Science.gov

Sample records for adequate measurement techniques

  1. Is clinical measurement of anatomic axis of the femur adequate?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2017-03-23

    Background and purpose - The accuracy of using clinical measurement from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the knee to determine an anatomic axis of the femur has rarely been studied. A radiographic technique with a full-length standing scanogram (FLSS) was used to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement. Patients and methods - 100 consecutive young adult patients (mean age 34 (20-40) years) with chronic unilateral lower extremity injuries were studied. The pelvis and intact contralateral lower extremity images in the FLSS were selected for study. The angles between the tibial axis and the femoral shaft anatomic axis (S-AA), the piriformis anatomic axis (P-AA), the clinical anatomic axis (C-AA), and the mechanical axis (MA) were compared between sexes. Results - Only the S-AA and C-AA angles were statistically significantly different in the 100 patients (3.6° vs. 2.8°; p = 0.03). There was a strong correlation between S-AA, P-AA, and C-AA angles (r > 0.9). The average intersecting angle between MA and S-AA in the femur in the 100 patients was 5.5°, and it was 4.8° between MA and C-AA. Interpretation - Clinical measurement of an anatomic axis from the ASIS to the center of the knee may be an adequate and acceptable method to determine lower extremity alignment. The optimal inlet for antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing may be the lateral edge of the piriformis fossa.

  2. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  3. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  4. Gaussian membership functions are most adequate in representing uncertainty in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreinovich, V.; Quintana, C.; Reznik, L.

    1992-01-01

    In rare situations, like fundamental physics, we perform experiments without knowing what their results will be. In the majority of real-life measurement situations, we more or less know beforehand what kind of results we will get. Of course, this is not the precise knowledge of the type 'the result will be between alpha - beta and alpha + beta,' because in this case, we would not need any measurements at all. This is usually a knowledge that is best represented in uncertain terms, like 'perhaps (or 'most likely', etc.) the measured value x is between alpha - beta and alpha + beta.' Traditional statistical methods neglect this additional knowledge and process only the measurement results. So it is desirable to be able to process this uncertain knowledge as well. A natural way to process it is by using fuzzy logic. But, there is a problem; we can use different membership functions to represent the same uncertain statements, and different functions lead to different results. What membership function do we choose? In the present paper, we show that under some reasonable assumptions, Gaussian functions mu(x) = exp(-beta(x(exp 2))) are the most adequate choice of the membership functions for representing uncertainty in measurements. This representation was efficiently used in testing jet engines to airplanes and spaceships.

  5. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Macarthur, Duncan W; Langner, Diana; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Razinkov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  6. Novel Diffusivity Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rashidnia, Nasser

    2001-01-01

    A common-path interferometer (CPI) system was developed to measure the diffusivity of liquid pairs. The CPI is an optical technique that can be used to measure changes in the gradient of the refraction index of transparent materials. This system uses a shearing interferometer that shares the same optical path from a laser light source to the final imaging plane. Hence, the molecular diffusion coefficient of liquids can be determined using the physical relations between changes in the optical path length and the liquid phase properties. The data obtained with this interferometer were compared with similar results from other techniques and demonstrated that the instrument is superior in measuring the diffusivity of miscible liquids while keeping the system very compact and robust. CPI can also be used for studies in interface dynamics and other diffusion-dominated-process applications.

  7. Aerodynamic measurement techniques. [laser based diagnostic techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, W. W., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Laser characteristics of intensity, monochromatic, spatial coherence, and temporal coherence were developed to advance laser based diagnostic techniques for aerodynamic related research. Two broad categories of visualization and optical measurements were considered, and three techniques received significant attention. These are holography, laser velocimetry, and Raman scattering. Examples of the quantitative laser velocimeter and Raman scattering measurements of velocity, temperature, and density indicated the potential of these nonintrusive techniques.

  8. Residual triose phosphate isomerase activity and color measurements to determine adequate cooking of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Sair, A I; Booren, A M; Berry, B W; Smith, D M

    1999-02-01

    The objectives were to (i) compare the use of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) activity and internal color scores for determination of cooking adequacy of beef patties and (ii) determine the effect of frozen storage and fat content on residual TPI activity in ground beef. Ground beef patties (24.4% fat) were cooked to five temperatures ranging from 60.0 to 82.2 degrees C. TPI activity decreased as beef patty cooking temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, no difference (P > 0.05) in activity (6.3 U/kg meat) was observed in patties cooked to 71.1 degrees C and above. Degree of doneness color scores, a* values and b* values, of ground beef patties decreased as internal temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, temperature had no effect on L* values. TPI activity in raw ground beef after five freeze-thaw cycles did not differ from the control. Three freeze-thaw cycles of raw ground beef resulted in a 57.2% decrease in TPI activity after cooking. TPI activity of cooked beef increased during 2 months of frozen storage, but TPI activity in ground beef stored for 3 months or longer did not differ from the unfrozen control. While past research has shown color to be a poor indicator of adequate thermal processing, our results suggest that undercooked ground beef patties could be distinguished from those that had been adequately cooked following U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines using residual TPI activity as a marker.

  9. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  10. Transmission potential and design of adequate control measures for Marburg hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Ajelli, Marco; Merler, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Marburg hemorrhagic fever is rare yet among the most severe diseases affecting humans, with case fatality ratio even higher than 80%. By analyzing the largest documented Marburg hemorrhagic fever epidemic, which occurred in Angola in 2005 and caused 329 deaths, and data on viral load over time in non-human primates, we make an assessment of transmissibility and severity of the disease. We also give insight into the control of new Marburg hemorrhagic fever epidemics to inform appropriate health responses. We estimated the distribution of the generation time to have mean 9 days (95%CI: 8.2-10 days) and standard deviation 5.4 days (95%CI: 3.9-8.6 days), and the basic reproduction number to be R(0) = 1.59 (95%CI: 1.53-1.66). Model simulations suggest that a timely isolation of cases, starting no later than 2-3 days after symptoms onset, is sufficient to contain an outbreak. Our analysis reveals that Marburg hemorrhagic fever is characterized by a relatively small reproduction number and by a relatively long generation time. Such factors, along with the extremely high severity and fatality, support the rare occurrence of large epidemics in human populations. Our results also support the effectiveness of social distancing measures--case isolation in particular--to contain or at least to mitigate an emerging outbreak. This work represents an advance in the knowledge required to manage a potential Marburg hemorrhagic fever epidemic.

  11. Remote Attitude Measurement Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    Engineering , New Jersey Institute of Technology. Published by University Microfilms International- Plibi R92,3 19. KCEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side...of the sensor is expressed in terms of a probabilistic matrix. The engineering considerations for liplementing a Remote Attitude Measure- ment...doctoral research. While in residence at Ft. Monmouth, the author served as the project engineer on an exploratory development model of a state of the art

  12. Helium II level measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, D.; Hilton, D. K.; Zhang, T.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2001-05-01

    In this paper, a survey of cryogenic liquid level measurement techniques applicable to superfluid helium (He II) is given. The survey includes both continuous and discrete measurement techniques. A number of different probes and controlling circuits for this purpose have been described in the literature. They fall into one of the following categories: capacitive liquid level gauges, superconducting wire liquid level gauges, thermodynamic (heat transfer-based) liquid level gauges, resistive gauges, ultrasound and transmission line-based level detectors. The present paper reviews these techniques and their suitability for He II service. In addition to these methods, techniques for measuring the total liquid volume and mass gauging are also discussed.

  13. Digital Techniques for Laboratory Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dart, S. Leonard

    1975-01-01

    Describes techniques and equipment intended to both improve laboratory measurements and also form a background for more advanced work by introducing the concepts of electronic and digital circuits. (GS)

  14. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  15. Modified Technique For Chemisorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schryer, David R.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Schryer, Jacqueline

    1989-01-01

    In measurements of chemisorption of CO on Pt/SnO2 catalyst observed that if small numbers of relatively large volumes of adsorbate gas are passed through sample, very little removal of CO detected. In these cases little or no CO has been chemisorbed on Pt/SnO2. Technique of using large number of small volumes of adsorbate gas to measure chemisorption applicable to many gas/material combinations other than CO on Pt/SnO2. Volume used chosen so that at least 10 percent of adsorbate gas removed during each exposure.

  16. A measurement technique for hydroxyacetone

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C{double{underscore}bond}CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NOx. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water, the authors developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one they reported earlier, namely, derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, they adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island, New York. The authors report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  17. A MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR HYDROXYACETONE.

    SciTech Connect

    KLOTZ,P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C=CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NO{sub x}. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water (it's Henry's law constant being {approx}2 x 10{sup 4} M atm{sup -1} at 20 C, Zhou and Lee, unpublished data), we developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one we reported earlier (Lee and Zhou, 1993), namely, based on derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, we adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island (LI), New York. We report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  18. Assessment of adequate quality and collocation of reference measurements with space borne hyperspectral infrared instruments to validate retrievals of temperature and water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, X.

    2015-06-01

    A method is presented to assess whether a given reference ground based point observation, typically a radiosonde measurement, is adequately collocated and sufficiently representative of space borne hyperspectral infrared instrument measurements. Once this assessment is made, the ground based data can be used to validate and potentially calibrate, with a high degree of accuracy, the hyperspectral retrievals of temperature and water vapour.

  19. An Examination of Principal Leadership Styles and Their Influence on School Performance as Measured by Adequate Yearly Progress at Selected Title I Elementary Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tammy Faith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine principal leadership styles and their influence on school performance as measured by adequate yearly progress at selected Title I schools in South Carolina. The main focus of the research study was to complete descriptive statistics on principal leadership styles in schools that met or did not meet adequate…

  20. Field measurements involve various techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.P.; Byars, H.G. )

    1990-07-30

    A number of field techniques are available to determine the extent of corrosion on production equipment. This article on oil field corrosion explains the use of corrosion coupons, several types of probes, and various inspection techniques, and shows how to monitor iron content in water.

  1. Assessment of adequate quality and collocation of reference measurements with space-borne hyperspectral infrared instruments to validate retrievals of temperature and water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calbet, X.

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to assess whether a given reference ground-based point observation, typically a radiosonde measurement, is adequately collocated and sufficiently representative of space-borne hyperspectral infrared instrument measurements. Once this assessment is made, the ground-based data can be used to validate and potentially calibrate, with a high degree of accuracy, the hyperspectral retrievals of temperature and water vapour.

  2. Breakwire Technique for Hypervelocity Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    R )ATORY DSTO - • ’, - , CCL!’ A ~t1 ror - NTSCRA&Ic ý, I rIC TA8 0 SU .,".o,;"ed...Boom,’ r , a large scale explohing’fl folhflii plat’ \\’einerator. Two techniques were tested, ta dual breakwire method and a single breakwire method. 7...E I ~0.8 U.0.6 0.4 0.2 0 0 4 8 12 16 Time. ps 1.8 Boomer 1: 3 WV 14 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 o 12 1824 F ~ev position. mm (b) Figure 7: ( a ) Approximate

  3. Measurement Techniques for Clock Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin; Schlesinger, Adam

    2012-01-01

    NASA is in the process of modernizing its communications infrastructure to accompany the development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to replace the shuttle. With this effort comes the opportunity to infuse more advanced coded modulation techniques, including low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes that offer greater coding gains than the current capability. However, in order to take full advantage of these codes, the ground segment receiver synchronization loops must be able to operate at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than supported by equipment currently in use.

  4. A review on creatinine measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr; Ganbari, Ahmad

    2012-08-15

    This paper reviews the entire recent global tendency for creatinine measurement. Creatinine biosensors involve complex relationships between biology and micro-mechatronics to which the blood is subjected. Comparison between new and old methods shows that new techniques (e.g. Molecular Imprinted Polymers based algorithms) are better than old methods (e.g. Elisa) in terms of stability and linear range. All methods and their details for serum, plasma, urine and blood samples are surveyed. They are categorized into five main algorithms: optical, electrochemical, impedometrical, Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistor (ISFET) based technique and chromatography. Response time, detection limit, linear range and selectivity of reported sensors are discussed. Potentiometric measurement technique has the lowest response time of 4-10 s and the lowest detection limit of 0.28 nmol L(-1) belongs to chromatographic technique. Comparison between various techniques of measurements indicates that the best selectivity belongs to MIP based and chromatographic techniques.

  5. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    , photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V(20 Gy). The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  6. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa’n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-10-01

    -only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p < 0.001). As expected, photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy}. The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  7. Liquid crystal quantitative temperature measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei; Wu, Zongshan

    2001-10-01

    Quantitative temperature measurement using wide band thermochromic liquid crystals is an “area” thermal measurement technique. This technique utilizes the feature that liquid crystal changes its reflex light color with variation of temperature and applies an image capturing and processing system to calibrate the characteristic curve of liquid crystal’s color-temperature. Afterwards, the technique uses this curve to measure the distribution of temperature on experimental model. In this paper, firstly, each part of quantitative temperature measurement system using liquid crystal is illustrated and discussed. Then the technique is employed in a long duration hypersonic wind tunnel, and the quantitative result of the heat transfer coefficient along laminar plate is obtained. Additionally, some qualitative results are also given. In the end, comparing the experimental results with reference enthalpy theoretical results, a conclusion of thermal measurement accuracy is drawn.

  8. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques, which involves some investigations related to measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand, is reported. A major part of the activity was devoted to instruction and discussion with Thai radar engineers, technicians, and meteorologists concerning the basic principles of radar meteorology and applications to specific problems, including measurement of rainfall and detection of wind shear/microburst hazards. Weather radar calibration techniques were also considered during this project. Most of the activity took place during two visits to Thailand, in December 1990 and February 1992.

  9. Ground reflectance measurement techniques: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Duggin, M J; Cunia, T

    1983-12-01

    The relative accuracies of reflectance factor measurement methods involving the simultaneous, as compared to the sequential, measurement of irradiance on and radiance reflected from the target are discussed. Data are presented to support a statistical demonstration that the simultaneous measurement technique is the more accurate.

  10. Two techniques for measuring locomotion impact forces during zero G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenisen, Michael C.; Smith, Richard A.; Klute, Glenn K.; Mccaulley, James B.

    1993-01-01

    A load-cell-instrumented treadmill mated to a Kistler force plate was used to investigate two methods of force measurement instrumentation during treadmill ambulation in zero g, created by parabolic flight on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Current spaceflight treadmills do not have adequate instrumentation to determine the resultant foot impact force applied during restrained ambulation. Accurate measurement of foot-ground reaction forces is critical in attaining proper one-g loading, therefore ensuring proper musculoskeletal conditioning. Treadmill instrumentation and force plate measurements were compared for frequency response and linearity. Locomotion impact data were also collected under one-g laboratory settings and in Keplerian flight. The first resonant frequency for both techniques was found to be well above the primary frequency content of the locomotive forces. Peak impact forces measured by the two systems compared to within 10 percent.

  11. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  12. Optical Measurement Technique for Space Column Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.; Watson, Judith J.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Phelps, James E.

    2004-01-01

    A simple optical technique for the structural characterization of lightweight space columns is presented. The technique is useful for determining the coefficient of thermal expansion during cool down as well as the induced strain during tension and compression testing. The technique is based upon object-to-image plane scaling and does not require any photogrammetric calibrations or computations. Examples of the measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion are presented for several lightweight space columns. Examples of strain measured during tension and compression testing are presented along with comparisons to results obtained with Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT) position transducers.

  13. In-flight aeroelastic measurement technique development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burner, Alpheus W.; Lokos, William A.; Barrows, Danny A.

    2003-11-01

    The initial concept and development of a low-cost, adaptable method for the measurement of static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation of aircraft during flight testing is presented. The method is adapted from a proven technique used in wind tunnel testing to measure model deformation, often referred to as the videogrammetric model deformation (or VMD) technique. The requirements for in-flight measurements are compared and contrasted with those for wind tunnel testing. The methodology for the proposed measurements and differences compared with that used for wind tunnel testing is given. Several error sources and their effects are identified. Measurement examples using the new technique, including change in wing twist and deflection as a function of time, from an F/A-18 research aircraft at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center are presented.

  14. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  15. Techniques For Optical Measurement Of Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zych, L. J.; Spadini, G.

    1985-07-01

    This paper discusses an optical technique capable of reliably measuring registration to few hundredths of a micron on virtually any layer. It has overcome the accuracy limitations and the proximity effect error present in other optical techniques. In spite of the recent popularity of highly accurate computerized electrical registration measurements optical registration measurements are still popular and necessary. This is because nonconductive layers, including resist, cannot be measured electrically. A quick optical technique with a high degree of accuracy has been developed and put to use. The measurement is made through a microscope, and a computer pattern recognition follows. It is free of the resolution limits inherent in such structures as optical verniers, which are bound to typically 0.1 microns by the grid size used to make the mask. This method employs a direct optical misalignment measurement between two matching structures and is capable of resolving 0.01 microns. It is also free of the proximity effects which make many verniers and pattern recognition schemes inaccurate. Proper microscope calibration, adjustments, and pattern recognition algorithms are key in making this technique work. The apertures must be accurately aligned and the focus properly adjusted to provide the right image. An HP 9000-226 computer has been custom interfaced to a Leitz microscope and a set of algorithms written. The result is a highly accurate, fast, and user friendly optical measurement system capable of measuring registration on all layers.

  16. Wastewater Sampling Methodologies and Flow Measurement Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Daniel J.; Keffer, William J.

    This document provides a ready source of information about water/wastewater sampling activities using various commercial sampling and flow measurement devices. The report consolidates the findings and summarizes the activities, experiences, sampling methods, and field measurement techniques conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),…

  17. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  18. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  19. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WDI 5387, 'Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells' was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and the international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  20. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  1. An intercomparison of five ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E. J.; Sandholm, S. T.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Schendel, J. S.; Langford, A. O.; Quinn, P. K.; Lebel, P. J.; Vay, S. A.; Roberts, P. D.; Norton, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from five techniques for measuring gas-phase ammonia at low concentration in the atmosphere are compared. These methods are: (1) a photofragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (PF/LIF) instrument; (2) a molybdenum oxide annular denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection technique; (3) a tungsten oxide denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection system; (4) a citric-acid-coated denuder sampling/ion chromatographic analysis (CAD/IC) method; and (5) an oxalic-acid-coated filter pack sampling/colorimetric analysis method. It was found that two of the techniques, the PF/LIF and the CAD/IC methods, measured approximately 90 percent of the calculated ammonia added in the spiking tests and agreed very well with each other in the ambient measurements.

  2. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  3. Apparatus and techniques for measuring bedload

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbell, David Wellington

    1964-01-01

    The need for accurate determinations of the total sediment discharge of particles of bedload size has prompted this investigation of available and possible measuring apparatus and procedures. The accuracy of measurements of sediment discharge made with trap-type samplers is affected by the variability of sampler efficiency, by the oscillatory variation of bedload discharge, and by sampler placement. Equations that were developed for determining total discharge from measured bedioad discharge and measured suspended-sediment discharge are simplest if the bedload apparatus measures only the true bedload. Early bedload samplers are generally unsatisfactory. Recently developed or suggested apparatus include various improved samplers of the pressure-difference type, a pumping sampler, a magnetic sampler, acoustical instruments that measure the magnitude of the sound of particle collisions, an ultrasonic bedload sampler designed to measure and integrate electronically the concentration and velocity, and a tiltmeter designed to measure the total sediment discharge from the ground tilt that results from the passage of flow. All the pressure-difference samplers are improvements over early samplers, but none are void of the inherent shortcomings of trap-type apparatus; probably the Sphinx (Dutch) and VUV (Hungarian) samplers are the most satisfactory. The acoustical instruments are capable of measuring only the relative discharge. The ultrasonic sampler and the tiltmeter are not adequate without further development. Some new possible apparatus and means for measuring or aiding in measuring bedload discharge are small pit samplers, ultrasonic sounders, pressure transducers, and photography. A small pit sampler for measuring bedload discharge was designed to provide self-placement and portability ; however, its practicability and efficiency are undetermined. Exploratory films show that by using slowmotion photography the discharge of particles larger than about pea size can be

  4. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    This grant provides for some investigations related to weather radar measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand. Quality data are needed from those systems to support TRMM and other scientific investigations. Activities carried out during a trip to the radar facilities at Phuket are described.

  5. High accuracy radiation efficiency measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozakoff, D. J.; Schuchardt, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    The relatively large antenna subarrays (tens of meters) to be used in the Solar Power Satellite, and the desire to accurately quantify antenna performance, dictate the requirement for specialized measurement techniques. The error contributors associated with both far-field and near-field antenna measurement concepts were quantified. As a result, instrumentation configurations with measurement accuracy potential were identified. In every case, advances in the state of the art of associated electronics were found to be required. Relative cost trade-offs between a candidate far-field elevated antenna range and near-field facility were also performed.

  6. Unsteady measurement techniques for turbomachinery flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffa, Nicholas Andrew

    Accurate unsteady measurements are required for studying the flows in high speed turbomachines, which rely on the interaction between rotating and stationary components. Using statistics of phase locked ensembles simplifies the problem, but accurate frequency response in the 10-100 kHz range significantly limits the applicable techniques. This research advances the state of the art for phase resolved measurement techniques using for high speed turbomachinery flows focusing on the following areas: development, validation, and uncertainty quantification. Four methods were developed and implemented: an unsteady total pressure probe, the multiple overheat hot-wire method, the slanted hot-wire method, and the phase peak yaw hot-wire method. These methods allow for the entire phase locked average flow field to be measured (temperature, pressure, and velocity components, swirl angle, etc.). No trusted reference measurement or representative canonical flow exists for comparison of the phase resolved quantities, making validation challenging. Five different validation exercises were performed to increase the confidence and explore the range of applicability. These exercises relied on checking for consistency with expected flow features, comparing independent measurements, and cross validation with CFD. The combined uncertainties for the measurements were quantified using uncertainty estimates from investigations into the elemental error sources. The frequency response uncertainty of constant temperature hot-wire system was investigated using a novel method of illuminating the wire with a laser pulse. The uncertainty analysis provided estimates for the uncertainty in the measurements as well as showing the sensitivity to various sources of error.

  7. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  8. Financial volatility: Issues and measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    This paper explains in non-technical terms various techniques used to measure volatility ranging from time invariant measures to time variant measures. It is shown that a weakness of the former measures arises from the underlying assumption that volatility is considered to be constant over time. This observation has led researchers to develop time variant measures based on the assumption that volatility changes over time. The introduction of the original ARCH model by Engle has spawned an ever increasing variety of models such as GARCH, EGARCH, NARCH, ARCH-M MARCH and the Taylor-Schwert model. The degree of sophistication employed in developing these models is discussed in detail as are the models characteristics used to capture the underlying economic and financial time series data including volatility clustering, leverage effects and the persistence of volatility itself. A feature of these more elaborate models is that they generally obtain a better fit to the data in-sample.

  9. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin'ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  10. Airborne intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Torres, Arnold L.; Davis, Douglas D.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted during missions flown in the fall of 1983 and spring of 1984. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system and two chemiluminescence instruments (CL). NO mixing ratios from below 5 pptv (parts per trillion by volume) to greater than 100 pptv were reported, with the majority less than 20 pptv. Good correlation was observed between the measurements reported by the CL and LIF techniques. The general level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements obtained during the two missions provides the basis from which one can conclude that equally 'valid' measurements of background levels of NO can be expected from either CL or LIF instruments. At the same time the periods of disagreement that were observed between the CL and LIF instruments as well as between the two CL instruments highlight the difficulty of obtaining reliable measurements with NO mixing ratios in the 5-20 pptv range and emphasize the vigilance that should be maintained in future NO measurements.

  11. An intercomparison of nitric oxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Gregory, G. L.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Carroll, M. A.; Mcfarland, M.; Ridley, B. A.; Davis, D. D.; Bradshaw, J.; Rodgers, M. O.; Torres, A. L.

    1985-01-01

    Results from an intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. The intercomparison was part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and was conducted at Wallops Island, VA, in July 1983. Instruments intercompared included a laser-induced fluorescence system and two chemiluminescence instruments. The intercomparisons were performed with ambient air at NO mixing ratios ranging from 10 to 60 pptv and NO-enriched ambient air at mixing ratios from 20 to 170 pptv. All instruments sampled from a common manifold. The techniques exhibited a high degree of correlation among themselves and with changes in the NO mixing ratio. Agreement among the three techniques was placed at approximately + or - 30 percent. Within this level of agreement, no artifacts or species interferences were identified.

  12. Measurement Techniques for Cellular Biomechanics In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Addae-Mensah, Kweku A; Wikswo, John P

    2014-01-01

    Living cells and tissues experience mechanical forces in their physiological environments that are known to affect many cellular processes. Also of importance are the mechanical properties of cells, as well as the microforces generated by cellular processes themselves in their microenvironments. The difficulty associated with studying these phenomena in vivo has led to alternatives such as using in vitro models. The need for experimental techniques for investigating cellular biomechanics and mechanobiology in vitro has fueled an evolution in the technology used in these studies. Particularly noteworthy are some of the new biomicroelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) devices and techniques that have been introduced to the field. We describe some of the cellular micromechanical techniques and methods that have been developed for in vitro studies, and provide summaries of the ranges of measured values of various biomechanical quantities. We also briefly address some of our experiences in using these methods and include modifications we have introduced in order to improve them. PMID:18445766

  13. Techniques for measurement of thoracoabdominal asynchrony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Hammer, J.; Newth, Christopher J L.

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory motion measured by respiratory inductance plethysmography often deviates from the sinusoidal pattern assumed in the traditional Lissajous figure (loop) analysis used to determine thoraco-abdominal asynchrony, or phase angle phi. We investigated six different time-domain methods of measuring phi, using simulated data with sinusoidal and triangular waveforms, phase shifts of 0-135 degrees, and 10% noise. The techniques were then used on data from 11 lightly anesthetized rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; 7.6 +/- 0.8 kg; 5.7 +/- 0.5 years old), instrumented with a respiratory inductive plethysmograph, and subjected to increasing levels of inspiratory resistive loading ranging from 5-1,000 cmH(2)O. L(-1). sec(-1).The best results were obtained from cross-correlation and maximum linear correlation, with errors less than approximately 5 degrees from the actual phase angle in the simulated data. The worst performance was produced by the loop analysis, which in some cases was in error by more than 30 degrees. Compared to correlation, other analysis techniques performed at an intermediate level. Maximum linear correlation and cross-correlation produced similar results on the data collected from monkeys (SD of the difference, 4.1 degrees ) but all other techniques had a high SD of the difference compared to the correlation techniques.We conclude that phase angles are best measured using cross-correlation or maximum linear correlation, techniques that are independent of waveform shape, and robust in the presence of noise. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Phase Retrieval Techniques In Coordinates Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Harizanova, J. I.; Stoykova, E. V.; Sainov, V. C.

    2007-04-23

    A precise pattern projection profilometry for three-dimensional shape measurements with different methods of fringe generation is presented. The application of phase-shifting algorithm along with two-spacing illumination allow for phase retrieval and estimation of relative and absolute coordinates of the tested samples. The following experimental approaches for fringe generation are investigated: interferometric approach based on a classical Michelson interferometer, digital computation with a DMD projection and light modulation by a sinusoidal phase grating. The theoretical background, experimental results as well as comparison of the applied generation methods are analyzed. The obtained outcomes successfully display the applicability of this technique for surface profile measurement. The application of the proposed techniques for remote, non-destructive in-situ inspection of real objects from cultural heritage is discussed.

  15. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  16. Investigation of a noncontact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.; Talarico, L.J.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new noncontact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components; however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  17. A DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements.

    PubMed

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Steinmann, Philipp; Bochud, François; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2014-09-16

    The toxicity of heavy metals in natural waters is strongly dependent on the local chemical environment. Assessing the bioavailability of radionuclides predicts the toxic effects to aquatic biota. The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is largely exploited for bioavailability measurements of trace metals in waters. However, it has not been applied for plutonium speciation measurements yet. This study investigates the use of DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements in chemically different environments. We used a diffusion cell to determine the diffusion coefficients (D) of plutonium in polyacrylamide (PAM) gel and found D in the range of 2.06-2.29 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). It ranged between 1.10 and 2.03 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) in the presence of fulvic acid and in natural waters with low DOM. In the presence of 20 ppm of humic acid of an organic-rich soil, plutonium diffusion was hindered by a factor of 5, with a diffusion coefficient of 0.50 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). We also tested commercially available DGT devices with Chelex resin for plutonium bioavailability measurements in laboratory conditions and the diffusion coefficients agreed with those from the diffusion cell experiments. These findings show that the DGT methodology can be used to investigate the bioaccumulation of the labile plutonium fraction in aquatic biota.

  18. A new kind of gear measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhaolong, Zhang; Tongnian, Huang; Shanglian, Huang; Deyuan, Kang; Hong, Wang; Rongan, Duan; Lu, Xu

    1997-07-01

    A new method of gear measurement is introduced in this paper. It is based on the traditional gear single-flank measurement, but it uses a special master gear with three kinds of measuring tooth and a tranmission tooth. The first kind of measurement tooth has a projective involute which is used as a reference. When it is engaged in mesh with the tooth of the workpiece, the deviation of transmission reflects the involute profile error of the workpiece. When a projective helix on the second kind of measurement tooth is meshed with the tooth of the workpiece the lead error can be obtained. Because the third kind of measurement tooth is the same as that used by a traditional single-flank tester, the tangential composite error can be easily obtained. The transmission tooth - whose thickness is reduced - is used to make the contact ratio less than one. When the new master gear is meshed with the workpiece for several turns the pitch error of the latter can be measured. Experimental results using equipment based on the new technique have shown that the method is feasible and efficient.

  19. Optical techniques for measurement of high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1991-10-25

    The availability of instrumentation to measure the high outlet gas temperature of a particle bed reactor is a topic of some concern. There are a number of possible techniques with advantages and disadvantages. In order to provide some baseline choice of instrumentation, a review has been conducted of these various technologies. This report summarizes the results of this review for a group of technologies loosely defined as optical techniques (excluding optical pyrometry). The review has concentrated on a number of questions for each technology investigated. These are: (1) Description of the technology, (2) Anticipated sensitivity and accuracy, (3) Requirements for implementation, (4) Necessary development time and costs, (5) Advantages and disadvantages of the technology. Each of these areas was considered for a technology and a large number of technologies were considered in a review of the literature. Based upon this review it was found that a large number of methods exist to measure temperatures in excess of 2000 K. None of the methods found were ideal. Four methods, however, appeared to warrant further consideration: opto-mechanical expansion thermometry, surface Raman spectroscopy, gas-phase Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). These techniques will be discussed further in this document.

  20. [Clinical use of pain measurement techniques].

    PubMed

    Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2002-03-25

    The increased knowledge about pain has lead to the suggestion of a mechanism-based classification of pain, and hence mechanism-based therapy. The implementation of this classification is unlikely to occur in the near future, but the concept as such emphasises the importance of a better understanding of the origin of pain before treatment is initiated. The basis for developing and applying such an approach in the future is accessibility to pain assessment techniques, which are able to measure and quantify patients' responses to pain. Experimental clinical research includes a number of techniques to assess the excitability of the pain system and the manifestations related to central sensitisation and neuroplasticity. This can now be applied for mechanism-based diagnosis and related targeted treatment. As the new generation analgesics with new sites of action are developed, a mechanisms-based approach could, it is hoped, lead to more rational management of pain in the future.

  1. Thermoluminescence measurement technique using millisecond temperature pulses.

    PubMed

    Manfred, Michael E; Gabriel, Nicholas T; Yukihara, Eduardo G; Talghader, Joseph J

    2010-06-01

    A measurement technique, pulsed thermoluminescence, is described which uses short thermal pulses to excite trapped carriers leading to radiative recombination. The pulses are obtained using microstructures with approximately 500 micros thermal time constants. The technique has many of the advantages of pulsed optically stimulated luminescence without the need for optical sources and filters to isolate the luminescent signal. Charge carrier traps in alpha-Al(2)O(3):C particles on microheaters were filled using 205 nm light. Temperature pulses of 10 and 50 ms were applied to the heaters and compared with a standard thermoluminescence curve taken at a ramp rate of 5 K s(-1). This produced curves of intensity verses temperature similar to standard thermoluminescence except shifted to higher temperatures. The luminescence of single particles was read multiple times with negligible loss of population. The lower limit of the duration of useful pulses appears to be limited by particle size and thermal contact between the particle and heater.

  2. Infrared radiometric technique in temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazer, S.; Madding, R.

    1988-01-01

    One class of commercially available imaging infrared radiometers using cooled detectors is sensitive to radiation over the 3 to 12 micron wavelength band. Spectral filters can tailor instrument sensitivity to specific regions where the target exhibits optimum radiance. The broadband spectral response coupled with real time two-dimensional imaging and emittance/background temperature corrections make the instruments useful for remote measurement of surface temperatures from -20 C to +1500 C. Commonly used radiometric techniques and assumptions are discussed, and performance specifications for a typical modern commercial instrument are presented. The potential usefulness of an imaging infrared radiometer in space laboratories is highlighted through examples of research, nondestructive evaluation, safety, and routine maintenance applications. Future improvements in instrument design and application of the radiometric technique are discussed.

  3. Flight Acoustics Measurement Techniques and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Marcolini, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    Careful consideration must be given to data acquisition and analysis techniques in the design of experiments for the measurement of noise generated by flight vehicles. Although noise measurement locations and data reduction procedures are specified for aircraft certification by FAA and ICAO directives, for example, there are virtually no established procedures for aircraft noise measurement for other purposes. To optimize the quality and quantity of information obtained in a flight acoustics experiment, microphone layout, data acquisition, and analysis must be tailored to the specific test objective. This paper will review flight acoustics technology at NASA Langley Research Center developed over the past decade. In particular, the paper will focus on flight experiments performed for three diverse objectives: (1) research applications, such as noise prediction code validation, (2) noise impact modeling, and (3) noise abatement flight procedures. To best achieve these diverse objectives, different deployments of microphone systems on the ground are required, and different data analysis techniques are needed. In all cases, accurate positioning of the aircraft synchronized in time with the data recording is necessary. However, there are some restrictions on flight operations unique to each case for the methods to properly work.

  4. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  5. A new technique for measuring ionospheric temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, William Edward

    The lower ionosphere is a region of immense electrical energy inflow from space, yet to date there are no direct (in-situ) measurements of the consequent Joule (frictional) heating, partly because of the lack of appropriate instrumentation. This thesis presents a new technique for measuring ion temperature from a sub-orbital sounding rocket using a new type of ion detector, the suprathermal ion imager (SII). Simulations of the SII instrument show that 2-dimensional count-rate distributions binned according to detector azimuth are sensitive to the ratio of ram speed to thermal speed, or Mach number. Analysis of data from the JOULE-II rocket mission show a significant increase in thermal speed at the peak of the Joule heating region as expected, and even higher but unexplained temperatures at lower altitudes.

  6. Techniques for Measuring Surface Potentials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2015-01-01

    Materials exposed to the space plasma environment charge to a net potential relative to the ambient plasma. The charging process is due to differential currents to the material surface that results in a net surface charge density. While this process is termed "spacecraft surface charging" when applied to aerospace hardware, it also applies to the surfaces of astronomical objects in direct contact with the space plasma environment including a number of planetary bodies, asteroids, and dust particles. The ability to measure surface potentials is important to many techniques used in conducting fundamental heliospheric science, spacecraft engineering operations, and space technology development activities. This presentation provides a survey of current technologies used to measure surface potentials of spacecraft and planetary bodies with examples of their application to space science and technology programs.

  7. Measurement of Physicians' Performance Using Existing Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Sanazaro, Paul J.

    1980-01-01

    Existing techniques permit objective and valid measurement of limited elements of physicians' performance. These limited aspects, however, are of considerable importance to patients. The basic components of performance in medicine and surgery can be defined and used as the basis of organized programs for such evaluation. Interhospital comparisons can provide an effective impetus for assessing and improving performance of individual staff members when this is indicated. Professional auspices are needed for the development and application of methods that can provide continuing assurance that the clinical activity of physicians corresponds to contemporary standards. A system of incentives should be provided to physicians to promote their participation in voluntary programs of self-assessment. The incentives should be in the form of performance assessment credits, comparable in definition to continuing medical education credits, but granted for participation in an accredited program that objectively measures physicians' performance against national standards of the respective specialty. PMID:7222656

  8. Measuring techniques in induced polarisation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlin, Torleif; Leroux, Virginie; Nissen, Johan

    2002-06-01

    Multi-electrode geoelectrical imaging has become very popular and is used for many different purposes. For some of these, the inclusion of IP data would be desirable as it would allow the interpreter to distinguish between, e.g. sand formations with saltwater infiltration and clay formations or help delineate landfills. However, present-day IP measuring techniques require the use of nonpolarisable potential electrodes and special wire layout and are thus cumbersome and expensive. In this paper, we suggest making IP measurements with multi-electrode cables and just one set of steel electrodes. The polarisation potentials on the potential electrodes are corrected for by subtracting the polarisation potential measured when no primary current and no IP signal are present. Test measurements indicate that the polarisation potentials vary slowly and that the correction procedure is feasible. At two sites in southern Sweden, we have compared measurements with only stainless steel electrodes and measurements with both stainless steel and Pb-PbCl nonpolarisable electrodes using one or two sets of multicore cables, respectively. Almost no difference between the two data sets was observed. At one site, the charge-up effect on the potential electrodes was not important, while at the other site, the correction procedure was crucial. Though only two sites have been studied so far, it seems that time-domain IP imaging measurements can be taken with only steel electrodes and ordinary multicore cables. Coupling in the multicore cables has not presented any problems at the investigated sites where grounding resistances were moderate, making the coupling effect small. High grounding resistance sites have not yet been investigated.

  9. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurements.

    PubMed

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H-S; Schneider, M

    2010-10-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  10. Measurement technique developments for LBE flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchenau, D.; Eckert, S.; Gerbeth, G.; Stieglitz, R.; Dierckx, M.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the development of measurement techniques for flows in lead-bismuth eutectic alloys (LBE). This paper covers the test results of newly developed contactless flow rate sensors as well as the development and test of the LIDAR technique for operational free surface level detection. The flow rate sensors are based on the flow-induced disturbance of an externally applied AC magnetic field which manifests itself by a modified amplitude or a modified phase of the AC field. Another concept of a force-free contactless flow meter uses a single cylindrical permanent magnet. The electromagnetic torque on the magnet caused by the liquid metal flow sets the magnet into rotation. The operation of those sensors has been demonstrated at liquid metal test loops for which comparative flow rate measurements are available, as well as at the LBE loops THESYS at KIT and WEBEXPIR at SCK-CEN. For the level detection a commercial LIDAR system was successfully tested at the WEBEXPIR facility in Mol and the THEADES loop in Karlsruhe.

