed to improve the speed of quality detection, and cooperating with several other nondestructive techniques, such as NMR and machine vision, is the research trend. PMID:17763775

  19. Investigation of techniques for bulk stress measurement on exposed pipelines -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, H.

    1993-10-01

    Subsidence, frost heave, fault slippage, landslides, and other forms of soil movement can cause localized areas of high stress on a pipeline. The areas of high stress can compromise the integrity of the pipeline, despite the fact that the highly stressed areas may not be readily detectable. This report describes two phases of development by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) of a nonintrusive technique to quantify the local, throughwall average axial stress in an exposed pipe. The technique selected for evaluation and development is a low-frequency, electromagnetic technique, called multiparameter magnetic measurement (MPMM). MPMM is a combination of existing magnetic techniques including magnetic hysteresis measurement, nonlinear harmonic analysis, and multiparameter correlation. The work included both a proof-of-principle demonstration of the technique using samples of grade X-42, X-46, and X-52 pipe (Phase 1), and further determination of practical applicability of the MPMM technique (Phase 2). Phase 2 focused on evaluating the variability of magnetic response to stress among five samples of grade X-42 pipe. The results of the investigations include the following; the technique can measure the throughwall average stress-difference between the axial and hoop stresses with approximately {+-} 5 ksi (35 Mpa) accuracy within the range up to about 50--75% of the yield strength; and at the present state of development, the practical applicability of the technique for measurements of absolute stress values is low.

  20. Surface displacement measured by beam distortion detection technique: Application to picosecond ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2006-11-15

    A sensitive technique of surface displacement measurement without interferometry is proposed for the goals of picosecond ultrasonics. Simple description of detection mechanism is provided on the basis of paraxial approximation of light diffraction. Test experiments with gold and tungsten layers have been performed and analyzed. The efficiency of the technique is compared with interferometry and reflectometry methods.

  1. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  2. Validity of using backward Lagrangian Stochastic technique in measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates the accuracy of measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoons using backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) technique. The bLs technique was originally developed for relatively homogeneous terrains without any obstacles causing significant windflow disturbance. The errors ass...

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW A review of the mass measurement techniques proposed for the Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Alan J.; Lester, Christopher G.

    2010-12-01

    We review the methods which have been proposed for measuring masses of new particles at the Large Hadron Collider paying particular attention to the kinematical techniques suitable for extracting mass information when invisible particles are expected.

  4. Evaluation of Preparation and Measuring Techniques for Interplanetary Dust Particles for the MIDAS Experiment on Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, I.; Stephan, T.; Jessberger, E. K.

    2004-03-01

    Preparation and measuring techniques were evaluated to assemble a dataset on morphology, microstructure, mineralogy, and chemistry of individual IDPs in order to generate a database for the upcoming results of the MIDAS experiment on Rosetta.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES FOR FUGITIVE EMISSIONS FROM PROCESS AND EFFLUENT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes work completed in this continuing program of evaluation, development, testing, and adaptation of existing and proposed measurement techniques for air and waterborne industrial process fugitive emissions. Results of five major research and development tasks a...

  6. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERGLASS-REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses several projects to measure hydrocarbon emissions associated with the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastics. The main purpose of the projects was to evaluate pollution prevention techniques to reduce emissions by altering raw materials, application equ...

  7. Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Method for Micro Droplet Utilizing Micro LIF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Horita, Ryo

    This paper describes a novel measurement technique for three-dimensional shape of micro droplet utilizing micro LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) technique. A measurement system consisted of microscope equipped with 10x lens, high sensitive CCD camera, mercury lamp, optical filters and so on. Calibration curve between thickness of micro droplet and emission of fluorescence dye solution was obtained by the use of the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchip, whose depth varied from 10 to 95 μm fabricated using photo lithography technique. The microchip based calibration method provides high measurement accuracy and eliminate photobleaching effect. Measurement accuracy of the present method in depth direction was about 0.57 μm assessed using laser con-focal microscope and the spatial resolution in the horizontal plane became 6.7 μm. The technique is useful to investigate a gas-liquid two-phase flow in micro scale.

