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Sample records for adequate measurement techniques

  1. Evaluation of catheter-manometer systems for adequate intravascular blood pressure measurements in small animals.

    PubMed

    Idvall, J; Aronsen, K F; Lindström, K; Ulmsten, U

    1977-09-30

    Various catheter-manometer systems possible for intravascular blood pressure measurments on rats have been elaborated and tested in vitro and in vivo. Using a pressure-step calibrator, it was observed from in vitro studies that microtransducers had superior frequency response compared to conventional transducers. Of the catheters tested, Pe-90 tapered to a 40 mm tip with an inner diameter of 0.3 mm had the best frequency response as judged from fall and settling times. Because of the damping effect, tapering increased fall time to 1.8 ms, which was still quite acceptable. By the same token settling time was minimized to 22.4 ms. With a special calculation method the theoretical percentile fault of the recordings was estimated to be 9.66%. When the measurement error was calculated from the actual in vivo recordings, it was found to be no more than 2.7%. These results show that the technique described is adequate for continuous intravascular blood pressure recordings on small animals. Finally it is emphasized that careful handling of the catheters and avoidance of stopcocks and air bubbles are essential for obtaining accurate and reproducible values. PMID:928971

  2. Remote Raman measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications is surveyed. A feasibility index is defined as a means to characterize the practicality of a given remote Raman measurement application. Specific applications of Raman scattering to the measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles, methane plumes from liquid natural gas spills, and subsurface ocean temperature profiles are described. This paper will survey the use of laser Raman measurement techniques in remote sensing applications using as examples specific systems that the Computer Genetics Corporation (CGC) group has developed and engineered.

  3. Sensorimotor System Measurement Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Riemann, Bryan L.; Myers, Joseph B.; Lephart, Scott M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To provide an overview of currently available sensorimotor assessment techniques. Data Sources: We drew information from an extensive review of the scientific literature conducted in the areas of proprioception, neuromuscular control, and motor control measurement. Literature searches were conducted using MEDLINE for the years 1965 to 1999 with the key words proprioception, somatosensory evoked potentials, nerve conduction testing, electromyography, muscle dynamometry, isometric, isokinetic, kinetic, kinematic, posture, equilibrium, balance, stiffness, neuromuscular, sensorimotor, and measurement. Additional sources were collected using the reference lists of identified articles. Data Synthesis: Sensorimotor measurement techniques are discussed with reference to the underlying physiologic mechanisms, influential factors and locations of the variable within the system, clinical research questions, limitations of the measurement technique, and directions for future research. Conclusions/Recommendations: The complex interactions and relationships among the individual components of the sensorimotor system make measuring and analyzing specific characteristics and functions difficult. Additionally, the specific assessment techniques used to measure a variable can influence attained results. Optimizing the application of sensorimotor research to clinical settings can, therefore, be best accomplished through the use of common nomenclature to describe underlying physiologic mechanisms and specific measurement techniques. PMID:16558672

  4. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Macarthur, Duncan W; Langner, Diana; Smith, Morag; Thron, Jonathan; Razinkov, Sergey; Livke, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  5. Foraminal height measurement techniques

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the proposed advantages of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is restoration of disc height and hence an indirect foraminal height restoration. While this proposed advantage is often quoted in the literature, there are few robust studies demonstrating restoration of foraminal volume. Thus, this study aimed to review the literature and discuss the progression and development of foramen measurement techniques. Methods A review of the literature was performed to identify studies which reported foraminal height and dimensions following fusion surgery in cadaveric models or patients. Results Techniques in prior studies used to quantify foraminal dimensions before and after fusion operations include analysis from plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Recent studies have attempted to standardize foraminal dimension measurements with the use of orthogonal software, accelerator-based measurements and the use of multiple images for three-dimensional reconstruction of the foramen volume. Conclusions Consistent results have demonstrated significant increases in foraminal area and height following anterior lumbar interbody distraction, providing evidence that ALIF can indirectly increase foraminal height. Future studies should use standardized measurement approaches such as the Pedicle-to-Pedicle technique with CT or MRI images to determine changes in foraminal dimensions.

  6. Foraminal height measurement techniques

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background One of the proposed advantages of anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) is restoration of disc height and hence an indirect foraminal height restoration. While this proposed advantage is often quoted in the literature, there are few robust studies demonstrating restoration of foraminal volume. Thus, this study aimed to review the literature and discuss the progression and development of foramen measurement techniques. Methods A review of the literature was performed to identify studies which reported foraminal height and dimensions following fusion surgery in cadaveric models or patients. Results Techniques in prior studies used to quantify foraminal dimensions before and after fusion operations include analysis from plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. Recent studies have attempted to standardize foraminal dimension measurements with the use of orthogonal software, accelerator-based measurements and the use of multiple images for three-dimensional reconstruction of the foramen volume. Conclusions Consistent results have demonstrated significant increases in foraminal area and height following anterior lumbar interbody distraction, providing evidence that ALIF can indirectly increase foraminal height. Future studies should use standardized measurement approaches such as the Pedicle-to-Pedicle technique with CT or MRI images to determine changes in foraminal dimensions. PMID:27683677

  7. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  8. Light absorption measurements: new techniques.

    PubMed

    Hänel, G; Busen, R; Hillenbrand, C; Schloss, R

    1982-02-01

    A new radiometer is described which simplifies measurement of the radiation supply of solar wavelengths. Two methods of measuring the radiant energy absorbed by aerosol particles are described: A photometric technique is used for particles collected on filters, and a calorimetric technique is used for in situ measurements. Data collected with the radiometer and the light absorption techniques yield the heating rate of the atmosphere due to light absorption by the particles. Sample measurements show substantial atmospheric temperature increases due to absorption, especially in industrial regions.

  9. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Liu, Tian-Shu

    2001-01-01

    The theory, methods, and applications of the videogrammetric model deformation (VMD) measurement technique used at NASA for wind tunnel testing are presented. The VMD technique, based on non-topographic photogrammetry, can determine static and dynamic aeroelastic deformation and attitude of a wind-tunnel model. Hardware of the system includes a video-rate CCD camera, a computer with an image acquisition frame grabber board, illumination lights, and retroreflective or painted targets on a wind tunnel model. Custom software includes routines for image acquisition, target-tracking/identification, target centroid calculation, camera calibration, and deformation calculations. Applications of the VMD technique at five large NASA wind tunnels are discussed.

  10. Metrology of vibration measurements by laser techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Martens, Hans-Jürgen

    2008-06-01

    Metrology as the art of careful measurement has been understood as uniform methodology for measurements in natural sciences, covering methods for the consistent assessment of experimental data and a corpus of rules regulating application in technology and in trade and industry. The knowledge, methods and tools available for precision measurements can be exploited for measurements at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology. A metrological approach to the preparation, execution and evaluation (including expression of uncertainty) of measurements of translational and rotational motion quantities using laser interferometer methods and techniques will be presented. The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and upgraded ISO standards are reviewed with respect to their suitability for ensuring traceable vibration measurements and calibrations in an extended frequency range of 0.4 Hz to higher than 100 kHz. Using adequate vibration exciters to generate sufficient displacement or velocity amplitudes, the upper frequency limits of the laser interferometer methods specified in ISO 16063-11 for frequencies <= 10 kHz can be expanded to 100 kHz and beyond. A comparison of different methods simultaneously used for vibration measurements at 100 kHz will be demonstrated. A statistical analysis of numerous experimental results proves the highest accuracy achievable currently in vibration measurements by specific laser methods, techniques and procedures (i.e. measurement uncertainty 0.05 % at frequencies <= 10 kHz, <= 1 % up to 100 kHz).

  11. A measurement technique for hydroxyacetone

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C{double{underscore}bond}CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NOx. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water, the authors developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one they reported earlier, namely, derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, they adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island, New York. The authors report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  12. A MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR HYDROXYACETONE.

    SciTech Connect

    KLOTZ,P.J.

    1999-10-04

    Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C=CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NO{sub x}. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water (it's Henry's law constant being {approx}2 x 10{sup 4} M atm{sup -1} at 20 C, Zhou and Lee, unpublished data), we developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one we reported earlier (Lee and Zhou, 1993), namely, based on derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, we adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island (LI), New York. We report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.

  13. An acoustic mode measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joppa, P. D.

    1984-10-01

    Turbomachinery noise propagates in aircraft jet engine ducts in a complicated manner. Measurement of this propagation is useful both to identify source mechanisms and to design efficient linings. A practical method of making these measurements has been developed, using linear arrays of equally spaced microphones mounted flush with the duct wall. Circumferential or axial arrays are analyzed by spatial Fourier transform, giving sound level as a function of spinning order or axial wavenumber respectively. Complex demodulation is used to acquire data in a modest bandwidth around a high frequency of interest. A joint NASA/Boeing test of the system used 32 microphones in a JT15D turbofan engine inlet. A 400-Hz bandwidth centered at blade passage frequency and at half blade passage frequency was studied. The theoretically predicted modes were clearly seen at blade passage frequency; broadband noise at half blade passage frequency was biased towards modes corotating with the fan. Interference between similar modes was not a significant problem. A lining design study indicated a 15 percent improvement in lining efficiency was possible when mode data were used, for this particular engine. The technique has proven reliable and useful for source diagnostics and lining design.

  14. An Examination of Principal Leadership Styles and Their Influence on School Performance as Measured by Adequate Yearly Progress at Selected Title I Elementary Schools in South Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Tammy Faith

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine principal leadership styles and their influence on school performance as measured by adequate yearly progress at selected Title I schools in South Carolina. The main focus of the research study was to complete descriptive statistics on principal leadership styles in schools that met or did not meet adequate…

  15. Comparison of Holdup Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lousteau, Angela L; Stooksbury, John C; Cleveland, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of uranium holdup, the residual material left in process equipment such as pipes or ducts, is an integral element of material control and accountability. Not only are the measurements important for accountability, they are also important for criticality safety. The goal in measuring holdup is to quantify the amount of material in the pipes to verify that all material is accounted for (inventory in [inventory out + holdup] = 0) and to ensure that the amount of material heldup is not a criticality risk. There are a number of ways to measure holdup in process equipment; however, this paper will evaluate only two methods (i.e., Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS-4) and In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS)) for specific measurement scenarios. The comparison will use measurements of well-known reference materials in various configurations and will examine the results, uncertainties, repeatability, time required, portability, and cost of each system.

  16. Measurement Techniques for Clock Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin; Schlesinger, Adam

    2012-01-01

    NASA is in the process of modernizing its communications infrastructure to accompany the development of a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to replace the shuttle. With this effort comes the opportunity to infuse more advanced coded modulation techniques, including low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes that offer greater coding gains than the current capability. However, in order to take full advantage of these codes, the ground segment receiver synchronization loops must be able to operate at a lower signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than supported by equipment currently in use.

  17. Enhancements in luminescence measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Bøtter-Jensen, L; Bulur, E; Murray, A S; Poolton, N R J

    2002-01-01

    New developments in the Risø TL/OSL system includes a software controlled heater fitted underneath the beta source to enable irradiation of samples at an elevated temperature. This allows investigations of competition effects from thermally shallow traps and centres. Significant additional software developments include the facility to vary linearly the stimulation power during stimulation (linearly modulated OSL). The elevated temperature irradiator facility has been further expanded to allow the measurement of radioluminescence (RL) during beta irradiation. This additional facility allows the measurement of TL, OSL and RL in the same software controlled automatic sequence. This paper provides a description of the capabilities of the new combined automatic TL/OSL/RL reader, and illustrates the application of the elevated temperature irradiator facility, and the RL unit. The new measurement facilities have provided preliminary information about possible trap competition during storage, and changes in recombination processes. PMID:12382719

  18. Wind tunnel buffet load measuring technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. S.; Ellison, A. M.

    1972-01-01

    Indirect force measurement technique estimates unsteady forces acting on elastic model during wind tunnel tests. Measurement of forces is practically insensitive to errors in aeroelastic scaling between model and full-scale structure, simplifying design, fabrication and dynamic calibration.

  19. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    PubMed

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    , photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V(20 Gy). The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  20. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    SciTech Connect

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa’n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-10-01

    -only plans (mean = 16.2 ± 3%, p < 0.001). As expected, photon-only plans demonstrated the highest target coverage and total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy}. The superiority of electron-only beams, in terms of decreasing lung dose, is set back by the dosimetric hotspots associated with such plans. Combined photon-electron treatment is a feasible technique for supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose.

  1. Technique for Measuring Gas Conversion Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for measuring calibration conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters applied to widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for hydrocarbon gases. Values of conversion factors for two common hydrocarbons measured using this technique in good agreement with empirical values cited by manufacturer. Similar agreement expected for all other hydrocarbons. Technique based on Nernst theorem for matching partial pressure of oxygen in combustion product gases with that in normal air. Simple, quick, and relatively safe, particularly for toxic/poisonous hydrocarbons.

  2. A review on creatinine measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohabbati-Kalejahi, Elham; Azimirad, Vahid; Bahrami, Manouchehr; Ganbari, Ahmad

    2012-08-15

    This paper reviews the entire recent global tendency for creatinine measurement. Creatinine biosensors involve complex relationships between biology and micro-mechatronics to which the blood is subjected. Comparison between new and old methods shows that new techniques (e.g. Molecular Imprinted Polymers based algorithms) are better than old methods (e.g. Elisa) in terms of stability and linear range. All methods and their details for serum, plasma, urine and blood samples are surveyed. They are categorized into five main algorithms: optical, electrochemical, impedometrical, Ion Selective Field-Effect Transistor (ISFET) based technique and chromatography. Response time, detection limit, linear range and selectivity of reported sensors are discussed. Potentiometric measurement technique has the lowest response time of 4-10 s and the lowest detection limit of 0.28 nmol L(-1) belongs to chromatographic technique. Comparison between various techniques of measurements indicates that the best selectivity belongs to MIP based and chromatographic techniques.

  3. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques, which involves some investigations related to measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand, is reported. A major part of the activity was devoted to instruction and discussion with Thai radar engineers, technicians, and meteorologists concerning the basic principles of radar meteorology and applications to specific problems, including measurement of rainfall and detection of wind shear/microburst hazards. Weather radar calibration techniques were also considered during this project. Most of the activity took place during two visits to Thailand, in December 1990 and February 1992.

  4. Alternative reliable techniques in femoral torsion measurement.

    PubMed

    Delialioglu, M Onder; Tasbas, Bulent A; Bayrakci, Kenan; Daglar, Bulent; Kurt, Murat; Agar, Mustafa; Gunel, Ugur

    2006-01-01

    The clinical and conventional bi-planar determinations of femoral torsion were compared with the tomographic technique, the reliability of which was confirmed. Femoral torsions were measured with the trochanteric prominence angle test, the sinus-wave bi-planar conventional radiographic technique, the modified Hermann bi-planar conventional radiographic technique and the limited three-dimensional volumetric tomography technique in 34 femora of 17 patients. There was a strong correlation between the modified Hermann and the limited tomography techniques for 14 intact and 20 fractured femora. If limited three-dimensional volumetric tomography cannot be obtained, the modified Hermann bi-planar conventional radiographic technique must be used in patients who have scarring about the proximal femur and obesity. Otherwise use of the trochanteric prominence angle test is much more cost-effective and is as accurate as the limited three-dimensional volumetric tomography technique.

  5. Using Math and Reading Curriculum-Based Measurements to Predict State Mathematics Test Performance: Are Simple One-Minute Measures Technically Adequate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiban, Cynthia L.; Deno, Stanley L.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the technical adequacy of 3 simple, 1-min curriculum-based measurements (CBM) for predicting third (n = 35) and fifth (n = 49) graders' performance on a state standards test of mathematics. Measures included 2 numeric CBMs: a traditional basic facts measure and a new "cloze" math facts measure, designed to require deeper…

  6. Experimental Techniques for Thermodynamic Measurements of Ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Putnam, Robert L.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    1999-01-01

    Experimental techniques for thermodynamic measurements on ceramic materials are reviewed. For total molar quantities, calorimetry is used. Total enthalpies are determined with combustion calorimetry or solution calorimetry. Heat capacities and entropies are determined with drop calorimetry, differential thermal methods, and adiabatic calorimetry . Three major techniques for determining partial molar quantities are discussed. These are gas equilibration techniques, Knudsen cell methods, and electrochemical techniques. Throughout this report, issues unique to ceramics are emphasized. Ceramic materials encompass a wide range of stabilities and this must be considered. In general data at high temperatures is required and the need for inert container materials presents a particular challenge.

  7. Laser Doppler measurement techniques for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinman, Peter W.; Gagliardi, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Two techniques are proposed for using laser links to measure the relative radial velocity of two spacecraft. The first technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on a transponded radio-frequency subcarrier. The subcarrier intensity-modulates reciprocating laser beams. The second technique determines the relative radial velocity from a measurement of the two-way Doppler shift on an optical frequency carrier which is transponded between spacecraft using optical Costas loops. The first technique might be used in conjunction with noncoherent optical communications, while the second technique is compatible with coherent optical communications. The first technique simultaneously exploits the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the maturity of radio-frequency phase-locked loop technology. The second technique exploits both the diffraction advantage of laser beams and the large Doppler effect at optical frequencies. The second technique has the potential for greater accuracy; unfortunately, it is more difficult to implement since it involves optical Costas loops.

  8. Multidirectional mobilities: Advanced measurement techniques and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivarsson, Lars Holger

    Today high noise-and-vibration comfort has become a quality sign of products in sectors such as the automotive industry, aircraft, components, households and manufacturing. Consequently, already in the design phase of products, tools are required to predict the final vibration and noise levels. These tools have to be applicable over a wide frequency range with sufficient accuracy. During recent decades a variety of tools have been developed such as transfer path analysis (TPA), input force estimation, substructuring, coupling by frequency response functions (FRF) and hybrid modelling. While these methods have a well-developed theoretical basis, their application combined with experimental data often suffers from a lack of information concerning rotational DOFs. In order to measure response in all 6 DOFs (including rotation), a sensor has been developed, whose special features are discussed in the thesis. This transducer simplifies the response measurements, although in practice the excitation of moments appears to be more difficult. Several excitation techniques have been developed to enable measurement of multidirectional mobilities. For rapid and simple measurement of the loaded mobility matrix, a MIMO (Multiple Input Multiple Output) technique is used. The technique has been tested and validated on several structures of different complexity. A second technique for measuring the loaded 6-by-6 mobility matrix has been developed. This technique employs a model of the excitation set-up, and with this model the mobility matrix is determined from sequential measurements. Measurements on ``real'' structures show that both techniques give results of similar quality, and both are recommended for practical use. As a further step, a technique for measuring the unloaded mobilities is presented. It employs the measured loaded mobility matrix in order to calculate compensation forces and moments, which are later applied in order to compensate for the loading of the

  9. Principles and techniques of blood pressure measurement

    PubMed Central

    Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Pickering, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Although the mercury sphygmomanometer is widely regarded as the “gold standard” for office blood pressure measurement, the ban on use of mercury devices continues to diminish their role in office and hospital settings. To date, mercury devices have largely been phased out in US hospitals. This has led to the proliferation of non-mercury devices and has changed (probably for ever) the preferable modality of blood pressure measurement in clinic and hospital settings. In this article, the basic techniques of blood pressure measurement and the technical issues associated with measurements in clinical practice are discussed. The devices currently available for hospital and clinic measurements and their important sources of error are presented. Practical advice is given on how the different devices and measurement techniques should be used. Blood pressure measurements in different circumstances and in special populations such as infants, children, pregnant women, elderly persons, and obese subjects are discussed. PMID:20937442

  10. Wastewater Sampling Methodologies and Flow Measurement Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Daniel J.; Keffer, William J.

    This document provides a ready source of information about water/wastewater sampling activities using various commercial sampling and flow measurement devices. The report consolidates the findings and summarizes the activities, experiences, sampling methods, and field measurement techniques conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA),…

  11. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-12-01

    Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

  12. A discussion of dynamic stability measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques for the measurement of the dynamic stability of linear systems are discussed. Particular attention is given to an analysis of the errors in the procedures, and to methods for calculating the system damping from the data. The techniques discussed include: transient decay, moving block analysis, spectral analysis, random decrement signatures, transfer function analysis, and parameter identification methods. The special problems of rotorcraft dynamic stability testing are discussed.

  13. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    1997-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WDI 5387, 'Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells' was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and the international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  14. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  15. An intercomparison of five ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, E. J.; Sandholm, S. T.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Schendel, J. S.; Langford, A. O.; Quinn, P. K.; Lebel, P. J.; Vay, S. A.; Roberts, P. D.; Norton, R. B.

    1992-01-01

    Results obtained from five techniques for measuring gas-phase ammonia at low concentration in the atmosphere are compared. These methods are: (1) a photofragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (PF/LIF) instrument; (2) a molybdenum oxide annular denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection technique; (3) a tungsten oxide denuder sampling/chemiluminescence detection system; (4) a citric-acid-coated denuder sampling/ion chromatographic analysis (CAD/IC) method; and (5) an oxalic-acid-coated filter pack sampling/colorimetric analysis method. It was found that two of the techniques, the PF/LIF and the CAD/IC methods, measured approximately 90 percent of the calculated ammonia added in the spiking tests and agreed very well with each other in the ambient measurements.

  16. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, J.J.; Khandelwal, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  17. Microwave techniques for physical property measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M.

    1993-01-01

    Industrial processing of metals and ceramics is now being streamlined by the development of theoretical models. High temperature thermophysical properties of these materials are required to successfully apply these theories. Unfortunately, there is insufficient experimental data available for many of these properties, particularly in the molten state. Microwave fields can be used to measure specific heat, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and dielectric constants at high temperatures. We propose to (1) develop a microwave flash method (analogous to the laser flash technique) that can simultaneously measure the thermal diffusivity and specific heat of insulators and semiconductors at high temperatures, (2) an appropriate theory and experimental apparatus to demonstrate the measurement of the specific heat of a metal using a new microwave ac specific heat technique, and (3) experimental methods for noncontact measurement of the real and imaginary dielectric constants.

  18. Mucosal Wave Measurement and Visualization Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Krausert, Christopher R.; Olszewski, Aleksandra E.; Taylor, Lindsay N.; McMurray, James S.; Dailey, Seth H.; Jiang, Jack J.

    2010-01-01

    Organized vibration of the vocal folds is critical to high quality voice production. When the vocal folds oscillate, the superficial tissue of the vocal fold is displaced in a wave-like fashion, creating the so called “mucosal wave”. Because the mucosal wave is dependent on vocal fold structure, physical alterations of that structure cause mucosal wave abnormalities. Visualization and quantification of mucosal wave properties have become useful parameters in diagnosing and managing vocal fold pathology. Mucosal wave measurement provides information about vocal fold characteristics that cannot be determined with other assessment techniques. Here, we discuss the benefits, disadvantages, and clinical applicability of the different mucosal wave measurement techniques, such as electroglottography (EGG), photoglottography (PGG), and ultrasound and visualization techniques that include videokymography (VKG), stroboscopy, and high-speed digital imaging (HSDI). The various techniques and their specific uses are reviewed with the intention of helping researchers and clinicians choose a method for a given situation and understand its limitations as well as its potential applications. Recent applications of these techniques for quantitative assessment demonstrate that additional research must be conducted to realize the full potential of these tools. Evaluations of existing research and recommendations for future research are given to promote both the quantitative study of the mucosal wave through accurate and standardized measurement of mucosal wave parameters and the development of reliable methods with which physicians can diagnose vocal disorders. PMID:20471798

  19. Recent advancement of turbulent flow measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Battle, T.; Wang, P.; Cheng, D. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Advancements of the fluctuating density gradient cross beam laser Schlieren technique, the fluctuating line-reversal temperature measurement and the development of the two-dimensional drag-sensing probe to a three-dimensional drag-sensing probe are discussed. The three-dimensionality of the instantaneous momentum vector can shed some light on the nature of turbulence especially with swirling flow. All three measured fluctuating quantities (density, temperature, and momentum) can provide valuable information for theoreticians.

  20. Apparatus and techniques for measuring bedload

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hubbell, David Wellington

    1964-01-01

    The need for accurate determinations of the total sediment discharge of particles of bedload size has prompted this investigation of available and possible measuring apparatus and procedures. The accuracy of measurements of sediment discharge made with trap-type samplers is affected by the variability of sampler efficiency, by the oscillatory variation of bedload discharge, and by sampler placement. Equations that were developed for determining total discharge from measured bedioad discharge and measured suspended-sediment discharge are simplest if the bedload apparatus measures only the true bedload. Early bedload samplers are generally unsatisfactory. Recently developed or suggested apparatus include various improved samplers of the pressure-difference type, a pumping sampler, a magnetic sampler, acoustical instruments that measure the magnitude of the sound of particle collisions, an ultrasonic bedload sampler designed to measure and integrate electronically the concentration and velocity, and a tiltmeter designed to measure the total sediment discharge from the ground tilt that results from the passage of flow. All the pressure-difference samplers are improvements over early samplers, but none are void of the inherent shortcomings of trap-type apparatus; probably the Sphinx (Dutch) and VUV (Hungarian) samplers are the most satisfactory. The acoustical instruments are capable of measuring only the relative discharge. The ultrasonic sampler and the tiltmeter are not adequate without further development. Some new possible apparatus and means for measuring or aiding in measuring bedload discharge are small pit samplers, ultrasonic sounders, pressure transducers, and photography. A small pit sampler for measuring bedload discharge was designed to provide self-placement and portability ; however, its practicability and efficiency are undetermined. Exploratory films show that by using slowmotion photography the discharge of particles larger than about pea size can be

  1. Ionospheric Measurements Using Environmental Sampling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdeau, R. E.; Jackson, J. E.; Kane, J. A.; Serbu, G. P.

    1960-01-01

    Two rockets were flown to peak altitudes of 220 km in September 1959 to test various methods planned for future measurements of ionization parameters in the ionosphere, exosphere, and interplanetary plasma. The experiments used techniques which sample the ambient environment in the immediate vicinity of the research vehicle. Direct methods were chosen since indirect propagation techniques do not provide the temperatures of charged particles, are insensitive to ion densities, and cannot measure local electron densities under all conditions. Very encouraging results have been obtained from a preliminary analysis of data provided by one of the two flights. A new rf probe technique was successfully used to determine the electron density profile. This was indicated by its agreement with the results of a companion cw propagation experiment, particularly when the probe data were corrected for the effects of the ion sheath which surrounds the vehicle. The characteristics of this sheath were determined directly in flight by an electric field meter which provided the sheath field, and by a Langmuir probe which measured the total potential across the sheath. The electron temperatures deduced from the Langmuir probe data are greater than the neutral gas temperatures previously measured for the same location and season, but these measurements possibly were taken under different atmospheric conditions. Ion densities were calculated from the ion trap data for several altitudes ranging from 130 to 210 km and were found to be within 20 percent of the measured electron densities.

  2. Research relative to weather radar measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Paul L.

    1992-01-01

    This grant provides for some investigations related to weather radar measurement techniques applicable to meteorological radar systems in Thailand. Quality data are needed from those systems to support TRMM and other scientific investigations. Activities carried out during a trip to the radar facilities at Phuket are described.

  3. Radionuclide Counting Technique Measures Wind Velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed technique for measuring wind velocity based on inverse-squarelaw variation of radioactive counting rates. In proposal, radioative source is deposited on bottom of light, hollow sphere and suspended by flexible wire over radiation counter, Anemometer based on this concept is self-contained, portable, yet not too fragile. Used for extended periods of time, even at remote, inhospitable and inaccessible sites.

  4. Techniques in audio and acoustic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kite, Thomas D.

    2003-10-01

    Measurement of acoustic devices and spaces is commonly performed with time-delay spectrometry (TDS) or maximum length sequence (MLS) analysis. Both techniques allow an impulse response to be measured with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that can be traded off against the measurement time. However, TDS suffers from long measurement times because of its linear sweep, while MLS suffers from the corruption of the impulse response by distortion. Recently a logarithmic sweep-based method has been devised which offers high SNR, short measurement times, and the ability to separate the linear impulse response from the impulse responses of distortion products. The applicability of these methods to audio and acoustic measurement will be compared.

  5. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1990-01-01

    Results of tests to measure ice growth in natural (flight) and artificial (icing wind tunnel) icing conditions are presented. Ice thickness is measured using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. Two icing regimes, wet and dry ice growth, are identified and the unique ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with these different types of ice growth are described. Ultrasonic measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to artificial and natural icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of plus or minus 0.5 mm is achieved for ice thickness measurement using the pulse-echo technique. The performance of two-probe type ice detectors is compared to the surface mounted ultrasonic system. The ultrasonically measured ice accretion rates and ice surface condition (wet or dry) are used to compare the heat transfer characteristics for flight and icing wind tunnel environments. In general the heat transfer coefficient is inferred to be higher in the wind tunnel environment, not likely due to higher freestream turbulence levels. Finally, preliminary results of tests to measure ice growth on airfoil using an array of ultrasonic transducers are described. Ice profiles obtained during flight in natural icing conditions are shown and compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  6. Financial volatility: Issues and measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, Kevin

    2008-04-01

    This paper explains in non-technical terms various techniques used to measure volatility ranging from time invariant measures to time variant measures. It is shown that a weakness of the former measures arises from the underlying assumption that volatility is considered to be constant over time. This observation has led researchers to develop time variant measures based on the assumption that volatility changes over time. The introduction of the original ARCH model by Engle has spawned an ever increasing variety of models such as GARCH, EGARCH, NARCH, ARCH-M MARCH and the Taylor-Schwert model. The degree of sophistication employed in developing these models is discussed in detail as are the models characteristics used to capture the underlying economic and financial time series data including volatility clustering, leverage effects and the persistence of volatility itself. A feature of these more elaborate models is that they generally obtain a better fit to the data in-sample.

  7. Measurements of Gastric Emptying by Biomagnetic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, L. A.; Sosa, M.; Córdova, T.; Vargas, F. M.; Huerta, M. R.

    2006-09-01

    In the present work a new method to measure the average time of gastric emptying by using a magnetic tracer is showed, this work shows the application of foundations of the electromagnetic theory in the study of the gastrointestinal system. The presented technique is relatively cheap and can be used it to diagnose of diseases, is a noninvasive method, is a technique that does not use ionizing radiation. In this investigation was possible to measure the average time of gastric emptying with a very high precision. In this investigation measurements of 10 healthy volunteers were made, and an average time of gastric emptying of 36.45 minutes in the space of the time was obtained, in addition with the analysis to the signal by means of the use of a pass-band filter it was possible to measure the peristaltic frequencies of the stomach and an average time of 37.24 minutes in the space of frequencies. With this technique it is possible to obtain data of the walls of the stomach. A peristaltic frequency of 2.79 was obtained cpm (cycles per minute).

  8. Absorption technique for OH measurements and calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakalyar, D. M.; James, J. V.; Wang, C. C.

    1982-01-01

    An absorption technique is described which utilizes a stabilized frequency-doubled tunable dye laser and a long-path White cell with high mirror reflectivities both in the red and UV. In laboratory conditions it has been possible to routinely obtain a detection sensitivity of 3 parts in 1,000,000 over absorption paths less than 1 m in length and a detection sensitivity of approximately 6 parts in 100,000 over an absorption path of the order of 1 km. The latter number corresponds to 3,000,000 OH molecules/cu cm, and therefore the technique should be particularly useful for calibration the fluorescence instrument for OH measurements. However, the presence of atmospheric fluctuations coupled with intensity variation accompanying frequency scanning appears to degrade the detection sensitivity in outdoor ambient conditions, thus making it unlikely that this technique can be employed for direct OH monitoring.

  9. Techniques for measurement of thoracoabdominal asynchrony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, G. Kim; Hammer, J.; Newth, Christopher J L.

    2002-01-01

    Respiratory motion measured by respiratory inductance plethysmography often deviates from the sinusoidal pattern assumed in the traditional Lissajous figure (loop) analysis used to determine thoraco-abdominal asynchrony, or phase angle phi. We investigated six different time-domain methods of measuring phi, using simulated data with sinusoidal and triangular waveforms, phase shifts of 0-135 degrees, and 10% noise. The techniques were then used on data from 11 lightly anesthetized rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; 7.6 +/- 0.8 kg; 5.7 +/- 0.5 years old), instrumented with a respiratory inductive plethysmograph, and subjected to increasing levels of inspiratory resistive loading ranging from 5-1,000 cmH(2)O. L(-1). sec(-1).The best results were obtained from cross-correlation and maximum linear correlation, with errors less than approximately 5 degrees from the actual phase angle in the simulated data. The worst performance was produced by the loop analysis, which in some cases was in error by more than 30 degrees. Compared to correlation, other analysis techniques performed at an intermediate level. Maximum linear correlation and cross-correlation produced similar results on the data collected from monkeys (SD of the difference, 4.1 degrees ) but all other techniques had a high SD of the difference compared to the correlation techniques.We conclude that phase angles are best measured using cross-correlation or maximum linear correlation, techniques that are independent of waveform shape, and robust in the presence of noise. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Surface Wear Measurement Using Optical Correlation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acinger, Kresimir

    1983-12-01

    The coherent optical correlation technique was applied for measuring the surface wear of a tappet (part of car engine), worn by friction with the camshaft. It was found that maximum correlation intensity decays exponentially with the number of wear cycles (i.e. camshaft revolutions). Tappets of the same make have an identical rate of correlation decay. Tappets of different makes have different rates of correlation decay which are in agreement with observed long term wear.

  11. Airborne intercomparisons of carbon monoxide measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoell, James M., Jr.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Mcdougal, David S.; Sachse, Glen W.; Hill, Gerald F.; Condon, Estelle P.

    1987-01-01

    Results from an airborne intercomparison of techniques to measure tropospheric levels of carbon monoxide (CO) are discussed. The intercomparison was conducted as part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Global Tropospheric Experiment and included a laser differential absorption method and two grab sample/gas chromatograph methods. Measurements were obtained during approximately 90 flight hours, during which the CO mixing ratios ranged from about 60 to 140 ppbv. The level of agreement observed for the ensemble of measurements was well within the overall accuracy stated for each instrument. The correlation observed between the measurements from the respective pairs of instruments ranged from 0.85 to 0.98, with no evidence for the presence of either a constant or proportional bias between any of the instruments.

  12. Aerosol pattern correlation techniques of wind measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of lidar image correlation techniques of remote wind measurement. It also examines the potential use of satellite borne lidar global wind measurements using this approach. Lidar systems can easily detect spatial variations in the volume scattering cross section of naturally occurring aerosols. Lidar derived RHI, PPI and range-time displays of aerosol backscatter have been extensively employed in the study of atmospheric structure. Descriptions of this type of data can be obtained in many references including Kunkel et al. (1977), Kunkel et al. (1980), Boers et al. (1984), Uthe et al. (1980), Melfi et al. (1985) and Browell et al. (1983). It is likely that the first space-borne lidars for atmospheric studies will observe aerosol backscatter to measure parameters such as boundary layer depth and cloud height. This paper examines the potential application of these relatively simple aerosol backscatter lidars to global wind measurements.

  13. Investigation of a noncontact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Damiano, B.; Talarico, L.J.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new noncontact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components; however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  14. A DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements.

    PubMed

    Cusnir, Ruslan; Steinmann, Philipp; Bochud, François; Froidevaux, Pascal

    2014-09-16

    The toxicity of heavy metals in natural waters is strongly dependent on the local chemical environment. Assessing the bioavailability of radionuclides predicts the toxic effects to aquatic biota. The technique of diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is largely exploited for bioavailability measurements of trace metals in waters. However, it has not been applied for plutonium speciation measurements yet. This study investigates the use of DGT technique for plutonium bioavailability measurements in chemically different environments. We used a diffusion cell to determine the diffusion coefficients (D) of plutonium in polyacrylamide (PAM) gel and found D in the range of 2.06-2.29 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). It ranged between 1.10 and 2.03 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1) in the presence of fulvic acid and in natural waters with low DOM. In the presence of 20 ppm of humic acid of an organic-rich soil, plutonium diffusion was hindered by a factor of 5, with a diffusion coefficient of 0.50 × 10(-6) cm(2) s(-1). We also tested commercially available DGT devices with Chelex resin for plutonium bioavailability measurements in laboratory conditions and the diffusion coefficients agreed with those from the diffusion cell experiments. These findings show that the DGT methodology can be used to investigate the bioaccumulation of the labile plutonium fraction in aquatic biota.

  15. UF 6 enrichment measurements using TDLS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, A. G.; Malyugin, S. L.; Nadezhdinskii, A. I.; Namestnikov, D. Yu.; Ponurovskii, Ya. Ya.; Stavrovskii, D. B.; Shapovalov, Yu. P.; Vyazov, I. E.; Zaslavskii, V. Ya.; Selivanov, Yu. G.; Gorshunov, N. M.; Grigoriev, G. Yu.; Nabiev, Sh. Sh.

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this work was investigation of possibility of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) technique application for gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF 6) isotope measurement. Spectra of uranium hexafluoride gas mixture were investigated using two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers Vector 22 and Bruker 66v. Observed spectral features were identified and model spectra of different gas mixture components were developed. Optimal spectral range for measurements was determined near maximum of UF 6 combination band ν1 + ν3. Laboratory prototype of multi-channel instrument under consideration based on tunable diode lasers was built and algorithms were developed to measure gaseous UF 6 isotopic ratios. Diode laser used operated at the wavelengths near λ = 7.68 μm. It was placed in a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat. Three instrument channels were used for laser frequency calibration and spectra recording. Instrument was tested in measurements of real UF 6 gas mixtures. Measurement accuracy was analyzed and error sources were identified. The root-mean-square random error in the 235U isotopic content is characterized by a spread of about 0.27% for quick measurements (at times less than 1 min) and 1% for periods of more than an hour. It was estimated that the measurement accuracy could be improved by at least an order of magnitude by minimizing the error sources.

  16. UF6 enrichment measurements using TDLS techniques.

    PubMed

    Berezin, A G; Malyugin, S L; Nadezhdinskii, A I; Namestnikov, D Yu; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Stavrovskii, D B; Shapovalov, Yu P; Vyazov, I E; Zaslavskii, V Ya; Selivanov, Yu G; Gorshunov, N M; Grigoriev, G Yu; Nabiev, Sh Sh

    2007-04-01

    The objective of this work was investigation of possibility of tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) technique application for gaseous uranium hexafluoride (UF6) isotope measurement. Spectra of uranium hexafluoride gas mixture were investigated using two different Fourier Transform Spectrometers Vector 22 and Bruker 66v. Observed spectral features were identified and model spectra of different gas mixture components were developed. Optimal spectral range for measurements was determined near maximum of UF6 combination band nu1+nu3. Laboratory prototype of multi-channel instrument under consideration based on tunable diode lasers was built and algorithms were developed to measure gaseous UF6 isotopic ratios. Diode laser used operated at the wavelengths near lambda=7.68 microm. It was placed in a liquid nitrogen cooled cryostat. Three instrument channels were used for laser frequency calibration and spectra recording. Instrument was tested in measurements of real UF6 gas mixtures. Measurement accuracy was analyzed and error sources were identified. The root-mean-square random error in the 235U isotopic content is characterized by a spread of about 0.27% for quick measurements (at times less than 1 min) and 1% for periods of more than an hour. It was estimated that the measurement accuracy could be improved by at least an order of magnitude by minimizing the error sources. PMID:17142093

  17. Effect of measurement site on the dimensional accuracy of die-forming materials and techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Cynthia S; Walker, Mary P; Theodotou, Nicholas; Glaros, Alan G; Williams, Karen

    2004-01-01

    To date, the comparisons of dimensional accuracy of various die materials has been investigated primarily by using a one-dimensional measurement on one die. However, a single measurement may not adequately represent the complex preparations that are encountered frequently in clinical dentistry. This investigation utilized a standardized model with two identical dies to measure die accuracy at four sites, using five different die-forming materials/techniques.

  18. Effect of measurement site on the dimensional accuracy of die-forming materials and techniques.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Cynthia S; Walker, Mary P; Theodotou, Nicholas; Glaros, Alan G; Williams, Karen

    2004-01-01

    To date, the comparisons of dimensional accuracy of various die materials has been investigated primarily by using a one-dimensional measurement on one die. However, a single measurement may not adequately represent the complex preparations that are encountered frequently in clinical dentistry. This investigation utilized a standardized model with two identical dies to measure die accuracy at four sites, using five different die-forming materials/techniques. PMID:15206253

  19. A comparison of two swirl measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. J.; Jambunathan, K.; Button, B. L.; Rhine, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Two experimental techniques for quantifying swirling airflow in the entrance region of annular ducts are presented. Swirl numbers derived from measurements of the torque on a pivoted honeycomb structure are compared with those obtained from the fringes on the inner surface of the duct sprayed with liquid crystals. The primary flow angles measured from the fringe patterns have been verified by using a Pitot tube and smoke trials. The swirl numbers range from 0.7 to 1.4 for Reynolds numbers of 4000-15,000. Data were obtained up to 11 hydraulic diameters from the entrance of two annular ducts that had diameter ratios of 0.66 and 0.79. The results show that the liquid crystal technique is an easy-to-use and attractive low-cost alternative to the more traditional approach, although the authors recognize that more expensive, nonintrusive, full-field velocity measurements, such as laser-Doppler anemometry, are superior to either of the methods considered here.

  20. Viscosity measurement techniques in Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boromand, Arman; Jamali, Safa; Maia, Joao M.

    2015-11-01

    In this study two main groups of viscosity measurement techniques are used to measure the viscosity of a simple fluid using Dissipative Particle Dynamics, DPD. In the first method, a microscopic definition of the pressure tensor is used in equilibrium and out of equilibrium to measure the zero-shear viscosity and shear viscosity, respectively. In the second method, a periodic Poiseuille flow and start-up transient shear flow is used and the shear viscosity is obtained from the velocity profiles by a numerical fitting procedure. Using the standard Lees-Edward boundary condition for DPD will result in incorrect velocity profiles at high values of the dissipative parameter. Although this issue was partially addressed in Chatterjee (2007), in this work we present further modifications (Lagrangian approach) to the original LE boundary condition (Eulerian approach) that will fix the deviation from the desired shear rate at high values of the dissipative parameter and decrease the noise to signal ratios in stress measurement while increases the accessible low shear rate window. Also, the thermostat effect of the dissipative and random forces is coupled to the dynamic response of the system and affects the transport properties like the viscosity and diffusion coefficient. We investigated thoroughly the dependency of viscosity measured by both Eulerian and Lagrangian methodologies, as well as numerical fitting procedures and found that all the methods are in quantitative agreement.

  1. Techniques for Measuring Surface Potentials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2015-01-01

    Materials exposed to the space plasma environment charge to a net potential relative to the ambient plasma. The charging process is due to differential currents to the material surface that results in a net surface charge density. While this process is termed "spacecraft surface charging" when applied to aerospace hardware, it also applies to the surfaces of astronomical objects in direct contact with the space plasma environment including a number of planetary bodies, asteroids, and dust particles. The ability to measure surface potentials is important to many techniques used in conducting fundamental heliospheric science, spacecraft engineering operations, and space technology development activities. This presentation provides a survey of current technologies used to measure surface potentials of spacecraft and planetary bodies with examples of their application to space science and technology programs.

  2. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H; Schneider, M

    2010-05-07

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  3. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurements

    SciTech Connect

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-10-15

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  4. Intercomparison of NO sub 2 measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Fehsenfeld, F.C.; Williams, E.J.; Buhr, M.P.; Hubler, G.; Langford, A.O.; Murphy, P.C. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder ); Parrish, D.D.; Norton, R.B.; Fahey, D.W. ); Drummond, J.W.; Mackay, G.I. ); Schiff, H.I. York Univ., North York, Ontario ); Roychowdhury, U.K.; Hovermale, C.; Mohnen, V.A.; Demerjian, K.L. ); Galvin, P.J. ); Calvert, J.G.; Ridley, B.A.; Grahek, F.; Heikes, B.G.; Kok, G.L.; Shetter, J.D.; Walega, J.G. ); Elsworth, C.M. )

    1990-03-20

    An intercomparison was made near Niwot Ridge, Colorado, of three different instruments for measuring NO{sub 2} at low concentrations in ambient air: (1) the photolysis/chemiluminescence (PC) instrument, (2) the tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS), and (3) the Luminox instrument. Calibrated mixtures of NO{sub 2} in air and NO{sub 2} with possible interferants (HNO{sub 3}, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, n-propyl nitrate, and O{sub 3}) were provided in simultaneous tests. Several conclusions were reached concerning the performance of these instruments during this intercomparison: (1) For NO{sub 2} levels above 2 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), similar results were obtained for all instruments; (2) Below 2 ppbv, the expected interferences from ozone and PAN influenced the NO{sub 2} measurements made using the Luminox instruments. Those interferences were sufficiently consistent that they could be corrected for by using the measured values of O{sub 3} and PAN down to about 0.3 ppbv NO{sub 2}; (3) The ozone interference on the Luminox instruments was removed by an ozone scrubber placed in the sampled air stream of the Luminox instrument. However, this did not remove PAN. In addition, the scrubber appeared to remove about 50% of the NO{sub 2} as well; (4) Although no interferences were identified for the TDLAS technique, care must be taken in the data analysis near (or below) the detection limit for the instrument. At these levels the data reduction program provided with the TDLAS will tend to find background noise that is correlated with the reference NO{sub 2} spectrum and calculate levels of NO{sub 2} that are too high; (5) No interferences or artifacts were found for the final results reported by the PC technique.

  5. Erosive Burning Study Utilizing Ultrasonic Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furfaro, James A.

    2003-01-01

    A 6-segment subscale motor was developed to generate a range of internal environments from which multiple propellants could be characterized for erosive burning. The motor test bed was designed to provide a high Mach number, high mass flux environment. Propellant regression rates were monitored for each segment utilizing ultrasonic measurement techniques. These data were obtained for three propellants RSRM, ETM- 03, and Castor@ IVA, which span two propellant types, PBAN (polybutadiene acrylonitrile) and HTPB (hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene). The characterization of these propellants indicates a remarkably similar erosive burning response to the induced flow environment. Propellant burnrates for each type had a conventional response with respect to pressure up to a bulk flow velocity threshold. Each propellant, however, had a unique threshold at which it would experience an increase in observed propellant burn rate. Above the observed threshold each propellant again demonstrated a similar enhanced burn rate response corresponding to the local flow environment.