  11. Reporting NETD: why measurement techniques matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Ryan K.; Edwards, W. Derrik; Waddle, Caleb E.; Dobbins, Christopher L.; Wood, Sam B.

    2014-05-01

    For over 30 years, the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) has specialized in characterizing the performance of infrared (IR) imaging systems in the laboratory and field. In the late 90's, AMRDEC developed the Automated IR Sensor Test Facility (AISTF) which allowed efficient deployment testing of aviation and missile IR sensor systems. More recently, AMRDEC has tested many uncooled infrared (UCIR) sensor systems that have size, weight, power, and cost (SWAPC) benefits for certain fielded U.S. Army imaging systems. To compensate for relatively poor detector sensitivities, most UCIR systems operate with very fast focal ratio or F-number (f/#) optics. AMRDEC has recently found that measuring the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) with traditional techniques used with cooled infrared systems produce biased results when applied to systems with faster f/# values or obscurations. Additionally, in order to compare these camera cores or sensor systems to one another, it is imperative to scale the NETD values for f/#, focus distance, and waveband differences accurately. This paper will outline proper measurement techniques to report UCIR camera core and system-level NETD, as well as demonstrate methods to scale the metric for these differences.

  12. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sondericker, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    While designing cryogenic instrumentation for the Colliding Beam Accelerator (CBA) helium-distribution system it became clear that accurate measurement of mass flow of helium which varied in temperature from room to sub-cooled conditions would be difficult. Conventional venturi flow meters full scale differential pressure signal would decrease by more than an order of magnitude during cooldown causing unacceptable error at operating temperature. At sub-cooled temperatures, helium would be pumped around cooling loops by an efficient, low head pressure circulating compressor. Additional pressure drop meant more pump work was necessary to compress the fluid resulting in a higher outlet temperature. The ideal mass flowmeter for this application was one which did not add pressure drop to the system, functioned over the entire temperature range, has high resolution and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. Ultrasonic flow measurement techniques used successfully by the process industry, seemed to meet all the necessary requirements. An extensive search for a supplier of such a device found that none of the commercial stock flowmeters were adaptable to cryogenic service so the development of the instrument was undertaken by the CBA Cryogenic Control and Instrumentation Engineering Group at BNL.

  13. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  14. Weathering: methods and techniques to measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, P.; Zornoza-Indart, A.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Surface recession takes place when weathered material is removed from the rocks. In order to know how fast does weathering and erosion occur, a review of several methods, analyses and destructive and non-destructive techniques to measure weathering of rocks caused by physico-chemical changes that occur in bedrocks due to salt crystallization, freezing-thaw, thermal shock, influence of water, wind, temperature or any type of environmental agent leading to weathering processes and development of soils, in-situ in the field or through experimental works in the laboratory are addressed. From micro-scale to macro-scale, from the surface down to more in depth, several case studies on in-situ monitoring of quantification of decay on soils and rocks from natural landscapes (mountains, cliffs, caves, etc) or from urban environment (foundations or facades of buildings, retaining walls, etc) or laboratory experimental works, such as artificial accelerated ageing tests (a.a.e.e.) or durability tests -in which one or more than one weathering agents are selected to assess the material behaviour in time and in a cyclic way- performed on specimens of these materials are summarised. Discoloration, structural alteration, precipitation of weathering products (mass transfer), and surface recession (mass loss) are all products of weathering processes. Destructive (SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, drilling resistance measurement, flexural and compression strength) and Non-destructive (spectrophotocolorimetry, 3D optical surface roughness, Schmidt hammer rebound tester, ultrasound velocity propagation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR, X ray computed micro-tomography or CT-scan, geo-radar differential global positioning systems) techniques and characterization analyses (e.g. water absorption, permeability, open porosity or porosity accessible to water) to assess their morphological, physico-chemical, mechanical and hydric weathering; consolidation products or

  15. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  16. Donnan membrane technique (DMT) for anion measurement.

    PubMed

    Vega, Flora Alonso; Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2010-04-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl(-), 1-2 days for NO(3)(-), 1-4 days for SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and 1-14 days for H(2)PO(4)(-) in a background of 2-200 mM KCl or K(2)SO(4). The strongest effect of ionic strength on equilibrium time is found for H(2)PO(4)(-), followed by SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and then by Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). The negatively charged organic particles of fulvic and humic acids do not pass the membrane. Two approaches for the measurement of different anion species of the same element, such as SeO(4)(2-) and HSeO(3)(-), using DMT are proposed and tested. These two approaches are based on transport kinetics or response to ionic strength difference. A transport model that was developed previously for cation DMT is applied in this work to analyze the rate-limiting step in the anion DMT. In the absence of mobile/labile complexes, transport tends to be controlled by diffusion in solution at a low ionic strength, whereas at a higher ionic strength, diffusion in the membrane starts to control the transport.

  17. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  18. Wheatstone bridge technique for magnetostriction measurements.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M

    1980-03-01

    A basic Wheatstone bridge, with additional electronic instrumentation, has been used in the measurement of magnetostriction. This method allows a resolution of approximately 10% on measurements of magnetostrictions less than 0.75 parts per million.

  19. Measuring Cognitive Ability with the Overclaiming Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulhus, Delroy L.; Harms, P. D.

    2004-01-01

    The overclaiming technique requires respondents to rate their familiarity with a list of general knowledge items (persons, places, things). Because 20[percent] of the items are foils (i.e., do not exist), the response pattern can be analyzed with signal detection methods to yield the accuracy and bias scores for each respondent. In Study 1, the…

  20. A simple technique for individual picosecond laser pulse duration measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    We describe here a simple nonlinear optic technique for the measurement of the duration of individual picosecond pulses. The accuracy and relative simplicity of the technique increase with the number of pulses measured. An experimental test of the basis of the technique is described.

  1. A Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently developed wireless measurement acquisition system to fluid-level measurement. This type of fluid-level measurement system alleviates many shortcomings of fluid-level measurement methods currently being used, including limited applicability of any one fluid-level sensor design. Measurement acquisition shortcomings include the necessity for power to be supplied to each sensor and for the measurement to be extracted from each sensor via a physical connection to the sensor. Another shortcoming is existing measurement systems require that a data channel and signal conditioning electronics be dedicated to each sensor. Use of wires results in other shortcomings such as logistics needed to add or replace sensors, weight, potential for electrical arcing and wire degradations. The fluid level sensor design is a simple passive inductor-capacitor circuit that is not subject to mechanical failure that is possible when float and lever-arm systems are used. Methods are presented for using the sensor in caustic, acidic or cryogenic fluids. Oscillating magnetic fields are used to power the sensor. Once electrically excited, the sensor produces a magnetic field response. The response frequency corresponds to the amount to fluid within the capacitor s electric field. The sensor design can be modified for measuring the level of any fluid or fluent substance that can be stored in a non-conductive reservoir. The interrogation method for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency is also presented.

  2. A Simple Technique for High Resistance Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguia; Landin, Ramon Ochoa

    2012-01-01

    A simple electronic system for the measurement of high values of resistance is shown. This system allows the measurement of resistance in the range of a few megohm up to 10[superscript 9] [omega]. We have used this system for the evaluation of CdS thin film resistance, but other practical uses in the basic physics laboratory are presented.…

  3. Time-domain flicker measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miseli, Joseph

    1999-04-01

    The visibility of flicker on a display depends upon many factors, including the observer's sensitivity to flicker. Whenever flicker is observed, it is probably undesirable and often unacceptable. Much has been written about flicker, its perception, and its variability. Methods have been presented to the industry that use frequency domain analysis of measured flicker response. Here we prose an alternate method to quantify flicker in the time domain, just as people see it, and we will try to understand how the measurements relate to what people see. Both the frequency domain and time domain flicker measurements can be found in the Video Electronics Standards Association Flat Panel Display Measurements Standard. An attempt is made to compare the two methods and show how the simpler measurement can be employed for many display technologies.

  4. Development of techniques for measuring pilot workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyker, D. A.; Stackhouse, S. P.; Khalafalla, A. S.; Mclane, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    An objective method of assessing information workload based on physiological measurements was developed. Information workload, or reserve capacity, was measured using a visual discrimination secondary task and subjective rating of task difficulty. The primary task was two axis (pitch and roll) tracking, and the independent variables in this study were aircraft pitch dynamics and wind gust disturbances. The study was structured to provide: (1) a sensitive, nonloading measure of reserve capacity, and (2) an unencumbering reliable measurement of the psychophysiological state. From these, a measured workload index (MWI) and physiological workload index (PWI) were extracted. An important measure of the success of this study was the degree to which the MWI and PWI agreed across the 243 randomly-presented, four-minute trials (9 subjects X 9 tasks X 3 replications). The electrophysiological data collected included vectorcardiogaram, respiration, electromyogram, skin impedance, and electroencephalogram. Special computer programs were created for the analysis of each physiological variable. The digital data base then consisted of 82 physiological features for each of the 243 trials. A prediction of workload based on physiological observations was formulated as a simultaneous least-squares prediction problem. A best subset of 10 features was chosen to predict the three measures of reserve capacity. The cannonical correlation coefficient was .754 with a chi squared value of 91.3 which allows rejection of the null hypothesis with p of .995.

  5. Technique for measuring gas conversion factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining hydrocarbon conversion factors for a flowmeter. A mixture of air, O2 and C sub x H sub y is burned and the partial paressure of O2 in the resulting gas is forced to equal the partial pressure of O2 in air. The flowrate of O2 flowing into the mixture is measured by flowmeter and the flowrate of C sub x H sub y flowing into the mixture is measured by the flowmeter conversion factor is to be determined. These measured values are used to calculate the conversion factor.

  6. New technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    The backstreaming contamination in the Space Power Facility, Ohio, was measured using small size clean silicon wafers as contamination sensors placed at all measurement sites. Two ellipsometric models were developed to measure the oil film with the contamination film refractive index of DC 705: a continuous, homogeneous film and islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. The island model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude. The continuous film model overestimated the oil volume by about 50 percent.

  7. A Plutonium Storage Container Pressure Measurement Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Grim, T.J.

    2002-05-10

    Plutonium oxide and metal awaiting final disposition are currently stored at the Savannah River Site in crimp sealed food pack cans. Surveillances to ensure continued safe storage of the cans include periodic lid deflection measurements using a mechanical device.

  8. Centrifugal techniques for measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimmo, John R.; Mello, Karen A.

    1991-01-01

    Centrifugal force is an alternative to large pressure gradients for the measurement of low values of saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ksat). With a head of water above a porous medium in a centrifuge bucket, both constant-head and falling-head measurements are practical at forces up to at least 1800 times normal gravity. Darcy's law applied to the known centrifugal potential leads to simple formulas for Ksat that are analogous to those used in the standard gravity-driven constant- and falling-head methods. Both centrifugal methods were tested on several fine-textured samples of soil and ceramic with Ksat between about 10−10 and 10−9 m/s. The results were compared to falling-head gravity measurements. The comparison shows most measurements agreeing to within 20% for a given sample, much of the variation probably resulting from run-to-run changes in sample structure. The falling-head centrifuge method proved to be especially simple in design and operation and was more accurate than the constant-head method. With modified apparatus, Ksat measurements less than 10−10 m/s should be attainable.

  9. Food groups associated with a composite measure of probability of adequate intake of 11 micronutrients in the diets of women in urban Mali.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Gina; Fanou-Fogny, Nadia; Seghieri, Chiara; Arimond, Mary; Koreissi, Yara; Dossa, Romain; Kok, Frans J; Brouwer, Inge D

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of micronutrient deficiency is high among women of reproductive age living in urban Mali. Despite this, there are little data on the dietary intake of micronutrients among women of reproductive age in Mali. This research tested the relationship between the quantity of intake of 21 possible food groups and estimated usual micronutrient (folate, vitamin B-12, calcium, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A, iron, thiamin, vitamin B-6, vitamin C, and zinc) intakes and a composite measure of adequacy of 11 micronutrients [mean probability of adequacy (MPA)] based on the individual probability of adequacy (PA) for the 11 micronutrients. Food group and micronutrient intakes were calculated from 24-h recall data in an urban sample of Malian women. PA was lowest for folate, vitamin B-12, calcium, and riboflavin. The overall MPA for the composite measure of 11 micronutrients was 0.47 ± 0.18. Grams of intake from the nuts/seeds, milk/yogurt, vitamin A-rich dark green leafy vegetables (DGLV), and vitamin C-rich vegetables food groups were correlated (Spearman's rho = 0.20-0.36; P < 0.05) with MPA. Women in the highest consumption groups of nuts/seeds and DGLV had 5- and 6-fold greater odds of an MPA > 0.5, respectively. These findings can be used to further the development of indicators of dietary diversity and to improve micronutrient intakes of women of reproductive age.

  10. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  11. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  12. Large antenna measurement and compensation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahmatsamii, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Antennas in the range of 20 meters or larger will be an integral part of future satellite communication and scientific payloads. In order to commercially use these large, low sidelobe and multiple-beam antennas, a high level of confidence must be established as to their performance in the 0-g and space environment. It is also desirable to compensate for slowly varying surface distortions which could results from thermal effects. An overview of recent advances in performing rf measurements on large antennas is presented with emphasis given to the application of a space-based far-field range utilizing the Space Shuttle. The concept of surface distortion compensation is discussed by providing numerical and measurement results.

  13. Thyroglobulin measurement. Techniques, clinical benefits, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Spencer, C A; Wang, C C

    1995-12-01

    The validity and reliability of serum Tg measurements is central to accurate diagnosis and cost-effective management of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Serum Tg is one of the most difficult biochemical tests for a laboratory to maintain at a high level of precision and reliability across the long clinical sampling interval typically employed when monitoring this condition. Physicians should be aware that the diagnostic value of serum Tg measurement is method-dependent, and that intermethod differences still approach 30% even after methods have been standardized on the new CBR reference preparation. This dictates that, ideally, serial serum Tg measurements in a patient should always be made in the same laboratory by the same method. Physicians need to consider a number of factors before selecting a laboratory to perform Tg measurements in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. These factors include assay sensitivity, as judged by the discrimination between lower limit of the euthyroid range and the functional sensitivity limit, as well as assay specificity, especially with respect to serum TgAb interference. laboratories should use a sensitive TgAb immunoassay (not hemagglutination) to prescreen sera for TgAb and report the TgAb level if positive. Furthermore, it is the laboratory's responsibility to advise physicians fully about any change in Tg method as well as the direction of TgAb interference expected with that method. When TgAb is present, the serum Tg level should be a measure of the total (free and TgAb-bound) serum Tg level. Typically, IMA methods underestimate the serum total Tg level, especially when serum TSH is suppressed, whereas RIA methods tend to overestimate the serum total Tg level. The interpretation of a serum Tg level in a TgAb-positive patient should be made with caution and with consideration to any changes in TgAb levels. Serial TgAb monitoring of TgAb-positive patients may provide a physician with additional

  14. Validation of Three Early Ejaculation Diagnostic Tools: A Composite Measure Is Accurate and More Adequate for Diagnosis by Updated Diagnostic Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Jern, Patrick; Piha, Juhana; Santtila, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To validate three early ejaculation diagnostic tools, and propose a new tool for diagnosis in line with proposed changes to diagnostic criteria. Significant changes to diagnostic criteria are expected in the near future. Available screening tools do not necessarily reflect proposed changes. Materials and Methods Data from 148 diagnosed early ejaculation patients (Mage = 42.8) and 892 controls (Mage = 33.1 years) from a population-based sample were used. Participants responded to three different questionnaires (Premature Ejaculation Profile; Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool; Multiple Indicators of Premature Ejaculation). Stopwatch measured ejaculation latency times were collected from a subsample of early ejaculation patients. We used two types of responses to the questionnaires depending on the treatment status of the patients 1) responses regarding the situation before starting pharmacological treatment and 2) responses regarding current situation. Logistic regressions and Receiver Operating Characteristics were used to assess ability of both the instruments and individual items to differentiate between patients and controls. Results All instruments had very good precision (Areas under the Curve ranging from .93-.98). A new five-item instrument (named CHecklist for Early Ejaculation Symptoms – CHEES) consisting of high-performance variables selected from the three instruments had validity (Nagelkerke R2 range .51-.79 for backwards/forwards logistic regression) equal to or slightly better than any individual instrument (i.e., had slightly higher validity statistics, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance). Importantly, however, this instrument was more in line with proposed changes to diagnostic criteria. Conclusions All three screening tools had good validity. A new 5-item diagnostic tool (CHEES) based on the three instruments had equal or somewhat more favorable validity statistics compared to the other three tools, but is

  15. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  16. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle.

  17. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy`s treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation.

  18. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R.; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  19. Sixport technique for phase measurement of guided optical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Fernandez, I.; Ortega-Moñux, A.; Halir, R.; Wangüemert-Pérez, J. G.; Perez-Lara, P.

    2010-04-01

    This paper introduces the sixport technique for precise amplitude and phase measurement of guided optical fields. The main theoretical advances in this topic are reviewed and recent experimental measurements of a Silicon on Insulator sixport PLC reflectometer are presented.

  20. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  1. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  2. Acoustic measuring techniques for suspended sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, P.; Felix, D.; Storti, G.; Lattuada, M.; Fleckenstein, P.; Deschwanden, F.

    2016-11-01

    Acoustic signals can be used in various ways for suspended sediment monitoring. One possibility which lends itself particularly well in the context of hydropower plants (HPPs), is to use installations for acoustic discharge measurement (ADM). Such installations already exist at waterways of many HPPs. Similar to certain turbidimeters, the attenuation of the forward scattered signal travelling through the water-sediment mixture is correlated with suspended sediment concentration (SSC). This correlation can be based on reference SSCs, e.g. from gravimetric analyses of bottle samples. Without the need of additional sensors and practically maintenance-free, this method is used successfully in the HPP Fieschertal to warn the HPP operator of high SSC to prevent excessive turbine abrasion. Acoustic methods and systems that allow for estimating both SSC and particle size distribution (PSD) are under development. The simultaneous determination of SSC and PSD is not possible using a single frequency. Therefore, multi-frequency approaches are investigated for generally scattered signals. When backscattered signals are used, a stronger frequency dependency can be exploited. However, the reliable simultaneous determination of particle size (and distribution) and concentration is still a major challenge due to a low signal-to-noise ratio and an ill- posed problem of estimating concentration and size from recorded signals. The optimal setup configuration (angles, frequencies) for such a system is not unique and further investigations are recommended.

  3. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study.

  4. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation: current measurement techniques and prospects for noninvasive optical methods.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Sergio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T; Kornbluth, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral autoregulation (CA) are critically important to maintain proper brain perfusion and supply the brain with the necessary oxygen and energy substrates. Adequate brain perfusion is required to support normal brain function, to achieve successful aging, and to navigate acute and chronic medical conditions. We review the general principles of CBF measurements and the current techniques to measure CBF based on direct intravascular measurements, nuclear medicine, X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound techniques, thermal diffusion, and optical methods. We also review techniques for arterial blood pressure measurements as well as theoretical and experimental methods for the assessment of CA, including recent approaches based on optical techniques. The assessment of cerebral perfusion in the clinical practice is also presented. The comprehensive description of principles, methods, and clinical requirements of CBF and CA measurements highlights the potentially important role that noninvasive optical methods can play in the assessment of neurovascular health. In fact, optical techniques have the ability to provide a noninvasive, quantitative, and continuous monitor of CBF and autoregulation.

  5. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management.

  6. Testing and Measurement Techniques in Heat Transfer and Combustion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    TURBULENT FLAMES USING THE L2F TECHNIQUE by H.Eickboff and R.Schodl II VELOCITY MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES IN LIQUID SPRAYS USING LASER DOPPLER VELOCIMETRY by...developed a pyrometer capable of measuring the mean and variance of the fluctuation temperatures in a hot gas stream. Laser -Optical-Velocimetry The...combustion system a temperature P.D.P. has to be built up from a number of measurements . The turbulent environments also dictate the use of broadband laser

  7. Wind measurements: Trimethyl aluminum (TMA) chemical release technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, M. F.

    2013-11-01

    Chemical release techniques have been used since the earliest days of sounding rocket measurements in the upper atmosphere. The measurements require no telemetry or other complicated electronics and the mechanical systems are relatively simple and very robust. The technique was therefore used early on when more complicated measurement techniques were difficult to implement. Chemical release techniques have remained important, however, even as rocket payloads have become more complex. In particular, the tracer measurements remain important as one of the primary techniques for obtaining neutral wind measurements in the upper mesosphere and thermosphere. Various metal vapor tracers have been used for wind measurements in the upper atmosphere, but the most widely used tracer has become trimethyl aluminum (TMA), which has been used in hundreds of rocket launches since the 1960's. The advantages of TMA include the chemiluminescence produced by the tracer, which makes wind measurements possible at any time during the night, and the fact that the tracer is a liquid, which makes it possible to control both the timing and duration of the release more accurately. An overview of the TMA wind measurement technique is presented, including the design of TMA release hardware and recent results from TMA measurements.

  8. Measurement Techniques for Data Recording and High Temperature Measurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    location. These fiber optic cables convey the infrared data produced by the fireball or other thermal event to a separate array of physically...for Data Recording and High Temperature Measurement 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT ... infrared data produced by the fireball or other thermal event to a separate array of physically protected NIR photo detectors whose data signals are

  9. Tone-burst technique measures high-intensity sound absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. G.; Van Houten, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Tone-burst technique, in which narrow-bandwidth, short-duration sonic pulse is propagated down a standing-wave tube, measures sound absorbing capacity of materials used in jet engine noise abatement. Technique eliminates effects of tube losses and yields normal-incidence absorption coefficient of specimen.

  10. Measuring Speed Using a Computer--Several Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jon M.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces three different techniques to facilitate the measurement of speed and the associated kinematics and dynamics using a computer. Discusses sensing techniques using optical or ultrasonic sensors, interfacing with a computer, software routines for the interfaces, and other applications. Provides circuit diagrams, pictures, and a program to…

  11. Calibration technique for the neutron surface moisture measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, W.T.; Shreve, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    A technique for calibrating the response of a surface neutron moisture measurement probe to material moisture concentration has been devised. Tests to ensure that the probe will function in the expected in-tank operating environment are also outlined.

  12. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  13. Turbine engine hot-part temperature measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, A.G.; Prufert, M.B. )

    1992-07-01

    The paper identifies altitude test facility techniques for nonintrusive acquisition of hot-part temperatures using IR radiance measurements. The techniques discussed are applicable for turbojet and low-bypass turbofan engines. Constraints limiting IR measurements in the altitude ground test facility are discussed. Methods for evaluating altitude ground test data are outlined including review of predictive capabilities which enable the determination of the influence of turbine engine hot-part temperatures on IR emissions. 7 refs.

  14. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-25

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  15. Novel phase measurement technique of the heterodyne laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunseung; Park, Kyihwan; La, Jongpil

    2005-09-15

    This article describes a novel phase measurement technique to increase the measurement velocity compared to the previous arc-tangent method in the heterodyne laser interferometer. The proposed method can reduce the calculation load because the pulse width modulation signal has a linear relation between the phase difference, while the nonlinear function such as arc tangent is required to demodulate the sinusoidal interferent signal. The brief analysis and measurement scheme of the system, and the experimental result using a Zeeman-stabilized He-Ne laser are presented. They demonstrate that the proposed phase measurement technique is proven to be three times faster and more robust than previous arc-tangent method.

  16. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  17. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  18. Transmittance ratio constrained retrieval technique for lidar cirrus measurements.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M Patrick; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Robert B; Leavor, Kevin R; Lei, Liqiao

    2012-05-01

    This letter describes a lidar retrieval technique that uses the transmittance ratio as a constraint to determine an average lidar ratio as well as extinction and backscatter coefficients of transparent cirrus clouds. The cloud transmittance ratio is directly obtained from two adjacent elastic lidar backscatter signals. The technique can be applied to cirrus measurements where neither the molecular scattering dominant signals above and below the cloud layer are found nor cloudfree reference profiles are available. The technique has been tested with simulated lidar signals and applied to backscatter lidar measurements at Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia.

  19. Error reduction techniques for measuring long synchrotron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.

    1998-07-01

    Many instruments and techniques are used for measuring long mirror surfaces. A Fizeau interferometer may be used to measure mirrors much longer than the interferometer aperture size by using grazing incidence at the mirror surface and analyzing the light reflected from a flat end mirror. Advantages of this technique are data acquisition speed and use of a common instrument. Disadvantages are reduced sampling interval, uncertainty of tangential position, and sagittal/tangential aspect ratio other than unity. Also, deep aspheric surfaces cannot be measured on a Fizeau interferometer without a specially made fringe nulling holographic plate. Other scanning instruments have been developed for measuring height, slope, or curvature profiles of the surface, but lack accuracy for very long scans required for X-ray synchrotron mirrors. The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) was developed specifically for long x-ray mirror measurement, and still outperforms other instruments, especially for aspheres. Thus, this paper focuses on error reduction techniques for the LTP.

  20. New radiosonde techniques to measure radiation profiles through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Romanens, Gonzague; Levrat, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    Solar and thermal radiation fluxes are usually measured at Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere. Here we show radiosonde techniques that allow measuring radiation flux profiles and the radiation budget from the Earth's surface to above 30 km in the stratosphere. During two-hour flights solar shortwave and thermal longwave irradiance, downward and upward, is measured with four individual sensors at one-second resolution, along with standard PTU radiosonde profiles. Daytime and nighttime shortwave and longwave radiation measurements, and 24 hours surface measurements, allow determining radiation budget- and total net radiation profiles through the atmosphere. We use a double balloon technique to prevent pendulum motion during the ascent and to keep the sonde as horizontal as possible. New techniques using auto controlled airplanes are now investigated to retrieve the sonde after release at a certain altitude and to land it if possible at the launch station.

  1. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  2. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  3. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  4. Optical skin friction measurement technique in hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Yao, Dapeng; Wen, Shuai; Pan, Junjie

    2016-10-01

    Shear-sensitive liquid-crystal coatings (SSLCCs) have an optical characteristic that they are sensitive to the applied shear stress. Based on this, a novel technique is developed to measure the applied shear stress of the model surface regarding both its magnitude and direction in hypersonic flow. The system of optical skin friction measurement are built in China Academy of Aerospace Aerodynamics (CAAA). A series of experiments of hypersonic vehicle is performed in wind tunnel of CAAA. Global skin friction distribution of the model which shows complicated flow structures is discussed, and a brief mechanism analysis and an evaluation on optical measurement technique have been made.

  5. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Mlynar, J.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  6. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique.

    PubMed

    Bonheure, G; Mlynar, J; Van Wassenhove, G; Hult, M; González de Orduña, R; Lutter, G; Vermaercke, P; Huber, A; Schweer, B; Esser, G; Biel, W

    2012-10-01

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R&D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -~6 times more--compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  7. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  8. [The ways of harmonization of clinical laboratory measurement techniques].

    PubMed

    Miller, W G; Myers, G L; Gantzer, M L; Kahn, S E; Schönbrunner, E R; Thienpont, L M; Bunk, D M; Christenson, R H; Eckfeldt, J H; Stanley, G L; Nubling, C M; Sturgeon, C M

    2013-02-01

    The results of implementation of different clinical laboratory techniques are to be equal in clinically significant limits to be optimally applied in diagnostics of diseases and treatment of patients. When the results of laboratory tests are not standardized and harmonized for the very same clinical assay the results can be expressed by unmatched numbers. Unfortunately, in some handbooks the values are presented based on the results of application of specific laboratory techniques without considering possibility or likelihood of differences between various techniques. When this is a case, accumulation of data of diferent clinical research studies and working out of clinical handbooks on this basis will be inconsistent. Inadequate understanding of issue that the results of laboratory tests are not standardized and harmonized can lead to incorrect clinical, financial, managerial or technical decisions. The standardization of clinical laboratory techniques was applied to many measurands related to primary referent techniques (standard specimen of pure substance) or/and developed referent measurement techniques. However, harmonization of clinical laboratory techniques for those measurands which are not related any developed measurement techniques is quite problematic due to inadequate determination of measurand, its inadequate analytical specificity, insufficient attention to commutability of referent materials and poor systematic approach to harmonization. To overcome these issues an infrastructure is to be developed to support systematic approach to identification and prioritization of measurands which are to be harmonized on the basis of clinical importance and technical applicability. The management of technical implementation harmonization process for specific measurands.

  9. Model Deformation Measurement Technique NASA Langley HSR Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.; Goad, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    Model deformation measurement techniques have been investigated and developed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The current technique is based upon a single video camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. Variations of this technique have been used to measure wing twist and bending at a few selected spanwise locations near the wing tip on HSR models at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Automated measurements have been made at both the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and at Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel during the past year. Automated measurements were made for the first time at the NTF during the recently completed HSR Reference H Test 78 in early 1996. A major problem in automation for the NTF has been the need for high contrast targets which do not exceed the stringent surface finish requirements. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Wing twist examples from the HSR Reference H model are presented to illustrate the run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode at the NTF. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode at the NTF are also presented.

  10. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  11. Synopsis of timing measurement techniques used in telecommunications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zampetti, G. P.

    1992-06-01

    Historically, Maximum Time Interval Error (MTIE) and Maximum Relative Time Interval Error (MRTIE) have been the main measurement techniques used to characterize timing performance in telecommunications networks. Recently, a new measurement technique, Time Variance (TVAR) has gained acceptance in the North American (ANSI) standards body. TVAR was developed in concurrence to address certain inadequacies in the MTIE approach. The advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches are outlined. Real measurement examples are presented to illustrate the critical issues in actual telecommunication applications. An MTIE measurement is proposed (ZTIE) that complements TVAR. The basic concept behind ZTIE is that a peak power measure is needed to complement TVAR. Together, TVAR and ZTIE provide a very good characterization of network timing.

  12. Mississippi River streamflow measurement techniques at St. Louis, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wastson, Chester C.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Biedenham, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Streamflow measurement techniques of the Mississippi River at St. Louis have changed through time (1866–present). In addition to different methods used for discrete streamflow measurements, the density and range of discrete measurements used to define the rating curve (stage versus streamflow) have also changed. Several authors have utilized published water surface elevation (stage) and streamflow data to assess changes in the rating curve, which may be attributed to be caused by flood control and/or navigation structures. The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the available flow measurement data and techniques and to assess how a strict awareness of the limitations of the data may affect previous analyses. It is concluded that the pre-1930s discrete streamflow measurement data are not of sufficient accuracy to be compared with modern streamflow values in establishing long-term trends of river behavior.

  13. A radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  14. Preliminary Studies of a Phase Modulation Technique for Measuring Chromaticity

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Cheng-Yang; /Fermilab

    2006-04-01

    The classical method for measuring chromaticity is to slowly modulate the RF frequency and then measuring the betatron tune excursion. The technique that is discussed in this paper modulates instead the phase of the RF and then the chromaticity is obtained by phase demodulating the betatron tune. However, this technique requires knowledge of the betatron frequency in real time in order for the phase to be demodulated. Fortunately, the Tevatron has a tune tracker based on the phase locked loop principle which fits this requirement. A preliminary study with this technique has showed that it is a promising method for doing continuous chromaticity measurement and raises the possibility of doing successful chromaticity feedback with it.

  15. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%). PMID:26262619

  16. Chromaticity measurement using a continuous head-tail kicking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Ranjbar, V.H.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2007-06-01

    In the classical head-tail chromaticity measurement technique, a single large kick is applied transversely to the beam. The resulting phase difference between the head and the tail is measured and the chromaticity extracted. In the continuous head-tail kicking technique, a very small transverse kick is applied to the beam and the asymptotic phase difference between the head and the tail is found to be a function of chromaticity. The advantage of this method is that since the tune tracker PLL already supplies the small transverse kicks, no extra modulation is required.

  17. A preliminary study of air-pollution measurement by active remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.; Proctor, E. K.; Gasiorek, L. S.; Liston, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollutants are identified, and the needs for their measurement from satellites and aircraft are discussed. An assessment is made of the properties of these pollutants and of the normal atmosphere, including interactions with light of various wavelengths and the resulting effects on transmission and scattering of optical signals. The possible methods for active remote measurement are described; the relative performance capabilities of double-ended and single-ended systems are compared qualitatively; and the capabilities of the several single-ended or backscattering techniques are compared quantitatively. The differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is shown to be superior to the other backscattering techniques. The lidar system parameters and their relationships to the environmental factors and the properties of pollutants are examined in detail. A computer program that models both the atmosphere (including pollutants) and the lidar system is described. The performance capabilities of present and future lidar components are assessed, and projections are made of prospective measurement capabilities for future lidar systems. Following a discussion of some important operational factors that affect both the design and measurement capabilities of airborne and satellite-based lidar systems, the extensive analytical results obtained through more than 1000 individual cases analyzed with the aid of the computer program are summarized and discussed. The conclusions are presented. Recommendations are also made for additional studies to investigate cases that could not be explored adequately during this study.

  18. Percutaneous permeation measurement of topical phthalocyanine by photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Emanoel P. O.; Barja, Paulo R.; Cardoso, Luiz E.; Beltrame, Milton

    2012-11-01

    This investigation have studied photoacoustic (PA) technique to percutaneous permeation of topical hydroxy-(29H,31H-phthalocyaninate) aluminum (PcAlOH) on pig ear skin. The PcAlOH was incorporated in an emulsion (O/W) (1 mg/dl) with assessed stability parameters of: pH, short and long term stability tests (in the several conditions). The skin was prepared through a heat separation technique, and with a scalpel, the outer skin of the cartilage was removed. The skins were then cut into 4 cm2 pieces and treated with sodium bromide 2 mol/L for 6 h at 37 °C. The epidermis layer was washed with purified water, dried, and stored under reduced pressure until use. The skin permeation kinetics was determined by photoacoustic technique in an open photoacoustic cell. Short (after preparation) and long-term stability tests showed no phase separation. The emulsion developed pH 7.6 and after incorporating the pH was unchanged. The typical times for percutaneous permeation of the emulsion base and emulsion + PcAlOH were 182 (±6) and 438 (±3) s, respectively. This study indicated that the formulations containing PcAlOH have stabile characteristics and show promising results in absorption into the skin. The presence of the photosensitive agent in the formulation contributed significantly to the greater absorption time than observed in the base formulation. The used photoacoustic technical to examine the penetration kinetics of PcAlOH in pig ear skin was adequate and may be employed in the determination of the percutaneous permeation of phthalocyanines.

  19. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  20. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Richard Q.

    1987-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described.

  1. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  2. A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.

    1973-01-01

    A technique for measuring hypersonic flow velocity profiles is described. This technique utilizes an arc-discharge-electron-beam system to produce a luminous disturbance in the flow. The time of flight of this disturbance was measured. Experimental tests were conducted in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. The measured velocities were of the order of 6000 m/sec over a free-stream density range from 0.000196 to 0.00186 kg/cu m. The fractional error in the velocity measurements was less than 5 percent. Long arc discharge columns (0.356 m) were generated under hypersonic flow conditions in the expansion-tube modified to operate as an expansion tunnel.

  3. Total body water measurements using resonant cavity perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Darren A.; Robinson, Martin P.

    2004-05-01

    A recent paper proposed a novel technique for determining the total body water (TBW) of patients suffering with abnormal hydration levels, using a resonant cavity perturbation method. Current techniques to measure TBW are limited by resolution and technical constraints. However, this new method involves measuring the dielectric properties of the body, by placing a subject in a large cavity resonator and measuring the subsequent change in its resonant frequency, fres and its Q-factor. Utilizing the relationship that water content correlates to these dielectric properties, it has been shown that the measured response of these parameters enables determination of TBW. Results are presented for a preliminary study using data estimated from anthropometric measurements, where volunteers were asked to lie and stand in an electromagnetic screened room, before and after drinking between 1 and 2 l of water, and in some cases, after voiding the bladder. Notable changes in the parameters were observed; fres showed a negative shift and Q was reduced. Preliminary calibration curves using estimated values of water content have been developed from these results, showing that for each subject the measured resonant frequency is a linear function of TBW. Because the gradients of these calibration curves correlate to the mass-to-height-ratio of the volunteers, it has proved that a system in which TBW can be unequivocally obtained is possible. Measured values of TBW have been determined using this new pilot-technique, and the values obtained correlate well with theoretical values of body water (r = 0.87) and resolution is very good (750 ml). The results obtained are measurable, repeatable and statistically significant. This leads to confidence in the integrity of the proposed technique.

  4. Mean velocities measured with the double pulse technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, E.

    2004-10-01

    It was recently observed that double-pulse measurements of the mean velocities of a wide asymmetric spectrum are a function of the time lag between the pulses (Uspensky et al., 2004). Here we demonstrate that the observed relationship probably is influenced by the measurement technique in a way that is consistent with theoretical prediction. It is further shown that for small time lags the double pulse velocity is a good approximation to the mean Doppler velo-city.

  5. Noncontact sheet resistance measurement technique for wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof; Rommel, J. Martin; Litovsky, Roman; Becla, Peter; Lojek, Bohumil; Bryson, Frank; Blake, Julian

    1995-12-01

    A new technique, MICROTHERM, has been developed for noncontact sheet resistance measurements of semiconductor wafers. It is based on the application of microwave energy to the wafer, and simultaneous detection of the infrared radiation resulting from ohmic heating. The pattern of the emitted radiation corresponds to the sheet resistance distribution across the wafer. This method is nondestructive, noncontact, and allows for measurements of very small areas (several square microns) of the wafer.