  8. Measurement techniques for assessing the olfactory impact of municipal sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Jacek; Byliński, Hubert; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The study presents information about the measurement techniques used for the assessment of air quality in terms of the olfactory intensity resulting from the operation of municipal sewage treatment plants. Advantages and disadvantages of the measurement techniques used are presented. Sources of malodourous substance emission from sewage treatment plants were described, and the malodourous substances emitted were characterised. Trends in development of analysis and monitoring of the malodourous substances in the air were also presented. PMID:26670041

  9. Absorption measurement of thin films by using photothermal techniques: The influence of thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.; Thomas, R.L.; Fan, Z.X.

    1995-12-31

    Photothermal techniques are widely used for measuring optical absorption of thin film coatings. In these applications the calibration of photothermal signal is typically based on the assumption that the thermal properties of the thin film make very little contribution. In this paper we take mirage technique as an example and present a detailed analysis of the influence of thin film thermal properties on absorption measurements. The results show that the traditional calibration method is not valid on surprisingly many situations.

  10. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  11. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  12. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging system skin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced in proportion to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  13. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging fkin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced proportional to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  14. Thermography analyses of the hole-drilling residual stress measuring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honner, Milan; Litoš, Pavel; Švantner, Michal

    2004-03-01

    The paper deals with methods and results of thermography analyses of the hole-drilling residual stress measuring technique. Surface IR properties of the drilling mill and sample with strain gauge rosette of millimeter dimensions are determined by the emissivity and reflectivity measurements. Dynamic surface temperature field measurement is accompanied by the strain measurement during step-by-step drilling. Possible sources of errors in relation to the residual stress determination are discussed.

  15. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P.

    2015-06-15

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others.

  16. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Cardoso, S.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P.

    2015-06-01

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others.

  17. Polarisation control through an optical feedback technique and its application in precise measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Zhang, Shulian; Long, Xingwu

    2013-01-01

    We present an anisotropic optical feedback technique for controlling light polarisation. The technique is based on the principle that the effective gain of a light mode is modulated by the magnitude of the anisotropic feedback. A new physical model that integrates Lamb's semi-classical theory and a model of the equivalent cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is developed to reveal the physical nature of this technique. We use this technique to measure the phase retardation, optical axis, angle, thickness and refractive index with a high precision of λ/1380, 0.01°, 0.002°, 59 nm and 0.0006, respectively. PMID:23771164

  18. Progress in laser-spectroscopic techniques for aerodynamic measurements - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the capabilities and recent progress in laser-spectroscopic measurement techniques for use in aerodynamic test facilities and flight research vehicles. It includes a survey of the literature which is centered on this application of laser spectroscopy. The intended reader is the specialist in experimental fluid dynamics who is not intimately familiar with the physics or applications of laser spectroscopy. Thus, some discussion is also included of the nature of each laser-spectroscopic technique and the practical aspects of its use for aerodynamic measurements. The specific techniques reviewed include laser absorption, laser-induced fluorescence, laser Rayleigh scattering, and laser Raman scattering including spontaneous and coherent processes.

  19. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  20. Comparing and assessing different measurement techniques for mercury in coal systhesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.P.; Richardson, C.F.

    1995-11-01

    Three mercury measurement techniques were performed on synthesis gas streams before and after an amine-based sulfur removal system. The syngas was sampled using (1) gas impingers containing a nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide solution, (2) coconut-based charcoal sorbent, and (3) an on-line atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a gold amalgamation trap and cold vapor cell. Various impinger solutions were applied upstream of the gold amalgamation trap to remove hydrogen sulfide and isolate oxidized and elemental species of mercury. The results from these three techniques are compared to provide an assessment of these measurement techniques in reducing gas atmospheres.

  1. A test technique for measuring lightning-induced voltages on aircraft electrical circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walko, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a test technique used for the measurement of lightning-induced voltages in the electrical circuits of a complete aircraft is described. The resultant technique utilizes a portable device known as a transient analyzer capable of generating unidirectional current impulses similar to lightning current surges, but at a lower current level. A linear relationship between the magnitude of lightning current and the magnitude of induced voltage permitted the scaling up of measured induced values to full threat levels. The test technique was found to be practical when used on a complete aircraft.