  6. Weathering: methods and techniques to measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Arce, P.; Zornoza-Indart, A.; Alvarez de Buergo, M.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    Surface recession takes place when weathered material is removed from the rocks. In order to know how fast does weathering and erosion occur, a review of several methods, analyses and destructive and non-destructive techniques to measure weathering of rocks caused by physico-chemical changes that occur in bedrocks due to salt crystallization, freezing-thaw, thermal shock, influence of water, wind, temperature or any type of environmental agent leading to weathering processes and development of soils, in-situ in the field or through experimental works in the laboratory are addressed. From micro-scale to macro-scale, from the surface down to more in depth, several case studies on in-situ monitoring of quantification of decay on soils and rocks from natural landscapes (mountains, cliffs, caves, etc) or from urban environment (foundations or facades of buildings, retaining walls, etc) or laboratory experimental works, such as artificial accelerated ageing tests (a.a.e.e.) or durability tests -in which one or more than one weathering agents are selected to assess the material behaviour in time and in a cyclic way- performed on specimens of these materials are summarised. Discoloration, structural alteration, precipitation of weathering products (mass transfer), and surface recession (mass loss) are all products of weathering processes. Destructive (SEM-EDX, optical microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, drilling resistance measurement, flexural and compression strength) and Non-destructive (spectrophotocolorimetry, 3D optical surface roughness, Schmidt hammer rebound tester, ultrasound velocity propagation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance NMR, X ray computed micro-tomography or CT-scan, geo-radar differential global positioning systems) techniques and characterization analyses (e.g. water absorption, permeability, open porosity or porosity accessible to water) to assess their morphological, physico-chemical, mechanical and hydric weathering; consolidation products or

  7. EDITORIAL: Measurement techniques for multiphase flows Measurement techniques for multiphase flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Murai, Yuichi

    2009-11-01

    Research on multiphase flows is very important for industrial applications, including power stations, vehicles, engines, food processing and so on. Multiphase flows originally have nonlinear features because of multiphase systems. The interaction between the phases plays a very interesting role in the flows. The nonlinear interaction causes the multiphase flows to be very complicated. Therefore techniques for measuring multiphase flows are very useful in helping to understand the nonlinear phenomena. The state-of-the-art measurement techniques were presented and discussed at the sixth International Symposium on Measurement Techniques for Multiphase Flows (ISMTMF2008) held in Okinawa, Japan, on 15-17 December 2008. This special feature of Measurement Science and Technology includes selected papers from ISMTMF2008. Okinawa has a long history as the Ryukyus Kingdom. China, Japan and many western Pacific countries have had cultural and economic exchanges through Okinawa for over 1000 years. Much technical and scientific information was exchanged at the symposium in Okinawa. The proceedings of ISMTMF2008 apart from these special featured papers were published in Journal of Physics: Conference Series vol. 147 (2009). We would like to express special thanks to all the contributors to the symposium and this special feature. This special feature will be a milestone in measurement techniques for multiphase flows.

  8. Donnan membrane technique (DMT) for anion measurement.

    PubMed

    Vega, Flora Alonso; Weng, Liping; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H

    2010-04-01

    Donnan membrane technique (DMT) is developed and tested for determination of free anion concentrations. Time needed to reach the Donnan membrane equilibrium depends on type of ions and the background. The Donnan membrane equilibrium is reached in 1 day for Cl(-), 1-2 days for NO(3)(-), 1-4 days for SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and 1-14 days for H(2)PO(4)(-) in a background of 2-200 mM KCl or K(2)SO(4). The strongest effect of ionic strength on equilibrium time is found for H(2)PO(4)(-), followed by SO(4)(2-) and SeO(4)(2-), and then by Cl(-) and NO(3)(-). The negatively charged organic particles of fulvic and humic acids do not pass the membrane. Two approaches for the measurement of different anion species of the same element, such as SeO(4)(2-) and HSeO(3)(-), using DMT are proposed and tested. These two approaches are based on transport kinetics or response to ionic strength difference. A transport model that was developed previously for cation DMT is applied in this work to analyze the rate-limiting step in the anion DMT. In the absence of mobile/labile complexes, transport tends to be controlled by diffusion in solution at a low ionic strength, whereas at a higher ionic strength, diffusion in the membrane starts to control the transport.

  9. Importance of adequate local spatiotemporal transmission measures in malaria cohort studies: application to the relation between placental malaria and first malaria infection in infants.

    PubMed

    Le Port, Agnès; Cottrell, Gilles; Chandre, Fabrice; Cot, Michel; Massougbodji, Achille; Garcia, André

    2013-07-01

    According to several studies, infants whose mothers had a malaria-infected placenta (MIP) at delivery are at increased risk of a first malaria infection. Immune tolerance caused by intrauterine contact with the parasite could explain this phenomenon, but it is also known that infants who are highly exposed to Anopheles mosquitoes infected with Plasmodium are at greater risk of contracting malaria. Consequently, local malaria transmission must be taken into account to demonstrate the immune tolerance hypothesis. From data collected between 2007 and 2010 on 545 infants followed from birth to age 18 months in southern Benin, we compared estimates of the effect of MIP on time to first malaria infection obtained through different Cox models. In these models, MIP was adjusted for either 1) "village-like" time-independent exposure variables or 2) spatiotemporal exposure prediction derived from local climatic, environmental, and behavioral factors. Only the use of exposure prediction improved the model's goodness of fit (Bayesian Information Criterion) and led to clear conclusions regarding the effect of placental infection, whereas the models using the village-like variables were less successful than the univariate model. This demonstrated clearly the benefit of adequately taking transmission into account in cohort studies of malaria.

  10. Spectroscopic Measurement Techniques for Aerospace Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Craig T.; Cutler, Andrew D.; Hurley, Samantha

    2014-01-01

    The conditions that characterize aerospace flows are so varied, that a single diagnostic technique is not sufficient for its measurement. Fluid dynamists use knowledge of similarity to help categorize and focus on different flow conditions. For example, the Reynolds number represents the ratio of inertial to viscous forces in a flow. When the velocity scales, length scales, and gas density are large and the magnitude of the molecular viscosity is low, the Reynolds number becomes large. This corresponds to large scale vehicles (e.g Airbus A380), fast moving objects (e.g. artillery projectiles), vehicles in dense fluids (e.g. submarine in water), or flows with low dynamic viscosity (e.g. skydiver in air). In each of these cases, the inertial forces dominate viscous forces, and unsteady turbulent fluctuations in the flow variables are observed. In contrast, flows with small length scales (e.g. dispersion of micro-particles in a solid rocket nozzle), slow moving objects (e.g. micro aerial vehicles), flows with low density gases (e.g. atmospheric re-entry), or fluids with a large magnitude of viscosity (e.g. engine coolant flow), all have low Reynolds numbers. In these cases, viscous forces become very important and often the flows can be steady and laminar. The Mach number, which is the ratio of the velocity to the speed of sound in the medium, also helps to differentiate types of flows. At very low Mach numbers, acoustic waves travel much faster than the object, and the flow can be assumed to be incompressible (e.g. Cessna 172 aircraft). As the object speed approaches the speed of sound, the gas density can become variable (e.g. flow over wing of Learjet 85). When the object speed is higher than the speed of sound (Ma > 1), the presences of shock waves and other gas dynamic features can become important to the vehicle performance (e.g. SR-71 Blackbird). In the hypersonic flow regime (Ma > 5), large changes in temperature begin to affect flow properties, causing real

  11. Measurement techniques for analysis of fission fragment excited gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Carroll, E. E.; Davis, J. F.; Davie, R. N.; Maguire, T. C.; Shipman, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    Spectroscopic analysis of fission fragment excited He, Ar, Xe, N2, Ne, Ar-N2, and Ne-N2 have been conducted. Boltzmann plot analysis of He, Ar and Xe have indicated a nonequilibrium, recombining plasma, and population inversions have been found in these gases. The observed radiating species in helium have been adequately described by a simple kinetic model. A more extensive model for argon, nitrogen and Ar-N2 mixtures was developed which adequately describes the energy flow in the system and compares favorably with experimental measurements. The kinetic processes involved in these systems are discussed.

  12. The EEG measurement technique under exercising.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, Naoya; Tanaka, Junya; Koyama, Akira; Magatani, Kazushige

    2006-01-01

    Our purpose of the research is a development of the detecting method of EEG under exercising. Usually, measuring EEG is done in the quiet state. In case of the measuring EEG under exercising, a movement of the body causes vibration of electrodes and artifact for the EEG. Therefore, generally detection of the EEG under exercising is said to be difficult. So, we developed the measuring method of EEG under exercising by using algorithm that we designed. Five normal subjects were tested with our method, and EEG without artifact was able to be measured in all cases. PMID:17945632

  13. A Simple Technique for High Resistance Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguilar, Horacio Munguia; Landin, Ramon Ochoa

    2012-01-01

    A simple electronic system for the measurement of high values of resistance is shown. This system allows the measurement of resistance in the range of a few megohm up to 10[superscript 9] [omega]. We have used this system for the evaluation of CdS thin film resistance, but other practical uses in the basic physics laboratory are presented.…

  14. Helium-flow measurement using ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sondericker, J. H.

    1983-08-01

    The ideal cryogenic instrumentation for the colliding beam accelerator helium distribution system does not add pressure drop to the system, functions over the entire temperature range, has high resolution, and delivers accurate mass flow measurement data. The design and testing of an ultrasonic flowmeter which measures helium flow under different temperatures are described.

  15. A Wireless Fluid-Level Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a recently developed wireless measurement acquisition system to fluid-level measurement. This type of fluid-level measurement system alleviates many shortcomings of fluid-level measurement methods currently being used, including limited applicability of any one fluid-level sensor design. Measurement acquisition shortcomings include the necessity for power to be supplied to each sensor and for the measurement to be extracted from each sensor via a physical connection to the sensor. Another shortcoming is existing measurement systems require that a data channel and signal conditioning electronics be dedicated to each sensor. Use of wires results in other shortcomings such as logistics needed to add or replace sensors, weight, potential for electrical arcing and wire degradations. The fluid level sensor design is a simple passive inductor-capacitor circuit that is not subject to mechanical failure that is possible when float and lever-arm systems are used. Methods are presented for using the sensor in caustic, acidic or cryogenic fluids. Oscillating magnetic fields are used to power the sensor. Once electrically excited, the sensor produces a magnetic field response. The response frequency corresponds to the amount to fluid within the capacitor s electric field. The sensor design can be modified for measuring the level of any fluid or fluent substance that can be stored in a non-conductive reservoir. The interrogation method for discerning changes in the sensor response frequency is also presented.

  16. How are we measuring resilience following childhood maltreatment? Is the research adequate and consistent? What is the impact on research, practice, and policy?

    PubMed

    Walsh, Wendy A; Dawson, Jean; Mattingly, Marybeth J

    2010-01-01

    The authors review the literature on resilience following childhood maltreatment and describe how variation in the measurement of outcomes at various developmental stages affects research findings, practice implications, and policy recommendations. Although the 21 studies reviewed considered competent functioning in similar domains as evidence of resilience following maltreatment, few provided prevalence estimates for specific indicators or across domains of functioning. Using the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), the authors explored different ways of operationalizing resilience. The number of children demonstrating competence following maltreatment varied greatly by the indicators used; furthermore, competence in one domain (behavioral, emotional, or educational) did not guarantee competence in another. About one in five children were functioning poorly in all three domains. Because findings vary according to the operational definition of resilience, researchers must use caution in conceptualizing their analytic variables and interpreting findings. Furthermore, given the lack of cross-domain competence, services to maltreated children and their families should be comprehensive.

  17. Development of techniques for measuring pilot workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyker, D. A.; Stackhouse, S. P.; Khalafalla, A. S.; Mclane, R. C.

    1971-01-01

    An objective method of assessing information workload based on physiological measurements was developed. Information workload, or reserve capacity, was measured using a visual discrimination secondary task and subjective rating of task difficulty. The primary task was two axis (pitch and roll) tracking, and the independent variables in this study were aircraft pitch dynamics and wind gust disturbances. The study was structured to provide: (1) a sensitive, nonloading measure of reserve capacity, and (2) an unencumbering reliable measurement of the psychophysiological state. From these, a measured workload index (MWI) and physiological workload index (PWI) were extracted. An important measure of the success of this study was the degree to which the MWI and PWI agreed across the 243 randomly-presented, four-minute trials (9 subjects X 9 tasks X 3 replications). The electrophysiological data collected included vectorcardiogaram, respiration, electromyogram, skin impedance, and electroencephalogram. Special computer programs were created for the analysis of each physiological variable. The digital data base then consisted of 82 physiological features for each of the 243 trials. A prediction of workload based on physiological observations was formulated as a simultaneous least-squares prediction problem. A best subset of 10 features was chosen to predict the three measures of reserve capacity. The cannonical correlation coefficient was .754 with a chi squared value of 91.3 which allows rejection of the null hypothesis with p of .995.

  18. Technique for measuring gas conversion factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A method for determining hydrocarbon conversion factors for a flowmeter. A mixture of air, O2 and C sub x H sub y is burned and the partial paressure of O2 in the resulting gas is forced to equal the partial pressure of O2 in air. The flowrate of O2 flowing into the mixture is measured by flowmeter and the flowrate of C sub x H sub y flowing into the mixture is measured by the flowmeter conversion factor is to be determined. These measured values are used to calculate the conversion factor.

  19. How are we measuring resilience following childhood maltreatment? Is the research adequate and consistent? What is the impact on research, practice, and policy?

    PubMed

    Walsh, Wendy A; Dawson, Jean; Mattingly, Marybeth J

    2010-01-01

    The authors review the literature on resilience following childhood maltreatment and describe how variation in the measurement of outcomes at various developmental stages affects research findings, practice implications, and policy recommendations. Although the 21 studies reviewed considered competent functioning in similar domains as evidence of resilience following maltreatment, few provided prevalence estimates for specific indicators or across domains of functioning. Using the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW), the authors explored different ways of operationalizing resilience. The number of children demonstrating competence following maltreatment varied greatly by the indicators used; furthermore, competence in one domain (behavioral, emotional, or educational) did not guarantee competence in another. About one in five children were functioning poorly in all three domains. Because findings vary according to the operational definition of resilience, researchers must use caution in conceptualizing their analytic variables and interpreting findings. Furthermore, given the lack of cross-domain competence, services to maltreated children and their families should be comprehensive. PMID:20093249

  20. New technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, Ohio, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.A. was measured. Small size clean silicon wafers as contamination sensors placed at all desired measurement sites were used. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet uniformly the silicon substrate, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: continuous, homogeneous film and islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models for our case shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on samples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  1. Electromagnetic probe technique for fluid flow measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constant of the fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow stream. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  2. Electromagnetic Probe Technique for Fluid Flow Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. D.; Carl, J. R.; Nguyen, T. X.

    1994-01-01

    The probes described herein, in various configurations, permit the measurement of the volume fraction of two or more fluids flowing through a pipe. Each probe measures the instantaneous relative dielectric constant of the fluid in immediate proximity. As long as separation of the relative dielectric constants of each fluid is possible, several or even many fluids can be measured in the same flow steam. By using multiple probes, the velocity of each fluid can generally be determined as well as the distribution of each constituent in the pipe. The values are determined by statistical computation. There are many potential applications for probes of this type in industry and government. Possible NASA applications include measurements of helium/hydrazine flow during rocket tests at White Sands, liquid/gas flow in hydrogen or oxygen lines in Orbiter engines, and liquid/gaseous Freon flow in zero gravity tests with the KS135 aircraft at JSC. Much interest has been shown recently by the oil industry. In this industry, a good method is needed to measure the fractions of oil, water, and natural gas flowing in a pipeline and the velocity of each. This particular problem involves an extension of what has been developed to date and our plans and program to solve this problem will be discussed herein.

  3. A new technique for measuring listening and reading literacy in developing countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Barbara A.; Royer, James M.; Anzalone, Stephen

    1990-03-01

    One problem in evaluating educational interventions in developing countries is the absence of tests that adequately reflect the culture and curriculum. The Sentence Verification Technique is a new procedure for measuring reading and listening comprehension that allows for the development of tests based on materials indigenous to a given culture. The validity of using the Sentence Verification Technique to measure reading comprehension in Grenada was evaluated in the present study. The study involved 786 students at standards 3, 4 and 5. The tests for each standard consisted of passages that varied in difficulty. The students identified as high ability students in all three standards performed better than those identified as low ability. All students performed better with easier passages. Additionally, students in higher standards performed bettter than students in lower standards on a given passage. These results supported the claim that the Sentence Verification Technique is a valid measure of reading comprehension in Grenada.

  4. Ultrasonic techniques for aircraft ice accretion measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.; Lichtenfelts, Fred

    1988-01-01

    Ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements of ice growth on cylinders and airfoils exposed to both artificial (icing wind tunnel) and natural (flight) icing conditions are presented. An accuracy of + or - 0.5 mm is achieved with the present method. The ultrasonic signal characteristics associated with each of the two types of icing regimes identified, wet and dry ice growth, are discussed. Heat transfer coefficients are found to be higher in the wind tunnel environment than in flight. Results for ice growth on airfoils have also been obtained using an array of ultrasonic transducers. Icing profiles obtained during flight are compared with mechanical and stereo image measurements.

  5. Model measurements for new accelerating techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, S.; Haseroth, H.; Knott, J.; Willis, W.

    1988-06-01

    We summarize the work carried out for the past two years, concerning some different ways for achieving high-field gradients, particularly in view of future linear lepton colliders. These studies and measurements on low power models concern the switched power principle and multifrequency excitation of resonant cavities. 15 refs., 12 figs.

  6. Amplitude Frequency Response Measurement: A Simple Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satish, L.; Vora, S. C.

    2010-01-01

    A simple method is described to combine a modern function generator and a digital oscilloscope to configure a setup that can directly measure the amplitude frequency response of a system. This is achieved by synchronously triggering both instruments, with the function generator operated in the "Linear-Sweep" frequency mode, while the oscilloscope…

  7. Transient particle emission measurement with optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, Vicente; Luján, José M.; Serrano, José R.; Pla, Benjamín

    2008-06-01

    Particulate matter is responsible for some respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. In addition, it is one of the most important pollutants of high-speed direct injection (HSDI) passenger car engines. Current legislation requires particulate dilution tunnels for particulate matter measuring. However for development work, dilution tunnels are expensive and sometimes not useful since they are not able to quantify real-time particulate emissions during transient operation. In this study, the use of a continuous measurement opacimeter and a fast response HFID is proven to be a good alternative to obtain instantaneous particle mass emissions during transient operation (due to particulate matter consisting mainly of soot and SOF). Some methods and correlations available from literature, but developed for steady conditions, are evaluated during transient operation by comparing with mini-tunnel measurements during the entire MVEG-A transient cycle. A new correlation was also derived from this evaluation. Results for soot and SOF (obtained from the new correlation proposed) are compared with soot and SOF captured with particulate filters, which have been separated by means of an SOF extraction method. Finally, as an example of ECU design strategies using these sort of correlations, the EGR valve opening is optimized during transient operation. The optimization is performed while simultaneously taking into account instantaneous fuel consumption, particulate emissions (calculated with the proposed correlation) and other regulated engine pollutants.

  8. POF strain sensor using phase measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisel, H.

    2008-03-01

    Polymer optical fiber (POF) elongation sensors have been proposed e.g. by Doering as a low-cost alternative to FBG (single mode Fiber Bragg Gratings) sensors targeting the lower sensitivity range. A recently recovered detection system known from laser distance meters turned out to be very sensitive while staying simple and thus offering low cost potential. The approach is based on measuring the phase shift of a (e.g. sinusoidally) modulated light signal guided in a POF under different tensions resulting in different transit times and thus different phase shifts.

  9. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  10. Calibration of an optical condensate measurement technique using indirect static headspace gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hoke, P B; Loconto, P R; McGrath, J J

    2001-12-01

    Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering seek to obtain a means to measure less than 3 mg of H2O that adheres to a metal surface as condensate. The objective is to calibrate optical reflectance measurements of an aluminum surface as a function of the condensate thickness present. Collaboration with the Hazardous Substance Research Center at Michigan State University results in the development of an indirect static headspace gas chromatographic technique capable of measuring H2O in low-milligram quantities. The technique utilizes manual headspace sampling, a megabore capillary column, and a flame ionization detector. A correlation of r2 = 0.999 is obtained for the calibration of the indirect measurement technique. The calibration of the analytical instrument demonstrates adequate precision (< +/- 50 microg at a 95% confidence interval) for such a heterogeneous sample. The calibration samples consist of a strip of aluminum metal, H2O, and pulverized calcium carbide to convert the H2O to acetylene. A scaled calibration technique is used to simplify handling trace water volumes. The surface reflectance measurements are found to correlate well (r2 = 0.935) with measurements of the condensate mass. This result facilitates the development of an optical mass-transfer measurement technique. This study focuses on the analytical method and its relationship with engineering research.

  11. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy`s treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation.

  12. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle.

  13. Tear film measurement by optical reflectometry technique.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Wang, Michael R; Wang, Jianhua; Shen, Meixiao

    2014-02-01

    Evaluation of tear film is performed by an optical reflectometer system with alignment guided by a galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer system utilizes optical fibers to deliver illumination light to the tear film and collect the film reflectance as a function of wavelength. Film thickness is determined by best fitting the reflectance-wavelength curve. The spectral reflectance acquisition time is 15 ms, fast enough for detecting film thickness changes. Fast beam alignment of 1 s is achieved by the galvanometer scanner. The reflectometer was first used to evaluate artificial tear film on a model eye with and without a contact lens. The film thickness and thinning rate have been successfully quantified with the minimum measured thickness of about 0.3 μm. Tear films in human eyes, with and without a contact lens, have also been evaluated. A high-contrast spectral reflectance signal from the precontact lens tear film is clearly observed, and the thinning dynamics have been easily recorded from 3.69 to 1.31 μm with lipid layer thickness variation in the range of 41 to 67 nm. The accuracy of the measurement is better than ±0.58% of the film thickness at an estimated tear film refractive index error of ±0.001. The fiber-based reflectometer system is compact and easy to handle. PMID:24500519

  14. Energy harvesting in high voltage measuring techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żyłka, Pawel; Doliński, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    The paper discusses selected problems related to application of energy harvesting (that is, generating electricity from surplus energy present in the environment) to supply autonomous ultra-low-power measurement systems applicable in high voltage engineering. As a practical example of such implementation a laboratory model of a remote temperature sensor is presented, which is self-powered by heat generated in a current-carrying busbar in HV- switchgear. Presented system exploits a thermoelectric harvester based on a passively cooled Peltier module supplying micro-power low-voltage dc-dc converter driving energy-efficient temperature sensor, microcontroller and a fibre-optic transmitter. Performance of the model in laboratory simulated conditions are presented and discussed.

  15. GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUES FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF ISOPRENE IN AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses gas chromatographic techniques for measuring isoprene in air. Such measurement basically consists of three parts: (1) collection of sufficient sample volume for representative and accurate quantitation, (2) separation (if necessary) of isoprene from interfer...

  16. Improved Hanle effect measurement technique for fast ions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. H.; Gardiner, R. B.; Church, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    An improved averaging technique for use with foil-excited fast ions is applied to a Hanle-effect measurement of the mean life of some fast ions. With improved data analysis, the employed technique is expected to be more precise, as well as experimentally simpler than previously used techniques.

  17. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  18. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement

    DOEpatents

    Butler, Michael A.; Ginley, David S.

    1989-01-01

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study.

  19. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation: current measurement techniques and prospects for noninvasive optical methods.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Sergio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T; Kornbluth, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral autoregulation (CA) are critically important to maintain proper brain perfusion and supply the brain with the necessary oxygen and energy substrates. Adequate brain perfusion is required to support normal brain function, to achieve successful aging, and to navigate acute and chronic medical conditions. We review the general principles of CBF measurements and the current techniques to measure CBF based on direct intravascular measurements, nuclear medicine, X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound techniques, thermal diffusion, and optical methods. We also review techniques for arterial blood pressure measurements as well as theoretical and experimental methods for the assessment of CA, including recent approaches based on optical techniques. The assessment of cerebral perfusion in the clinical practice is also presented. The comprehensive description of principles, methods, and clinical requirements of CBF and CA measurements highlights the potentially important role that noninvasive optical methods can play in the assessment of neurovascular health. In fact, optical techniques have the ability to provide a noninvasive, quantitative, and continuous monitor of CBF and autoregulation. PMID:27403447

  20. Cerebral blood flow and autoregulation: current measurement techniques and prospects for noninvasive optical methods.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Sergio; Sassaroli, Angelo; Tgavalekos, Kristen T; Kornbluth, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral autoregulation (CA) are critically important to maintain proper brain perfusion and supply the brain with the necessary oxygen and energy substrates. Adequate brain perfusion is required to support normal brain function, to achieve successful aging, and to navigate acute and chronic medical conditions. We review the general principles of CBF measurements and the current techniques to measure CBF based on direct intravascular measurements, nuclear medicine, X-ray imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound techniques, thermal diffusion, and optical methods. We also review techniques for arterial blood pressure measurements as well as theoretical and experimental methods for the assessment of CA, including recent approaches based on optical techniques. The assessment of cerebral perfusion in the clinical practice is also presented. The comprehensive description of principles, methods, and clinical requirements of CBF and CA measurements highlights the potentially important role that noninvasive optical methods can play in the assessment of neurovascular health. In fact, optical techniques have the ability to provide a noninvasive, quantitative, and continuous monitor of CBF and autoregulation.

  1. Comparison of commercial analytical techniques for measuring chlorine dioxide in urban desalinated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ammar, T A; Abid, K Y; El-Bindary, A A; El-Sonbati, A Z

    2015-12-01

    Most drinking water industries are closely examining options to maintain a certain level of disinfectant residual through the entire distribution system. Chlorine dioxide is one of the promising disinfectants that is usually used as a secondary disinfectant, whereas the selection of the proper monitoring analytical technique to ensure disinfection and regulatory compliance has been debated within the industry. This research endeavored to objectively compare the performance of commercially available analytical techniques used for chlorine dioxide measurements (namely, chronoamperometry, DPD (N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine), Lissamine Green B (LGB WET) and amperometric titration), to determine the superior technique. The commonly available commercial analytical techniques were evaluated over a wide range of chlorine dioxide concentrations. In reference to pre-defined criteria, the superior analytical technique was determined. To discern the effectiveness of such superior technique, various factors, such as sample temperature, high ionic strength, and other interferences that might influence the performance were examined. Among the four techniques, chronoamperometry technique indicates a significant level of accuracy and precision. Furthermore, the various influencing factors studied did not diminish the technique's performance where it was fairly adequate in all matrices. This study is a step towards proper disinfection monitoring and it confidently assists engineers with chlorine dioxide disinfection system planning and management.

  2. Tone-burst technique measures high-intensity sound absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. G.; Van Houten, J. J.

    1971-01-01

    Tone-burst technique, in which narrow-bandwidth, short-duration sonic pulse is propagated down a standing-wave tube, measures sound absorbing capacity of materials used in jet engine noise abatement. Technique eliminates effects of tube losses and yields normal-incidence absorption coefficient of specimen.

  3. Measuring Speed Using a Computer--Several Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Jon M.

    1988-01-01

    Introduces three different techniques to facilitate the measurement of speed and the associated kinematics and dynamics using a computer. Discusses sensing techniques using optical or ultrasonic sensors, interfacing with a computer, software routines for the interfaces, and other applications. Provides circuit diagrams, pictures, and a program to…

  4. Non-Contact Electrical Conductivity Measurement Technique for Molten Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, W. K.; Ishikawa, T.

    1998-01-01

    A non-contact technique of measuring the electrical conductivity (or resistivity) of conducting liquids while they are levitated by the high temperature electrostatic levitator in a high vacuum is reported.

  5. Measuring elastic constants using non-contact ultrasonic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, R. S.; Perry, R.; Cleanthous, D.; Backhouse, D. J.; Moore, I. J.; Clough, A. R.; Stone, D. I.

    2012-05-01

    The use of ultrasound for measuring elastic constants and phase transitions is well established. Standard measurements use piezoelectric transducers requiring couplant and contact with the sample. Recently, non-destructive testing (NDT) has seen an increase in the use of non-contact ultrasonic techniques, for example electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMATs) and laser ultrasound, due to their many benefits. For measurements of single crystals over a range of temperatures non-contact techniques could also bring many benefits. These techniques do not require couplant, and hence do not suffer from breaking of the bond between transducer and sample during thermal cycling, and will potentially lead to a simpler and more adaptable measurement system with lower risk of sample damage. We present recent work adapting EMAT advances from NDT to measurements of single crystals at cryogenic temperatures and illustrate this with measurements of magnetic phase transitions in Gd64Sc36 using both contact and non-contact transducers. We discuss the measurement techniques implemented to overcome noise problems, and a digital pulse-echo-overlap technique, using data analysis in the frequency domain to measure the velocity.

  6. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  7. Novel phase measurement technique of the heterodyne laser interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Hyunseung; Park, Kyihwan; La, Jongpil

    2005-09-15

    This article describes a novel phase measurement technique to increase the measurement velocity compared to the previous arc-tangent method in the heterodyne laser interferometer. The proposed method can reduce the calculation load because the pulse width modulation signal has a linear relation between the phase difference, while the nonlinear function such as arc tangent is required to demodulate the sinusoidal interferent signal. The brief analysis and measurement scheme of the system, and the experimental result using a Zeeman-stabilized He-Ne laser are presented. They demonstrate that the proposed phase measurement technique is proven to be three times faster and more robust than previous arc-tangent method.

  8. Optical fiber technique for in-reactor mechanical properties measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schley, R. S.; Hurley, D. H.; Hua, Z. A.

    2013-01-25

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the resonant frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  9. Emerging measurement techniques for studies of mesoscopic superconductors.

    SciTech Connect

    Rydh, A.; Tagliati, S.; Nilsson, R. A.; Xie, R.; Pearson, J. E.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. K.; Divan, R.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental research on mesoscopic systems puts high demands on the measurement infrastructure, including measurement system with associated sample preparation, experimental design, measurement electronics, and data collection. Successful experiments require both the ability to manufacture small samples and to successfully and accurately study their novel properties. Here, we discuss some aspects and recent advancements of general measurement techniques that should benefit several characterization methods such as thermodynamic, magnetic, and transport studies of mesoscopic superconductors.

  10. Techniques for measuring radiation induced effects of acousto optic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, E.W.

    1995-08-01

    Innovative measurement techniques for determining radiation induced changes in acousto optic devices are briefly discussed. Measurements of acousto optic operational parameters such as signal transmission efficiency, diffraction efficiency, spatial intensity and bandwidth responses during electron irradiations are described. During exposure to pulsed electrons, only transient perturbations to the acousto optic operational parameters were experienced. Examples of new measurement procedures and typical data resulting from the measurements are presented.

  11. Transmittance ratio constrained retrieval technique for lidar cirrus measurements.

    PubMed

    Su, Jia; McCormick, M Patrick; Liu, Zhaoyan; Lee, Robert B; Leavor, Kevin R; Lei, Liqiao

    2012-05-01

    This letter describes a lidar retrieval technique that uses the transmittance ratio as a constraint to determine an average lidar ratio as well as extinction and backscatter coefficients of transparent cirrus clouds. The cloud transmittance ratio is directly obtained from two adjacent elastic lidar backscatter signals. The technique can be applied to cirrus measurements where neither the molecular scattering dominant signals above and below the cloud layer are found nor cloudfree reference profiles are available. The technique has been tested with simulated lidar signals and applied to backscatter lidar measurements at Hampton University, Hampton, Virginia.

  12. New radiosonde techniques to measure radiation profiles through the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Romanens, Gonzague; Levrat, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    Solar and thermal radiation fluxes are usually measured at Earth's surface and at the top of the atmosphere. Here we show radiosonde techniques that allow measuring radiation flux profiles and the radiation budget from the Earth's surface to above 30 km in the stratosphere. During two-hour flights solar shortwave and thermal longwave irradiance, downward and upward, is measured with four individual sensors at one-second resolution, along with standard PTU radiosonde profiles. Daytime and nighttime shortwave and longwave radiation measurements, and 24 hours surface measurements, allow determining radiation budget- and total net radiation profiles through the atmosphere. We use a double balloon technique to prevent pendulum motion during the ascent and to keep the sonde as horizontal as possible. New techniques using auto controlled airplanes are now investigated to retrieve the sonde after release at a certain altitude and to land it if possible at the launch station.

  13. A remote surface pressure measurement technique for rotating elements

    SciTech Connect

    Hubner, J.P.; Abbitt, J.D.; Carroll, B.F.; Schanze, K.S.

    1997-04-01

    This technical note describes a photoluminescent paint technique developed to measure the steady-state surface pressure distributions on rotating elements. The application of pressure-sensitive paints (PSPs) as a means of measuring surface pressure has emerged in recent years as a viable alternative to conventional transducers, yielding accurate quantitative results (Morris et al., 1993; McLachlan et al., 1993; Morris, 1995). Burns and Sullivan (1995) describe a lifetime-based technique to measure pressure on rotating machinery with tip speeds exceeding 200 m/s. Their method measures the phase shift that occurs between a modulated excitation source and the corresponding emission response of the paint. The technique performed in this paper uses an unmodulated light source and measures the actual intensity decay with respect to time. The corresponding lifetimes of decay are then calibrated with the steady-state pressure.

  14. Error reduction techniques for measuring long synchrotron mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Irick, S.

    1998-07-01

    Many instruments and techniques are used for measuring long mirror surfaces. A Fizeau interferometer may be used to measure mirrors much longer than the interferometer aperture size by using grazing incidence at the mirror surface and analyzing the light reflected from a flat end mirror. Advantages of this technique are data acquisition speed and use of a common instrument. Disadvantages are reduced sampling interval, uncertainty of tangential position, and sagittal/tangential aspect ratio other than unity. Also, deep aspheric surfaces cannot be measured on a Fizeau interferometer without a specially made fringe nulling holographic plate. Other scanning instruments have been developed for measuring height, slope, or curvature profiles of the surface, but lack accuracy for very long scans required for X-ray synchrotron mirrors. The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) was developed specifically for long x-ray mirror measurement, and still outperforms other instruments, especially for aspheres. Thus, this paper focuses on error reduction techniques for the LTP.

  15. An ultrasonic technique for measuring stress in fasteners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, K. J.; Day, P.; Byron, D.

    1999-12-01

    High temperature bolting alloys are extensively used in the thermal power generation industry as for example, reheat ESV and Governor valve studs. Remnant life assessment methodologies and plant maintenance procedures require the monitoring of the operational stress levels in these fasteners. Some conventional ultrasonic techniques require longitudinal wave measurements to be undertaken when the nut on the bolt is loosened and then re-tightened. Other techniques use a combination of shear waves and longitudinal waves. In this paper, the problems and pitfalls associated with various ultrasonic techniques for measuring stress in bolts, is discussed. An ultrasonic technique developed for measuring the stress in Durehete 1055 bolts is presented. Material from a textured rolled bar has been used as a test bed in the development work. The technique uses shear wave birefringence and compression waves at several frequencies to measure texture, fastener length and the average stress. The technique was developed by making ultrasonic measurements on bolts tensioned in universal testing machines and a hydraulic nut. The ultrasonic measurements of residual stress have been checked against strain gauge measurements. The Durehete bolts have a hollow cylinder geometry of restricted dimensions, which significantly alters compression and shear wave velocities from bulk values and introduces hoop stresses which can be measured by rotating the polarization of the shear wave probe. Modelling of the experimental results has been undertaken using theories for the elastic wave propagation through waveguides. The dispersion equations allow the velocity and length of the fastener to be measured ultrasonically in some situations where the length of the fastener can not be measured directly with a vernier caliper or micrometer and/or where it is undesirable to loosen nuts to take calibration readings of the shear and compression wave velocities.

  16. Specular surface measurement by using least squares light tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hongwei; Feng, Peng; Tao, Tao

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a novel technique for measuring the three-dimensional (3-D) shapes of specular surfaces. In this technique, an LCD monitor plane is used as the diffusive light source. It can be vertically moved to two or more different positions. At each position, sinusoid fringe patterns are displayed on the LCD plane and reflected by the measured specular surface. The distorted fringe patterns are captured with a camera, so that the phase distributions at these positions are measured. From the phases, the locus of the incident ray for each pixel is determined in the least squares sense, and further the three-dimensional shape of the specular surface is reconstructed. In so doing, the restrictions and limitations of the existing techniques in computational complexities, phase ambiguities, and error accumulations are eliminated. The validity of this technique has been demonstrated by experimental results.

  17. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    1999-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K - 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous Materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was limited by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/- 15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 mm to 400 mm in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen- oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used (a) for assessing the uncertainty in infering gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  18. A Precise Calibration Technique for Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Schultz, Donald F.

    2000-01-01

    A technique was developed for direct measurement of gas temperatures in the range of 2050 K 2700 K with improved accuracy and reproducibility. The technique utilized the low-emittance of certain fibrous materials, and the uncertainty of the technique was United by the uncertainty in the melting points of the materials, i.e., +/-15 K. The materials were pure, thin, metal-oxide fibers whose diameters varied from 60 microns to 400 microns in the experiments. The sharp increase in the emittance of the fibers upon melting was utilized as indication of reaching a known gas temperature. The accuracy of the technique was confirmed by both calculated low emittance values of transparent fibers, of order 0.01, up to a few degrees below their melting point and by the fiber-diameter independence of the results. This melting-point temperature was approached by increments not larger than 4 K, which was accomplished by controlled increases of reactant flow rates in hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-oxygen flames. As examples of the applications of the technique, the gas-temperature measurements were used: (a) for assessing the uncertainty in inferring gas temperatures from thermocouple measurements, and (b) for calibrating an IR camera to measure gas temperatures. The technique offers an excellent calibration reference for other gas-temperature measurement methods to improve their accuracy and reliably extending their temperature range of applicability.

  19. Measurement of water depth by multispectral ratio techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polcyn, F. C.

    1970-01-01

    The technique for measuring the depth of water using a multispectral scanner is discussed. The procedure takes advantage of the absorption properties of different wavelengths of light. Making use of the property of the selected transmission of light at different wavelengths, an equation was developed relating the outputs of at least two channels of multispectral scanner to measure water depth.

  20. Blower-door techniques for measuring interzonal leakage

    SciTech Connect

    Hult, Erin L.; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The standard blower door test methods, such as ASTM E779, describe how to use a single blower door to determine the total leakage of a single-zone structure such as a detached single-family home. There are no standard test methods for measuring interzonal leakage in a two-zone or multi-zone building envelope such as might be encountered in with an attached garage or in a multifamily building. Some practitioners have been using techniques that involve making multiple measurements with a single blower door as well as combined measurements using multiple blower doors. Even for just two zones there are dozens of combinations of one-door and two-door test protocols that could conceivably be used to determine the interzonal air tightness. We examined many of these two-zone configurations using both simulation and measured data to estimate the accuracy and precision of each technique for realistic measurement scenarios. We also considered the impact of taking measurements at a single pressure versus over multiple pressures. We compared the various techniques and evaluated them for specific uses. Some techniques work better in one leakage regime; some are more sensitive to wind and other noise; some are more suited to determining only a subset of the leakage values. This paper makes recommendations on which techniques to use or not use for various cases and provides data that could be used to develop future test methods.

  1. Videogrammetric Model Deformation Measurement Technique for Wind Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrows, Danny A.

    2006-01-01

    Videogrammetric measurement technique developments at NASA Langley were driven largely by the need to quantify model deformation at the National Transonic Facility (NTF). This paper summarizes recent wind tunnel applications and issues at the NTF and other NASA Langley facilities including the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel, 8-Ft high Temperature Tunnel, and the 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel. In addition, several adaptations of wind tunnel techniques to non-wind tunnel applications are summarized. These applications include wing deformation measurements on vehicles in flight, determining aerodynamic loads based on optical elastic deformation measurements, measurements on ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures, and the use of an object-to-image plane scaling technique to support NASA s Space Exploration program.

  2. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van; Mlynar, J.; Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G.; Vermaercke, P.; Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W.

    2012-10-15

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  3. Model Deformation Measurement Technique NASA Langley HSR Experiences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Wahls, R. A.; Owens, L. R.; Goad, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    Model deformation measurement techniques have been investigated and developed at NASA's Langley Research Center. The current technique is based upon a single video camera photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. Variations of this technique have been used to measure wing twist and bending at a few selected spanwise locations near the wing tip on HSR models at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. Automated measurements have been made at both the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and at Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel during the past year. Automated measurements were made for the first time at the NTF during the recently completed HSR Reference H Test 78 in early 1996. A major problem in automation for the NTF has been the need for high contrast targets which do not exceed the stringent surface finish requirements. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique as well as the rationale for selection of this particular technique are discussed. Wing twist examples from the HSR Reference H model are presented to illustrate the run-to-run and test-to-test repeatability of the technique in air mode at the NTF. Examples of wing twist in cryogenic nitrogen mode at the NTF are also presented.

  4. Review of past and present techniques of measuring corneal topography.

    PubMed

    Fowler, C W; Dave, T N

    1994-01-01

    Various methods of measuring corneal topography are described. The advantages and disadvantages of the principles used in the measurement of corneal shape by the various techniques are discussed. The corneal surface may be described in a number of ways; some researchers have used conic sections while others have used more complex polynomial expressions. Computer algorithms have also been developed to calculate quantitative measures of corneal topography to augment the information obtained from topographical maps. These descriptors are discussed in this article.

  5. Application of impedance measurement techniques to accelerating cavity mode characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. M.; Stefan, P. M.

    1993-11-01

    Impedance measurements, using a central wire to simulate the electron beam, were performed on a 52 MHz accelerating cavity at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This cavity was recently installed in the X-ray storage ring at the NSLS as a part of an upgrade of the ring. To damp higher-order modes (HOM) in this cavity, damping antennas have been installed. We implemented the impedance measurement technique to characterize the cavity modes up to 1 GHz and confirm the effectiveness of the damping antennas. Scattering parameters were measured using a network analyzer (HP 8510B) with a personal computer as a controller. Analysis based on S and T parameters for the system was used to solve for the cavity impedance, Z( ω), as a function of the measured transmission response, S21( ω). Search techniques were used to find the shunt resistance Rsh, and Q from the calculated Z( ω) for different modes. Our results for {R}/{Q} showed good agreement with URMEL simulations. The values of Q were compared with other independent Q measurement techniques. Our analytical technique offers an alternative approach for cases where full thru-reflection-line (TRL) calibration is not feasible and a more time-effective technique for obtaining {R}/{Q}, compared with the bead-pull method.

  6. Displacement measurements in structural elements by optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Peña, Rolando; Cibrián-Ortiz de Anda, Rosa María.; Pino-Velazquez, Angel J.; Soler-de la Cruz, José; González-Jorge, Yhoama

    2000-08-01

    Speckle metrology and holographic interferometry (HI) have been used in several civil engineering applications. We present the results obtained by applying speckle photography (SP) to the study of two quadratic shearwalls with different boundary conditions, and the potential of the technique in the study of this kind of structures is described. The analysis of Young's fringes obtained with this technique at certain points on each shearwall provides the whole field of displacement measurements. HI has been used to measure the three components of absolute displacement, verifying that the bulging phenomenon does not affect the in-plane components when the applied load remains on the same plane as the shearwall. A qualitative analysis is carried out following an electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) technique. The results obtained by optical techniques are compared to the numerical results obtained by the finite element method (FEM), finding good correlation between them in all the cases.

  7. Thermal properties measurements in biodiesel oils using photothermal techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, M. P. P.; Andrade, A. A.; Franco, R. W. A.; Miranda, P. C. M. L.; Sthel, M.; Vargas, H.; Constantino, R.; Baesso, M. L.

    2005-08-01

    In this Letter, thermal lens and open cell photoacoustic techniques are used to measure the thermal properties of biodiesel oils. The absolute values of the thermal effusivity, thermal diffusivity, thermal conductivity and the temperature coefficient of the refractive index were determined for samples obtained from soy, castor bean, sunflower and turnip. The results suggest that the employed techniques may be useful as complementary methods for biodiesel certification.

  8. Measurement of fuel spray vaporisation by laser techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yule, A. J.; Seng, C. A.; Felton, P. G.; Ungut, A.; Chigier, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    Comparison of fuel spray structures in heated and in cold environments is made by using a new laser tomographic technique and laser anemometry. The tomography technique is shown to give accurate and rapid 'point' measurements of droplet sizes and concentrations. Experimental results show acceleration of droplets to the local gas velocity, preferential vaporisation of the smallest droplets and the dispersion of droplets by the turbulence.

  9. Effects of equipment and technique on peak flow measurements

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Thomas; O'Driscoll, B Ronan

    2006-01-01

    Background Different lung function equipment and different respiratory manoeuvres may produce different Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) results. Although the PEF is the most common lung function test, there have been few studies of these effects and no previous study has evaluated both factors in a single group of patients. Methods We studied 36 subjects (PEF range 80–570 l/min). All patients recorded PEF measurements using a short rapid expiration following maximal inspiration (PEF technique) or a forced maximal expiration to residual volume (FVC technique). Measurements were made using a Wright's peak flow meter, a turbine spirometer and a Fleisch pneumotachograph spirometer. Results The mean PEF was 8.7% higher when the PEF technique was used (compared with FVC technique, p < 0.0001). The mean PEF recorded with the turbine spirometer was 5.5% lower than the Wright meter reading. The Fleisch spirometer result was 19.5% lower than the Wright reading. However, adjustment of the Wrights measurements from the traditional Wright's scale to the new EU Peak Flow scale produced results that were only 7.2% higher than the Fleisch pneumotachograph measurements. Conclusion Peak flow measurements are affected by the instruction given and by the device and Peak Flow scale used. Patient management decisions should not be based on PEF measurement made on different instruments. PMID:16787543

  10. Mississippi River streamflow measurement techniques at St. Louis, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wastson, Chester C.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Biedenham, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Streamflow measurement techniques of the Mississippi River at St. Louis have changed through time (1866–present). In addition to different methods used for discrete streamflow measurements, the density and range of discrete measurements used to define the rating curve (stage versus streamflow) have also changed. Several authors have utilized published water surface elevation (stage) and streamflow data to assess changes in the rating curve, which may be attributed to be caused by flood control and/or navigation structures. The purpose of this paper is to provide a thorough review of the available flow measurement data and techniques and to assess how a strict awareness of the limitations of the data may affect previous analyses. It is concluded that the pre-1930s discrete streamflow measurement data are not of sufficient accuracy to be compared with modern streamflow values in establishing long-term trends of river behavior.

  11. Optical measurement techniques for high Reynolds number train investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loose, S.; Richard, H.; Bosbach, J.; Thimm, M.; Becker, W.; Raffel, M.

    2006-04-01

    This article reports on experimental aerodynamic investigations on a generic high-speed train configuration performed within two different wind tunnels. Both wind tunnels are specialized facilities for high Reynolds number investigations and offer low turbulence levels. The wind tunnels are the cryogenic wind tunnel located in Cologne (KKK) and in the high-pressure wind tunnel located in Göttingen (HDG). Both facilities are part of the German Dutch wind tunnel association (DNW). The adaptation and application of three optical measurement techniques for such high Reynolds number investigations is described in the article. The optical methods are: Particle Image Velocimetry for the measurement of velocity fields, Background Oriented Schlieren technique for density gradient measurements, and a white light Digital Speckle Photography technique for model deformation monitoring.

  12. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-08-07

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10(-3) g/cm(3) (1%).

  13. Ultrasonic Technique for Density Measurement of Liquids in Extreme Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Kazys, Rymantas; Sliteris, Reimondas; Rekuviene, Regina; Zukauskas, Egidijus; Mazeika, Liudas

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasonic technique, invariant to temperature changes, for a density measurement of different liquids under in situ extreme conditions is presented. The influence of geometry and material parameters of the measurement system (transducer, waveguide, matching layer) on measurement accuracy and reliability is analyzed theoretically along with experimental results. The proposed method is based on measurement of the amplitude of the ultrasonic wave, reflected from the interface of the solid/liquid medium under investigation. In order to enhance sensitivity, the use of a quarter wavelength acoustic matching layer is proposed. Therefore, the sensitivity of the measurement system increases significantly. Density measurements quite often must be performed in extreme conditions at high temperature (up to 220 °C) and high pressure. In this case, metal waveguides between piezoelectric transducer and the measured liquid are used in order to protect the conventional transducer from the influence of high temperature and to avoid depolarization. The presented ultrasonic density measurement technique is suitable for density measurement in different materials, including liquids and polymer melts in extreme conditions. A new calibration algorithm was proposed. The metrological evaluation of the measurement method was performed. The expanded measurement uncertainty Uρ = 7.4 × 10−3 g/cm3 (1%). PMID:26262619

  14. Intercomparison of Nitrous Acid (HONO) Measurement Techniques during SHARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, J. P.; Meng, Q.; Dibb, J. E.; Lefer, B. L.; Rappenglueck, B.; Ren, X.; Stutz, J.; Zhang, R.