  6. TEER measurement techniques for in vitro barrier model systems

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Kolli, Aditya Reddy; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L.; Hickman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Transepithelial/transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely accepted quantitative technique to measure the integrity of tight junction dynamics in cell culture models of endothelial and epithelial monolayers. TEER values are strong indicators of the integrity of the cellular barriers before they are evaluated for transport of drugs or chemicals. TEER measurements can be performed in real-time without cell damage and generally are based on measuring ohmic resistance or measuring impedance across a wide spectrum of frequencies. TEER measurements for various cell types have been reported with commercially available measurement systems and also with custom built microfluidic implementations. Some of the barrier models that have been widely characterized utilizing TEER include the blood-brain barrier (BBB), gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and pulmonary models. Variations in TEER value can arise due to factors such as temperature, medium formulation and passage number of cells. The aim of this paper is to review the different TEER measurement techniques and analyze their strengths and weaknesses, the significance of TEER in drug toxicity studies, examine the various in vitro models and microfluidic organs-on-chips implementations utilizing TEER measurements in some widely studied barrier models (BBB, GI tract and pulmonary), and discuss the various factors that can affect TEER measurements. PMID:25586998

  7. Updates on measurements and modeling techniques for expendable countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gignilliat, Robert; Tepfer, Kathleen; Wilson, Rebekah F.; Taczak, Thomas M.

    2016-10-01

    The potential threat of recently-advertised anti-ship missiles has instigated research at the United States (US) Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) into the improvement of measurement techniques for visual band countermeasures. The goal of measurements is the collection of radiometric imagery for use in the building and validation of digital models of expendable countermeasures. This paper will present an overview of measurement requirements unique to the visual band and differences between visual band and infrared (IR) band measurements. A review of the metrics used to characterize signatures in the visible band will be presented and contrasted to those commonly used in IR band measurements. For example, the visual band measurements require higher fidelity characterization of the background, including improved high-transmittance measurements and better characterization of solar conditions to correlate results more closely with changes in the environment. The range of relevant engagement angles has also been expanded to include higher altitude measurements of targets and countermeasures. In addition to the discussion of measurement techniques, a top-level qualitative summary of modeling approaches will be presented. No quantitative results or data will be presented.

  8. A technique for measuring absolute toe pressures: evaluation of pressure-sensitive film techniques.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, A S; Werner, F W; Fortino, M D; Spadaro, J A

    1992-05-01

    Although a number of pathologies of the forefoot in ballet dancers on pointe have been described, pressures and deforming forces have not been adequately measured. To evaluate the possible use of pressure-sensitive film (PSF) in measuring the pressures on the external soft tissues in such a confined space as the dancer's toe shoe, it was tested and calibrated with 20 cadaver toes. Each cadaver toe was internally stabilized and loaded longitudinally against PSF on a flat surface. The resultant films were analyzed with a video imaging system and the pressures and total forces were determined. Results showed that the linearity of the PSF to pressure had a regression value of 0.98. By using two sensitivity ranges of films, the total force measured by the PSF was found to be within 10% of the known applied force on each toe. The PSF, therefore, may very well be a useful and accurate method of measuring external soft tissue pressures on the forefoot.

  9. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-01

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new "sliding cell technique" to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  10. A stirred bath technique for diffusivity measurements in cell matrices.

    PubMed

    Chresand, T J; Dale, B E; Hanson, S L; Gillies, R J

    1988-10-05

    A stirred bath technique was developed for determining effective diffusivities in cell matrices. The technique involves cell immobilization in a dilute gel which has negligible effect on solute diffusion. Agar and collagen were tested as immobilizing gels. Agar gel was shown to have minor interactions with the diffusion of various biological molecules, and was used for immobilization of Ehrlich Ascites Tumor (EAT) cells. Diffusivities of glucose and lactic acid were measured in EAT matrices for cell loadings between 20 and 45 vol %. Treatment with glutaraldehyde was effective in quenching the metabolic activity of the cells while preserving their physical properties and diffusive resistance. The measured data agree favorably with predictions based on Maxwell's equation for effective diffusion in a periodic composite material. The stirred bath technique is useful for diffusivity determinations in immobilized matrices or free slurries, and is applicable to both microbial and mammalian cell systems.

  11. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  12. Review of Techniques for Measuring Soil Moisture In situ.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    tested and sensor (1965) showed that modern improvements in the calibration, technique, such as using of Peltier devices for 3. Size of the sensitive...rays in measuring water con- Marais, P C and W B. De V Smit (1%2) Effet t of bulk density tent and permeability in unsaturated columns of :iI and of

  13. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  14. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors.A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L.The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg.In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L.

  15. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors. A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L. The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg. In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L. PMID:27902589

  16. INSTRUMENTS MEASURING PERCEIVED RACISM/RACIAL DISCRIMINATION: REVIEW AND CRITIQUE OF FACTOR ANALYTIC TECHNIQUES

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Rahshida

    2015-01-01

    Several compendiums of instruments that measure perceived racism and/or discrimination are present in the literature. Other works have reviewed the psychometric properties of these instruments in terms of validity and reliability and have indicated if the instrument was factor analyzed. However, little attention has been given to the quality of the factor analysis performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exploratory factor analyses done on instruments measuring perceived racism/racial discrimination using guidelines from experts in psychometric theory. The techniques used for factor analysis were reviewed and critiqued and the adequacy of reporting was evaluated. Internet search engines and four electronic abstract databases were used to identify 16 relevant instruments that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Principal component analysis was the most frequent method of extraction (81%). Sample sizes were adequate for factor analysis in 81 percent of studies. The majority of studies reported appropriate criteria for the acceptance of un-rotated factors (81%) and justified the rotation method (75%). Exactly 94 percent of studies reported partially acceptable criteria for the acceptance of rotated factors. The majority of articles (69%) reported adequate coefficient alphas for the resultant subscales. In 81 percent of the studies, the conceptualized dimensions were supported by factor analysis. PMID:25626225

  17. Instruments measuring perceived racism/racial discrimination: review and critique of factor analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Rahshida

    2014-01-01

    Several compendiums of instruments that measure perceived racism and/or discrimination are present in the literature. Other works have reviewed the psychometric properties of these instruments in terms of validity and reliability and have indicated if the instrument was factor analyzed. However, little attention has been given to the quality of the factor analysis performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exploratory factor analyses done on instruments measuring perceived racism/racial discrimination using guidelines from experts in psychometric theory. The techniques used for factor analysis were reviewed and critiqued and the adequacy of reporting was evaluated. Internet search engines and four electronic abstract databases were used to identify 16 relevant instruments that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Principal component analysis was the most frequent method of extraction (81%). Sample sizes were adequate for factor analysis in 81 percent of studies. The majority of studies reported appropriate criteria for the acceptance of un-rotated factors (81%) and justified the rotation method (75%). Exactly 94 percent of studies reported partially acceptable criteria for the acceptance of rotated factors. The majority of articles (69%) reported adequate coefficient alphas for the resultant subscales. In 81 percent of the studies, the conceptualized dimensions were supported by factor analysis.

  18. Electromagnetic measurement and modeling techniques for microwave ablation probes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Joseph D

    2009-01-01

    Broadband scattering parameter measurement of a commercially available microwave ablation probe over the course of a 10 minute 45 Watt ablation cycle within ex-vivo bovine liver tissue is performed. Measurement results are compared to finite difference time domain simulation of the probe in non-ablated and fully ablated tissue geometries. Measurement and simulation results agree well from 0-3 GHz demonstrating the accuracy of a multi-compartmental ablation geometry modeling technique. The electromagnetic modeling technique presented in this paper introduces a useful design tool for optimizing microwave ablation probes without the need for multi-physics simulation packages. The relevance of tissue complex permittivity change with temperature to microwave ablation probe performance is discussed.

  19. Technique for measuring the dielectric constant of thin materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    A practical technique for measuring the dielectric constant of vegetation leaves and similarly thin materials is presented. A rectangular section of the leaf is placed in the tranverse plane in a rectangular waveguide and the magnitude and phase of the reflection coefficient are measured over the desired frequency band using a vector network analyzer. By treating the leaf as an infinitesimally thin resistive sheet, an explicit expression for its dielectric constant is obtained in terms of the reflection coefficient. Because of the thin-sheet approximation, however, this approach is valid only at frequencies below 1.5 GHz. To extend the technique to higher frequencies, higher order approximations are derived and their accuracies are compared to the exact dielectric-slab solution. For a material whose thickness is 0.5 mm or less, the proposed technique was found to provide accurate values of its dielectric constant up to frequencies of 12 GHz or higher. The technique was used to measure the 8 to 12 GHz dielectric spectrum for vegetation leaves, teflon and rock samples.

  20. Pulse train fluorescence technique for measuring triplet state dynamics.

    PubMed

    De Boni, Leonardo; Franzen, Paulo L; Gonçalves, Pablo J; Borissevitch, Iouri E; Misoguti, Lino; Mendonça, Cleber R; Zilio, Sergio C

    2011-05-23

    We report on a method to study the dynamics of triplet formation based on the fluorescence signal produced by a pulse train. Basically, the pulse train acts as sequential pump-probe pulses that precisely map the excited-state dynamics in the long time scale. This allows characterizing those processes that affect the population evolution of the first excited singlet state, whose decay gives rise to the fluorescence. The technique was proven to be valuable to measure parameters of triplet formation in organic molecules. Additionally, this single beam technique has the advantages of simplicity, low noise and background-free signal detection.

  1. Image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-bin; Wu, Zhi-qun; Zhu, Jian-ping; He, Jian-guo; Liu, Guang-min

    2013-10-01

    The paper proposes a method to measure vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn which is a very important component in the spindle for micro-electrical-chemical discharging machining. The method of image measuring amplitude on high frequency vibration is introduced. Non-contact measurement system based on vision technology is constructed. High precision location algorithm on image centroid, quadratic location algorithm, is presented to find the center of little light spot. Measurement experiments have been done to show the effect of image measurement technique on vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn. In the experiments, precise calibration of the vision system is implemented using a normal graticule to obtain the scale factor between image pixel and real distance. The vibration amplitude of ultrasonic horn is changed by modifying the voltage amplitude of pulse power supply. The image of feature on ultrasonic horn is captured and image processing is carried out. The vibration amplitudes are got at different voltages.

  2. Evaluation of flow capture techniques for measuring HVAC grilleairflows

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.

    2002-11-01

    This paper discusses the accuracy of commercially available flow hoods for residential applications. Results of laboratory and field tests indicate these hoods can be inadequate to measure airflows in residential systems, and there can be large measurement discrepancies between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of the hoods to grille airflow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. It is possible to obtain reasonable results using some flow hoods if the field tests are carefully done, the grilles are appropriate, and grille location does not restrict flow hood placement. We also evaluated several simple flow capture techniques for measuring grille airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics. These simple techniques can be as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, agencies such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow capture techniques.

  3. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Influence of phytase and xylanase, individually or in combination, on performance, apparent metabolisable energy, digestive tract measurements and gut morphology in broilers fed wheat-based diets containing adequate level of phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y B; Ravindran, V; Thomas, D G; Birtles, M J; Hendriks, W H

    2004-02-01

    1. The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of microbial phytase and xylanase, individually or in combination, on performance, apparent metabolisable energy, digesta viscosity, digestive tract measurements and gut morphology in broilers fed on wheat-soy diets containing adequate phosphorus (P). The wheat-soy basal diet was formulated to contain 4.5 g/kg non-phytate P and the experimental diets were formulated by supplementing the basal diet with xylanase (1000 xylanase units/kg diet), phytase (500 phytase units/kg diet) or a combination of phytase and xylanase. 2. Supplemental phytase improved the weight gains and feed efficiency by 17.5 and 2.9%, respectively. Corresponding improvements due to the addition of xylanase were 16.5 and 4.9%, respectively. The combination of phytase and xylanase caused no further improvements in broiler performance. 3. Individual additions of xylanase or phytase resulted in numerical improvements in apparent metabolisable energy (AME), but the differences were not significant. The combination of the two enzymes significantly increased AME. Addition of xylanase and the combination of the two enzymes reduced the viscosity of digesta in all sections of the intestine. Phytase supplementation reduced digesta viscosity in the duodenum and ileum, but not in the jejunum. 4. Enzyme supplementation lowered the relative weight and length of the small intestine. Additions of xylanase and phytase reduced the relative weight of the small intestine by 15.5 and 11.4%, respectively, while the corresponding reductions in the relative length of the small intestine were 16.5 and 14.1%, respectively. The combination of phytase and xylanase had no further effects on the relative weight and length of the small intestine compared with the xylanase group. 5. The addition of phytase increased villus height in the duodenum and decreased the number of goblet cells in the jejunum compared with those on the unsupplemented basal diet. Xylanase

  5. The design of rapid turbidity measurement system based on single photon detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Huanqin; Cao, Yangyang; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Liang; Cao, Huibin; Yu, Tongzhu; You, Hui

    2015-10-01

    A new rapid turbidity measurement system has been developed to measure the turbidity of drinking water. To determinate the turbidity quantitatively, the total intensity of scattering light has been measured and quantified as number of photons by adopting the single photon detection techniques (SPDT) which has the advantage of high sensitivity. On the basis of SPDT, the measurement system has been built and series of experiments have been carried out. Combining then the 90° Mie scattering theory with the principle of SPDT, a turbidity measurement model has been proposed to explain the experimental results. The experimental results show that a turbidity, which is as low as 0.1 NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Units), can be measured steadily within 100 ms. It also shows a good linearity and stability over the range of 0.1-400 NTU and the precision can be controlled within 5% full scale. In order to improve its precision and stability, some key parameters, including the sampling time and incident light intensity, have been discussed. It has been proved that, to guarantee an excellent system performance, a good compromise between the measurement speed and the low power consumption should be considered adequately depending on the practical applications.

  6. Objective techniques for psychological assessment, phase 2. [techniques for measuring human performance during space flight stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortz, E. C.; Saur, A. J.; Nowlis, D. P.; Kendall, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of an initial experiment in a research program designed to develop objective techniques for psychological assessment of individuals and groups participating in long-duration space flights. Specifically examined is the rationale for utilizing measures of attention as an objective assessment technique. Subjects participating in the experiment performed various tasks (eg, playing matrix games which appeared on a display screen along with auditory stimuli). The psychophysiological reactions of the subjects were measured and are given. Previous research of various performance and psychophysiological methods of measuring attention is also discussed. The experiment design (independent and dependent variables) and apparatus (computers and display devices) are described and shown. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  7. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  8. Optical center alignment technique based on inner profile measurement method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Toshitaka; Yoshizawa, Toru

    2014-05-01

    Center alignment is important technique to tune up the spindle of various precision machines in manufacturing industry. Conventionally such a tool as a dial indicator has been used to adjust and to position the axis by manual operations of a technical worker. However, it is not easy to precisely control its axis. In this paper, we developed the optical center alignment technique based on inner profile measurement using a ring beam device. In this case, the center position of the cylinder hole can be determined from circular profile detected by optical sectioning method using a ring beam device. In our trials, the resolution of the center position is proved less than 10 micrometers in extreme cases. This technique is available for practical applications in machine tool industry.

  9. Novel Techniques for Pulsed Field Gradient NMR Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brey, William Wallace

    Pulsed field gradient (PFG) techniques now find application in multiple quantum filtering and diffusion experiments as well as in magnetic resonance imaging and spatially selective spectroscopy. Conventionally, the gradient fields are produced by azimuthal and longitudinal currents on the surfaces of one or two cylinders. Using a series of planar units consisting of azimuthal and radial current elements spaced along the longitudinal axis, we have designed gradient coils having linear regions that extend axially nearly to the ends of the coil and to more than 80% of the inner radius. These designs locate the current return paths on a concentric cylinder, so the coils are called Concentric Return Path (CRP) coils. Coils having extended linear regions can be made smaller for a given sample size. Among the advantages that can accrue from using smaller coils are improved gradient strength and switching time, reduced eddy currents in the absence of shielding, and improved use of bore space. We used an approximation technique to predict the remaining eddy currents and a time-domain model of coil performance to simulate the electrical performance of the CRP coil and several reduced volume coils of more conventional design. One of the conventional coils was designed based on the time-domain performance model. A single-point acquisition technique was developed to measure the remaining eddy currents of the reduced volume coils. Adaptive sampling increases the dynamic range of the measurement. Measuring only the center of the stimulated echo removes chemical shift and B_0 inhomogeneity effects. The technique was also used to design an inverse filter to remove the eddy current effects in a larger coil set. We added pulsed field gradient and imaging capability to a 7 T commercial spectrometer to perform neuroscience and embryology research and used it in preliminary studies of binary liquid mixtures separating near a critical point. These techniques and coil designs will find

  10. Double threshold ultrasonic distance measurement technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weihua; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-04-01

    The double threshold method realized by hardware circuits and high performance timing chip TDC-GP21 was successfully adapted to solve the key problem of ultrasonic distance measurement, the accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of ultrasonic wave. Compared with other techniques of TOF measurement, the double threshold method presented in this work can suppress noise in the received signal, and achieve a time resolution of around 22 ps and real-time. This method is easy to realize and pertains the advantage of low cost. To compensate temperature and pressure deviations, a temperature measurement module of 10 mK in precision as well as a pressure measurement module of 0.01% in accuracy was developed. The system designed in this work can be exactly used as a two paths ultrasonic gas flowmeter without any adjustment of the hardware circuit. The double threshold method was further corroborated using experiment results of both the ultrasonic distance measurement and ultrasonic gas flow measurement. In distance measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the maximum relative error are 0.69 mm and 0.28%, respectively, for a target distance range of 100-600 mm. In flow measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the worst repeatability are 1.16% and 0.65% for a flow in the range of 50-700 m3/h.

  11. Double threshold ultrasonic distance measurement technique and its application.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihua; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-04-01

    The double threshold method realized by hardware circuits and high performance timing chip TDC-GP21 was successfully adapted to solve the key problem of ultrasonic distance measurement, the accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of ultrasonic wave. Compared with other techniques of TOF measurement, the double threshold method presented in this work can suppress noise in the received signal, and achieve a time resolution of around 22 ps and real-time. This method is easy to realize and pertains the advantage of low cost. To compensate temperature and pressure deviations, a temperature measurement module of 10 mK in precision as well as a pressure measurement module of 0.01% in accuracy was developed. The system designed in this work can be exactly used as a two paths ultrasonic gas flowmeter without any adjustment of the hardware circuit. The double threshold method was further corroborated using experiment results of both the ultrasonic distance measurement and ultrasonic gas flow measurement. In distance measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the maximum relative error are 0.69 mm and 0.28%, respectively, for a target distance range of 100-600 mm. In flow measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the worst repeatability are 1.16% and 0.65% for a flow in the range of 50-700 m(3)/h.

  12. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  13. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  14. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity and direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An anemometer utilizing a radionuclide counting technique for measuring both the velocity and the direction of wind is described. A pendulum consisting of a wire and a ball with a source of radiation on the lower surface of the ball is positioned by the wind. Detectors and are located in a plane perpendicular to pendulum (no wind). The detectors are located on the circumferene of a circle and are equidistant from each other as well as the undisturbed (no wind) source ball position.

  15. Measurement Techniques for Electrothermal-Chemical Gun Diagnostics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-01

    conductors of a circuit ( Askeland 1985). This technique has been successfully applied to other experimental work including the pressure measurements made in...Fe2O4 ( Askeland 1985). Ferrites are implemented by wrapping the power cords and coaxial data lines of all electronics equipment tightly for several... Askeland , D. R. The Sciece and Engineering of Materials. Prindle, Weber, and Schmidt, 1985. Burden. H. S., and D. D. Shear. "Transient Noise in Electronic

  16. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-11-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  17. Experimental Methods Using Photogrammetric Techniques for Parachute Canopy Shape Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Downey, James M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Desabrais, Kenneth J.; Noetscher, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in partnership with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center has collaborated on the development of a payload instrumentation package to record the physical parameters observed during parachute air drop tests. The instrumentation package records a variety of parameters including canopy shape, suspension line loads, payload 3-axis acceleration, and payload velocity. This report discusses the instrumentation design and development process, as well as the photogrammetric measurement technique used to provide shape measurements. The scaled model tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Plum Brook Space Propulsion Facility, OH.

  18. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  19. High precision speed measurement by using interferometric techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Ávila, M. A.; Ochoa Valiente, R.; García Trujillo, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the experimental realization of speed measurement by the use of a two wave interferometer and digital signal processing techniques. We built an automated Michelson interferometer and using an He-Ne laser and with the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and computer algorithms we derived a method for finding the speed of displacement. We report uncertainties in the order of 2-3 μm/s. with the use of this procedure. This brings the potential of another physical variable measurement like distance or pressure by this indirect measurement method. This approach is compared with an ultrasonic Logger Pro ® speed measurement system, and the results are compared between systems.

  20. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  1. Edge technique Doppler lidar wind measurements with high vertical resolution.

    PubMed

    Korb, C L; Gentry, B M; Li, S X

    1997-08-20

    We have developed a Doppler lidar system using the edge technique and have made atmospheric lidar wind measurements. Line-of-sight wind profiles with a vertical resolution of 22 m have a standard deviation of 0.40 m /s for a ten-shot average. Day and night lidar measurements of the vector wind have been made for altitudes from 200 to 2000 m. We validated the lidar measurements by comparing them with independent rawinsonde and pilot balloon measurements of wind speed and direction. Good agreement was obtained. The instrumental noise for these data is 0.11 m /s for a 500-shot average, which is in good agreement with the observed minimum value of the standard deviation for the atmospheric measurements. The average standard deviation over 30 mins varied from 1.16 to 0.25 m /s for day and night, respectively. High spatial and temporal resolution lidar profiles of line-of-sight winds clearly show wind shear and turbulent features at the 1 -2-m /s level with a high signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate the potential of the edge-technique lidar for studying turbulent processes and atmospheric dynamics.

  2. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  3. Non-intrusive measurement techniques for hydroelectric applicants

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, R.; Lemon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Non-intrusive acoustic methods for measuring flows, originally developed for oceanographic applications, are being used in and around hydroelectric dams. The acoustic methods can be categorized as either back-scattering or forward-scattering. The first, using the back-scattered signal, measures the Doppler shift of the returning echo to determine the along-beam component of flow. These instruments are generally called Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). Three beam solutions allow computation of the velocity components. Time gating the return provides a velocity profile with bin segments as small as 0.25 in. In areas of strong magnetic deviation, often the case beside large dams, a gyrocompass can be used to provide directional orientation. The velocity data can also be used to quickly compute river or channel discharge. Typical applications and several case studies are presented. The second acoustic technique is based on a forward-scattering phenomenon known as scintillation. This technique has been used on the Fraser River to monitor flows, and properties of the signal have recently been correlated with the biomass of upstream-migrating salmon. Acoustic scintillation flow measurements are well suited to applications with limited space in the along-flow direction. Applications to hydroelectric dams include turbine intake flow measurements, and a system has been developed to measure flow along fish diversion screens.

  4. Investigation of a non-contact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; Damiano, B.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new non-contact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components, however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  5. Principles of Blood Pressure Measurement - Current Techniques, Office vs Ambulatory Blood Pressure Measurement.

    PubMed

    Vischer, Annina S; Burkard, Thilo

    2016-07-15

    Blood pressure measurement has a long history and a crucial role in clinical medicine. Manual measurement using a mercury sphygmomanometer and a stethoscope remains the Gold Standard. However, this technique is technically demanding and commonly leads to faulty values. Automatic devices have helped to improve and simplify the technical aspects, but a standardised procedure of obtaining comparable measurements remains problematic and may therefore limit their validity in clinical practice. This underlines the importance of less error-prone measurement methods such as ambulatory or home blood pressure measurements and automated office blood pressure measurements. These techniques may help to uncover patients with otherwise unrecognised or overestimated arterial hypertension. Additionally these techniques may yield a better prognostic value.

  6. Impact of sampling techniques on measured stormwater quality data for small streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmel, R.D.; Slade, R.M.; Haney, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Science-based sampling methodologies are needed to enhance water quality characterization for setting appropriate water quality standards, developing Total Maximum Daily Loads, and managing nonpoint source pollution. Storm event sampling, which is vital for adequate assessment of water quality in small (wadeable) streams, is typically conducted by manual grab or integrated sampling or with an automated sampler. Although it is typically assumed that samples from a single point adequately represent mean cross-sectional concentrations, especially for dissolved constituents, this assumption of well-mixed conditions has received limited evaluation. Similarly, the impact of temporal (within-storm) concentration variability is rarely considered. Therefore, this study evaluated differences in stormwater quality measured in small streams with several common sampling techniques, which in essence evaluated within-channel and within-storm concentration variability. Constituent concentrations from manual grab samples and from integrated samples were compared for 31 events, then concentrations were also compared for seven events with automated sample collection. Comparison of sampling techniques indicated varying degrees of concentration variability within channel cross sections for both dissolved and particulate constituents, which is contrary to common assumptions of substantial variability in particulate concentrations and of minimal variability in dissolved concentrations. Results also indicated the potential for substantial within-storm (temporal) concentration variability for both dissolved and particulate constituents. Thus, failing to account for potential cross-sectional and temporal concentration variability in stormwater monitoring projects can introduce additional uncertainty in measured water quality data. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. Improved Tandem Measurement Techniques for Aerosol Particle Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawat, Vivek Kumar

    Non-spherical, chemically inhomogeneous (complex) nanoparticles are encountered in a number of natural and engineered environments, including combustion systems (which produces highly non-spherical aggregates), reactors used in gas-phase materials synthesis of doped or multicomponent materials, and in ambient air. These nanoparticles are often highly diverse in size, composition and shape, and hence require determination of property distribution functions for accurate characterization. This thesis focuses on development of tandem mobility-mass measurement techniques coupled with appropriate data inversion routines to facilitate measurement of two dimensional size-mass distribution functions while correcting for the non-idealities of the instruments. Chapter 1 provides the detailed background and motivation for the studies performed in this thesis. In chapter 2, the development of an inversion routine is described which is employed to determine two dimensional size-mass distribution functions from Differential Mobility Analyzer-Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer tandem measurements. Chapter 3 demonstrates the application of the two dimensional distribution function to compute cumulative mass distribution function and also evaluates the validity of this technique by comparing the calculated total mass concentrations to measured values for a variety of aerosols. In Chapter 4, this tandem measurement technique with the inversion routine is employed to analyze colloidal suspensions. Chapter 5 focuses on application of a transverse modulation ion mobility spectrometer coupled with a mass spectrometer to study the effect of vapor dopants on the mobility shifts of sub 2 nm peptide ion clusters. These mobility shifts are then compared to models based on vapor uptake theories. Finally, in Chapter 6, a conclusion of all the studies performed in this thesis is provided and future avenues of research are discussed.

  8. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  9. Region merging techniques using information theory statistical measures.

    PubMed

    Calderero, Felipe; Marques, Ferran

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the current work is to propose, under a statistical framework, a family of unsupervised region merging techniques providing a set of the most relevant region-based explanations of an image at different levels of analysis. These techniques are characterized by general and nonparametric region models, with neither color nor texture homogeneity assumptions, and a set of innovative merging criteria, based on information theory statistical measures. The scale consistency of the partitions is assured through i) a size regularization term into the merging criteria and a classical merging order, or ii) using a novel scale-based merging order to avoid the region size homogeneity imposed by the use of a size regularization term. Moreover, a partition significance index is defined to automatically determine the subset of most representative partitions from the created hierarchy. Most significant automatically extracted partitions show the ability to represent the semantic content of the image from a human point of view. Finally, a complete and exhaustive evaluation of the proposed techniques is performed, using not only different databases for the two main addressed problems (object-oriented segmentation of generic images and texture image segmentation), but also specific evaluation features in each case: under- and oversegmentation error, and a large set of region-based, pixel-based and error consistency indicators, respectively. Results are promising, outperforming in most indicators both object-oriented and texture state-of-the-art segmentation techniques.

  10. Flow mediated endothelium function: advantages of an automatic measuring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Yamila; Casciaro, Mariano E.; José Urcola y, Maria; Craiem, Damian

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this work is to show the advantages of a non invasive automated method for measuring flow mediated dilation (FMD) in the forearm. This dilation takes place in answer to a shear tension generated by the increase of blood flow, sensed by the endothelium, after the liberation of an occlusion sustained in the time. The method consists of three stages: the continuous acquisition of images of the brachial artery using ultrasound techniques, the pulse to pulse measurement of the vessel's diameter by means of a border detection algorithm, and the later analysis of the results. By means of this technique one cannot only obtain the maximum dilation percentage (FMD%), but a continuous diameter curve that allows to evaluate other relevant aspects such as dilation speed, dilation sustain in time and general maneuver performance. The simplicity of this method, robustness of the technique and accessibility of the required elements makes it a viable alternative of great clinical value for diagnosis in the early detection of numerous cardiovascular pathologies.

  11. Laboratory technique for quantitative thermal emissivity measurements of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, George; Nair, Archana; Gundu Rao, T. K.; Pande, Kanchan

    2009-08-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the compositional analysis of geological materials. The spectral feature in the mid-IR region is diagnostic of the mineralogy and spectral signatures of mixtures of minerals that add linearly, and therefore, can be used as an important tool to determine the mineralogy of rocks in the laboratory and remotely for planetary exploration. The greatest challenge in the emission measurement lies in the measurement of the weak thermal photons emitted from geological materials in a laboratory setup, and accurately records the temperature of the rock sample. The present work pertains to the details of a new Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) laboratory that has been developed under the ISRO Planetary Science and Exploration (PLANEX) programme, for emission related mineralogical investigations of planetary surfaces. The focus of the paper is on the acquisition and calibration technique for obtaining emissivity, and the deconvolution procedure to obtain the modal abundances of the thermal emission spectra in the range of 6-25 µm using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The basic technique is adopted from the work of Ruff et al (1997). This laboratory at the Department of Earth Sciences, IIT-Bombay is currently developing pure end mineral library of mineral particulates (<65 µm), and adding new end members to the existing ASU spectral library. The paper argues the need for considering Lunar Orbiter Thermal Emission Spectrometer (LOTES) for future Indian Moon mission programme (Chandrayan-II) to determine evidences of varied lithologies on the lunar surface.

  12. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  13. Measurement of high viscosity with laser induced surface deformation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshitake, Y.; Mitani, S.; Sakai, K.; Takagi, K.

    2005-01-15

    A technique for viscosity measurement was developed based on the principle of laser-induced surface deformation. Light incident into liquids increases its momentum due to the difference in refractive index and gives the surface an upward force as a reaction. The plane surface thus swells up and deforms, and the shape is determined so that the force is balanced with the surface tension and the gravity. On sudden laser irradiation, the deformation inevitably accompanies a viscous flow and exhibits a relaxational behavior with a delay time, which gives the viscosity. Theoretical prediction of the step-response function was given that takes surface tension waves excited by the laser into consideration. Nd-yttritium-aluminum-garnet laser with 0.6 W output was focused to {approx}200 {mu}m beam waist and used for the pumping. The deformation process was observed sensitively with another probe laser illuminating the activated area. This system was tested with the standard liquids for viscosity ranging from 1 to 10{sup 6} cSt. The results demonstrated the validity of this technique, though a correction for the inertia effect was needed in the range lower than 10 cSt. Further, effect of the thermal expansion by a slight optical absorption was discussed. This technique is especially useful at high viscosities since the measurement takes only a few seconds even in the specimen with 10{sup 6} cSt. Besides the rapidity, it has a great advantage of a noncontact feature and is appropriate for measuring the liquids that strongly dislike contamination. It has also potential applications in industries, measurement of liquids isolated in a production line, for instance.

  14. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  15. Effect of analytical techniques on measured ambient NO2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S K; Gavane, A G

    2005-06-01

    A study was carried out with specific reference to NO2 measurements in three countries (designated as A, B and C), which use three different manual methods; viz. Sodium Arsenite, Greiss Saltzman and TGS-ANSA for the determination of NO2 in ambient air. Significant deviation (up to 36 + %) was observed in measured NO, ion concentration when spiked samples were analyzed using these methods. Further, to make the data inter-comparable, exhaustive laboratory studies were carried out on these manual methods. Different concentration levels of NO2 were generated in the laboratory and analyzed by these methods simultaneously. The results were evaluated statistically. An interrelationship among the methods was established as method conversion factors (MCF). This would be useful in relating atmospheric concentration of NO2 among various countries, where different measurement techniques are adopted.

  16. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  17. Experimental measurements of the thermal conductivity of ash deposits: Part 1. Measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    A. L. Robinson; S. G. Buckley; N. Yang; L. L. Baxter

    2000-04-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to make in situ, time-resolved measurements of the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits formed under conditions that closely replicate those found in the convective pass of a commercial boiler. Since ash deposit thermal conductivity is thought to be strongly dependent on deposit microstructure, the technique is designed to minimize the disturbance of the natural deposit microstructure. Traditional techniques for measuring deposit thermal conductivity generally do not preserve the sample microstructure. Experiments are described that demonstrate the technique, quantify experimental uncertainty, and determine the thermal conductivity of highly porous, unsintered deposits. The average measured conductivity of loose, unsintered deposits is 0.14 {+-} 0.03 W/(m K), approximately midway between rational theoretical limits for deposit thermal conductivity.

  18. A study of the river velocity measurement techniques and analysis methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung Yang, Han; Lun Chiang, Jie

    2013-04-01

    Velocity measurement technology can be traced back to the pitot tube velocity measurement method in the 18th century and today's velocity measurement technology use the acoustic and radar technology, with the Doppler principle developed technology advances, in order to develop the measurement method is more suitable for the measurement of velocity, the purpose is to get a more accurate measurement data and with the surface velocity theory, the maximum velocity theory and the indicator theory to obtain the mean velocity. As the main research direction of this article is to review the literature of the velocity measurement techniques and analysis methods, and to explore the applicability of the measurement method of the velocity measurement instruments, and then to describe the advantages and disadvantages of the different mean velocity profiles analysis method. Adequate review of the references of this study will be able to provide a reference for follow-up study of the velocity measurement. Review velocity measurement literature that different velocity measurement is required to follow the different flow conditions measured be upgraded its accuracy, because each flow rate measurement method has its advantages and disadvantages. Traditional velocity instrument can be used at low flow and RiverRAD microwave radar or imaging technology measurement method may be applied in high flow. In the tidal river can use the ADCP to quickly measure river vertical velocity distribution. In addition, urban rivers may be used the CW radar to set up on the bridge, and wide rivers can be used RiverRAD microwave radar to measure the velocities. Review the relevant literature also found that using Ultrasonic Doppler Current Profiler with the Chiu's theory to the velocity of observing automation work can save manpower and resources to improve measurement accuracy, reduce the risk of measurement, but the great variability of river characteristics in Taiwan and a lot of drifting floating

  19. Viscosity Measurements of Industrial Alloys Using the Oscillating Cup Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, P.; Overfelt, R. A.

    1999-11-01

    Molten metal processing can be effectively simulated using state-of-the-art computer algorithms, and manufacturers increasingly rely upon these tools to optimize the design of their operations. Reliable thermophysical properties of the solid, solid + liquid, and liquid phases are essential for effective computer simulation. Commercially available instruments can measure many of the required properties of molten metals (e.g., transformation temperatures, thermal conductivity, specific heat, latent heat, and density). However, there are no commercially available instruments to characterize several important thermophysical properties (e.g., emissivity, electrical resistivity, surface tension, and viscosity). Although the literature has numerous examples of measurements of surface tension using the sessile drop and the oscillating drop techniques, literature references are sparse with regard to measurements of emissivity, electrical resistivity, and viscosity. The present paper discusses the development of an oscillating cup viscometer and its application to characterizing the viscosity of fully molten industrial alloys. The theory behind the oscillating cup technique is reviewed, and the design details of the current instrument are discussed. In addition, experimental data of the viscosity of several nickel-based superalloys are presented.

  20. Sand Shear Band Thickness Measurements by Digital Imaging Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alshibli, Khalid A.; Sture, Stein

    1998-01-01

    Digital imaging analysis was used to study localized deformations in granular materials tested under plane strain condition. Two independent techniques were applied and compared. In the first, the digitized optical images of a grid printed on the latex membrane were used to measure the shear band orientation angle and thickness, and were found to be 54.5' and 3.01 mm respectively. The second technique involved introducing an ultra-low viscosity resin into the specimen in preparation for thin- sectioning and microscopic study of the internal fabric. A total of 24 microscopic images obtained from four thin sections were analyzed and void ratio variation was measured. The shear band thickness measurements from images located along the shear band axis (at two locations) were equal to 3.19 mm and 3.29 mm which are very close to the average value obtained from surface analysis. The study was then extended to investigate the effects of sand grain-size and properties, specimen density, and confining pressure on shear band thickness. It was found that the normalized shear band thickness decreases as grain-size and confining pressure increase and as density decreases. Finally, shear band thickness is highly influenced by the specimen dilatancy.

  1. Response Surface Methods for Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatial ly-re solved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/-30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-light, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center.

  2. CD-measurement technique for hole patterns on stencil mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Mikio; Yusa, Satoshi; Takikawa, Tadahiko; Fujita, Hiroshi; Sano, Hisatake; Hoga, Morihisa; Hayashi, Naoya

    2004-12-01

    EB lithography has a potential to successfully form hole patterns as small as 80 nm with a stencil mask. In a previous paper we proposed a technique using a HOLON dual-mode critical dimension (CD) SEM ESPA-75S in the transmission mode for CD measurement of line-and-space patterns on a stencil mask. In this paper we extend our effort of developing a CD measurement technique to contact hole features and determine it in comparison of measured values between features on mask and those printed on wafer. We have evaluated the width method and the area methods using designed 80-500 nm wide contact hole patterns on a large area membrane mask and their resist images on wafer printed by a LEEPL3000. We find that 1) the width method and the area methods show an excellent mask-wafer correlation for holes over 110 nm, and 2) the area methods show a better mask-wafer correlation than the width method does for holes below 110 nm. We conclude that the area calculated from the transmission SEM image is more suitable in defining the hole dimensions than the width for contact holes on a stencil mask.

  3. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-07

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown.

