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Sample records for adequate oxygen delivery

  1. Switching off angiogenic signalling: creating channelled constructs for adequate oxygen delivery in tissue engineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Cheema, U; Alekseeva, T; Abou-Neel, E A; Brown, R A

    2010-10-06

    A major question in biomimetic tissue engineering is how much of the structure/function of native vasculature needs to be reproduced for effective tissue perfusion. O2 supplied to cells in 3D scaffolds in vitro is initially dependent upon diffusion through the scaffold and cell consumption. Low O2 (3%) enhances specific cell behaviours, but where O2 is critically low (pathological hypoxia) cell survival becomes compromised. We measured real-time O2 in 3D scaffolds and introduced micro-channelled architecture to controllably increase delivery of O2 to cells and switch off the hypoxic response. Simple static micro-channelling gives adequate perfusion and can be used to control cell generated hypoxia-induced signalling.

  2. Oxygen delivery from red cells.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, A; Federspiel, W J; Clark, P A; Cokelet, G R

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the theoretical analysis of the unloading of oxygen from a red cell. A scale analysis of the governing transport equations shows that the solutions have a boundary layer structure near the red-cell membrane. The boundary layer is a region of chemical nonequilibrium, and it owes its existence to the fact that the kinetic time scales are shorter than the diffusion time scales in the red cell. The presence of the boundary layer allows an analytical solution to be obtained by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. A very useful result from the analysis is a simple, lumped-parameter description of the oxygen delivery from a red cell. The accuracy of the lumped-parameter description has been verified by comparing its predictions with results obtained by numerical integration of the full equations for a one-dimensional slab. As an application, we calculate minimum oxygen unloading times for red cells. PMID:3978198

  3. Long lived microbubbles for oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Frédéric; Waton, Gilles; Krafft, Marie Pierre; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2007-01-01

    Exceptionally long lived microbubbles containing a fluorocarbon as part of their filling gas have been obtained by using a fluorinated phospholipid instead of a standard phospholipid as shell component. An unexpected, strong synergistic effect between the fluorocarbon gas and the fluorinated phospholipid has been discovered. Such bubbles could be used for in vivo oxygen delivery, ultrasound contrast imaging and drug delivery.

  4. Large arteriolar component of oxygen delivery implies safe margin of oxygen supply to cerebral tissue

    PubMed Central

    Sakadžić, Sava; Mandeville, Emiri T.; Gagnon, Louis; Musacchia, Joseph J.; Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Yucel, Meryem A; Lefebvre, Joel; Lesage, Frédéric; Dale, Anders M.; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Lo, Eng H.; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    What is the organization of cerebral microvascular oxygenation and morphology that allows adequate tissue oxygenation at different activity levels? We address this question in the mouse cerebral cortex using microscopic imaging of intravascular O2 partial pressure and blood flow combined with numerical modeling. Here we show that parenchymal arterioles are responsible for 50% of the extracted O2 at baseline activity and the majority of the remaining O2 exchange takes place within the first few capillary branches. Most capillaries release little O2 at baseline acting as an O2 reserve that is recruited during increased neuronal activity or decreased blood flow. Our results challenge the common perception that capillaries are the major site of O2 delivery to cerebral tissue. The understanding of oxygenation distribution along arterio-capillary paths may have profound implications for the interpretation of BOLD fMRI signal and for evaluating microvascular O2 delivery capacity to support cerebral tissue in disease. PMID:25483924

  5. PG medical training and accreditation: responsibility of the government for the adequate health service delivery.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, M D