    2010-12-01

    HONO is regarded as a potentially important radical precursor in a number of diverse environments ranging from polar to semi-tropical. As part of the SHARP (Study of Houston Atmospheric Radical Precursors), time series of HONO were obtained by five different measurement techniques. Techniques used were long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), long-path absorption photometry (LoPAP), mist chamber (MC), quantum cascade laser and ionization detection-chemical ionization mass spectrometry. Various combinations of techniques were in operation during the whole period from 15 April through 31 May 2009 with a common measurement period extending from 16 to 28 May. All instruments recorded a similar diurnal pattern of HONO concentrations with higher mean values from the in-situ techniques than either the low- or mid-path DOAS. The largest differences among techniques were found during the afternoon with measurements from the in-situ techniques higher than either the low- or mid-path DOAS. Principal components analysis using measurements of trace species was used to identify possible sources of interference in the chemical measurements. Two major components were identified: one associated with primary, mainly traffic related pollutants and the other with photochemical species. The afternoon differences between DOAS and MC and the U Miami LoPAP were found to be most strongly associated with the photochemical component. The results for comparison between DOAS and MC are in accord with those found previously during August-September 2006. All instruments showed some association between measurement differences and the primary component. Further details and associations with air coming from different areas of the Houston airshed will also be presented.

  15. Chromaticity measurement using a continuous head-tail kicking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, C.Y.; Ranjbar, V.H.; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2007-06-01

    In the classical head-tail chromaticity measurement technique, a single large kick is applied transversely to the beam. The resulting phase difference between the head and the tail is measured and the chromaticity extracted. In the continuous head-tail kicking technique, a very small transverse kick is applied to the beam and the asymptotic phase difference between the head and the tail is found to be a function of chromaticity. The advantage of this method is that since the tune tracker PLL already supplies the small transverse kicks, no extra modulation is required.

  16. A preliminary study of air-pollution measurement by active remote-sensing techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. L.; Proctor, E. K.; Gasiorek, L. S.; Liston, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    Air pollutants are identified, and the needs for their measurement from satellites and aircraft are discussed. An assessment is made of the properties of these pollutants and of the normal atmosphere, including interactions with light of various wavelengths and the resulting effects on transmission and scattering of optical signals. The possible methods for active remote measurement are described; the relative performance capabilities of double-ended and single-ended systems are compared qualitatively; and the capabilities of the several single-ended or backscattering techniques are compared quantitatively. The differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique is shown to be superior to the other backscattering techniques. The lidar system parameters and their relationships to the environmental factors and the properties of pollutants are examined in detail. A computer program that models both the atmosphere (including pollutants) and the lidar system is described. The performance capabilities of present and future lidar components are assessed, and projections are made of prospective measurement capabilities for future lidar systems. Following a discussion of some important operational factors that affect both the design and measurement capabilities of airborne and satellite-based lidar systems, the extensive analytical results obtained through more than 1000 individual cases analyzed with the aid of the computer program are summarized and discussed. The conclusions are presented. Recommendations are also made for additional studies to investigate cases that could not be explored adequately during this study.

  17. Percutaneous permeation measurement of topical phthalocyanine by photoacoustic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Emanoel P. O.; Barja, Paulo R.; Cardoso, Luiz E.; Beltrame, Milton

    2012-11-01

    This investigation have studied photoacoustic (PA) technique to percutaneous permeation of topical hydroxy-(29H,31H-phthalocyaninate) aluminum (PcAlOH) on pig ear skin. The PcAlOH was incorporated in an emulsion (O/W) (1 mg/dl) with assessed stability parameters of: pH, short and long term stability tests (in the several conditions). The skin was prepared through a heat separation technique, and with a scalpel, the outer skin of the cartilage was removed. The skins were then cut into 4 cm2 pieces and treated with sodium bromide 2 mol/L for 6 h at 37 °C. The epidermis layer was washed with purified water, dried, and stored under reduced pressure until use. The skin permeation kinetics was determined by photoacoustic technique in an open photoacoustic cell. Short (after preparation) and long-term stability tests showed no phase separation. The emulsion developed pH 7.6 and after incorporating the pH was unchanged. The typical times for percutaneous permeation of the emulsion base and emulsion + PcAlOH were 182 (±6) and 438 (±3) s, respectively. This study indicated that the formulations containing PcAlOH have stabile characteristics and show promising results in absorption into the skin. The presence of the photosensitive agent in the formulation contributed significantly to the greater absorption time than observed in the base formulation. The used photoacoustic technical to examine the penetration kinetics of PcAlOH in pig ear skin was adequate and may be employed in the determination of the percutaneous permeation of phthalocyanines.

  18. Infrared Spectroscopy of Explosives Residues: Measurement Techniques and Spectral Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2015-03-11

    Infrared laser spectroscopy of explosives is a promising technique for standoff and non-contact detection applications. However, the interpretation of spectra obtained in typical standoff measurement configurations presents numerous challenges. Understanding the variability in observed spectra from explosives residues and particles is crucial for design and implementation of detection algorithms with high detection confidence and low false alarm probability. We discuss a series of infrared spectroscopic techniques applied toward measuring and interpreting the reflectance spectra obtained from explosives particles and residues. These techniques utilize the high spectral radiance, broad tuning range, rapid wavelength tuning, high scan reproducibility, and low noise of an external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) system developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The ECQCL source permits measurements in configurations which would be either impractical or overly time-consuming with broadband, incoherent infrared sources, and enables a combination of rapid measurement speed and high detection sensitivity. The spectroscopic methods employed include standoff hyperspectral reflectance imaging, quantitative measurements of diffuse reflectance spectra, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, microscopic imaging and spectroscopy, and nano-scale imaging and spectroscopy. Measurements of explosives particles and residues reveal important factors affecting observed reflectance spectra, including measurement geometry, substrate on which the explosives are deposited, and morphological effects such as particle shape, size, orientation, and crystal structure.

  19. Sound absorption by suspensions of nonspherical particles: measurements compared with predictions using various particle sizing techniques.

    PubMed

    Richards, Simon D; Leighton, Timothy G; Brown, Niven R

    2003-10-01

    Knowledge of the particle size distribution is required in order to predict ultrasonic absorption in polydisperse particulate suspensions. This paper shows that the method used to measure the particle size distribution can lead to important differences in the predicted absorption. A reverberation technique developed for measuring ultrasonic absorption by suspended particles is used to measure the absorption in suspensions of nonspherical particles. Two types of particulates are studied: (i) kaolin (china clay) particles which are platelike in form; and (ii) calcium carbonate particles which are more granular. Results are compared to theoretical predictions of visco-inertial absorption by suspensions of spherical particles. The particle size distributions, which are required for these predictions, are measured by laser diffraction, gravitational sedimentation and centrifugal sedimentation, all of which assume spherical particles. For a given sample, each sizing technique yields a different size distribution, leading to differences in the predicted absorption. The particle size distributions obtained by gravitational and centrifugal sedimentation are reinterpreted to yield a representative size distribution of oblate spheroids, and predictions for absorption by these spheroids are compared with the measurements. Good agreement between theory and measurement for the flat kaolin particles is obtained, demonstrating that these particles can be adequately represented by oblate spheroids. PMID:14587585

  20. Problems in vibration measurement by laser techniques through combusting flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paone, Nicola; Revel, Gian M.

    1996-08-01

    A study of the metrologic problems connected to performing laser vibrometer measurements through combusting flows has been presented in this paper, in order to test the real applicability of laser vibrometer techniques to carry out measurements on full-scale burners. A model of the instrument is developed to describe main effects on the measurement system due to time varying refractive index within the flame; measurement uncertainty sources are discussed. Variations in the optical path length of the measuring arm of the interferometer due to changes in the laser beam wavelength and propagation direction caused by refractive index gradients seem to be the most influent effects and they are modulated at the natural flickering frequency of the flame. Experimental results from measurements performed by a single-point laser vibrometer through an unconfined CH4 flame from a Bunsen burner are in agreement with the model and provide an explanation of the phenomena which affect uncertainty in these particular measurements.

  1. Total body water measurements using resonant cavity perturbation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Darren A.; Robinson, Martin P.

    2004-05-01

    A recent paper proposed a novel technique for determining the total body water (TBW) of patients suffering with abnormal hydration levels, using a resonant cavity perturbation method. Current techniques to measure TBW are limited by resolution and technical constraints. However, this new method involves measuring the dielectric properties of the body, by placing a subject in a large cavity resonator and measuring the subsequent change in its resonant frequency, fres and its Q-factor. Utilizing the relationship that water content correlates to these dielectric properties, it has been shown that the measured response of these parameters enables determination of TBW. Results are presented for a preliminary study using data estimated from anthropometric measurements, where volunteers were asked to lie and stand in an electromagnetic screened room, before and after drinking between 1 and 2 l of water, and in some cases, after voiding the bladder. Notable changes in the parameters were observed; fres showed a negative shift and Q was reduced. Preliminary calibration curves using estimated values of water content have been developed from these results, showing that for each subject the measured resonant frequency is a linear function of TBW. Because the gradients of these calibration curves correlate to the mass-to-height-ratio of the volunteers, it has proved that a system in which TBW can be unequivocally obtained is possible. Measured values of TBW have been determined using this new pilot-technique, and the values obtained correlate well with theoretical values of body water (r = 0.87) and resolution is very good (750 ml). The results obtained are measurable, repeatable and statistically significant. This leads to confidence in the integrity of the proposed technique.

  2. Self-normalized photothermal techniques for thermal diffusivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balderas-López, J. A.; Mandelis, A.

    2000-12-01

    Two self-normalized photothermal techniques, to carry out thermal diffusivity measurements of condensed phase materials, are presented. These simple methodologies involve linear fitting procedures of the signal amplitude and phase. These procedures lead to the elimination of the usual requirement for instrumental transfer-function normalization. The thermal diffusivities for two dental resins and two pure liquids are measured with these simple methodologies and very good agreement is found with values reported in the literature, where more involved analysis is usually required.

  3. TEER measurement techniques for in vitro barrier model systems

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Kolli, Aditya Reddy; Esch, Mandy Brigitte; Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shuler, Michael L.; Hickman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Transepithelial/transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) is a widely accepted quantitative technique to measure the integrity of tight junction dynamics in cell culture models of endothelial and epithelial monolayers. TEER values are strong indicators of the integrity of the cellular barriers before they are evaluated for transport of drugs or chemicals. TEER measurements can be performed in real-time without cell damage and generally are based on measuring ohmic resistance or measuring impedance across a wide spectrum of frequencies. TEER measurements for various cell types have been reported with commercially available measurement systems and also with custom built microfluidic implementations. Some of the barrier models that have been widely characterized utilizing TEER include the blood-brain barrier (BBB), gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and pulmonary models. Variations in TEER value can arise due to factors such as temperature, medium formulation and passage number of cells. The aim of this paper is to review the different TEER measurement techniques and analyze their strengths and weaknesses, the significance of TEER in drug toxicity studies, examine the various in vitro models and microfluidic organs-on-chips implementations utilizing TEER measurements in some widely studied barrier models (BBB, GI tract and pulmonary), and discuss the various factors that can affect TEER measurements. PMID:25586998

  4. Non-intrusive temperature measurement using microscale visualization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamarthy, Pramod; Garimella, Suresh V.; Wereley, Steven T.

    2009-07-01

    μPIV is a widely accepted tool for making accurate measurements in microscale flows. The particles that are used to seed the flow, due to their small size, undergo Brownian motion which adds a random noise component to the measurements. Brownian motion introduces an undesirable error in the velocity measurements, but also contains valuable temperature information. A PIV algorithm which detects both the location and broadening of the correlation peak can measure velocity as well as temperature simultaneously using the same set of images. The approach presented in this work eliminates the use of the calibration constant used in the literature (Hohreiter et al. in Meas Sci Technol 13(7):1072-1078, 2002), making the method system-independent, and reducing the uncertainty involved in the technique. The temperature in a stationary fluid was experimentally measured using this technique and compared to that obtained using the particle tracking thermometry method and a novel method, low image density PIV. The method of cross-correlation PIV was modified to measure the temperature of a moving fluid. A standard epi-fluorescence μPIV system was used for all the measurements. The experiments were conducted using spherical fluorescent polystyrene-latex particles suspended in water. Temperatures ranging from 20 to 80°C were measured. This method allows simultaneous non-intrusive temperature and velocity measurements in integrated cooling systems and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  5. Auditory thresholds in the rat measured by an operant technique.

    PubMed

    GOUREVITCH, G; HACK, M H; HAWKINS, J E

    1960-04-01

    An adaptation of the Ratliff and Blough technique has been developed for auditory measurement in rats. Thresholds for a 2000-cy/sec tone were determined over a period of weeks. Kanamycin, an ototoxic agent, was then administered, and the gradual rise in threshold was followed.

  6. The application of measurement techniques to track flutter testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roglin, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    The application is discussed of measurement techniques to captive flight flutter tests at the Supersonic Naval Ordnance Research Track (SNORT), U. S. Naval Ordnance Test Station, China Lake, California. The high-speed track, by its ability to prove the validity of design and to accurately determine the actual margin of safety, offers a unique method of flutter testing for the aircraft design engineer.

  7. Survey of Temperature Measurement Techniques For Studying Underwater Shock Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Alderfer, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Several optical methods for measuring temperature near underwater shock waves are reviewed and compared. The relative merits of the different techniques are compared, considering accuracy, precision, ease of use, applicable temperature range, maturity, spatial resolution, and whether or not special additives are required.

  8. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate evidence. 85.900 Section 85.900 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support...

  9. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  10. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  11. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  12. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  13. Accurate Fiber Length Measurement Using Time-of-Flight Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, Osama; Hussein, Hatem

    2016-06-01

    Fiber artifacts of very well-measured length are required for the calibration of optical time domain reflectometers (OTDR). In this paper accurate length measurement of different fiber lengths using the time-of-flight technique is performed. A setup is proposed to measure accurately lengths from 1 to 40 km at 1,550 and 1,310 nm using high-speed electro-optic modulator and photodetector. This setup offers traceability to the SI unit of time, the second (and hence to meter by definition), by locking the time interval counter to the Global Positioning System (GPS)-disciplined quartz oscillator. Additionally, the length of a recirculating loop artifact is measured and compared with the measurement made for the same fiber by the National Physical Laboratory of United Kingdom (NPL). Finally, a method is proposed to relatively correct the fiber refractive index to allow accurate fiber length measurement.

  14. An ion-beam technique for measuring surface diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLuca, P. M.; Labanda, J. G. C.; Barnett, S. A.

    1999-03-01

    The effective surface diffusion coefficient of Ga along the [110] direction on vicinal GaAs(001)2×4 surfaces during molecular-beam epitaxy was measured using specular ion current measurements. In this technique, 3 keV Ar ions were impinged upon the surface at a glancing angle (typically 3°), and the specularly scattered ion current was measured. Since specular reflections require a locally flat surface, adatoms cause a decrease in the measured current, allowing an average adatom density measurement. The time dependence of the Ga adatom population was measured during and after Ga deposition. Diffusion coefficients, obtained from the adatom lifetimes using a simple model of diffusion to the step edges, were fit well by the expression D=2×10-9 exp(-0.73 eV/kT)cm2/s from 400 to 600 °C.

  15. Fiber optic techniques for measuring various properties of shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prinse, Wim C.; van Esveld, Rene; Oostdam, Rene; van Rooijen, Murk; Bouma, Richard

    1999-06-01

    For the past years we have developed several optical techniques to measure properties of shock waves. The fiber optic probe (FOP) is developed to measure the shock-wave velocity and/or the detonation velocity inside an explosive. The space resolution can be as small as 0.5 mm. Single fibers are used as velocity pins, and as devices to measure the flatness of flyers. Arrays of fibers are used to measure the curvature of a shock or detonation front. Also a Fabry-Perot velocity Interferometer System is constructed to measure the velocity of the flyer of an electric gun and the particle velocity in a shock wave. It is possible to combine these two measurements to determine simultaneously the flyer velocity that induces a shock wave in sample and the particle velocity in a window material at the back in a single streak record.

  16. Instruments measuring perceived racism/racial discrimination: review and critique of factor analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Rahshida

    2014-01-01

    Several compendiums of instruments that measure perceived racism and/or discrimination are present in the literature. Other works have reviewed the psychometric properties of these instruments in terms of validity and reliability and have indicated if the instrument was factor analyzed. However, little attention has been given to the quality of the factor analysis performed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the exploratory factor analyses done on instruments measuring perceived racism/racial discrimination using guidelines from experts in psychometric theory. The techniques used for factor analysis were reviewed and critiqued and the adequacy of reporting was evaluated. Internet search engines and four electronic abstract databases were used to identify 16 relevant instruments that met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. Principal component analysis was the most frequent method of extraction (81%). Sample sizes were adequate for factor analysis in 81 percent of studies. The majority of studies reported appropriate criteria for the acceptance of un-rotated factors (81%) and justified the rotation method (75%). Exactly 94 percent of studies reported partially acceptable criteria for the acceptance of rotated factors. The majority of articles (69%) reported adequate coefficient alphas for the resultant subscales. In 81 percent of the studies, the conceptualized dimensions were supported by factor analysis.

  17. A drag measurement technique for free piston shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanderson, S. R.; Simmons, J. M.; Tuttle, S. L.

    1991-01-01

    A new technique is described for measuring drag with 100-microsecond rise time on a nonlifting model in a free piston shock tunnel. The technique involves interpretation of the stress waves propagating within the model and its support. A finite element representation and spectral methods are used to obtain a mean square optimal estimate of the time history of the aerodynamic loading. Thus, drag is measured instantaneously and the previous restriction caused by the mechanical time constant of balances is overcome. The effectiveness of the balance is demonstrated by measuring the drag on cones with 5 and 15 deg semi-vertex angles in nominally Mach 5.6 flow with stagnation enthalpies from 2.6 to 33 MJ/kg.

  18. Technique for measuring the dielectric constant of thin materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1988-01-01

    A practical technique for measuring the dielectric constant of vegetation leaves and similarly thin materials is presented. A rectangular section of the leaf is placed in the tranverse plane in a rectangular waveguide and the magnitude and phase of the reflection coefficient are measured over the desired frequency band using a vector network analyzer. By treating the leaf as an infinitesimally thin resistive sheet, an explicit expression for its dielectric constant is obtained in terms of the reflection coefficient. Because of the thin-sheet approximation, however, this approach is valid only at frequencies below 1.5 GHz. To extend the technique to higher frequencies, higher order approximations are derived and their accuracies are compared to the exact dielectric-slab solution. For a material whose thickness is 0.5 mm or less, the proposed technique was found to provide accurate values of its dielectric constant up to frequencies of 12 GHz or higher. The technique was used to measure the 8 to 12 GHz dielectric spectrum for vegetation leaves, teflon and rock samples.

  19. Laser Sounder Technique for Remotely Measuring Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun, X.; Riris, H.; Andrews, A. E.; Krainak, M.

    2001-12-01

    We describe progress in developing a lidar technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations. Our goal is to demonstrate a technique and technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft at the few ppm level, with a capability of scaling to permit global CO2 measurements from orbit. Accurate remote sensing measurements of CO2 mixing ratio from aircraft and space appear difficult. Potential error sources include possible interferences from other trace gas species, the effects of clouds and aerosols in the path, and variability in dry air density caused by pressure or topographic changes. Some potential instrumental errors include frequency drifts in the transmitter and sensitivity drifts in the receiver. High signal-to-noise ratios are needed for estimates at the few ppm level. We are developing a laser sounder approach as a candidate for these measurements. It uses 3 laser transmitters to permit simultaneous measurement of CO2 and O2 extinction, and aerosol backscatter at 1064 nm in the same atmospheric path. It directs the co-aligned laser beams from the lidar toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser backscatter from land and water surfaces. During each measurement period, the two narrow linewidth lasers are rapidly tuned on and off the selected CO2 and O2 absorption lines. The receiver records and averages the energies of the laser echoes. The column extinction and column densities of both CO2 and O2 are estimated via the differential absorption lidar technique. For the on-line wavelength, the side of the gas absorption line is used, which weights its measurements to 0-4 km in the troposphere. Simultaneous measurements of O2 column abundance are made using an identical approach using an O2 line near 770 nm. Atmospheric baskscatter profiles are measured with the 1064 nm channel, which permits identifying and excluding measurements containing clouds or aerosols backscatter

  20. Advances in the Rising Bubble Technique for discharge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilgersom, Koen; Luxemburg, Willem; Willemsen, Geert; Bussmann, Luuk

    2014-05-01

    Already in the 19th century, d'Auria described a discharge measurement technique that applies floats to find the depth-integrated velocity (d'Auria, 1882). The basis of this technique was that the horizontal distance that the float travels on its way to the surface is the image of the integrated velocity profile over depth. Viol and Semenov (1964) improved this method by using air bubbles as floats, but still distances were measured manually until Sargent (1981) introduced a technique that could derive the distances from two photographs simultaneously taken from each side of the river bank. Recently, modern image processing techniques proved to further improve the applicability of the method (Hilgersom and Luxemburg, 2012). In the 2012 article, controlling and determining the rising velocity of an air bubble still appeared a major challenge for the application of this method. Ever since, laboratory experiments with different nozzle and tube sizes lead to advances in our self-made equipment enabling us to produce individual air bubbles with a more constant rising velocity. Also, we introduced an underwater camera to on-site determine the rising velocity, which is dependent on the water temperature and contamination, and therefore is site-specific. Camera measurements of the rising velocity proved successful in a laboratory and field setting, although some improvements to the setup are necessary to capture the air bubbles also at depths where little daylight penetrates. References D'Auria, L.: Velocity of streams; A new method to determine correctly the mean velocity of any perpendicular in rivers and canals, (The) American Engineers, 3, 1882. Hilgersom, K.P. and Luxemburg, W.M.J.: Technical Note: How image processing facilitates the rising bubble technique for discharge measurement, Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 16(2), 345-356, 2012. Sargent, D.: Development of a viable method of stream flow measurement using the integrating float technique, Proceedings of

  1. Unit vent airflow measurements using a tracer gas technique

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D.G.; Lagus, P.L.; Fleming, K.M.

    1997-08-01

    An alternative method for assessing flowrates that does not depend on point measurements of air flow velocity is the constant tracer injection technique. In this method one injects a tracer gas at a constant rate into a duct and measures the resulting concentration downstream of the injection point. A simple equation derived from the conservation of mass allows calculation of the flowrate at the point of injection. Flowrate data obtained using both a pitot tube and a flow measuring station were compared with tracer gas flowrate measurements in the unit vent duct at the Callaway Nuclear Station during late 1995 and early 1996. These data are presented and discussed with an eye toward obtaining precise flowrate data for release rate calculations. The advantages and disadvantages of the technique are also described. In those test situations for which many flowrate combinations are required, or in large area ducts, a tracer flowrate determination requires fewer man-hours than does a conventional traverse-based technique and does not require knowledge of the duct area. 6 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Noble Gas Measurement and Analysis Technique for Monitoring Reprocessing Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Charlton, William S

    1999-09-01

    An environmental monitoring technique using analysis of stable noble gas isotopic ratios on-stack at a reprocessing facility was developed. This technique integrates existing technologies to strengthen safeguards at reprocessing facilities. The isotopic ratios are measured using a mass spectrometry system and are compared to a database of calculated isotopic ratios using a Bayesian data analysis method to determine specific fuel parameters (e.g., burnup, fuel type, fuel age, etc.). These inferred parameters can be used by investigators to verify operator declarations. A user-friendly software application (named NOVA) was developed for the application of this technique. NOVA included a Visual Basic user interface coupling a Bayesian data analysis procedure to a reactor physics database (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). The integrated system (mass spectrometry, reactor modeling, and data analysis) was validated using on-stack measurements during the reprocessing of target fuel from a U.S. production reactor and gas samples from the processing of EBR-II fast breeder reactor driver fuel. These measurements led to an inferred burnup that matched the declared burnup with sufficient accuracy and consistency for most safeguards applications. The NOVA code was also tested using numerous light water reactor measurements from the literature. NOVA was capable of accurately determining spent fuel type, burnup, and fuel age for these experimental results. Work should continue to demonstrate the robustness of this system for production, power, and research reactor fuels.

  3. Objective techniques for psychological assessment, phase 2. [techniques for measuring human performance during space flight stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortz, E. C.; Saur, A. J.; Nowlis, D. P.; Kendall, M. P.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of an initial experiment in a research program designed to develop objective techniques for psychological assessment of individuals and groups participating in long-duration space flights. Specifically examined is the rationale for utilizing measures of attention as an objective assessment technique. Subjects participating in the experiment performed various tasks (eg, playing matrix games which appeared on a display screen along with auditory stimuli). The psychophysiological reactions of the subjects were measured and are given. Previous research of various performance and psychophysiological methods of measuring attention is also discussed. The experiment design (independent and dependent variables) and apparatus (computers and display devices) are described and shown. Conclusions and recommendations are presented.

  4. A sliding cell technique for diffusion measurements in liquid metals

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Yongliang; Zhu, Chunao; Zhang, Bo

    2014-03-15

    The long capillary and shear cell techniques are the usual methods for diffusion measurements in liquid metals. Here we present a new “sliding cell technique” to measure interdiffusion in liquid alloys, which combines the merits of these two methods. Instead of a number of shear cells, as used in the shear cell method, only one sliding cell is designed to separate and join the liquid diffusion samples. Using the sliding cell technique, the influence of the heating process (which affects liquid diffusion measurements in the conventional long capillary method) can be eliminated. Time-dependent diffusion measurements at the same isothermal temperature were carried out in Al-Cu liquids. Compared with the previous results measured by in-situ X-ray radiography, the obtained liquid diffusion coefficient in this work is believed to be influenced by convective flow. The present work further supports the idea that to obtain accurate diffusion constants in liquid metals, the measurement conditions must be well controlled, and there should be no temperature gradients or other disturbances.

  5. The design of rapid turbidity measurement system based on single photon detection techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yixin; Wang, Huanqin; Cao, Yangyang; Gui, Huaqiao; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Liang; Cao, Huibin; Yu, Tongzhu; You, Hui

    2015-10-01

    A new rapid turbidity measurement system has been developed to measure the turbidity of drinking water. To determinate the turbidity quantitatively, the total intensity of scattering light has been measured and quantified as number of photons by adopting the single photon detection techniques (SPDT) which has the advantage of high sensitivity. On the basis of SPDT, the measurement system has been built and series of experiments have been carried out. Combining then the 90° Mie scattering theory with the principle of SPDT, a turbidity measurement model has been proposed to explain the experimental results. The experimental results show that a turbidity, which is as low as 0.1 NTU (Nephelometric Turbidity Units), can be measured steadily within 100 ms. It also shows a good linearity and stability over the range of 0.1-400 NTU and the precision can be controlled within 5% full scale. In order to improve its precision and stability, some key parameters, including the sampling time and incident light intensity, have been discussed. It has been proved that, to guarantee an excellent system performance, a good compromise between the measurement speed and the low power consumption should be considered adequately depending on the practical applications.

  6. Double threshold ultrasonic distance measurement technique and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weihua; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-04-01

    The double threshold method realized by hardware circuits and high performance timing chip TDC-GP21 was successfully adapted to solve the key problem of ultrasonic distance measurement, the accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of ultrasonic wave. Compared with other techniques of TOF measurement, the double threshold method presented in this work can suppress noise in the received signal, and achieve a time resolution of around 22 ps and real-time. This method is easy to realize and pertains the advantage of low cost. To compensate temperature and pressure deviations, a temperature measurement module of 10 mK in precision as well as a pressure measurement module of 0.01% in accuracy was developed. The system designed in this work can be exactly used as a two paths ultrasonic gas flowmeter without any adjustment of the hardware circuit. The double threshold method was further corroborated using experiment results of both the ultrasonic distance measurement and ultrasonic gas flow measurement. In distance measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the maximum relative error are 0.69 mm and 0.28%, respectively, for a target distance range of 100-600 mm. In flow measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the worst repeatability are 1.16% and 0.65% for a flow in the range of 50-700 m3/h.

  7. Double threshold ultrasonic distance measurement technique and its application.

    PubMed

    Li, Weihua; Chen, Qiang; Wu, Jiangtao

    2014-04-01

    The double threshold method realized by hardware circuits and high performance timing chip TDC-GP21 was successfully adapted to solve the key problem of ultrasonic distance measurement, the accurate time-of-flight (TOF) measurement of ultrasonic wave. Compared with other techniques of TOF measurement, the double threshold method presented in this work can suppress noise in the received signal, and achieve a time resolution of around 22 ps and real-time. This method is easy to realize and pertains the advantage of low cost. To compensate temperature and pressure deviations, a temperature measurement module of 10 mK in precision as well as a pressure measurement module of 0.01% in accuracy was developed. The system designed in this work can be exactly used as a two paths ultrasonic gas flowmeter without any adjustment of the hardware circuit. The double threshold method was further corroborated using experiment results of both the ultrasonic distance measurement and ultrasonic gas flow measurement. In distance measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the maximum relative error are 0.69 mm and 0.28%, respectively, for a target distance range of 100-600 mm. In flow measurement, the maximum absolute deviation and the worst repeatability are 1.16% and 0.65% for a flow in the range of 50-700 m(3)/h. PMID:24784646

  8. Fourier transform approach in modulation technique of experimental measurements.

    PubMed

    Khazimullin, M V; Lebedev, Yu A

    2010-04-01

    An application of Fourier transform approach in modulation technique of experimental studies is considered. This method has obvious advantages compared with traditional lock-in amplifiers technique--simple experimental setup, a quickly available information on all the required harmonics, high speed of data processing using fast Fourier transform algorithm. A computationally simple, fast and accurate Fourier coefficients interpolation (FCI) method has been implemented to obtain a useful information from harmonics of a multimode signal. Our analysis shows that in this case FCI method has a systematical error (bias) of a signal parameters estimation, which became essential for the short data sets. Hence, a new differential Fourier coefficients interpolation (DFCI) method has been suggested, which is less sensitive to a presence of several modes in a signal. The analysis has been confirmed by simulations and measurements of a quartz wedge birefringence by means of the photoelastic modulator. The obtained bias, noise level, and measuring speed are comparable and even better than in lock-in amplifier technique. Moreover, presented DFCI method is expected to be promised candidate for using in actively developing imaging systems based on the modulation technique requiring fast digital signal processing of large data sets.

  9. Ground-based intercomparison of nitric acid measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Huey, L. Greg; Sueper, Donna T.; Norton, Richard B.; Williams, Eric J.; Eisele, Fred L.; Mauldin, R. Lee; Tanner, David J.

    1998-02-01

    An informal intercomparison of gas-phase nitric acid (HNO3) measuring techniques was carried out. The intercomparison involved two new chemical ionization mass spectrometers (CIMSs) that have been developed for the measurement of HNO3 along with an older, more established filter pack (FP) technique. The filter pack was composed of a teflon prefilter which collected aerosols followed by a nylon filter which collected the gas-phase HNO3. The study was carried out during the late winter and early spring of 1996 at a site located on the western edge of the Denver metropolitan area. Throughout the study the two CIMS techniques were in general agreement. However, under certain conditions the HNO3 levels obtained from the nylon filter of the FP gave values for the gas-phase concentration of HNO3 that were somewhat higher than that recorded by the two CIMS systems. The formation of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) containing aerosols is common during the colder months in this area. An analysis of these results suggests that the HNO3 collected by the nylon filter in the FP suffers an interference associated with the disproportionation of NH4NO3 from aerosols containing that compound that were initially collected on the teflon prefilter. This problem with the FP technique has been suggested from results obtained in previous intercomparisons.

  10. Optical measuring technique for small scale water surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahne, Bernd; Waas, Stefan

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes two optical measuring techniques for determining the spatial and temporal structure of small-scale surface waves: (1) the imaging slope gage (ISG) and (2) the reflective stereo slope gage (RSSG). The ISG is based on light refraction at the water surface; it records image sequences of the wave slope at a maximum area of 1 sq m. The RSSG technique involves illumination of the water surface from above by a monochromatic light source; its two CCD camera take stereo images of sequences of the specular reflexes returned by the water surface. Both instruments were successfully used in wind/wave facility investigations. The results show that they permit a much more detailed investigation of the physics of small scale waves than those made using conventional equipment, such as point measuring devices or laser slope gages.

  11. Equivalence and Accuracy of MOSFET Channel Length Measurement Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Sanjay

    1989-02-01

    It is shown that the MOSFET channel length measurement techniques of Terada and Muta, Peng et al., Whitfield, Suciu and Johnston, and De La Moneda et al. are actually equivalent, i.e. merely different expressions of the same formula for channel length in terms of measured resistance, and that some of the transresistance methods of Jain, although not equivalent, are also related to the same formula. The accuracy of this formula is evaluated for the general case and related to the error components due to source and drain resistance asymmetry, short channel geometry effect, and variation of series resistance with bias. No independent error component due to field-induced mobility degradation is found. Finally the errors in the methods of Terada and Muta, Chen et al., Sheu et al., Wordeman et al. and Jain, are determined and compared. The gate transresistance technique is found to be the most accurate method.

  12. Lock-in technique for concurrent measurement of adhesion and friction with the scanning force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotil, H.-U.; Stifter, Th.; Marti, O.

    2001-01-01

    Regardless of all the great progress in new scanning probe microscopy techniques, the concurrent measurement of adhesive and frictional forces with local resolution using scanning force microscopy (SFM) has not been possible until now. In this paper, we present a novel scanning probe microscopy mode, called combined dynamic x mode or CODYMode®. In CODYMode® SFM at least two oscillations with sufficiently different frequencies and amplitudes are superimposed and interact with the sample surface. This enables the concurrent measurement of the topography, adhesive and frictional forces beside further mechanical surface properties of the sample. By means of the characterization of plasma treated biaxially oriented polypropylene foils the benefits of the new modulation technique are pointed out where common SFM techniques are not adequate. As second application high-velocity friction experiments (in the range of several centimeters per second) on silicon under controlled environmental conditions are introduced and the role of the native water film on it is discussed under friction and viscoelastic aspects.

  13. Radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity and direction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An anemometer utilizing a radionuclide counting technique for measuring both the velocity and the direction of wind is described. A pendulum consisting of a wire and a ball with a source of radiation on the lower surface of the ball is positioned by the wind. Detectors and are located in a plane perpendicular to pendulum (no wind). The detectors are located on the circumferene of a circle and are equidistant from each other as well as the undisturbed (no wind) source ball position.

  14. A technique to measure rotordynamic coefficients in hydrostatic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capaldi, Russell J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental technique is described for measuring the rotordynamic coefficients of fluid film journal bearings. The bearing tester incorporates a double-spool shaft assembly that permits independent control over the journal spin speed and the frequency of an adjustable-magnitude circular orbit. This configuration yields data that enables determination of the full linear anisotropic rotordynamic coefficient matrices. The dynamic force measurements were made simultaneously with two independent systems, one with piezoelectric load cells and the other with strain gage load cells. Some results are presented for a four-recess, oil-fed hydrostatic journal bearing.

  15. Experimental Methods Using Photogrammetric Techniques for Parachute Canopy Shape Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas W.; Downey, James M.; Lunsford, Charles B.; Desabrais, Kenneth J.; Noetscher, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in partnership with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Center has collaborated on the development of a payload instrumentation package to record the physical parameters observed during parachute air drop tests. The instrumentation package records a variety of parameters including canopy shape, suspension line loads, payload 3-axis acceleration, and payload velocity. This report discusses the instrumentation design and development process, as well as the photogrammetric measurement technique used to provide shape measurements. The scaled model tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Plum Brook Space Propulsion Facility, OH.

  16. Alignment techniques required by precise measurement of effective focal length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, T. D.

    1980-01-01

    The characteristics of false color imagery produced by instrumentation on earth resource mapping satellites are examined. The spatial fidelity of the imagery is dependent upon the geometric accuracy (GA) and the band-to-band registration (BBR) with which the telescope instrument is assembled. BBR and GA require knowledge of telescope effective focal length (EFL) to one part in 10,000 in order that the next generation of earth mappers be able to carry out their missions. The basis for this level of precision is briefly considered, and a description is given of the means by which such precise EFL measurements have been carried out. Attention is given to accuracy requirements, the technique used to measure effective focal length, possible sources of error in the EFL measurement, approaches for eliminating errors, and the results of the efforts to control measurement errors in EFL determinations.

  17. Optical coherence tomography as film thickness measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manallah, Aissa; Bouafia, Mohamed; Meguellati, Said

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a powerful optical method, noninvasive and noncontact diagnostic method. Although it is usually used for medical examinations, particularly in ocular exploration; it can also be used in optical metrology as measure technique. In this work, we use OCT to measure thicknesses of films. In OCT, depth profiles are constructed by measuring the time delay of back reflected light by interferometry measurements. Frequency in k-space is proportional to optical path difference. Then the reflectivity profile is obtained by a Fourier transformation, and the difference between two successive peaks of the resulting spectrum gives the film thickness. Several films, food-type, of different thicknesses were investigated and the results were very accurate.

  18. Vibration frequency measurement using a local multithreshold technique.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Belen; Espinosa, Julian; Roig, Ana B; Perez, J; Mas, D

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of a video camera for measuring the frequency of small-amplitude vibration movements. The method is based on image acquisition and multilevel thresholding and it only requires a video camera with high enough acquisition rate, not being necessary the use of targets or auxiliary laser beams. Our proposal is accurate and robust. We demonstrate the technique with a pocket camera recording low-resolution videos with AVI-JPEG compression and measuring different objects that vibrate in parallel or perpendicular direction to the optical sensor. Despite the low resolution and the noise, we are able to measure the main vibration modes of a tuning fork, a loudspeaker and a bridge. Results are successfully compared with design parameters and measurements with alternative devices.

  19. A growing-drop technique for measuring dynamic interfacial tension

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, C.A.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01

    A novel, growing-drop technique is described for measuring dynamic interfacial tension due to sorption of surface-active solutes. The proposed method relates the instantaneous pressure and size of expanding liquid drops to interfacial tension and is useful for measuring both liquid/gas and liquid/liquid tensions over a wide range of time scales, currently from 10 ms to several hours. Growing-drop measurements on surfactant-free water/air and water/octanol interfaces yield constant tensions equal to their known literature values. For surfactant-laden, liquid drops, the growing-drop technique captures the actual transient tension evolution of a single interface, rather than interval times as with the classic maximum-drop-pressure and drop.-volume tension measurements. Dynamic tensions measured for 0.25 mM aqueous 1-decanol solution/air and 0.02 kg/m{sup 3} aqueous Triton X-100 solution/dodecane interfaces show nonmonotonic behavior, indicating slow surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of interfacial dilatation. The dynamic tension of a purified and fresh 6 mM aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution/air interface shows only a monotonic decrease, indicating rapid surfactant transport relative to the imposed rates of dilatation. ConverselY, an aged SDS solution, naturally containing trace dodecanol impurities, exhibits dynamic tensions which reflect a superposition of the rapidly equilibrating SDS and the slowly adsorbing dodecanol.

  20. Planar laser light scattering technique for measurement of nonspherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Woo; Choi, Man Soo; Jeong, Dae Hwa; Lee, Hyo Hyung

    2004-09-01

    Small particles are one of the biggest sources that cause loss in semiconductor and flat panel display industry. Therefore, it is important to control them during their manufacturing process. To achieve this goal, exact measurement of particles is first required. Laser light scattering is the most widely used technique for diagnosis of particles because it does not disturb flow field and enables real time and spatially resolved analysis. Measurement of nonspherical aggregates comprised of small primary particles is difficult compared with spherical particles because they have very complex morphology. In addition, most researches on aggregates using light scattering are limited to point measurement, which requires much time to inspect large area and is difficult to observe unsteady phenomenon. Motivated by this, we have developed a laser light scattering method for simultaneous measurement of spatial distributions of aggregate size and morphology. Silica aggregates that were generated in Methane/air premixed flame were used as test particles. Multiangular planar light scattering measurement was carried out using a sheet beam of Ar ion laser and an intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera as a light source and a detector, respectively. The result was interpreted based on the Rayleigh-Debye-Gans scattering theory for fractal aggregates to obtain the mean radius of gyration and fractal dimension that are the parameters characterizing aggregate size and morphology. The suitability of our new technique was confirmed by experiment using conventional light scattering.

  1. Sensor Web Dynamic Measurement Techniques and Adaptive Observing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talabac, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    Sensor Web observing systems may have the potential to significantly improve our ability to monitor, understand, and predict the evolution of rapidly evolving, transient, or variable environmental features and events. This improvement will come about by integrating novel data collection techniques, new or improved instruments, emerging communications technologies and protocols, sensor mark-up languages, and interoperable planning and scheduling systems. In contrast to today's observing systems, "event-driven" sensor webs will synthesize real- or near-real time measurements and information from other platforms and then react by reconfiguring the platforms and instruments to invoke new measurement modes and adaptive observation strategies. Similarly, "model-driven" sensor webs will utilize environmental prediction models to initiate targeted sensor measurements or to use a new observing strategy. The sensor web concept contrasts with today's data collection techniques and observing system operations concepts where independent measurements are made by remote sensing and in situ platforms that do not share, and therefore cannot act upon, potentially useful complementary sensor measurement data and platform state information. This presentation describes NASA's view of event-driven and model-driven Sensor Webs and highlights several research and development activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center.

  2. Edge technique Doppler lidar wind measurements with high vertical resolution.

    PubMed

    Korb, C L; Gentry, B M; Li, S X

    1997-08-20

    We have developed a Doppler lidar system using the edge technique and have made atmospheric lidar wind measurements. Line-of-sight wind profiles with a vertical resolution of 22 m have a standard deviation of 0.40 m /s for a ten-shot average. Day and night lidar measurements of the vector wind have been made for altitudes from 200 to 2000 m. We validated the lidar measurements by comparing them with independent rawinsonde and pilot balloon measurements of wind speed and direction. Good agreement was obtained. The instrumental noise for these data is 0.11 m /s for a 500-shot average, which is in good agreement with the observed minimum value of the standard deviation for the atmospheric measurements. The average standard deviation over 30 mins varied from 1.16 to 0.25 m /s for day and night, respectively. High spatial and temporal resolution lidar profiles of line-of-sight winds clearly show wind shear and turbulent features at the 1 -2-m /s level with a high signal-to-noise ratio and demonstrate the potential of the edge-technique lidar for studying turbulent processes and atmospheric dynamics.

  3. Non-intrusive measurement techniques for hydroelectric applicants

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, R.; Lemon, D.

    1995-12-31

    Non-intrusive acoustic methods for measuring flows, originally developed for oceanographic applications, are being used in and around hydroelectric dams. The acoustic methods can be categorized as either back-scattering or forward-scattering. The first, using the back-scattered signal, measures the Doppler shift of the returning echo to determine the along-beam component of flow. These instruments are generally called Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP). Three beam solutions allow computation of the velocity components. Time gating the return provides a velocity profile with bin segments as small as 0.25 in. In areas of strong magnetic deviation, often the case beside large dams, a gyrocompass can be used to provide directional orientation. The velocity data can also be used to quickly compute river or channel discharge. Typical applications and several case studies are presented. The second acoustic technique is based on a forward-scattering phenomenon known as scintillation. This technique has been used on the Fraser River to monitor flows, and properties of the signal have recently been correlated with the biomass of upstream-migrating salmon. Acoustic scintillation flow measurements are well suited to applications with limited space in the along-flow direction. Applications to hydroelectric dams include turbine intake flow measurements, and a system has been developed to measure flow along fish diversion screens.

  4. Measurement technique for bottom scattering in shallow water

    PubMed

    Holland; Hollett; Troiano

    2000-09-01

    Sonar performance predictions of reverberation in shallow water rely upon good estimates of the bottom-scattering strength. However, little is understood about bottom scattering in shallow water in the frequency range 400-4000 Hz, particularly its dependency upon frequency and its relationship to the physical properties of the seafloor. In order to address these issues, a new measurement technique has been developed to probe the frequency and angular dependency of bottom-scattering strength. The experimental technique is described which employs either coherent or incoherent sources (lightbulbs). In addition, measurement and modeling results for two diverse shallow water sites are presented. At one site, the scattering appears to arise at or near the water-sediment interface. At the other site, scattering from a 23-m sub-bottom horizon is clearly apparent in the data at and below 1800 Hz. The fact that our measurement technique can directly reveal the presence of sub-bottom scattering is a significant advance in the development of methods to explore the physical mechanisms that control bottom scattering.

  5. Investigation of a non-contact strain measurement technique

    SciTech Connect

    Talarico, L.J.; Damiano, B.

    1997-03-01

    The goal of this project was to investigate the feasibility of a new non-contact technique for directly and continuously monitoring peak strain in rotating components. The technique utilizes the unique strain-sensitive magnetic material properties of TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel alloys to measure strain. These alloys are weakly magnetic when unstrained but become strongly ferromagnetic after mechanical deformation. A computer study was performed to determine whether the strain-induced change in the magnetic material properties of a TRIP steel gage bonded to a rotating component would cause significant perturbations in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The effects of strain level, distance between the rotating component and the stationary electromagnet, and motion-induced eddy currents on flux perturbation magnitude were investigated. The calculated results indicate that a TRIP steel strain sensing element can cause a significant perturbation in the magnetic flux of a stationary electromagnet. The magnetic flux perturbation magnitude was found to be inversely proportional to the distance between the magnet face and the TRIP steel element and directly proportional to the TRIP steel strain level. The effect of motion-induced eddy currents on the magnetic flux was found to be negligible. It appears that the technique can be successfully applied to measure peak strain in rotating components, however, the sensitivity of the magnetic flux perturbation magnitude to the distance between the strain sensing element and the electromagnet may require making an independent proximity measurement.

  6. Impact of sampling techniques on measured stormwater quality data for small streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harmel, R.D.; Slade, R.M.; Haney, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    Science-based sampling methodologies are needed to enhance water quality characterization for setting appropriate water quality standards, developing Total Maximum Daily Loads, and managing nonpoint source pollution. Storm event sampling, which is vital for adequate assessment of water quality in small (wadeable) streams, is typically conducted by manual grab or integrated sampling or with an automated sampler. Although it is typically assumed that samples from a single point adequately represent mean cross-sectional concentrations, especially for dissolved constituents, this assumption of well-mixed conditions has received limited evaluation. Similarly, the impact of temporal (within-storm) concentration variability is rarely considered. Therefore, this study evaluated differences in stormwater quality measured in small streams with several common sampling techniques, which in essence evaluated within-channel and within-storm concentration variability. Constituent concentrations from manual grab samples and from integrated samples were compared for 31 events, then concentrations were also compared for seven events with automated sample collection. Comparison of sampling techniques indicated varying degrees of concentration variability within channel cross sections for both dissolved and particulate constituents, which is contrary to common assumptions of substantial variability in particulate concentrations and of minimal variability in dissolved concentrations. Results also indicated the potential for substantial within-storm (temporal) concentration variability for both dissolved and particulate constituents. Thus, failing to account for potential cross-sectional and temporal concentration variability in stormwater monitoring projects can introduce additional uncertainty in measured water quality data. Copyright ?? 2010 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekdash, O.; Norcross, J.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, and dizziness. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device, would not impede suit ventilation delivery, and is placed directly in the breathing path of the user.