  4. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  5. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  6. A Comparison of Stellar Elemental Abundance Techniques and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D.; Desch, Steven J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Adibekyan, Vardan; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Delgado Mena, Elisa; Liu, Fan; Nordlander, Thomas; Sousa, Sergio G.; Korn, Andreas; Gruyters, Pieter; Heiter, Ulrike; Jofré, Paula; Santos, Nuno C.; Soubiran, Caroline

    2016-09-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond the quoted error for the same elements within the same stars. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) to calculate 10 element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD 361, HD 10700, HD 121504, and HD 202206). Each group produced measurements for each star using (1) their own autonomous techniques, (2) standardized stellar parameters, (3) a standardized line list, and (4) both standardized parameters and a line list. We present the resulting stellar parameters, absolute abundances, and a metric of data similarity that quantifies the homogeneity of the data. We conclude that standardization of some kind, particularly stellar parameters, improves the consistency between methods. However, because results did not converge as more free parameters were standardized, it is clear there are inherent issues within the techniques that need to be reconciled. Therefore, we encourage more conversation and transparency within the community such that stellar abundance determinations can be reproducible as well as accurate and precise.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  8. Development of Nondestructive Measuring Technique of Environmental Radioactive Strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Tatsuru; Murata, Jiro

    The Fukushima first nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the Japanese big earthquake in 2011. The main radioactivity concerned after the accident are I-131 (half-life 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years) and 137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days) and 90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new detection technique which enables us to realize quantitative evaluation of the strontium radioactivity by means of nondestructive measurement without chemical separation processing, which is concerned to be included inside foods, environmental water and soil around us, in order to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to the radiation.

  9. Refined flicker photometry technique to measure ocular lens density.

    PubMed

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M; Gronfier, Claude

    2012-11-01

    Many physiological and pathological conditions are associated with a change in the crystalline lens transmittance. Estimates of lens opacification, however, generally rely on subjective rather than objective measures in clinical practice. The goal of our study was to develop an improved psychophysical heterochromatic flicker photometry technique combined with existing mathematical models to evaluate the spectral transmittance of the human ocular media noninvasively. Our results show that it is possible to accurately estimate ocular media density in vivo in humans. Potential applications of our approach include basic research and clinical settings on visual and nonimage-forming visual systems.

  10. Novel polarization-sensitive micropulse lidar measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Connor J; Mendoza, Albert; Zheng, Yunhui; Mathur, Savyasachee

    2007-03-19

    Polarization-sensitive detection of elastic backscattered light is useful for detection of cloud phase and depolarizing aerosols. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program has deployed micropulse lidar (MPL) for over a decade, but without polarized detection. Adding an actively-controlled liquid crystal retarder provides the capability to identify depolarizing particles by alternately transmitting linearly and circularly polarized light. This represents a departure from established techniques, which transmit exclusively linear polarization or exclusively circular polarization. Mueller matrix calculations yield simple relationships between the well-known linear depolarization ratio delta(linear), the circular depolarization ratio delta(circ), and this MPL depolarization ratio delta(MPL).

  11. Preferential alignment of birefringent tissue measured with polarization sensitive techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, J. C.; Ruiz, T.; Ghassemi, P.; Travis, T. E.; Shupp, J. W.; Chue-Sang, J.; Bai, Y.

    2015-02-01

    Assessing collagen alignment is of interest when evaluating a therapeutic strategy and evaluating its outcome in scar management. In this work we introduce a theoretical and experimental methodology for the quantification of collagen and birefringent media alignment based on polarized light transport. The technique relies on the fact that these materials exhibit directional anisotropy. A polarized Monte Carlo model and a spectro-polarimetric imaging system were devised to predict and measure the impact of birefringence on an impinging polarized light beam. Experiments conducted on birefringent phantoms, and biological samples consisting of highly packed parallel birefringent fibers, showed a good agreement with the analytical results.

  12. Measurement of interfacial tension by use of pendant drop video techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, M.D.; Thomas, C.P.; Bala, G.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes an instrument to measure the interfacial tension (IFT) of aqueous surfactant solutions and crude oil. The method involves injection of a drop of fluid (such as crude oil) into a second immiscible phase to determine the IFT between the two phases. The instrument is composed of an AT-class computer, optical cell, illumination, video camera and lens, video frame digitizer board, monitor, and software. The camera displays an image of the pendant drop on the monitor, which is then processed by the frame digitizer board and non-proprietary software to determine the IFT. Several binary and ternary phase systems were taken from the literature and used to measure the precision and accuracy of the instrument in determining IFTs. A copy of the software program is included in the report. A copy of the program on diskette can be obtained from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center, P.O. Box 1020, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-1020. The accuracy and precision of the technique and apparatus presented is very good for measurement of IFTs in the range from 72 to 10{sup {minus}2} mN/m, which is adequate for many EOR applications. With modifications to the equipment and the numerical techniques, measurements of ultralow IFTs (<10{sup {minus}3} mN/m) should be possible as well as measurements at reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The instrument has been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to support the research program on microbial enhanced oil recovery. Measurements of IFTs for several bacterial supernatants and unfractionated acid precipitates of microbial cultures containing biosurfactants against medium to heavy crude oils are reported. These experiments demonstrate that the use of automated video imaging of pendant drops is a simple and fast method to reliably determine interfacial tension between two immiscible liquid phases, or between a gas and a liquid phase.

  13. Measurement of interfacial tension by use of pendant drop video techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herd, Melvin D.; Thomas, Charles P.; Bala, Gregory A.; Lassahn, Gordon D.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes an instrument to measure the interfacial tension (IFT) of aqueous surfactant solutions and crude oil. The method involves injection of a drop of fluid (such as crude oil) into a second immiscible phase to determine the IFT between the two phases. The instrument is composed of an AT-class computer, optical cell, illumination, video camera and lens, video frame digitizer board, monitor, and software. The camera displays an image of the pendant drop on the monitor, which is then processed by the frame digitizer board and non-proprietary software to determine the IFT. Several binary and ternary phase systems were taken from the literature and used to measure the precision and accuracy of the instrument in determining IFT's. A copy of the software program is included in the report. A copy of the program on diskette can be obtained from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center, P.O. Box 1020, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-1020. The accuracy and precision of the technique and apparatus presented is very good for measurement of IFT's in the range from 72 to 10(exp -2) mN/m, which is adequate for many EOR applications. With modifications to the equipment and the numerical techniques, measurements of ultralow IFT's (less than 10(exp -3) mN/m) should be possible as well as measurements at reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The instrument has been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to support the research program on microbial enhanced oil recovery. Measurements of IFT's for several bacterial supernatants and unfractionated acid precipitates of microbial cultures containing biosurfactants against medium to heavy crude oils are reported. These experiments demonstrate that the use of automated video imaging of pendant drops is a simple and fast method to reliably determine interfacial tension between two immiscible liquid phases, or between a gas and a liquid phase.

  14. Roll bar x-ray spot size measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, R. A.; Houck, T. L.

    1998-08-14

    A time dependent x-ray spot size measurement is critical to understanding beam target physics such as target plasma generated beam instabilities. The so-called roll bar measurement uses a heavy metal material which is optically thick to X-rays, to form a 1D shadow of the x-ray origination spot. This spot is where an energetic electron beam interacts with a high Z target to produce the x-rays. The material (the "roll bar") has a slight radius to avoid alignment problems. If a beam profile is assumed (or measured by other means), the equivalent x-ray spot size can be calculated from the x-ray shadow cast by the roll bar. Typically a radiographic film is exposed over the duration of the beam pulse, and the shadow is analyzed for a time integrated measurement. This paper explores various techniques to convert the x-rays to visible photons which can be imaged using a gated camera or streak camera for time evolved x-ray spot size. Data will be presented from the measurements on the ETA II induction linac.

  15. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described. The measurement was made using an automatic network analyzer with the microstrip line terminated in a short circuit. Experimental data for two microstrip lines on 10 and 30 mil Cuflon substrates were recorded over a frequency range of 2 to 20 GHz. Agreement with theoretical results computed by the spectral domain approach is good. Possible sources of error for the discrepancy are discussed.

  16. Apparent thermal conductivity measurements by an unguarded technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, R. S.; Yarbrough, D. W.; McElroy, D. L.

    An unguarded longitudinal heat flow apparatus for measuring the apparent thermal conductivity (lambda/sub a) of insulations was tested. Heat flow is provided by a horizontal electrically heated Nichrome screen sandwiched between test samples that are bounded by temperature controlled copper plates and 9 cm of mineral fiber insulation. A determinate error analysis shows lambda/sub a/ measurement uncertainty to be less than + or - 1.7% for insulating materials as thin as 3 cm. Three-dimensional thermal modeling indicates negligible error in lambda/sub a/ due to edge loss for insulations up to 7.62 cm thick when the temperature difference across the sample is measured at the screen center. System repeatability and reproducibility were determined to be + or - 0.2%. Differences of lambda/sub a/ results from the screen tester and results from the National Bureau of Standards were 0.1% for a 10-kg/m(3) Calibration Transfer Standard and 0.9% for 127-kg/m(3) fibrous glass board (SRM 1450b). Measurements on fiberglass and rock wool batt insulations showed the dependence of lambda/sub a/ on density, temperature, temperature difference, plate emittance, and heat flow direction. Results obtained for lambda/sub a/ as a function of density at 240C differed by less than 2% from values obtained with a guarded hot plate. It is demonstrated that this simple technique has the accuracy and sensitivity needed for useful lambda/sub a/ measurements on thermal insulating materials.

  17. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kye-Si; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-01

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  18. Improved technique for blood flow velocity measurement using Doppler effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valadares Oliveira, Eduardo J.; Nantes Button, Vera L. d. S.; Maia, Joaquim M.; Costa, Eduardo T.

    2002-04-01

    The Doppler velocimeter developed allows to determine the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the velocity vector of the flow, and to calculate the precise blood flow in a vessel. Four piezoelectric transducers constitute the Doppler velocimeter. Three of these transducers are positioned to form an equilateral triangle (base of a pyramid). When these transducers move simultaneously, backward or forward from the initial position, the emitted ultrasonic beams focalize on a position (peak of the pyramid) closer or farther from the transducers faces, according to the depth of the vessel where we intend to measure de flow. The angle between the transducers allows adjusting the height of this pyramid and the position of the focus (where the three beams meet). A forth transducer is used to determine the diameter of the vessel and monitor the position of the Doppler velocimeter relative to the vessel. Simulation results showed that with this technique is possible to accomplish precise measurement of blood flow.

  19. Novel polarization-sensitive micropulse lidar measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn, Connor J.; Mendoza, Albert; Zheng, Yunhui; Mathur, Savyasachee

    2007-03-19

    Polarization-sensitive detection of elastic backscatter is useful for detection of cloud phase and depolarizing aerosols. The U.S. DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program has deployed micropulse lidar (MPL) for over a decade, but without polarized detection. Adding an actively-controlled liquid crystal retarder provides the capability to identify depolarizing particles by alternately transmitting linearly and circularly polarized light. This represents a departure from established techniques which transmit exclusively linear polarization or exclusively circular polarization. Mueller matrix calculations yield simple relationships between the well-known linear depolarization ratio δlinear, the circular depolarization ratio δcirc, and the hybrid MPL depolarization ratio δMPL. This research was supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program.

  20. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  1. Measuring fast-neutron flux by track-etch technique

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    The method covers the measurement of neutron flux by the use of fissionable materials. Fission fragments emitted by the fissionable materials during neutron bombardment penetrate a suitable recording medium, such as plastic, glass, or mica, that is in contact with the fissionable material. Appropriate etching techniques render the path of the fragment in the recording medium visible under an optical microscope. Since measurement of the decay of radioisotopes is not involved in this method, irradiation times are limited only by the maximum number of fission fragment tracks that can be clearly distinguished without pile up: approximately 2 x 10/sup 5//cm/sup 2/. The method includes a discussion of apparatus, reagents and materials, procedure, calculations, precision, and accuracy. (JMT)

  2. Machine vision technique for measuring glass container thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Ralph M.; Mercier, Jeffrey A.

    2003-05-01

    The inspection of sidewall thickness provides important information about the production processes for glass container manufacture. By monitoring the thickness profile around the perimeter of bottles in real-time, the manufacturing process can be altered to produce higher quality products. This also provides the ability to identify and remove defective products. In order to improve the speed and accuracy of inspections, a new non-contact method for acquiring thickness profiles of glass bottles that employs optical and machine vision techniques has been developed and tested. One of the fundamental laws of optics, Snell's Law, is the basic concept upon which the inspection technique relies. The thickness of a flat plane of transparent material can be determined from Snell"s Law with a single beam of light that passes through the medium, reflects off the secondary surface, and travels back to the initial surface and passes through it. Based upon this principle, a new non-contact glass thickness measurement technique has been developed and it has demonstrated good accuracy.

  3. A novel technique to measure subsurface flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmair, S.; Weiler, M.

    2010-12-01

    To better understand subsurface flow (SSF) processes at the hillslope scale, measuring subsurface flow velocity should be of great interest. However, due to the large heterogeneity in time and space, we are faced with the need to continuously measure SSF velocity at several locations within a hillslope over a distance being representative for certain hillslope segments. At present, SSF velocity is either measured by tracer tests over larger distances or via centimeter-scale measurements using heat dissipation or other tracers. This calls for a cheap and easily applicable method to continuously detect subsurface flow velocity in the field over a distance representative for certain hillslope segments. We currently develop a novel technique, which has shown promising results in the laboratory. The technique is based on an automatic salt tracer injection into a small-diameter borehole once the soil matrix has reached saturation. The tracer signal is captured by a 5TE probe (Decagon Devices) measuring soil moisture, electrical conductivity, and temperature every two minutes, which is inserted a few decimetres downslope of the injection point into the soil. The automatic injection is also controlled by the 5TE probe, which is connected to a CR1000 Logger (Campbell Scientific). Once saturated conditions have been established, a plug valve attached to an above-mounted bottle with NaCl solution is opened for 2 seconds and the tracer is injected into the borehole via a small steel tube screened at the bottom. Under saturated conditions the automatic injection is conducted every two hours and the breakthrough curves are analyzed for the mean effective velocity. In a first step, the technique was tested in a sand filled box with constant in- and outflow conditions representing a homogeneous miniature hillslope. Several experimental set-ups differing in hydraulic gradient, distance from injection point to 5TE probe, orientation of 5TE probe, and amount and concentration of

  4. Interferometric phase measurement techniques for coherent beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, Marie; Bourderionnet, Jérôme; Larat, Christian; Lallier, Eric; Primot, Jérôme; Brignon, Arnaud

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining of fiber amplifiers provides an attractive mean of reaching high power laser. In an interferometric phase measurement the beams issued for each fiber combined are imaged onto a sensor and interfere with a reference plane wave. This registration of interference patterns on a camera allows the measurement of the exact phase error of each fiber beam in a single shot. Therefore, this method is a promising candidate toward very large number of combined fibers. Based on this technique, several architectures can be proposed to coherently combine a high number of fibers. The first one based on digital holography transfers directly the image of the camera to spatial light modulator (SLM). The generated hologram is used to compensate the phase errors induced by the amplifiers. This architecture has therefore a collective phase measurement and correction. Unlike previous digital holography technique, the probe beams measuring the phase errors between the fibers are co-propagating with the phase-locked signal beams. This architecture is compatible with the use of multi-stage isolated amplifying fibers. In that case, only 20 pixels per fiber on the SLM are needed to obtain a residual phase shift error below λ/10rms. The second proposed architecture calculates the correction applied to each fiber channel by tracking the relative position of the interference finges. In this case, a phase modulator is placed on each channel. In that configuration, only 8 pixels per fiber on the camera is required for a stable close loop operation with a residual phase error of λ/20rms, which demonstrates the scalability of this concept.

  5. High precision metrology based microwave effective linewidth measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Nan; Green, Jerome J.; Beitscher, Bailey A.; Patton, Carl E.

    2007-11-15

    A precision microwave effective linewidth measurement technique for magnetic samples has been developed. The measurement utilizes a high-Q cylindrical cavity that contains the sample of interest, a highly stable and programable static magnetic field source, a computer controlled network analyzer for cavity center frequency {omega}{sub c} and quality factor Q{sub c} determinations, and the standard metrological substitution ABA method for accurate relative {omega}{sub c} and Q{sub c} measurements. Sequential long term ABA measurements show that the time and temperature drifts and random errors are the dominant sources of error, with uncertainties in {omega}{sub c}/2{pi} and Q{sub c} in the range of 50 kHz and 25, respectively. The ABA method is applied to eliminate these drifts and minimize the random errors. For measurements over 25 ABA cycles, accuracy is improved to 0.14 kHz for {omega}{sub c}/2{pi} and 3 for Q{sub c}. The temperature variation over a single ABA cycle is generally on the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -5} deg. C and there is no need for any further temperature stabilization or correction measures. The overall uncertainty in the 10 GHz effective linewidth determinations for a 3 mm diam, 0.5 mm thick polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet (YIG) disk is 0.15 Oe or less, well below the intrinsic single crystal YIG linewidth. This represents a factor of 10 improvement in measurement accuracy over previous work.

  6. Microvascular imaging: techniques and opportunities for clinical physiological measurements.

    PubMed

    Allen, John; Howell, Kevin

    2014-07-01

    The microvasculature presents a particular challenge in physiological measurement because the vessel structure is spatially inhomogeneous and perfusion can exhibit high variability over time. This review describes, with a clinical focus, the wide variety of methods now available for imaging of the microvasculature and their key applications. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging are established, commercially-available techniques for determining microvascular perfusion, with proven clinical utility for applications such as burn-depth assessment. Nailfold capillaroscopy is also commercially available, with significant published literature that supports its use for detecting microangiopathy secondary to specific connective tissue diseases in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon. Infrared thermography measures skin temperature and not perfusion directly, and it has only gained acceptance for some surgical and peripheral microvascular applications. Other emerging technologies including imaging photoplethysmography, optical coherence tomography, photoacoustic tomography, hyperspectral imaging, and tissue viability imaging are also described to show their potential as techniques that could become established tools for clinical microvascular assessment. Growing interest in the microcirculation has helped drive the rapid development in perfusion imaging of the microvessels, bringing exciting opportunities in microvascular research.

  7. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p < 0.002; DXA, p < 0.005), and the densities from the two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Actual density values were higher for Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  8. Measurement of interface strength by a laser spallation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V.; Argon, A. S.; Parks, D. M.; Cornie, J. A.

    A LASER spallation experiment has been developed to measure the strength of planar interfaces between a substrate and a thin coating (in the thickness range of 0.3-3 μm). In this technique a laser pulse of a high enough energy and a pre-determined duration is converted into a pressure pulse of a critical amplitude and width that is sent through the substrate toward the free surface with the coating. The reflected tensile wave from the free surface of the coating pries-off the coating. The critical stress amplitude that accomplishes the removal of the coating is determined from a computer simulation of the process. The simulation itself is verified by means of a piezo-electric crystal probe that is capable of mapping out the profile of the stress pulse generated by the laser pulse. Interface strength values ranging from 3.7 to 10.5 GPa were determined for the Si/SiC system. For the interfaces between pyrolytic graphite and SiC coatings an average strength of 7.2 GPA was measured, while the corresponding interface strength between a Pitch-55 type ribbon with a fiber-like morphology and SiC coatings was found to be 0.23 GPa. Intrinsic strengths of SiC coatings and Si crystal were also determined using this technique. These were, on the average, 8.6 GPa for Si crystals and 11.9 GPa for a SiC coating. Furthermore, the potential of the laser technique to determine the interface toughness was also demonstrated, provided well-characterizable flaws can be planted on the interface.

  9. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  10. Nonlinear ultrasonic measurements based on cross-correlation filtering techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Andrew; Stewart, Dylan; Bunget, Gheorghe; Kramer, Patrick; Farinholt, Kevin; Friedersdorf, Fritz; Pepi, Marc; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic loading of mechanical components promotes the formation of dislocation dipoles in metals, which can serve as precursors to crack nucleation and ultimately lead to failure. In the laboratory setting, an acoustic nonlinearity parameter has been assessed as an effective indicator for characterizing the progression of fatigue damage precursors. However, the need to use monochromatic waves of medium-to-high acoustic energy has presented a constraint, making it problematic for use in field applications. This paper presents a potential approach for field measurement of acoustic nonlinearity by using general purpose ultrasonic pulser-receivers. Nonlinear ultrasonic measurements during fatigue testing were analyzed by the using contact and immersion pulse-through method. A novel cross-correlation filtering technique was developed to extract the fundamental and higher harmonic waves from the signals. As in the case of the classic harmonic generation, the nonlinearity parameters of the second and third harmonics indicate a strong correlation with fatigue cycles. Consideration was given to potential nonlinearities in the measurement system, and tests have confirmed that measured second harmonic signals exhibit a linear dependence on the input signal strength, further affirming the conclusion that this parameter relates to damage precursor formation from cyclic loading.

  11. Recent improvements in PDS technique for low-absorption measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montecchi, Marco; Masetti, Enrico; Emiliani, Gabriele

    1990-08-01

    Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is a recently developed technique that is finding a useful application in the measurement of low optical absorptance of thin films. Among the noise sources affecting the PDS measurement, probe beam pointing instability and mechanical vibration play a considerable role. In this work an optoelectronic system for the reduction of their influence is described. Moreover, PDS measurements are typically performed keeping the sample immersed in a deflecting liquid; thus measured values of absorptance must be corrected when other surrounding media, as air, are considered. This correction is an easy task for single film coatings. Here the general case of an unknown multiplayer coating is analysed; a range of values containing the true absorptance in air is obtained by theoretical analysis and a practical method to evaluate the absorptance in air is discussed. Finally, deflecting liquids alternative to the commonly used CCI4 have been examined. Useful optical range, thermal diffusivity and "relative deflecting power" of CCI4, CS2, Iso-octane and Aceton are reported.

  12. Objective Area Measurement Technique for Choroidal Neovascularization from Fluorescein Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Micah J.; Osswald, Christian R.; Valio, Nicole L.; Mieler, William F.; Kang-Mieler, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a non-biased method of quantitatively measuring choroidal neovascularization (CNV) areas based on late-phase fluorescein angiography (FA) images. Experimental CNV was induced in Long Evans rats by laser disruption of the Bruch’s membrane. FA was performed weekly for 5 weeks. Multi-Otsu thresholding (MOT) was used to quantify CNV in late-phase FA images from both experimental rodent CNV and wet age-related macular degeneration patients (wAMD). Images were automatically thresholded into three levels based on the image histogram, with the highest level containing CNV. To determine the technique’s ability to quantify CNV areas, rats were given either triamcinolone acetonide or dexamethasone sodium phosphate to treat CNV and compared to untreated rats. The rat CNV lesion areas measured from 5-week histology sections from each treatment group were compared to areas measured from the corresponding FA images. MOT was able to detect statistical decreases in rodent CNV area in the treatment groups versus control from weeks 3 through 5. The ratio of CNV area measured from histology to area measured from FA images was not statistically different between groups. Finally, to determine the usefulness of MOT on pathological morphologies of CNV, MOT was performed on late-phase FA images from patients with classic and diffuse CNV. The technique was able to segment classical CNV in wAMD patients, but performed poorly with diffuse CNV. MOT provides a robust, objective, and quantifiable area measurement of CNV lesion area in both experimentally-induced and pathological CNV. The results indicate that MOT could be a useful research tool in helping evaluate the effects of therapeutics on CNV growth. PMID:24316422

  13. 5 CFR 919.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate evidence. 919.900 Section 919.900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.900 Adequate...

  14. AGARD flight test techniques series. Volume 9: Aircraft exterior noise measurement and analysis techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, H.

    1991-04-01

    Testing and analysis techniques to measure aircraft noise primarily for purposes of noise certification as specified by the 'International Civil Aviation Organization', ICAO are described. The relevant aircraft noise certification standards and recommended practices are presented in detail for subsonic jet aircraft, for heavy and light propeller-driven aircraft, and for helicopters. The practical execution of conducting noise certification tests is treated in depth. The characteristics and requirements of the acoustic and non-acoustic instrumentation for data acquisition and data processing are discussed, as are the procedures to determine the special noise measures - effective perceived noise level (EPNL) and maximum overall A-weighted noise level (L sub pA,max) - that are required for the noise certification of different types of aircraft. The AGARDograph also contains an extensive, although selective, discussion of test and analysis techniques for more detailed aircraft noise studies by means of either flight experiments or full-scale and model-scale wind tunnel experiments. Appendices provide supplementary information.

  15. REVIEW ARTICLE: Emission measurement techniques for advanced powertrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Masayuki

    2000-10-01

    Recent developments in high-efficiency low-emission powertrains require the emission measurement technologies to be able to detect regulated and unregulated compounds with very high sensitivity and a fast response. For example, levels of a variety of nitrogen compounds and sulphur compounds should be analysed in real time in order to develop aftertreatment systems to decrease emission of NOx for the lean burning powertrains. Also, real-time information on the emission of particulate matter for the transient operation of diesel engines and direct injection gasoline engines is invaluable. The present paper reviews newly introduced instrumentation for such emission measurement that is demanded for the developments in advanced powertrain systems. They include Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and fast response flame ionization detection. In addition, demands and applications of the fuel reformer developments for fuel cell electric vehicles are discussed. Besides the detection methodologies, sample handling techniques for the measurement of concentrations emitted from low emission vehicles for which the concentrations of the pollutants are significantly lower than the concentrations present in ambient air, are also described.

  16. Microbial Sulfate Reduction Measured by an Automated Electrical Impedance Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Silverman, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    Electrical impedance measurements are used to investigate the rates of sulfate reduction by pure cultures of and sediments containing sulfur-reducing bacteria. Changes in the electrical impedance ratios of pure cultures of Desulfovibrio aestuarii and samples of reduced sediments from San Francisco Bay were measured by a Bactometer 32, and sulfate reduction was followed by measuring the incorporation of (S-35) sulfate into metal sulfides. The growth of the bacteria in pure culture is found to result in an increase of 0.2200 in the impedance ratio within 24 h, accompanied by increases in protein, ATP, sulfide and absorptance at 660 nm, all of which are inhibited by the addition of molybdate. Similar responses were observed in the sediments, although impedance ratio responses were not completely inhibited upon the addition of molybdate, due to the presence of nonsulfate-respiring microorganisms. Experiments conducted with sterile media and autoclaved sediments indicate that the presence of H2S together with iron is responsible for the impedance effect, and sulfate reduction rates ranging between 0.85 and 1.78 mmol/l per day are estimated for the sediments by the impedance technique.

  17. Fast processing techniques for accurate ultrasonic range measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barshan, Billur

    2000-01-01

    Four methods of range measurement for airborne ultrasonic systems - namely simple thresholding, curve-fitting, sliding-window, and correlation detection - are compared on the basis of bias error, standard deviation, total error, robustness to noise, and the difficulty/complexity of implementation. Whereas correlation detection is theoretically optimal, the other three methods can offer acceptable performance at much lower cost. Performances of all methods have been investigated as a function of target range, azimuth, and signal-to-noise ratio. Curve fitting, sliding window, and thresholding follow correlation detection in the order of decreasing complexity. Apart from correlation detection, minimum bias and total error is most consistently obtained with the curve-fitting method. On the other hand, the sliding-window method is always better than the thresholding and curve-fitting methods in terms of minimizing the standard deviation. The experimental results are in close agreement with the corresponding simulation results. Overall, the three simple and fast processing methods provide a variety of attractive compromises between measurement accuracy and system complexity. Although this paper concentrates on ultrasonic range measurement in air, the techniques described may also find application in underwater acoustics.

  18. Hospitals Productivity Measurement Using Data Envelopment Analysis Technique

    PubMed Central

    TORABIPOUR, Amin; NAJARZADEH, Maryam; ARAB, Mohammad; FARZIANPOUR, Freshteh; GHASEMZADEH, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to measure the hospital productivity using data envelopment analysis (DEA) technique and Malmquist indices. Methods This is a cross sectional study in which the panel data were used in a 4 year period from 2007 to 2010. The research was implemented in 12 teaching and non-teaching hospitals of Ahvaz County. Data envelopment analysis technique and the Malmquist indices with an input-orientation approach, was used to analyze the data and estimation of productivity. Data were analyzed using the SPSS.18 and DEAP.2 software. Results Six hospitals (50%) had a value lower than 1, which represents an increase in total productivity and other hospitals were non-productive. the average of total productivity factor (TPF) was 1.024 for all hospitals, which represents a decrease in efficiency by 2.4% from 2007 to 2010. The average technical, technologic, scale and managerial efficiency change was 0.989, 1.008, 1.028, and 0.996 respectively. There was not a significant difference in mean productivity changes among teaching and non-teaching hospitals (P>0.05) (except in 2009 years). Conclusion Productivity rate of hospitals had an increasing trend generally. However, the total average of productivity was decreased in hospitals. Besides, between the several components of total productivity, variation of technological efficiency had the highest impact on reduce of total average of productivity. PMID:26060727

  19. Measured extent of agricultural expansion depends on analysis technique

    DOE PAGES

    Dunn, Jennifer B.; Merz, Dylan; Copenhaver, Ken L.; ...

    2017-01-31

    Concern is rising that ecologically important, carbon-rich natural lands in the United States are losing ground to agriculture. We investigate how quantitative assessments of historical land use change to address this concern differ in their conclusions depending on the data set used. We examined land use change between 2006 and 2014 in 20 counties in the Prairie Pothole Region using the Cropland Data Layer, a modified Cropland Data Layer, data from the National Agricultural Imagery Program, and in-person ground-truthing. The Cropland Data Layer analyses overwhelmingly returned the largest amount of land use change with associated error that limits drawing conclusionsmore » from it. Analysis with visual imagery estimated a fraction of this land use change. Clearly, analysis technique drives understanding of the measured extent of land use change; different techniques produce vastly different results that would inform land management policy in strikingly different ways. As a result, best practice guidelines are needed.« less

  20. Quadrant-division technique for differential sensitivity optical beam measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hii, K. U.

    2016-11-01

    A novel method for optical beam collimation measurement is presented. The collimating lens is utilized in four parts of quadrants with the beam aligned onto the first quadrant and configured to pass the subsequent quadrants. This allows the test beam to pass the collimating lens for four times. Subsequently, the test beam is reversed to achieve a total number of eight passes. Hence, for a defocus introduced, the collimation state of the test beam can be evaluated at the amplification of eight. The evaluation of the test beam is performed based on the approach of collimation testing using lateral shearing interferometer. The proposed technique provides a differential collimation sensitivity for accurate setting of a highly collimated beam.

  1. Viscosity measurements of metallic melts using the oscillating drop technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzmann, P.; Yang, F.; Schneider, S.; Lohöfer, G.; Meyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    By means of benchmarking reduced gravity experiments, we have verified the measured viscosity of binary Zr-Ni glass forming liquids utilizing the oscillating drop technique combined with ground-based electrostatic levitation (ESL). Reliable viscosity data can be obtained as long as internal viscous damping of a single oscillation mode of a levitated drop dominates external perturbations. This can be verified by the absence of a sample mass dependence of the results. Hence, ESL is an excellent tool for studying the viscosity of metallic glass forming melts in the range of about 10-250 mPa s, with sample masses below 100 mg. To this end, we show that, for binary Zr-Ni melts, the viscosity is qualitatively controlled by the packing density.

  2. Water induced geohazards measured with spaceborne interferometry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncos, V.; Serban, F.; Teleaga, D.; Ciocan, V.; Sorin, M.; Caranda, D.; Zamfirescu, F.; Andrei, M.; Copaescu, S.; Radu, M.; Raduca, V.

    2012-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic occurrence of groundwater is inducing surficial crustal deformation processes that can be accurately measured with high spatial density from space, regardless of the ground access conditions. The detection of the surface deformation allows uncovering spatial and temporal patterns of subsurface processes such as land subsidence, cave-ins and differential ground settlement related to water content. InSAR measurements combined with ground truth data permit estimation of the mechanical properties of the rocks and the development of models and scenarios to predict disaster events such as cave-ins, landslides and soil liquefaction in the case of an Earthquake. A number of three sites in Romania that suffer of ground instability because of the water component will be presented. The DInSAR, Interferograms Stacking and Persistent Scatterers Interferometry techniques were applied to retrieve as accurate as possible the displacement information. The first studied site is the city of Bucharest; using 7 years of ERS data ground instability was detected on a large area that represents the historical watershed of the Dambovita river. A network of water wells shows that the ground instability is directly proportional to the groundwater depth. The second site is the Ocnele Mari brine extraction area. The exploitation of the Ocnele Mari salt deposit started from the Roman Empire time using the mining technology and from 1954 the salt dissolution technology which involves injecting water into the ground using a well and extracting the brine (water and salt) through another well. The extraction of salt through dissolution led to slow ground subsidence but the flooding and dissolution of the Roman caves led to catastrophic cave-ins and the relocation of an entire village. The water injection technique is still applied and the Roman cave system is an unknown, therefore further catastrophic events are expected. The existing theoretical simulations of the

  3. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  4. Technique for measuring atomic recoil frequency using coherence functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, S.; Barrett, B.; Chan, I.; Mok, C.; Yavin, I.; Kumarakrishnan, A.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a technique for measuring the atomic recoil frequency using a single-state echo-type atom interferometer that manipulates laser-cooled atoms in the ground state. The interferometer relies on momentum-state interference due to two standing-wave pulses that produce density gratings. The interference is modified by applying a third standing-wave pulse during the interferometer pulse sequence. As a result, the grating contrast exhibits periodic revivals at the atomic recoil frequency ωr as a function of the time at which the third pulse is applied, allowing ωr to be measured easily and precisely. The contrast is accurately described by a coherence function, which is the Fourier transform of the momentum distribution, produced by the third pulse and by the theory of echo formation. If the third pulse is a traveling wave, loss of grating contrast is observed, an effect also described by a coherence function. The decay of the grating contrast as a function of continuous-wave light intensity is used to infer the cross section for photon absorption.

  5. A magnetic field measurement technique using a miniature transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fales, C. L., Jr.; Breckenridge, R. A.; Debnam, W. J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The development, fabrication, and application of a magnetometer are described. The magnetometer has a miniature transducer and is capable of automatic scanning. The magnetometer described here is capable of detecting static magnetic fields as low as 1.6 A/m and its transducer has an active area 0.64 mm by 0.76 mm. Thin and rugged, the transducer uses wire, 0.05 mm in diameter, which is plated with a magnetic film, enabling measurement of transverse magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from a surface. The magnetometer, which is simple to operate and has a fast response, uses an inexpensive clip-on milliammeter (commonly found in most laboratories) for driving and processing the electrical signals and readout. A specially designed transducer holding mechanism replaces the XY recorder ink pen; this mechanism provides the basis for an automatic scanning technique. The instrument has been applied to the measurements of magnetic fields arising from remanent magnetization in experimental plated-wire memory planes and regions of magnetic activity in geological rock specimens.

  6. Trace element measurement in Saliva by NAA and PIXE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidian, M.R.; Vahid Golpayegani, M.; Shojai, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The activity of salivary glands and the chemical and physical properties of saliva, especially in some illnesses in which the activity of salivary glands and the chemical and physical properties alter, sometimes have severe effects on sedimentation and tooth decay. Long-standing investigations have shown the relationship between salivary gland activity and saliva composition in dental carries. Many modern techniques have been employed to measure important elements in saliva. The major elements in saliva include sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, phosphorus, iodine, and fluorine. It should be pointed out that the amount of minerals changes when the diet changes. The major constituent of saliva is water with a density of 1.007 g/cm[sup 3] in which 0.6% is solid, 0.3% organic material and 0.3% inorganic material. In addition to other effects, the acidity (pH) of saliva has a strong effect on tooth sedimentation. Type of work, degree of stress, and mental condition affect salivary gland activity. When the acidity of salivary fluid in the mouth and consequently over the teeth drops, sedimentation increases. In this paper, the results of trace element measurement in saliva are presented.

  7. UCMS - A new signal parameter measurement system using digital signal processing techniques. [User Constraint Measurement System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, H. J.; Su, Y. T.

    1986-01-01

    The User Constraint Measurement System (UCMS) is a hardware/software package developed by NASA Goddard to measure the signal parameter constraints of the user transponder in the TDRSS environment by means of an all-digital signal sampling technique. An account is presently given of the features of UCMS design and of its performance capabilities and applications; attention is given to such important aspects of the system as RF interface parameter definitions, hardware minimization, the emphasis on offline software signal processing, and end-to-end link performance. Applications to the measurement of other signal parameters are also discussed.

  8. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  9. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  10. Momentum--"Evaluating Your Marketing Program: Measuring and Tracking Techniques."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meservey, Lynne D.

    1990-01-01

    Suggests 10 tracking techniques for evaluating marketing performance. Techniques involve utilization rate, inquiry and source of inquiry tracking, appointment and interview tracking, enrollment conversion, cost per inquiry and per enrollment, retention rate, survey results, and "mystery shopper." (RJC)

  11. Comparison of ozone measurement techniques using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Reck, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to verify the ultraviolet absorption technique used in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, two flight experiments were conducted employing several techniques, both in situ and remote, for measuring atmospheric ozone. The first experiment used the NASA CV-990 equipped with an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor and an ultraviolet spectrophotometer, a balloon ozonesonde, and a Dobson station for determining and comparing the ozone concentration data. A second experiment compared ozone data from an automated sampling system aboard a B-747 with data from a manned system installed on the NASA CV-990 during a cross-country flight with both aircraft following the same flight path separated by 32 kilometers.

  12. New technique for retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles from Rayleigh-scatter lidar measurements using nonlinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Jaya; Bandoro, Justin; Sica, R J; McElroy, C Thomas

    2012-11-20

    The conventional method of calculating atmospheric temperature profiles using Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements has limitations that necessitate abandoning temperatures retrieved at the greatest heights, due to the assumption of a pressure value required to initialize the integration at the highest altitude. An inversion approach is used to develop an alternative way of retrieving nightly atmospheric temperature profiles from the lidar measurements. Measurements obtained by the Purple Crow lidar facility located near The University of Western Ontario are used to develop and test this new technique. Our results show temperatures can be reliably retrieved at all heights where measurements with adequate signal-to-noise ratio exist. A Monte Carlo technique was developed to provide accurate estimates of both the systematic and random uncertainties for the retrieved nightly average temperature profile. An advantage of this new method is the ability to seed the temperature integration from the lowest rather than the greatest height, where the variability of the pressure is smaller than in the mesosphere or lower thermosphere and may in practice be routinely measured by a radiosonde, rather than requiring a rocket or satellite-borne measurement. Thus, this new technique extends the altitude range of existing Rayleigh-scatter lidars 10-15 km, producing the equivalent of four times the power-aperture product.

  13. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  14. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading.