  2. A new technique for measuring gas conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters was developed. It was applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for hydrocarbon gases. The values of conversion factors for two common hydrocarbons measured using this technique are in good agreement with the empirical values cited by the manufacturer. Similar agreements can be expected for all other hydrocarbons. The technique is based on Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion product gases with that in normal air. It is simple, quick and relatively safe--particularly for toxic/poisonous hydrocarbons.

  3. Comparison of Two-dimensional Measurement Techniques for Predicting Knee Angle and Moment during a Drop Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Toepke, John J.; Tofte, Kari B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of two dimensional (2D) video-based techniques and three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis to assess potential knee injury risk factors during jump landing. Design Observational study Setting Research Laboratory Participants Thirty-six female athletes in cutting and pivoting sports. Assessment Athletes performed a drop vertical jump during which movement was recorded with a motion analysis system and a digital video camera positioned in the frontal plane. Main Outcome Measures The 2D variables were the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA), the angle formed between thigh and leg, and the knee:ankle separation ratio, the distance between knee joints divided by the distance between ankles. The 3D variables were knee abduction angle and external abduction moment. All variables were assessed at peak knee flexion. Linear regression assessed the relationship between the 2D and 3D variables. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficients determined rater reliability for the 2D variables and compared the 2D measurements made from digital video to the same measurements from the motion analysis. Results The knee:ankle separation ratio accounted for a higher variance of 3D knee abduction angle (r2 =0.350) and knee abduction moment (r2=0.394) when compared to the FPPA (r2=0.145, 0.254). The digital video measures had favorable rater reliability (ICC:0.89–0.94) and were comparable to the motion analysis system (ICC≥0.92). Conclusion When compared to the FPPA, the knee:ankle separation ratio had better association with previously cited knee injury risk factors in female athletes. The 2D measures have adequate consistency and validity to merit further clinical consideration in jump landing assessments. PMID:22544058

  4. Measuring bacterial adhesion at environmental interfaces with single-cell and single-molecule techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camesano, Terri A.; Liu, Yatao; Datta, Meera

    2007-06-01

    A synopsis is provided of techniques currently used to quantify the interactions between bacterial cells and surfaces. Focus is placed on techniques which allow for direct probing of nano, pico, or femto-scale interaction forces between bacteria and surfaces of relevance for environmental science and engineering. We focus on bacterial adhesion measurements and surface characterizations via techniques that measure forces on individual bacterial cells or cellular macromolecules, particularly atomic force microscopy (AFM) and related force spectroscopy. However, we also include overviews of other techniques useful for evaluating cellular forces, such as optical tweezers, evanescent wave scattering-based techniques (i.e. total internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) and total internal reflection aqueous fluorescence (TIRAF) microscopy) and the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). These latter techniques, while most are not providing direct measurements of forces of adhesion, can be used to explain adhesion and interaction forces in bacterial systems. We review the operating principles, advantages and limitations of each technique, and key bacterial adhesion studies from each area are presented. Qualitative and quantitative methodologies for relating force measurements to bacterial attachment, particularly to bacterial retention in porous media, are discussed.

  5. Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration Technique in Cavitation Research and Comparison to Phase-Doppler Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Eric; Kröger, Willfried; Damaschke, Nils

    2015-12-01

    Small particles, especially bubbles in the micro-meter range, influence the cavitation of the propellers. The prediction of cavitation inception and water quality measurements are important in cavitation research. The Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration (HDNC) technique can be used for reliable bubble concentration measurements in fluid flows. The HDNC technique bases on the analysis of scattered light from the cavitation nuclei in the water. The HDNC technique can distinguish between bubbles and solid particles. The particle type classification is important, because the number concentration of solid particles is often much higher than the nuclei concentration in cavitation tunnels and in seawater. Verification experiments show, that the HDNC technique reaches similar capabilities in number concentration estimation as Phase Doppler (PD) technique in much shorter acquisition time.