  8. Non-invasive techniques for the measurement of bone mineral.

    PubMed

    Seeman, E; Martin, T J

    1989-05-01

    Non-invasive, safe and precise techniques for measuring bone mineral density are available and have an important role in the detection, prevention and treatment of bone loss associated with aging, menopause and many illnesses affecting women and men. The three most widely accessible and established techniques for measuring regional bone mineral density are single and dual photon absorptiometry and quantitative computed tomography. A technique of greater accuracy, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, has only recently become available. These techniques have made it possible to measure the magnitude, time course and regional specificity of the skeleton's response to ageing, menopause and illness. A better understanding of the clinical epidemiology of fractures and the mechanisms responsible for bone loss has been obtained. Practical information has been obtained about the dose, duration and efficacy of oestrogen replacement therapy in preventing perimenopausal bone loss and the benefits and limitations of different forms of exercise on bone mineral density in healthy postmenopausal women. The beneficial effect of dietary calcium on peak bone mineral density and in decreasing bone loss in cortical bone has been documented. Information regarding the prevention and treatment of bone loss in exogenous hypercortisolism and the magnitude and reversibility of bone loss associated with many diseases which affect bone has been obtained. One of the most important clinical applications of these techniques is the assessment of the efficacy of treatment of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. As antifracture efficacy is not readily measurable, considerable information is being obtained about many potentially useful forms of therapy that may prevent bone loss and increase bone mineral density. The role of these non-invasive methods in the assessment of fracture risk and the need for oestrogen or other therapy in an individual who has attained a low peak bone mass or has risk

  9. A novel assessment technique for measuring ankle orientation and stiffness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingming; Davies, T Claire; Nandakumar, Anoop; Quan Xie, Sheng

    2015-09-18

    The measurement of ankle orientation and stiffness can provide insight into improvements and allows for effective monitoring during a rehabilitation program. Existing assessment techniques have a variety of limitations. Dynamometer based methods rely on manual manipulation. The use of torque meter is usually for single degree-of-freedom (DOF) devices. This study proposes a novel ankle assessment technique that can be used for multiple DOFs devices working in both manual and automatic modes using the position sensor and the multi-axis load cell. As a preliminary evaluation, an assessment device for ankle dorsiflexion and plantarflexion was constructed. Nine subjects participated to evaluate the effectiveness of the assessment device in determining ankle orientation and stiffness. The measured ankle orientation was consistent with that from the NDI Polaris optical tracking system. The measured ankle torque and stiffness compared well with published data. The test-retest reliability was high with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC2, 1) values greater than 0.846 and standard error of measurement (SEM) less than 1.38. PMID:26159061

  10. Double-Edge Molecular Technique for Doppler Lidar Wind Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flesia, Cristina; Korb, C. Laurence

    1998-01-01

    The double-edge lidar technique for measuring the wind using molecular backscatter is described. Two high spectral resolution edge filters are located in the wings of the Rayleigh-Brillouin profile. This doubles the signal change per unit Doppler shift, the sensitivity, and gives nearly a factor of two improvement in measurement accuracy. The use of a crossover region is described where the sensitivity of a molecular and aerosol-based measurement are equal. This desensitizes the molecular measurement to the effects of aerosol scattering over a frequency range of +/- 100 m/s. We give methods for correcting for short-term frequency jitter and drift using a laser reference frequency measurement and methods for long-term frequency correction using a servo control system. The effects of Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering on the measurement are shown to be significant and are included in the analysis. Simulations for a conical scanning satellite-based lidar at 355 nm show an accuracy of 2-3 m/s for altitudes of 2 to 15 km for a 1 km vertical resolution, a satellite altitude of 400 km and a 200 km x 200 km spatial resolution. Results of ground based wind measurements are presented.

  11. Quantitative Proton Magnetic Resonance Techniques for Measuring Fat

    PubMed Central

    Harry, Houchun; Kan, Hermien E.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate, precise, and reliable techniques for quantifying body and organ fat distributions are important tools in physiology research. They are critically needed in studies of obesity and diseases involving excess fat accumulation. Proton magnetic resonance methods address this need by providing an array of relaxometry-based (T1, T2) and chemical-shift-based approaches. These techniques can generate informative visualizations of regional and whole-body fat distributions, yield measurements of fat volumes within specific body depots, and quantify fat accumulation in abdominal organs and muscles. MR methods are commonly used to investigate the role of fat in nutrition and metabolism, to measure the efficacy of short and long-term dietary and exercise interventions, to study the implications of fat in organ steatosis and muscular dystrophies, and to elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms in the context of obesity and its comorbidities. The purpose of this review is to provide a summary of mainstream MR strategies for fat quantification. The article will succinctly describe the principles that differentiate water and fat proton signals, summarize advantages and limitations of various techniques, and offer a few illustrative examples. The article will also highlight recent efforts in MR of brown adipose tissue and conclude by briefly discussing some future research directions. PMID:24123229

  12. Flow mediated endothelium function: advantages of an automatic measuring technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maio, Yamila; Casciaro, Mariano E.; José Urcola y, Maria; Craiem, Damian

    2007-11-01

    The objective of this work is to show the advantages of a non invasive automated method for measuring flow mediated dilation (FMD) in the forearm. This dilation takes place in answer to a shear tension generated by the increase of blood flow, sensed by the endothelium, after the liberation of an occlusion sustained in the time. The method consists of three stages: the continuous acquisition of images of the brachial artery using ultrasound techniques, the pulse to pulse measurement of the vessel's diameter by means of a border detection algorithm, and the later analysis of the results. By means of this technique one cannot only obtain the maximum dilation percentage (FMD%), but a continuous diameter curve that allows to evaluate other relevant aspects such as dilation speed, dilation sustain in time and general maneuver performance. The simplicity of this method, robustness of the technique and accessibility of the required elements makes it a viable alternative of great clinical value for diagnosis in the early detection of numerous cardiovascular pathologies.

  13. Novel atmospheric extinction measurement techniques for aerospace laser system applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Novel techniques for laser beam atmospheric extinction measurements, suitable for manned and unmanned aerospace vehicle applications, are presented in this paper. Extinction measurements are essential to support the engineering development and the operational employment of a variety of aerospace electro-optical sensor systems, allowing calculation of the range performance attainable with such systems in current and likely future applications. Such applications include ranging, weaponry, Earth remote sensing and possible planetary exploration missions performed by satellites and unmanned flight vehicles. Unlike traditional LIDAR methods, the proposed techniques are based on measurements of the laser energy (intensity and spatial distribution) incident on target surfaces of known geometric and reflective characteristics, by means of infrared detectors and/or infrared cameras calibrated for radiance. Various laser sources can be employed with wavelengths from the visible to the far infrared portions of the spectrum, allowing for data correlation and extended sensitivity. Errors affecting measurements performed using the proposed methods are discussed in the paper and algorithms are proposed that allow a direct determination of the atmospheric transmittance and spatial characteristics of the laser spot. These algorithms take into account a variety of linear and non-linear propagation effects. Finally, results are presented relative to some experimental activities performed to validate the proposed techniques. Particularly, data are presented relative to both ground and flight trials performed with laser systems operating in the near infrared (NIR) at λ = 1064 nm and λ = 1550 nm. This includes ground tests performed with 10 Hz and 20 kHz PRF NIR laser systems in a large variety of atmospheric conditions, and flight trials performed with a 10 Hz airborne NIR laser system installed on a TORNADO aircraft, flying up to altitudes of 22,000 ft.

  14. Impact during equine locomotion: techniques for measurement and analysis.

    PubMed

    Burn, J F; Wilson, A; Nason, G P

    1997-05-01

    Impact is implicated in the development of several types of musculoskeletal injury in the horse. Characterisation of impact experienced during strenuous exercise is an important first step towards understanding the mechanism for injury. Measurement and analysis of large, short duration impacts is difficult. The measurement system must be able to record transient peaks and high frequencies accurately. The analysis technique must be able to characterise the impact signal in time and frequency. This paper presents a measurement system and analysis technique for the characterisation of large impacts. A piezo-electric accelerometer was securely mounted on the dorsal surface of the horses hoof. Saddle mounted charge amplifiers and a 20 m coaxial cable transferred these data to a PC based logging system. Data were down-loaded onto a UNIX workstation and analysed using a proprietary statistics package. The values of parameters calculated from the time series data were comparable to those of other authors. A wavelet decomposition showed that the frequency profile of the signal changed with time. While most spectral energy was seen at impact, a significant amount of energy was contained in the signal immediately following impact. Over 99% of this energy was contained in frequencies less than 1250 Hz. The sampling rate and the frequency response of a measurement system for recording impact should be chosen carefully to prevent loss or corruption of data. Time scale analysis using a wavelet decomposition is a powerful technique which can be used to characterise impact data. The use of contour plots provides a highly visual representation of the time and frequency localisation of power during impact.

  15. Can imaging techniques measure neuroprotection and remyelination in multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2007-05-29

    MRI is the most important paraclinical measure for assessing and monitoring the pathologic changes implicated in the onset and progression of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional MRI sequences, such as T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced and spin-echo T2-weighted imaging, are unable to provide full details about the degree of inflammation and underlying neurodegenerative changes. Newer nonconventional MRI techniques have the potential to detect clinical impairment, disease progression, accumulation of disability, and the neuroprotective effects of treatment. Unenhanced T1-weighted imaging can reveal hypointense black holes, a measure of chronic neurodegeneration. Two- and three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences allow better identification of cortical lesions. Ultrahigh-field strength MRI has the potential to detect subpial cortical and deep gray matter lesions. Magnetization transfer imaging is increasingly used to characterize the evolution of MS lesions and normal-appearing brain tissue. Evidence suggests that the dynamics of magnetization transfer changes correlate with the extent of demyelination and remyelination. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which provides details on tissue biochemistry, metabolism, and function, also has the capacity to reveal neuroprotective mechanisms. By measuring the motion of water, diffusion imaging can provide information about the orientation, size, and geometry of tissue damage in white and gray matter. Functional MRI may help clarify the brain's plasticity-dependent compensatory mechanisms in patients with MS. High-resolution microautoradiography and new contrast agents are proving to be sensitive means for characterizing molecular markers of disease activity, such as activated microglia and macrophages. Optical coherence tomography, a new research technique, makes it possible to investigate relevant physiologic systems that provide accurate measures of tissue changes secondary to the MS disease process

  16. An Ultrasonic Circulation Measurement Technique for Spatial Lift Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiankun; Olinger, David J.

    1998-11-01

    An experimental investigation of the mean spanwise lift distribution for flow over inclined flat plates with sinusoidal trailing edges has been conducted. The stationary plates were vertically aligned in a low-speed wind tunnel with Reynolds number based on chord length of about 30,000. Three distinct flow patterns; streamlined flow, stalled flow and bluff body flow, were studied by varying plate angle of attack between 6 and 45 degrees. A novel ultrasonic technique based on determining the fluid circulation around a path enclosing the flat plate was utilized to measure the lift distribution. In order to correlate the measured lift distribution with wake structures, smoke-wire flow visualization was also performed. The lift distributions for the sinusoidal trailing edge case varied significantly from the nominal 2-D distributions based on local chord length. Preliminary extensions of the ultrasonic method to measure instantaneous lift distributions during an entire shedding cycle on vibrating plates and flexible cables are also discussed.

  17. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  18. Density measurements in water using background oriented schlieren technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Shi; Wang, Chuanxi; Eliasson, Veronica

    2012-11-01

    Undersea earthquakes, tsunamis and underwater explosions are examples of phenomena that cause compressible wave propagation in oceans leading to changes in density and pressure. Here, a direct impact method is used to generate a shock wave in a water-filled channel and the following changes in the density of the fluid is quantified using an extended background oriented schlieren technique. Background oriented schlieren technique relies on measuring variations in index of refraction in the fluid. A high-speed camera is used to capture multiple frames of the shock wave propagation. A code has been developed to quantify the change in index of refection, and map it to the change in density. Results of density changes due to shock wave propagation in converging water-filled channels will be presented. Supported by Office of Naval Research through a MURI Grant Number N00014-06-1-0730 (Dr. Y.D.S. Rajapakse, Program Manager).

  19. A novel technique for highly accurate gas exchange measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkenings, R. K.; Jähne, B. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Heidelberg Aeolotron is a circular wind-wave facility for investigating air-sea gas exchange. In this contribution a novel technique for measuring highly accurate transfer velocities k of mass transfer will be presented. Traditionally, in mass balance techniques the constant of decay for gas concentrations over time is measured. The major drawback of this concept is the long time constant. At low wind speeds and a water height greater than 1 m the period of observation has to be several days. In a gas-tight facility such as the Aeolotron, the transfer velocity k can be computed from the concentration in the water body and the change of concentration in the gas space. Owing to this fact, transfer velocities are gained while greatly reducing the measuring times to less than one hour. The transfer velocity k of a tracer can be parameterized as k=1/β \\cdot u_* \\cdot Sc^n, with the Schmidt Number Sc, shear velocity u_* and the dimensionless transfer resistance β. The Schmidt Number exponent n can be derived from simultaneous measurements of different tracers. Since these tracers are of different Schmidt number, the shear velocity is not needed. To allow for Schmidt numbers spanning a hole decade, in our experiments He, H_2, N_2O and F12 are used. The relative accuracy of measuring the transfer velocity was improved to less than 2%. In 9 consecutive experiments conducted at a wind speed of 6.2 m/s, the deviation of the Schmidt number exponent was found to be just under 0.02. This high accuracy will allow precisely determining the transition of the Schmidt number exponent from n=2/3 to n=0.5 from a flat to wavy water surface. In order to quantify gas exchange not only the wind speed is important. Surfactants have a pronounced effect on the wave field and lead to a drastic reduction in the transfer velocity. In the Aeolotron measurements were conducted with a variety of measuring devices, ranging from an imaging slope gauge (ISG) to thermal techniques with IR

  20. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon

    2014-02-18

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  1. Powerful New Technique to Measure Asteroids' Sizes and Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    A team of French and Italian astronomers have devised a new method for measuring the size and shape of asteroids that are too small or too far away for traditional techniques, increasing the number of asteroids that can be measured by a factor of several hundred. This method takes advantage of the unique capabilities of ESO's Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). ESO PR Photo 04a/09 Asteroid Barbara (artist's impression) "Knowledge of the sizes and shapes of asteroids is crucial to understanding how, in the early days of our Solar System, dust and pebbles collected together to form larger bodies and how collisions and re-accumulation have since modified them," says Marco Delbo from the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France, who led the study. Direct imaging with adaptive optics on the largest ground-based telescopes such as the Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile (see ESO 21/05 and 18/07), and space telescopes, or radar measurements (ESO 11/07) are the currently favoured methods of asteroid measurement. However, direct imaging, even with adaptive optics, is generally limited to the one hundred largest asteroids of the main belt, while radar measurements are mostly constrained to observations of near-Earth asteroids that experience close encounters with our planet. Delbo and his colleagues have devised a new method that uses interferometry to resolve asteroids as small as about 15 km in diameter located in the main asteroid belt, 200 million kilometres away. This is equivalent to being able to measure the size of a tennis ball a distance of a thousand kilometres. This technique will not only increase the number of objects that can be measured dramatically, but, more importantly, bring small asteroids that are physically very different from the well studied larger ones into reach. The interferometric technique combines the light from two or more telescopes. Astronomers proved their method using ESO's VLTI, combining the light of two of the VLT's 8.2-metre

  2. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown. PMID:24113712

  3. Equipment and Experimental Technique For Temperature Measurements In Deep Boreholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristoforov, A.

    The technique of temperature measurements is highly informative since any dynami- cal processes in the boreholes and in the vicinities are accompanied by thermal effects. Electronics and equipment for remote measurements in the boreholes are briefly dis- cussed in the report. It includes a deep instrument, cable winch and surface recording unit placed onboard a car. The temperature dependent frequency modulated signal is used in deep instrument. A cable of original construction was developed for chute-lift operations. It has a signal and power channel at the same time and play the depth me- ter. The surface recording unit includes power supply for deep instruments, receiver, frequency meter and indicator. A personal computer is used for the measurement nu- merical control. Energy for the electronics is supplied by a car battery. Self sufficiency and high accuracy are specialities of the equipment. Using the technique and equip- ment we made the experimental study of temperature in the boreholes of the East European platform, Middle Asia, West Siberia, Kamchatka and other regions. Most of our temperatures and temperature gradients have been used for mapping.

  4. Bioluminescence-based imaging technique for pressure measurement in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Tanaka, Yasufumi

    2011-07-01

    The dinoflagellate Pyrocystis lunula emits light in response to water motion. We developed a new imaging technique for measuring pressure using plankton that emits light in response to mechanical stimulation. The bioluminescence emitted by P. lunula was used to measure impact water pressure produced using weight-drop tests. The maximum mean luminescence intensity correlated with the maximum impact pressure that the cells receive when the circadian and diurnal biological rhythms are appropriately controlled. Thus, with appropriate calibration of experimentally determined parameters, the dynamic impact pressure can be estimated by measuring the cell-flash distribution. Statistical features of the evolution of flash intensity and the probability distribution during the impacting event, which are described by both biological and mechanical response parameters, are also discussed in this paper. The practical applicability of this bioluminescence imaging technique is examined through a water drop test. The maximum dynamic pressure, occurring at the impact of a water jet against a wall, was estimated from the flash intensity of the dinoflagellate.

  5. Review on measurement techniques of transport properties of nanowires.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Miguel Muñoz; Calero, Olga Caballero; Lopeandia, A F; Rodriguez-Viejo, J; Martín-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2013-12-01

    Physical properties at the nanoscale are novel and different from those in bulk materials. Over the last few decades, there has been an ever growing interest in the fabrication of nanowire structures for a wide variety of applications including energy generation purposes. Nevertheless, the study of their transport properties, such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity or Seebeck coefficient, remains an experimental challenge. For instance, in the particular case of nanostructured thermoelectrics, theoretical calculations have shown that nanowires offer a promising way of enhancing the hitherto low efficiency of these materials in the conversion of temperature differences into electricity. Therefore, within the thermoelectrical community there has been a great experimental effort in the measurement of these quantities in actual nanowires. The measurements of these properties at the nanoscale are also of interest in fields other than energy, such as electrical components for microchips, field effect transistors, sensors, and other low scale devices. For all these applications, knowing the transport properties is mandatory. This review deals with the latest techniques developed to perform the measurement of these transport properties in nanowires. A thorough overview of the most important and modern techniques used for the characterization of different kinds of nanowires will be shown.

  6. Response Surface Methods For Spatially-Resolved Optical Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, P. M.; Dorrington, A. A.; Cutler, A. D.; DeLoach, R.

    2003-01-01

    Response surface methods (or methodology), RSM, have been applied to improve data quality for two vastly different spatially-resolved optical measurement techniques. In the first application, modern design of experiments (MDOE) methods, including RSM, are employed to map the temperature field in a direct-connect supersonic combustion test facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The laser-based measurement technique known as coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is used to measure temperature at various locations in the combustor. RSM is then used to develop temperature maps of the flow. Even though the temperature fluctuations at a single point in the flowfield have a standard deviation on the order of 300 K, RSM provides analytic fits to the data having 95% confidence interval half width uncertainties in the fit as low as +/- 30 K. Methods of optimizing future CARS experiments are explored. The second application of RSM is to quantify the shape of a 5-meter diameter, ultra-lightweight, inflatable space antenna at NASA Langley Research Center. Photogrammetry is used to simultaneously measure the shape of the antenna at approximately 500 discrete spatial locations. RSM allows an analytic model to be developed that describes the shape of the majority of the antenna with an uncertainty of 0.4 mm, with 95% confidence. This model would allow a quantitative comparison between the actual shape of the antenna and the original design shape. Accurately determining this shape also allows confident interpolation between the measured points. Such a model could, for example, be used for ray tracing of radio-frequency waves up to 95 GHz. to predict the performance of the antenna.

  7. High resolution redox potential measurements: techniques, interpretation and value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorenhout, Michel; van der Geest, Harm G.

    2013-04-01

    The ongoing improvement of techniques for the in situ measurement of redox potentials has led to a large number of studies on redox variability in various environments. These studies originate from a wide array of scientific disciplines, amongst which ecology (sediment biogeochemistry), environmental chemistry (degradation studies) and archaeology (in situ preservation). To gain insight in the potential applications, this paper presents three examples of studies in which a newly developed measurement technique was used in soils and where spatial and temporal variation plays an important role. The first one is a microcosm study on the effects of biota on the dynamics of redox conditions in the toplayer of aquatic sediments, showing that the presence of microbiota has a direct influence on biogeochemical parameters. The second is the study of the redox potential in the world heritage site of Bryggen (Bergen, NO) that is under threat of oxidation. The oxidation, caused by a lowered groundwater table, causes soil degradation and unstable conditions for the monumental buildings of the Medieval site. The third study shows variability in a sandy flood plain in Bangladesh, where redox processes dictate the environmental behaviour of Arsenic. This toxic metal is present in many wells used for drinking water, but shows very local variation in dissolution dynamics. In these three studies, continuous measurements of (changes in) redox conditions revealed a strong variability in these systems and consequences for the interpretation of single point measurements or low frequency sampling campaigns are discussed. In these and many other cases, the continuous measurement of the redox potential in soil media will aid in the understanding of the system under study.

  8. A Comparison of Stellar Elemental Abundance Techniques and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, Natalie R.; Young, Patrick A.; Pagano, Michael D.; Desch, Steven J.; Anbar, Ariel D.; Adibekyan, Vardan; Blanco-Cuaresma, Sergi; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Delgado Mena, Elisa; Liu, Fan; Nordlander, Thomas; Sousa, Sergio G.; Korn, Andreas; Gruyters, Pieter; Heiter, Ulrike; Jofré, Paula; Santos, Nuno C.; Soubiran, Caroline

    2016-09-01

    Stellar elemental abundances are important for understanding the fundamental properties of a star or stellar group, such as age and evolutionary history, as well as the composition of an orbiting planet. However, as abundance measurement techniques have progressed, there has been little standardization between individual methods and their comparisons. As a result, different stellar abundance procedures determine measurements that vary beyond the quoted error for the same elements within the same stars. The purpose of this paper is to better understand the systematic variations between methods and offer recommendations for producing more accurate results in the future. We invited a number of participants from around the world (Australia, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States) to calculate 10 element abundances (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Fe, Ni, Ba, and Eu) using the same stellar spectra for four stars (HD 361, HD 10700, HD 121504, and HD 202206). Each group produced measurements for each star using (1) their own autonomous techniques, (2) standardized stellar parameters, (3) a standardized line list, and (4) both standardized parameters and a line list. We present the resulting stellar parameters, absolute abundances, and a metric of data similarity that quantifies the homogeneity of the data. We conclude that standardization of some kind, particularly stellar parameters, improves the consistency between methods. However, because results did not converge as more free parameters were standardized, it is clear there are inherent issues within the techniques that need to be reconciled. Therefore, we encourage more conversation and transparency within the community such that stellar abundance determinations can be reproducible as well as accurate and precise.

  9. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  10. Refined flicker photometry technique to measure ocular lens density.

    PubMed

    Teikari, Petteri; Najjar, Raymond P; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Dumortier, Dominique; Cornut, Pierre-Loïc; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M; Gronfier, Claude

    2012-11-01

    Many physiological and pathological conditions are associated with a change in the crystalline lens transmittance. Estimates of lens opacification, however, generally rely on subjective rather than objective measures in clinical practice. The goal of our study was to develop an improved psychophysical heterochromatic flicker photometry technique combined with existing mathematical models to evaluate the spectral transmittance of the human ocular media noninvasively. Our results show that it is possible to accurately estimate ocular media density in vivo in humans. Potential applications of our approach include basic research and clinical settings on visual and nonimage-forming visual systems.

  11. The development of a parachute strain measurement technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Render, A. B.; Bradley, P. D.

    This paper reports come aspects of work carried out to develop a strain measurement technique suitable for use on parachutes. Details of a strain gauge employing piezoelectric plastic film are given. Laboratory tests to determine the biaxial stress/strain characteristics of the trials parachute material are presented, which are used in conjunction with an elementary mathematical model, to construct a carpet graph depicting the stress/strain relationship of the material. The performance and reliability of the strain gauges were tested in a series of wind tunnel deployments at airspeeds up to 49 m/s. Selected results are discussed.

  12. Development of Nondestructive Measuring Technique of Environmental Radioactive Strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiba, Shuntaro; Okamiya, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Saki; Tanuma, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Tatsuru; Murata, Jiro

    The Fukushima first nuclear power plant accident was triggered by the Japanese big earthquake in 2011. The main radioactivity concerned after the accident are I-131 (half-life 8.0 days), Cs-134 (2.1 years) and 137 (30 years), Sr-89 (51 days) and 90 (29 years). We are aiming to establish a new detection technique which enables us to realize quantitative evaluation of the strontium radioactivity by means of nondestructive measurement without chemical separation processing, which is concerned to be included inside foods, environmental water and soil around us, in order to prevent us from undesired internal exposure to the radiation.

  13. A technique for measuring convective heat transfer at rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuolan; Ireland, P. T.; Jones, T. V.

    1990-06-01

    A new method has been developed for measuring local heat transfer coefficients at rough surfaces. The technique was applied to an idealized section of a large scaled model of a turbine blade cooling passage to assess the effect of surface irregularities which result from the blade manufacturing process. The experimental method is described in full and the results are presented for tests on an isolated pin-fin situated in fully developed channel flow. The effect of the thermal conductivity of the roughness elements is discussed.

  14. Measurement and calibration techniques used in computer partial pressure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, D.J.

    1985-05-01

    The uses of residual gas analyzers (RGA's) in computer controlled analytical studies and process monitoring applications are discussed in this paper. The relative merits are compared for the two most commonly used RGA's, which are the magnetic sector and the quadrupole mass analyzer. Methods of installing RGA's in vacuum systems and computer interfacing techniques are described. Measurement and calibration methods are outlined for applications where it is desirable to characterize either partial pressures or gas evolution rates. Interpretation of RGA spectra and limitations imposed by analytical errors are also discussed.

  15. Electrical conductivity measurements on silicate melts using the loop technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waff, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    A new method is described for measurement of the electrical conductivity of silicate melts under controlled oxygen partial pressure at temperatures to 1550 C. The melt samples are suspended as droplets on platinum-rhodium loops, minimizing iron loss from the melt due to alloying with platinum, and providing maximum surface exposure of the melt to the oxygen-buffering gas atmosphere. The latter provides extremely rapid equilibration of the melt with the imposed oxygen partial pressure. The loop technique involves a minimum of setup time and cost, provides reproducible results to within + or - 5% and is well suited to electrical conductivity studies on silicate melts containing redox cations.

  16. Measurement of interfacial tension by use of pendant drop video techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Herd, M.D.; Thomas, C.P.; Bala, G.A.; Lassahn, G.D.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes an instrument to measure the interfacial tension (IFT) of aqueous surfactant solutions and crude oil. The method involves injection of a drop of fluid (such as crude oil) into a second immiscible phase to determine the IFT between the two phases. The instrument is composed of an AT-class computer, optical cell, illumination, video camera and lens, video frame digitizer board, monitor, and software. The camera displays an image of the pendant drop on the monitor, which is then processed by the frame digitizer board and non-proprietary software to determine the IFT. Several binary and ternary phase systems were taken from the literature and used to measure the precision and accuracy of the instrument in determining IFTs. A copy of the software program is included in the report. A copy of the program on diskette can be obtained from the Energy Science and Technology Software Center, P.O. Box 1020, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-1020. The accuracy and precision of the technique and apparatus presented is very good for measurement of IFTs in the range from 72 to 10{sup {minus}2} mN/m, which is adequate for many EOR applications. With modifications to the equipment and the numerical techniques, measurements of ultralow IFTs (<10{sup {minus}3} mN/m) should be possible as well as measurements at reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The instrument has been used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to support the research program on microbial enhanced oil recovery. Measurements of IFTs for several bacterial supernatants and unfractionated acid precipitates of microbial cultures containing biosurfactants against medium to heavy crude oils are reported. These experiments demonstrate that the use of automated video imaging of pendant drops is a simple and fast method to reliably determine interfacial tension between two immiscible liquid phases, or between a gas and a liquid phase.

  17. Swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement of microstrip lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. Q.

    1986-01-01

    Microstrip lines used in microwave integrated circuits are dispersive. Because a microstrip line is an open structure, the dispersion can not be derived with pure TEM, TE, or TM mode analysis. Dispersion analysis has commonly been done using a spectral domain approach, and dispersion measurement has been made with high Q microstrip ring resonators. Since the dispersion of a microstrip line is fully characterized by the frequency dependent phase velocity of the line, dispersion measurement of microstrip lines requires the measurement of the line wavelength as a function of frequency. In this paper, a swept frequency technique for dispersion measurement is described. The measurement was made using an automatic network analyzer with the microstrip line terminated in a short circuit. Experimental data for two microstrip lines on 10 and 30 mil Cuflon substrates were recorded over a frequency range of 2 to 20 GHz. Agreement with theoretical results computed by the spectral domain approach is good. Possible sources of error for the discrepancy are discussed.

  18. Equation of State Measurement Technique for Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, T.; Benage, J.; Evans, S.; Kyrala, G.; Montoya, R.; Roberts, J.; Taylor, T.; Workman, J.

    2000-09-01

    Low-temperature ( ~ 1eV), high-density(n_e ~10^21 cm-3) plasmas are called strongly coupled (SCP) when the coulomb interaction energy is comparable to the thermal kinetic energy. We intend to measure the SCP equation of state (EOS) by modifying the standard EOS shock technique. A square column of aluminum SCP ( ~0.1 g/ cm^3, ~1 eV) is shocked by a 2-3 J, 0.8 ns frequency-doubled Nd:Yag laser pulse, producing a ~1 g/cm^3, ~20 eV SCP. The densities of the pre-shocked and shocked regions are measured by Ti K-shell (4.75 keV) x-ray absorption. Mg K-shell x-ray (1.35 keV) absorption, imaged through a high-resolution 1-D microscope onto a streak camera, provides shock speed measurements. Filtered PMTs provide the temperature and an initial internal energy estimate. Using these measurements in the Rankine-Hugoniot conservation equations we determine the pressure, final internal energy and, thus, the SCP EOS. We present the preliminary measurements of the aluminum conditions with emphasis on determining the EOS. * Work performed under the auspices of DOE

  19. Tritium measurement technique using in-bed'' calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium heels'' from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and in-bed'' tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

  20. Tritium measurement technique using ``in-bed`` calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Mallory, M.K.; Nobile, A. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    One of the new technologies that has been introduced to the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the production scale use of metal hydride technology to store, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. For tritium stored in metal hydride storage beds, a unique relationship does not exist between the amount of tritium in the bed and the pressure-volume-temperature properties of the hydride material. Determining the amount of tritium in a hydride bed after desorbing the contents of the bed to a tank and performing pressure, volume, temperature, and composition (PVTC) measurements is not practical due to long desorption/absorption times and the inability to remove tritium ``heels`` from the metal hydride materials under normal processing conditions. To eliminate the need to remove tritium from hydride storage beds for measurement purposes, and ``in-bed`` tritium calorimetric measurement technique has been developed. The steady-state temperature rise of a gas stream flowing through a jacketed metal hydride storage bed is measured and correlated with power input to electric heaters used to simulate the radiolytic power generated by the decay of tritium to {sup 3}He. Temperature rise results for prototype metal hydride storage beds and the effects of using different gases in the bed are shown. Linear regression results shows that for 95% confidence intervals, temperature rise measurements can be obtained in 14 hours and have an accuracy of {plus_minus}1.6% of a tritium filled hydride storage bed.

  1. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Kye-Si Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong; Ko, Hyun-Seok

    2014-06-15

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  2. Solids concentration measurements in molten wax by an ultrasonic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Soong, Y.; Gamwo, I.K.; Blackwell, A.G.; Schehl, R.R.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1994-12-31

    The application of the three-phase slurry reactor system to coal liquefaction processing and chemical industries has recently received considerable attention. To design and efficiently operate a three-phase slurry reactor, the degree of dispersion of the solid (catalyst) in the reactor should be understood. The solids distribution within the reactor greatly affects its performance. An ultrasonic technique is under development for measuring solids concentration in a three-phase slurry reactor. Preliminary measurements have been made on slurries consisting of molten paraffin wax, glass beads, and nitrogen bubbles at 189 C. The data show that the velocity and attenuation of the sound are well-defined functions of the solid and gas concentrations in the molten wax.

  3. Determination of Probe Volume Dimensions in Coherent Measurement Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tedder, Sarah A.; Weikl, Markus C.; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    When investigating combustion phenomena with pump-probe techniques, the spatial resolution is given by the overlapping region of the laser beams and thus defines the probe volume size. The size of this probe volume becomes important when the length scales of interest are on the same order or smaller. In this work, we present a new approach to measure the probe volume in three dimensions (3-D), which can be used to determine the probe volume length, diameter, and shape. The optical arrangement and data evaluation are demonstrated for a dual-pump dual-broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) setup which is used for combustion diagnostics. This new approach offers a simple, quick alternative with more capabilities than formerly used probe volume measurement methods.

  4. Phase comparison technique for measuring liquid-liquid phase equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Daridon, J. L.; Lagourette, B.; Ye, S.

    1999-04-01

    In this article, a new method is demonstrated to measure the liquid-liquid phase equilibrium for binary systems. A phase comparison technique was employed to real-time display the phase-time curve in a "wave form (time) object" of Hewlett-Packard visual engineering environment. It was found that the phase-time curve showed a distorted wave form when liquid-liquid phase transition took place. The abnormal curve can therefore be used to detect liquid-liquid phase transitions. Measurements were performed in several binary systems such as nitromethane+1-hexanol, nitromethane+butanol, and nitroethane+n-hexane. The experimental results are in good agreement with those in the literature.

  5. Ion beam technique for the measurement of deuterium diffusion coefficients

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M.B.; Farrell, K.

    1980-05-15

    This letter describes how a combination of the techniques of nuclear microanalysis and cathodic hydrogenation has been used to determine the diffusion coefficient of dueterium in austenitic stainless steel at room temperature. Samples charged in deuterated acid solutions to levels of about 20 at. % deuterium were quickly transferred to a scattering chamber where a depth profile of the near-surface deuterium was measured. For charging times much longer than the transfer plus anlyzing time, the deuterium profile could be described by an error function at the specimen surface. A diffusion coefficient was determined by a chi-squared test fitting procedure and shown to be consistent with values reported for other methods measured at higher temperatures.

  6. Optical velocity-measurement techniques for supersonic surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, M,E.; Hemsing, W. F.; Shinas, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Interferometric techniques have been used routinely for more than 20 years to measure velocities of explosive shock-fronts. Recently, structured-light measurements have been used for the same purpose. Explosions accelerate surfaces to as much as 15 km/sec in a nanosecond or less, often generating much light, large changes in reflectivity, and ejecting particles or layers at different speeds. I will describe the current performance of fiber-optic displacement-interferometers, Fabret-Perot inteferometers, velocity interferometers (VISAR), and structured light, in this interesting physical space. We have designed and used for several years a 1/4 inch OD optical probe with large depth of field that both illuminates and returns the image from a surface inside a confined geometry. We report on its design and performance. The increased information from the surface requires greater automation from the analysis software. We report our software automation and analysis improvements.

  7. Diagnostic techniques for measuring suprathermal electron dynamics in plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Coda, S.

    2008-10-15

    Plasmas, both in the laboratory and in space, are often not in thermodynamic equilibrium, and the plasma electron distribution function is accordingly non-Maxwellian. Suprathermal electron tails can be generated by external drives, such as rf waves and electric fields, or internal ones, such as instabilities and magnetic reconnection. The variety and importance of the phenomena in which suprathermal electrons play a significant role explains an enduring interest in diagnostic techniques to investigate their properties and dynamics. X-ray bremsstrahlung emission has been studied in hot magnetized plasmas for well over two decades, flanked progressively by electron-cyclotron emission in geometries favoring the high-energy end of the distribution function (high-field-side, vertical, oblique emission), by electron-cyclotron absorption, by spectroscopic techniques, and at lower temperatures, by Langmuir probes and electrostatic analyzers. Continuous progress in detector technology and in measurement and analysis techniques, increasingly sophisticated layouts (multichannel and tomographic systems, imaging geometries), and highly controlled suprathermal generation methods (e.g., perturbative rf modulation) have all been brought to bear in recent years on an increasingly detailed, although far from complete, understanding of suprathermal electron dynamics.

  8. A Balloon Sounding Technique for Measuring SO2 Plumes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Gary A.; Komhyr, Walter D.; Hirokawa, Jun; Lefer, Barry; Krotkov, Nicholay; Ngan, Fong

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a new technique for inexpensive measurements of SO2 profiles using a modified dual-ozonesonde instrument payload. The presence of SO2 interferes with the standard electrochemical cell (ECC) ozonesonde measurement, resulting in -1 molecule of O3 reported for each molecule of SO2 present (provided [O3] > [SO2]). In laboratory tests, an SO2 filter made with Cr03 placed on the inlet side of the sonde removes nearly 100% of the SO2 present for concentrations up to 60 ppbv and remained effective after exposure to 2.8 X 10(exp 16) molecules of SO2 [equivalent to a column approximately 150 DU (1 DU = 2.69 X 10(exp 20) molecules m(exp -2))]. Flying two ECC instruments on the same payload with one filtered and the other unfiltered yields SO2 profiles, inferred by subtraction. Laboratory tests and field experience suggest an SO2 detection limit of approximately 3 pbb with profiles valid from the surface to the ozonopause [i.e., approximately (8-10 km)]. Two example profiles demonstrate the success of this technique for both volcanic and industrial plumes.

  9. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p < 0.002; DXA, p < 0.005), and the densities from the two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Actual density values were higher for Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats.

  10. Comparison of bone density measurement techniques: DXA and Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Keenan, M J; Hegsted, M; Jones, K L; Delany, J P; Kime, J C; Melancon, L E; Tulley, R T; Hong, K D

    1997-11-01

    The standard method for determination of density (g/cm3) of bones from small animals has been the application of Archimedes' principle. A recent development has been software for the determination of "density" (g/cm2) of small animal bones with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We compared Archimedes' principle and DXA (Hologic QDR-2000) in the measurement of the densities of whole and hollowed femurs of 5- to 6-month-old retired female breeder rats. In an attempt to ensure detectable treatment differences, rats were used from a low-vitamin D Holtzman and a supplemental-vitamin D Sprague-Dawley colony. Whole femur densities were higher for supplemental-vitamin D colony rats than for low vitamin D rats using both techniques (Archimedes' principle, p < 0.002; DXA, p < 0.005), and the densities from the two techniques were highly correlated (r = 0.82, p < 0.0001). Actual density values were higher for Archimedes' principle than for DXA. Other variables such as femur ash weight and calcium content were also highly correlated to densities with both techniques. Hollowed femur density values were higher than whole femur values with Archimedes' principle but lower with DXA. Colony effects for hollowed femur densities were diminished with Archimedes' principle (p < 0.03) and eliminated with DXA (p < 0.53). Investigation of whole bones is more biologically relevant, and both techniques were effective in detecting differences between whole femurs from low-vitamin D and supplemental-vitamin D colony rats. PMID:9383695

  11. Electron Microprobe Analysis Techniques for Accurate Measurements of Apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldoff, B. A.; Webster, J. D.; Harlov, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Apatite [Ca5(PO4)3(F, Cl, OH)] is a ubiquitous accessory mineral in igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. The mineral contains halogens and hydroxyl ions, which can provide important constraints on fugacities of volatile components in fluids and other phases in igneous and metamorphic environments in which apatite has equilibrated. Accurate measurements of these components in apatite are therefore necessary. Analyzing apatite by electron microprobe (EMPA), which is a commonly used geochemical analytical technique, has often been found to be problematic and previous studies have identified sources of error. For example, Stormer et al. (1993) demonstrated that the orientation of an apatite grain relative to the incident electron beam could significantly affect the concentration results. In this study, a variety of alternative EMPA operating conditions for apatite analysis were investigated: a range of electron beam settings, count times, crystal grain orientations, and calibration standards were tested. Twenty synthetic anhydrous apatite samples that span the fluorapatite-chlorapatite solid solution series, and whose halogen concentrations were determined by wet chemistry, were analyzed. Accurate measurements of these samples were obtained with many EMPA techniques. One effective method includes setting a static electron beam to 10-15nA, 15kV, and 10 microns in diameter. Additionally, the apatite sample is oriented with the crystal’s c-axis parallel to the slide surface and the count times are moderate. Importantly, the F and Cl EMPA concentrations are in extremely good agreement with the wet-chemical data. We also present EMPA operating conditions and techniques that are problematic and should be avoided. J.C. Stormer, Jr. et al., Am. Mineral. 78 (1993) 641-648.

  12. An Assessment of a Technique for Modeling Lidar Background Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, K. A.; Hunt, W. H.; Vaughan, M. A.; Hair, J. W.; Butler, C. F.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    A high-fidelity lidar simulation tool has been developed to generate synthetic lidar backscatter data that closely matches the expected performance of various lidars, including the noise characteristics inherent to analog detection and uncertainties related to the measurement environment. This tool supports performance trade studies and scientific investigations for both the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP), which flies aboard Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO), and the NASA Langley Research Center airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL). The simulation tool models the lidar instrument characteristics, the backscatter signals generated from aerosols, clouds, ocean surface and subsurface, and the solar background signals. The background signals are derived from the simulated aerosol and cloud characteristics, the surface type, and solar zenith angle, using a look-up table of upwelling radiance vs scene type. The upwelling radiances were derived from the CALIOP RMS background noise and were correlated with measurements of the particulate intensive and extensive optical properties, including surface scattering for transparent layers. Tests were conducted by tuning the tool for both HSRL and CALIOP instrument settings and the atmospheres were defined using HSRL measurements from underflights of CALIPSO. For similar scenes, the simulated and measured backgrounds were compared. Overall, comparisons showed good agreement, verifying the accuracy of the tool to support studies involving instrument characterization and advanced data analysis techniques.

  13. Low cost varying synthetic wavelength technique for absolute distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, S.; Salvadé, Y.

    2010-04-01

    A new low-cost superheterodyne configuration, without acousto-optic modulator, is applied to the two-wavelength interferometry for absolute distance measurement. The principle relies on a synchronized frequency sweep of two optical signals, but with different frequency excursions. The frequency difference between the two optical waves is highly accurate. This is realized by injecting a frequency modulated laser signal in an intensity modulator that is biased at halfwave voltage and driven by a digitally swept radio-frequency signal between 13 and 15 GHz. This latter is a continuous up and down ramp. The two synchronized optical signals emerging from the modulator produce in a Michelson interferometer a distance dependent superheterodyne signal, with a variable synthetic wavelength of about 10 mm. The superheterodyne frequency depends linearly on distance and on the radio-frequency excursion. The integration time for a distance measurement point corresponds to the duration of single sweep (i.e. one millisecond in our case). Absolute distance measurements from 1 to 15 meters yield an accuracy of +/-50 μm, showing the validity of the technique.

  14. H sup minus temperature measurements by a slit diagnostic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, J.D.; Smith, H.V. Jr.; Geisik, C.; Allison, P.

    1991-01-01

    H{sup {minus}} ion beams are extracted at 5-25 kV from a long, narrow slit on a Penning surface-plasma source (the 8X source). The extraction geometry produces negligible transverse electric fields (focusing effects) along the slit length. Therefore, the ion angular spread reflects the distribution of ion energies at the plasma surface. The angular distributions are measured with an electric-sweep emittance scanner whose slits are oriented normal to the long dimension of the emission slit. The nearly-Maxwellian angular distributions measured over the central portions of the ribbon beam give kT{sub H{sup {minus}}} of 0.1 to 0.2 eV for a 2-A dc discharge and 0.8 to 1.0 eV for 350- to 500-A pulsed discharges. This diagnostic technique has sufficient position resolution to allow measurement of the kT{sub H{sup {minus}}} spatial distributions. It also allows study of the kT{sub H{sup {minus}}} dependencies on ion source parameters (e.g., increasing the H{sub 2} gas flow lowers kT{sub H{sup {minus}}}). 7 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Cavity perturbation techniques for measurement of the microwave conductivity and dielectric constant of a bulk semiconductor material.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldumiati, I. I.; Haddad, G. I.

    1972-01-01

    Cavity perturbation techniques offer a very sensitive and highly versatile means for studying the complex microwave conductivity of a bulk material. A knowledge of the cavity coupling factor in the absence of perturbation, together with the change in the reflected power and the cavity resonance frequency shift, are adequate for the determination of the material properties. This eliminates the need to determine the Q-factor change with perturbation which may lead to appreciable error, especially in the presence of mismatch loss. The measurement accuracy can also be improved by a proper choice of the cavity coupling factor prior to the perturbation.

  16. Moire technique utilization for detection and measurement of scoliosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawieska, Dorota; Podlasiak, Piotr

    1993-02-01

    Moire projection method enables non-contact measurement of the shape or deformation of different surfaces and constructions by fringe pattern analysis. The fringe map acquisition of the whole surface of the object under test is one of the main advantages compared with 'point by point' methods. The computer analyzes the shape of the whole surface and next user can selected different points or cross section of the object map. In this paper a few typical examples of an application of the moire technique in solving different medical problems will be presented. We will also present to you the equipment the moire pattern analysis is done in real time using the phase stepping method with CCD camera.

  17. Viscosity measurements of metallic melts using the oscillating drop technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintzmann, P.; Yang, F.; Schneider, S.; Lohöfer, G.; Meyer, A.

    2016-06-01

    By means of benchmarking reduced gravity experiments, we have verified the measured viscosity of binary Zr-Ni glass forming liquids utilizing the oscillating drop technique combined with ground-based electrostatic levitation (ESL). Reliable viscosity data can be obtained as long as internal viscous damping of a single oscillation mode of a levitated drop dominates external perturbations. This can be verified by the absence of a sample mass dependence of the results. Hence, ESL is an excellent tool for studying the viscosity of metallic glass forming melts in the range of about 10-250 mPa s, with sample masses below 100 mg. To this end, we show that, for binary Zr-Ni melts, the viscosity is qualitatively controlled by the packing density.