    PubMed

    Lin, Y L; Qin, J G; Chen, R; Zhao, P D; Lu, F Y

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m(2)/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  15. A technique for measuring dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y. L.; Qin, J. G.; Chen, R.; Zhao, P. D.; Lu, F. Y.

    2014-09-01

    We develop a novel setup based on the split Hopkinson pressure bar technique to test the dynamic friction coefficient under impact loading. In the setup, the major improvement is that the end of the incident bar near the specimen is wedge-shaped, which results in a combined compressive and shear loading applied to the specimen. In fact, the shear loading is caused by the interfacial friction between specimen and bars. Therefore, when the two loading force histories are measured, the friction coefficient histories can be calculated without any assumptions and theoretical derivations. The geometry of the friction pairs is simple, and can be either cuboid or cylindrical. Regarding the measurements, two quartz transducers are used to directly record the force histories, and an optical apparatus is designed to test the interfacial slip movement. By using the setup, the dynamic friction coefficient of PTFE/aluminum 7075 friction pairs was tested. The time resolved dynamic friction coefficient and slip movement histories were achieved. The results show that the friction coefficient changes during the loading process, the average data of the relatively stable flat plateau section of the friction coefficient curves is 0.137, the maximum normal pressure is 52 MPa, the maximum relative slip velocity is 1.5 m/s, and the acceleration is 8400 m2/s. Furthermore, the friction test was simulated using an explicit FEM code LS-DYNA. The simulation results showed that the constant pressure and slip velocity can both be obtained with a wide flat plateau incident pulse. For some special friction pairs, normal pressure up to a few hundred MPa, interfacial slip velocities up to 10 m/s, and slip movement up to centimeter-level can be expected.

  16. A new remote sensing technique to measure global reservoir storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2012-10-01

    Nearly 60% of the world's large rivers are affected by dams, with more than 33,000 large dams holding back upward of 8300 cubic kilometers of water across the planet. Reservoirs are employed worldwide, helping to ensure regular access to fresh water, mitigate flash flooding, and maintain minimum river flow levels. However, not all reservoirs have adequate and accessible monitoring systems. Having no easily accessible method with which to monitor changing reservoir storage volumes hinders long-term planning and efforts to model the Earth's climate.

  17. Blood pressure measurement in hemodialysis: The importance of the measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Kubrusly, M; de Oliveira, Claudia Maria Costa; Silva, R P; Pinheiro, M A; Rocha, M B C; Magalhães, R M

    2016-03-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension contributes to the high cardiovascular morbidity in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but the accuracy of blood pressure (BP) measurement in this population has not been well studied. To evaluate the agreement between BP measurement using the routine measurement technique (usual method) and the technique recommended by the VII Joint (standard method). This cross-sectional study enrolled 124 patients in a single center who had undergone dialysis for more than three months and were 18 years of age or older. The BP was verified at the start of dialysis by the nursing team (usual method) and by the researchers (standard method). The agreement between the systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) measurements was tested by the Bland-Altman analysis. A difference in BP measurement higher than ±5 mm Hg was considered clinically significant. The studied group had a mean age of 53.2 years. The average difference between routine and standard BP measurement was -6 mm Hg for SBP (limits of agreement: -40.1-28 mm Hg; P <0.001) and -5.6 mm Hg for DBP (limits of agreement: -33.1-21.8 mm Hg; P <0.001). A clinically significant difference in BP measured by both methods was observed in 69.4% of the patients for SBP and in 61.3% for DBP. The disagreement between the results of different BP measurement methods in HD patients was significant and the BP was underestimated using the usual BP method. BP measurement standardization should be encouraged to avoid errors in diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  19. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  20. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-06-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  1. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-01-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  2. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  3. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  4. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  5. High-temperature strain measurement techniques: Current developments and challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1987, a very substantial amount of R&D has been conducted in an attempt to develop reliable strain sensors for the measurements of structural strains during ground testing and hypersonic flight, at temperatures up to at least 2000 deg F. Much of the effort has been focused on requirements of the NASP Program. This presentation is limited to the current sensor development work and characterization studies carried out within that program. It is basically an assessment as to where we are now and what remains to be done in the way of technical accomplishments to meet the technical challenges posed by the requirements and constraints established for the NASP Program. The approach for meeting those requirements and constraints has been multi-disciplinary in nature. It was recognized early on that no one sensor could meet all these requirements and constraints, largely because of the large temperature range (cryogenic to at least 2000 deg F) and many other factors, including the most challenging requirement that the sensor system be capable of obtaining valid 'first cycle data'. Present candidate alloys for resistance-type strain gages include Fe-Cr-Al and Pd-Cr. Although they have superior properties regarding withstanding very high temperatures, they exhibit large apparent strains that must either be accounted for or cancelled out by various techniques, including the use of a dual-element, half-bridge dummy gage, or electrical compensation networks. A significant effort is being devoted to developing, refining, and evaluating the effectiveness of those techniques over a broad range in temperature and time. In the quest to obtain first-cycle data, ways must be found to eliminate the need to prestabilize or precondition the strain gage, before it is attached to the test article. It should be noted that present NASP constraints do not permit prestabilization of the sensor, in situ. Gages are currently being 'heat treated' during manufacture in both the wire- and foil

  6. Measurement of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L-Band: Techniques and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.; LeVine, D.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instruments, that will monitor salinity from space in the near future, require an accurate relationship between salinity/temperature and seawater dielectric constant. This paper will review measurements that were made of the dielectric constant of seawater during the past several years. The objective of the measurements is to determine the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on salinity and on temperature, more accurately than in the past. by taking advantage of modem instrumentation. The measurements of seawater permittivity have been performed as a function of salinity and temperature using a transmission resonant cavity technique. The measurements have been made in the salinity range of 10 to 38 psu and in the temperature range of IOU C to 35 C. These results will be useful in algorithm development for sensor systems such as SMOS and Aquarius. The measurement system consists of a brass microwave cavity that is resonant at 1.413 GHz. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a capillary glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. The diameter of the tube has been made very small so that the amount of seawater introduced in the cavity is small - thus maintaining the sensitivity of the measurements and allowing the use of perturbation theory predicting the seawater permittivity. The change in resonant frequency and the change in cavity Q can be used to determine the real and imaginary pare of the dielectric constant of seawater introduced into the slender tube. The microwave measurements are made by an HPS722D network analyzer. The cavity has been immersed in a uateriethylene-glycol bath which is connected to a Lauda circulator. The circulator keeps the brass cavity at a temperature constant to within 0.01 degrees. The system is automated using a Visual Basic program to control the analyzer and to collect the data. The results of the dielectric constant measurements of seawater will be presented. The measurement results will be

  7. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  8. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  9. Techniques for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectrics and dielectric properties of materials are defined generally, and methods for measuring dielectric properties of agricultural products are described for several frequency ranges from audio frequencies through microwave frequencies. These include measurement with impedance and admittance...

  10. Technique for extending the range of a signal measuring circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chaprnka, Anthony G.; Sun, Shan C.; Vercellotti, Leonard C.

    1978-01-01

    An input signal supplied to a signal measuring circuit is either amplified or attenuated as necessary to establish the magnitude of the input signal within the defined dynamic range of the measuring circuit and the output signal developed by the measuring circuit is subsequently readjusted through amplification or attenuation to develop an output signal which corresponds to the magnitude of the initial input signal.

  11. Measuring colloidal forces with the magnetic chaining technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyfus, R.; Lacoste, D.; Bibette, J.; Baudry, J.

    2009-02-01

    In 1994 Leal Calderon et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2959 (1994)) introduced the magnetic chaining technique to directly probe the force-distance profile between colloidal particles. In this paper, we revisit this approach in two ways. First, we describe a new experimental design which allows us to utilize sample volumes as low as a few microliters, involving femtomoles of surface active macromolecules. Secondly, we extensively describe the characterization and preparation of the magnetic colloids, and we give a quantitative evaluation of performance and resolution of the technique in terms of force and interparticle separation.

  12. Results on plasma temperature measurement using an image processing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavipour, B.; Hatami, A.; Salar Elahi, A.

    Image processing technique (IPT) is a computational technique which is a simple, wide and great for many purposes. In this paper, we used IPT to obtain plasma source such as sun and sunspot temperatures. Sun image was taken by a telescope and DSLR camera and imported to MATLAB software. Using the IPT, we cropped two areas and evaluated their RGB values, using a code which was written according to Python software. We computed wavelengths and then by substituting wavelengths in Wien's law, we obtained sun's surface and sunspot temperature's. The temperature errors for surface and sunspot were 0.57% and 13% respectively.

  13. Application of bag sampling technique for particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2009-11-01

    Bag sampling techniques can be used to temporarily store the aerosol and therefore provide sufficient time to utilize sensitive but slow instrumental techniques for recording detailed particle size distributions. Laboratory based assessment of the method was conducted to examine size dependant deposition loss coefficients for aerosols held in Velostat bags conforming to a horizontal cylindrical geometry. Deposition losses of NaCl particles in the range of 10 nm to 160 nm were analysed in relation to the bag size, storage time, and sampling flow rate. Results of this study suggest that the bag sampling method is most useful for moderately short sampling periods of about 5 minutes.

  14. Optical Reflection Measurement System Using A Swept Modulation Frequency Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, David M.; Leyde, Kent W.

    1989-03-01

    A measurement system has been developed capable of mea-suring reflected optical power as low as 0.0025% with a spot size diam-eter of 24 Am. One application for this system is the characterization of small-area photodetectors. The operation of the measurement system is simple, allowing the operator to quickly make multiple reflection measurements, and it does not require a darkroom. The measurement system merges a microscope, for visual alignment and focusing of the laser beam, with a lightwave component analyzer using modulation vec-tor error correction. A measurement comparison between the analyzer-based system and a power-meter-based system showed that each sys-tem can measure reflections as low as 0.0025%. However, the analyzer-based system offers the advantage of identifying the location and magnitude of system reflections. The system operates at a wavelength of 1310 nm.

  15. Advanced techniques for the measurement of multiple recombination parameters in solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newhouse, M.; Wolf, M.

    1985-01-01

    A survey of bulk recombination measurement techniques was presented. Classical methods were reviewed along with their limiting assumptions and simplifications. A modulated light measurement system was built and showed the large effects of junction capacitance. Techniques for extension of classical methods for measurement of multiparameter multiregression measurements were identified and analyzed.

  16. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF ULTRATRACE LASER SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of Arsenic Speciation Techniques Based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    J.B. Simeonsson, H.D. Beach and D.J. Thomas
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Resear...

  18. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  19. A confirmatory measurement technique for HEU (highly enriched uranium)

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Goldman, A.; Russo, P.A.; Stovall, L.; Brumfield, T.L.; Gunn, C.S.; Watson, D.R.; Beedgen, R.

    1987-01-01

    Precise measurements of the special nuclear material (SNM) in an item can be used to confirm that the item has not been tampered with. These measurements do not require a highly accurate calibration, but they should be based on an attribute that is unique to the SNM. We describe an instrument that performs gamma-ray measurements at three energies: 185.7 keV, 1001 keV, and 2614 keV. This instrument collects data for 200 s from shipping containers (208-l barrels). These measurements help to distinguish the issue of material control - Has any material been diverted. - from the issue of measurement control - Is there a measurement bias.

  20. Measurement techniques investigated for detection of hydrogen chloride gas in ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nine basic techniques are discussed, ranging from concentration (parts per million) to dosage only (parts per million-seconds) measurement techniques. Data for each technique include lower detection limit, response time, instrument status, and in some cases, specificity. Several techniques discussed can detect ambient hydrogen chloride concentrations below 1 part per million with a response time of seconds.

  1. A Technique for Measuring the Solubilities of Gases in Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    measured using a mercury manometer referenced to vacuum. To begin the experiment, a pure, dry gas is injected quickly into the system by opening valve...Tbath Vx - v - V 2 - V 3Apfinal Tm where Pb - ambient pressure (mmHg). The ambient pressure is measured using a mercury manometer and the ambient

  2. Regression Techniques for the Measurement of Psychotherapeutic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloat, Donald; And Others

    The problems involved in measuring psychotherapeutic effectiveness must be addressed first by developing specific criteria for measuring behavior change. These criteria can be established when a clear-cut distinction between acceptable and unacceptable behavior is well defined. To illustrate the potential use of regression methodology in measuring…

  3. A new technique for measuring sputtering yields at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Griffith, J. E.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of thin, self-supporting carbon catcher foils allows one to measure sputtering yields in a broad range of materials with high sensitivity. Analyzing the foils with Rutherford forward scattering, sputtered Al, Si and P surface densities down to 5 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm with uncertainties of about 20 percent have been measured.

  4. Measurements of dimensional accuracy using linear and scanning profile techniques.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A; Huggett, R; Zissis, A

    1992-01-01

    Various measurement methods have been described for the determination of dimensional accuracy and stability of denture base materials. This investigation introduces a computerised coordinate measuring machine (CCMM) and compares it with two methods routinely used for assessment of the accuracy of fit of denture base materials. The results demonstrate that the three methods (digital calipers, optical comparator, and CCMM) are acceptable for linear measurement. The CCMM was also used in its scanning mode to define and to quantify the contour changes of the resin bases. The advantages of the CCMM become apparent when two-dimensional changes require assessment.

  5. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  6. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  7. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum.

  8. Apt strain measurement technique for impulsive loading applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Nanda, Soumya; Kulkarni, Vinayak; Sahoo, Niranjan

    2017-03-01

    The necessity of precise measurement of strain time history for impulsive loading applications has been addressed in the present investigation. Finite element modeling is initially carried out for a hemispherical test model and stress bar assembly to arrive at an appropriate location for strain measurement. In dynamic calibration experiments, strain measurements are performed using two wire and three wire quarter bride arrangements along with half bridge circuit. Usefulness of these arrangements has been verified by analyzing strain signals in time and frequency domains. Comparison of recovered force time histories proved that the half bridge circuit is the most suitable for such applications. Actual shock tube testing of the instrumented hemispherical test model confirmed the applicability of half bridge circuit for short duration strain measurements.

  9. Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Erwin

    2010-05-28

    The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

  10. In-Vivo Techniques for Measuring Electrical Properties of Tissues.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    of a 16-guage hypodermic needle . In-situ dielectric measurements of both living and non-living canine brain were performed on the dura, on the pia...ensure their proper performance and measurement accuracy. The use of a stainless steel hypodermic needle as the outer conductor of the probe provided...fabrication, the design of special coaxial probes, (with the outer conductor being effectively a hypodermic needle ), and the design tooling, and

  11. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-05-22

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed.

  12. A study of radar cross section measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1986-01-01

    Past, present, and proposed future technologies for the measurement of radar cross section were studied. The purpose was to determine which method(s) could most advantageously be implemented in the large microwave anechoic chamber facility which is operated at the antenna test range site. The progression toward performing radar cross section measurements of space vehicles with which the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle will be called upon to rendezvous and dock is a natural outgrowth of previous work conducted in recent years of developing a high accuracy range and velocity sensing radar system. The radar system was designed to support the rendezvous and docking of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle with various other space vehicles. The measurement of radar cross sections of space vehicles will be necessary in order to plan properly for Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle rendezvous and docking assignments. The methods which were studied include: standard far-field measurements; reflector-type compact range measurements; lens-type compact range measurement; near field/far field transformations; and computer predictive modeling. The feasibility of each approach is examined.

  13. The experimental technique of the G^0 measurement.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Julie

    2001-10-01

    The G^0 experiment(JLab experiment E00-006, D.H. Beck, spokesperson.) will measure the parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron-nucleon scattering. The experiment will be performed in Hall C at Jefferson Lab using a dedicated apparatus. In order to achieve the required statistical accuracy of the measurements, a super-conducting toroidal spectrometer, with azimuthally symmetric angular acceptance, and an associated cryogenic target have been constructed. The Focal Plane Detectors are arranged in 8 arrays of 16 arc-shaped scintillator pairs providing a fast signal compatible with the high rates of this counting experiment. For the forward angle measurement, custom built electronics will provide a time-of-flight measurement discriminating elastic recoil protons from pions and inelastic protons. For the backward angle measurements, additional scintillators and Cerenkov counters will provide separation of the elastic electrons from inelastic electrons and pions. An overview of the experimental apparatus and method for the G^0 measurement will be presented.

  14. A new technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination was measured in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, OH, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.. Small clean silicon wafers placed at all desired measurement sites were used as contamination sensors. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet the silicon substrate uniformly, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: (1) continuous, homogeneous film; and (2) islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on examples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  15. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  16. Computer-Aided Techniques for Providing Operator Performance Measures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    the researcher’s ingenuity and the time he has available for the study, and (3) the research process and all associated manual effort must be repeated...ever need to see during the entire mission, or (2) allow various CRT "pAes" to be manually selected. The first technique is objectionable due to the...update the re gression. Four candidato updatente efunctions are generated for each maneuver sector: i q = (X, a, 0M .. ) ! ~FO(Xo.,,,O..,,) " ~ F( 0

  17. A technique to measure eyelid pressure using piezoresistive sensors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alyra J; Davis, Brett A; Collins, Michael J; Carney, Leo G

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, novel procedures were developed using a thin (0.17 mm) tactile piezoresistive pressure sensor mounted on a rigid contact lens to measure upper eyelid pressure. A hydrostatic calibration system was constructed, and the influence of conditioning (prestressing), drift (continued increasing response with a static load), and temperature variations on the response of the sensor were examined. To optimally position the sensor-contact lens combination under the upper eyelid margin, an in vivo measurement apparatus was constructed. Calibration gave a linear relationship between raw sensor output and actual pressure units for loads between 1 and 10 mmHg ( R(2) = 0.96 ). Conditioning the sensor prior to use regulated the measurement response, and sensor output stabilized about 10 s after loading. While sensor output drifts slightly over several hours, it was not significant beyond the measurement time of 1 min used for eyelid pressure. The error associated with calibrating at room temperature but measuring at ocular surface temperature led to a very small overestimation of pressure. Eyelid pressure readings were observed when the upper eyelid was placed on the sensor, and removed during a recording. When the eyelid pressure was increased by pulling the lids tighter against the eye, the readings from the sensor significantly increased.

  18. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meginnis, I; Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to provide adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout in a space suit to reduce the risks associated with manned operations in space suits. Symptoms of elevated CO2 levels range from reduced cognitive performance and headache to unconsciousness and death at high levels of CO2. Because of this, NASA imposes limits on inspired CO2 levels for space suits when they are used in space and for ground testing. Testing and/or analysis must be performed to verify that a space suit meets CO2 washout requirements. Testing for developmental space suits has traditionally used an oronasal mask that collects CO2 samples at the left and rights sides of the mouth. Testing with this mask resulted in artificially elevated CO2 concentration measurements, which is most likely due to the dead space volume at the front of the mask. The mask also extends outward and into the supply gas stream, which may disrupt the washout effect of the suit supply gas. To mitigate these problems, a nasal cannula was investigated as a method for measuring inspired CO2 based on the assumptions that it is low profile and would not interfere with the designed suit gas flow path, and it has reduced dead space. This test series compared the performance of a nasal cannula to the oronasal mask in the Mark III space suit. Inspired CO2 levels were measured with subjects at rest and at metabolic workloads of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Workloads were achieved by use of an arm ergometer or treadmill. Test points were conducted at air flow rates of 2, 4, and 6 actual cubic feet per minute, with a suit pressure of 4.3 psid. Results from this test series will evaluate the accuracy and repeatability across subjects of the nasal cannula collection method, which will provide rationale for using a nasal cannula as the new method for measuring inspired CO2 in a space suit. Proper characterization of sampling methods and of suit CO2 washout capability will better inform requirements definition and verification

  19. Measurement of odour with focus on sampling techniques.

    PubMed

    Bockreis, A; Steinberg, I

    2005-01-01

    The treatment of waste and many manufacturing processes cause odour emissions. In order to prevent odours, the residents and businesses in the neighbourhood of such plants complain about odour, and it becomes necessary to reduce the emissions. To achieve that, the emissions have to be investigated and evaluated in a representative and reproducible manner. The DIN EN 13725 (2003) [DIN EN 13725. 2003. Luftbeschaffenheit--Bestimmung der Geruchsstoffkonzentration mit dynamischer Olfaktometrie--Air quality--Determination of odour concentration by dynamic olfactometry, Deutsche Fassung EN 13725:2003. Beuth Verlag, Berlin (DE)] provides a European standard for the measurement of odour. Nevertheless, the subject of sampling is not standardised; even though it has a substantial influence on the results of the measurements. In this paper, the odour measurement itself, as well as the different kinds of sampling methods (depending on the specific type of source), will be presented and discussed.

  20. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  1. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.

    2002-11-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  2. Investigation of remote sensing techniques of measuring soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Blanchard, A. J.; Nieber, J. L.; Lascano, R.; Tsang, L.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1981-01-01

    Major activities described include development and evaluation of theoretical models that describe both active and passive microwave sensing of soil moisture, the evaluation of these models for their applicability, the execution of a controlled field experiment during which passive microwave measurements were acquired to validate these models, and evaluation of previously acquired aircraft microwave measurements. The development of a root zone soil water and soil temperature profile model and the calibration and evaluation of gamma ray attenuation probes for measuring soil moisture profiles are considered. The analysis of spatial variability of soil information as related to remote sensing is discussed as well as the implementation of an instrumented field site for acquisition of soil moisture and meteorologic information for use in validating the soil water profile and soil temperature profile models.

  3. Method of pectus excavatum measurement based on structured light technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glinkowski, Wojciech; Sitnik, Robert; Witkowski, Marcin; Kocoń, Hanna; Bolewicki, Pawel; Górecki, Andrzej

    2009-07-01

    We present an automatic method for assessment of pectus excavatum severity based on an optical 3-D markerless shape measurement. A four-directional measurement system based on a structured light projection method is built to capture the shape of the body surface of the patients. The system setup is described and typical measurement parameters are given. The automated data analysis path is explained. Their main steps are: normalization of trunk model orientation, cutting the model into slices, analysis of each slice shape, selecting the proper slice for the assessment of pectus excavatum of the patient, and calculating its shape parameter. We develop a new shape parameter (I3ds) that shows high correlation with the computed tomography (CT) Haller index widely used for assessment of pectus excavatum. Clinical results and the evaluation of developed indexes are presented.

  4. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  5. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  6. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  7. Comparative study of optical coherence tomography, photoacoustic technique, and time-of-flight technique in phantom measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinnunen, Matti; Myllylä, Risto

    2006-08-01

    of biomedical imaging techniques, the optical coherence tomography (OCT), photoacoustic (PA) and time-of-flight (TOF) techniques are among the most researched and, consequently, increasingly broadly applied. This article reviews their basic principles, compares their technical aspects and discusses their ability to determine optical parameters. Also studied is their applicability to non-invasive glucose monitoring in Intralipid TM phantom measurements, followed by a discussion of some detected problems. Although suffering from a limited probing depth, OCT was found to have the best capacity for detecting changes in the light scattering properties of Intralipid TM. Photon migration studies with the TOF technique showed changes in pulse amplitude, pulse width and arrival time of the pulse maximum as a function of changes in Intralipid TM concentration, whereas the sensitivity of the PA technique for detecting changes in scattering was less pronounced. However, each technique showed changes in the registered signals when measuring large glucose concentrations in Intralipid TM phantoms. Measurement results were also affected by the varying measurement geometries and the photon energies of the light sources.

  8. Measuring the Readability of Elementary Algebra Using the Cloze Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulm, Gerald

    The relationship to readability of ten variables characterizing structural properties of mathematical prose was investigated in elementary algebra textbooks. Readability was measured by algebra student's responses to two forms of cloze tests. Linear and currilinear correlations were calculated between each structural variable and the cloze test.…

  9. Solvent residue content measured by light scattering technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salkowski, M. J.; Werle, D. K.

    1966-01-01

    Photometric analyzer measures NVR /nonvolatile residue/ in trichloroethylene and other organic solvents. The analyzer converts the liquid solvent to aerosol and passes it between an optically focused light beam and a photodetector that is connected to standard amplifying and readout equipment.

  10. Corruption in Higher Education: Conceptual Approaches and Measurement Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2007-01-01

    Corruption is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. Forms of corruption are multiple. Measuring corruption is necessary not only for getting ideas about the scale and scope of the problem, but for making simple comparisons between the countries and conducting comparative analysis of corruption. While the total impact of corruption is indeed…

  11. Computer-Aided Techniques for Providing Operator Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Edward M.; And Others

    This report documents the theory, structure, and implementation of a performance processor (written in FORTRAN IV) that can accept performance demonstration data representing various levels of operator's skill and, under user control, analyze data to provide candidate performance measures and validation test results. The processor accepts two…

  12. Temperature Measurement Technique Using Phosphorescence of Porphyrin Dyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kura, Kentaro; Someya, Satoshi; Okamoto, Koji

    2007-11-01

    LIF have been developed to measure the temperature, pH and the oxygen concentration in the fluid. However, the frequent excitation of the fluorescent dye causes the quenching effect. In addition, two color LIF should be applied in order to cancel the effect of non-uniform light intensity of excitation. The phosphor emitting the phosphorescence for a few milliseconds by an excitation was measured at the high time resolution, while the phosphorescence lifetime is the function of the temperature. As the phosphorescence dyes, PtTFPP and PdTFPP were tested. Those mixed with Coumarin30 were also demonstrated. These dyes were excited by a CW laser with the wavelength of 405nm. As the result, it was clarified to be able to measure the temperature using these dyes and this laser. Present study is the result of ``High speed three-dimensional direct measurement technology development for the evaluation of heat flux and flow of liquid metal'' entrusted to the University of Tokyo by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT).

  13. New Measurement Techniques Using Tracers within Laser-Produced Plasmas.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-06

    profiles and the above-mentioned physical processes are affected by lateral flow of energy out of the finite focal spot . One then desires measurements of...parameters averaged over the focal spot , one should use an array of detectors at a . range of angles. The error that may result if too few detectors are

  14. Measurement Techniques for Flow Diagnostic in ITAM Impulse Wind Tunnels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    induces an electromotive force of bridge disbalance, proportional to the pressure difference on the membrane, and corresponding current at the system...test series is within 5 %. Figure 14 shows a typical Interferogram obtained by measuring the heat fluxes on the windward surface of a delta wing with

  15. Trojan Horse technique to measure nuclear astrophysics rearrangement reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitaleri, Claudio

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of nucleosynthesis and of energy production in stars requires an increasingly precise measurement of nuclear fusion reactions at the Gamow energy. Because of the Coulomb barrier reaction cross sections in astrophysics cannot be accessed directly at ultra -low energies, unless very favorable conditions are met. Moreover, the energies characterizing nuclear processes in several astrophysical contexts are so low that the presence of atomic electrons must be taken into account. Theoretical extrapolations of available data are then needed to derive astrophysical S(E)-factors. To overcome these experimental difficulties the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been introduced. The method provides a valid alternative path to measure unscreened low-energy cross sections of reactions between charged particles, and to retrieve information on the electron screening potential when ultra-low energy direct measurements are available. While the theory has been discussed in detail in some theoretical works, present in the scientific literature, also in relation to different types of excitation functions (e.g. non-resonant and resonant), work on detailed methodology used to extract the events to be considered for the bare nucleus cross section measurements is still on going. In this work we will present some critical points in the application of THM that deserve to be discussed in more detail.

  16. Elbow Radiographic Anatomy: Measurement Techniques and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Charles A.; Patterson, J. Megan M.; Sutter, Melanie; Krauss, Melissa; Steffen, Jennifer A.; Galatz, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    Background An increase in elbow pathology in adolescents has paralleled an increase in sports participation. Evaluation and classification of these injuries is challenging because of limited information regarding normal anatomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate normal radiographic anatomy in adolescents to establish parameters for diagnosing abnormal development. Established and new measurements were evaluated for reliability and variance based on age and sex. Methods Three orthopaedic surgeons independently and in a standardized fashion evaluated the normal anteroposterior and lateral elbow radiographs of 178 adolescent and young adult subjects. Fourteen measurements were performed including radial neck- shaft angle, articular surface angle, articular surface morphologic assessment (subjective and objective evaluation of the patterns of ridges and sulci), among others. We performed a statistical analysis by age and sex for each measure and assessed for inter and intra-observer reliability. Results The distal humerus articular surface was relatively flat in adolescence and became more contoured with age as objectively demonstrated by increasing depth of the trochlear and trochleocapitellar sulci, and decreasing trochlear notch angle. Overall measurements were similar between males and females, with an increased carrying angle in females. There were several statistically significant differences based on age and sex but these were small and unlikely to be clinically significant. Inter and intra-observer reliability were variable; some commonly utilized tools had poor reliability. Conclusions Most commonly utilized radiographic measures were consistent between sexes, across the adolescent age group, and between adolescents and young adults. Several commonly used assessment tools show poor reliability. Level of evidence Basic Science Study, Anatomic Study, Imaging PMID:22329911

  17. A Free-Space Measurement Technique of Terahertz Dielectric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiansheng; Chang, Tianying; Cui, Hong-Liang; Sun, Zhonglin; Yang, Chuanfa; Yang, Xiuwei; Liu, Lingyu; Fan, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The free-space method for material dielectric characterization in the microwave band is extended to terahertz frequencies. By analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the relative permittivity of the transmission/reflection method for non-magnetic materials, a fast calculation method using a transmission-only method is proposed. Based on the convergence analysis of the algorithm, a method to estimate the initial value is also proposed. Finally, through measurements of the permittivity of high-density polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, and polymethyl methacrylate in the 325-500 GHz band, we verify the rationality of the algorithm and demonstrate its applicability. Through the combination of the two methods, the terahertz dielectric properties of a majority of flat non-conducting solid materials and non-polar liquid materials can be measured.

  18. A Free-Space Measurement Technique of Terahertz Dielectric Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiansheng; Chang, Tianying; Cui, Hong-Liang; Sun, Zhonglin; Yang, Chuanfa; Yang, Xiuwei; Liu, Lingyu; Fan, Wei

    2016-11-01

    The free-space method for material dielectric characterization in the microwave band is extended to terahertz frequencies. By analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of the relative permittivity of the transmission/reflection method for non-magnetic materials, a fast calculation method using a transmission-only method is proposed. Based on the convergence analysis of the algorithm, a method to estimate the initial value is also proposed. Finally, through measurements of the permittivity of high-density polyethylene, polystyrene, polypropylene, and polymethyl methacrylate in the 325-500 GHz band, we verify the rationality of the algorithm and demonstrate its applicability. Through the combination of the two methods, the terahertz dielectric properties of a majority of flat non-conducting solid materials and non-polar liquid materials can be measured.

  19. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The principal gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes, produced in the body of astronauts by cosmic-ray bombardment, which have half-lives long enough to be useful for radiation dose evaluation, are Be-7, Na-22, and Na-24. The sodium isotopes were measured in the preflight and postflight urine and feces, and those feces specimens collected during the manned Apollo missions, by analysis of the urine salts and the raw feces in large crystal multidimensional gamma-ray spectrometers. The Be-7 was chemically separated, and its concentration measured in an all NaI (TL), anticoincidence shielded, scintillation well crystal. The astronaut radiation dose in millirads, as determined for the Apollo 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 missions, was 330, 160, smaller than 315, 870 plus or minus 550, 31, 110, and smaller than 250, respectively.

  20. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  1. Situation Awareness Measurement Techniques for Submarine Track Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-22

    efficient performance in work systems as diverse as combat aviation (Vidulich, McCoy, & Crabtree, 1995), anaesthesiology (Gaba, Howard, & Small, 1995), and...between when the experimenter asks the participant whether they were ‘ready’ to the time that the participant accepts the question. Following this, the...SA question is asked and SPAM response time is measured as the time between when the experimenter completes asking the question to the time the

  2. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  3. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Jackson, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    A paper discusses the need to perform accurate dielectric property measurements on larger sized samples, particularly liquids at microwave frequencies. These types of measurements cannot be obtained using conventional cavity perturbation methods, particularly for liquids or powdered or granulated solids that require a surrounding container. To solve this problem, a model has been developed for the resonant frequency and quality factor of a cylindrical microwave cavity containing concentric cylindrical samples. This model can then be inverted to obtain the real and imaginary dielectric constants of the material of interest. This approach is based on using exact solutions to Maxwell s equations for the resonant properties of a cylindrical microwave cavity and also using the effective electrical conductivity of the cavity walls that is estimated from the measured empty cavity quality factor. This new approach calculates the complex resonant frequency and associated electromagnetic fields for a cylindrical microwave cavity with lossy walls that is loaded with concentric, axially aligned, lossy dielectric cylindrical samples. In this approach, the calculated complex resonant frequency, consisting of real and imaginary parts, is related to the experimentally measured quantities. Because this approach uses Maxwell's equations to determine the perturbed electromagnetic fields in the cavity with the material(s) inserted, one can calculate the expected wall losses using the fields for the loaded cavity rather than just depending on the value of the fields obtained from the empty cavity quality factor. These additional calculations provide a more accurate determination of the complex dielectric constant of the material being studied. The improved approach will be particularly important when working with larger samples or samples with larger dielectric constants that will further perturb the cavity electromagnetic fields. Also, this approach enables the ability to have a

  4. Measurement techniques for the verification of excess weapons materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Yates, M.A.

    1998-12-01

    The end of the superpower arms race has resulted in an unprecedented reduction in stockpiles of deployed nuclear weapons. Numerous proposals have been put forward and actions have been taken to ensure the irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions, including unilateral initiatives such as those made by President Clinton in September 1993 to place fissile materials no longer needed for a deterrent under international inspection, and bilateral and multilateral measures currently being negotiated. For the technologist, there is a unique opportunity to develop the technical means to monitor nuclear materials that have been declared excess to nuclear weapons programs, to provide confidence that reductions are taking place and that the released materials are not being used again for nuclear explosive programs. However, because of the sensitive nature of these materials, a fundamental conflict exists between the desire to know that the bulk materials or weapon components in fact represent evidence of warhead reductions, and treaty commitments and national laws that require the protection of weapons design information. This conflict presents a unique challenge to technologists. The flow of excess weapons materials, from deployed warheads through storage, disassembly, component storage, conversion to bulk forms, and disposition, will be described in general terms. Measurement approaches based on the detection of passive or induced radiation will be discussed along with the requirement to protect sensitive information from release to unauthorized parties. Possible uses of measurement methods to assist in the verification of arms reductions will be described. The concept of measuring attributes of items rather than quantitative mass-based inventory verification will be discussed along with associated information-barrier concepts required to protect sensitive information.

  5. A Split-Root Technique for Measuring Root Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Kingsley B.; Rawlins, Stephen L.

    1981-01-01

    Water encounters various resistances in moving along a path of decreasing potential energy from the soil through the plant to the atmosphere. The reported relative magnitudes of these pathway resistances vary widely and often these results are conflicting. One reason for such inconsistency is the difficulty in measuring the potential drop across various segments of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The measurement of water potentials at the soil-root interface and in the root xylem of a transpiring plant remains a challenging problem. In the divided root experiment reported here, the measured water potential of an enclosed, nonabsorbing branch of the root system of young corn (Bonanza) plants to infer the water potential of the remaining roots growing in soil was used. The selected root branch of the seedling was grown in a specially constructed Teflon test tube into which a screen-enclosed thermocouple psychrometer was inserted and sealed to monitor the root's water potential. The root and its surrounding atmosphere were assumed to be in vapor equilibrium. Images PMID:16661886

  6. Measuring stress in wildlife: techniques for quantifying glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Michael J; Dantzer, Ben; Delehanty, Brendan; Palme, Rupert; Boonstra, Rudy

    2011-08-01

    Stress responses play a key role in allowing animals to cope with change and challenge in the face of both environmental certainty and uncertainty. Measurement of glucocorticoid levels, key elements in the neuroendocrine stress axis, can give insight into an animal's well-being and can aid understanding ecological and evolutionary processes as well as conservation and management issues. We give an overview of the four main biological samples that have been utilized [blood, saliva, excreta (feces and urine), and integumentary structures (hair and feathers)], their advantages and disadvantages for use with wildlife, and some of the background and pitfalls that users must consider in interpreting their results. The matrix of choice will depend on the nature of the study and of the species, on whether one is examining the impact of acute versus chronic stressors, and on the degree of invasiveness that is possible or desirable. In some cases, more than one matrix can be measured to achieve the same ends. All require a significant degree of expertise, sometimes in obtaining the sample and always in extracting and analyzing the glucocorticoid or its metabolites. Glucocorticoid measurement is proving to be a powerful integrator of environmental stressors and of an animal's condition.

  7. Hypersonic Transition Experiments in 3D Cone Flow with New Measurement Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    thermography was used for measuring stationary crossflow vortices. This instability was quantitatively measured. The position where these vortices...different measurement techniques were applied for investigating them: (i) IR- thermography was used for measuring stationary crossflow vortices. This... thermography were presented. Measurements of stationary crossflow vortices were shown and this instability was characterized concerning location

  8. A new technique to determine the lightning charge location from the electric field vector measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravichandran, M.; Kamra, A. K.

    2004-03-01

    A new technique to find out the magnitude and location of the net charge center and the charge destroyed in a lightning flash in a thundercloud has been proposed. The technique is based on the measurements of the electric field vector on the ground surface during a lightning flash. The technique has the advantage of field measurements being made at only one station if simultaneous measurements for the distance of lightning are made with time-to-thunder technique. From our measurements made with a spherical field meter with Maxwell's current density, typical cases of cloud-to-cloud and cloud-to-ground discharges are analyzed. The values of above parameters calculated from this technique are within the normal range of these variables in thunderclouds inferred from other techniques. However, the charge values show significant change when the electric field vector instead of only the vertical electric field measured by conventional field mill is used for the calculations.

  9. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Pogany, A.; Junninen, H.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2010-01-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in Southern Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system; DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system; c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux; Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) Spectrometer. The instruments were compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the main factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  10. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Junninen, H.; Pogany, A.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2009-08-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in S. Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system, DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system, c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux, Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. Each instrument was compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the overruling factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  11. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  12. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  13. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  14. Measurement of soil moisture using remote sensing multisensor radiation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical modeling as well as laboratory and field measurement were coupled with analysis of aircraft data obtained from controlled sites in an effort to enhance understanding of the microwave response due to soil moisture so as to specify sensor parameters and develop inversion algorithms. Models to predict the complex dielectric constant were produced which led to the interpretation of the results in terms of a matrix potential rather than simply moisture content. Similar advances were made in the development of coherent and incoherent radiative transfer models and rough surface scattering models.