  6. Uncertainty quantification of three-dimensional velocimetry techniques for small measurement depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the multi-camera techniques tomographic PTV and 3D-PTV as well as the single-camera defocusing PTV approach are assessed for flow measurements with a small measurement depth in conjunction with a high resolution along the optical axis. This includes the measurement of flows with strong velocity gradients in z direction and flow features, which have smaller scales than the actual light sheet thickness. Furthermore, in fields like turbomachinery, the measurement of flows in domains with small depth dimensions is of great interest. Typically, these domains have dimensions on the order of 100 mm in z direction and of 101 mm in x and y direction. For small domain depths, employing a 3D flow velocimetry technique is inevitable, since the measurement depths lie in the range of the light sheet thickness. To resolve strong velocity gradients and small-scale flow features along the z axis, the accuracy and spatial resolution of the 3D technique are very important. For the comparison of the different measurement methods, a planar Poiseuille flow is investigated. Quantitative uncertainty analyses reveal the excellent suitability of all three methods for the measurement of flows in domains with small measurement depths. Naturally, the multi-camera approaches tomographic PTV and 3D-PTV yield lower uncertainties, since they image the measurement volume from different angles. Other criteria, such as optical access requirements, hardware costs, and setup complexity, clearly favor defocusing PTV over the more complex multi-camera techniques.

  7. Interferometric Dynamic Measurement: Techniques Based on High-Speed Imaging or a Single Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  8. Interferometric dynamic measurement: techniques based on high-speed imaging or a single photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Li, Xide

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  9. Measurement of solar cell ac parameters using the time domain technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, M. P.; Kumar, R. Anil; Nagaraju, J.

    2004-08-01

    The instrumentation to measure solar cell ac parameters [cell capacitance (CP) and cell resistance (RP)] using the time domain technique is developed. The cell capacitance (CP) and series resistance (r) are calculated using open circuit voltage decay (OCVD) technique. It is calibrated with the help of an electrical network with passive components similar to ac equivalent circuit of a solar cell consisting of precision resistors and capacitors. The maximum error observed in the measurement of resistor and capacitor value is ±3.5%. The cell resistance (RP) is calculated from I-V characteristics of solar cell. The data obtained in time domain technique is compared with the impedance spectroscopy technique data measured on same solar cell and it is found that the deviation in cell capacitance and resistance are within ±8%.

  10. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  11. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  12. Comparison of stress-measuring techniques at the DNA-UTP site, Rodgers Hollow, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) is developing explosives technology through its Underground Technology Program (UTP). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has supported the DNA by conducting research to characterize the in situ stress and rock mass deformability at one of the UTP underground sites at Rodgers Hollow, near Louisville, Kentucky on the Fort Knox Military Reservation. The purpose of SNL`s testing was to determine the in situ stress using three different measurement techniques and, if possible, to estimate the rock mass modulus near the underground opening. The three stress-measuring techniques are (1) borehole deformation measurements using overcoring, (2) Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) complemented by laboratory ultrasonic and mechanical properties testing, and (3) the in situ flatjack technique using cancellation pressure. Rock mass modulus around the underground opening was estimated using the load deformation history of the flatjack and surrounding rock. Borehole deformation measurements using the overcoring technique probably represent the most reliable method for in situ stress determination in boreholes up to 50 ft (15 m) deep in competent rock around an isolated excavation. The technique is used extensively by the tunneling and mining industries. The ASR technique is also a core-based technique and is used in the petroleum and natural gas industries for characterization of in situ stress from deep boreholes. The flatjack technique has also been used in the tunneling and mining industries, and until recently has been limited to measurement of the stress immediately around the excavation. Results from the flatjack technique must be further analyzed to calculate the in situ stress in the far field.

  13. Development of a noninvasive technique for the measurement of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, T.; Shuer, L. M.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamics are important for understanding adjustments to altered gravity. Previous flight observations document significant facial edema during exposure to microgravity, which suggests that ICP is elevated during microgravity. However, there are no experimental results obtained during space flight, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed and refined a noninvasive technique to measure intracranial pressure noninvasively. The technique is based upon detecting skull movements of a few micrometers in association with altered intracranial pressure. We reported that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with the pulsation of ICP in cadavera. In normal operations, however, we place a transducer on the scalp. Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the PPLL technique picks up cutaneous pulsation. The purpose of the present study was therefore to show that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with cardiac cycles in vivo.