  18. Assessment of a bone biopsy technique for measuring tiludronate in horses: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Delguste, Catherine; Doucet, Michèle; Gabriel, Annick; Guyonnet, Jérôme; Lepage, Olivier M.; Amory, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the feasibility of measuring tiludronate in horses using a minimally invasive bone biopsy technique. Eight horses were treated with intravenous (IV) tiludronate [1 mg/kg bodyweight (BW)], either once (n = 4) or twice, 28 d apart (n = 4). The horses that were treated once were euthanized on days 1, 43, 57, or 92 and those that were treated twice, were euthanized on days 112, 154, 194, or 364. Bone samples were taken bilaterally from each horse at 4 sites: the third metacarpal bone (MCIII), the 13th rib (R13), the tuber coxae (TC), and the cuboid bone (CB). Test samples were taken with a 5-mm diameter dental drill, while larger reference samples were taken with an osteotome. The concentrations of tiludronate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection. The TC was the easiest site to sample, and no technical difficulties were encountered for extraction and measurement. Drill sampling at the MCIII was difficult. Moreover, both the extraction and measurement caused technical problems and results were unreliable in most cases (93%). Drill samples obtained from the R13 were very small and access to the CB required considerable dissection, which would not be feasible in vivo. Forty-six percent and 36% of the tiludronate measurements performed on the R13 and CB samples, respectively, were unreliable. The ratio of tiludronate concentrations ranged from 73% to 185% (median: 118%) in the TC, 65% to 208% (median: 81%) in the R13, and 26% to 110% (median: 57%) in the CB. In all but 1 horse, the highest concentrations of tiludronate were found in the TC. It was concluded that bone biopsies performed at the TC were adequate for measuring tiludronate in horses and should be considered in future for repeated measurements over time in living animals. PMID:21731184

  19. An accurate scatter measurement and correction technique for cone beam breast CT imaging using scanning sampled measurement (SSM)technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinming; Shaw, Chris C.; Wang, Tianpeng; Chen, Lingyun; Altunbas, Mustafa C.; Kappadath, S. Cheenu

    2006-03-01

    We developed and investigated a scanning sampled measurement (SSM) technique for scatter measurement and correction in cone beam breast CT imaging. A cylindrical polypropylene phantom (water equivalent) was mounted on a rotating table in a stationary gantry experimental cone beam breast CT imaging system. A 2-D array of lead beads, with the beads set apart about ~1 cm from each other and slightly tilted vertically, was placed between the object and x-ray source. A series of projection images were acquired as the phantom is rotated 1 degree per projection view and the lead beads array shifted vertically from one projection view to the next. A series of lead bars were also placed at the phantom edge to produce better scatter estimation across the phantom edges. Image signals in the lead beads/bars shadow were used to obtain sampled scatter measurements which were then interpolated to form an estimated scatter distribution across the projection images. The image data behind the lead bead/bar shadows were restored by interpolating image data from two adjacent projection views to form beam-block free projection images. The estimated scatter distribution was then subtracted from the corresponding restored projection image to obtain the scatter removed projection images. Our preliminary experiment has demonstrated that it is feasible to implement SSM technique for scatter estimation and correction for cone beam breast CT imaging. Scatter correction was successfully performed on all projection images using scatter distribution interpolated from SSM and restored projection image data. The resultant scatter corrected projection image data resulted in elevated CT number and largely reduced the cupping effects.

  20. Water induced geohazards measured with spaceborne interferometry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncos, V.; Serban, F.; Teleaga, D.; Ciocan, V.; Sorin, M.; Caranda, D.; Zamfirescu, F.; Andrei, M.; Copaescu, S.; Radu, M.; Raduca, V.

    2012-04-01

    Natural and anthropogenic occurrence of groundwater is inducing surficial crustal deformation processes that can be accurately measured with high spatial density from space, regardless of the ground access conditions. The detection of the surface deformation allows uncovering spatial and temporal patterns of subsurface processes such as land subsidence, cave-ins and differential ground settlement related to water content. InSAR measurements combined with ground truth data permit estimation of the mechanical properties of the rocks and the development of models and scenarios to predict disaster events such as cave-ins, landslides and soil liquefaction in the case of an Earthquake. A number of three sites in Romania that suffer of ground instability because of the water component will be presented. The DInSAR, Interferograms Stacking and Persistent Scatterers Interferometry techniques were applied to retrieve as accurate as possible the displacement information. The first studied site is the city of Bucharest; using 7 years of ERS data ground instability was detected on a large area that represents the historical watershed of the Dambovita river. A network of water wells shows that the ground instability is directly proportional to the groundwater depth. The second site is the Ocnele Mari brine extraction area. The exploitation of the Ocnele Mari salt deposit started from the Roman Empire time using the mining technology and from 1954 the salt dissolution technology which involves injecting water into the ground using a well and extracting the brine (water and salt) through another well. The extraction of salt through dissolution led to slow ground subsidence but the flooding and dissolution of the Roman caves led to catastrophic cave-ins and the relocation of an entire village. The water injection technique is still applied and the Roman cave system is an unknown, therefore further catastrophic events are expected. The existing theoretical simulations of the

  1. Unsteady thrust measurement techniques for pulse detonation engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Dibesh Dhoj

    Thrust is a critical performance parameter and its correct determination is necessary to characterize an engine. Many conventional thrust measurement techniques prevail. However, further developments are required for correct measurement of thrust in the case of a pulse detonation engine (PDE), since the entire thrust generation process is intermittent. The significant effect of system dynamics in the form of inertial forces, stress wave propagation and reflections initiated in the structure due to detonations and pulse-to-pulse interaction in a fast operating PDE further complicate the thrust measurement process. These complications call for a further, detailed study of the unsteady thrust characteristics. A general approach was first developed to recover actual thrust from the measured thrust generated by the PDE. The developed approach consisted of two steps. The first step incorporated a deconvolution procedure using a pre-established system transfer function and measured input to reconstruct the output yielding the deconvolved thrust. The second step accounted for inertial forces through an acceleration compensation procedure. These two steps allowed the actual thrust to be determined. A small scale PDE operating at 10 and 20 Hz with varied filling fractions and mixture equivalence ratios was used for the experimental application of the general approach. The analytical study of gas dynamics in the PDE while in operation and the measured pressure histories at the exit of the engine allowed the generated thrust during a cycle to be determined semi-empirically. The thrust values determined semi-empirically were compared against the experimental results. A dynamical model of the PDE was created for the study of the unsteady thrust characteristics using finite element analysis. The results from finite element analysis were compared against semi-empirical and experimental results. In addition, finite element analysis also facilitated to numerically determine the

  2. Helium bottle pressure measurement by portable ultrasonic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Alden

    1989-02-01

    The report details the application of a portable ultrasonic method to accurately check the pressure in a helium bottle. The subject helium bottle provides an initial launch boost to the Short Range Attack Missile's (SRAM-A, or AGM-69A) hydraulic flight control system. The method described would apply to any pressure vessel, with minor variations from those procedures and equipment detailed in the report. A series of tests was conducted at the Boeing Aerospace facility in Kent, Washington on a SRAM-A helium gas bottle, to determine the feasibility of measuring gas pressure within the helium bottle by ultrasonic technique. The method, based on measurement of the speed of ultrasonic waves transmitted through a medium at constant pressure and temperature, provides the ability to determine bottle pressure without the necessity of removing the bottle from the missile. This bottle had previously been used for pressurizing the Flight Control Actuation System. The ultrasonic waves were introduced into the bottle by a transducer attached to one side of the gas bottle and received by a transducer attached 180 directly opposite the input transducer. The amplitude of the ultrasonic signal decreased with decreasing pressure, proving that the method was feasible.

  3. Trace element measurement in Saliva by NAA and PIXE techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hamidian, M.R.; Vahid Golpayegani, M.; Shojai, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The activity of salivary glands and the chemical and physical properties of saliva, especially in some illnesses in which the activity of salivary glands and the chemical and physical properties alter, sometimes have severe effects on sedimentation and tooth decay. Long-standing investigations have shown the relationship between salivary gland activity and saliva composition in dental carries. Many modern techniques have been employed to measure important elements in saliva. The major elements in saliva include sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chlorine, phosphorus, iodine, and fluorine. It should be pointed out that the amount of minerals changes when the diet changes. The major constituent of saliva is water with a density of 1.007 g/cm[sup 3] in which 0.6% is solid, 0.3% organic material and 0.3% inorganic material. In addition to other effects, the acidity (pH) of saliva has a strong effect on tooth sedimentation. Type of work, degree of stress, and mental condition affect salivary gland activity. When the acidity of salivary fluid in the mouth and consequently over the teeth drops, sedimentation increases. In this paper, the results of trace element measurement in saliva are presented.

  4. A neutron activation technique for manganese measurements in humans.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, C; Byun, S H; Chettle, D R; Inskip, M J; Prestwich, W V

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element for humans, animals, and plants and is required for growth, development, and maintenance of health. Studies show that Mn metabolism is similar to that of iron, therefore, increased Mn levels in humans could interfere with the absorption of dietary iron leading to anemia. Also, excess exposure to Mn dust, leads to nervous system disorders similar to Parkinson's disease. Higher exposure to Mn is essentially related to industrial pollution. Thus, there is a benefit in developing a clean non-invasive technique for monitoring such increased levels of Mn in order to understand the risk of disease and development of appropriate treatments. To this end, the feasibility of Mn measurements with their minimum detection limits (MDL) has been reported earlier from the McMaster group. This work presents improvement to Mn assessment using an upgraded system and optimized times of irradiation and counting for induced gamma activity of Mn. The technique utilizes the high proton current Tandetron accelerator producing neutrons via the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction at McMaster University and an array of nine NaI (Tl) detectors in a 4 π geometry for delayed counting of gamma rays. The neutron irradiation of a set of phantoms was performed with protocols having different proton energy, current and time of irradiation. The improved MDLs estimated using the upgraded set up and constrained timings are reported as 0.67 μgMn/gCa for 2.3 MeV protons and 0.71 μgMn/gCa for 2.0 MeV protons. These are a factor of about 2.3 times better than previous measurements done at McMaster University using the in vivo set-up. Also, because of lower dose-equivalent and a relatively close MDL, the combination of: 2.0 MeV; 300 μA; 3 min protocol is recommended as compared to 2.3 MeV; 400 μA; 45 s protocol for further measurements of Mn in vivo. PMID:25169978

  5. Empirical technique to measure x-ray production and detection efficiencies in the analytical electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    King, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the present work, a technique is proposed to experimentally measure the effective x-ray production and detection efficiency in pure element standards. This technique supplements and in some cases is preferable to the multi-element standard technique. Measurements of effective x-ray production and detection efficiencies are expected to be preferable to the standardless technique in cases where pure element samples can be prepared since the most uncertain parameters in the standardless technique are measured in the proposed technique.

  6. Adaptability of laser diffraction measurement technique in soil physics methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Gyöngyi; Szabó, József; Rajkai, Kálmán; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor; László, Péter; Hauk, Gabriella; Makó, András

    2016-04-01

    There are intentions all around the world to harmonize soils' particle size distribution (PSD) data by the laser diffractometer measurements (LDM) to that of the sedimentation techniques (pipette or hydrometer methods). Unfortunately, up to the applied methodology (e. g. type of pre-treatments, kind of dispersant etc.), PSDs of the sedimentation methods (due to different standards) are dissimilar and could be hardly harmonized with each other, as well. A need was arisen therefore to build up a database, containing PSD values measured by the pipette method according to the Hungarian standard (MSZ-08. 0205: 1978) and the LDM according to a widespread and widely used procedure. In our current publication the first results of statistical analysis of the new and growing PSD database are presented: 204 soil samples measured with pipette method and LDM (Malvern Mastersizer 2000, HydroG dispersion unit) were compared. Applying usual size limits at the LDM, clay fraction was highly under- and silt fraction was overestimated compared to the pipette method. Subsequently soil texture classes determined from the LDM measurements significantly differ from results of the pipette method. According to previous surveys and relating to each other the two dataset to optimizing, the clay/silt boundary at LDM was changed. Comparing the results of PSDs by pipette method to that of the LDM, in case of clay and silt fractions the modified size limits gave higher similarities. Extension of upper size limit of clay fraction from 0.002 to 0.0066 mm, and so change the lower size limit of silt fractions causes more easy comparability of pipette method and LDM. Higher correlations were found between clay content and water vapor adsorption, specific surface area in case of modified limit, as well. Texture classes were also found less dissimilar. The difference between the results of the two kind of PSD measurement methods could be further reduced knowing other routinely analyzed soil parameters

  7. A review of hemorheology: Measuring techniques and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Patrícia C.; Pinho, Fernando T.; Alves, Manuel A.; Oliveira, Mónica S. N.

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made over the years on the topic of hemorheology, not only in terms of the development of more accurate and sophisticated techniques, but also in terms of understanding the phenomena associated with blood components, their interactions and impact upon blood properties. The rheological properties of blood are strongly dependent on the interactions and mechanical properties of red blood cells, and a variation of these properties can bring further insight into the human health state and can be an important parameter in clinical diagnosis. In this article, we provide both a reference for hemorheological research and a resource regarding the fundamental concepts in hemorheology. This review is aimed at those starting in the field of hemodynamics, where blood rheology plays a significant role, but also at those in search of the most up-to-date findings (both qualitative and quantitative) in hemorheological measurements and novel techniques used in this context, including technical advances under more extreme conditions such as in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow or under extensional flow, which impose large deformations comparable to those found in the microcirculatory system and in diseased vessels. Given the impressive rate of increase in the available knowledge on blood flow, this review is also intended to identify areas where current knowledge is still incomplete, and which have the potential for new, exciting and useful research. We also discuss the most important parameters that can lead to an alteration of blood rheology, and which as a consequence can have a significant impact on the normal physiological behavior of blood.

  8. Momentum--"Evaluating Your Marketing Program: Measuring and Tracking Techniques."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meservey, Lynne D.

    1990-01-01

    Suggests 10 tracking techniques for evaluating marketing performance. Techniques involve utilization rate, inquiry and source of inquiry tracking, appointment and interview tracking, enrollment conversion, cost per inquiry and per enrollment, retention rate, survey results, and "mystery shopper." (RJC)

  9. Airborne measurements of peroxy radicals using the PERCA technique.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Reeves, Claire E; Brough, Neil; Edwards, Gavin D; Monks, Paul S; Penkett, Stuart A

    2003-02-01

    The Peroxy Radical Chemical Amplifier (PERCA) technique is a proven method for measurement of ambient levels of peroxy radicals at ground level, but there are no published instances of the technique being used on an aerial platform. Here we describe deployment of a PERCA on the former UK Meteorological Office C-130 Hercules research aircraft. The instrument uses the established method of chemical amplification and conversion of peroxy radicals to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) by doping the sample air-flow matrix with CO and NO, subsequently measuring the NO2 yield with an improved 'Luminox' LMA-3 NO2 detector. NO2 from the amplification chemistry is distinguished from other sources of NO2 reaching the detector by periodically injecting CO approximately 1 s downstream of the NO injection point (termination mode). Chain lengths (CL's) for the amplification chemistry were typically approximately 260 (ground level) to approximately 200 (7,000 m). This variation with altitude is less than the variation associated with the 'age' of the PFA inlet material where the amplification chemistry occurs; CL's of approximately 200 with old tubing to approximately 300 with new clean tubing were typical (ground level values). The CL determinations were made in-flight using an onboard calibration unit based on the 254 nm photolysis of 7.5 to 10 parts per billion (by volume, ppbv) of CH3I in air, producing CH3O2 in a quantitative manner. The noise-equivalent detection limit for peroxy radicals (HO2 + RO2) is 2 parts per trillion (by volume, pptv) at 3,650 m when the background ambient ozone levels are stable, based on a 5 min average of five 30 s amplification cycles and five 30 s termination cycles. This detection limit is a function of several factors but is most seriously degraded when there is large variability in the ambient ozone concentration. This paper describes the instrument design, considers its performance and proposes design improvements. It concludes that the performance of an

  10. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  11. Comparison of ozone measurement techniques using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Reck, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to verify the ultraviolet absorption technique used in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, two flight experiments were conducted employing several techniques, both in situ and remote, for measuring atmospheric ozone. The first experiment used the NASA CV-990 equipped with an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor and an ultraviolet spectrophotometer, a balloon ozonesonde, and a Dobson station for determining and comparing the ozone concentration data. A second experiment compared ozone data from an automated sampling system aboard a B-747 with data from a manned system installed on the NASA CV-990 during a cross-country flight with both aircraft following the same flight path separated by 32 kilometers.

  12. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  13. New technique for retrieval of atmospheric temperature profiles from Rayleigh-scatter lidar measurements using nonlinear inversion.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Jaya; Bandoro, Justin; Sica, R J; McElroy, C Thomas

    2012-11-20

    The conventional method of calculating atmospheric temperature profiles using Rayleigh-scattering lidar measurements has limitations that necessitate abandoning temperatures retrieved at the greatest heights, due to the assumption of a pressure value required to initialize the integration at the highest altitude. An inversion approach is used to develop an alternative way of retrieving nightly atmospheric temperature profiles from the lidar measurements. Measurements obtained by the Purple Crow lidar facility located near The University of Western Ontario are used to develop and test this new technique. Our results show temperatures can be reliably retrieved at all heights where measurements with adequate signal-to-noise ratio exist. A Monte Carlo technique was developed to provide accurate estimates of both the systematic and random uncertainties for the retrieved nightly average temperature profile. An advantage of this new method is the ability to seed the temperature integration from the lowest rather than the greatest height, where the variability of the pressure is smaller than in the mesosphere or lower thermosphere and may in practice be routinely measured by a radiosonde, rather than requiring a rocket or satellite-borne measurement. Thus, this new technique extends the altitude range of existing Rayleigh-scatter lidars 10-15 km, producing the equivalent of four times the power-aperture product.

  14. Vascular wall shear rate measurement using coded excitation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Jean K.; Liu, Jie; Insana, Michael F.

    2005-04-01

    Wall shear rate (WSR) is the derivative of blood velocity with respect to vessel radius at the endothelial surface. The product of WSR and blood viscosity is the wall shear stress (WSS) that must remain relatively high to maintain normal endothelial cell function, arterial health and prevent plaque formation. Accurate WSR estimation requires the lowest possible variance and bias for blood velocity estimates near the wall. This situation is achieved for conditions where the echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) and spatial resolution for velocity are high. We transmitted coded pulses, i.e., those with time-bandwidth product greater than 1, to increase eSNR from weak blood scatter without increasing instantaneous power or reducing spatial resolution. This paper is a summary of WSR measurements from a flow phantom where a variety of acoustic pulses were transmitted: frequencymodulated (FM) codes and phase-modulated (PM) codes were compared with uncoded broadband and narrow band pulse transmissions. Both simulation and experimental results show that coded-pulse excitation increases accuracy and precision in WSR estimation when compared to standard pulsing techniques. Additionally, PM codes can reduce WSR errors more than FM codes for equal pulse energy. This reduction in WSR error could greatly extend the application of ultrasound in the study of cardiovascular disease.

  15. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  16. Supervision of Student Teachers: How Adequate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ken

    This study attempted to ascertain how adequately student teachers are supervised by college supervisors and supervising teachers. Questions to be answered were as follows: a) How do student teachers rate the adequacy of supervision given them by college supervisors and supervising teachers? and b) Are there significant differences between ratings…

  17. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  18. Toward More Adequate Quantitative Instructional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Sets an agenda for improving instructional research conducted with classical quantitative experimental or quasi-experimental methodology. Includes guidelines regarding the role of a social perspective, adequate conceptual and operational definition, quality instrumentation, control of threats to internal and external validity, and the use of…

  19. An Adequate Education Defined. Fastback 476.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Donald; Davis, E. E. (Gene)

    Court decisions historically have dealt with educational equity; now they are helping to establish "adequacy" as a standard in education. Legislatures, however, have been slow to enact remedies. One debate over education adequacy, though, is settled: Schools are not financed at an adequate level. This fastback is divided into three sections.…

  20. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  1. Blood pressure measurement in hemodialysis: The importance of the measurement technique.

    PubMed

    Kubrusly, M; de Oliveira, Claudia Maria Costa; Silva, R P; Pinheiro, M A; Rocha, M B C; Magalhães, R M

    2016-03-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension contributes to the high cardiovascular morbidity in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but the accuracy of blood pressure (BP) measurement in this population has not been well studied. To evaluate the agreement between BP measurement using the routine measurement technique (usual method) and the technique recommended by the VII Joint (standard method). This cross-sectional study enrolled 124 patients in a single center who had undergone dialysis for more than three months and were 18 years of age or older. The BP was verified at the start of dialysis by the nursing team (usual method) and by the researchers (standard method). The agreement between the systolic and diastolic BP (SBP and DBP) measurements was tested by the Bland-Altman analysis. A difference in BP measurement higher than ±5 mm Hg was considered clinically significant. The studied group had a mean age of 53.2 years. The average difference between routine and standard BP measurement was -6 mm Hg for SBP (limits of agreement: -40.1-28 mm Hg; P <0.001) and -5.6 mm Hg for DBP (limits of agreement: -33.1-21.8 mm Hg; P <0.001). A clinically significant difference in BP measured by both methods was observed in 69.4% of the patients for SBP and in 61.3% for DBP. The disagreement between the results of different BP measurement methods in HD patients was significant and the BP was underestimated using the usual BP method. BP measurement standardization should be encouraged to avoid errors in diagnosis and therapy.

  2. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  3. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  4. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-06-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  5. An ultrasonic technique to measure the depth of burn wounds in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T.; Cantrell, John H.; Hanna, Pamela D.

    1991-01-01

    Whenever ultrasound encounters discontinuity in its medium of propagation, some energy is reflected from the interface. Such reflections or echoes occur when incident energy encounters the front skin, viable/necrotic, and dermis/fat skin tissue interfaces. It was shown that the most probable cause of the viable/necrotic interface is the uncoiling of collagen in the necrotic tissue, which can cause a reflection at the viable/necrotic interface of approximately 10 percent of the wave amplitude, and is approximately the same as that from the other two interfaces noted. The instrument, still in the prototype stage, was designed to detect the various reflections from within the skin layer. It is shown that, by studying the timing between the various echoes, one can use ultrasound as an aid in diagnosing the depth of burned skin tissue in humans. The instrument is a 60-MHz A-scan unit, modified to more easily identify the echoes occurring within the short time interval during which the reflections are received from the skin layers. A high frequency unit was selected so that various transducers could be utilized to optimize the system. Signal conditioning circuits were modified and added to provide an adequate display of the principle reflections expected. The unit was successful in studying burned tissue in pigs and was recently used to study burn wounds in humans. Measurement techniques and preliminary results are presented.

  6. Measurement of the absorption coefficient using the sound-intensity technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using the sound intensity technique to measure the absorption coefficient of a material is investigated. This technique measures the absorption coefficient by measuring the intensity incident on the sample and the net intensity reflected by the sample. Results obtained by this technique are compared with the standard techniques of measuring the change in the reverberation time and the standing wave ratio in a tube, thereby, calculating the random incident and the normal incident adsorption coefficient.

  7. High-temperature strain measurement techniques: Current developments and challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1992-01-01

    Since 1987, a very substantial amount of R&D has been conducted in an attempt to develop reliable strain sensors for the measurements of structural strains during ground testing and hypersonic flight, at temperatures up to at least 2000 deg F. Much of the effort has been focused on requirements of the NASP Program. This presentation is limited to the current sensor development work and characterization studies carried out within that program. It is basically an assessment as to where we are now and what remains to be done in the way of technical accomplishments to meet the technical challenges posed by the requirements and constraints established for the NASP Program. The approach for meeting those requirements and constraints has been multi-disciplinary in nature. It was recognized early on that no one sensor could meet all these requirements and constraints, largely because of the large temperature range (cryogenic to at least 2000 deg F) and many other factors, including the most challenging requirement that the sensor system be capable of obtaining valid 'first cycle data'. Present candidate alloys for resistance-type strain gages include Fe-Cr-Al and Pd-Cr. Although they have superior properties regarding withstanding very high temperatures, they exhibit large apparent strains that must either be accounted for or cancelled out by various techniques, including the use of a dual-element, half-bridge dummy gage, or electrical compensation networks. A significant effort is being devoted to developing, refining, and evaluating the effectiveness of those techniques over a broad range in temperature and time. In the quest to obtain first-cycle data, ways must be found to eliminate the need to prestabilize or precondition the strain gage, before it is attached to the test article. It should be noted that present NASP constraints do not permit prestabilization of the sensor, in situ. Gages are currently being 'heat treated' during manufacture in both the wire- and foil

  8. High-temperature strain measurement techniques: Current developments and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemcoe, M. M.

    1992-09-01

    Since 1987, a very substantial amount of R&D has been conducted in an attempt to develop reliable strain sensors for the measurements of structural strains during ground testing and hypersonic flight, at temperatures up to at least 2000 deg F. Much of the effort has been focused on requirements of the NASP Program. This presentation is limited to the current sensor development work and characterization studies carried out within that program. It is basically an assessment as to where we are now and what remains to be done in the way of technical accomplishments to meet the technical challenges posed by the requirements and constraints established for the NASP Program. The approach for meeting those requirements and constraints has been multi-disciplinary in nature. It was recognized early on that no one sensor could meet all these requirements and constraints, largely because of the large temperature range (cryogenic to at least 2000 deg F) and many other factors, including the most challenging requirement that the sensor system be capable of obtaining valid 'first cycle data'. Present candidate alloys for resistance-type strain gages include Fe-Cr-Al and Pd-Cr. Although they have superior properties regarding withstanding very high temperatures, they exhibit large apparent strains that must either be accounted for or cancelled out by various techniques, including the use of a dual-element, half-bridge dummy gage, or electrical compensation networks. A significant effort is being devoted to developing, refining, and evaluating the effectiveness of those techniques over a broad range in temperature and time. In the quest to obtain first-cycle data, ways must be found to eliminate the need to prestabilize or precondition the strain gage, before it is attached to the test article. It should be noted that present NASP constraints do not permit prestabilization of the sensor, in situ. Gages are currently being 'heat treated' during manufacture in both the wire- and foil

  9. Optical strain measuring techniques for high temperature tensile testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Hemann, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A number of optical techniques used for the analysis of in-plane displacements or strains are reviewed. The application would be for the high temperature, approximately 1430 C (2600 F), tensile testing of ceramic composites in an oxidizing atmosphere. General descriptions of the various techniques and specifics such as gauge lengths and sensitivities are noted. Also, possible problems with the use of each method in the given application are discussed.

  10. Measurement of the Dielectric Constant of Seawater at L-Band: Techniques and Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R.; Utku, C.; Tarkocin, Y.; LeVine, D.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite instruments, that will monitor salinity from space in the near future, require an accurate relationship between salinity/temperature and seawater dielectric constant. This paper will review measurements that were made of the dielectric constant of seawater during the past several years. The objective of the measurements is to determine the dependence of the dielectric constant of seawater on salinity and on temperature, more accurately than in the past. by taking advantage of modem instrumentation. The measurements of seawater permittivity have been performed as a function of salinity and temperature using a transmission resonant cavity technique. The measurements have been made in the salinity range of 10 to 38 psu and in the temperature range of IOU C to 35 C. These results will be useful in algorithm development for sensor systems such as SMOS and Aquarius. The measurement system consists of a brass microwave cavity that is resonant at 1.413 GHz. The seawater is introduced into the cavity through a capillary glass tube having an inner diameter of 0.1 mm. The diameter of the tube has been made very small so that the amount of seawater introduced in the cavity is small - thus maintaining the sensitivity of the measurements and allowing the use of perturbation theory predicting the seawater permittivity. The change in resonant frequency and the change in cavity Q can be used to determine the real and imaginary pare of the dielectric constant of seawater introduced into the slender tube. The microwave measurements are made by an HPS722D network analyzer. The cavity has been immersed in a uateriethylene-glycol bath which is connected to a Lauda circulator. The circulator keeps the brass cavity at a temperature constant to within 0.01 degrees. The system is automated using a Visual Basic program to control the analyzer and to collect the data. The results of the dielectric constant measurements of seawater will be presented. The measurement results will be

  11. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  12. Techniques for Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Agricultural Products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dielectrics and dielectric properties of materials are defined generally, and methods for measuring dielectric properties of agricultural products are described for several frequency ranges from audio frequencies through microwave frequencies. These include measurement with impedance and admittance...

  13. Technique for extending the range of a signal measuring circuit

    DOEpatents

    Chaprnka, Anthony G.; Sun, Shan C.; Vercellotti, Leonard C.

    1978-01-01

    An input signal supplied to a signal measuring circuit is either amplified or attenuated as necessary to establish the magnitude of the input signal within the defined dynamic range of the measuring circuit and the output signal developed by the measuring circuit is subsequently readjusted through amplification or attenuation to develop an output signal which corresponds to the magnitude of the initial input signal.

  14. Global measurements of air pollution from satellites. [employing radiometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acton, L. L.; Bartle, E. R.; Griggs, M.; Hall, G. D.; Hesketh, W. D.; Ludwig, C. B.; Malkmus, W.; Reichle, H.

    1974-01-01

    The conceptual design of an FOV nadir radiometer was examined for its applicability to monitoring the radiation process in the atmosphere as it relates to aerosol behavior. The instrument employs a gas filter correlation technique and is suitable for transportation onboard satellite.

  15. Novel optical techniques for remote water column temperature measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresswell, Brian; Hodgson, Elizabeth M.; Wakefield, Clare

    1997-04-01

    This paper assesses novel optical techniques for the remote mastermind of water column temperatures, using non-linear effects such as stimulated Raman scattering. Results are presented from a modeling program to predict water flow patterns produced by an underwater heat source.

  16. MEASUREMENTS OF AIR POLLUTANT BIOMARKERS WITH EXHALED BREATH TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) has appeal as a noninvasive surrogate sample for lung-derived fluid. Additionally, EBC can be collected multiple times over the course of a study, unlike many other lung sampling techniques which can be performed fewer times. However validat...

  17. Dynamic technique for measuring adsorption in a gas chromatograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deuel, C. L.; Hultgren, N. W.; Mobert, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Gas-chromatographic procedure, together with mathematical analysis of adsorption isotherm, allows relative surface areas and adsorptive powers for trace concentrations to be determined in a few minutes. Technique may be used to evaluate relative surface areas of different adsorbates, expressed as volume of adsorbent/gram of adsorbate, and to evaluate their relative adsorptive power.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF ULTRATRACE LASER SPECTROMETRY TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENTS OF ARSENIC

    EPA Science Inventory


    Development of Arsenic Speciation Techniques Based on High Performance Liquid Chromatography and Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry

    J.B. Simeonsson, H.D. Beach and D.J. Thomas
    US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Resear...

  19. Nitrogen oxide measurements at rural sites in Switzerland: Bias of conventional measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbacher, M.; Zellweger, C.; Schwarzenbach, B.; Bugmann, S.; Buchmann, B.; OrdóñEz, C.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Hueglin, C.

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) in the atmosphere are often measured using instruments equipped with molybdenum converters. NO2 is catalytically converted to NO on a heated molybdenum surface and subsequently measured by chemiluminescence after reaction with ozone. The drawback of this technique is that other oxidized nitrogen compounds such as peroxyacetyl nitrate and nitric acid are also partly converted to NO. Thus such NO2 measurements are really surrogate NO2 measurements because the resultant values systematically overestimate the true value because of interferences of these compounds, especially when sampling photochemically aged air masses. However, molybdenum converters are widely used, and a dense network of surrogate NO2 measurements exists. As an alternative with far less interference, photolytic converters using ultraviolet light are nowadays applicable also for long-term measurements. This work presents long-term collocated NO2 measurements using molybdenum and photolytic converters at two rural sites in Switzerland. On a relative scale, the molybdenum converter instruments overestimate the NO2 concentrations most during spring/summer because of prevalent photochemistry. On a monthly basis, only 70-83% of the "surrogate" NO2 can be attributed to "real" NO2 at the non-elevated site and even less (43-76%) at the elevated one. The observed interferences have to be taken into account for monitoring and regulatory issues and to be considered when using these data for ground-truthing of satellite data or for validation of chemical transport models. Alternatively, an increased availability of artifact-free data would also be beneficial for these issues.

  20. A confirmatory measurement technique for HEU (highly enriched uranium)

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, J.K. Jr.; Goldman, A.; Russo, P.A.; Stovall, L.; Brumfield, T.L.; Gunn, C.S.; Watson, D.R.; Beedgen, R.

    1987-01-01

    Precise measurements of the special nuclear material (SNM) in an item can be used to confirm that the item has not been tampered with. These measurements do not require a highly accurate calibration, but they should be based on an attribute that is unique to the SNM. We describe an instrument that performs gamma-ray measurements at three energies: 185.7 keV, 1001 keV, and 2614 keV. This instrument collects data for 200 s from shipping containers (208-l barrels). These measurements help to distinguish the issue of material control - Has any material been diverted. - from the issue of measurement control - Is there a measurement bias.

  1. Development of the EEG measurement technique under exercising.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Junya; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Hosaka, Naoya; Sawaji, Hiroyuki; Sakakura, Kenichi; Magatani, Kazushige

    2005-01-01

    Our purpose of this research is a development of the method that detects EEG of an athlete under exercising. If EEG under exercising can be measured, we can assess the mental condition of the athlete. Usually, EEG is measured in the shield room, and a subject is required rest in bed while measurement. And it is said that measuring EEG under exercising is difficult. In this paper, we will discus about our new measuring method that can detect EEG under exercising by using independent component analysis. Five normal subjects were tested with our method, and EEG without artifact was able to measured. So, we think our new method will be useful for the research of mental condition of the athlete. PMID:17281621

  2. Air exchange effectiveness in office buildings: Measurement techniques and results

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.

    1992-07-01

    We define two air exchange effectiveness parameters which indicate the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement air flow in an entire building, the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern locally, and the normalized local age of air. After describing two tracer gas procedures for measuring these parameters, we discuss assumptions inherent in the data analysis that are often violated in large office buildings. To obtain valuable data, careful selection of buildings for measurements and assessments to determine if operating conditions are reasonably consistent with the assumptions are necessary. Multiple factors, in addition to the air flow pattern in the occupied space, can affect measurement results, consequently, the interpretation of measurements is not straightforward. We summarize the results of measurements in several office buildings and in a research laboratory. Almost all measurements indicate that the extent of both short circuiting and displacement flow is small. A moderate amount of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. Ages of air and their reciprocals (local ventilation rates) often vary substantially between rooms, probably because of room-to-room variation in the rate of air supply. For future research, we suggest assessments of measurement accuracy, development of measurement approaches that may be practically applied for a broader range of buildings, and a greater focus on pollutant removal efficiencies.

  3. Full-field laser vibration measurement in NDT techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Kaiduan; Li, Zhongke; Yi, Yaxing; Zhang, Fei

    2008-12-01

    Research of Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methodology has developed rapidly in recent years[1][2]. But it is rarely used for small objects such as Micro-electronic Mechanics System. Due to the small size of the MEMS, the traditional method of contact measurement seriously affects the parameter of the object measured. So a high accuracy non-contact measurement is required for optimization of MEMS designs and improvement of its reliability[3][4]. With recent advances in photonics, electronics, and computer technology, a Non Destructive Testing (NDT) laser time average interferometry is proposed in the paper. Laser interferometry has the advantages of non-contact, high accuracy, full-field and fast speed, so it can be used to detect cracks in MEMS. A time average measurement method of digital speckle pattern interferometry is proposed to measure the vibration mode of the MEMS in the paper. According to the sudden change of amplitude of vibration mode, a crack can be measured. With the speckle average technology, high accuracy phase-shift, continuous phase scanning technology, combined with optical amplification technology, the resolution of the amplitude reaches 1nm, and the resolution of the crack reaches 5μm. The measurement system being full-field, the measuring speed of the measurement system can reach 512*512 points per one minute.

  4. Measurement techniques investigated for detection of hydrogen chloride gas in ambient air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nine basic techniques are discussed, ranging from concentration (parts per million) to dosage only (parts per million-seconds) measurement techniques. Data for each technique include lower detection limit, response time, instrument status, and in some cases, specificity. Several techniques discussed can detect ambient hydrogen chloride concentrations below 1 part per million with a response time of seconds.

  5. Regression Techniques for the Measurement of Psychotherapeutic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloat, Donald; And Others

    The problems involved in measuring psychotherapeutic effectiveness must be addressed first by developing specific criteria for measuring behavior change. These criteria can be established when a clear-cut distinction between acceptable and unacceptable behavior is well defined. To illustrate the potential use of regression methodology in measuring…

  6. Measurement techniques for cryogenic Ka-band microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, K. B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Claspy, P. C.

    1991-01-01

    The measurement of cryogenic antennas poses unique logistical problems since the antenna under test must be embedded in a cooling chamber. A method of measuring the performance of cryogenic microstrip antennas using a closed cycle gas cooled refrigerator in a far field range is described. Antenna patterns showing the performance of gold and superconducting Ka-band microstrip antennas at various temperatures are presented.

  7. Surface moisture measurement system electromagnetic induction probe calibration technique

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, R.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-08

    The Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS) is designed to measure the moisture concentration near the surfaces of the wastes located in the Hanford Site tank farms. This document describes a calibration methodology to demonstrate that the Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) moisture probe meets relevant requirements in the `Design Requirements Document (DRD) for the Surface Moisture Measurement System.` The primary purpose of the experimental tests described in this methodology is to make possible interpretation of EMI in-tank surface probe data to estimate the surface moisture.

  8. Correlation techniques and measurements of wave-height statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthart, H.; Taylor, W. C.; Graf, K. A.; Douglas, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Statistical measurements of wave height fluctuations have been made in a wind wave tank. The power spectral density function of temporal wave height fluctuations evidenced second-harmonic components and an f to the minus 5th power law decay beyond the second harmonic. The observations of second harmonic effects agreed very well with a theoretical prediction. From the wave statistics, surface drift currents were inferred and compared to experimental measurements with satisfactory agreement. Measurements were made of the two dimensional correlation coefficient at 15 deg increments in angle with respect to the wind vector. An estimate of the two-dimensional spatial power spectral density function was also made.

  9. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF DISSOLVED OXYGEN: A COMPARISON OF TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The measurement and interpretation of geochemical redox parameters are key components of ground water remedial investigations. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is perhaps the most robust geochemical parameter in redox characterization; however, recent work has indicated a need for proper da...

  10. Progress on a Rayleigh Scattering Mass Flux Measurement Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke-Fagan, Amy F.; Clem, Michelle M.; Elam, Kristie A.; Hirt, Stefanie M.

    2010-01-01

    A Rayleigh scattering diagnostic has been developed to provide mass flux measurements in wind tunnel flows. Spectroscopic molecular Rayleigh scattering is an established flow diagnostic tool that has the ability to provide simultaneous density and velocity measurements in gaseous flows. Rayleigh scattered light from a focused 10 Watt continuous-wave laser beam is collected and fiber-optically transmitted to a solid Fabry-Perot etalon for spectral analysis. The circular interference pattern that contains the spectral information that is needed to determine the flow properties is imaged onto a CCD detector. Baseline measurements of density and velocity in the test section of the 15 cm x 15 cm Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center are presented as well as velocity measurements within a supersonic combustion ramjet engine isolator model installed in the tunnel test section.

  11. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum. PMID:27217264

  12. Advances in measuring techniques for turbine cooling test rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.

    1972-01-01

    Surface temperature distribution measurements for turbine vanes and blades were obtained by measuring the infrared energy emitted by the airfoil. The IR distribution can be related to temperature distribution by suitable calibration methods and the data presented in the form of isotherm maps. Both IR photographic and real time electro-optical methods are being investigated. The methods can be adapted to rotating as well as stationary targets, and both methods can utilize computer processing. Pressure measurements on rotating components are made with a rotating system incorporating 10 miniature transducers. A mercury wetted slip ring assembly was used to supply excitation power and as a signal transfer device. The system was successfully tested up to speeds of 9000 rpm and is now being adapted to measure rotating blade airflow quantities in a spin rig and a research engine.

  13. Advances in bioanalytical techniques to measure steroid hormones in serum.

    PubMed

    French, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Steroid hormones are measured clinically to determine if a patient has a pathological process occurring in the adrenal gland, or other hormone responsive organs. They are very similar in structure making them analytically challenging to measure. Additionally, these hormones have vast concentration differences in human serum adding to the measurement complexity. GC-MS was the gold standard methodology used to measure steroid hormones clinically, followed by radioimmunoassay, but that was replaced by immunoassay due to ease of use. LC-MS/MS has now become a popular alternative owing to simplified sample preparation than for GC-MS and increased specificity and sensitivity over immunoassay. This review will discuss these methodologies and some new developments that could simplify and improve steroid hormone analysis in serum.

  14. Measurement techniques for cryogenic Ka-band microstrip antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, M. A.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Gilbert, C.; Metzler, S.; Claspy, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of cryogenic antennas poses unique logistical problems since the antenna under test must be embedded in the cooling chamber. A method for measuring the performance of cryogenic microstrip antennas using a closed cycle gas-cooled refrigerator in a far field range is described. Antenna patterns showing the performance of gold and superconducting Ka-band microstrip antennas at various temperatures are presented.

  15. Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Erwin

    2010-05-28

    The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

  16. A study of radar cross section measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Malcolm W.

    1986-01-01

    Past, present, and proposed future technologies for the measurement of radar cross section were studied. The purpose was to determine which method(s) could most advantageously be implemented in the large microwave anechoic chamber facility which is operated at the antenna test range site. The progression toward performing radar cross section measurements of space vehicles with which the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle will be called upon to rendezvous and dock is a natural outgrowth of previous work conducted in recent years of developing a high accuracy range and velocity sensing radar system. The radar system was designed to support the rendezvous and docking of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle with various other space vehicles. The measurement of radar cross sections of space vehicles will be necessary in order to plan properly for Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle rendezvous and docking assignments. The methods which were studied include: standard far-field measurements; reflector-type compact range measurements; lens-type compact range measurement; near field/far field transformations; and computer predictive modeling. The feasibility of each approach is examined.

  17. A new technique for oil backstreaming contamination measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, S. A.; Speier, H. J.; Sieg, R. M.; Drotos, M. N.; Dunning, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    Due to the large size and the number of diffusion pumps, space simulation chambers cannot be easily calibrated by the usual test dome method for measuring backstreaming from oil diffusion pumps. In addition, location dependent contamination may be an important parameter of the test. The backstreaming contamination was measured in the Space Power Facility (SPF) near Sandusky, OH, the largest space simulation vacuum test chamber in the U.S.. Small clean silicon wafers placed at all desired measurement sites were used as contamination sensors. The facility used diffusion pumps with DC 705 oil. The thickness of the contamination oil film was measured using ellipsometry. Since the oil did not wet the silicon substrate uniformly, two analysis models were developed to measure the oil film: (1) continuous, homogeneous film; and (2) islands of oil with the islands varying in coverage fraction and height. In both cases, the contamination film refractive index was assumed to be that of DC 705. The second model improved the ellipsometric analysis quality parameter by up to two orders of magnitude, especially for the low coverage cases. Comparison of the two models shows that the continuous film model overestimates the oil volume by less than 50 percent. Absolute numbers for backstreaming are in good agreement with published results for diffusion pumps. Good agreement was also found between the ellipsometric results and measurements done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on examples exposed to the same vacuum runs.

  18. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-05-22

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed.

  19. A poloidal field measurement technique: Pitch angle measurements via injected He/sup +/ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Jobes, F.C.

    1989-07-01

    The poloidal field of a tokamak can be determined by observing the light emitted by He/sup +/ ions injected into the plasma by a perpendicular He/sup 0/ beam. These ions will orbit in small circles located where the neutral atom became ionized, and they will remain there for a few microseconds. During this time, some of these ions will also emit light at various spectral lines. The observed spectrum of any of these lines will have a peculiar and very wide shape, and it will be offset (Doppler shifted) with respect to the natural line location. The location and width of the spectral pattern provide independent information about the components of the poloidal field which are parallel and perpendicular to the beam velocity, and this information is local to the point where the light is emitted. For a horizontal beam, these components are b/sub x/ and b/sub y/, respectively. The difference in Doppler shift between two measurement points above one another (at the top and bottom of the beam) is directly proportional to /delta/b/sub x/, which in turn is proportional to the transform on that flux surface. Thus, this technique provides a means to measure directly local values of q(r). Simulation studies indicate that accurate measurements can be made in milliseconds. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Ionospheric wave and irregularity measurements using passive radio astronomy techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, W. C.; Mahoney, M. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Knowles, S. H.

    1988-01-01

    The observation of midlatitude structures using passive radio astronomy techniques is discussed, with particular attention being given to the low-frequency radio telescope at the Clark Lake Radio Observatory. The present telescope operates in the 10-125-MHz frequency range. Observations of the ionosphere at separations of a few kilometers to a few hundreds of kilometers by the lines of sight to sources are possible, allowing the determination of the amplitude, wavelength, direction of propagation, and propagation speed of ionospheric waves. Data are considered on large-scale ionospheric gradients and the two-dimensional shapes and sizes of ionospheric irregularities.

  1. Review of measurement techniques for the neutron radiative-capture process

    SciTech Connect

    Poenitz, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The experimental techniques applied in measurements of the neutron capture process are reviewed. The emphasis is on measurement techniques used in neutron capture cross section measurements. The activation technique applied mainly in earlier work has still its use in some cases, specifically for measurements of technologically important cross sections (/sup 238/U and /sup 232/Th) with high accuracy. Three major prompt neutron radioactive capture detection techniques have evolved: the total gamma radiation energy detection technique (mainly with large liquid scintillation detectors), the gamma-energy proportional detectors (with proportional counters or Moxon-Rae detectors), and the pulse-height weighting technique. These measurement techniques are generally applicable, however, shortcomings limit the achievable accuracy to a approx. = 5 to 15% uncertainty level.

  2. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure.

    PubMed

    Cohen, B S; Harley, N H; Lippmann, M

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and "mini hi-volume" samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. We conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  3. Bias in air sampling techniques used to measure inhalation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.S.; Harley, N.H.; Lippmann, M.

    1984-03-01

    Factors have been evaluated which contribute to the lack of agreement between inhalation exposure estimates obtained by time-weighted averaging of samples taken with mini hi-volume samplers, and those measured by time integrating, low-volume, lapel mounted, personal monitors. Measurements made with real-time aerosol monitors on workers at a Be-Cu production furnace show that part of the discrepancy results from variability of the aerosol concentration within the breathing zone. Field studies of sampler inlet bias, the influences of the electrostatic fields around polystyrene filter holders, and resuspension of dust from work clothing, were done in three areas of a Be plant. No significant differences were found in Be air concentrations measured simultaneously by open and closed face cassettes, and mini hi-volume samplers mounted on a test stand. No significant influence on Be collection was detected between either positively or negatively charged monitors and charge neutralized control monitors. The effect of contaminated work clothing on dust collection by lapel mounted monitors is most important. Beryllium release from the fabrics affected air concentrations measured by fabric mounted monitors more than it affected concentrations measured by monitors positioned above the fabrics. The latter were placed 16 cm from the vertically mounted fabrics, to simulate the position of the nose or mouth. The authors conclude that dust resuspended from work clothing is the major source of the observed discrepancy between exposures estimated from lapel mounted samplers and time-weighted averages.

  4. Investigation of remote sensing techniques of measuring soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. W. (Principal Investigator); Blanchard, A. J.; Nieber, J. L.; Lascano, R.; Tsang, L.; Vanbavel, C. H. M.

    1981-01-01

    Major activities described include development and evaluation of theoretical models that describe both active and passive microwave sensing of soil moisture, the evaluation of these models for their applicability, the execution of a controlled field experiment during which passive microwave measurements were acquired to validate these models, and evaluation of previously acquired aircraft microwave measurements. The development of a root zone soil water and soil temperature profile model and the calibration and evaluation of gamma ray attenuation probes for measuring soil moisture profiles are considered. The analysis of spatial variability of soil information as related to remote sensing is discussed as well as the implementation of an instrumented field site for acquisition of soil moisture and meteorologic information for use in validating the soil water profile and soil temperature profile models.