  15. A radiosonde thermal sensor technique for measurement of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new system was developed to measure vertical profiles of microthermal turbulence in the free atmosphere. It combines thermal sensor technology with radiosonde balloon systems. The resultant data set from each thermosonde flight is a profile of the strength and distribution of microthermal fluctuations which act as tracers for turbulence. The optical strength of this turbulence is computed and used to predict optical and laser beam propagation statistics. A description of the flight payload, examples of turbulence profiles, and comparison with simultaneous stellar observations are included.

  16. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method, system, apparatus, and computer readable medium has been provided with the ability to obtain a complex permittivity dielectric or a complex permeability micron of a sample in a cavity. One or more complex-valued resonance frequencies f(sub m) of the cavity, wherein each f(sub m) is a measurement, are obtained. Maxwell's equations are solved exactly for dielectric, and/or micron, using the f(sub m) as known quantities, thereby obtaining the dielectric and/or micron of the sample.

  17. Infrared Optical Property Measurement Techniques. Definition and Preliminary Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Temperatura (ms) Test I 1000 7.2 Nitrogen/Argon 1 j 1500 4.6 Nitrogen/Argon | 2000 3.5 Helium/Argon | 2500 2.9 Helium/Argon 3000 2.5...O^. Zr02 at Elevated Temperatures, AFRPL-TR-77-14, The Aerospace Corporation , El Segundo, CA, April 1977. 2. Piuchino, A.B... Corporation , Bethpage, New York, May 1981. 8. Calia, V.S., Konopka, W. , Reed, R.A., and Omon, R.A., "Shock Tube Measurements of IR

  18. Measuring Technique of Bubble Size Distributions in Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Tsuta, Mizuki

    A novel technique to recognize bubbles in bread dough and analyze their size distribution was developed by using a Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS). Samples were taken from the final stage of the mixing process of bread dough which generally consists of four distinctive stages. Also, to investigate the effect of freeze preservation on the size distribution of bubbles, comparisons were made between fresh dough and the dough that had been freeze preserved at .30°C for three months. Bubbles in the dough samples were identified in the images of MSIPS as defocusing spots due to the difference in focal distance created by vacant spaces. In case of the fresh dough, a total of 910 bubbles were recognized and their maximum diameter ranged from 0.4 to 70.5μm with an average of 11.1μm. On the other hand, a total of 1,195 bubbles were recognized from the freeze-preserved sample, and the maximum diameter ranged from 0.9 to 32.7μm with an average of 6.7μm. Small bubbles with maximum diameters less than 10μm comprised approximately 59% and 78% of total bubbles for fresh and freeze-preserved dough samples, respectively. The results indicated that the bubble size of frozen dough is smaller than that of unfrozen one. The proposed method can provide a novel tool to investigate the effects of mixing and preservation treatments on the size, morphology and distribution of bubbles in bread dough.

  19. Optical technique for measurement of random water wave surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrell, F. Y.; Withers, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    An optical system using the refraction of a vertical light ray has been developed for measuring the slope of random wind-generated water waves. The basic elements of the system are photovoltaic cells which are connected to individual amplifiers so that when the refracted light beam is incident on a cell, the output of the cell is amplified and then supplied as input to a comparator. The comparator then provides a specified voltage output, independent of the incident light intensity, as long as it is above a designated background value. The comparators are designed to give output voltages comparable with standard TTL. This arrangement provides a high signal from the cell when it experiences incident light, and a low signal when there is only background light, with the high and low signals at TTL voltage levels.

  20. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique.

    PubMed

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Liu, Tianyi; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively.

  1. Measuring Agarwood Formation Ratio Quantitatively by Fluorescence Spectral Imaging Technique

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Botao; Nguyen, Duykien; Jiang, Kaibin; Tan, Jinfen; Liu, Chunxin; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Shaowei

    2015-01-01

    Agarwood is a kind of important and precious traditional Chinese medicine. With the decreasing of natural agarwood, artificial cultivation has become more and more important in recent years. Quantifying the formation of agarwood is an essential work which could provide information for guiding cultivation and controlling quality. But people only can judge the amount of agarwood qualitatively by experience before. Fluorescence multispectral imaging method is presented to measure the agarwood quantitatively in this paper. A spectral cube from 450 nm to 800 nm was captured under the 365 nm excitation sources. The nonagarwood, agarwood, and rotten wood in the same sample were distinguished based on analyzing the spectral cube. Then the area ratio of agarwood to the whole sample was worked out, which is the quantitative information of agarwood area percentage. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the formation of agarwood was quantified accurately and nondestructively. PMID:26089935

  2. Measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A cosmic radiation dose to the Apollo 17 crew of 1.3 R was calculated from the specific activities of Na-24 in their postflight urine specimens. The specific activities of K-42, Cr-51, Co60, and Sb-124, introduced by injection into the astronauts, are extremely high in these specimens. The Fe-59 and Cs-137 levels are also reported and appear to be normal. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, Cr, Fe, Co, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Sn, As, Sb, Se, Br, Sc, La, Sm, Eu, Tb, Hf, Ta, and Th were measured in urine specimens from the Apollo 17 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. Strontium, barium, gold, cadmium, lanthanum, samarium, europium, terbium, thorium, and tin are reported for the first time. The concentrations or excretion rates of bromine and the alkali metals exhibit singificantly reduced postflight levels and are generally lower than values observed for previous missions. Chromium concentrations reflect radiochromium injections.

  3. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  4. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Measurements of Gas-Phase Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Yoshida, K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D. J.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Hubler, G.; Fortin, T. J.; Sueper, D. J.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) can be a highly selective technique with fast time response for measuring many atmospheric trace gases (e.g., hydroxyl radical (OH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), nitric acid (HNO3)). CIMS is highly versatile and has been used under a wide variety of conditions with many different ion-molecule detection schemes, even for detecting the same molecule. Because of its high proton affinity (853.6 kJ/mol), ammonia (NH3) is another ideal candidate for detection by CIMS. NH3, the dominant gas-phase base in the atmosphere, is a precursor of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfates, compounds that are important constituents of airborne fine particulate matter that affect air quality. The characterization of three NH3 CIMS instruments: an atmospheric pressure ionization instrument and a low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument, both utilizing protonated ethanol cluster ion chemistry, and a different low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument using protonated acetone dimer ion chemistry, is presented here. Instrument performance is assessed using ambient data from both ground-based and airborne field programs to examine detection sensitivity, background signal, and time response. Laboratory characterization of different inlet materials is also presented. All three instruments used PFA Teflon sampling inlets. Instrumental backgrounds were determined by scrubbing NH3 from ambient air using silicon phosphates that release phosphoric acid when exposed to ambient levels of humidity. Standard addition calibrations were performed using NH3 permeation devices whose output was determined via 185nm optical absorption. Regardless of CIMS technique or ion chemistry used, the observed detection sensitivities were all adequate for detecting changes in NH3 at the 10 pptv level on a 1s timescale. The time responses, defined by a 1/e2 decay in the calibration signal, ranged from 5s to 45s for the different sampling inlet configurations and are rapid enough

  5. Requirements and Techniques for Developing and Measuring Simulant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Owens, Charles; Howard, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The 1989 workshop report entitled Workshop on Production and Uses of Simulated Lunar Materials and the Lunar Regolith Simulant Materials: Recommendations for Standardization, Production, and Usage, NASA Technical Publication identify and reinforced a need for a set of standards and requirements for the production and usage of the lunar simulant materials. As NASA need prepares to return to the moon, a set of requirements have been developed for simulant materials and methods to produce and measure those simulants have been defined. Addressed in the requirements document are: 1) a method for evaluating the quality of any simulant of a regolith, 2) the minimum Characteristics for simulants of lunar regolith, and 3) a method to produce lunar regolith simulants needed for NASA's exploration mission. A method to evaluate new and current simulants has also been rigorously defined through the mathematics of Figures of Merit (FoM), a concept new to simulant development. A single FoM is conceptually an algorithm defining a single characteristic of a simulant and provides a clear comparison of that characteristic for both the simulant and a reference material. Included as an intrinsic part of the algorithm is a minimum acceptable performance for the characteristic of interest. The algorithms for the FoM for Standard Lunar Regolith Simulants are also explicitly keyed to a recommended method to make lunar simulants.

  6. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic radiation doses to the crews of the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions of 142 + or - 80, 340 + or - 80, and 210 + or - 130 mR respectively were calculated from the specific activities of Na-22 and Na-24 in the postflight urine specimens of the astronauts. The specific activity of Fe-59 was higher in the urine than in the feces of the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts, and a possible explanation is given. The concentrations of K-40, K-42, Cr-51, Co-60, and Cs-137 in the urine are also reported for these astronauts. The radiation doses received by pilots and navigators flying high altitude missions during the solar flare of March 27 to 30, 1972 were calculated from the specific activity of Na-24 in their urine. These values are compared with the expected radiation dose calculated from the known shape and intensity of the proton spectrum and demonstrate the magnitude of atmospheric shielding. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Fe, Co, Ag, Zn, Hg, As, Sb, Se, and Br were measured in the urine specimens from the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. The mercury and arsenic levels were much higher than expected.

  7. Direct measurement of densification rate using a neutron scattering technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, E. M.; Wingham, D.

    2012-12-01

    A non-destructive method for measuring density, based on neutron-scattering, has been used in the dry snow area of the Greenland Ice Sheet to derive profiles of densification rate over periods ranging from a few days to 5 years. From these observations we have derived a constitutive law for the compaction of dry snow relating strainrate to stress, temperature and the "type" of snow, that is, whether the snow is part of a "winter" wind-compacted layer with rounded grains or a "summer" lower-density hoar layer. We suggest that the processes which allow compaction of the snow also promote sintering, by bringing the snow grains into closer proximity. Higher temperatures increase the initial densification rate for a snow element but also, over time, harden it more rapidly. The net result is a much-reduced apparent activation energy for snow densification, similar to that used by Herron and Langway in their empirical equation derived from ice core density profiles.

  8. Solid Earth science in the 1990s. Volume 3: Measurement techniques and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Reports are contained from the NASA Workshop on Solid Earth Science in the 1990s. The techniques and technologies needed to address the program objectives are discussed. The Measurement Technique and Technology Panel identified (1) candidate measurement systems for each of the measurements required for the Solid Earth Science Program that would fall under the NASA purview; (2) the capabilities and limitations of each technique; and (3) the developments necessary for each technique to meet the science panel requirements. In nearly all cases, current technology or a development path with existing technology was identified as capable of meeting the requirements of the science panels. These technologies and development paths are discussed.

  9. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  10. Field-aligned electric currents and their measurement by the incoherent backscatter technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P.; Cole, K. D.; Lejeume, G.

    1975-01-01

    Field aligned electric currents flow in the magnetosphere in many situations of fundamental geophysical interest. It is shown here that the incoherent backscatter technique can be used to measure these currents when the plasma line can be observed. The technique provides a ground based means of measuring these currents which complements the rocket and satellite ones.

  11. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  12. Intracellular Calcium Gradients in Single Living Cells: Measurement and Analysis by Optical and Digital Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao Viswanadha

    Intracellular calcium (Ca^{2+ }) has been considered as a regulator of many cellular processes. In addition, Ca^{2+ } also plays a key role in mediating actions of many hormones, growth factors, and drugs. This thesis describes two general approaches, digital video and photomultiplier (PMT) based fluorescence microscopic systems, to measure such Ca^{2+} changes throughout the cell. They reveal the heterogeneous spatial and fast temporal changes of Ca^{2+} within a single isolated living cell. In order to measure spatial Ca^ {2+} in three dimensions (3-D), optical section microscopy (OSM) coupled to digital video imaging is introduced. With this approach, an increase in nuclear Ca^{2+} compared to cytosolic Ca^{2+} is detected in human erythroblasts and rat hepatocytes under the addition of growth factors: erythropoietin and epidermal growth factor respectively. In addition, the primary effect of non growth-promoting hormone vasopressin, raise in cytosolic Ca^{2+}, is also observed. These observations are the first to underscore the importance of nuclear Ca^{2+} increase in cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, to track fast Ca^ {2+} transients (mesc) during excitation -contraction (EC) cycle and then examine alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in healthy and diseased (hypertensive) heart cells, a PMT based system is implemented. Significant alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in hypertensive heart cells were observed. This finding is compatible with the clinical finding that patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy suffer a lack of adequate relaxation. Finally, to correlate the Ca^{2+} dynamics in an EC cycle with mechanical activity, a hybrid optical digital processor was developed. The performance of the hybrid processor is analyzed and applied simultaneously with the PMT based system. The mechanical contraction and relaxation of a single cardiac cell closely paralleled that of Ca^{2+} dynamics during an EC cycle. In summary, this thesis illustrates

  13. Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Deringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories - chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and other physicals. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life prediction tests of arrays were selected.

  14. Plasma density measurements using FM-CW millimeter wave radar techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Doane, J.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Modified FM-CW radar techniques using swept millimeter-wave oscillators are useful for determining when a particular density has been reached in a plasma. Narrowband measurements on the Princeton Large Torus (PLT) demonstrate the suitability of these techniques for controlling high-power auxiliary plasma heating systems. Broadband measurements using these same techniques are proposed, by which the density profile could be determined.

  15. Comparative study of various techniques for environmental radon, thoron and progeny measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Gusain, G S; Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, S K; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    Long-term average concentrations of radon, thoron and progeny were measured in normal and high background radiation areas in India using different techniques. Radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were measured using Raduet, Pin-Hole dosimeter, deposition-based CR-39 and deposition-based direct radon/thoron progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS) detector system. All these techniques were used at a same time inside an individual dwelling. Radon concentration was recorded higher than thoron concentration in Garhwal Homes (NBRA) while thoron concentration was found relatively higher in the houses of Chhatarpur area (HBRA) in Odisha, India. The values measured with the CR-39 detector-based technique were found comparable with the values measured with the LR-115 detector-based technique. The comparisons of results using various techniques and their usefulness in radiation measurements are discussed in detail.

  16. Overview of Selected Measurement Techniques for Aerodynamics Testing in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2000-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is. therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a around-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  17. Application of Replica Technique and SEM in Accuracy Measurement of Ceramic Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifkovic, B.; Budak, I.; Todorovic, A.; Hodolic, J.; Puskar, T.; Jevremovic, D.; Vukelic, D.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a comparative study of the measuring values of the marginal gap related to the ceramic crowns made by dental CAD/CAM system using the replica technique and SEM. The study was conducted using three experimental groups, which consisted of ceramic crowns manufactured by the Cerec CAD/CAM system. The scanning procedure was carried out using three specialized dental 3D digitization systems from the Cerec family - two types of extraoral optical scanning systems and an intraoral optical scanner. Measurements of the marginal gap were carried out using the replica technique and SEM. The comparison of aggregate values of the marginal gap using the replica technique showed a statistically significant difference between the systems. The measured values of marginal gaps of ceramic crowns using the replica technique were significantly lower compared to those measured by SEM. The results indicate that the choice of technique for measuring the accuracy of ceramic crowns influences the final results of investigation.

  18. The time-shift technique for measurement size of non-transparent spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Walter; Tropea, Cameron

    2014-08-01

    In this study we introduce the time-shift technique, also known as the pulsed-displacement technique, as a means of measuring size and velocity of spherical particles. The measurement technique is not new, it has been introduced by Semidetnov[1] in 1985 and more generally discussed by Hess and Wood[2], Lin et al[3], Damaschke et al.[4] and Albrecht et al[5]. The novelty introduced in this study is the application of the technique to measure non-transparent particles, which are quite common for example in spray drying processes or in paint sprays. In this contribution the basic working principle of the time-shift technique will be reviewed and an optical configuration suitable for the measurement of non-transparent droplets will be presented. The signal generation and processing will be discussed. Example measurements in a milk spray are presented.

  19. Measurement of precision oscillator phase noise using the two-oscillator coherent down-conversion technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnanelli, Christopher J.; Cashin, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of precision frequency standard phase noise and spurious outputs is addressed, using the two-oscillator coherent downconversion technique. Focus is on techniques for making accurate measurements of phase noise and spurious outputs within 100 KHz of a carrier. Significant sources of measurement error related to hardware design problems and inadequate measurement procedures are discussed: measurement errors resulting from system noise sources, phase-locked loop effects, and system bandwidth limitations. In addition, methods and design considerations for minimizing the effects of such errors are presented. Analytic discussions and results are supplemented with actual test data and measurements made using measurement hardware developed at the Ball Corporation, Efratom Division.

  20. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, dizziness, and in severe cases can lead to unconsciousness and death. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Prior work conducted by the EPL examined several different wearable, respirator style, masks that could be used to sample air from the vicinity surround the nose and mouth of a suited test subject. Previously published studies utilized these masks, some being commercial products and some novel designs, to monitor CO2 under various exercise and flow conditions with mixed results for repeatability and/or consistency between subjects. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device that is placed directly in the flow path of the user as they breathe. A nasal cannula was used to sample air inhaled by the test subjects during both rest and exercise conditions. Eight subjects were tasked with walking on a treadmill or operating an arm ergometer to reach target metabolic rates of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid for all tests, with supply flow rates of 6, 4, and 2 actual cubic feet per minute depending on the test condition. Each test configuration was conducted twice with subjects breathing

  1. A transient liquid crystal thermography technique for gas turbine heat transfer measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekkad, Srinath V.; Han, Je-Chin

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents in detail the transient liquid crystal technique for convective heat transfer measurements. A historical perspective on the active development of liquid crystal techniques for convective heat transfer measurement is also presented. The experimental technique involves using a thermochromic liquid crystal coating on the test surface. The colour change time of the coating at every pixel location on the heat transfer surface during a transient test is measured using an image processing system. The heat transfer coefficients are calculated from the measured time responses of these thermochromic coatings. This technique has been used for turbine blade internal coolant passage heat transfer measurements as well as turbine blade film cooling heat transfer measurements. Results can be obtained on complex geometry surfaces if visually accessible. Some heat transfer results for experiments with jet impingement, internal cooling channels with ribs, flow over simulated TBC spallation, flat plate film cooling, cylindrical leading edge and turbine blade film cooling are presented for demonstration.

  2. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique is presented for directly measuring the core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines. The technique requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far-field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross-spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine core. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an AVCO Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  3. Dynamic Measurement of the J Integral in Ductile Metals: Comparison of Experimental and Numerical Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    proven experimental techniques for measruing J under static loading, few proven experimental techniques exist for measurement of the time history of J...Freund[9], who estimate jd by measuring the tran- sient load displacement records and by using the quasi-static formula for deeply notched round bars...HY-100 steel, loaded by a projectile, are compared to experimental measurements performed by means of the interferometric strain- displacement gauge

  4. Analysis and correction of ground reflection effects in measured narrowband sound spectra using cepstral techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Stevens, G. H.; Leininger, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflections generate undesirable effects on acoustic measurements such as those conducted outdoors for jet noise research, aircraft certification, and motor vehicle regulation. Cepstral techniques developed in speech processing are adapted to identify echo delay time and to correct for ground reflection effects. A sample result is presented using an actual narrowband sound pressure level spectrum. The technique can readily be adapted to existing fast Fourier transform type spectrum measurement instrumentation to provide field measurements/of echo time delays.

  5. Offset reduction in Hall effect measurements using a nonswitching van der Pauw technique.

    PubMed

    Riss, O; Shaked, E; Karpovsky, M; Gerber, A

    2008-07-01

    A nonswitching van der Pauw technique, which uses two electrically isolated alternating current sources operating at two different frequencies and two lock-in amplifiers, is suggested for Hall effect measurements. Parasitic offset voltage, typical for this type of measurements, is reduced by averaging two sets of data accumulated simultaneously. Application of the technique is particularly useful when the offset changes on a time scale comparable to the measurement cycle.

  6. A new technique to measure the spectral properties of conifer needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    A technique that enables the measurement of reflectance and transmittance of narrow leaves or needles with spectroradiometers equipped with a light source and integrating sphere is described. Measurement procedures and formulas for optical property calculations are presented. A test of the techniques resulted in absolute reflectance differences of 3 percent or less when comparing optical properties measured for whole leaves and narrow strips cut from the leaves.

  7. Low power autocorrelation technique based on the degree-of-polarization measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junhao; Yu, Changyuan

    2010-12-01

    Based on the degree-of-polarization (DOP) measurement, an autocorrelation technique to measure the pulse width of chirp-free optical short pulse with a very low optical power (<-60 dBm) is demonstrated. The impacts of chirp and misalignment of the input light are also discussed in detail. The pulse width measurement results are consistent with the conventional second-harmonic generation (SHG) autocorrelation, while our autocorrelation technique does not require high input power or rigid optical alignment.

  8. Introduction of measurement techniques in ultrasonic electronics: Basic principles and recent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Ebihara, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    Measurement — the act of measuring physical properties that we perform — has the potential to contribute to the successful advancement of sciences and society. To open doors in physics and other sciences, various measurement methods and related applications have been developed, and ultrasound has remained a useful probe, power source, and interesting measurement object for the past two centuries. In this paper, we first summarize the basic principles of ultrasound from the viewpoint of measurement techniques for readers who just have started studying or are interested in the field of ultrasonic electronics. Moreover, we also introduce recent studies — ultrasonic properties of materials, measurement techniques, piezoelectric devices, nonlinear acoustics, biomedical ultrasound, and ocean acoustics — and their trends related to measurement techniques in ultrasonic electronics to provide some ideas for related applications.

  9. High-resolution OH LIF velocity measurement technique for high-speed reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klavuhn, K. G.; Gauba, G.; Mcdaniel, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A nonintrusive optical technique was developed for the quantitative study of velocity fields in steady, high-speed, reacting flows. A narrow-linewidth laser source was tuned through an isolated OH absorption line to measure the Doppler-shifted linecenter frequency relative to an iodine reference line. A counterpropagating beam approach was used to eliminate collisional impact shift effects. Pointwise measurements of velocity were made in a unique reacting underexpanded jet facility as an extensive calibration of the technique over a wide range of flow conditions. The extension of the technique to planar measurements is also discussed.

  10. Online and offline experimental techniques for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons recovery and measurement.

    PubMed

    Comandini, A; Malewicki, T; Brezinsky, K

    2012-03-01

    The implementation of techniques aimed at improving engine performance and reducing particulate matter (PM) pollutant emissions is strongly influenced by the limited understanding of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formation chemistry, in combustion devices, that produces the PM emissions. New experimental results which examine the formation of multi-ring compounds are required. The present investigation focuses on two techniques for such an experimental examination by recovery of PAH compounds from a typical combustion oriented experimental apparatus. The online technique discussed constitutes an optimal solution but not always feasible approach. Nevertheless, a detailed description of a new online sampling system is provided which can serve as reference for future applications to different experimental set-ups. In comparison, an offline technique, which is sometimes more experimentally feasible but not necessarily optimal, has been studied in detail for the recovery of a variety of compounds with different properties, including naphthalene, biphenyl, and iodobenzene. The recovery results from both techniques were excellent with an error in the total carbon balance of around 10% for the online technique and an uncertainty in the measurement of the single species of around 7% for the offline technique. Although both techniques proved to be suitable for measurement of large PAH compounds, the online technique represents the optimal solution in view of the simplicity of the corresponding experimental procedure. On the other hand, the offline technique represents a valuable solution in those cases where the online technique cannot be implemented.

  11. Investigation of laser Doppler anemometry in developing a velocity-based measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Ki Won

    2009-12-01

    Acoustic properties, such as the characteristic impedance and the complex propagation constant, of porous materials have been traditionally characterized based on pressure-based measurement techniques using microphones. Although the microphone techniques have evolved since their introduction, the most general form of the microphone technique employs two microphones in characterizing the acoustic field for one continuous medium. The shortcomings of determining the acoustic field based on only two microphones can be overcome by using numerous microphones. However, the use of a number of microphones requires a careful and intricate calibration procedure. This dissertation uses laser Doppler anemometry (LDA) to establish a new measurement technique which can resolve issues that microphone techniques have: First, it is based on a single sensor, thus the calibration is unnecessary when only overall ratio of the acoustic field is required for the characterization of a system. This includes the measurements of the characteristic impedance and the complex propagation constant of a system. Second, it can handle multiple positional measurements without calibrating the signal at each position. Third, it can measure three dimensional components of velocity even in a system with a complex geometry. Fourth, it has a flexible adaptability which is not restricted to a certain type of apparatus only if the apparatus is transparent. LDA is known to possess several disadvantages, such as the requirement of a transparent apparatus, high cost, and necessity of seeding particles. The technique based on LDA combined with a curvefitting algorithm is validated through measurements on three systems. First, the complex propagation constant of the air is measured in a rigidly terminated cylindrical pipe which has very low dissipation. Second, the radiation impedance of an open-ended pipe is measured. These two parameters can be characterized by the ratio of acoustic field measured at multiple

  12. Measurement of Device Parameters Using Image Recovery Techniques in Large-Scale IC Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scheick, Leif; Edmonds, Larry

    2004-01-01

    Devices that respond to radiation on a cell level will produce histograms showing the relative frequency of cell damage as a function of damage. The measured distribution is the convolution of distributions from radiation responses, measurement noise, and manufacturing parameters. A method of extracting device characteristics and parameters from measured distributions via mathematical and image subtraction techniques is described.

  13. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  14. Spectral resolution measurement technique for Czerny-Turner spectrometers based on spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Martínez, Ramiro; Garduño Mejía, Jesús; Rosete Aguilar, Martha; Román Moreno, Carlos J.

    2016-08-01

    We propose the design of a new technique for measuring the spectral resolution of a Czerny-Turner Spectrometer based on spectral interferometry of ultrashort laser pulses. It is well known that ultrashort pulse measurement like SPIDER and TADPOLE techniques requires a precise and well characterized spectrum, especially in fringe resolution. We developed a new technique, to our knowledge, in which by measuring the nominal fringe spacing of a spectral interferogram one can characterize the spectral resolution in a Czerny-Turner spectrometer using Ryleigh's criteria. This technique was tested in a commercial Czerny-Turner spectrometer. The results demonstrate a consistent spectral resolution between what was reported by the manufacturer. The actual calibration technique was applied in a homemade broadband astigmatism-free Czerny-Turner spectrometer. Theory and experimental results are presented.

  15. An Investigation of a Photographic Technique of Measuring High Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siviter, James H., Jr.; Strass, H. Kurt

    1960-01-01

    A photographic method of temperature determination has been developed to measure elevated temperatures of surfaces. The technique presented herein minimizes calibration procedures and permits wide variation in emulsion developing techniques. The present work indicates that the lower limit of applicability is approximately 1,400 F when conventional cameras, emulsions, and moderate exposures are used. The upper limit is determined by the calibration technique and the accuracy required.

  16. Validity of using backward Lagrangian Stochastic technique in measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates the accuracy of measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoons using backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) technique. The bLs technique was originally developed for relatively homogeneous terrains without any obstacles causing significant windflow disturbance. The errors ass...

  17. Goal Attainment Scaling as a Clinical Measurement Technique in Communication Disorders: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Ralf W.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of client progress is an important topic in communicative disorders research and clinical literature. Goal attainment scaling (GAS) is a technique for evaluating individual progress toward goals. Despite recognition of GAS as a clinical-outcome assessment technique in other clinical professions, the current debate on measuring client…

  18. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  19. Surface displacement measured by beam distortion detection technique: Application to picosecond ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2006-11-15

    A sensitive technique of surface displacement measurement without interferometry is proposed for the goals of picosecond ultrasonics. Simple description of detection mechanism is provided on the basis of paraxial approximation of light diffraction. Test experiments with gold and tungsten layers have been performed and analyzed. The efficiency of the technique is compared with interferometry and reflectometry methods.

  20. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERGLASS-REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses several projects to measure hydrocarbon emissions associated with the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastics. The main purpose of the projects was to evaluate pollution prevention techniques to reduce emissions by altering raw materials, application equ...

  1. Measurement techniques for assessing the olfactory impact of municipal sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Jacek; Byliński, Hubert; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    The study presents information about the measurement techniques used for the assessment of air quality in terms of the olfactory intensity resulting from the operation of municipal sewage treatment plants. Advantages and disadvantages of the measurement techniques used are presented. Sources of malodourous substance emission from sewage treatment plants were described, and the malodourous substances emitted were characterised. Trends in development of analysis and monitoring of the malodourous substances in the air were also presented.

  2. A novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujii, K.; Fusayasu, T.; Ikematsu, K.; Kato, Y.; Kawada, S.; Matsuda, T.; Settles, R. D.; Sugiyama, A.; Takahashi, T.; Tian, J.; Watanabe, T.; Yonamine, R.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors using a UV laser. The technique is simple and requires a short data-taking time of about ten minutes. Furthermore, it is applicable for relatively low gas gains. Our experimental setup as well as the measurement principle, and the results obtained with a stack of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) operated in several gas mixtures are presented.

  3. Absorption measurement of thin films by using photothermal techniques: The influence of thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.; Thomas, R.L.; Fan, Z.X.

    1995-12-31

    Photothermal techniques are widely used for measuring optical absorption of thin film coatings. In these applications the calibration of photothermal signal is typically based on the assumption that the thermal properties of the thin film make very little contribution. In this paper we take mirage technique as an example and present a detailed analysis of the influence of thin film thermal properties on absorption measurements. The results show that the traditional calibration method is not valid on surprisingly many situations.

  4. Laser and acoustic Doppler techniques for the measurement of fluid velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of current laser and acoustic Doppler techniques is presented. Results obtained by Doppler anemometry and conventional sensors are compared. Comparisons include simultaneous velocity measurements by hot wire and a three-dimensional laser anemometer made in a gaseous pipe flow as well as direct comparisons of atmospheric velocities measured with propeller and cup anemometry. Scanning techniques are also discussed. Conclusions and recommendations for future work are presented.

  5. Combined laser calorimetry and photothermal technique for absorption measurement of optical coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Li Bincheng; Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev

    2006-08-10

    To the best of our knowledge, a combined sensitive technique employing both laser calorimetry and a surface thermal lens scheme for measuring absorption values of optical coatings is presented for the first time. Laser calorimetric and pulsed surface thermal lens signals are simultaneously obtained with a highly reflecting UV coating sample irradiated at 193 nm. The advantages and potential applications of the combined technique and the experimental factors limiting the measurement sensitivity are discussed.

  6. Combined laser calorimetry and photothermal technique for absorption measurement of optical coatings.

    PubMed

    Li, Bincheng; Blaschke, Holger; Ristau, Detlev

    2006-08-10

    To the best of our knowledge, a combined sensitive technique employing both laser calorimetry and a surface thermal lens scheme for measuring absorption values of optical coatings is presented for the first time. Laser calorimetric and pulsed surface thermal lens signals are simultaneously obtained with a highly reflecting UV coating sample irradiated at 193 nm. The advantages and potential applications of the combined technique and the experimental factors limiting the measurement sensitivity are discussed.

  7. Techniques for determining propulsion system forces for accurate high speed vehicle drag measurements in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaiz, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    As part of a NASA program to evaluate current methods of predicting the performance of large, supersonic airplanes, the drag of the XB-70 airplane was measured accurately in flight at Mach numbers from 0.75 to 2.5. This paper describes the techniques used to determine engine net thrust and the drag forces charged to the propulsion system that were required for the in-flight drag measurements. The accuracy of the measurements and the application of the measurement techniques to aircraft with different propulsion systems are discussed. Examples of results obtained for the XB-70 airplane are presented.

  8. Laser induced deflection technique for absolute thin film absorption measurement: optimized concepts and experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Muehlig, Christian; Kufert, Siegfried; Bublitz, Simon; Speck, Uwe

    2011-03-20

    Using experimental results and numerical simulations, two measuring concepts of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique are introduced and optimized for absolute thin film absorption measurements from deep ultraviolet to IR wavelengths. For transparent optical coatings, a particular probe beam deflection direction allows the absorption measurement with virtually no influence of the substrate absorption, yielding improved accuracy compared to the common techniques of separating bulk and coating absorption. For high-reflection coatings, where substrate absorption contributions are negligible, a different probe beam deflection is chosen to achieve a better signal-to-noise ratio. Various experimental results for the two different measurement concepts are presented.

  9. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging system skin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced in proportion to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  10. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  11. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P.

    2015-06-15

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others.

  12. ‘Dose-to-Mother’ Deuterium Oxide Dilution Technique: An Accurate Strategy to Measure Vitamin A Intake in Breastfed Infants

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Teros, Veronica; Limon-Miro, Ana Teresa; Astiazaran-Garcia, Humberto; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A.; Tortoledo-Ortiz, Orlando; Valencia, Mauro E.

    2017-01-01

    In Mexico, infants (0–2 years old) show the highest prevalence of vitamin A deficiency (VAD), measured by serum retinol concentrations. Thus, we consider that low vitamin A (VA) intake through breast milk (BM) combined with poor weaning practices are the main factors that contribute to VAD in this group. We combined the assessment of VA status in lactating women using BM retinol and a stable isotope ‘dose-to-mother’ technique to measure BM production in women from urban and agricultural areas. Infants’ mean BM intake was 758 ± 185 mL, and no difference was observed between both areas (p = 0.067). Mean BM retinol concentration was 1.09 μmol/L, which was significantly lower for the agricultural area (p = 0.028). Based on BM retinol concentration, 57% of women were VAD; although this prevalence fell to 16% when based on fat content. Regardless of the VA biomarker used here, infants from the urban and agricultural areas cover only 66% and 49% of their dietary adequate intake from BM, respectively (p = 0.054). Our data indicate that VAD is still a public health concern in Mexico. Adopting both methods to assess VA transfer from the mother to the breastfed child offers an innovative approach towards the nutritional assessment of vulnerable groups. PMID:28230781

  13. A test technique for measuring lightning-induced voltages on aircraft electrical circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walko, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a test technique used for the measurement of lightning-induced voltages in the electrical circuits of a complete aircraft is described. The resultant technique utilizes a portable device known as a transient analyzer capable of generating unidirectional current impulses similar to lightning current surges, but at a lower current level. A linear relationship between the magnitude of lightning current and the magnitude of induced voltage permitted the scaling up of measured induced values to full threat levels. The test technique was found to be practical when used on a complete aircraft.

  14. Comparing and assessing different measurement techniques for mercury in coal systhesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.P.; Richardson, C.F.

    1995-11-01

    Three mercury measurement techniques were performed on synthesis gas streams before and after an amine-based sulfur removal system. The syngas was sampled using (1) gas impingers containing a nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide solution, (2) coconut-based charcoal sorbent, and (3) an on-line atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a gold amalgamation trap and cold vapor cell. Various impinger solutions were applied upstream of the gold amalgamation trap to remove hydrogen sulfide and isolate oxidized and elemental species of mercury. The results from these three techniques are compared to provide an assessment of these measurement techniques in reducing gas atmospheres.

  15. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  16. A Review of Emerging Analytical Techniques for Objective Physical Activity Measurement in Humans.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cain C T; Barnes, Claire M; Stratton, Gareth; McNarry, Melitta A; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Summers, Huw D

    2017-03-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most prevalent risk factors for non-communicable diseases in the world. A fundamental barrier to enhancing physical activity levels and decreasing sedentary behavior is limited by our understanding of associated measurement and analytical techniques. The number of analytical techniques for physical activity measurement has grown significantly, and although emerging techniques may advance analyses, little consensus is presently available and further synthesis is therefore required. The objective of this review was to identify the accuracy of emerging analytical techniques used for physical activity measurement in humans. We conducted a search of electronic databases using Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar. This review included studies written in English and published between January 2010 and December 2014 that assessed physical activity using emerging analytical techniques and reported technique accuracy. A total of 2064 papers were initially retrieved from three databases. After duplicates were removed and remaining articles screened, 50 full-text articles were reviewed, resulting in the inclusion of 11 articles that met the eligibility criteria. Despite the diverse nature and the range in accuracy associated with some of the analytic techniques, the rapid development of analytics has demonstrated that more sensitive information about physical activity may be attained. However, further refinement of these techniques is needed.

  17. Comparison of techniques for measurement of ambient levels of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Shepson, P.B.; Hodges, D.N.; Nero, C.M.; Arnts, R.R.; Dasgupta, P.K.; Hwang, H.; Kok, G.L.; Lind, J.A.; Lazrus, A.L.; Mackay, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to measure hydrogen peroxide from three sources: (1) zero air in the presence and absence of common interferences, (2) steady-state irradiations of hydrocarbon/NO/sub x/ mixtures, and (3) ambient air. The techniques employed for measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ included infrared absorption from a diode laser, fluorescence from an enzymatically produced complex, and chemiluminescence from reaction with luminol. The measurements were conducted simultaneously from a common manifold. Four systems, each of which utilized one of the above techniques, were compared with respect to sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range in measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentrations ranging from 0.062 to 128 ppbv. For pure samples measured in zero air, agreement of 14-23% was achieved when compared to standard values. In these examples, there was no indication of interferences for an H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ level of 6 ppbv except in the luminol technique where a negative interference was caused by SO/sub 2/. Agreement among techniques was much worse for measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced in the photochemical mixtures. In these mixtures, significant concentrations of organic peroxide were also measured by the enzymatic techniques.

  18. Technique for measuring the three-dimensional shapes of telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhenzhou

    2016-09-01

    Telescope mirrors determine the imaging quality and the observation ability of the telescopes. Unfortunately, manufacturing highly accurate mirrors remains a bottleneck problem in space optics. One primary cause is the lack of a technique to robustly measure the three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of mirrors for inverse engineering. After centuries of study, researchers developed different techniques for testing the quality of telescope mirrors and proposed different methods for measuring the 3-D shapes of mirrors. Among them, interferometers become popular in evaluating the surface errors of the manufactured mirrors. However, interferometers could not measure some important mirror parameters, e.g., paraxial radius, geometry dimension, and eccentric errors, directly and accurately although these parameters are essential for mirror manufacturing. For those methods that could measure these parameters, their measurement accuracies are far beyond satisfactory. We present a technique for robust measurement of the 3-D shapes of mirrors with single-shot projection. Experimental results show that this technique is significantly more robust than state-of-the-art techniques, which makes it feasible for commercial devices to measure the shapes of mirrors quantitatively and robustly.