  14. A simple technique for measuring buoyant weight increment of entire, transplanted coral colonies in the field

    PubMed Central

    Herler, Jürgen; Dirnwöber, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the impacts of global and local threats on coral reefs requires monitoring reef health and measuring coral growth and calcification rates at different time scales. This has traditionally been mostly performed in short-term experimental studies in which coral fragments were grown in the laboratory or in the field but measured ex situ. Practical techniques in which growth and measurements are performed over the long term in situ are rare. Apart from photographic approaches, weight increment measurements have also been applied. Past buoyant weight measurements under water involved a complicated and little-used apparatus. We introduce a new method that combines previous field and laboratory techniques to measure the buoyant weight of entire, transplanted corals under water. This method uses an electronic balance fitted into an acrylic glass underwater housing and placed atop of an acrylic glass cube. Within this cube, corals transplanted onto artificial bases can be attached to the balance and weighed at predetermined intervals while they continue growth in the field. We also provide a set of simple equations for the volume and weight determinations required to calculate net growth rates. The new technique is highly accurate: low error of weight determinations due to variation of coral density (< 0.08%) and low standard error (< 0.01%) for repeated measurements of the same corals. We outline a transplantation technique for properly preparing corals for such long-term in situ experiments and measurements. PMID:22049248

  15. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  16. Edge technique lidar for high accuracy, high spatial resolution wind measurement in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Gentry, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    The goal of the Army Research Office (ARO) Geosciences Program is to measure the three dimensional wind field in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a measurement volume with a 50 meter spatial resolution and with measurement accuracies of the order of 20 cm/sec. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a high vertical resolution lidar experiment using the edge technique for high accuracy measurement of the atmospheric wind field to meet the ARO requirements. This experiment allows the powerful capabilities of the edge technique to be quantitatively evaluated. In the edge technique, a laser is located on the steep slope of a high resolution spectral filter. This produces large changes in measured signal for small Doppler shifts. A differential frequency technique renders the Doppler shift measurement insensitive to both laser and filter frequency jitter and drift. The measurement is also relatively insensitive to the laser spectral width for widths less than the width of the edge filter. Thus, the goal is to develop a system which will yield a substantial improvement in the state of the art of wind profile measurement in terms of both vertical resolution and accuracy and which will provide a unique capability for atmospheric wind studies.

  17. Construction of Weak and Strong Similarity Measures for Ordered Sets of Documents Using Fuzzy Set Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, L.; Michel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ordered sets (OS) of documents are encountered more and more in information distribution systems, such as information retrieval systems. Classical similarity measures for ordinary sets of documents need to be extended to these ordered sets. This is done in this article using fuzzy set techniques. The practical usability of the OS-measures is…

  18. Measurement Techniques for Transmit Source Clock Jitter for Weak Serial RF Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin A.; Schlesinger, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for filtering clock jitter measurements are developed, in the context of controlling data modulation jitter on an RF carrier to accommodate low signal-to-noise ratio thresholds of high-performance error correction codes. Measurement artifacts from sampling are considered, and a tutorial on interpretation of direct readings is included.

  19. Measuring tropospheric HNO3 - Problems and prospects for Nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1990-05-01

    A series of laboratory and field measurements was performed to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO3 concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO3 vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia, the Nylon filter measured an average of 70 percent higher HNO3 concentration than the mist chamber technique. The results indicate that O3 causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO3 measurements performed with the filter technique. This O3-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO3 concentrations determined with the two techniques. It is hypothesized that unidentified (organic?) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO3(-) on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO3 vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO3 with the mist chamber method.

  20. Measuring tropospheric HNO3 - Problems and prospects for Nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of laboratory and field measurements was performed to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO3 concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO3 vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia, the Nylon filter measured an average of 70 percent higher HNO3 concentration than the mist chamber technique. The results indicate that O3 causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO3 measurements performed with the filter technique. This O3-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO3 concentrations determined with the two techniques. It is hypothesized that unidentified (organic?) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO3(-) on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO3 vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO3 with the mist chamber method.

  1. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  14. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  15. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  17. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  18. 10 CFR 503.35 - Inability to obtain adequate capital.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inability to obtain adequate capital. 503.35 Section 503.35 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES Permanent Exemptions for New Facilities § 503.35 Inability to obtain adequate capital. (a) Eligibility. Section 212(a)(1)(D)...

  19. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

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  20. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

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