  5. Techniques for measuring intercepted and absorbed PAR in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.

    1984-01-01

    The quantity of radiation potentially available for photosynthesis that is captured by the crop is best described as absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Absorbed PAR (APAR) is the difference between descending and ascending fluxes. The four components of APAR were measured above and within two planting densities of corn (Zea mays L.) and several methods of measuring and estimating APAR were examined. A line quantum sensor that spatially averages the photosynthetic photon flux density provided a rapid and portable method of measuring APAR. PAR reflectance from the soil (Typic Argiaquoll) surface decreased from 10% to less than 1% of the incoming PAR as the canopy cover increased. PAR reflectance from the canopy decreased to less than 3% at maximum vegetative cover. Intercepted PAR (1 - transmitted PAR) generally overestimated absorbed PAR by less than 4% throughout most of the growing season. Thus intercepted PAR appears to be a reasonable estimate of absorbed PAR.

  6. Ultrasonic Apparatus and Technique to Measure Changes in Intracranial Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, William T. (Inventor); Cantrell, John H. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure can be measured dynamically and non-invasively by monitoring one or more cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components. Pulsatile components such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures are partially transferred to the cerebrospinal fluid by way of blood vessels contained in the surrounding brain tissue and membrane. As intracranial pressure varies these cerebrospinal fluid pulsatile components also vary. Thus, intracranial pressure can be dynamically measured. Furthermore, use of acoustics allows the measurement to be completely non-invasive. In the preferred embodiment, phase comparison of a reflected acoustic signal to a reference signal using a constant frequency pulsed phase-locked-loop ultrasonic device allows the pulsatile components to be monitored. Calibrating the device by inducing a known change in intracranial pressure allows conversion to changes in intracranial pressure.

  7. GRI-sponsored research tests gas measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, K.M.; Gregor, J.G. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reports on the Gas Research Institute (GRI) which is managing a comprehensive research and development (R and D) program in gas flow measurement to improve gas metering accuracy and to reduce operation and maintenance costs. A portion of the program is centered on construction of a Metering Research Facility (MRF) and collecting experimental data over a range of Reynolds numbers to determine the effects of upstream flow conditions on orifice and turbine meters. In addition, GRI is sponsoring the development of new concepts for energy content and energy rate measurement: a low-cost, low-power electronic flow measurement device and accurate gas mixtures for use with gas chromatographs and calorimeters.

  8. Work function measurements using a field emission retarding potential technique.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, M H M O; Dall'Agnol, F F; Pimentel, V L; Mammana, V P; Tatsch, P J; den Engelsen, D

    2016-03-01

    Herein we describe the measurement of the work function of a metal with advanced equipment based on the field emission retarding potential (FERP) method using a carbon nanotube (CNT) as cathode. The accuracy of the FERP method using a CNT emitter is described and a comparison between measurements of the work functions of aluminum, barium, calcium, gold, and platinum with published data will be presented. Our FERP equipment could be optimized with the aid of particle tracing simulations. These simulations led us to insert a magnetic collimator to improve the collection efficiency at the anode. PMID:27036828

  9. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  10. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    PubMed Central

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  11. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    PubMed

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems. PMID:26690172

  12. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meginnis, I; Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.

    2016-01-01

    It is essential to provide adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout in a space suit to reduce the risks associated with manned operations in space suits. Symptoms of elevated CO2 levels range from reduced cognitive performance and headache to unconsciousness and death at high levels of CO2. Because of this, NASA imposes limits on inspired CO2 levels for space suits when they are used in space and for ground testing. Testing and/or analysis must be performed to verify that a space suit meets CO2 washout requirements. Testing for developmental space suits has traditionally used an oronasal mask that collects CO2 samples at the left and rights sides of the mouth. Testing with this mask resulted in artificially elevated CO2 concentration measurements, which is most likely due to the dead space volume at the front of the mask. The mask also extends outward and into the supply gas stream, which may disrupt the washout effect of the suit supply gas. To mitigate these problems, a nasal cannula was investigated as a method for measuring inspired CO2 based on the assumptions that it is low profile and would not interfere with the designed suit gas flow path, and it has reduced dead space. This test series compared the performance of a nasal cannula to the oronasal mask in the Mark III space suit. Inspired CO2 levels were measured with subjects at rest and at metabolic workloads of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Workloads were achieved by use of an arm ergometer or treadmill. Test points were conducted at air flow rates of 2, 4, and 6 actual cubic feet per minute, with a suit pressure of 4.3 psid. Results from this test series will evaluate the accuracy and repeatability across subjects of the nasal cannula collection method, which will provide rationale for using a nasal cannula as the new method for measuring inspired CO2 in a space suit. Proper characterization of sampling methods and of suit CO2 washout capability will better inform requirements definition and verification

  13. Measurement of track strength using nondestructive evaluation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalay, Semih F.

    1995-06-01

    As a direct result of the industry's goal to improve the quality and safety of service to its customers, the Association of American Railroads (AAR) has embarked on a major research project to develop and implement automated inspection methods to effectively measure the available track stength, and to identify and repair the weak spots before further track degradation and increased maintenance are needed. The AAR has designed and constructed a track loading vehicle (TLV) which was used extensively in testing of track lateral restraint. This new vehicle is capable of applying computer controlled loads over a range of track conditions and measure the dynamic response of the track. The TLV is built on the underframe of a diesel-electric locomotive and features a retractable load bogie mounted underneath the center for applying computer controlled loads to the track and measuring the response while stationary or moving. The TLV was successfuly tested over 3,500 miles of revenue track to identify wide gage and weaker tie/fastener conditions. The test results have shown that it is feasible to implement automated inspection methods to effectively measure the available track strength, and to identify and repair the weak spots before further degradation and increased maintenance is needed. Substantial savings could be realized by the industry if positive identification of defective ties can be improved using test devices like the TLV.

  14. Measuring Student Growth: Techniques and Procedures for Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Richard C.; Wentling, Tim L.

    Designed for current and future occupational instructors, counselors, and administrators, the comprehensive measurement text is directed toward all subject areas in occupational education--industrial, business/distributive, home economics, agriculture, health occupations, and personal/public services. It offers necessary guidelines to select,…

  15. Computer-Aided Techniques for Providing Operator Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Edward M.; And Others

    This report documents the theory, structure, and implementation of a performance processor (written in FORTRAN IV) that can accept performance demonstration data representing various levels of operator's skill and, under user control, analyze data to provide candidate performance measures and validation test results. The processor accepts two…

  16. Corruption in Higher Education: Conceptual Approaches and Measurement Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osipian, Ararat L.

    2007-01-01

    Corruption is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon. Forms of corruption are multiple. Measuring corruption is necessary not only for getting ideas about the scale and scope of the problem, but for making simple comparisons between the countries and conducting comparative analysis of corruption. While the total impact of corruption is indeed…

  17. Measuring the Readability of Elementary Algebra Using the Cloze Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulm, Gerald

    The relationship to readability of ten variables characterizing structural properties of mathematical prose was investigated in elementary algebra textbooks. Readability was measured by algebra student's responses to two forms of cloze tests. Linear and currilinear correlations were calculated between each structural variable and the cloze test.…

  18. Dynamic vacuum measurement by an optical interferometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mari, Domenico; Bergoglio, Mercede; Pisani, Marco; Zucco, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    A homodyne Michelson interferometer was developed to realize a dynamic vacuum standard. The interferometer measures variation in optical path due to refractive index changes related to the pressure of the gas. The measurement arm of the interferometer is formed by two quasi-parallel mirrors which act as a multiplication set-up to allow an increment of the optical path and consequently of the sensitivity. The interference signal is detected by a high speed camera: starting from the recorded interference pattern, two quadrature regions are identified and analyzed by custom software to obtain the quadrature phase signals. The dynamic vacuum system is mainly composed of a large low-pressure chamber VA (about 800 L) connected by a valve and a replaceable orifice to a high pressure chamber VB of about 2 L, hosting the interferometer. The fast pressure drop from 100 kPa to 100 Pa is obtained by a gas expansion from VB to VA. The velocity of the expansion process can be easily varied by substituting the orifice connecting the two chambers. The response of the system was first tested with a slow process of about 40 s at different gains of the measurement arm of the interferometer. Subsequently, a fast process (< 3 s) was considered and the result of the optical device was compared to the measurements performed by two capacitance diaphragm gauges (133 kPa and 1.33 kPa full scale). The gauges are equipped with special electronics to give each nominal reading every 0.7 ms. The two measurements performed by the dynamic vacuum standard and capacitance diaphragm gauges showed an agreement better than 12%.

  19. Elbow Radiographic Anatomy: Measurement Techniques and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Charles A.; Patterson, J. Megan M.; Sutter, Melanie; Krauss, Melissa; Steffen, Jennifer A.; Galatz, Leesa

    2011-01-01

    Background An increase in elbow pathology in adolescents has paralleled an increase in sports participation. Evaluation and classification of these injuries is challenging because of limited information regarding normal anatomy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate normal radiographic anatomy in adolescents to establish parameters for diagnosing abnormal development. Established and new measurements were evaluated for reliability and variance based on age and sex. Methods Three orthopaedic surgeons independently and in a standardized fashion evaluated the normal anteroposterior and lateral elbow radiographs of 178 adolescent and young adult subjects. Fourteen measurements were performed including radial neck- shaft angle, articular surface angle, articular surface morphologic assessment (subjective and objective evaluation of the patterns of ridges and sulci), among others. We performed a statistical analysis by age and sex for each measure and assessed for inter and intra-observer reliability. Results The distal humerus articular surface was relatively flat in adolescence and became more contoured with age as objectively demonstrated by increasing depth of the trochlear and trochleocapitellar sulci, and decreasing trochlear notch angle. Overall measurements were similar between males and females, with an increased carrying angle in females. There were several statistically significant differences based on age and sex but these were small and unlikely to be clinically significant. Inter and intra-observer reliability were variable; some commonly utilized tools had poor reliability. Conclusions Most commonly utilized radiographic measures were consistent between sexes, across the adolescent age group, and between adolescents and young adults. Several commonly used assessment tools show poor reliability. Level of evidence Basic Science Study, Anatomic Study, Imaging PMID:22329911

  20. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines. [YF 102 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    The core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines were measured using a technique which requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine vore. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an Avco Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  1. Accuracy of dilution techniques for access flow measurement during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Krivitski, N M; MacGibbon, D; Gleed, R D; Dobson, A

    1998-03-01

    Access flow is now widely measured by creating artificial recirculation with the dialysis lines reversed and using dilution methods that sense either ultrasound velocity, electrical impedance, optical, or thermal changes. This study identifies and quantifies factors that influence the accuracy of access flow measurements and recommends ways to reduce these errors. Two major sources of access flow measurement error are identified, arising firstly from the second pass of the indicator by recirculation through the cardiopulmonary system (cardiopulmonary recirculation, CPR), and secondly from changes in venous line blood flow (Qb) and vascular access flow induced by the pressure of venous bolus injections. These errors are considered from theory, by direct measurement of access flow in a sheep model, and by analysis of clinical data. Two extremes for the venous introduction of indicator can be considered in access flow measurements, a slow infusion, which perturbs neither the venous line flow nor access flow but increases the error attributable to the second pass of the indicator by recirculation through cardiopulmonary system, or rapid injection, which eases separation of the second pass of the indicator signal but generates changes in the venous flow and access flow. If CPR is not eliminated, the area added to that of the first pass of indicator ranges up to 40%. Good time resolution could permit the separation of the areas generated by the first and second passage of the indicator. In sheep experiments, injections of 5 or 10 mL into a venous port close to the vascular access caused Qb to change by 20% to 40%. Both the animal experiments and analysis of raw data collected during routine clinical dialysis showed that moving the injection site sufficiently far from the patient, before or into the venous bubble trap, reduced the increase in Qb to only approximately 5% during the critical time when the concentration curve is changing for most tubing brands (Baxter, Belco

  2. Extrapolation technique pitfalls in asymmetry measurements at colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colletti, Katrina; Hong, Ziqing; Toback, David; Wilson, Jonathan S.

    2016-09-01

    Asymmetry measurements are common in collider experiments and can sensitively probe particle properties. Typically, data can only be measured in a finite region covered by the detector, so an extrapolation from the visible asymmetry to the inclusive asymmetry is necessary. Often a constant multiplicative factor is advantageous for the extrapolation and this factor can be readily determined using simulation methods. However, there is a potential, avoidable pitfall involved in the determination of this factor when the asymmetry in the simulated data sample is small. We find that to obtain a reliable estimate of the extrapolation factor, the number of simulated events required rises as the inverse square of the simulated asymmetry; this can mean that an unexpectedly large sample size is required when determining the extrapolation factor.

  3. Accuracy of dilution techniques for access flow measurement during hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Krivitski, N M; MacGibbon, D; Gleed, R D; Dobson, A

    1998-03-01

    Access flow is now widely measured by creating artificial recirculation with the dialysis lines reversed and using dilution methods that sense either ultrasound velocity, electrical impedance, optical, or thermal changes. This study identifies and quantifies factors that influence the accuracy of access flow measurements and recommends ways to reduce these errors. Two major sources of access flow measurement error are identified, arising firstly from the second pass of the indicator by recirculation through the cardiopulmonary system (cardiopulmonary recirculation, CPR), and secondly from changes in venous line blood flow (Qb) and vascular access flow induced by the pressure of venous bolus injections. These errors are considered from theory, by direct measurement of access flow in a sheep model, and by analysis of clinical data. Two extremes for the venous introduction of indicator can be considered in access flow measurements, a slow infusion, which perturbs neither the venous line flow nor access flow but increases the error attributable to the second pass of the indicator by recirculation through cardiopulmonary system, or rapid injection, which eases separation of the second pass of the indicator signal but generates changes in the venous flow and access flow. If CPR is not eliminated, the area added to that of the first pass of indicator ranges up to 40%. Good time resolution could permit the separation of the areas generated by the first and second passage of the indicator. In sheep experiments, injections of 5 or 10 mL into a venous port close to the vascular access caused Qb to change by 20% to 40%. Both the animal experiments and analysis of raw data collected during routine clinical dialysis showed that moving the injection site sufficiently far from the patient, before or into the venous bubble trap, reduced the increase in Qb to only approximately 5% during the critical time when the concentration curve is changing for most tubing brands (Baxter, Belco

  4. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The principal gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes, produced in the body of astronauts by cosmic-ray bombardment, which have half-lives long enough to be useful for radiation dose evaluation, are Be-7, Na-22, and Na-24. The sodium isotopes were measured in the preflight and postflight urine and feces, and those feces specimens collected during the manned Apollo missions, by analysis of the urine salts and the raw feces in large crystal multidimensional gamma-ray spectrometers. The Be-7 was chemically separated, and its concentration measured in an all NaI (TL), anticoincidence shielded, scintillation well crystal. The astronaut radiation dose in millirads, as determined for the Apollo 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13 missions, was 330, 160, smaller than 315, 870 plus or minus 550, 31, 110, and smaller than 250, respectively.

  5. Noninvasive technique for measurement of glucose content in body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agapiou, George; Theofanous, N. G.

    1998-07-01

    This work is focused on the measurement of glucose in various diluted solutions and aims to be implemented in testing the glucose content in the anterior chamber of the eye by means of an electro-optic modulation method. By using solutions containing only glucose concentrations, a calibration curve displaying the dependence of the glucose concentration on a DC field, applied to a modulator, was obtained.

  6. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B.; Jackson, Henry W.

    2010-01-01

    A paper discusses the need to perform accurate dielectric property measurements on larger sized samples, particularly liquids at microwave frequencies. These types of measurements cannot be obtained using conventional cavity perturbation methods, particularly for liquids or powdered or granulated solids that require a surrounding container. To solve this problem, a model has been developed for the resonant frequency and quality factor of a cylindrical microwave cavity containing concentric cylindrical samples. This model can then be inverted to obtain the real and imaginary dielectric constants of the material of interest. This approach is based on using exact solutions to Maxwell s equations for the resonant properties of a cylindrical microwave cavity and also using the effective electrical conductivity of the cavity walls that is estimated from the measured empty cavity quality factor. This new approach calculates the complex resonant frequency and associated electromagnetic fields for a cylindrical microwave cavity with lossy walls that is loaded with concentric, axially aligned, lossy dielectric cylindrical samples. In this approach, the calculated complex resonant frequency, consisting of real and imaginary parts, is related to the experimentally measured quantities. Because this approach uses Maxwell's equations to determine the perturbed electromagnetic fields in the cavity with the material(s) inserted, one can calculate the expected wall losses using the fields for the loaded cavity rather than just depending on the value of the fields obtained from the empty cavity quality factor. These additional calculations provide a more accurate determination of the complex dielectric constant of the material being studied. The improved approach will be particularly important when working with larger samples or samples with larger dielectric constants that will further perturb the cavity electromagnetic fields. Also, this approach enables the ability to have a

  7. Measurement techniques for the verification of excess weapons materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Yates, M.A.

    1998-12-01

    The end of the superpower arms race has resulted in an unprecedented reduction in stockpiles of deployed nuclear weapons. Numerous proposals have been put forward and actions have been taken to ensure the irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions, including unilateral initiatives such as those made by President Clinton in September 1993 to place fissile materials no longer needed for a deterrent under international inspection, and bilateral and multilateral measures currently being negotiated. For the technologist, there is a unique opportunity to develop the technical means to monitor nuclear materials that have been declared excess to nuclear weapons programs, to provide confidence that reductions are taking place and that the released materials are not being used again for nuclear explosive programs. However, because of the sensitive nature of these materials, a fundamental conflict exists between the desire to know that the bulk materials or weapon components in fact represent evidence of warhead reductions, and treaty commitments and national laws that require the protection of weapons design information. This conflict presents a unique challenge to technologists. The flow of excess weapons materials, from deployed warheads through storage, disassembly, component storage, conversion to bulk forms, and disposition, will be described in general terms. Measurement approaches based on the detection of passive or induced radiation will be discussed along with the requirement to protect sensitive information from release to unauthorized parties. Possible uses of measurement methods to assist in the verification of arms reductions will be described. The concept of measuring attributes of items rather than quantitative mass-based inventory verification will be discussed along with associated information-barrier concepts required to protect sensitive information.

  8. Measuring 35S of Aerosol Sulfate: Techniques and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brothers, L. A.; Dominguez, G.; Bluen, B.; Corbin, A.; Abramian, A.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    On a global and regional level, the cycling of sulfur in the environment has consequences for air quality, human health, and may contribute to global climate change. Due to its multiple oxidation states, the sulfur cycle is very complex and poorly understood. Stable isotopes are currently used to understand reaction pathways as well as sources and sinks of sulfurous compounds in the environment. Sulfur also has one short lived (τ1/2 ~87 d) radioactive isotope (35S) which is continuously made in the atmosphere by the cosmic ray spallation of argon, is then quickly oxidized to 35SO2 and enters the atmospheric sulfur cycle. The short-lived radioactive nature of this isotope of sulfur provides us with potentially powerful tracer for understanding the time scales at which sulfur is oxidized, deposited, and transported in the atmosphere and the deposition of atmospheric sulfate into rivers and water catchments. However, despite its potential, the use of 35S as a tracer of aerosol chemistry has not been fully exploited, Here we present details of instrumental set up for measuring 35S in aerosol sulfate and some preliminary results of measurements of 35S abundances in aerosols from Riverside (inland) and La Jolla (coastal) CA and discuss the sensitivity and limitations of the measurements in providing insights into day/night aerosol chemistry (Riverside) as well as the uptake of SO2 pollution in coastal environments by sea-salt aerosols. Also, we present preliminary results from measurement of sulfate in river water in Ecuador before and after precipitation events.

  9. Comparison of energy expenditure measurement techniques in severely burned patients.

    PubMed

    Schane, J; Goede, M; Silverstein, P

    1987-01-01

    The degree of accuracy of existing formulas for calculating energy expenditure can be determined by comparing them to the measured energy expenditure via indirect calorimetry. As a result, one can modify traditional predicted recommendations for nutrition alimentation of the burn patient with real-time data. In this study, 21 sequential adult admissions with second- and third-degree total body surface area (TBSA) burn wounds (range 21%-81% TBSA) underwent serial assessments of energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. On admission, maximum, and discharge, measured energy expenditure (MEE) was compared with the calculations for predicted energy expenditure by the Curreri (CEE) and modified Harris-Benedict (MBEE) equations. The mean energy expenditure calculated from the Curreri equation on admission (CEEA) overestimated the mean MEE on admission (MEEA) by 25% (P less than 0.001) and on discharge (MEED) by 36% (P less than 0.0005). The mean modified Harris-Benedict equation overestimated the mean MEEA by 32% (P less than 0.0005) and the mean MEED by 39% (P less than 0.0005). No significant difference was noted between the mean MEE at maximum (MEEM) and the mean CEEA or the mean MBEEA. This indicates excessive overfeeding of the burn patient from admission to discharge by both standard formulas. Actual measured data provide a better indicator of varying nutritional needs throughout the hospital course than the standard formulas, and their use would result in significant savings in the expenses of enteral/parenteral nutritional supplements. PMID:3667663

  10. A Split-Root Technique for Measuring Root Water Potential

    PubMed Central

    Adeoye, Kingsley B.; Rawlins, Stephen L.

    1981-01-01

    Water encounters various resistances in moving along a path of decreasing potential energy from the soil through the plant to the atmosphere. The reported relative magnitudes of these pathway resistances vary widely and often these results are conflicting. One reason for such inconsistency is the difficulty in measuring the potential drop across various segments of the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. The measurement of water potentials at the soil-root interface and in the root xylem of a transpiring plant remains a challenging problem. In the divided root experiment reported here, the measured water potential of an enclosed, nonabsorbing branch of the root system of young corn (Bonanza) plants to infer the water potential of the remaining roots growing in soil was used. The selected root branch of the seedling was grown in a specially constructed Teflon test tube into which a screen-enclosed thermocouple psychrometer was inserted and sealed to monitor the root's water potential. The root and its surrounding atmosphere were assumed to be in vapor equilibrium. Images PMID:16661886

  11. Probing Radiation Damage in Plutonium Alloys with Multiple Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McCall, S K; Fluss, M J; Chung, B W

    2010-04-21

    A material subjected to radiation damage will usually experience changes in its physical properties. Measuring these changes in the physical properties provides a basis to study radiation damage in a material which is important for a variety of real world applications from reactor materials to semiconducting devices. When investigating radiation damage, the relative sensitivity of any given property can vary considerably based on the concentration and type of damage present as well as external parameters such as the temperature and starting material composition. By measuring multiple physical properties, these differing sensitivities can be leveraged to provide greater insight into the different aspects of radiation damage accumulation, thereby providing a broader understanding of the mechanisms involved. In this report, self-damage from {alpha}-particle decay in Pu is investigated by measuring two different properties: magnetic susceptibility and resistivity. The results suggest that while the first annealing stage obeys second order chemical kinetics, the primary mechanism is not the recombination of vacancy-interstitial close pairs.

  12. Electrophysiologic Measurement in Neural Processing Disorders: Application of Auditory Brainstem Response Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbott, Richard E.

    1979-01-01

    The application of electrophysiologic measurement techniques in the study of mental retardation, autism, and other disorders previously considered "behavioral" or "psychological" is discussed. (Author)

  13. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise.

  14. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Jurns, J.; Chato, David J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  15. LN2 spray droplet size measurement via ensemble diffraction technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saiyed, N. H.; Chato, D. J.; Jurns, J.

    1991-01-01

    The size of subcooled liquified nitrogen droplets are measured with a 5 mW He-Ne laser as a function of pressure difference (delta P) across flat spray and full cone pressure atomizing nozzles. For delta P's of 3 to 30 psid, the spray sauter mean diameter (SMD) ranged between 250 to 50 microns. The pressure range tested is representative of those expected during cryogenic fluid transfer operations in space. The droplet sizes from the flat spray nozzles were greater than those from the full cone nozzle. A power function of the form, SMD varies as delta P(exp a), describes the spray SMD as a function of the delta P very well. The values of a were -0.36 for the flat spray and -0.87 for the full cone. The reduced dependence of the flat spray SMD on the delta P was probably because of: (1) the absence of a swirler that generates a turbulence within the nozzle to enhance atomization, and (2) a possible increase in shearing stress resulting from the delayed atomization due to the absence of turbulence. The nitrogen quality, up to 1.5 percent is based on isenthalpic expansion, did not have a distinct and measurable effect on the spray SMD. Both bimodal and monomodal droplet size population distributions were measured. In the bimodal distribution, the frequency of the first mode was much greater than the frequency of the second mode. Also, the frequency of the second mode was low enough such that a monomodal approximation probably would give reasonable results.

  16. Ionospheric response to tidal waves measured by dynasonde techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negrea, Cǎtǎlin; Zabotin, Nikolay; Bullett, Terence; Codrescu, Mihail; Fuller-Rowell, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric tides are known to have a dramatic influence on thermospheric and ionospheric structure and variability. Considerable effort goes into understanding characteristics of tidal modes, their interactions with planetary and gravity waves and other tidal modes, as well as their influence on the background state of the thermosphere-ionosphere system. For the altitude interval between roughly 120 and 400 km, this effort is somewhat hindered by the lack of global observations. We propose a new method of determining tidal variability by making use of dynasonde measurements. The NeXtYZ inversion procedure produces altitude profiles of the ionospheric parameters with a vertical resolution typically better than 1 km. This, together with the typical 2 min cadence of the instrument, results in extensive data sets with wide temporal and altitude coverage. At any given altitude we have nonuniform sampling due to the natural ionospheric variability. A Lomb-Scargle implementation is used to obtain equivalent results at all altitudes and locations. We report height profiles of the first three tidal harmonics derived from dynasonde measurements. The data analyzed include the vertical electron density profiles, the ionospheric X (east-west) "tilt" measurement, and the derived zonal plasma density gradient. Both the tilt and the gradient are shown to be sensitive tracers of atmospheric waves. We use data from Wallops Island and San Juan, for two time intervals: 6 May- 6 June and 9 October- 8 November 2013, thus capturing seasonal, latitudinal, and altitude variations of tidal amplitude and phase. This proves the potential of using dynasonde-capable instruments as a data source for tidal studies in the thermosphere.

  17. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Pogany, A.; Junninen, H.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2010-01-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in Southern Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system; DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system; c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux; Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) Spectrometer. The instruments were compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the main factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  18. Field inter-comparison of eleven atmospheric ammonia measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Bobrutzki, K.; Braban, C. F.; Famulari, D.; Jones, S. K.; Blackall, T.; Smith, T. E. L.; Blom, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Ghalaieny, M.; McGillen, M. R.; Percival, C. J.; Whitehead, J. D.; Ellis, R.; Murphy, J.; Mohacsi, A.; Junninen, H.; Pogany, A.; Rantanen, S.; Sutton, M. A.; Nemitz, E.

    2009-08-01

    Eleven instruments for the measurement of ambient concentrations of atmospheric ammonia gas (NH3), based on eight different measurement methods were inter-compared above an intensively managed agricultural field in late summer 2008 in S. Scotland. To test the instruments over a wide range of concentrations, the field was fertilised with urea midway through the experiment, leading to an increase in the average concentration from 10 to 100 ppbv. The instruments deployed included three wet-chemistry systems, one with offline analysis (annular rotating batch denuder, RBD) and two with online-analysis (Annular Denuder sampling with online Analysis, AMANDA; AiRRmonia), two Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectrometers (a large-cell dual system, DUAL-QCLAS, and a compact system, c-QCLAS), two photo-acoustic spectrometers (WaSul-Flux, Nitrolux-100), a Cavity Ring Down Spectrosmeter (CRDS), a Chemical Ionisation Mass Spectrometer (CIMS), an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) and an Open-Path Fourier Transform Infra-Red (OP-FTIR) spectroscopy. Each instrument was compared with each other and with the average concentration of all instruments. An overall good agreement of hourly average concentrations between the instruments (R2>0.84), was observed for NH3 concentrations at the field of up to 120 ppbv with the slopes against the average ranging from 0.67 (DUAL-QCLAS) to 1.13 (AiRRmonia) with intercepts of -0.74 ppbv (RBD) to +2.69 ppbv (CIMS). More variability was found for performance for lower concentrations (<10 ppbv). Here the overruling factors affecting measurement precision are (a) the inlet design, (b) the state of inlet filters (where applicable), and (c) the quality of gas-phase standards (where applicable). By reference to the fast (1 Hz) instruments deployed during the study, it was possible to characterize the response times of the slower instruments.

  19. Technique for Performing Dielectric Property Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method, system, apparatus, and computer readable medium has been provided with the ability to obtain a complex permittivity dielectric or a complex permeability micron of a sample in a cavity. One or more complex-valued resonance frequencies f(sub m) of the cavity, wherein each f(sub m) is a measurement, are obtained. Maxwell's equations are solved exactly for dielectric, and/or micron, using the f(sub m) as known quantities, thereby obtaining the dielectric and/or micron of the sample.

  20. Antenna pointing compensation based on precision optical measurement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1988-01-01

    The pointing control loops of the Deep Space Network 70 meter antennas extend only to the Intermediate Reference Structure (IRS). Thus, distortion of the structure forward of the IRS due to unpredictable environmental loads can result in uncompensated boresight shifts which degrade blind pointing accuracy. A system is described which can provide real time bias commands to the pointing control system to compensate for environmental effects on blind pointing performance. The bias commands are computed in real time based on optical ranging measurements of the structure from the IRS to a number of selected points on the primary and secondary reflectors.

  1. Measurement of soil moisture using remote sensing multisensor radiation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, W. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical modeling as well as laboratory and field measurement were coupled with analysis of aircraft data obtained from controlled sites in an effort to enhance understanding of the microwave response due to soil moisture so as to specify sensor parameters and develop inversion algorithms. Models to predict the complex dielectric constant were produced which led to the interpretation of the results in terms of a matrix potential rather than simply moisture content. Similar advances were made in the development of coherent and incoherent radiative transfer models and rough surface scattering models.

  2. Techniques for Measurement of Nitrate Movement in Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broadbent, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of surface and ground waters with nitrate usually involves leaching through soil of nitrate produced by mineralization of soil organic matter, decomposition of animal wastes or plant residues, or derived from fertilizers. Nitrate concentrations in the soil solution may be measured by several chemical procedures or by the nitrate electrode. since nitrate is produced throughout the soil mass it is difficult to identify a source of nitrate contamination by conventional means. This problem can be solved by use of N-15-enriched or N-15-depleted materials as tracers. The latter is particularly attractive because of the negligible possibility of the tracer hazardous to health.

  3. A radiosonde thermal sensor technique for measurement of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    A new system was developed to measure vertical profiles of microthermal turbulence in the free atmosphere. It combines thermal sensor technology with radiosonde balloon systems. The resultant data set from each thermosonde flight is a profile of the strength and distribution of microthermal fluctuations which act as tracers for turbulence. The optical strength of this turbulence is computed and used to predict optical and laser beam propagation statistics. A description of the flight payload, examples of turbulence profiles, and comparison with simultaneous stellar observations are included.

  4. Measurement of interfacial tension by automated video techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Miller, R.L.; Watkins, A.D.; Ward, M.B.; Barrett, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes a simple automated system for measuring interfacial tension using the pendant or sessile drop method. The size and shape of a transparent or opaque drop of one fluid immersed in a second, transparent, fluid is recorded with a CCD video camera and digitized and stored by a computer-controlled system. Custom software determines various droplet shape factors and computes the interfacial tension. A limited number of video frames can be stored on disc, or longer runs can be stored on video tape for later digitization. Alternatively, only the shape factor and interfacial tension data are stored to reduce demands on the storage medium. The first application of the system was measurement of the interfacial tension of crude oil interacting with various bacterial agents in aqueous suspension. Some of these agents can greatly influence the effective interfacial tension of the crude oil and potentially improve recovery rates from oil reserves, particularly of the heavier'' or more viscous oils. 11 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Sounding depth measurements: a method for evaluating various surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Ben-Yehouda, A; Machtei, E E

    1991-09-01

    Fourteen patients undergoing periodontal treatment for moderate to severe adult-type periodontitis were included in the study. Seven patients (a total of 210 sites) were treated with modified Widman flap surgery while the other 7 patients (the same number of sites) were treated with apically-positioned flap surgery. The 2 modalities were compared using sounding depth measurements before and immediately after surgery. The mean sounding depth decreased from 4.89 mm to 3.42 mm in the modified Widman flap group, compared to a drop from 4.77 mm to 2.46 mm in the apically-positioned flap group. Neither of these procedures resulted in the total eradication of all periodontal pockets. The final outcome of modified Widman flap surgery may, at times, result in zero sounding depth (placement of the flap at the crest of the bone); on the other hand, very often the flap was placed far supra-crestally in an intended apically-positioned flap procedure. This lack of consistency between intended and actual flap placement would suggest that studies which try to compare different treatment modalities using a flap approach should include sounding depth measurements immediately post-surgery. This is needed to assure that the intended procedure has actually been carried out. PMID:1941496

  6. Measuring Technique of Bubble Size Distributions in Dough

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tatsurou; Do, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Oguchi, Kosei; Tsuta, Mizuki

    A novel technique to recognize bubbles in bread dough and analyze their size distribution was developed by using a Micro-Slicer Image Processing System (MSIPS). Samples were taken from the final stage of the mixing process of bread dough which generally consists of four distinctive stages. Also, to investigate the effect of freeze preservation on the size distribution of bubbles, comparisons were made between fresh dough and the dough that had been freeze preserved at .30°C for three months. Bubbles in the dough samples were identified in the images of MSIPS as defocusing spots due to the difference in focal distance created by vacant spaces. In case of the fresh dough, a total of 910 bubbles were recognized and their maximum diameter ranged from 0.4 to 70.5μm with an average of 11.1μm. On the other hand, a total of 1,195 bubbles were recognized from the freeze-preserved sample, and the maximum diameter ranged from 0.9 to 32.7μm with an average of 6.7μm. Small bubbles with maximum diameters less than 10μm comprised approximately 59% and 78% of total bubbles for fresh and freeze-preserved dough samples, respectively. The results indicated that the bubble size of frozen dough is smaller than that of unfrozen one. The proposed method can provide a novel tool to investigate the effects of mixing and preservation treatments on the size, morphology and distribution of bubbles in bread dough.

  7. Techniques for measuring red cell, platelet, and WBC survival

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, K.; Freeman, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Blood cell survival studies yield valuable information concerning production and destruction of cells circulating in the bloodstream. Methodologies for the measurement of red cell survival include nonisotopic methods such as differential agglutination and hemolysis. The isotopic label may be radioactive or, if not, will require availability of a mass spectrograph. These methods fall into two categories, one where red cells of all ages are labeled (/sup 51/Cr, DFP32, etc.) and those employing a cohort label of newly formed cells (/sup 14/C glycine, /sup 75/Se methionine, etc.). Interpretation of results for methodology employed and mechanism of destruction, random or by senescence, are discussed. A similar approach is presented for platelet and leukocyte survival studies. The inherent difficulties and complications of sequestration, storage, and margination of these cells are emphasized and discussed. 38 references.

  8. Measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    A cosmic radiation dose to the Apollo 17 crew of 1.3 R was calculated from the specific activities of Na-24 in their postflight urine specimens. The specific activities of K-42, Cr-51, Co60, and Sb-124, introduced by injection into the astronauts, are extremely high in these specimens. The Fe-59 and Cs-137 levels are also reported and appear to be normal. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ca, Sr, Ba, Cr, Fe, Co, Ag, Au, Zn, Cd, Hg, Sn, As, Sb, Se, Br, Sc, La, Sm, Eu, Tb, Hf, Ta, and Th were measured in urine specimens from the Apollo 17 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. Strontium, barium, gold, cadmium, lanthanum, samarium, europium, terbium, thorium, and tin are reported for the first time. The concentrations or excretion rates of bromine and the alkali metals exhibit singificantly reduced postflight levels and are generally lower than values observed for previous missions. Chromium concentrations reflect radiochromium injections.

  9. Optokinetic technique for measuring infants' responses to color.

    PubMed

    Anstis, S; Cavanagh, P; Maurer, D; Lewis, T

    1987-04-15

    Two motion tests will measure normal and defective responses to color in non-verbal infants. Moving gratings displayed on a computer-controlled TV monitor elicited optokinetic eye movements. The first test established three results. First, non-verbal infants can be successfully screened, the one baby known to be colorblind was readily identified. Second, the equiluminance point for red and green was shifted for protans, who needed more red light than normals to make an equiluminance match. Third, the relative contribution of R- and G-cones to the luminance pathways is already in place at the adult level within the first three months of life. The second test, run only on adults, correctly diagnosed deutans who were missed by the first test, and showed that opponent-color mechanisms contribute directly to motion for normal but not for color-deficient observers. PMID:20454352

  10. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  11. Optical technique for measurement of random water wave surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorrell, F. Y.; Withers, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    An optical system using the refraction of a vertical light ray has been developed for measuring the slope of random wind-generated water waves. The basic elements of the system are photovoltaic cells which are connected to individual amplifiers so that when the refracted light beam is incident on a cell, the output of the cell is amplified and then supplied as input to a comparator. The comparator then provides a specified voltage output, independent of the incident light intensity, as long as it is above a designated background value. The comparators are designed to give output voltages comparable with standard TTL. This arrangement provides a high signal from the cell when it experiences incident light, and a low signal when there is only background light, with the high and low signals at TTL voltage levels.

  12. Measuring infant movement. Clinical and technological assessment techniques.

    PubMed

    Harris, S R; Heriza, C B

    1987-12-01

    Assessment of infant movement patterns is an important evaluation component in the early identification and management of high-risk and handicapped infants. Differences in infant movement patterns may provide early clues to the diagnosis of cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities. The ultimate goal of early identification of movement disorders is the provision of early intervention services, such as developmental physical therapy. Qualitative analysis of infant movement differences can assist the clinician in developing treatment strategies aimed at facilitating normal movement patterns during the critical period of early central nervous system plasticity. This article presents four measurement strategies for quantifying such qualitative differences. Three clinical assessment tools--the Movement Assessment of Infants, the Bayley Motor Scale, and the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales--are described. Finally, new technological advances for kinematic analysis of infant movement are presented.

  13. Measurement of optical nonlinearity by antiresonant ring interferometric nonlinear spectroscopic (ARINS) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, B.

    2016-08-01

    We have reported the measurement of third-order optical nonlinearity by antiresonant ring interferometric nonlinear spectroscopic (ARINS) technique and discussed its usefulness over other popular measuring techniques such as Z-scan, degenerate four wave mixing (DFWM) and third harmonic generation (THG). The measurement has been simulated theoretically by taking different numerical values as well as sign of δ, which is a key parameter of ARINS. The technique has been benchmarked using toluene and the theoretical simulation has been substantiated experimentally by measuring the nonlinear optical coefficients ( n 2 and β) of two different samples. The disadvantages of the technique have also been discussed. However, a number of advantages of ARINS override its disadvantages and therefore, ARINS may be preferred over other measuring techniques for the measurement of nonlinear optical parameters.

  14. The Kety-Schmidt Technique for Quantitative Perfusion and Oxygen Metabolism Measurements in the MR Environment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John J.; Powers, William J.; Faulkner, Chad B.; Boyle, Patrick J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2013-01-01

    The Kety-Schmidt technique provides quantitative measurement of whole brain cerebral blood flow (CBF). CBF is measured as the area between the arterial and venous washout curves of a diffusible tracer. Oxygen extraction and metabolism may be calculated from arterial and venous samples. In this report we present a method for performing these measurements in an MR environment. This technique could be useful for validation of MR methods of hemodynamic and metabolic measurements in humans. PMID:22997166

  15. Requirements and Techniques for Developing and Measuring Simulant Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Owens, Charles; Howard, Rick

    2006-01-01

    The 1989 workshop report entitled Workshop on Production and Uses of Simulated Lunar Materials and the Lunar Regolith Simulant Materials: Recommendations for Standardization, Production, and Usage, NASA Technical Publication identify and reinforced a need for a set of standards and requirements for the production and usage of the lunar simulant materials. As NASA need prepares to return to the moon, a set of requirements have been developed for simulant materials and methods to produce and measure those simulants have been defined. Addressed in the requirements document are: 1) a method for evaluating the quality of any simulant of a regolith, 2) the minimum Characteristics for simulants of lunar regolith, and 3) a method to produce lunar regolith simulants needed for NASA's exploration mission. A method to evaluate new and current simulants has also been rigorously defined through the mathematics of Figures of Merit (FoM), a concept new to simulant development. A single FoM is conceptually an algorithm defining a single characteristic of a simulant and provides a clear comparison of that characteristic for both the simulant and a reference material. Included as an intrinsic part of the algorithm is a minimum acceptable performance for the characteristic of interest. The algorithms for the FoM for Standard Lunar Regolith Simulants are also explicitly keyed to a recommended method to make lunar simulants.

  16. The measurement of radiation exposure of astronauts by radiochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodzinski, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Cosmic radiation doses to the crews of the Apollo 14, 15, and 16 missions of 142 + or - 80, 340 + or - 80, and 210 + or - 130 mR respectively were calculated from the specific activities of Na-22 and Na-24 in the postflight urine specimens of the astronauts. The specific activity of Fe-59 was higher in the urine than in the feces of the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts, and a possible explanation is given. The concentrations of K-40, K-42, Cr-51, Co-60, and Cs-137 in the urine are also reported for these astronauts. The radiation doses received by pilots and navigators flying high altitude missions during the solar flare of March 27 to 30, 1972 were calculated from the specific activity of Na-24 in their urine. These values are compared with the expected radiation dose calculated from the known shape and intensity of the proton spectrum and demonstrate the magnitude of atmospheric shielding. The concentrations of Na, K, Rb, Cs, Fe, Co, Ag, Zn, Hg, As, Sb, Se, and Br were measured in the urine specimens from the Apollo 14 and 15 astronauts by neutron activation analysis. The mercury and arsenic levels were much higher than expected.

  17. Intercomparison of techniques for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass

    SciTech Connect

    Cohn, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    A variety of methods are presently available for the non-invasive measurement of bone mass of both normal individuals and patients with metabolic disorders. Chief among these methods are radiographic techniques such as radiogrammetry, photon absorptiometry, computer tomography, Compton scattering and neutron activation analysis. In this review, the salient features of the bone measurement techniques are discussed along with their accuracy and precision. The advantages and disadvantages of the various techniques for measuring bone mass are summarized. Where possible, intercomparisons are made of the various techniques.

  18. Solid Earth science in the 1990s. Volume 3: Measurement techniques and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Reports are contained from the NASA Workshop on Solid Earth Science in the 1990s. The techniques and technologies needed to address the program objectives are discussed. The Measurement Technique and Technology Panel identified (1) candidate measurement systems for each of the measurements required for the Solid Earth Science Program that would fall under the NASA purview; (2) the capabilities and limitations of each technique; and (3) the developments necessary for each technique to meet the science panel requirements. In nearly all cases, current technology or a development path with existing technology was identified as capable of meeting the requirements of the science panels. These technologies and development paths are discussed.

  19. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  20. Field-aligned electric currents and their measurement by the incoherent backscatter technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, P.; Cole, K. D.; Lejeume, G.

    1975-01-01

    Field aligned electric currents flow in the magnetosphere in many situations of fundamental geophysical interest. It is shown here that the incoherent backscatter technique can be used to measure these currents when the plasma line can be observed. The technique provides a ground based means of measuring these currents which complements the rocket and satellite ones.

  1. Intracellular Calcium Gradients in Single Living Cells: Measurement and Analysis by Optical and Digital Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yelamarty, Rao Viswanadha

    Intracellular calcium (Ca^{2+ }) has been considered as a regulator of many cellular processes. In addition, Ca^{2+ } also plays a key role in mediating actions of many hormones, growth factors, and drugs. This thesis describes two general approaches, digital video and photomultiplier (PMT) based fluorescence microscopic systems, to measure such Ca^{2+} changes throughout the cell. They reveal the heterogeneous spatial and fast temporal changes of Ca^{2+} within a single isolated living cell. In order to measure spatial Ca^ {2+} in three dimensions (3-D), optical section microscopy (OSM) coupled to digital video imaging is introduced. With this approach, an increase in nuclear Ca^{2+} compared to cytosolic Ca^{2+} is detected in human erythroblasts and rat hepatocytes under the addition of growth factors: erythropoietin and epidermal growth factor respectively. In addition, the primary effect of non growth-promoting hormone vasopressin, raise in cytosolic Ca^{2+}, is also observed. These observations are the first to underscore the importance of nuclear Ca^{2+} increase in cell growth and differentiation. On the other hand, to track fast Ca^ {2+} transients (mesc) during excitation -contraction (EC) cycle and then examine alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in healthy and diseased (hypertensive) heart cells, a PMT based system is implemented. Significant alterations in Ca^{2+} transients in hypertensive heart cells were observed. This finding is compatible with the clinical finding that patients with hypertensive cardiomyopathy suffer a lack of adequate relaxation. Finally, to correlate the Ca^{2+} dynamics in an EC cycle with mechanical activity, a hybrid optical digital processor was developed. The performance of the hybrid processor is analyzed and applied simultaneously with the PMT based system. The mechanical contraction and relaxation of a single cardiac cell closely paralleled that of Ca^{2+} dynamics during an EC cycle. In summary, this thesis illustrates

  2. Measurement techniques and instruments suitable for life-prediction testing of photovoltaic arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noel, G. T.; Sliemers, F. A.; Deringer, G. C.; Wood, V. E.; Wilkes, K. E.; Gaines, G. B.; Carmichael, D. C.

    1978-01-01

    Array failure modes, relevant materials property changes, and primary degradation mechanisms are discussed as a prerequisite to identifying suitable measurement techniques and instruments. Candidate techniques and instruments are identified on the basis of extensive reviews of published and unpublished information. These methods are organized in six measurement categories - chemical, electrical, optical, thermal, mechanical, and other physicals. Using specified evaluation criteria, the most promising techniques and instruments for use in life prediction tests of arrays were selected.

  3. Comparative study of various techniques for environmental radon, thoron and progeny measurements.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Mukesh; Rawat, Mukesh; Dangwal, Anoop; Gusain, G S; Mishra, Rosaline; Sahoo, S K; Tokonami, S

    2015-11-01

    Long-term average concentrations of radon, thoron and progeny were measured in normal and high background radiation areas in India using different techniques. Radon, thoron and progeny concentrations were measured using Raduet, Pin-Hole dosimeter, deposition-based CR-39 and deposition-based direct radon/thoron progeny sensor (DRPS/DTPS) detector system. All these techniques were used at a same time inside an individual dwelling. Radon concentration was recorded higher than thoron concentration in Garhwal Homes (NBRA) while thoron concentration was found relatively higher in the houses of Chhatarpur area (HBRA) in Odisha, India. The values measured with the CR-39 detector-based technique were found comparable with the values measured with the LR-115 detector-based technique. The comparisons of results using various techniques and their usefulness in radiation measurements are discussed in detail.

  4. The time-shift technique for measurement size of non-transparent spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, Walter; Tropea, Cameron

    2014-08-01

    In this study we introduce the time-shift technique, also known as the pulsed-displacement technique, as a means of measuring size and velocity of spherical particles. The measurement technique is not new, it has been introduced by Semidetnov[1] in 1985 and more generally discussed by Hess and Wood[2], Lin et al[3], Damaschke et al.[4] and Albrecht et al[5]. The novelty introduced in this study is the application of the technique to measure non-transparent particles, which are quite common for example in spray drying processes or in paint sprays. In this contribution the basic working principle of the time-shift technique will be reviewed and an optical configuration suitable for the measurement of non-transparent droplets will be presented. The signal generation and processing will be discussed. Example measurements in a milk spray are presented.