  19. A comparison of flat-field measurement techniques for optical streak cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.S.; Wiedwald, J.D.

    1988-08-01

    A technique for calibrating the flat-field response and geometric distortion of optical steak cameras using high-power lasers and electro-optic pulse shaping hardware was reported previously. The laser hardware provides a temporally-flat light pulse that can be used to calibrate streak cameras operating with sweep durations of 3- 10 ns. Although this technique is successful, the hardware involved is expensive and the process is complex. Based on the analysis of calibrations made at these fast sweep rates, we developed a new technique to measure the flat-field response of an optical streak camera using an array of visible light emitting diodes (LED) and a slow (/approximately/10..mu..s) sweep generator. We will discuss the new slow technique, and will present a comparison between calibration measurements made using the two techniques. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Uncertainty quantification of three-dimensional velocimetry techniques for small measurement depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Thomas; Hain, Rainer; Kähler, Christian J.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the multi-camera techniques tomographic PTV and 3D-PTV as well as the single-camera defocusing PTV approach are assessed for flow measurements with a small measurement depth in conjunction with a high resolution along the optical axis. This includes the measurement of flows with strong velocity gradients in z direction and flow features, which have smaller scales than the actual light sheet thickness. Furthermore, in fields like turbomachinery, the measurement of flows in domains with small depth dimensions is of great interest. Typically, these domains have dimensions on the order of 100 mm in z direction and of 101 mm in x and y direction. For small domain depths, employing a 3D flow velocimetry technique is inevitable, since the measurement depths lie in the range of the light sheet thickness. To resolve strong velocity gradients and small-scale flow features along the z axis, the accuracy and spatial resolution of the 3D technique are very important. For the comparison of the different measurement methods, a planar Poiseuille flow is investigated. Quantitative uncertainty analyses reveal the excellent suitability of all three methods for the measurement of flows in domains with small measurement depths. Naturally, the multi-camera approaches tomographic PTV and 3D-PTV yield lower uncertainties, since they image the measurement volume from different angles. Other criteria, such as optical access requirements, hardware costs, and setup complexity, clearly favor defocusing PTV over the more complex multi-camera techniques.

  1. Interferometric Dynamic Measurement: Techniques Based on High-Speed Imaging or a Single Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  2. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  3. An optical technique to measure ion engine grid distortion due to differential thermal expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trava-Airoldi, V. J.; Garner, C. E.; Pivirotto, T. J.; Brophy, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an optical technique developed for measuring small differential grid displacements due to thermal expansion of an ion thruster accelerator system. The technique is based on confocal scanning optical microscope type II. For the measurements of small displacements where there are distances on the order of a meter or more between the lens plane and the sample, some of the optical components are moved while the sample is kept fixed. The feasibility of applying this technique to measure the thermally induced ion thruster grid displacements was demonstrated in a bench-top simulation. It is noted that this technique can also provide information on grid movement resulting from thermal transients such as the start-up.

  4. Novel Optical Technique Developed and Tested for Measuring Two-Point Velocity Correlations in Turbulent Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Goldburg, Walter I.

    2002-01-01

    A novel technique for characterizing turbulent flows was developed and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The work is being done in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh, through a grant from the NASA Microgravity Fluid Physics Program. The technique we are using, Homodyne Correlation Spectroscopy (HCS), is a laser-light-scattering technique that measures the Doppler frequency shift of light scattered from microscopic particles in the fluid flow. Whereas Laser Doppler Velocimetry gives a local (single-point) measurement of the fluid velocity, the HCS technique measures correlations between fluid velocities at two separate points in the flow at the same instant of time. Velocity correlations in the flow field are of fundamental interest to turbulence researchers and are of practical importance in many engineering applications, such as aeronautics.

  5. Vibration measurement based on the optical cross-correlation technique with femtosecond pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jibo; Wu, Tengfei; Zhao, Chunbo; Li, Shuyi

    2016-10-01

    Two vibration measurement methods with femtosecond pulsed laser based on the optical cross-correlation technique are presented independently in this paper. The balanced optical cross-correlation technique can reflect the time jitter between the reference pluses and measurement pluses by detecting second harmonic signals using type II phase-matched nonlinear crystal and balanced amplified photo-detectors. In the first method, with the purpose of attaining the vibration displacement, the time difference of the reference pulses relative to the measurement pluses can be measured using single femtosecond pulsed laser. In the second method, there are a couple of femtosecond pulsed lasers with high pulse repetition frequency. Vibration displacement associated with cavity length can be calculated by means of precisely measuring the pulse repetition frequency. The results show that the range of measurement attains ±150μm for a 500fs pulse. These methods will be suited for vibration displacement measurement, including laboratory use, field testing and industrial application.

  6. Comparison of techniques for measurement of ambient levels of hydrogen peroxide (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Shepson, P.B.; Hodges, D.N.; Nero, C.M.; Arnts, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A study measured hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) from three sources: (1) zero air in the presence and absence of common interferences; (2) steady-state irradiations of hydrocarbon/NOX mixtures; and (3) ambient air. The techniques employed for measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ included infrared absorption from a diode laser, fluorescence from an enzymatically produced complex, and chemiluminescence from reaction with luminol. Four systems, each of which utilized one of the above techniques, were compared with respect to sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range in measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentrations ranging from 0.062 to 128 ppbv. There was no indication of interferences for an H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ level of 6 ppbv except in the luminol technique, where a negative interference was caused by SO/sub 2/. Agreement among techniques was much worse for measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced in the photochemical mixtures. Significant concentrations of organic peroxide were measured by the enzymatic technique. During ambient monitoring, the techniques employed showed quantitative agreement.

  7. An improved visualization-based force-measurement technique for short-duration hypersonic facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurence, Stuart J.; Karl, Sebastian

    2010-06-01

    This article is concerned with describing and exploring the limitations of an improved version of a recently proposed visualization-based technique for the measurement of forces and moments in short-duration hypersonic wind tunnels. The technique is based on tracking the motion of a free-flying body over a sequence of high-speed visualizations; while this idea is not new in itself, the use of high-speed digital cinematography combined with a highly accurate least-squares tracking algorithm allows improved results over what have been previously possible with such techniques. The technique precision is estimated through the analysis of artificially constructed and experimental test images, and the resulting error in acceleration measurements is characterized. For wind-tunnel scale models, position measurements to within a few microns are shown to be readily attainable. Image data from two previous experimental studies in the T5 hypervelocity shock tunnel are then reanalyzed with the improved technique: the uncertainty in the mean drag acceleration is shown to be reduced to the order of the flow unsteadiness, 2-3%, and time-resolved acceleration measurements are also shown to be possible. The response time of the technique for the configurations studied is estimated to be ˜0.5 ms. Comparisons with computations using the DLR TAU code also yield agreement to within the overall experimental uncertainty. Measurement of the pitching moment for blunt geometries still appears challenging, however.

  8. Development of a noninvasive technique for the measurement of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, T.; Shuer, L. M.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamics are important for understanding adjustments to altered gravity. Previous flight observations document significant facial edema during exposure to microgravity, which suggests that ICP is elevated during microgravity. However, there are no experimental results obtained during space flight, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed and refined a noninvasive technique to measure intracranial pressure noninvasively. The technique is based upon detecting skull movements of a few micrometers in association with altered intracranial pressure. We reported that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with the pulsation of ICP in cadavera. In normal operations, however, we place a transducer on the scalp. Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the PPLL technique picks up cutaneous pulsation. The purpose of the present study was therefore to show that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with cardiac cycles in vivo.

  9. The cerebellopontine angle: does the translabyrinthine approach give adequate access?

    PubMed

    Fagan, P A; Sheehy, J P; Chang, P; Doust, B D; Coakley, D; Atlas, M D

    1998-05-01

    A long-standing but unfounded criticism of the translabyrinthine approach is the misperception that this approach does not give adequate access to the cerebellopontine angle. Because of what is perceived as limited visualization and operating space within the cerebellopontine angle, some surgeons still believe that the translabyrinthine approach is inappropriate for large acoustic tumors. In this study, the surgical access to the cerebellopontine angle by virtue of the translabyrinthine approach is measured and analyzed. The parameters are compared with those measured for the retrosigmoid approach. This series objectively confirms that the translabyrinthine approach offers the neurotologic surgeon a shorter operative depth to the tumor, via a similar-sized craniotomy. This permits superior visualization by virtue of a wider angle of surgical access. Such access is achieved with the merit of minimal cerebellar retraction.

  10. New techniques to measure cliff change from historical oblique aerial photographs and structure-from-motion photogrammetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan; Ritchie, Andy; Adelman, Gabrielle; Adelman, Ken; Limber, Patrick W

    2017-01-01

    Oblique aerial photograph surveys are commonly used to document coastal landscapes. Here it is shown that adequate overlap may exist in these photographic records to develop topographic models with Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetric techniques. Using photographs of Fort Funston, California, from the California Coastal Records Project, imagery were combined with ground control points in a four-dimensional analysis that produced topographic point clouds of the study area’s cliffs for 5 years spanning 2002 to 2010. Uncertainty was assessed by comparing point clouds with airborne LIDAR data, and these uncertainties were related to the number and spatial distribution of ground control points used in the SfM analyses. With six or more ground control points, the root mean squared errors between the SfM and LIDAR data were less than 0.30 m (minimum 1⁄4 0.18 m), and the mean systematic error was less than 0.10 m. The SfM results had several benefits over traditional airborne LIDAR in that they included point coverage on vertical- to-overhanging sections of the cliff and resulted in 10–100 times greater point densities. Time series of the SfM results revealed topographic changes, including landslides, rock falls, and the erosion of landslide talus along the Fort Funston beach. Thus, it was concluded that SfM photogrammetric techniques with historical oblique photographs allow for the extraction of useful quantitative information for mapping coastal topography and measuring coastal change. The new techniques presented here are likely applicable to many photograph collections and problems in the earth sciences.

  11. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  12. Measurement Techniques for Transmit Source Clock Jitter for Weak Serial RF Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin A.; Schlesinger, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for filtering clock jitter measurements are developed, in the context of controlling data modulation jitter on an RF carrier to accommodate low signal-to-noise ratio thresholds of high-performance error correction codes. Measurement artifacts from sampling are considered, and a tutorial on interpretation of direct readings is included.

  13. Using Rating Scale and Nomination Techniques to Measure Friendship and Popularity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, William M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied the associations between measures of friendship and popularity derived from nomination and rating scales procedures with a sample of school-age and early adolescent boys and girls. Found that each of these techniques can provide parallel measures of popularity (sociometric preference) and friendship (whether the child is participating in a…

  14. Measuring tropospheric HNO3 - Problems and prospects for Nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of laboratory and field measurements was performed to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO3 concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO3 vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia, the Nylon filter measured an average of 70 percent higher HNO3 concentration than the mist chamber technique. The results indicate that O3 causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO3 measurements performed with the filter technique. This O3-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO3 concentrations determined with the two techniques. It is hypothesized that unidentified (organic?) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO3(-) on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO3 vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO3 with the mist chamber method.

  15. Spatially localized measurement of thermal conductivity using a hybrid photothermal technique

    SciTech Connect

    David H Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Zilong Hua; Rory Kennedy; Heng Ban

    2012-05-01

    A photothermal technique capable of measuring thermal conductivity with micrometer lateral resolution is presented. This technique involves measuring separately the thermal diffusivity, D, and thermal effusivity, e, to extract the thermal conductivity, k=(e2/D)1/2. To generalize this approach, sensitivity analysis was conducted for materials having a range of thermal conductivities. Experimental validation was sought using two substrate materials, SiO2 and CaF2, both coated with thin titanium films. The measured conductivities compare favorably with literature values.

  16. Optical diagnostics of gas-dynamic flows using advanced laser measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.

    1985-01-01

    Using laser-induced fluorescence to probe nitrogen flows seeded with small amounts of nitric oxide, simultaneous measurements of all three thermodynamic scalar quantities temperature, density, and pressure, were demonstrated in a supersonic turbulent boundary layer. Instrumental uncertainty is 1% for temperature and 2% for density and pressure, making the techniques suitable for measurements of turbulent fluctuations. This technology is currently being transferred to an experimental program designed to use these optical techniques in conjunction with traditional methods to make measurements in turbulent flowfields that were not possible before. A detailed descritpion of the research progress and pertinent results are presented.

  17. Quasi-continuous combined scattered light and fluorescence measurements: a novel measurement technique for shaken microtiter plates.

    PubMed

    Samorski, M; Müller-Newen, G; Büchs, J

    2005-10-05

    A novel quasi-continuous on-line measuring technique for shaken microtiter plates is presented. Light scattering as well as intracellular and/or protein fluorescence (e.g. NADH, YFP) is measured during the shaking procedure, thus allowing a process monitoring of 96 different simultaneous cultures in a microtiter plate. In contrast to existing measurement techniques, the shaking process does not have to be stopped to take the measurements, thus avoiding the corresponding interruption of the cultures' oxygen supply and any unpredictable effects on the cultures. Experiments were conducted with E. coli in LB, TB, and MOPS minimal medium and V. natriegens in modified LB and TB media. Intensity curves of scattered light and NADH fluorescence were used to distinguish different lag phases, growth velocities, or inoculation densities. Data from this new method corresponded well to the off-line measured optical densities and to the oxygen transfer rates of cultures run in simultaneously conducted shake flask experiments at equivalent oxygen transfer capacities. With the aid of yellow fluorescence protein fused to interleukin-6 the optimal induction time of an expressing E. coli strain could be determined by on-line monitoring of product formation. Thus, this measuring technique enables the researcher to evaluate and to discriminate different cultures on a screening level and to improve screening conditions, process development and scale-up.

  18. Candidate techniques for non-intrusive measurement of flight boundary-layer properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, G. M., Jr.; Hoppe, J.; Eide, D. G.; Lewis, B. W.; Brown, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques to measure gas composition and chemical activity in the hypersonic boundary layer associated with entry research vehicles and with a tethered satellite deployed at 100-125 km altitude are currently being investigated at the NASA-Langley Research Center. These measurements are appropriate for the study of the aerothermodynamic properties of these vehicles when operating with controlled trajectories in the thermosphere between 125 and 55 km. A number of the required quantitative physical measurements have been identified, and candidate techniques to obtain the measurements without perturbing the flow are being considered. Two candidate techniques are discussed in this paper: a mass spectrometer to analyze the gas composition at the vehicle surface, and Rayleigh scattering to obtain density, velocity, and temperature gradients from the surface to the edge of the boundary layer.

  19. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  20. Are shear force methods adequately reported?

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Fowler, Stephanie M; Hopkins, David L

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the detail to which shear force (SF) protocols and methods have been reported in the scientific literature between 2009 and 2015. Articles (n=734) published in peer-reviewed animal and food science journals and limited to only those testing the SF of unprocessed and non-fabricated mammal meats were evaluated. It was found that most of these SF articles originated in Europe (35.3%), investigated bovine species (49.0%), measured m. longissimus samples (55.2%), used tenderometers manufactured by Instron (31.2%), and equipped with Warner-Bratzler blades (68.8%). SF samples were also predominantly thawed prior to cooking (37.1%) and cooked sous vide, using a water bath (50.5%). Information pertaining to blade crosshead speed (47.5%), recorded SF resistance (56.7%), muscle fibre orientation when tested (49.2%), sub-section or core dimension (21.8%), end-point temperature (29.3%), and other factors contributing to SF variation were often omitted. This base failure diminishes repeatability and accurate SF interpretation, and must therefore be rectified.

  1. Measurements of effective non-rainfall in soil with the use of time-domain reflectometry technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakonieczna, Anna; Kafarski, Marcin; Wilczek, Andrzej; Szypłowska, Agnieszka; Skierucha, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    mass loss, which was a measure of the amount of water that evaporated from the porous medium. Preliminary measurements demonstrated that the temperature control is dispensable for the conducted laboratory studies, because small temperature variations do not influence the results noticeably. However, field measurements would definitely require advanced temperature calibration. The aim of the research was to test the designed sensor for the effective non-rainfall intensity measurements in actual soil samples. It turned out that the device is highly sensitive to the amount of water present in the investigated medium. The geometry of the sensor allowed obtaining satisfactory resolution, which in the case of soil samples did not exceed 0.015 mm of water. Moreover, the direct translation of the TDR time into the water amount present in the examined media is straightforward and workable among the tested materials, which is the main advantage of the presented measurement method. Hence, both the applied TDR technique and the construction of the sensor proved to be adequate for the planned measurements of the effective non-rainfall intensity.

  2. Hybrid PIV-PTV technique for measuring blood flow in rat mesenteric vessels.

    PubMed

    Ha, Hojin; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Lee, Sang Joon

    2012-11-01

    The micro-particle tracking velocimetry (μ-PTV) technique is used to obtain the velocity fields of blood flow in the microvasculature under in vivo conditions because it can provide the blood velocity distribution in microvessels with high spatial resolution. The in vivo μ-PTV technique usually requires a few to tens of seconds to obtain a whole velocity profile across the vessel diameter because of the limited number density of tracer particles under in vivo conditions. Thus, the μ-PTV technique alone is limited in measuring unsteady blood flows that fluctuate irregularly due to the heart beating and muscle movement in surrounding tissues. In this study, a new hybrid PIV-PTV technique was established by combining PTV and particle image velocimetry (PIV) techniques to resolve the drawbacks of the μ-PTV method in measuring blood flow in microvessels under in vivo conditions. Images of red blood cells (RBCs) and fluorescent particles in rat mesenteric vessels were obtained simultaneously. Temporal variations of the centerline blood velocity were monitored using a fast Fourier transform-based cross-correlation PIV method. The fluorescence particle images were analyzed using the μ-PTV technique to extract the spatial distribution of the velocity vectors. Data from the μ-PTV and PIV methods were combined to obtain a better estimate of the velocity profile in actual blood flow. This technique will be useful in investigating hemodynamics in microcirculation by measuring unsteady irregular blood flows more accurately.

  3. Optical measurement techniques for mobile and large-scale dimensional metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuypers, W.; Van Gestel, N.; Voet, A.; Kruth, J.-P.; Mingneau, J.; Bleys, P.

    2009-03-01

    Dimensional inspection tasks are often carried out on conventional coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). These CMMs can differ in layout and size depending on the application area. They can have measurement volumes up to 100 m 3. However, when measuring large objects it is not always possible to bring a large object to these conventional CMMs. That is why for these applications mobile measuring systems are an ideal solution. These systems often measure the dimensions through optical techniques, like interferometry and optical triangulation. After a short survey of common optical measurement techniques for mobile and large-scale measurements, this paper focuses on two industrial cases where different techniques were used to solve a measurement problem. The first case covers the measurement of a large iron casting with an optical LED-based triangulation system. It was possible to predict problems that would occur with the machining of the part, like unfinished surfaces after milling due to material shortage, and adapt the alignment of the part to prevent these problems. The second case covers the measurement of a double-decker train by means of photogrammetry, as an alternative for the currently used total station. Despite some specific drawbacks of photogrammetry systems it was possible to obtain the same accuracy and to reduce the overall inspection time significantly in comparison with the current situation.

  4. Evaluation of Two Computational Techniques of Calculating Multipath Using Global Positioning System Carrier Phase Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan F.; Hood, Laura; Panneton, Robert J.; Saunders, Penny E.; Adkins, Antha; Hwu, Shian U.; Lu, Ba P.

    1996-01-01

    Two computational techniques are used to calculate differential phase errors on Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier war phase measurements due to certain multipath-producing objects. The two computational techniques are a rigorous computati electromagnetics technique called Geometric Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and the other is a simple ray tracing method. The GTD technique has been used successfully to predict microwave propagation characteristics by taking into account the dominant multipath components due to reflections and diffractions from scattering structures. The ray tracing technique only solves for reflected signals. The results from the two techniques are compared to GPS differential carrier phase ns taken on the ground using a GPS receiver in the presence of typical International Space Station (ISS) interference structures. The calculations produced using the GTD code compared to the measured results better than the ray tracing technique. The agreement was good, demonstrating that the phase errors due to multipath can be modeled and characterized using the GTD technique and characterized to a lesser fidelity using the DECAT technique. However, some discrepancies were observed. Most of the discrepancies occurred at lower devations and were either due to phase center deviations of the antenna, the background multipath environment, or the receiver itself. Selected measured and predicted differential carrier phase error results are presented and compared. Results indicate that reflections and diffractions caused by the multipath producers, located near the GPS antennas, can produce phase shifts of greater than 10 mm, and as high as 95 mm. It should be noted tl the field test configuration was meant to simulate typical ISS structures, but the two environments are not identical. The GZ and DECAT techniques have been used to calculate phase errors due to multipath o the ISS configuration to quantify the expected attitude determination errors.

  5. Assessment of recent advances in measurement techniques for atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, Christoph; Emmenegger, Lukas; Firdaus, Mohd; Hatakka, Juha; Heimann, Martin; Kozlova, Elena; Spain, T. Gerard; Steinbacher, Martin; van der Schoot, Marcel V.; Buchmann, Brigitte

    2016-09-01

    Until recently, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) measurements were made almost exclusively using nondispersive infrared (NDIR) absorption and gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC/FID) techniques, respectively. Recently, commercially available instruments based on spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have become more widely available and affordable. This resulted in a widespread use of these techniques at many measurement stations. This paper is focused on the comparison between a CRDS "travelling instrument" that has been used during performance audits within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) with instruments incorporating other, more traditional techniques for measuring CO2 and CH4 (NDIR and GC/FID). We demonstrate that CRDS instruments and likely other spectroscopic techniques are suitable for WMO/GAW stations and allow a smooth continuation of historic CO2 and CH4 time series. Moreover, the analysis of the audit results indicates that the spectroscopic techniques have a number of advantages over the traditional methods which will lead to the improved accuracy of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 measurements.

  6. Methane emissions from dairy cows measured using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer and chamber techniques.

    PubMed

    Grainger, C; Clarke, T; McGinn, S M; Auldist, M J; Beauchemin, K A; Hannah, M C; Waghorn, G C; Clark, H; Eckard, R J

    2007-06-01

    Our study compared methane (CH4) emissions from lactating dairy cows measured using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer and open-circuit respiration chamber techniques. The study was conducted using 16 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. In each chamber, the cow was fitted with the SF6 tracer apparatus to measure total CH4 emissions, including emissions from the rectum. Fresh ryegrass pasture was harvested daily and fed ad libitum to each cow with a supplement of 5 kg of grain/d. The CH4 emissions measured using the SF6 tracer technique were similar to those using the chamber technique: 331 vs. 322 g of CH4/d per cow. The accuracy of the SF6 tracer technique was indicated by considering the ratio of the CH4 emission measured using the SF6 tracer to the emission measured using the chamber for each cow on each day. The calculated ratio of 102.3% (SE = 1.51) was not different from 100%. A higher variability within cow between days was found for the SF6 tracer technique [coefficient of variation (CV) = 6.1%] than for the chamber technique (CV = 4.3%). The variability among cows was substantially higher than within cows, and was higher for the SF6 technique (CV = 19.6%) than for the chamber technique (CV = 17.8%). Our CH4 emission data were compared with whole-animal chamber studies conducted in Canada and Ireland. In the Canadian study the SF6 technique did not measure CH4 emissions from the rectum and emissions were 8% lower than those measured using the chamber, indicating that emissions from the rectum may be greater than previously measured (1%). The relationship between CH4 emission and dry matter intake was examined for our data and for that reported in the Canadian study. There was a difference in the slopes of the regressions derived from our data and that from Canada; 17.1 vs. 20.8 g of CH4/kg of dry matter intake. A difference between the 2 locations was expected based on the difference in diet composition for these 2 studies. The SF6 tracer technique is

  7. Quantitative Measurements of Elastic Properties with Ultrasonic-Based AFM and Conventional Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurley, D. C.

    A prime motivation for the original development of ultrasonic-based AFM methods was to enable measurements of elastic properties with nanoscale spatial resolution. In this chapter, we discuss the quantitative measurement of elastic modulus with ultrasonic-based AFM methods and compare it to measurement by more conventional or established techniques. First, we present the basic principles of modulus measurement with methods that involve contact resonance spectroscopy, such as atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM) and ultrasonic AFM (U-AFM). Fundamental concepts of modulus measurement with more established approaches, especially instrumented (nano-) indentation (NI) and surface acoustic wave spectroscopy (SAWS), are then discussed. We consider the relative strengths and limitations of various approaches, for example measurement accuracy, spatial resolution, and applicability to different materials. Example results for specific material systems are given with an emphasis on studies involving direct intercomparison of different techniques. Finally, current research in this area and opportunities for future work are described.

  8. A New Measurement Equivalence Technique Based on Latent Class Regression as Compared with Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi; Jafari, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measurement equivalence is an essential prerequisite for making valid comparisons in mental health questionnaires across groups. In most methods used for assessing measurement equivalence, which is known as Differential Item Functioning (DIF), latent variables are assumed to be continuous. Objective: To compare a new method called Latent Class Regression (LCR) designed for discrete latent variable with the multiple indicators multiple cause (MIMIC) as a continuous latent variable technique to assess the measurement equivalence of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which is a cross deferent subgroup of Iranian nurses. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 among 771 nurses working in the hospitals of Fars and Bushehr provinces of southern Iran. To identify the Minor Psychiatric Disorders (MPD), the nurses completed self-report GHQ-12 questionnaires and sociodemographic questions. Two uniform-DIF detection methods, LCR and MIMIC, were applied for comparability when the GHQ-12 score was assumed to be discrete and continuous, respectively. Results: The result of fitting LCR with 2 classes indicated that 27.4% of the nurses had MPD. Gender was identified as an influential factor of the level of MPD.LCR and MIMIC agree with detection of DIF and DIF-free items by gender, age, education and marital status in 83.3, 100.0, 91.7 and 83.3% cases, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicated that the GHQ-12 is to a great degree, an invariant measure for the assessment of MPD among nurses. High convergence between the two methods suggests using the LCR approach in cases of discrete latent variable, e.g. GHQ-12 and adequate sample size. PMID:27482129

  9. Measurement selection for groundwater-surface water investigations using Discrimination-Inference to Reduce Expected Cost Technique (DIRECT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, C.; Ferre, T. P.; Bayley, T.; Hundt, S.

    2012-12-01

    Reliable characterization of groundwater-surface water interaction is confounded by the identification of dominant physical and geochemical processes, system boundaries, and the complex distribution of subsurface hydraulic properties in both space and time. To address uncertainties arising from these factors, investigations of groundwater-surface water interaction typically require field observations of hydrologic states and fluxes. Uncertainties in system characterization are reduced as more data are collected. However, some hydrologic data may be poorly suited or inadequate to reduce the most critical uncertainties in coupled groundwater-surface water systems. This problem may be avoided by undertaking value-of-data analyses before and during field measurement campaigns. This research seeks to identify data most suited to guide objective-driven characterization of groundwater-surface water systems using Discrimination-Inference to Reduce Expected Cost Technique (DIRECT) - a new framework for merging decision support with hydrologic measurement selection. In the framework of DIRECT, candidate hydrologic measurements are assessed based upon their capability to elucidate characteristics of groundwater-surface water systems most pertinent to user-specified objectives such as adequate supply for human uses, in-stream flows, and protection of water quality. DIRECT explicitly considers competing hypotheses of dominant physical and geochemical processes by incorporating multiple conceptual models in the analysis. We present applications of this approach in several diverse environments, including sedimentary basins, glacially-dominated terrain, and permafrost-affected hillslopes. In all of these investigations, DIRECT shows great promise as a tool for refining measurement selection to improve understanding and management of groundwater-surface water systems.

  10. A scaleable technique for the measurement of intrinsic MOS capacitance with atto-farad resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, H.; Oristian, J. E.; Walker, J. T.; Dutton, R. W.

    1985-02-01

    An on-chip capacitance measurement technique used for interline capacitances has been extended to MOS transistor capacitance measurements. The gate of the test transistor is connected to a reference capacitance made on the same chip. Small ac signals are applied to one of the transistor terminals successively. The magnitude of the ac voltages appearing on the gate node is measured indirectly. C(gd), C(gs), and C(gb) are calculated accurately from the measured ac voltage and the reference capacitance value. It was found that C(gd) and C(gs) are measured completely free of parasitic capacitances resulting from both the internal on-chip circuit and external wiring. The on-chip circuitry is simple and can easily be scaled down. These features insure this technique is the most suitable for the measurement of minimum geometry transistors with atto-farad-range resolution. It is shown that this technique has the ability to detect the capacitance difference which comes from the misalignment of source and drain metal connections. Measurements with this technique are used to first describe the short- and narrow-channel effects on MOS transistor capacitance.

  11. Pupil Alignment Measuring Technique and Alignment Reference for Instruments or Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A technique was created to measure the pupil alignment of instruments in situ by measuring calibrated pupil alignment references (PARs) in instruments. The PAR can also be measured using an alignment telescope or an imaging system. PAR allows the verification of the science instrument (SI) pupil alignment at the integrated science instrument module (ISIM) level of assembly at ambient and cryogenic operating temperature. This will allow verification of the ISIM+SI alignment, and provide feedback to realign the SI if necessary.

  12. Short-term temporal variations of soil gas radon concentration and comparison of measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Neznal, Martin; Matolín, Milan; Just, Günther; Turek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Short-term temporal variations of soil gas radon concentration have been studied using different measuring techniques--instantaneous methods (grab sampling) using Lucas cells, continuous monitors, and integral nuclear track-etch detectors. A relatively low variability appeared during a 72-h follow-up. Different temporal changes were observed by using different methods. A substantial part of these changes was probably caused by fluctuations and errors connected with measuring methods themselves and did not reflect real variations of the measured parameter.

  13. Overview of Supersonic Aerodynamics Measurement Techniques in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On-surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is, therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a ground-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  14. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, M. D.; Ismail, S.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper.

  15. A Survey of Measurements and Measuring Techniques in Rapidly Distorted Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernholz, H. H.; Finley, P. J.; Dussauge, J. P.; Smits, A. J.; Reshotko, E. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A wide range of recent work on compressible turbulent boundary layers is described. Special attention was paid to flows with rapid changes in pressure including flows with shock waves, curved walls, and expansions. The application of rapid distortion theory to flows transversing expansion and shock waves is reviewed. This is followed by an account of experiments aimed at elucidating the large scale structures present in supersonic boundary layers. The current status of laser-Doppler and hot-wire anemometry in supersonic flow is discussed, and a new interferometric technique for the determination of wall-stress is described. The use of small pressure transducers to deduce information about the structure of zero pressure-gradient and severely perturbed boundary layers is investigated. Finally, there is an extension of the data presentation of AGARDographs 223, 253 and 263 to cover rapidly distorted boundary layers.

  16. Study on fast measurement of sugar content of yogurt using Vis/NIR spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Feng, Shuijuan; Wu, Di; Li, Xiaoli

    2006-09-01

    In order to measuring the sugar content of yogurt rapidly, a fast measurement of sugar content of yogurt using Vis/NIR-spectroscopy techniques was established. 25 samples selected separately from five different brands of yogurt were measured by Vis/NIR-spectroscopy. The sugar content of yogurt on positions scanned by spectrum were measured by a sugar content meter. The mathematical model between sugar content and Vis/NIR spectral measurements was established and developed based on partial least squares (PLS). The correlation coefficient of sugar content based on PLS model is more than 0.894, and standard error of calibration (SEC) is 0.356, standard error of prediction (SEP) is 0.389. Through predicting the sugar content quantitatively of 35 samples of yogurt from 5 different brands, the correlation coefficient between predictive value and measured value of those samples is more than 0.934. The results show the good to excellent prediction performance. The Vis/NIR spectroscopy technique had significantly greater accuracy for determining the sugar content. It was concluded that the Vis/NIRS measurement technique seems reliable to assess the fast measurement of sugar content of yogurt, and a new method for the measurement of sugar content of yogurt was established.

  17. Experimental comparison of measurement techniques for drop size distributions in liquid/liquid dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaß, S.; Wollny, S.; Voigt, A.; Kraume, M.

    2011-02-01

    An online measurement technique for drop size distribution in stirred tank reactors is needed but has not yet been developed. Different approaches and different techniques have been published as the new standard during the last decade. Three of them (focus beam reflectance measurement, two-dimensional optical reflectance measurement techniques and a fiber optical FBR sensor) are tested, and their results are compared with trustful image analysis results from an in situ microscope. The measurement of drop sizes in liquid/liquid distribution is a major challenge for all tested measurement probes, and none provides exact results for the tested system of pure toluene/water compared to an endoscope. Not only the size analysis but also the change of the size over time gives unreasonable results. The influence of the power input on the drop size distribution was the only reasonable observation in this study. The FBR sensor was not applicable at all to the used system. While all three probes are based on laser back scattering, the general question of the usability of this principle for measuring evolving drop size distributions in liquid/liquid system is asked. The exterior smooth surface of droplets in such systems is leading to strong errors in the measurement of the size of the drops. That leads to widely divergent results. A different measurement principle should be used for online measurements of drop size distributions than laser back scattering.

  18. Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles with the Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Korb, C. Laurence; Mathur, Savyasachee; Chen, Huailin

    1998-01-01

    Research has established the importance of global tropospheric wind measurements for large scale improvements in numerical weather prediction. In addition, global wind measurements provide data that are fundamental to the understanding and prediction of global climate change. These tasks are closely linked with the goals of the NASA Earth Science Enterprise and Global Climate Change programs. NASA Goddard has been actively involved in the development of direct detection Doppler lidar methods and technologies to meet the wind observing needs of the atmospheric science community. A variety of direct detection Doppler wind lidar measurements have recently been reported indicating the growing interest in this area. Our program at Goddard has concentrated on the development of the edge technique for lidar wind measurements. Implementations of the edge technique using either the aerosol or molecular backscatter for the Doppler wind measurement have been described. The basic principles have been verified in lab and atmospheric lidar wind experiments. The lidar measurements were obtained with an aerosol edge technique lidar operating at 1064 nm. These measurements demonstrated high spatial resolution (22 m) and high velocity sensitivity (rms variances of 0.1 m/s) in the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The aerosol backscatter is typically high in the PBL and the effects of the molecular backscatter can often be neglected. However, as was discussed in the original edge technique paper, the molecular contribution to the signal is significant above the boundary layer and a correction for the effects of molecular backscatter is required to make wind measurements. In addition, the molecular signal is a dominant source of noise in regions where the molecular to aerosol ratio is large since the energy monitor channel used in the single edge technique measures the sum of the aerosol and molecular signals. To extend the operation of the edge technique into the free troposphere we

  19. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner.

    PubMed

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C; Shah, J B

    2013-12-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.(1) Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.(7,9) The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.(2,3) A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.(2,3) Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.(2) Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving

  20. Wound Measurement Techniques: Comparing the Use of Ruler Method, 2D Imaging and 3D Scanner

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aj; Wollak, C.; Shah, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    The statistics on the growing number of non-healing wounds is alarming. In the United States, chronic wounds affect 6.5 million patients. An estimated US $25 billion is spent annually on treatment of chronic wounds and the burden is rapidly growing due to increasing health care costs, an aging population and a sharp rise in the incidence of diabetes and obesity worldwide.1 Accurate wound measurement techniques will help health care personnel to monitor the wounds which will indirectly help improving care.7,9 The clinical practice of measuring wounds has not improved even today.2,3 A common method like the ruler method to measure wounds has poor interrater and intrarater reliability.2,3 Measuring the greatest length by the greatest width perpendicular to the greatest length, the perpendicular method, is more valid and reliable than other ruler based methods.2 Another common method like acetate tracing is more accurate than the ruler method but still has its disadvantages. These common measurement techniques are time consuming with variable inaccuracies. In this study, volumetric measurements taken with a non-contact 3-D scanner are benchmarked against the common ruler method, acetate grid tracing, and 2-D image planimetry volumetric measurement technique. A liquid volumetric fill method is used as the control volume. Results support the hypothesis that the 3-D scanner consistently shows accurate volumetric measurements in comparison to standard volumetric measurements obtained by the waterfill technique (average difference of 11%). The 3-D scanner measurement technique was found more reliable and valid compared to other three techniques, the ruler method (average difference of 75%), acetate grid tracing (average difference of 41%), and 2D planimetric measurements (average difference of 52%). Acetate tracing showed more accurate measurements compared to the ruler method (average difference of 41% (acetate tracing) compared to 75% (ruler method)). Improving the

  1. Computer Aided Measurement Laser (CAML): technique to quantify post-mastectomy lymphoedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetta, Chiara; Abundo, Paolo; Felici, Antonella; Ljoka, Concetta; Di Cori, Sandro; Rosato, Nicola; Foti, Calogero

    2012-10-01

    Lymphoedema can be a side effect of cancer treatment. Eventhough several methods for assessing lymphoedema are used in clinical practice, an objective quantification of lymphoedema has been problematic. The aim of the study was to determine the objectivity, reliability and repeatability of the computer aided measurement laser (CAML) technique. CAML technique is based on computer aided design (CAD) methods and requires an infrared laser scanner. Measurements are scanned and the information describing size and shape of the limb allows to design the model by using the CAD software. The objectivity and repeatability was established in the beginning using a phantom. Consequently a group of subjects presenting post-breast cancer lymphoedema was evaluated using as a control the contralateral limb. Results confirmed that in clinical settings CAML technique is easy to perform, rapid and provides meaningful data for assessing lymphoedema. Future research will include a comparison of upper limb CAML technique between healthy subjects and patients with known lymphoedema.

  2. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  3. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-03-06

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Unified Instrumentation: Examining the Simultaneous Application of Advanced Measurement Techniques for Increased Wind Tunnel Testing Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, Gary A. (Editor); Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Jordan, Jeffrey D.; Lee, Joseph W.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Meyers, James F.; South, Bruce W.; Cavone, Angelo A.; Ingram, JoAnne L.