  5. New technique for the direct measurement of core noise from aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krejsa, E. A.

    1981-01-01

    A new technique is presented for directly measuring the core noise levels from gas turbine aircraft engines. The technique requires that fluctuating pressures be measured in the far-field and at two locations within the engine core. The cross-spectra of these measurements are used to determine the levels of the far-field noise that propagated from the engine core. The technique makes it possible to measure core noise levels even when other noise sources dominate. The technique was applied to signals measured from an AVCO Lycoming YF102 turbofan engine. Core noise levels as a function of frequency and radiation angle were measured and are presented over a range of power settings.

  6. Characterization of Carbon Dioxide Washout Measurement Techniques in the Mark-III Space Suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norcross, J.; Bekdash, O.; Meginnis, I.

    2016-01-01

    Providing adequate carbon dioxide (CO2) washout is essential to the reduction of risk in performing suited operations. Long term CO2 exposure can lead to symptoms such as headache, lethargy, dizziness, and in severe cases can lead to unconsciousness and death. Thus maintaining adequate CO2 washout in both ground testing and during in flight EVAs is a requirement of current and future suit designs. It is necessary to understand the inspired CO2 of suit wearers such that future requirements for space suits appropriately address the risk of inadequate washout. Testing conducted by the EVA Physiology Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center aimed to characterize a method for noninvasively measuring inspired oronasal CO2 under pressurized suited conditions in order to better inform requirements definition and verification techniques for future CO2 washout limits in space suits. Prior work conducted by the EPL examined several different wearable, respirator style, masks that could be used to sample air from the vicinity surround the nose and mouth of a suited test subject. Previously published studies utilized these masks, some being commercial products and some novel designs, to monitor CO2 under various exercise and flow conditions with mixed results for repeatability and/or consistency between subjects. Based on a meta-analysis of those studies it was decided to test a nasal cannula as it is a commercially available device that is placed directly in the flow path of the user as they breathe. A nasal cannula was used to sample air inhaled by the test subjects during both rest and exercise conditions. Eight subjects were tasked with walking on a treadmill or operating an arm ergometer to reach target metabolic rates of 1000, 2000, and 3000 BTU/hr. Suit pressure was maintained at 4.3 psid for all tests, with supply flow rates of 6, 4, and 2 actual cubic feet per minute depending on the test condition. Each test configuration was conducted twice with subjects breathing

  7. Measuring the effectiveness of nonpoint-source control techniques for aquatic protection. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Gadbois, L.E.

    1989-11-01

    Documenting the effectiveness of nonpoint source (NPS) pollution control technologies requires a technique- and a site-specific monitoring program. This report details an evaluation method developed to determine which NPS control technique should be used, and how to evaluate the control's effectiveness. Attention to nonpoint source pollution (NPSP) originating from stormwater runoff is growing as point sources are eliminated or controlled. NPSP has largely escaped regulation because of frequent difficulty in identifying a culpable source and quantifying its environmental impact, as well as from little knowledge of effective control techniques. The lack of corporate knowledge of NPSP control techniques results from limited historical regulation and from poorly developed methods to measure the techniques' effectiveness. The refinement of a single or small set of control techniques will not be appropriate for all NPSP due to the diversity of pollutants in runoff. Several measures of effectiveness may be needed for each technique due to site-specific variations.

  8. Analysis and correction of ground reflection effects in measured narrowband sound spectra using cepstral techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, J. H.; Stevens, G. H.; Leininger, G. G.

    1975-01-01

    Ground reflections generate undesirable effects on acoustic measurements such as those conducted outdoors for jet noise research, aircraft certification, and motor vehicle regulation. Cepstral techniques developed in speech processing are adapted to identify echo delay time and to correct for ground reflection effects. A sample result is presented using an actual narrowband sound pressure level spectrum. The technique can readily be adapted to existing fast Fourier transform type spectrum measurement instrumentation to provide field measurements/of echo time delays.

  9. Determination of dry deposition of ozone: Comparison of different measuring techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colbeck, I.; Simmons, A.

    1994-01-01

    Five methods were used to investigate the deposition of ozone. The measurements of the eddy diffusivity of heat using the Bowen ratio technique were slightly higher than but closely matched the measurements made for the momentum eddy diffusivity, measured simultaneously, using the profile technique. Similar flux values were obtained by the profile and eddy correlation method. Deposition velocities determined using the box method were higher than those calculated using an open top chamber.

  10. Measurement technique for determining the temperature distribution in a transparent solid using holographic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ito, A; Kashiwagi, T

    1987-03-01

    Temperature distributions in transparent solids have been determined by measurements of changes in the refractive index of the sample using a holographic interferometry technique. The steady-state temperature distributions within two samples, fused silica and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were measured to demonstrate the technique. Various errors in the measured temperature distribution caused by refraction and heat losses from the sample are discussed and estimated.

  11. A new technique to measure the spectral properties of conifer needles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1989-01-01

    A technique that enables the measurement of reflectance and transmittance of narrow leaves or needles with spectroradiometers equipped with a light source and integrating sphere is described. Measurement procedures and formulas for optical property calculations are presented. A test of the techniques resulted in absolute reflectance differences of 3 percent or less when comparing optical properties measured for whole leaves and narrow strips cut from the leaves.

  12. Thrombography reveals thrombin generation potential continues to deteriorate following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery despite adequate hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond K; Sleep, Joseph R; Visner, Allison J; Raasch, David J; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Torloni, Antonio S; Arabia, Francisco A

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic activation pathways of the hemostatic system converge when prothrombin is converted to thrombin. The ability to generate an adequate thrombin burst is the most central aspect of the coagulation cascade. The thrombin-generating potential in patients following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be indicative of their hemostatic status. In this report, thrombography, a unique technique for directly measuring the potential of patients' blood samples to generate adequate thrombin bursts, is used to characterize the coagulopathic profile in post-CPB patients. Post-CPB hemostasis is typically achieved with protamine reversal of heparin anticoagulation and occasionally supplemented with blood product component transfusions. In this pilot study, platelet poor plasma samples were derived from 11 primary cardiac surgery patients at five time points: prior to CPB, immediately post-protamine, upon arrival to the intensive care unit (ICU), 3 hours post-ICU admission, and 24 hours after ICU arrival. Thrombography revealed that the Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) was not different between [Baseline] and [PostProtamine] but proceeded to deteriorate in the immediate postoperative period. At the [3HourPostICU] time point, the ETP was significantly lower than the [Baseline] values, 1233 +/- 591 versus 595 +/- 379 nM.min (mean +/- SD; n=9, p < .005), despite continued adequacy of hemostasis. ETPs returned to baseline values the day after surgery. Transfusions received, conventional blood coagulation testing results, and blood loss volumes are also presented. Despite adequate hemostasis, thrombography reveals an underlying coagulopathic process that could put some cardiac surgical patients at risk for postoperative bleeding. Thrombography is a novel technique that could be developed into a useful tool for perfusionists and physicians to identify coagulopathies and optimize blood management following CPB. PMID:21449230

  13. Dynamic measurement of bulk modulus of dielectric materials using a microwave phase shift technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, B. J.; Strand, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    A microwave Doppler shift technique was developed for measuring the dynamic bulk modulus of dielectric materials such as solid propellants. The system has a demonstrated time resolution on the order of milliseconds and a theoretical spatial resolution of a few microns. Accuracy of the technique is dependent on an accurate knowledge of the wavelength of the microwave in the sample being tested. Such measurement techniques are discussed. Preliminary tests with two solid propellants, one non-aluminized and one containing 16% aluminum, yielded reasonable, reproducible results. It was concluded that with refinements the technique holds promise as a practical means for obtaining accurate dynamic bulk modulus data over a variety of transient conditions.

  14. In situ attosecond pulse characterization techniques to measure the electromagnetic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanner, M.; Bertrand, J. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-08-01

    A number of techniques have been developed to characterize the attosecond emission from high-order-harmonic sources. These techniques are broadly classified as ex situ, where the attosecond pulse train photoionizes a target gas in the presence of an infrared field, and in situ, where the measurement takes place in the medium in which the attosecond pulses are generated. It is accepted that ex situ techniques measure the characteristics of the electromagnetic field, including the phase of the recombination transition moment of the emitting atom or molecule, when the phase of the second medium is known. However, there is debate about whether in situ techniques measure the electromagnetic field, or only the characteristics of the recolliding electron before recombination occurs. We show numerically that in situ measurements are not sensitive to the recombination phase, when implemented in the perturbative regime as originally envisioned, and that they do not measure the electromagnetic phase of the emission.

  15. Introduction of measurement techniques in ultrasonic electronics: Basic principles and recent trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, Koichi; Wakatsuki, Naoto; Ebihara, Tadashi

    2016-07-01

    Measurement — the act of measuring physical properties that we perform — has the potential to contribute to the successful advancement of sciences and society. To open doors in physics and other sciences, various measurement methods and related applications have been developed, and ultrasound has remained a useful probe, power source, and interesting measurement object for the past two centuries. In this paper, we first summarize the basic principles of ultrasound from the viewpoint of measurement techniques for readers who just have started studying or are interested in the field of ultrasonic electronics. Moreover, we also introduce recent studies — ultrasonic properties of materials, measurement techniques, piezoelectric devices, nonlinear acoustics, biomedical ultrasound, and ocean acoustics — and their trends related to measurement techniques in ultrasonic electronics to provide some ideas for related applications.

  16. Simultaneous PVDF/VISAR measurement technique for isentropic loading with graded density impactors

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.U.; Chhabildas, L.C.; Reinhart, W.D.

    1997-10-01

    A simultaneous PVDF/VISAR measurement technique was used for isentropic-loading experiments with a polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) specimen. The experiments used a graded density impactor accelerated onto a tantalum driver backed with PMMA and then lithium fluoride windows for each experiment. Simultaneous measurements made at each window interface provided precise transit time and particle velocity measurements which can be used to determine the stress-vs-strain loading path using Lagrangian analysis techniques. The experimental technique provides access to 40 GPa stress levels in PMMA under isentropic-loading conditions.

  17. Techniques for Down-Sampling a Measured Surface Height Map for Model Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin

    2012-01-01

    This software allows one to down-sample a measured surface map for model validation, not only without introducing any re-sampling errors, but also eliminating the existing measurement noise and measurement errors. The software tool of the current two new techniques can be used in all optical model validation processes involving large space optical surfaces

  18. [Application of near infrared spectroscopy technique to nondestructive measurement of vegetable quality].

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Juan; Ying, Yi-Bin; Yu, Hai-Yan; Fu, Xia-Ping

    2007-06-01

    Nondestructive detection techniques of vegetable include electrical properties, optical reflectance and transmission, sonic vibration, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), machine vision, aromatic volatile emission, vibration characteristics and others. The most widely employed and successful technique is to use its optical property. Near infrared spectroscopy technique is extremely fast, highly efficient, cheap to implement, of good recurrence and no sample preparation, and is a rapid and non-destructive modern measuring technique that has been widely used in many fields. In the present paper, the application of near infrared spectroscopy technique to nondestructive measurement of vegetable quality was briefly introduced. Some considerable aspects existing in the application were also discussed, and it is pointed out that because of vegetable's diversity and rot-proneness, automation analysis machine should be developed to improve the speed of quality detection, and cooperating with several other nondestructive techniques, such as NMR and machine vision, is the research trend.

  19. An Investigation of a Photographic Technique of Measuring High Surface Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siviter, James H., Jr.; Strass, H. Kurt

    1960-01-01

    A photographic method of temperature determination has been developed to measure elevated temperatures of surfaces. The technique presented herein minimizes calibration procedures and permits wide variation in emulsion developing techniques. The present work indicates that the lower limit of applicability is approximately 1,400 F when conventional cameras, emulsions, and moderate exposures are used. The upper limit is determined by the calibration technique and the accuracy required.

  20. Goal Attainment Scaling as a Clinical Measurement Technique in Communication Disorders: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlosser, Ralf W.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of client progress is an important topic in communicative disorders research and clinical literature. Goal attainment scaling (GAS) is a technique for evaluating individual progress toward goals. Despite recognition of GAS as a clinical-outcome assessment technique in other clinical professions, the current debate on measuring client…

  1. Validity of using backward Lagrangian Stochastic technique in measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates the accuracy of measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoons using backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) technique. The bLs technique was originally developed for relatively homogeneous terrains without any obstacles causing significant windflow disturbance. The errors ass...

  2. A Novel Microcharacterization Technique in the Measurement of Strain and Orientation Gradient in Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garmestai, H.; Harris, K.; Lourenco, L.

    1997-01-01

    Representation of morphology and evolution of the microstructure during processing and their relation to properties requires proper experimental techniques. Residual strains, lattice distortion, and texture (micro-texture) at the interface and the matrix of a layered structure or a functionally gradient material and their variation are among parameters important in materials characterization but hard to measure with present experimental techniques. Current techniques available to measure changes in interred material parameters (residual stress, micro-texture, microplasticity) produce results which are either qualitative or unreliable. This problem becomes even more complicated in the case of a temperature variation. These parameters affect many of the mechanical properties of advanced materials including stress-strain relation, ductility, creep, and fatigue. A review of some novel experimental techniques using recent advances in electron microscopy is presented here to measure internal stress, (micro)texture, interracial strength and (sub)grain formation and realignment. Two of these techniques are combined in the chamber of an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope to measure strain and orientation gradients in advanced materials. These techniques which include Backscattered Kikuchi Diffractometry (BKD) and Microscopic Strain Field Analysis are used to characterize metallic and intermetallic matrix composites and superplastic materials. These techniques are compared with the more conventional x-ray diffraction and indentation techniques.

  3. Surface displacement measured by beam distortion detection technique: Application to picosecond ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Chigarev, N.; Rossignol, C.; Audoin, B.

    2006-11-15

    A sensitive technique of surface displacement measurement without interferometry is proposed for the goals of picosecond ultrasonics. Simple description of detection mechanism is provided on the basis of paraxial approximation of light diffraction. Test experiments with gold and tungsten layers have been performed and analyzed. The efficiency of the technique is compared with interferometry and reflectometry methods.

  4. Investigation of techniques for bulk stress measurement on exposed pipelines -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, H.

    1993-10-01

    Subsidence, frost heave, fault slippage, landslides, and other forms of soil movement can cause localized areas of high stress on a pipeline. The areas of high stress can compromise the integrity of the pipeline, despite the fact that the highly stressed areas may not be readily detectable. This report describes two phases of development by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) of a nonintrusive technique to quantify the local, throughwall average axial stress in an exposed pipe. The technique selected for evaluation and development is a low-frequency, electromagnetic technique, called multiparameter magnetic measurement (MPMM). MPMM is a combination of existing magnetic techniques including magnetic hysteresis measurement, nonlinear harmonic analysis, and multiparameter correlation. The work included both a proof-of-principle demonstration of the technique using samples of grade X-42, X-46, and X-52 pipe (Phase 1), and further determination of practical applicability of the MPMM technique (Phase 2). Phase 2 focused on evaluating the variability of magnetic response to stress among five samples of grade X-42 pipe. The results of the investigations include the following; the technique can measure the throughwall average stress-difference between the axial and hoop stresses with approximately {+-} 5 ksi (35 Mpa) accuracy within the range up to about 50--75% of the yield strength; and at the present state of development, the practical applicability of the technique for measurements of absolute stress values is low.

  5. Measurement of the absorption coefficient of a glucose solution through transmission of light and polarymetry techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yáñez M., J.

    2011-10-01

    Diabetes is a disease with no cure, but can be controlled to improve the quality of life of sufferers. Currently there are means to control, but this means they have the disadvantage that in order to measure the amount of glucose is necessary to take blood samples that are painful. This paper presents a system for measuring glucose using non-invasive optical techniques: using absorption spectroscopy and polarimetry technique. It shows the results obtained from experiments done on samples containing distilled water and different amounts of glucose to study the absorption coefficient of glucose with both techniques. Water is used because it is one of the main elements in the blood and interferes with glucose measurement. This experiment will develop a prototype to measure glucose through a non-invasive technique.

  6. COMPARISON OF ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING HYDROCARBON EMISSIONS FROM THE MANUFACTURE OF FIBERGLASS-REINFORCED PLASTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses several projects to measure hydrocarbon emissions associated with the manufacture of fiberglass-reinforced plastics. The main purpose of the projects was to evaluate pollution prevention techniques to reduce emissions by altering raw materials, application equ...

  7. Three-Dimensional Shape Measurement Method for Micro Droplet Utilizing Micro LIF Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugii, Yasuhiko; Horita, Ryo

    This paper describes a novel measurement technique for three-dimensional shape of micro droplet utilizing micro LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) technique. A measurement system consisted of microscope equipped with 10x lens, high sensitive CCD camera, mercury lamp, optical filters and so on. Calibration curve between thickness of micro droplet and emission of fluorescence dye solution was obtained by the use of the PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) microchip, whose depth varied from 10 to 95 μm fabricated using photo lithography technique. The microchip based calibration method provides high measurement accuracy and eliminate photobleaching effect. Measurement accuracy of the present method in depth direction was about 0.57 μm assessed using laser con-focal microscope and the spatial resolution in the horizontal plane became 6.7 μm. The technique is useful to investigate a gas-liquid two-phase flow in micro scale.

  8. Are shear force methods adequately reported?

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Fowler, Stephanie M; Hopkins, David L

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the detail to which shear force (SF) protocols and methods have been reported in the scientific literature between 2009 and 2015. Articles (n=734) published in peer-reviewed animal and food science journals and limited to only those testing the SF of unprocessed and non-fabricated mammal meats were evaluated. It was found that most of these SF articles originated in Europe (35.3%), investigated bovine species (49.0%), measured m. longissimus samples (55.2%), used tenderometers manufactured by Instron (31.2%), and equipped with Warner-Bratzler blades (68.8%). SF samples were also predominantly thawed prior to cooking (37.1%) and cooked sous vide, using a water bath (50.5%). Information pertaining to blade crosshead speed (47.5%), recorded SF resistance (56.7%), muscle fibre orientation when tested (49.2%), sub-section or core dimension (21.8%), end-point temperature (29.3%), and other factors contributing to SF variation were often omitted. This base failure diminishes repeatability and accurate SF interpretation, and must therefore be rectified. PMID:27107727

  9. Are shear force methods adequately reported?

    PubMed

    Holman, Benjamin W B; Fowler, Stephanie M; Hopkins, David L

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the detail to which shear force (SF) protocols and methods have been reported in the scientific literature between 2009 and 2015. Articles (n=734) published in peer-reviewed animal and food science journals and limited to only those testing the SF of unprocessed and non-fabricated mammal meats were evaluated. It was found that most of these SF articles originated in Europe (35.3%), investigated bovine species (49.0%), measured m. longissimus samples (55.2%), used tenderometers manufactured by Instron (31.2%), and equipped with Warner-Bratzler blades (68.8%). SF samples were also predominantly thawed prior to cooking (37.1%) and cooked sous vide, using a water bath (50.5%). Information pertaining to blade crosshead speed (47.5%), recorded SF resistance (56.7%), muscle fibre orientation when tested (49.2%), sub-section or core dimension (21.8%), end-point temperature (29.3%), and other factors contributing to SF variation were often omitted. This base failure diminishes repeatability and accurate SF interpretation, and must therefore be rectified.

  10. Absorption measurement of thin films by using photothermal techniques: The influence of thermal properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Z.L.; Kuo, P.K.; Thomas, R.L.; Fan, Z.X.

    1995-12-31

    Photothermal techniques are widely used for measuring optical absorption of thin film coatings. In these applications the calibration of photothermal signal is typically based on the assumption that the thermal properties of the thin film make very little contribution. In this paper we take mirage technique as an example and present a detailed analysis of the influence of thin film thermal properties on absorption measurements. The results show that the traditional calibration method is not valid on surprisingly many situations.

  11. [Adaptive procedures for measuring arterial blood flow velocity in retinal vessels using indicator technique].

    PubMed

    Vilser, W; Schack, B; Bareshova, E; Senff, I; Bräuer-Burchardt, C; Münch, K; Strobel, J

    1995-10-01

    There are highly significant differences in the measuring results of arterial blood velocity between the indicator and laser-Doppler techniques (up to 800%). A new measuring procedure for the analysis of indicator dilution curves was developed based on indicator model and experimental results. The use of this new measuring procedure results in reduced mean systematic error between the indicator and laser-Doppler techniques to values around 10%. With the introduction of adaptive measuring arrays for the creation of indicator dilution curves and the application of adaptive algorithms for centering and spectral normalizing of the dilution curves, improved reproducibility can be expected.

  12. Boundary-layer transition and global skin friction measurement with an oil-fringe imaging technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, Daryl J.; Mateer, George G.; Menter, Florian R.

    1993-01-01

    A new oil-fringe imaging system skin friction (FISF) technique to measure skin friction on wind tunnel models is presented. In the method used to demonstrate the technique, lines of oil are applied on surfaces that connect the intended sets of measurement points, and then a wind tunnel is run so that the oil thins and forms interference fringes that are spaced in proportion to local skin friction. After a run the fringe spacings are imaged with a CCD-array digital camera and measured on a computer. Skin friction and transition measurements on a two-dimensional wing are presented and compared with computational predictions.

  13. A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luke, Keung L.; Cheng, Li-Jen

    1988-01-01

    A chemical/microwave technique for the measurement of bulk minority carrier lifetime in silicon wafers is described. This method consists of a wet chemical treatment (surface cleaning, oxidation in solution, and measurement in HF solution) to passivate the silicon surfaces, a laser diode array for carrier excitation, and a microwave bridge measuring system which is more sensitive than the microwave systems used previously for lifetime measurement. Representative experimental data are presented to demonstrate this technique. The result reveals that this method is useful for the determination of bulk lifetime of commercial silicon wafers.

  14. Design of 3D measurement system based on multi-sensor data fusion technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiguang; Han, Jun; Yu, Xun

    2009-05-01

    With the rapid development of shape measurement technique, multi-sensor approach becomes one of valid way to improve the accuracy, to expend measuring range, to reduce occlusion, to realize multi-resolution measurement, and to increase measuring speed simultaneously. Sensors in multi-sensor system can have different system parameters, and they may have different measuring range and different precision. Light sectioning method is one of useful measurement technique for 3D profile measurement. It is insensitive to the surface optical property of 3D object, has scarcely any demand on surrounding. A multi-sensor system scheme, which uses light sectioning method and multi-sensor data fusion techniques, is presented for blade of aviation engine and spiral bevel gear measurement. The system model is developed to build the relationship between measuring range & precision and system parameters. The system parameters were set according to system error analysis, measuring range and precision. The result shows that the system is more universal than it's ancestor, and that the accuracy of the system is about 0.05mm for the 60× 60mm2 measuring range, and that the system is successful for the aero-dynamical data curve of blade of aviation engine and tooth profile of spiral bevel gear measurement with 3600 multi-resolution measuring character.

  15. Note: A non-invasive electronic measurement technique to measure the embedded four resistive elements in a Wheatstone bridge sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Ravelo Arias, S. I.; Ramírez Muñoz, D.; Ferreira, R.; Freitas, P.

    2015-06-15

    The work shows a measurement technique to obtain the correct value of the four elements in a resistive Wheatstone bridge without the need to separate the physical connections existing between them. Two electronic solutions are presented, based on a source-and-measure unit and using discrete electronic components. The proposed technique brings the possibility to know the mismatching or the tolerance between the bridge resistive elements and then to pass or reject it in terms of its related common-mode rejection. Experimental results were taken in various Wheatstone resistive bridges (discrete and magnetoresistive integrated bridges) validating the proposed measurement technique specially when the bridge is micro-fabricated and there is no physical way to separate one resistive element from the others.

  16. Polarisation control through an optical feedback technique and its application in precise measurements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenxue; Zhang, Shulian; Long, Xingwu

    2013-01-01

    We present an anisotropic optical feedback technique for controlling light polarisation. The technique is based on the principle that the effective gain of a light mode is modulated by the magnitude of the anisotropic feedback. A new physical model that integrates Lamb's semi-classical theory and a model of the equivalent cavity of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is developed to reveal the physical nature of this technique. We use this technique to measure the phase retardation, optical axis, angle, thickness and refractive index with a high precision of λ/1380, 0.01°, 0.002°, 59 nm and 0.0006, respectively. PMID:23771164

  17. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  18. Comparing and assessing different measurement techniques for mercury in coal systhesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, D.P.; Richardson, C.F.

    1995-11-01

    Three mercury measurement techniques were performed on synthesis gas streams before and after an amine-based sulfur removal system. The syngas was sampled using (1) gas impingers containing a nitric acid-hydrogen peroxide solution, (2) coconut-based charcoal sorbent, and (3) an on-line atomic absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a gold amalgamation trap and cold vapor cell. Various impinger solutions were applied upstream of the gold amalgamation trap to remove hydrogen sulfide and isolate oxidized and elemental species of mercury. The results from these three techniques are compared to provide an assessment of these measurement techniques in reducing gas atmospheres.

  19. A test technique for measuring lightning-induced voltages on aircraft electrical circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walko, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a test technique used for the measurement of lightning-induced voltages in the electrical circuits of a complete aircraft is described. The resultant technique utilizes a portable device known as a transient analyzer capable of generating unidirectional current impulses similar to lightning current surges, but at a lower current level. A linear relationship between the magnitude of lightning current and the magnitude of induced voltage permitted the scaling up of measured induced values to full threat levels. The test technique was found to be practical when used on a complete aircraft.

  20. A new technique for measuring gas conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Sprinkle, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration conversion factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters was developed. It was applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for hydrocarbon gases. The values of conversion factors for two common hydrocarbons measured using this technique are in good agreement with the empirical values cited by the manufacturer. Similar agreements can be expected for all other hydrocarbons. The technique is based on Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion product gases with that in normal air. It is simple, quick and relatively safe--particularly for toxic/poisonous hydrocarbons.

  1. Comparison of techniques for measurement of ambient levels of hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Shepson, P.B.; Hodges, D.N.; Nero, C.M.; Arnts, R.R.; Dasgupta, P.K.; Hwang, H.; Kok, G.L.; Lind, J.A.; Lazrus, A.L.; Mackay, G.I.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to measure hydrogen peroxide from three sources: (1) zero air in the presence and absence of common interferences, (2) steady-state irradiations of hydrocarbon/NO/sub x/ mixtures, and (3) ambient air. The techniques employed for measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ included infrared absorption from a diode laser, fluorescence from an enzymatically produced complex, and chemiluminescence from reaction with luminol. The measurements were conducted simultaneously from a common manifold. Four systems, each of which utilized one of the above techniques, were compared with respect to sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range in measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentrations ranging from 0.062 to 128 ppbv. For pure samples measured in zero air, agreement of 14-23% was achieved when compared to standard values. In these examples, there was no indication of interferences for an H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ level of 6 ppbv except in the luminol technique where a negative interference was caused by SO/sub 2/. Agreement among techniques was much worse for measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced in the photochemical mixtures. In these mixtures, significant concentrations of organic peroxide were also measured by the enzymatic techniques.

  2. Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration Technique in Cavitation Research and Comparison to Phase-Doppler Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Eric; Kröger, Willfried; Damaschke, Nils

    2015-12-01

    Small particles, especially bubbles in the micro-meter range, influence the cavitation of the propellers. The prediction of cavitation inception and water quality measurements are important in cavitation research. The Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration (HDNC) technique can be used for reliable bubble concentration measurements in fluid flows. The HDNC technique bases on the analysis of scattered light from the cavitation nuclei in the water. The HDNC technique can distinguish between bubbles and solid particles. The particle type classification is important, because the number concentration of solid particles is often much higher than the nuclei concentration in cavitation tunnels and in seawater. Verification experiments show, that the HDNC technique reaches similar capabilities in number concentration estimation as Phase Doppler (PD) technique in much shorter acquisition time.

  3. Interferometric dynamic measurement: techniques based on high-speed imaging or a single photodetector.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Li, Xide

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  4. Interferometric Dynamic Measurement: Techniques Based on High-Speed Imaging or a Single Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yu; Pedrini, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, optical interferometry-based techniques have been widely used to perform noncontact measurement of dynamic deformation in different industrial areas. In these applications, various physical quantities need to be measured in any instant and the Nyquist sampling theorem has to be satisfied along the time axis on each measurement point. Two types of techniques were developed for such measurements: one is based on high-speed cameras and the other uses a single photodetector. The limitation of the measurement range along the time axis in camera-based technology is mainly due to the low capturing rate, while the photodetector-based technology can only do the measurement on a single point. In this paper, several aspects of these two technologies are discussed. For the camera-based interferometry, the discussion includes the introduction of the carrier, the processing of the recorded images, the phase extraction algorithms in various domains, and how to increase the temporal measurement range by using multiwavelength techniques. For the detector-based interferometry, the discussion mainly focuses on the single-point and multipoint laser Doppler vibrometers and their applications for measurement under extreme conditions. The results show the effort done by researchers for the improvement of the measurement capabilities using interferometry-based techniques to cover the requirements needed for the industrial applications. PMID:24963503

  5. Comparison of Two-dimensional Measurement Techniques for Predicting Knee Angle and Moment during a Drop Vertical Jump

    PubMed Central

    Mizner, Ryan L.; Chmielewski, Terese L.; Toepke, John J.; Tofte, Kari B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of two dimensional (2D) video-based techniques and three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis to assess potential knee injury risk factors during jump landing. Design Observational study Setting Research Laboratory Participants Thirty-six female athletes in cutting and pivoting sports. Assessment Athletes performed a drop vertical jump during which movement was recorded with a motion analysis system and a digital video camera positioned in the frontal plane. Main Outcome Measures The 2D variables were the frontal plane projection angle (FPPA), the angle formed between thigh and leg, and the knee:ankle separation ratio, the distance between knee joints divided by the distance between ankles. The 3D variables were knee abduction angle and external abduction moment. All variables were assessed at peak knee flexion. Linear regression assessed the relationship between the 2D and 3D variables. In addition, intraclass correlation coefficients determined rater reliability for the 2D variables and compared the 2D measurements made from digital video to the same measurements from the motion analysis. Results The knee:ankle separation ratio accounted for a higher variance of 3D knee abduction angle (r2 =0.350) and knee abduction moment (r2=0.394) when compared to the FPPA (r2=0.145, 0.254). The digital video measures had favorable rater reliability (ICC:0.89–0.94) and were comparable to the motion analysis system (ICC≥0.92). Conclusion When compared to the FPPA, the knee:ankle separation ratio had better association with previously cited knee injury risk factors in female athletes. The 2D measures have adequate consistency and validity to merit further clinical consideration in jump landing assessments. PMID:22544058

  6. Measuring excited state lifetime of Rb atoms with pump-probe technique

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, X.; Boiko, D. L.

    2015-08-31

    A technique for measuring the excited state lifetime τ{sub ex} of optical transitions in alkali atoms is presented. It is a form of pump-probe technique based on time-resolved optical transmission through the atomic vapor cell. This technique can serve as an alternative to the traditionally used time-resolved photofluorescence methods when measuring alkali vapor cells with heavily quenched fluorescence, where the τ{sub ex} is expected to be on the order of a few nanoseconds, and the highly sensitive fluorescence detectors with sub-nanosecond temporal resolution that are required may not be available. We use this technique to measure the τ{sub ex} of Rb atoms in vapor cells with different buffer gas pressures.

  7. Comparison of techniques for measurement of ambient levels of hydrogen peroxide (journal version)

    SciTech Connect

    Kleindienst, T.E.; Shepson, P.B.; Hodges, D.N.; Nero, C.M.; Arnts, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    A study measured hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) from three sources: (1) zero air in the presence and absence of common interferences; (2) steady-state irradiations of hydrocarbon/NOX mixtures; and (3) ambient air. The techniques employed for measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ included infrared absorption from a diode laser, fluorescence from an enzymatically produced complex, and chemiluminescence from reaction with luminol. Four systems, each of which utilized one of the above techniques, were compared with respect to sensitivity, selectivity, and dynamic range in measuring H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ concentrations ranging from 0.062 to 128 ppbv. There was no indication of interferences for an H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ level of 6 ppbv except in the luminol technique, where a negative interference was caused by SO/sub 2/. Agreement among techniques was much worse for measurement of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced in the photochemical mixtures. Significant concentrations of organic peroxide were measured by the enzymatic technique. During ambient monitoring, the techniques employed showed quantitative agreement.

  8. Comparison of stress-measuring techniques at the DNA-UTP site, Rodgers Hollow, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) is developing explosives technology through its Underground Technology Program (UTP). Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has supported the DNA by conducting research to characterize the in situ stress and rock mass deformability at one of the UTP underground sites at Rodgers Hollow, near Louisville, Kentucky on the Fort Knox Military Reservation. The purpose of SNL`s testing was to determine the in situ stress using three different measurement techniques and, if possible, to estimate the rock mass modulus near the underground opening. The three stress-measuring techniques are (1) borehole deformation measurements using overcoring, (2) Anelastic Strain Recovery (ASR) complemented by laboratory ultrasonic and mechanical properties testing, and (3) the in situ flatjack technique using cancellation pressure. Rock mass modulus around the underground opening was estimated using the load deformation history of the flatjack and surrounding rock. Borehole deformation measurements using the overcoring technique probably represent the most reliable method for in situ stress determination in boreholes up to 50 ft (15 m) deep in competent rock around an isolated excavation. The technique is used extensively by the tunneling and mining industries. The ASR technique is also a core-based technique and is used in the petroleum and natural gas industries for characterization of in situ stress from deep boreholes. The flatjack technique has also been used in the tunneling and mining industries, and until recently has been limited to measurement of the stress immediately around the excavation. Results from the flatjack technique must be further analyzed to calculate the in situ stress in the far field.

  9. Development of a noninvasive technique for the measurement of intracranial pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ueno, T.; Shuer, L. M.; Yost, W. T.; Hargens, A. R.

    1998-01-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) dynamics are important for understanding adjustments to altered gravity. Previous flight observations document significant facial edema during exposure to microgravity, which suggests that ICP is elevated during microgravity. However, there are no experimental results obtained during space flight, primarily due to the invasiveness of currently available techniques. We have developed and refined a noninvasive technique to measure intracranial pressure noninvasively. The technique is based upon detecting skull movements of a few micrometers in association with altered intracranial pressure. We reported that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with the pulsation of ICP in cadavera. In normal operations, however, we place a transducer on the scalp. Thus, we cannot rule out the possibility that the PPLL technique picks up cutaneous pulsation. The purpose of the present study was therefore to show that the PPLL technique has enough sensitivity to detect changes in cranial distance associated with cardiac cycles in vivo.

  10. Measurement Techniques for Transmit Source Clock Jitter for Weak Serial RF Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin A.; Schlesinger, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for filtering clock jitter measurements are developed, in the context of controlling data modulation jitter on an RF carrier to accommodate low signal-to-noise ratio thresholds of high-performance error correction codes. Measurement artifacts from sampling are considered, and a tutorial on interpretation of direct readings is included.

  11. Comparison of atomic oxygen measurements by incoherent scatter and satellite-borne mass spectrometer techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedin, A. E.; Alcayde, D.

    1974-01-01

    Atomic oxygen densities determined by the incoherent scatter technique are compared to densities deduced from satellite-borne mass spectrometer measurements and are found to agree within experimental error. The diurnal variations inferred from the incoherent scatter measurements do show, however, some departure from diurnal variations found by modeling the mass spectrometer results. Some implications of these departures are briefly discussed.

  12. A simple technique for measuring buoyant weight increment of entire, transplanted coral colonies in the field

    PubMed Central

    Herler, Jürgen; Dirnwöber, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the impacts of global and local threats on coral reefs requires monitoring reef health and measuring coral growth and calcification rates at different time scales. This has traditionally been mostly performed in short-term experimental studies in which coral fragments were grown in the laboratory or in the field but measured ex situ. Practical techniques in which growth and measurements are performed over the long term in situ are rare. Apart from photographic approaches, weight increment measurements have also been applied. Past buoyant weight measurements under water involved a complicated and little-used apparatus. We introduce a new method that combines previous field and laboratory techniques to measure the buoyant weight of entire, transplanted corals under water. This method uses an electronic balance fitted into an acrylic glass underwater housing and placed atop of an acrylic glass cube. Within this cube, corals transplanted onto artificial bases can be attached to the balance and weighed at predetermined intervals while they continue growth in the field. We also provide a set of simple equations for the volume and weight determinations required to calculate net growth rates. The new technique is highly accurate: low error of weight determinations due to variation of coral density (< 0.08%) and low standard error (< 0.01%) for repeated measurements of the same corals. We outline a transplantation technique for properly preparing corals for such long-term in situ experiments and measurements. PMID:22049248

  13. Using Rating Scale and Nomination Techniques to Measure Friendship and Popularity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bukowski, William M.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Studied the associations between measures of friendship and popularity derived from nomination and rating scales procedures with a sample of school-age and early adolescent boys and girls. Found that each of these techniques can provide parallel measures of popularity (sociometric preference) and friendship (whether the child is participating in a…

  14. Construction of Weak and Strong Similarity Measures for Ordered Sets of Documents Using Fuzzy Set Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egghe, L.; Michel, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ordered sets (OS) of documents are encountered more and more in information distribution systems, such as information retrieval systems. Classical similarity measures for ordinary sets of documents need to be extended to these ordered sets. This is done in this article using fuzzy set techniques. The practical usability of the OS-measures is…

  15. Measuring and Fixturing Techniques. Auto Body. Unitized Vehicles. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardin, G. W.

    This module contains information on unibody construction and control points for structural measurements to perform repairs on the bodies of unitized vehicles. The module covers the fundamental aspects related to the measuring and fixturing techniques used to analyze collision damage before and during repair operations. Designed for individualized…

  16. Measuring tropospheric HNO3 - Problems and prospects for Nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of laboratory and field measurements was performed to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO3 concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO3 vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia, the Nylon filter measured an average of 70 percent higher HNO3 concentration than the mist chamber technique. The results indicate that O3 causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO3 measurements performed with the filter technique. This O3-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO3 concentrations determined with the two techniques. It is hypothesized that unidentified (organic?) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO3(-) on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO3 vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO3 with the mist chamber method.

  17. Nonintrusive ultrasonic flow measurement techniques and their applications to BTU metering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, S. H.; Karvelas, D. E.; Raptis, A. C.

    1987-04-01

    The paper reviews the state-of-the-art ultrasonic flow measurement techniques and assesses their potential application to BTU metering for District Heating and Cooling (DHC). The assessed techniques include Doppler, transit-time, and cross-correlation ultrasonic flowmeters which are currently available on the market. A novel modification of the flow instruments to include temperature measurement is also discussed. The modified flowmeter provides a direct measurement of heat content in hot water flow, thus, it allows one to meter the BTU consumption of a DHC system.

  18. Measuring Three-Dimensional Thorax Motion Via Biplane Radiographic Imaging: Technique and Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Baumer, Timothy G; Giles, Joshua W; Drake, Anne; Zauel, Roger; Bey, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Measures of scapulothoracic motion are dependent on accurate imaging of the scapula and thorax. Advanced radiographic techniques can provide accurate measures of scapular motion, but the limited 3D imaging volume of these techniques often precludes measurement of thorax motion. To overcome this, a thorax coordinate system was defined based on the position of rib pairs and then compared to a conventional sternum/spine-based thorax coordinate system. Alignment of the rib-based coordinate system was dependent on the rib pairs used, with the rib3:rib4 pairing aligned to within 4.4 ± 2.1 deg of the conventional thorax coordinate system.

  19. A new technique to improve the accuracy of LDA tracker measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonka, V.; Hoornstra, J.; Oldengarm, J.

    1981-08-01

    A new technique that improves the measurement accuracy of a tracker type laser Doppler anemometer for time averaged velocity measurements in a stationary flow is presented. It is shown that the accuracy of the demodulation system is affected by a systematic error, which can be eliminated. The principle of the technique is based on taking two independent but coupled measurements such that the error appears in both results but with opposite sign. This is achieved by up- and down-shifting the Doppler frequency using a bidirectional optical frequency shifting device.

  20. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1 3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  1. Attempts to develop a new nuclear measurement technique of β-glucuronidase levels in biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünak, T.; Avcibasi, U.; Yildirim, Y.; Çetinkaya, B.

    2003-01-01

    β-Glucuronidase is one of the most important hydrolytic enzymes in living systems and plays an essential role in the detoxification pathway of toxic materials incorporated into the metabolism. Some organs, especially liver and some tumour tissues, have high level of β-glucuronidase activity. As a result the enzymatic activity of some kind of tumour cells, the radiolabelled glucuronide conjugates of cytotoxic, as well as radiotoxic compounds have potentially very valuable diagnostic and therapeutic applications in cancer research. For this reason, a sensitive measurement of β-glucuronidase levels in normal and tumour tissues is a very important step for these kinds of applications. According to the classical measurement method of β-glucuronidase activity, in general, the quantity of phenolphthalein liberated from its glucuronide conjugate, i.e. phenolphthalein-glucuronide, by β-glucuronidase has been measured by use of the spectrophotometric technique. The lower detection limit of phenolphthalein by the spectrophotometric technique is about 1-3 μg. This means that the β-glucuronidase levels could not be detected in biological samples having lower levels of β-glucuronidase activity and therefore the applications of the spectrophotometric technique in cancer research are very seriously limited. Starting from this consideration, we recently attempted to develop a new nuclear technique to measure much lower concentrations of β-glucuronidase in biological samples. To improve the detection limit, phenolphthalein-glucuronide and also phenyl-N-glucuronide were radioiodinated with 131I and their radioactivity was measured by use of the counting technique. Therefore, the quantity of phenolphthalein or aniline radioiodinated with 131I and liberated by the deglucuronidation reactivity of β-glucuronidase was used in an attempt to measure levels lower than the spectrophotometric measurement technique. The results obtained clearly verified that 0.01 pg level of

  2. Novel Spectrograph/Radiometer for Cloud Top Height Measurement Using Three Complementary Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hongwoo; Soulen, Peter F.; Prasad, Coorg R.

    1997-01-01

    A proof-of-concept (POC) instrument system to measure cloud top height from space using three complementary techniques is presented. These techniques use measurements of: (1) thermal infrared (IR); (2) molecular oxygen 'A' band absorption; and (3) filling-in of Fraunhofer lines (the Ring effect), respectively. Combining three techniques is achieved with a single grating spectrograph with bandpass and order sorting filters by measuring I I jim radiation from the zeroth order of the grating for the IR, 750-780 nm radiation from the first order for the 'A' band absorption, and 390-400 mn radiation from the second order for the Ca K and H Fraunhofer line filling-in effect. The POC system and its measurement results with the POC system are described.

  3. Towards convective heat transfer enhancement: surface modification, characterization and measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, T. J.; Thakur, D. B.; Van der Meer, T. H.

    2012-11-01

    In this work, heat transfer surface modification and heat transfer measurement technique is developed. Heat transfer investigation was aimed to study the effect of carbon nano fibers (extremely high thermal conductive material) on the enhancement level in heat transfer. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures is achieved using thermal catalytic chemical vapor deposition process (TCCVD) on a 50 μm pure nickel (Ni270) wire. The micro wire samples covered with CNF layers were subjected to a uniform flow from a nozzle. Heat transfer measurement was achieved by a controlled heat dissipation through the micro wire to attain a constant temperature during the flow. This measurement technique is adopted from hot wire anemometry calibration method. Synthesis of carbon nano structures, heat transfer surface characterization and measurement technique are evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that an average enhancement in Nusselt Number of 17% is achieved.

  4. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Techniques Developed for Measuring Gas Flow Velocity, Density, Temperature, and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Seasholtz, Richard G.; Elam, Kristie A.; Panda, Jayanta

    2005-01-01

    Nonintrusive optical point-wise measurement techniques utilizing the principles of molecular Rayleigh scattering have been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to obtain time-averaged information about gas velocity, density, temperature, and turbulence, or dynamic information about gas velocity and density in unseeded flows. These techniques enable measurements that are necessary for validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and computational aeroacoustic (CAA) codes. Dynamic measurements allow the calculation of power spectra for the various flow properties. This type of information is currently being used in jet noise studies, correlating sound pressure fluctuations with velocity and density fluctuations to determine noise sources in jets. These nonintrusive techniques are particularly useful in supersonic flows, where seeding the flow with particles is not an option, and where the environment is too harsh for hot-wire measurements.

  5. Evaluation of Two Computational Techniques of Calculating Multipath Using Global Positioning System Carrier Phase Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Susan F.; Hood, Laura; Panneton, Robert J.; Saunders, Penny E.; Adkins, Antha; Hwu, Shian U.; Lu, Ba P.

    1996-01-01

    Two computational techniques are used to calculate differential phase errors on Global Positioning System (GPS) carrier war phase measurements due to certain multipath-producing objects. The two computational techniques are a rigorous computati electromagnetics technique called Geometric Theory of Diffraction (GTD) and the other is a simple ray tracing method. The GTD technique has been used successfully to predict microwave propagation characteristics by taking into account the dominant multipath components due to reflections and diffractions from scattering structures. The ray tracing technique only solves for reflected signals. The results from the two techniques are compared to GPS differential carrier phase ns taken on the ground using a GPS receiver in the presence of typical International Space Station (ISS) interference structures. The calculations produced using the GTD code compared to the measured results better than the ray tracing technique. The agreement was good, demonstrating that the phase errors due to multipath can be modeled and characterized using the GTD technique and characterized to a lesser fidelity using the DECAT technique. However, some discrepancies were observed. Most of the discrepancies occurred at lower devations and were either due to phase center deviations of the antenna, the background multipath environment, or the receiver itself. Selected measured and predicted differential carrier phase error results are presented and compared. Results indicate that reflections and diffractions caused by the multipath producers, located near the GPS antennas, can produce phase shifts of greater than 10 mm, and as high as 95 mm. It should be noted tl the field test configuration was meant to simulate typical ISS structures, but the two environments are not identical. The GZ and DECAT techniques have been used to calculate phase errors due to multipath o the ISS configuration to quantify the expected attitude determination errors.

  6. Assessment of recent advances in measurement techniques for atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellweger, Christoph; Emmenegger, Lukas; Firdaus, Mohd; Hatakka, Juha; Heimann, Martin; Kozlova, Elena; Spain, T. Gerard; Steinbacher, Martin; van der Schoot, Marcel V.; Buchmann, Brigitte

    2016-09-01

    Until recently, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) measurements were made almost exclusively using nondispersive infrared (NDIR) absorption and gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC/FID) techniques, respectively. Recently, commercially available instruments based on spectroscopic techniques such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy have become more widely available and affordable. This resulted in a widespread use of these techniques at many measurement stations. This paper is focused on the comparison between a CRDS "travelling instrument" that has been used during performance audits within the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) with instruments incorporating other, more traditional techniques for measuring CO2 and CH4 (NDIR and GC/FID). We demonstrate that CRDS instruments and likely other spectroscopic techniques are suitable for WMO/GAW stations and allow a smooth continuation of historic CO2 and CH4 time series. Moreover, the analysis of the audit results indicates that the spectroscopic techniques have a number of advantages over the traditional methods which will lead to the improved accuracy of atmospheric CO2 and CH4 measurements.

  7. Methane emissions from dairy cows measured using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer and chamber techniques.

    PubMed

    Grainger, C; Clarke, T; McGinn, S M; Auldist, M J; Beauchemin, K A; Hannah, M C; Waghorn, G C; Clark, H; Eckard, R J

    2007-06-01

    Our study compared methane (CH4) emissions from lactating dairy cows measured using the sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer and open-circuit respiration chamber techniques. The study was conducted using 16 lactating Holstein-Friesian cows. In each chamber, the cow was fitted with the SF6 tracer apparatus to measure total CH4 emissions, including emissions from the rectum. Fresh ryegrass pasture was harvested daily and fed ad libitum to each cow with a supplement of 5 kg of grain/d. The CH4 emissions measured using the SF6 tracer technique were similar to those using the chamber technique: 331 vs. 322 g of CH4/d per cow. The accuracy of the SF6 tracer technique was indicated by considering the ratio of the CH4 emission measured using the SF6 tracer to the emission measured using the chamber for each cow on each day. The calculated ratio of 102.3% (SE = 1.51) was not different from 100%. A higher variability within cow between days was found for the SF6 tracer technique [coefficient of variation (CV) = 6.1%] than for the chamber technique (CV = 4.3%). The variability among cows was substantially higher than within cows, and was higher for the SF6 technique (CV = 19.6%) than for the chamber technique (CV = 17.8%). Our CH4 emission data were compared with whole-animal chamber studies conducted in Canada and Ireland. In the Canadian study the SF6 technique did not measure CH4 emissions from the rectum and emissions were 8% lower than those measured using the chamber, indicating that emissions from the rectum may be greater than previously measured (1%). The relationship between CH4 emission and dry matter intake was examined for our data and for that reported in the Canadian study. There was a difference in the slopes of the regressions derived from our data and that from Canada; 17.1 vs. 20.8 g of CH4/kg of dry matter intake. A difference between the 2 locations was expected based on the difference in diet composition for these 2 studies. The SF6 tracer technique is

  8. A New Measurement Equivalence Technique Based on Latent Class Regression as Compared with Multiple Indicators Multiple Causes

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Jamshid; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Mohammad Taghi; Jafari, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Background: Measurement equivalence is an essential prerequisite for making valid comparisons in mental health questionnaires across groups. In most methods used for assessing measurement equivalence, which is known as Differential Item Functioning (DIF), latent variables are assumed to be continuous. Objective: To compare a new method called Latent Class Regression (LCR) designed for discrete latent variable with the multiple indicators multiple cause (MIMIC) as a continuous latent variable technique to assess the measurement equivalence of the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12), which is a cross deferent subgroup of Iranian nurses. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 among 771 nurses working in the hospitals of Fars and Bushehr provinces of southern Iran. To identify the Minor Psychiatric Disorders (MPD), the nurses completed self-report GHQ-12 questionnaires and sociodemographic questions. Two uniform-DIF detection methods, LCR and MIMIC, were applied for comparability when the GHQ-12 score was assumed to be discrete and continuous, respectively. Results: The result of fitting LCR with 2 classes indicated that 27.4% of the nurses had MPD. Gender was identified as an influential factor of the level of MPD.LCR and MIMIC agree with detection of DIF and DIF-free items by gender, age, education and marital status in 83.3, 100.0, 91.7 and 83.3% cases, respectively. Conclusions: The results indicated that the GHQ-12 is to a great degree, an invariant measure for the assessment of MPD among nurses. High convergence between the two methods suggests using the LCR approach in cases of discrete latent variable, e.g. GHQ-12 and adequate sample size. PMID:27482129

  9. Pupil Alignment Measuring Technique and Alignment Reference for Instruments or Optical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagopian, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A technique was created to measure the pupil alignment of instruments in situ by measuring calibrated pupil alignment references (PARs) in instruments. The PAR can also be measured using an alignment telescope or an imaging system. PAR allows the verification of the science instrument (SI) pupil alignment at the integrated science instrument module (ISIM) level of assembly at ambient and cryogenic operating temperature. This will allow verification of the ISIM+SI alignment, and provide feedback to realign the SI if necessary.

  10. Overview of Supersonic Aerodynamics Measurement Techniques in the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Gary E.

    2007-01-01

    An overview is given of selected measurement techniques used in the NASA Langley Research Center (NASA LaRC) Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of aerospace vehicles operating at supersonic speeds. A broad definition of a measurement technique is adopted in this paper and is any qualitative or quantitative experimental approach that provides information leading to the improved understanding of the supersonic aerodynamic characteristics. On-surface and off-surface measurement techniques used to obtain discrete (point) and global (field) measurements and planar and global flow visualizations are described, and examples of all methods are included. The discussion is limited to recent experiences in the UPWT and is, therefore, not an exhaustive review of existing experimental techniques. The diversity and high quality of the measurement techniques and the resultant data illustrate the capabilities of a ground-based experimental facility and the key role that it plays in the advancement of our understanding, prediction, and control of supersonic aerodynamics.

  11. Soil porosity in agricultural context: A review of measurement techniques at various scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garré, Sarah; Chélin, Marie; Luong, Jeanne; Parvin, Nargish; Degré, Aurore; Mercatoris, Benoit

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction was identified by European Commission as one of the eight main threats for agricultural soils. In order to address this issue, measurements of soil porosity are critical. However, there are as many techniques to measure as there are definitions of porosity. A single method is not sufficient to obtain a complete image of the soil porosity at various scales and encompassing different levels of complexity. Each existing method is characterized by a unique combination of a specific level of complexity, resolution and scale of measurement. In this review, we started by defining the basic terms linked to soil porosity in an agricultural context. Then we give an overview of relevant measurement techniques, from classical methods to recent advances. We present their advantages and disadvantages, the scales of measurement, the resolution, the expected accuracy and the susceptibility to errors. This work aims at guiding the choice for the best (combination of) technique(s) to answer questions related to agricultural soil porosity, categorizing techniques according to the parameters they focus on: from total porosity over pore size distribution, structure and connectivity up to the quantification of spatio-temporal dynamics.

  12. Study on fast measurement of sugar content of yogurt using Vis/NIR spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yong; Feng, Shuijuan; Wu, Di; Li, Xiaoli

    2006-09-01

    In order to measuring the sugar content of yogurt rapidly, a fast measurement of sugar content of yogurt using Vis/NIR-spectroscopy techniques was established. 25 samples selected separately from five different brands of yogurt were measured by Vis/NIR-spectroscopy. The sugar content of yogurt on positions scanned by spectrum were measured by a sugar content meter. The mathematical model between sugar content and Vis/NIR spectral measurements was established and developed based on partial least squares (PLS). The correlation coefficient of sugar content based on PLS model is more than 0.894, and standard error of calibration (SEC) is 0.356, standard error of prediction (SEP) is 0.389. Through predicting the sugar content quantitatively of 35 samples of yogurt from 5 different brands, the correlation coefficient between predictive value and measured value of those samples is more than 0.934. The results show the good to excellent prediction performance. The Vis/NIR spectroscopy technique had significantly greater accuracy for determining the sugar content. It was concluded that the Vis/NIRS measurement technique seems reliable to assess the fast measurement of sugar content of yogurt, and a new method for the measurement of sugar content of yogurt was established.

  13. A fiber-array probe technique for measuring the viscosity of a substance under shock compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Li-Peng; Liu, Fu-Sheng; Ma, Xiao-Juan; Zhao, Bei-Jing; Zhang, Ning-Chao; Wang, Wen-Peng; Hao, Bin-Bin

    2013-10-01

    A fiber-array probe is designed to measure the damping behavior of a small perturbed shock wave in an opaque substance, by which the effective viscosity of substance under the condition of high temperature and high pressure can be constrained according to the flyer-impact technique. It shows that the measurement precision of the shock arrival time by using this technique is within 2 ns. To easily compare with the results given by electrical pin technique, the newly developed method is used to investigate the effective viscosity of aluminum (Al). The shear viscosity coefficient of Al is determined to be 1700 Pa·s at 71 GPa with a strain rate of 3.6 × 106 s-1, which is in good agreement with the results of other methods. The advantage of the new technique over the electrical pin one is that it is applicable for studying the non-conductive substances.

  14. Measurement of spray characteristics using the background-oriented schlieren technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junyong; Kim, Namho; Min, Kyoungdoug

    2013-02-01

    The background-oriented schlieren (BOS) technique has not yet been used in the visualization of fuel spray in automotive research despite its great promise. To investigate the potential of this technique, the density distribution of a cross section of the spray was obtained by applying a filtered back projection (FBP) to the BOS results. Using the density distribution, the penetration lengths of the liquid and vapor phases of the fuel were measured and compared with the results of Mie scattering and shadowgraph images. The results show that the BOS technique is applicable for measuring the liquid and vapor penetration lengths simultaneously. Furthermore, the analysis of the back-projected density distribution revealed that the BOS technique is capable of visualizing the difference in the transient change in the density distribution due to changes in the injection pressure and the fuel volatility.

  15. Computer Aided Measurement Laser (CAML): technique to quantify post-mastectomy lymphoedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetta, Chiara; Abundo, Paolo; Felici, Antonella; Ljoka, Concetta; Di Cori, Sandro; Rosato, Nicola; Foti, Calogero

    2012-10-01

    Lymphoedema can be a side effect of cancer treatment. Eventhough several methods for assessing lymphoedema are used in clinical practice, an objective quantification of lymphoedema has been problematic. The aim of the study was to determine the objectivity, reliability and repeatability of the computer aided measurement laser (CAML) technique. CAML technique is based on computer aided design (CAD) methods and requires an infrared laser scanner. Measurements are scanned and the information describing size and shape of the limb allows to design the model by using the CAD software. The objectivity and repeatability was established in the beginning using a phantom. Consequently a group of subjects presenting post-breast cancer lymphoedema was evaluated using as a control the contralateral limb. Results confirmed that in clinical settings CAML technique is easy to perform, rapid and provides meaningful data for assessing lymphoedema. Future research will include a comparison of upper limb CAML technique between healthy subjects and patients with known lymphoedema.

  16. Measurement of real pulsatile blood flow using X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Lim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Sang-Joon

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging technique has been used to investigate biofluid flows in a non-destructive manner. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of the X-ray PIV technique with CO2 microbubbles as flow tracer for measurement of pulsatile blood flows under in vivo conditions. The traceability of CO2 microbubbles in a pulsatile flow was demonstrated through in vitro experiment. A rat extracorporeal bypass loop was used by connecting a tube between the abdominal aorta and jugular vein of a rat to obtain hemodynamic information of actual pulsatile blood flows without changing the hemorheological properties. The decrease in image contrast of the surrounding tissue was also investigated for in vivo applications of the proposed technique. This technique could be used to accurately measure whole velocity field information of real pulsatile blood flows and has strong potential for hemodynamic diagnosis of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25744850

  17. Optimization of the tungsten oxide technique for measurement of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Hollow tubes coated with tungstic acid have been shown to be of value in the determination of ammonia and nitric acid in ambient air. Practical application of this technique was demonstrated utilizing an automated sampling system for in-flight collection and analysis of atmospheric samples. Due to time constraints these previous measurements were performed on tubes that had not been well characterized in the laboratory. As a result the experimental precision could not be accurately estimated. Since the technique was being compared to other techniques for measuring these compounds, it became necessary to perform laboratory tests which would establish the reliability of the technique. This report is a summary of these laboratory experiments as they are applied to the determination of ambient ammonia concentration.

  18. Wind tunnel evaluation of several tracer and collection techniques for the measurement of spray drift.

    PubMed

    Brusselman, E; Van Driessen, K; Steurbaut, W; Gabriels, D; Cornelis, W; Nuyttens, D; Sonck, B; Baetens, K; Nicolai, B; Verboven, P; Ramon, H

    2004-01-01

    In the history of pesticide drift measuring techniques, different tracers and a lot of different collection techniques have been used. At the start of a new Flemish project 'Protecting the Flemish environment against drift - The importance of drift-reducing techniques', wind tunnel tests have been executed to select the most efficient tracer and collection technique. As tracer types a fluorescent tracer Renaissance W15, 2 different chelates, a NaCl-solution and a fungicide Tolylfluanide were used. 2 different collection techniques were tested: drains incorporated in the wind tunnel floor filled with filter paper and filled with cloths. The recovery of the different tracers combined with the 2 collection materials was calculated. The advantages and disadvantages of the tracers and collection materials are enumerated in this article. PMID:15756877

  19. A development of a technique for measuring the compliance of the textile vascular prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoffi, F.; Dieval, F.; Chakfé, N.; Durand, B.

    The objective of this study is to develop a technique for measuring the compliance of the textile vascular prostheses without membrane. The principle of this test is to investigate the dimensional changes of prostheses, using imaging techniques, submitted to internal pressure. The internal compliance is broken into three categories: the radial compliance, the longitudinal compliance and the volumetric compliance. The results have shown a significant difference in compliance between the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) vascular grafts and the healthy host arteries.

  20. Measurements and implications of vortex motions using two flow-visualization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delisi, Donald P.; Greene, George C.

    1990-01-01

    The present comparative study of two different, but complementary flow-visualization techniques, which yield different interpretations of vortex-migration distance and lifetime, gives attention to the difficulty of determining vortex evolution and lifetime from flow-visualization measurements. The techniques involved the release of a fluorescent dye and of neutrally buoyant particles in a water-filled towing tank. Vortices are found to migrate farther, and last longer, when visualized with neutrally buoyant particles rather than with dyes.

  1. Plasma Sheet Velocity Measurement Techniques for the Pulsed Plasma Thruster SIMP-LEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Lau, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The velocity of the first plasma sheet was determined between the electrodes of a pulsed plasma thruster using three measurement techniques: time of flight probe, high speed camera and magnetic field probe. Further, for time of flight probe and magnetic field probe, it was possible to determine the velocity distribution along the electrodes, as the plasma sheet is accelerated. The results from all three techniques are shown, and are compared for one thruster geometry.

  2. The application of acoustic emission technique to fatigue crack measurement. [in aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Davis, W. T.; Crews, J. H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission technique to measure fatigue cracks in aluminum alloy specimens was investigated. There are several variables, such as the metallurgical and the physical treatment of the specimen, that can affect the level of acoustic activity of a fatigue specimen. It is therefore recommended that the acoustic emission technique be supplemented by other nondestructive evaluation methods to obtain quantitative data on crack growth.

  3. Techniques for Measuring Low Earth Orbital Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Demko, Rikako

    2002-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton and Teflon FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials due to their desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low Earth orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft durability. It is therefore important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield (E, the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is through mass loss measurements. For limited duration exposure experiments, such as shuttle experiments, where the atomic oxygen fluence is often so low that mass loss measurements can not produce acceptable uncertainties, recession measurements based on atomic force microscopy analyses can be used. Equally necessary to knowing the mass loss or recession depth for determining the erosion yield of polymers is the knowledge of the atomic oxygen fluence that the polymers were exposed to in space. This paper discusses the procedures and relevant issues for mass loss and recession depth measurements for passive atomic oxygen erosion yield characterization of polymers, along with techniques for active atomic oxygen fluence and erosion characterization. One active atomic oxygen erosion technique discussed is a new technique based on optical measurements. Details including the use of both semi-transparent and opaque polymers for active erosion measurement are reviewed.

  4. Technique for calibrating angular measurement devices when calibration standards are unavailable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Tom D.

    1991-01-01

    A calibration technique is proposed that will allow the calibration of certain angular measurement devices without requiring the use of absolute standard. The technique assumes that the device to be calibrated has deterministic bias errors. A comparison device must be available that meets the same requirements. The two devices are compared; one device is then rotated with respect to the other, and a second comparison is performed. If the data are reduced using the described technique, the individual errors of the two devices can be determined.

  5. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required.

  6. A technique for fast and accurate measurement of hand volumes using Archimedes' principle.

    PubMed

    Hughes, S; Lau, J

    2008-03-01

    A new technique for measuring hand volumes using Archimedes principle is described. The technique involves the immersion of a hand in a water container placed on an electronic balance. The volume is given by the change in weight divided by the density of water. This technique was compared with the more conventional technique of immersing an object in a container with an overflow spout and collecting and weighing the volume of overflow water. The hand volume of two subjects was measured. Hand volumes were 494 +/- 6 ml and 312 +/- 7 ml for the immersion method and 476 +/- 14 ml and 302 +/- 8 ml for the overflow method for the two subjects respectively. Using plastic test objects, the mean difference between the actual and measured volume was -0.3% and 2.0% for the immersion and overflow techniques respectively. This study shows that hand volumes can be obtained more quickly than the overflow method. The technique could find an application in clinics where frequent hand volumes are required. PMID:18488965

  7. Use of image processing techniques for heat transfer measurements using thermochromic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Crabtree, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A Macintosh-based image processing code has been developed for use in making continuous temperature profile measurements using thermochromic liquid crystals. This software is the result of extensive modifications to the public domain software, NIH Image developed by the National Institutes of Health. These modifications primarily include routines to quantify the TLC color changes as temperature measurements while providing a simple user interface. Using these techniques, one can perform literally thousands of temperature measurements over a small area (307,200 temperature measurements in a 640*480 image), thus making continuous profile measurement possible. This technique was developed in support of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (a new nuclear fission research reactor being developed at Oak Ridge National Lab.) for use in experiments designed to study the impact of a flow blockage at the inlet to the reactor core.

  8. Novel technique for distributed fibre sensing based on coherent Rayleigh scattering measurements of birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin; Soto, Marcelo A.; Thévenaz, Luc

    2016-05-01

    A novel distributed fibre sensing technique is described and experimentally validated, based on birefringence measurements using coherent Rayleigh scattering. It natively provides distributed measurements of temperature and strain with more than an order of magnitude higher sensitivity than Brillouin sensing, and requiring access to a single fibre-end. Unlike the traditional Rayleigh-based coherent optical time-domain reflectometry, this new method provides absolute measurements of the measurand and may lead to a robust discrimination between temperature and strain in combination with another technique. Since birefringence is purposely induced in the fibre by design, large degrees of freedom are offered to optimize and scale the sensitivity to a given quantity. The technique has been validated in 2 radically different types of birefringent fibres - elliptical-core and Panda polarization-maintaining fibres - with a good repeatability.

  9. Differential absorption lidar technique for measurement of the atmospheric pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new two-wavelength lidar technique for remotely measuring the pressure profile using the trough absorption region between two strong lines in the oxygen A band is described. The theory of integrated vertical path, differential ranging, and horizontal-path pressure measurements is given, with methods to desensitize and correct for temperature effects. The properties of absorption troughs are described and shown to reduce errors due to laser frequency jitter by up to two orders of magnitude. A general analysis, including laser bandwidth effects, demonstrates that pressure measurements with an integrated-vertical-path technique are typically fifty times more accurate than with a differential ranging technique. Simulations show 0.1-0.3 percent accuracy for ground and Shuttle-based pressure-profile and surface-pressure experiments.

  10. A synchronous measurement technique for the evaluation of atmospheric extinction coefficient and refractive index structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dagang; Deng, Ke; Zhang, Peng; Yao, Zhoushi; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, Kaiyu

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric extinction coefficient and refractive index structure constant (Cn2) are important parameters to represent laser beam propagation in the atmosphere. However, to best of our knowledge, the typical measurement methods for these two parameters have not been integrated into a system. Therefore, a synchronous measurement technique for the evaluation of atmospheric extinction coefficient and Cn2 is proposed, which is applicable from weak to strong fluctuation. This technique employs projector image optics with larger aperture Fresnel lens to receive atmosphere modulated speckle. The extinction coefficient is evaluated by speckle irradiance and Cn2 is evaluated by speckle wander effect. The receiving aperture constrain condition is also discussed to ensure the speckle can be received in the long term beam wander effect under the strong fluctuation. The theory and experiment demonstration indicate that this technique provides a feasible way to simultaneously measurement extinction coefficient and Cn2.

  11. A radionuclide counting technique for measuring wind velocity. [drag force anemometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Mall, G. H.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for measuring wind velocities of meteorological interest is described. It is based on inverse-square-law variation of the counting rates as the radioactive source-to-counter distance is changed by wind drag on the source ball. Results of a feasibility study using a weak bismuth 207 radiation source and three Geiger-Muller radiation counters are reported. The use of the technique is not restricted to Martian or Mars-like environments. A description of the apparatus, typical results, and frequency response characteristics are included. A discussion of a double-pendulum arrangement is presented. Measurements reported herein indicate that the proposed technique may be suitable for measuring wind speeds up to 100 m/sec, which are either steady or whose rates of fluctuation are less than 1 kHz.

  12. Applications of Advanced Nondestructive Measurement Techniques to Address Safety of Flight Issues on NASA Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, Bill

    2016-01-01

    Advanced nondestructive measurement techniques are critical for ensuring the reliability and safety of NASA spacecraft. Techniques such as infrared thermography, THz imaging, X-ray computed tomography and backscatter X-ray are used to detect indications of damage in spacecraft components and structures. Additionally, sensor and measurement systems are integrated into spacecraft to provide structural health monitoring to detect damaging events that occur during flight such as debris impacts during launch and assent or from micrometeoroid and orbital debris, or excessive loading due to anomalous flight conditions. A number of examples will be provided of how these nondestructive measurement techniques have been applied to resolve safety critical inspection concerns for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and a variety of launch vehicles and unmanned spacecraft.

  13. A Remote Sensing Technique For Combustion Gas Temperature Measurement In Black Liquor Recovery Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charagundla, S. R.; Semerjian, H. G.

    1986-10-01

    A remote sensing technique, based on the principles of emission spectroscopy, is being developed for temperature measurements in black liquor recovery boilers. Several tests have been carried out, both in the laboratory and at a number of recovery boilers, to characterize the emission spectra in the wavelength range of 300 nm to 800 nm. These tests have pointed out the potential for temperature measurements using the line intensity ratio technique based on a pair of emission lines at 404.4 nm and 766.5 nm observed in the recovery boiler combustion zone; these emission lines are due to potassium, a common constituent found in all the black liquors. Accordingly, a fiber optics based four-color system has been developed. This in-situ, nonintrusive temperature measurement technique, together with some of the more recent results, is described in this paper.

  14. Hydrogen clearance: Assessment of technique for measurement of skin-flap blood flow in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, J.G.; Kerrigan, C.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The hydrogen clearance technique has been used for many years by investigators to determine brain blood flow and has been partially validated in this setting using other methods of blood flow measurement. The method has been modified to allow blood flow measurements in skin, but the accuracy of H2 clearance for measuring skin blood flow has not been determined. Multiple blood flow measurements were performed using H2 clearance and radioactive microspheres on skin flaps and control skin in pigs. On 12 pigs, a total of 117 flap and 42 control skin measurements were available for analysis. There was no significant difference between the two techniques in measuring mean control skin blood flow. In skin flaps, H2 clearance was significantly correlated to microsphere-measured blood flow, but it consistently gave an overestimate. Sources of error may include injury to the tissues by insertion of electrodes, consumption of H2 by the electrodes, or diffusion of H2 from the relatively ischemic flap to its well-vascularized bed. Further studies are necessary to determine the cause of this error and to measure the technique's accuracy in skeletal muscle and other flaps.

  15. Combined FTIR-micrometeorological techniques for long term measurements of greenhouse gas fluxes from agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, A. K.; Griffith, D.; Harvey, M.; Naylor, T.; Smith, M.

    2009-04-01

    The exchange of trace gases between the biosphere and the atmosphere affects the atmospheric concentrations of gases such as methane, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, ammonia, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen dioxide and others. The quantification of the exchange between a biogenic system and the atmosphere is necessary for the evaluation of the impact of these interactions. This is of special interest for agricultural systems which can be sources or sinks of trace gases, and the measurement of the fluxes is necessary when evaluating both the environmental impact of agricultural activities and the impact of atmospheric pollution on agricultural production and sustainability. With the exception of CO2, micrometeorological measurements of the fluxes of greenhouse gases from agricultural activities are still mostly possible only in campaign mode due to the complexity and logistical requirements of the existing measurement techniques. This limitation precludes studies of fluxes which run for longer periods, for example over full seasonal or growing cycles for both animal- and crop-based agriculture. We have developed an instrument system for long-term flux measurements through a combination of micrometeorological flux measurement techniques such as Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) and Flux-Gradient (FG) with the high precision multi-species detection capabilities of FTIR spectroscopy. The combined technique is capable of simultaneous flux measurements of N2O, CH4 and CO2 at paddock to regional scales continuously, over longer terms (months, seasonal cycles, years). The system was tested on a 3 weeks field campaign in NSW, Australia on a flat, homogeneous circular grass paddock with grazing cattle. The flux of the atmospheric trace gas CO2 was measured with three different micrometeorological techniques: Relaxed Eddy Accumulation, Flux-Gradient, and Eddy Correlation. Simultaneously, fluxes of CH4 and N2O were measured by REA and FG technique.

  16. Pressure Measurement Techniques for Abdominal Hypertension: Conclusions from an Experimental Model.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Sascha Santosh; Wolf, Stefan; Rohde, Veit; Freimann, Florian Baptist

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) measurement is an indispensable tool for the diagnosis of abdominal hypertension. Different techniques have been described in the literature and applied in the clinical setting. Methods. A porcine model was created to simulate an abdominal compartment syndrome ranging from baseline IAP to 30 mmHg. Three different measurement techniques were applied, comprising telemetric piezoresistive probes at two different sites (epigastric and pelvic) for direct pressure measurement and intragastric and intravesical probes for indirect measurement. Results. The mean difference between the invasive IAP measurements using telemetric pressure probes and the IVP measurements was -0.58 mmHg. The bias between the invasive IAP measurements and the IGP measurements was 3.8 mmHg. Compared to the realistic results of the intraperitoneal and intravesical measurements, the intragastric data showed a strong tendency towards decreased values. The hydrostatic character of the IAP was eliminated at high-pressure levels. Conclusion. We conclude that intragastric pressure measurement is potentially hazardous and might lead to inaccurately low intra-abdominal pressure values. This may result in missed diagnosis of elevated abdominal pressure or even ACS. The intravesical measurements showed the most accurate values during baseline pressure and both high-pressure plateaus. PMID:26113992

  17. Molecular-Based Optical Measurement Techniques for Transition and Turbulence in High-Speed Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    High-speed laminar-to-turbulent transition and turbulence affect the control of flight vehicles, the heat transfer rate to a flight vehicle's surface, the material selected to protect such vehicles from high heating loads, the ultimate weight of a flight vehicle due to the presence of thermal protection systems, the efficiency of fuel-air mixing processes in high-speed combustion applications, etc. Gaining a fundamental understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in the transition process will lead to the development of predictive capabilities that can identify transition location and its impact on parameters like surface heating. Currently, there is no general theory that can completely describe the transition-to-turbulence process. However, transition research has led to the identification of the predominant pathways by which this process occurs. For a truly physics-based model of transition to be developed, the individual stages in the paths leading to the onset of fully turbulent flow must be well understood. This requires that each pathway be computationally modeled and experimentally characterized and validated. This may also lead to the discovery of new physical pathways. This document is intended to describe molecular based measurement techniques that have been developed, addressing the needs of the high-speed transition-to-turbulence and high-speed turbulence research fields. In particular, we focus on techniques that have either been used to study high speed transition and turbulence or techniques that show promise for studying these flows. This review is not exhaustive. In addition to the probe-based techniques described in the previous paragraph, several other classes of measurement techniques that are, or could be, used to study high speed transition and turbulence are excluded from this manuscript. For example, surface measurement techniques such as pressure and temperature paint, phosphor thermography, skin friction measurements and

  18. Comparative evaluation of radon measurement techniques for uranium exploration. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Czarnecki, R F; Pacer, J C; Freeman, R W

    1983-03-01

    The measurement of radon (Rn-222) in soil gas aids in uranium exploration by indicating indirectly the presence of buried ore bodies. Intrest in this exploration methodology has led to the development of various radon measurement techniques which detect the presence of soil-gas radon, both directly and/or indirectly. To establish the relative merit of these new radon measurement techniques, Bendix Field Engineering Corporation has tested a variety of them using existing uranium occurrences located in the Red Desert area of south-central Wyoming. The following soil-gas radon measurement techniques were tested: a prototype microprocessor-controlled emanometer; a commercially available emanometer; alpha-track detectors equipped with two types of detector material (carbonate and nitrate), and equipped with and without membranes for thoron separation; radon adsorption on activated charcoal; and partial extraction of lead-210 from soil samples. These techniques were compared for relative sensitivity, variability, signal-to-background contrast, and correlation. The radon measurements obtained were also correlated to the equivalent uranium in soil, as determined radiometrically. From approximately 34 replicate samples, the variability associated with a technique was lowest with the TSA emanometer (13%). The EDA emanometer showed 31% and Track Etch carbonate/open cup (C/O) 27%. The best signal-to-background ratio, 2.55, was obtained by the EDA emanometer; the Track Etch nitrate/members cup (N/M) was a close second with 2.45. All signal-to-background ratios were greater than 2.0 except for the TSA emanometer with 1.87. All the techniques measured a sufficient number of anomalous values to locate the subsurface ore body.

  19. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  20. Negative Expiratory Pressure Technique: An Awake Test to Measure Upper Airway Collapsibility in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, Helena Larramona; Marcus, Carole L.; McDonough, Joseph M.; Morera, Joan C. Oliva; Huang, Jingtao; Farre, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Upper airway (UA) collapsibility is a major pathophysiologic feature of the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). In adolescents, it is measured by obtaining the slope of pressure-flow relationship (SPF) while applying negative nasal pressure during sleep. An easier technique to assess UA collapsibility, consisting of application of negative expiratory pressure (NEP) during wakefulness, has demonstrated differences between control and OSAS subjects. We hypothesized that the NEP technique would correlate with SPF as a measurement of UA collapsibility in adolescents. Design: During wakefulness, NEP of −5 cm H2O in the seated and supine position was applied during the first second of expiration. The area under the expiratory flow-volume curve during NEP was compared to tidal breathing (RatioNEP). In addition, adolescents underwent SPF measurements during sleep. Two SPF techniques were performed to measure the activated and relatively hypotonic UA. Setting: Pediatric sleep laboratory. Participants: Seven adolescents with OSAS and 20 controls. Results: In the seated position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and both hypotonic SPF (r = −0.39, P = 0.04) and activated SPF (r = −0.62, P = 0.001). In the supine position, there was a correlation between RatioNEP and activated SPF (r = −0.43, P = 0.03) and a trend for hypotonic SPF (r = −0.38, P = 0.06). Conclusions: The negative expiratory pressure (NEP) technique correlates with the hypotonic and activated slope of pressure-flow relationship measurements. The seated position showed the strongest correlation. The NEP technique can be used as an alternative method to evaluate upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. Citation: Carrera HL, Marcus CL, McDonough JM, Morera JC, Huang J, Farre R, Montserrat JM. Negative expiratory pressure technique: an awake test to measure upper airway collapsibility in adolescents. SLEEP 2015;38(11):1783–1791. PMID:26158888

  1. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  2. New linear sweep technique to measure generation lifetimes in thin-film SOI MOSFET's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatesan, S.; Pierret, R. F.; Neudeck, G. W.

    1994-04-01

    A new linear sweep technique to measure generation lifetimes (tau(sub g)) in silicon-on-insulator (SOI) material is presented. A detailed analytic formulation is applied to fully-depleted and partially-depleted SOI films and used to simulate the behavior of the SOI devices under linear sweep conditions. A novel algorithm accurately determines the effective generation width in fully depleted SOI films. The measurement technique is experimentally verified by applying the algorithm to fully depleted SIMOX P-channel MOSFET's where observed lifetimes ranged from 0.3 mu s to 2.4 mu s.

  3. Simultaneous Global Pressure and Temperature Measurement Technique for Hypersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    High-temperature luminescent coatings are being developed and applied for simultaneous pressure and temperature mapping in conventional-type hypersonic wind tunnels, providing global pressure as well as Global aeroheating measurements. Together, with advanced model fabrication and analysis methods, these techniques will provide a more rapid and complete experimental aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic database for future aerospace vehicles. The current status in development of simultaneous pressure- and temperature-sensitive coatings and measurement techniques for hypersonic wind tunnels at Langley Research Center is described. and initial results from a feasibility study in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel are presented.

  4. Influence of beverage composition on the results of erosive potential measurement by different measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Jager, D H J; Vieira, A M; Ruben, J L; Huysmans, M C D N J M

    2008-01-01

    The influence of beverage composition on the measurement of erosive potential is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether beverage composition influences the measurement of erosive potential and to evaluate the influence of exposure in small and large volumes. Eleven beverages were included: water (control), 3 alcopops, 2 beers and 5 soft drinks. For each beverage 15 bovine enamel samples were used: 5 for chemical and 10 for profilometric analysis. After exposure to the beverages (63 min) the resulting solutions were analyzed for Ca and inorganic phosphorus (P(i)) content. The samples for optical profilometry were submersed sequentially in 500 ml or in 1 ml of the drinks for 3, 6, 9, 15 and 30 min (total 63 min). For some of the beverages high baseline concentrations of Ca (energy drink) or P(i) (cola drink, cola lemon drink, beer, beer lemon) were found. Some of the beverages showed a good correlation between the chemical methods. Profilometry (both for 1 and 500 ml) showed generally lower enamel losses than the chemical methods. Lower enamel losses were found for the profilometry 1 ml compared to the profilometry 500 ml only for the cola drinks. It can be concluded that the composition of the beverages had a significant effect on the determination of the erosive potential with chemical analyses. Drink composition also influenced the effect of small versus large exposure volumes, indicating the need for standardization of exposure parameters. PMID:18277070

  5. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  6. Correlation between near infrared spectroscopy and electrical techniques in measuring skin moisture content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamad, M.; Sabbri, A. R. M.; Mat Jafri, M. Z.; Omar, A. F.

    2014-11-01

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy technique serves as an important tool for the measurement of moisture content of skin owing to the advantages it has over the other techniques. The purpose of the study is to develop a correlation between NIR spectrometer with electrical conventional techniques for skin moisture measurement. A non-invasive measurement of moisture content of skin was performed on different part of human face and hand under control environment (temperature 21 ± 1 °C, relative humidity 45 ± 5 %). Ten healthy volunteers age between 21-25 (male and female) participated in this study. The moisture content of skin was measured using DermaLab® USB Moisture Module, Scalar Moisture Checker and NIR spectroscopy (NIRQuest). Higher correlation was observed between NIRQuest and Dermalab moisture probe with a coefficient of determination (R2) above 70 % for all the subjects. However, the value of R2 between NIRQuest and Moisture Checker was observed to be lower with the R2 values ranges from 51.6 to 94.4 %. The correlation of NIR spectroscopy technique successfully developed for measuring moisture content of the skin. The analysis of this correlation can help to establish novel instruments based on an optical system in clinical used especially in the dermatology field.

  7. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  8. Improved techniques for measurement of nanolitre volumes of phloem exudate from aphid stylectomy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When conducting aphid stylectomy, measuring accurate rates of phloem exudation is difficult because the volumes collected are in the nanolitre (nl) range. In a new method, exudate volume was calculated from optical measurement of droplet diameter as it forms on the tip of a severed aphid stylet. Evaporation was shown to decrease the accuracy of the measurement but was countered with the addition of water-saturated mineral oil. Volume measurements by optical estimation of the volume of a sphere suspended in oil was affected by the curvature of the oil surface. In contrast, measuring the exudate volume from optical measurement of droplet-diameter as formed on the tip of a severed aphid stylet, removes any inaccuracies due to oil surface curvature. A modified technique is proposed for measuring exudate volumes without oil by estimating the flow rate from photo-sequences of the collection period; a correction for evaporation is applied later. Results A change in oil volume of ±1.75% from an optimum volume of 285 μl had a statistically significant effect on droplet measurement, under or over-estimating droplet volume due to optical effects caused by the oil surface. Using microscope image capture and measurement software, a modified method for measuring phloem volume in air was developed, by reducing air exposure during measurement to approximately 5 s for each measurement. Phloem volumes were measured using both techniques with measurements in air being on average 19.9 nl less (SD 18.87, p<0.001) than those made in oil, and there was a strong linear relationship (R2=0.942) between the techniques. This linear relationship enabled the development of a correction equation with no significant difference at the 5% level between corrected volumes and actual volumes measured under oil. Conclusions This study showed that oil has a significant role in countering evaporation but oil volume must be carefully optimised for optical measurement of droplets to ensure

  9. Ultra-small time-delay estimation via a weak measurement technique with post-selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Chen; Huang, Jing-Zheng; Yu, Yang; Li, Qinzheng; Zeng, Guihua

    2016-09-01

    Weak measurement is a novel technique for parameter estimation with higher precision. In this paper we develop a general theory for the parameter estimation based on a weak measurement technique with arbitrary post-selection. The weak-value amplification model and the joint weak measurement model are two special cases in our theory. Applying the developed theory, time-delay estimation is investigated in both theory and experiments. The experimental results show that when the time delay is ultra-small, the joint weak measurement scheme outperforms the weak-value amplification scheme, and is robust against not only misalignment errors but also the wavelength dependence of the optical components. These results are consistent with theoretical predictions that have not been previously verified by any experiment.

  10. Thermoreflectance-based in-depth stress distribution measurement technique for single-crystal silicon structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Shugo; Kato, Takaaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Namazu, Takahiro

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we suggest a new stress measurement technique based on the thermoreflectance method for the estimation of the in-depth stress distribution of fabricated silicon devices. Changing the modulated intensity of a heating laser beam of the frequency-domain thermoreflectance method (FD-TRM) can vary the estimation depth optionally. We developed a measurement system on the basis of the FD-TRM and demonstrated in-depth stress measurement for a single-crystal silicon (SCS) sample. The result measured at a modulation frequency of 3 MHz showed the phase distribution of the TR signal corresponding to the stress distribution determined by 632-nm-excited Raman spectroscopy. In addition, it was found that the phase distribution changed depending on the modulation frequency. The FD-TRM can be a powerful technique for estimating the in-depth stress distribution of silicon materials.

  11. Non-contact measurement of diamagnetic susceptibility change by a magnetic levitation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mogi, I.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-03-01

    A new method for measuring the temperature dependence of the diamagnetic susceptibility is described. It is based on the Faraday method and employs a magnetic levitation technique. The susceptibility of a magnetically levitating diamagnetic sample is determined from the product of the magnetic flux density and the field gradient at the levitating position observed using a micro CCD camera. The susceptibility of a sample during containerless melting and solidification can be measured to a precision of better than ±0.05%. The temperature dependence of the susceptibility of paraffin wax was measured by the magnetic levitation technique with an accuracy of ±0.25%. This method enables sensitive and contactless measurements of the diamagnetic susceptibility across the melting point with in situ observations.

  12. A unified planar measurement technique for compressible flows using laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartfield, Roy J., Jr.; Hollo, Steven D.; Mcdaniel, James C.

    1992-01-01

    A unified laser-induced fluorescence technique for conducting planar measurements of temperature, pressure and velocity in nonreacting, highly compressible flows has been developed, validated and demonstrated. Planar fluorescence from iodine, seeded into air, was induced by an argon-ion laser and collected using a liquid-nitrogen cooled CCD camera. In the measurement technique, temperature is determined from the fluorescence induced with the laser operated broad band. Pressure and velocity are determined from the shape and position of the fluorescence excitation spectrum which is measured with the laser operated narrow band. The measurement approach described herein provides a means of obtaining accurate, spatially-complete maps of the primary flow field parameters in a wide variety of cold supersonic and transonic flows.

  13. A technique using a stellar spectrographic plate to measure terrestrial ozone column depth

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.Y.

    1995-08-01

    This thesis examines the feasibility of a technique to extract ozone column depths from photographic stellar spectra in the 5000--7000 Angstrom spectral region. A stellar spectrographic plate is measured to yield the relative intensity distribution of a star`s radiation after transmission through the earth`s atmosphere. The amount of stellar radiation absorbed by the ozone Chappuis band is proportional to the ozone column depth. The measured column depth is within 10% the mean monthly value for latitude 36{degree}N, however the uncertainty is too large to make the measurement useful. This thesis shows that a 10% improvement to the photographic sensitivity uncertainty can decrease the column depth uncertainty to a level acceptable for climatic study use. This technique offers the possibility of measuring past ozone column depths.

  14. Temperature and pressure measurement techniques for an advanced turbine test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, F. G.; Cochran, R. P.

    1980-01-01

    A high pressure, high-temperature turbine test facility constructed for use in turbine cooling research is described. Several recently developed temperature and pressure measuring techniques are used in this facility. The measurement techniques, their status, previous applications and some results are discussed. Noncontact surface temperature measurements are made by optical methods. Radiation pyrometry principles combined with photoelectric scanning are used for rotating components and infrared photography for stationary components. Contact (direct) temperature and pressure measurements on rotating components are expected to be handled with an 80 channel rotary data package which mounts on and rotates with the turbine shaft at speeds up to 17,500 rpm. The data channels are time-division multiplexed and converted to digital words in the data package. A rotary transformer couples power and digital data to and from the shaft.

  15. Novel On-wafer Radiation Pattern Measurement Technique for MEMS Actuator Based Reconfigurable Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a novel on-wafer, antenna far field pattern measurement technique for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based reconfigurable patch antennas. The measurement technique significantly reduces the time and the cost associated with the characterization of printed antennas, fabricated on a semiconductor wafer or dielectric substrate. To measure the radiation patterns, the RF probe station is modified to accommodate an open-ended rectangular waveguide as the rotating linearly polarized sampling antenna. The open-ended waveguide is attached through a coaxial rotary joint to a Plexiglas(Trademark) arm and is driven along an arc by a stepper motor. Thus, the spinning open-ended waveguide can sample the relative field intensity of the patch as a function of the angle from bore sight. The experimental results include the measured linearly polarized and circularly polarized radiation patterns for MEMS-based frequency reconfigurable rectangular and polarization reconfigurable nearly square patch antennas, respectively.

  16. Field comparison of disjunct and conventional eddy covariance techniques for trace gas flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Rinne, J; Douffet, T; Prigent, Y; Durand, P

    2008-04-01

    A field intercomparison experiment of the disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) and the conventional eddy covariance (EC) techniques was conducted over a grass field. The half-hourly water vapor fluxes measured by the DEC were within the estimated uncertainty from the fluxes measured by the EC. On the average there was a slight overestimation (<10%) of the fluxes measured by the DEC during the day and underestimation during the night as compared to the fluxes measured by the EC. As this bias does not appear in the simulated DEC measurements it is likely to be due to instrumental problems. The insensitivity of the quality of the fluxes measured by the DEC method to the deficiencies in the gas analysis shows the robustness of this new approach for measuring the surface-atmosphere exchange of trace gases.

  17. Nonintrusive optical measurements of aircraft engine exhaust emissions and comparison with standard intrusive techniques.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, K; Heland, J; Lister, D H; Wilson, C W; Howes, R J; Falk, R S; Lindermeir, E; Birk, M; Wagner, G; Haschberger, P; Bernard, M; Legras, O; Wiesen, P; Kurtenbach, R; Brockmann, K J; Kriesche, V; Hilton, M; Bishop, G; Clarke, R; Workman, J; Caola, M; Geatches, R; Burrows, R; Black, J D; Hervé, P; Vally, J

    2000-01-20

    Nonintrusive systems for the measurement on test rigs of aeroengine exhaust emissions required for engine certification (CO, NO(x), total unburned hydrocarbon, and smoke), together with CO(2) and temperature have been developed. These results have been compared with current certified intrusive measurements on an engine test. A spectroscopic database and data-analysis software has been developed to enable Fourier-transform Infrared measurement of concentrations of molecular species. CO(2), CO, and NO data showed agreement with intrusive techniques of approximately ?30%. A narrow-band spectroscopic device was used to measure CO(2) (with deviations of less than ?10% from the intrusive measurement), whereas laser-induced incandescence was used to measure particles. Future improvements to allow for the commercial use of the nonintrusive systems have been identified and the methods are applicable to any measurement of combustion emissions.

  18. Doppler Lidar Measurements of Tropospheric Wind Profiles Using the Aerosol Double Edge Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Bruce M.; Li, Steven X.; Mathur, Savyasachee; Korb, C. Laurence; Chen, Huailin

    2000-01-01

    The development of a ground based direct detection Doppler lidar based on the recently described aerosol double edge technique is reported. A pulsed, injection seeded Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm is used to make range resolved measurements of atmospheric winds in the free troposphere. The wind measurements are determined by measuring the Doppler shift of the laser signal backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. The lidar instrument and double edge method are described and initial tropospheric wind profile measurements are presented. Wind profiles are reported for both day and night operation. The measurements extend to altitudes as high as 14 km and are compared to rawinsonde wind profile data from Dulles airport in Virginia. Vertical resolution of the lidar measurements is 330 m and the rms precision of the measurements is a low as 0.6 m/s.

  19. Comparison of the accuracy of aerosol refractive index measurements from single particle and ensemble techniques.

    PubMed

    Mason, Bernard J; King, Simon-John; Miles, Rachael E H; Manfred, Katherine M; Rickards, Andrew M J; Kim, Jin; Reid, Jonathan P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2012-08-23

    The ability of two techniques, aerosol cavity ring down spectroscopy (A-CRDS) and optical tweezers, to retrieve the refractive index of atmospherically relevant aerosol was compared through analysis of supersaturated sodium nitrate at a range of relative humidities. Accumulation mode particles in the diameter range 300-600 nm were probed using A-CRDS, with optical tweezer measurements performed on coarse mode particles several micrometers in diameter. A correction for doubly charged particles was applied in the A-CRDS measurements. Both techniques were found to retrieve refractive indices in good agreement with previously published results from Tang and Munkelwitz, with a precision of ±0.0012 for the optical tweezers and ±0.02 for the A-CRDS technique. The coarse mode optical tweezer measurements agreed most closely with refractive index predictions made using a mass-weighted linear mixing rule. The uncertainty in the refractive index retrieved by the A-CRDS technique prevented discrimination between predictions using both mass-weighted and volume-weighted linear mixing rules. No efflorescence or kinetic limitations on water transport between the particle and the gas phase were observed at relative humidities down to 14%. The magnitude of the uncertainty in refractive index retrieved using the A-CRDS technique reflects the challenges in determining particle optical properties in the accumulation mode, where the extinction efficiency varies steeply with particle size.

  20. Application of the can technique and radon gas analyzer for radon exhalation measurements.

    PubMed

    Fazal-ur-Rehman; Al-Jarallah, M I; Musazay, M S; Abu-Jarad, F

    2003-01-01

    A passive "can technique" and an active radon gas analyzer with an emanation container were applied for radon exhalation rate measurements from different construction materials, viz. five marble seven ceramic and 100 granite tiles used in Saudi Arabia. The marble and ceramic tiles did not show detectable radon exhalation using the active radon gas analyzer system. However the granite tiles showed relatively high radon exhalations, indicating a relatively high uranium content. A comparison of the radon exhalation rates measured by the two techniques showed a linear correlation coefficient of 0.57. The radon exhalation rates from the granites varied from 0.02 to 6.58 Bqm(-2)h(-1) with an average of 1.35+/-1.40 Bqm(-2)h(-1). The geometric mean and the geometric standard deviation of the frequency distribution were found to be 0.80 and 3.1, respectively. The track density found on the nuclear track detectors in the can technique exposed to the granites, having high exhalation rates, varied linearly with exposure time with a linear correlation coefficient of 0.99. This experimental finding agrees with the theoretical prediction. The can technique showed sensitivity to low radon exhalation rates from ceramic, marble and some granite over a period of 2 months, which were not detectable by the active radon gas analyzer system. The reproducibility of data with both measuring techniques was found to be within a 7% deviation.

  1. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

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  2. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

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  3. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

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  4. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

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  8. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  9. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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  10. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  11. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

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  13. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

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    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

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  18. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

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  19. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

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  20. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...