    2002-01-01

    A Unified Instrumentation Test examining the combined application of Pressure Sensitive Paint, Projection Moire Interferometry, Digital Particle Image Velocimetry, Doppler Global Velocimetry, and Acoustic Microphone Array has been conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fundamental purposes of conducting the test were to: (a) identify and solve compatibility issues among the techniques that would inhibit their simultaneous application in a wind tunnel, and (b) demonstrate that simultaneous use of advanced instrumentation techniques is feasible for increasing tunnel efficiency and identifying control surface actuation / aerodynamic reaction phenomena. This paper provides summary descriptions of each measurement technique used during the Unified Instrumentation Test, their implementation for testing in a unified fashion, and example results identifying areas of instrument compatibility and incompatibility. Conclusions are drawn regarding the conditions under which the measurement techniques can be operated simultaneously on a non-interference basis. Finally, areas requiring improvement for successfully applying unified instrumentation in future wind tunnel tests are addressed.

  5. Optimization of the tungsten oxide technique for measurement of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Hollow tubes coated with tungstic acid have been shown to be of value in the determination of ammonia and nitric acid in ambient air. Practical application of this technique was demonstrated utilizing an automated sampling system for in-flight collection and analysis of atmospheric samples. Due to time constraints these previous measurements were performed on tubes that had not been well characterized in the laboratory. As a result the experimental precision could not be accurately estimated. Since the technique was being compared to other techniques for measuring these compounds, it became necessary to perform laboratory tests which would establish the reliability of the technique. This report is a summary of these laboratory experiments as they are applied to the determination of ambient ammonia concentration.

  6. International Congress on Acoustic Intensity Measurement: Measurement Techniques and Applications, 2nd, Senlis, France, September 23-26, 1985, Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recent developments in acoustic-intensity measurement are discussed in reviews and reports of theoretical and experimental investigations. Instrumentation, vector acoustics, sound radiation, intensity in the presence of flow, intensity in structures, sound power, source localization, impedance, absorption, and transmission are the fields covered by the contributions. Specific topics addressed include microphone configurations for intensity probes, the rotational structure of intensity fields, acoustic intensity and numerical simulation, sound-power measurement in the presence of background noise, and techniques for measuring the absorption coefficient of acoustic materials. Graphs, drawings, diagrams, tables of numerical data, and photographs of test setups are provided.

  7. General solution for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement using the fringe projection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shijie; Zhang, Yuzhen; Chen, Qian; Zuo, Chao; Li, Rubin; Shen, Guochen

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a general solution for realizing high dynamic range three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement based on fringe projection. Three concrete techniques are involved in the solution for measuring object with large range of reflectivity (LRR) or one with shiny specular surface. For the first technique, the measured surface reflectivities are sub-divided into several groups based on its histogram distribution, then the optimal exposure time for each group can be predicted adaptively so that the bright as well as dark areas on the measured surface are able to be handled without any compromise. Phase-shifted images are then captured at the calculated exposure times and a composite phase-shifted image is generated by extracting the optimally exposed pixels in the raw fringes images. For the second technique, it is proposed by introducing two orthogonal polarizers which are placed separately in front of the camera and projector into the first technique and the third one is developed by combining the second technique with the strategy of properly altering the angle between the transmission axes of the two polarizers. Experimental results show that the first technique can effectively improve the measurement accuracy of diffuse objects with LRR, the second one is capable of measuring object with weak specular reflection (WSR: e.g. shiny plastic surface) and the third can inspect surface with strong specular reflection (SSR: e.g. highlight on aluminum alloy) precisely. Further, more complex scene, such as the one with LRR and WSR, or even the one simultaneously involving LRR, WSR and SSR, can be measured accurately by the proposed solution.

  8. Measurements and implications of vortex motions using two flow-visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Greene, George C.

    1990-01-01

    The present comparative study of two different, but complementary flow-visualization techniques, which yield different interpretations of vortex-migration distance and lifetime, gives attention to the difficulty of determining vortex evolution and lifetime from flow-visualization measurements. The techniques involved the release of a fluorescent dye and of neutrally buoyant particles in a water-filled towing tank. Vortices are found to migrate farther, and last longer, when visualized with neutrally buoyant particles rather than with dyes.

  9. Minority carrier diffusion length measurements - A review and comparison of techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Hermann, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the major techniques for measuring minority carrier diffusion lengths in solar cells is given. Limits of applicability are indicated for each method, as relevant to indirect bandgap materials such as silicon, and direct bandgap materials like gallium arsenide. A discussion and bibliography is presented for the following techniques: uniform generation, electron beam induced current, Schottky barrier (and other steady-state) photocurrent, surface photovoltage, transient decay, and luminescence.

  10. Plasma Sheet Velocity Measurement Techniques for the Pulsed Plasma Thruster SIMP-LEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Lau, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of the first plasma sheet was determined between the electrodes of a pulsed plasma thruster using three measurement techniques: time of flight probe, high speed camera and magnetic field probe. Further, for time of flight probe and magnetic field probe, it was possible to determine the velocity distribution along the electrodes, as the plasma sheet is accelerated. The results from all three techniques are shown, and are compared for one thruster geometry.

  11. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  12. Comparison between two computer-assisted total knee arthroplasty: gap-balancing versus measured resection technique.

    PubMed

    Tigani, Domenico; Sabbioni, G; Ben Ayad, R; Filanti, M; Rani, N; Del Piccolo, N

    2010-10-01

    Two surgical strategies are possible in total knee arthroplasty (TKA): a measured resection technique, in which bone landmarks are used to guide resections equal to the distal and posterior thickness of the femoral component, or a gap-balancing approach, in which equal collateral ligament tension in flexion and extension is sought before and as a guide to final bone cuts. In this study performed with computer assisted system, we compared the 2 different methods in 126 patients followed prospectively in order to analyze the effect of both the techniques on joint-line (JL) maintenance, axial limb restoration and components position. The gap technique showed a statistical increase in the post-operative value when compared with the measured resection technique, (P = 0.008). When comparing the two groups regarding to the pre-operative deformity, we have found a statistical difference (P = 0.001) in case of moderate pre-operative deformity (less than 10 degrees), and the measured resection technique showed a slight superiority in preserving a joint line more faithful to the pre-operative. We found an ideal alignment for the mechanical axis (180 degrees ± 3 degrees) (95% of cases). In six cases (5%), the mean post-operative value exceeded (varus or valgus) the ideal value by more than 3 degrees. In the frontal plane, a good alignment was observed for both femoral and tibial components without a significant difference between the two techniques. In the sagittal plane was found more alignment variability due to the different implants used and their ideal starting slope, from 7 degrees to 3 degrees. Finally, the surgeon can use the approach with which he has more confidence; however, as the measured resection technique causes less reduction in the post-operative joint-line position, in case of shortening of patellar tendon or patella infera, this technique is preferable.

  13. Measurement of absolute displacement by a double-modulation technique based on a Michelson interferometer.

    PubMed

    Chang, L W; Chien, P Y; Lee, C T

    1999-05-01

    A novel method is presented for of measuring absolute displacement with a synthesized wavelength interferometer. The optical phase of the interferometer is simultaneously modulated with a frequency-modulated laser diode and optical path-length difference. The error signal originating from the intensity modulation of the source is eliminated by a signal processing circuit. In addition, a lock-in technique is used to demodulate the envelope of the interferometric signal. The displacement signal is derived by the self-mixing technique.

  14. Measurement techniques for local and global fluid dynamic quantities in two and three phase systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Dudukovic, M.P.; Toseland, B.A.

    1998-01-01

    Available measurement techniques for evaluation of global and local phase holdups, instantaneous and average phase velocities and for the determination of bubble sizes in gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid systems are reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of various techniques are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying methods that can be employed on large scale, thick wall, high pressure and high temperature reactors used in the manufacture of fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas and its derivatives.

  15. Evaluation of acoustic emission technique for crack growth measurement in aeronautical structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted concerning the possibility to use the acoustic emission technique for the measurement of fatigue crack growth in aluminum alloy specimens. Two types of aluminum alloys were tested in the investigation. It was found that the acoustic emission technique provides a reliable indication of changes in the crack dimensions over relatively short periods of time. The level of acoustic activity serves as an indicator of the size of the cracks.

  16. Techniques for Measuring Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Demko, Rikako

    2002-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials due to their desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft durability. It is therefore important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is through mass loss measurements. For limited duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle experiments, where the atomic oxygen fluence is often so low that mass loss measurements can not produce acceptable uncertainties, recession measurements based on atomic force microscopy analyses can be used. Equally necessary to knowing the mass loss or recession depth for determining the erosion yield of polymers is the knowledge of the atomic oxygen fluence that the polymers were exposed to in space. This paper discusses the procedures and relevant issues for mass loss and recession depth measurements for passive atomic oxygen erosion yield characterization of polymers, along with techniques for active atomic oxygen fluence and erosion characterization. One active atomic oxygen erosion technique discussed is a new technique based on optical measurements. Details including the use of both semi-transparent and opaque polymers for active erosion measurement are reviewed.

  17. Pulse-power integrated-decay technique for the measurement of thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharalkar, Nachiket M.; Hayes, Linda J.; Valvano, Jonathan W.

    2008-07-01

    A pulse-power integrated-decay technique for the measurement of thermal conductivity of biological tissues is presented. A self-heated thermistor probe is used to deliver heat and also to measure the temperature response. Three-dimensional finite element analyses are used in this paper to design and optimize the technique. The thermal conductivity measurements from the computer simulations were in close accordance with the experimental data. An empirical calibration process, performed in glycerol and agar-gelled water, provides accurate thermal conductivity measurements. An accuracy analysis evaluated multiple experimental protocols using three solutions of known thermal properties. The results indicate that the thermal decay technique protocol had better accuracy than the constant temperature heating techniques. In vitro measurements demonstrate the variability of tissue thermal conductivity, and the need to perform direct measurements for tissues of interest. The factors that may introduce error in the experimental data are (i) poor thermal/physical contact between the thermistor probe and tissue sample, (ii) water loss from tissue during the course of experimentation and (iii) temperature stability.

  18. A simple technique for measuring rainfall interception by small shrub: interception flow collection box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte Serrato, F.; Romero Diaz, A.

    1998-03-01

    In this paper a simple technique for field measurement of rain water loss arising from interception and water flows associated with species of small Mediterranean shrub is described: the interception flow collection box. This technique solves the problem of installing devices to control stemflow in species with a multiple trunk and demonstrates its efficiency through the results obtained from the data observed for three species of semi-arid Mediterranean shrub: Juniperus oxycedrus, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris. Finally, the empirical equations for the prediction of throughfall, stemflow and rain water loss through interception are presented for the three selected species and the validity of the technique employed is established.

  19. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required.

  20. Use of image processing techniques for heat transfer measurements using thermochromic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A Macintosh-based image processing code has been developed for use in making continuous temperature profile measurements using thermochromic liquid crystals. This software is the result of extensive modifications to the public domain software, NIH Image developed by the National Institutes of Health. These modifications primarily include routines to quantify the TLC color changes as temperature measurements while providing a simple user interface. Using these techniques, one can perform literally thousands of temperature measurements over a small area (307,200 temperature measurements in a 640*480 image), thus making continuous profile measurement possible. This technique was developed in support of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (a new nuclear fission research reactor being developed at Oak Ridge National Lab.) for use in experiments designed to study the impact of a flow blockage at the inlet to the reactor core.

  1. Noncontact technique for measuring the electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of electrostatically levitated melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustan, G. E.; Spyrison, N. S.; Kreyssig, A.; Prozorov, R.; Goldman, A. I.

    2012-02-01

    Over the last two decades the popularity of levitation methods for studying equilibrium and supercooled melts has increased steadily. Measurements of density, viscosity, surface tension, and atomic structure have become well established. In contrast, measurements of electrical resistivity and magnetic susceptibility of levitated melts have been very limited. To fill this void, we have combined the tunnel diode oscillator (TDO) technique with electrostatic levitation (ESL) to perform inductively coupled measurements on levitated melts. A description of the basic operating principles of the TDO and ESL will be given, as well as a description of the implementation and performance characteristics of this technique. Preliminary measurements of electrical resistivity in the solid and liquid state will be presented for samples of Zr, Si, and Ge, as well as the measurements of ferromagnetic transitions in Fe and Co based alloys.

  2. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  3. Differential absorption lidar technique for measurement of the atmospheric pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new two-wavelength lidar technique for remotely measuring the pressure profile using the trough absorption region between two strong lines in the oxygen A band is described. The theory of integrated vertical path, differential ranging, and horizontal-path pressure measurements is given, with methods to desensitize and correct for temperature effects. The properties of absorption troughs are described and shown to reduce errors due to laser frequency jitter by up to two orders of magnitude. A general analysis, including laser bandwidth effects, demonstrates that pressure measurements with an integrated-vertical-path technique are typically fifty times more accurate than with a differential ranging technique. Simulations show 0.1-0.3 percent accuracy for ground and Shuttle-based pressure-profile and surface-pressure experiments.

  4. A radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity. [drag force anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  5. Novel technique for distributed fibre sensing based on coherent Rayleigh scattering measurements of birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Soto, Marcelo A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-05-01

    A novel distributed fibre sensing technique is described and experimentally validated, based on birefringence measurements using coherent Rayleigh scattering. It natively provides distributed measurements of temperature and strain with more than an order of magnitude higher sensitivity than Brillouin sensing, and requiring access to a single fibre-end. Unlike the traditional Rayleigh-based coherent optical time-domain reflectometry, this new method provides absolute measurements of the measurand and may lead to a robust discrimination between temperature and strain in combination with another technique. Since birefringence is purposely induced in the fibre by design, large degrees of freedom are offered to optimize and scale the sensitivity to a given quantity. The technique has been validated in 2 radically different types of birefringent fibres - elliptical-core and Panda polarization-maintaining fibres - with a good repeatability.

  6. A Remote Sensing Technique For Combustion Gas Temperature Measurement In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charagundla, S. R.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    A remote sensing technique, based on the principles of emission spectroscopy, is being developed for temperature measurements in black liquor recovery boilers. Several tests have been carried out, both in the laboratory and at a number of recovery boilers, to characterize the emission spectra in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 800 nm. These tests have pointed out the potential for temperature measurements using the line intensity ratio technique based on a pair of emission lines at 404.4 nm and 766.5 nm observed in the recovery boiler combustion zone; these emission lines are due to potassium, a common constituent found in all the black liquors. Accordingly, a fiber optics based four-color system has been developed. This in-situ, nonintrusive temperature measurement technique, together with some of the more recent results, is described in this paper.

  7. Development of a Falling Sphere Technique for E-region Wind Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, B. K.; Fish, C. S.; Larsen, M. F.; Swenson, C.

    2009-12-01

    In this presentation we outline the development of a new falling sphere technique sensor for measuring the lower E-region neutral winds and density, which are critical for many of the electrodynamics and plasma physics studies that are carried out as part of the NASA suborbital rocket program. Currently, chemical releases are the primary technique for measuring winds in the lower E-region. Chemical release wind measurements provide detailed wind profiles with good accuracy and have a long flight history. However, they have a number of operational drawbacks, including the need for clear skies over a broad area for camera observations, limited viewing windows (e.g., only at nighttime in the case of trimethyl aluminum), and the need to follow strict handling procedures. Recent advances in low-cost commercial technology have made the falling sphere technique an attractive option to chemical release for E-region measurements. Falling sphere instruments (typically inflatable devices) have been used extensively to make wind measurements in the D-region. Similar measurements in the lower E-region require higher sensitivity accelerometers and a more careful design of the sphere (e.g., solid sphere structure for hypersonic speeds). This presentation demonstrates the design and laboratory testing and calibration of a next-generation solid falling sphere instrument for E-region measurements. Ultimately, the development of this new falling sphere instrument will enable the deployment of multiple falling spheres from one rocket for 3D volume determination of neutral wind measurements.

  8. Hydrogen clearance: Assessment of technique for measurement of skin-flap blood flow in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.G.; Kerrigan, C.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The hydrogen clearance technique has been used for many years by investigators to determine brain blood flow and has been partially validated in this setting using other methods of blood flow measurement. The method has been modified to allow blood flow measurements in skin, but the accuracy of H2 clearance for measuring skin blood flow has not been determined. Multiple blood flow measurements were performed using H2 clearance and radioactive microspheres on skin flaps and control skin in pigs. On 12 pigs, a total of 117 flap and 42 control skin measurements were available for analysis. There was no significant difference between the two techniques in measuring mean control skin blood flow. In skin flaps, H2 clearance was significantly correlated to microsphere-measured blood flow, but it consistently gave an overestimate. Sources of error may include injury to the tissues by insertion of electrodes, consumption of H2 by the electrodes, or diffusion of H2 from the relatively ischemic flap to its well-vascularized bed. Further studies are necessary to determine the cause of this error and to measure the technique's accuracy in skeletal muscle and other flaps.

  9. A lithium depth-marker technique for rapid erosion and deposition measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. M.; Pang, A.; Martinez-Sanchez, M.; Whyte, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    A novel, high-resolution technique has been developed for the measurement of erosion and deposition in solid material surfaces. The technique uses a combination of nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) to determine the change in depth of a previously implanted marker layer consisting of 7Li. A scoping study shows that 7Li is an ideal marker candidate due to a high Q (∼18 MeV) nuclear reaction, 7Li(p,α)4He. Net erosion or deposition is measured by NRA of modified alpha energy passing through the bulk material. The reaction's high cross-section provides for the fast time resolution needed to measure erosion from high flux plasmas, and a highly penetrating proton beam provides for a large range of erosion/deposition measurements. Additionally, the implantation of low-Z Li leads to relatively low vacancy concentrations in the solid material due to implantation. This technique thus provides greater assurance that the measured erosion rate is indicative of the solid material: due to both the low vacancy production and the fact that no films or deposits are involved. Validation was performed by comparing the measured and predicted amount of erosion based on previously measured sputtering yields; the two were found to agree, within the uncertainty of the experiment. The depth resolution of the techniques is ∼60 nm at a net erosion depth of about 1 μm. The benefits of this technique are summarized as: short time scales (minutes) to obtain results, the marker layer can be used in any solid material, greater assurance that the measured erosion is indicative of the unperturbed solid material, and the continuous monitoring of the surface composition for contaminants and/or identification of deposited species using RBS simultaneous with the NRA.

  10. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  11. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    High-speed laminar-to-turbulent transition and turbulence affect the control of flight vehicles, the heat transfer rate to a flight vehicle's surface, the material selected to protect such vehicles from high heating loads, the ultimate weight of a flight vehicle due to the presence of thermal protection systems, the efficiency of fuel-air mixing processes in high-speed combustion applications, etc. Gaining a fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the transition process will lead to the development of predictive capabilities that can identify transition location and its impact on parameters like surface heating. Currently, there is no general theory that can completely describe the transition-to-turbulence process. However, transition research has led to the identification of the predominant pathways by which this process occurs. For a truly physics-based model of transition to be developed, the individual stages in the paths leading to the onset of fully turbulent flow must be well understood. This requires that each pathway be computationally modeled and experimentally characterized and validated. This may also lead to the discovery of new physical pathways. This document is intended to describe molecular based measurement techniques that have been developed, addressing the needs of the high-speed transition-to-turbulence and high-speed turbulence research fields. In particular, we focus on techniques that have either been used to study high speed transition and turbulence or techniques that show promise for studying these flows. This review is not exhaustive. In addition to the probe-based techniques described in the previous paragraph, several other classes of measurement techniques that are, or could be, used to study high speed transition and turbulence are excluded from this manuscript. For example, surface measurement techniques such as pressure and temperature paint, phosphor thermography, skin friction measurements and

  12. Comparative evaluation of radon measurement techniques for uranium exploration. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, R F; Pacer, J C; Freeman, R W

    1983-03-01

    The measurement of radon (Rn-222) in soil gas aids in uranium exploration by indicating indirectly the presence of buried ore bodies. Intrest in this exploration methodology has led to the development of various radon measurement techniques which detect the presence of soil-gas radon, both directly and/or indirectly. To establish the relative merit of these new radon measurement techniques, Bendix Field Engineering Corporation has tested a variety of them using existing uranium occurrences located in the Red Desert area of south-central Wyoming. The following soil-gas radon measurement techniques were tested: a prototype microprocessor-controlled emanometer; a commercially available emanometer; alpha-track detectors equipped with two types of detector material (carbonate and nitrate), and equipped with and without membranes for thoron separation; radon adsorption on activated charcoal; and partial extraction of lead-210 from soil samples. These techniques were compared for relative sensitivity, variability, signal-to-background contrast, and correlation. The radon measurements obtained were also correlated to the equivalent uranium in soil, as determined radiometrically. From approximately 34 replicate samples, the variability associated with a technique was lowest with the TSA emanometer (13%). The EDA emanometer showed 31% and Track Etch carbonate/open cup (C/O) 27%. The best signal-to-background ratio, 2.55, was obtained by the EDA emanometer; the Track Etch nitrate/members cup (N/M) was a close second with 2.45. All signal-to-background ratios were greater than 2.0 except for the TSA emanometer with 1.87. All the techniques measured a sufficient number of anomalous values to locate the subsurface ore body.

  13. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  14. Negative Expiratory Pressure Technique: An Awake Test to Measure Upper Airway Collapsibility in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Helena Larramona; Marcus, Carole L.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Morera, Joan C. Oliva; Huang, Jingtao; Farre, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Upper airway (UA) collapsibility is a major pathophysiologic feature of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In adolescents, it is measured by obtaining the slope of pressure-flow relationship (SPF) while applying negative nasal pressure during sleep. An easier technique to assess UA collapsibility, consisting of application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) during wakefulness, has demonstrated differences between control and OSAS subjects. We hypothesized that the NEP technique would correlate with SPF as a measurement of UA collapsibility in adolescents. Design: During wakefulness, NEP of −5 cm H2O in the seated and supine position was applied during the first second of expiration. The area under the expiratory flow-volume curve during NEP was compared to tidal breathing (RatioNEP). In addition, adolescents underwent SPF measurements during sleep. Two SPF techniques were performed to measure the activated and relatively hypotonic UA. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Participants: Seven adolescents with OSAS and 20 controls. Results: In the seated position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and both hypotonic SPF (r = −0.39, P = 0.04) and activated SPF (r = −0.62, P = 0.001). In the supine position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and activated SPF (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and a trend for hypotonic SPF (r = −0.38, P = 0.06). Conclusions: The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique correlates with the hypotonic and activated slope of pressure-flow relationship measurements. The seated position showed the strongest correlation. The NEP technique can be used as an alternative method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. Citation: Carrera HL, Marcus CL, McDonough JM, Morera JC, Huang J, Farre R, Montserrat JM. Negative expiratory pressure technique: an awake test to measure upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1783–1791. PMID:26158888

  15. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  16. Simultaneous Global Pressure and Temperature Measurement Technique for Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature luminescent coatings are being developed and applied for simultaneous pressure and temperature mapping in conventional-type hypersonic wind tunnels, providing global pressure as well as Global aeroheating measurements. Together, with advanced model fabrication and analysis methods, these techniques will provide a more rapid and complete experimental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic database for future aerospace vehicles. The current status in development of simultaneous pressure- and temperature-sensitive coatings and measurement techniques for hypersonic wind tunnels at Langley Research Center is described. and initial results from a feasibility study in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel are presented.

  17. Development of a Noninterference Technique for Measurement of Turbine Engine Compressor Blade Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    TECHNIQUE FOR MEASUREMENT OF TURBINE ENGINE COMPRESSOR BLADE STRESS 7 A U T H O R ( s ) P . E. M c C a r t y a n d J . W. Thompson , J r...e a e a ~ and tdentJ~ by b|ock numbe~ A noninterference technique for measuring stress in compressor blades of turbine engines is being developed...43 4 AEDC-TR-79-78 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND Compressor rotor blades in turbojet engines are subjected to

  18. Technique to measure contact angle of micro/nanodroplets using atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yong Chae; Bhushan, Bharat

    2008-07-15

    Contact angle is the primary parameter that characterizes wetting; however, the measurement techniques have been limited to droplets with a diameter as low as about 50 {mu}m. The authors developed an atomic force microscopy-based technique to measure the contact angle of micro- and nanodroplets deposited using a modified nanoscale dispensing tip. The obtained contact angle results were compared with those of a macrodroplet (2.1 mm diameter). It was found that the contact angle on various surfaces decreases with decreasing the droplet size.

  19. Advancing IM-CW Lidar Modulation Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements from Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Harrison, F. W.; Chen, S.; Obland, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements through the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) decadal survey recommended space mission are critical for improving our understanding of CO2 sources and sinks. IM-CW (Intensity Modulated Continuous Wave) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS science requirements. In previous laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used linear swept frequency modulation to discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate clouds, which is a requirement for the inversion of the CO2 column mixing ratio from the instrument optical depth measurements, has been demonstrated with the linear swept frequency modulation technique. We are concurrently investigating advanced techniques to help improve the auto-correlation properties of the transmitted waveform implemented through physical hardware to make cloud rejection more robust in special restricted scenarios. Several different modulation techniques are compared including orthogonal linear swept, orthogonal non-linear swept, time shifted PN, sine wave modulated PN, and sine wave pulsed PN. Different PN code techniques are presented that are appropriate for different types of lidar hardware, including our current ASCENDS IM-CW concept space hardware. These techniques have excellent auto-correlation properties without sidelobes while possessing a finite bandwidth (by way of a new cyclic digital filter), which will reduce bias error in the presence of multiple scatterers. Our analyses show that the studied modulation techniques can increase the accuracy of CO2 column measurements from space.

  20. Correlation between near infrared spectroscopy and electrical techniques in measuring skin moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, M.; Sabbri, A. R. M.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Omar, A. F.

    2014-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technique serves as an important tool for the measurement of moisture content of skin owing to the advantages it has over the other techniques. The purpose of the study is to develop a correlation between NIR spectrometer with electrical conventional techniques for skin moisture measurement. A non-invasive measurement of moisture content of skin was performed on different part of human face and hand under control environment (temperature 21 ± 1 °C, relative humidity 45 ± 5 %). Ten healthy volunteers age between 21-25 (male and female) participated in this study. The moisture content of skin was measured using DermaLab® USB Moisture Module, Scalar Moisture Checker and NIR spectroscopy (NIRQuest). Higher correlation was observed between NIRQuest and Dermalab moisture probe with a coefficient of determination (R2) above 70 % for all the subjects. However, the value of R2 between NIRQuest and Moisture Checker was observed to be lower with the R2 values ranges from 51.6 to 94.4 %. The correlation of NIR spectroscopy technique successfully developed for measuring moisture content of the skin. The analysis of this correlation can help to establish novel instruments based on an optical system in clinical used especially in the dermatology field.

  1. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high-speed flowfields.

  2. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  3. The measurements of ultrasound parameters on calcaneus by two-sided interrogation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Jarn; Chen, Tainsong; Lu, Ming-Chang; Yao, Wei-Jen

    2005-06-01

    Recently, ultrasound techniques have become an important alternative in the assessment of osteoporosis. The speed of sound (SOS) and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) on calcaneus are commonly used in an ultrasound densitometer for osteoporosis evaluation. However, the quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters provided by a densitometer using most commercial ultrasound instruments are based on the assumption of a fixed bone thickness. Information on bone thickness is a critical factor for accurate estimation of SOS through conventional approaches; yet, the thickness of bone tissue is not available through in vivo measurements and it is almost impossible to obtain the thickness of bone tissue via conventional approaches. Therefore, the SOS measurements will be incorrect. The purpose of this work is to develop a two-sided interrogation technique for the SOS measurements that is less susceptible to bone thickness. The results show that this proposed technique can obtain a better SOS estimation on bone tissue. Using bone phantoms that mimic actual tissue, the validity of the approach is confirmed with measurements showing high accuracy (>99%) and low standard deviation (<0.5%). Finally, the measurements of 14 healthy subjects are also reported. The results show that this technique can provide the bone thickness information to reduce the SOS estimation errors compared with the fixed bone thickness assumption.

  4. A laser reflectometry technique for on-device coating thickness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of Beam Profile Reflectometry (BPR) to measure coating thicknesses on small, highly curved devices such as cardiac stents. BPR has long been used in the semiconductor industry as a powerful technique for measuring the thickness and refractive index of transparent films. The method uses a diffraction-limited focused laser beam to provide light at multiple angles-of-incidence simultaneously within a sub-micron measurement area. By analyzing the reflected light as a function of angle-of-incidence and polarization, robust and deterministic measurements of film-thickness and refractive index can be obtained taking proper account of birefringence. For the current work, the technique has been implemented in a compact desktop configuration suitable, for example, for the in-line monitoring of coating thickness and composition as part of a stent manufacturing process. Provision is made for the alignment and manipulation of the small and fragile samples, and for the location of the measurement spot at the appropriate site on the stent's surface. Validation measurements on stent-like reference samples, comparing results from the technique with destructive measurements on the same samples, show correlation of better than 99% over a range of coating thicknesses and sample morphologies down to curvature radii of ~50μm.

  5. High-accuracy thickness measurement of a transparent plate with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wang-Tsung; Hsieh, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wei-Yao; Chen, Yen-Liang; Su, Der-Chin

    2011-07-20

    In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the optical path variation is measured with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique, as the light beam is focused by a displaced microscopic objective on the front/rear surface of the test transparent plate. The optical path length variation is then measured similarly after the test plate is removed. The geometrical thickness of the test plate can be calculated under the consideration of dispersion effect. This method has a wide measurable range and a high accuracy in the measurable range.

  6. High-accuracy thickness measurement of a transparent plate with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wang-Tsung; Hsieh, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wei-Yao; Chen, Yen-Liang; Su, Der-Chin

    2011-07-20

    In a modified Twyman-Green interferometer, the optical path variation is measured with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique, as the light beam is focused by a displaced microscopic objective on the front/rear surface of the test transparent plate. The optical path length variation is then measured similarly after the test plate is removed. The geometrical thickness of the test plate can be calculated under the consideration of dispersion effect. This method has a wide measurable range and a high accuracy in the measurable range.

  7. High-accuracy thickness measurement of a transparent plate with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wang-Tsung; Hsieh, Hung-Chih; Chang, Wei-Yao; Chen, Yen-Liang; Su, Der-Chin

    2011-07-01

    In a modified Twyman--Green interferometer, the optical path variation is measured with the heterodyne central fringe identification technique, as the light beam is focused by a displaced microscopic objective on the front/rear surface of the test transparent plate. The optical path length variation is then measured similarly after the test plate is removed. The geometrical thickness of the test plate can be calculated under the consideration of dispersion effect. This method has a wide measurable range and a high accuracy in the measurable range.

  8. [Measurement of the blood flow velocity in the pulmonary arteries using the magnetic resonance technique].

    PubMed

    Gamroth, A H; Schad, L R; Wacker, C M; Gehling, U; Knopp, M V; Betsch, B; Clorius, J H; van Kaick, G

    1992-04-01

    MR blood velocity measurements were performed by the RACE technique in a plane perpendicular to the flow of the pulmonary arteries. MR findings were correlated with those of perfusion scintigraphy, Doppler US and right heart catheter (thermodilution). The ratio of MR blood flow measurements of right and left pulmonary arteries correlated well with the results of perfusion scintigraphy (RPA to LPA) and Doppler. Poor correlation was found when comparing MR blood flow measurements with right heart catheter since absolute flow measurements can be superimposed by neighboring blood vessels in complex anatomic situations.

  9. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  10. Development of Local Gas Temperature Measurement Technique inside a Combustion Chamber Using Two-Wire Thermocouple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Shigemi; Moriyoshi, Yasuo; Enomoto, Yoshiteru

    Thermocouples are widely used to measure the local gas temperature due to its accuracy and convenience. However, it is difficult to use thermocouples in a transient phenomenon such as reacting fields. In this study, the unsteady gas temperature inside a combustion chamber was measured by using an improved two-wire thermocouple technique. Based on previous two-wire methods, some modifications were examined. Firstly, numerical analysis of heat transfer between transient flow and thermocouple was performed to see what kind of modification was required. Secondly, a correction term was added to the basic equation, which was validated by experiments using a Rapid Compression and Expansion Machine. Finally, an improved two-wire thermocouple technique was evaluated by measuring the transient gas temperature inside a combustion chamber and compared to the estimated temperature using measured pressure data and assumptions of chemical equilibrium.

  11. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Alec Y.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  12. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  13. Novel On-wafer Radiation Pattern Measurement Technique for MEMS Actuator Based Reconfigurable Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a novel on-wafer, antenna far field pattern measurement technique for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based reconfigurable patch antennas. The measurement technique significantly reduces the time and the cost associated with the characterization of printed antennas, fabricated on a semiconductor wafer or dielectric substrate. To measure the radiation patterns, the RF probe station is modified to accommodate an open-ended rectangular waveguide as the rotating linearly polarized sampling antenna. The open-ended waveguide is attached through a coaxial rotary joint to a Plexiglas(Trademark) arm and is driven along an arc by a stepper motor. Thus, the spinning open-ended waveguide can sample the relative field intensity of the patch as a function of the angle from bore sight. The experimental results include the measured linearly polarized and circularly polarized radiation patterns for MEMS-based frequency reconfigurable rectangular and polarization reconfigurable nearly square patch antennas, respectively.

  14. Temperature and pressure measurement techniques for an advanced turbine test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.; Cochran, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, high-temperature turbine test facility constructed for use in turbine cooling research is described. Several recently developed temperature and pressure measuring techniques are used in this facility. The measurement techniques, their status, previous applications and some results are discussed. Noncontact surface temperature measurements are made by optical methods. Radiation pyrometry principles combined with photoelectric scanning are used for rotating components and infrared photography for stationary components. Contact (direct) temperature and pressure measurements on rotating components are expected to be handled with an 80 channel rotary data package which mounts on and rotates with the turbine shaft at speeds up to 17,500 rpm. The data channels are time-division multiplexed and converted to digital words in the data package. A rotary transformer couples power and digital data to and from the shaft.

  15. An optical fiber sensing technique for temperature distribution measurements in microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Daichi; Sugiyama, Jun-ichi; Zushi, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    We introduce an optical fiber sensing technique that can measure the temperature distributions along a fiber during microwave heating. We used a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as an electromagnetic-immune sensor and interrogated temperature distributions along the FBG by an optical frequency domain reflectometry. Water in a glass tube with a length of 820 mm was heated in a microwave oven, and its temperature distribution along the glass tube was measured using the sensing system. The temperature distribution was obtained in 5 mm intervals. Infrared radiometry was also used to compare the temperature measurement results. Time and spatial variations of the temperature distribution profiles were monitored for several microwave input powers. The results clearly depict inhomogeneous temperature profiles. The applicability and effectiveness of the optical fiber distributed measurement technique in microwave heating are demonstrated.

  16. Doppler Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles Using the Aerosol Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin

    2000-01-01

    The development of a ground based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the recently described aerosol double edge technique is reported. A pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm is used to make range resolved measurements of atmospheric winds in the free troposphere. The wind measurements are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the laser signal backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. The lidar instrument and double edge method are described and initial tropospheric wind profile measurements are presented. Wind profiles are reported for both day and night operation. The measurements extend to altitudes as high as 14 km and are compared to rawinsonde wind profile data from Dulles airport in Virginia. Vertical resolution of the lidar measurements is 330 m and the rms precision of the measurements is a low as 0.6 m/s.

  17. Non-Intrusive Measurement Techniques Applied to the Hybrid Solid Fuel Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauty, F.

    2004-10-01

    The knowledge of the solid fuel regression rate and the time evolution of the grain geometry are requested for hybrid motor design and control of its operating conditions. Two non-intrusive techniques (NDT) have been applied to hybrid propulsion : both are based on wave propagation, the X-rays and the ultrasounds, through the materials. X-ray techniques allow local thickness measurements (attenuated signal level) using small probes or 2D images (Real Time Radiography), with a link between the size of field of view and accuracy. Beside the safety hazards associated with the high-intensity X-ray systems, the image analysis requires the use of quite complex post-processing techniques. The ultrasound technique is more widely used in energetic material applications, including hybrid fuels. Depending upon the transducer size and the associated equipment, the application domain is large, from tiny samples to the quad-port wagon wheel grain of the 1.1 MN thrust HPDP motor. The effect of the physical quantities has to be taken into account in the wave propagation analysis. With respect to the various applications, there is no unique and perfect experimental method to measure the fuel regression rate. The best solution could be obtained by combining two techniques at the same time, each technique enhancing the quality of the global data.

  18. Measuring chemical emissions from wet products--development of a new measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Zhu, Jiping; Rastan, Soheil; Haghighat, Fariborz

    2011-09-15

    A new approach for estimating chemical emissions from wet products has been developed. The concept of such approach is that emission rates can be estimated from the amount of target chemicals in the product as a function of evaporation time. Samples were placed under a laboratory fume hood under controlled conditions (surface air velocity and temperature). Weight losses of the product were monitored and residuals at different time intervals were chemically analyzed. Emission factors of the target chemicals were then calculated based on the weight losses and residual levels of the chemicals. To demonstrate the applicability of this approach, two wet products with very different physical characteristics, one liquid and one paste-like viscous fluid, were chosen. Emissions of two principle chemicals in the products, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) were measured. The influences of initial sample weight, surface air velocity, and temperature were investigated. The calculated emission profiles were compared with those obtained from the chamber method. The described approach could be used as an alternative screening method for emission tests of wet products, especially for compounds with low vapour pressure when sink effect poses serious challenge in traditional chamber-based emission tests.

  19. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements.

    PubMed

    Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Musazay, M S; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-01-01

    A passive "can technique" and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bqm(-2)h(-1) with an average of 1.35+/-1.40 Bqm(-2)h(-1). The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  20. Evaluation of three new laser spectrometer techniques for in-situ carbon monoxide measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, C.; Steinbacher, M.; Buchmann, B.

    2012-07-01

    Long-term time series of the atmospheric composition are essential for environmental research and thus require compatible, multi-decadal monitoring activities. However, the current data quality objectives of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) for carbon monoxide (CO) in the atmosphere are very challenging to meet with the measurement techniques that have been used until recently. During the past few years, new spectroscopic techniques came on the market with promising properties for trace gas analytics. The current study compares three instruments that are recently commercially available (since 2011) with the up to now best available technique (vacuum UV fluorescence) and provides a link to previous comparison studies. The instruments were investigated for their performance regarding repeatability, reproducibility, drift, temperature dependence, water vapour interference and linearity. Finally, all instruments were examined during a short measurement campaign to assess their applicability for long-term field measurements. It could be shown that the new techniques provide a considerably better performance compared to previous techniques, although some issues such as temperature influence and cross sensitivities need further attention.