    2012-09-01

    On one hand there is obvious inadequate health coverage to the rural population and on the other hand the densely populated urban area is facing the triple burden of increasing non-communicable and communicable health problems and the rising health cost. The postgraduate medical training is closely interrelated with the adequate health service delivery and health economics. In relation to the prevailing situation, the modern medical education trend indicates the five vital issues. These are i). Opportunity needs to be given to all MBBS graduates for General Specialist and Sub-Specialist Training inside the country to complete their medical education, ii). Urgent need for review of PG residential training criteria including appropriate bed and teacher criteria as well as entry criteria and eligibility criteria, iii). Involvement of all available units of hospitals fulfilling the requirements of the residential PG training criteria, iv). PG residential trainings involve doing the required work in the hospitals entitling them full pay and continuation of the service without any training fee or tuition fee, and v). Planning of the proportions of General Specialty and Sub-Specialty Training fields, particularly General Practice (GP) including its career and female participation. With increased number of medical graduates, now it seems possible to plan for optimal health coverage to the populations with appropriate postgraduate medical training. The medical professionals and public health workers must make the Government aware of the vital responsibility and the holistic approach required.

  6. Large arteriolar component of oxygen delivery implies a safe margin of oxygen supply to cerebral tissue.

    PubMed

    Sakadžić, Sava; Mandeville, Emiri T; Gagnon, Louis; Musacchia, Joseph J; Yaseen, Mohammad A; Yucel, Meryem A; Lefebvre, Joel; Lesage, Frédéric; Dale, Anders M; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Ayata, Cenk; Srinivasan, Vivek J; Lo, Eng H; Devor, Anna; Boas, David A

    2014-12-08

    What is the organization of cerebral microvascular oxygenation and morphology that allows adequate tissue oxygenation at different activity levels? We address this question in the mouse cerebral cortex using microscopic imaging of intravascular O2 partial pressure and blood flow combined with numerical modelling. Here we show that parenchymal arterioles are responsible for 50% of the extracted O2 at baseline activity, and the majority of the remaining O2 exchange takes place within the first few capillary branches. Most capillaries release little O2 at baseline acting as an O2 reserve that is recruited during increased neuronal activity or decreased blood flow. Our results challenge the common perception that capillaries are the major site of O2 delivery to cerebral tissue. The understanding of oxygenation distribution along arterio-capillary paths may have profound implications for the interpretation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging and for evaluating microvascular O2 delivery capacity to support cerebral tissue in disease.

  7. Cerebral Oxygen Delivery and Consumption During Evoked Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Alberto L.; Masamoto, Kazuto; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kim, Seong-Gi

    2010-01-01

    Increases in neural activity evoke increases in the delivery and consumption of oxygen. Beyond observations of cerebral tissue and blood oxygen, the role and properties of cerebral oxygen delivery and consumption during changes in brain function are not well understood. This work overviews the current knowledge of functional oxygen delivery and consumption and introduces recent and preliminary findings to explore the mechanisms by which oxygen is delivered to tissue as well as the temporal dynamics of oxygen metabolism. Vascular oxygen tension measurements have shown that a relatively large amount of oxygen exits pial arterioles prior to capillaries. Additionally, increases in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by evoked neural activation are accompanied by arterial vasodilation and also by increases in arteriolar oxygenation. This increase contributes not only to the down-stream delivery of oxygen to tissue, but also to delivery of additional oxygen to extra-vascular spaces surrounding the arterioles. On the other hand, the changes in tissue oxygen tension due to functional increases in oxygen consumption have been investigated using a method to suppress the evoked CBF response. The functional decreases in tissue oxygen tension induced by increases in oxygen consumption are slow to evoked changes in CBF under control conditions. Preliminary findings obtained using flavoprotein autofluorescence imaging suggest cellular oxidative metabolism changes at a faster rate than the average changes in tissue oxygen. These issues are important in the determination of the dynamic changes in tissue oxygen metabolism from hemoglobin-based imaging techniques such as blood oxygenation-level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). PMID:20616881

  8. Thermodynamic approach to oxygen delivery in vivo by natural and artificial oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Enrico

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen is a toxic gas, still indispensable to aerobic life. This paper explores how normal physiology uses the physico-chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of oxygen for transforming a toxic gas into a non toxic indispensable metabolite. Plasma oxygen concentration is in the range of 10(-5) M, insufficient to sustain metabolism. Oxygen carriers, present in blood, release oxygen into plasma, thereby replacing consumed oxygen and buffering PO(2) near their P(50). They are the natural cell-bound carriers, like hemoglobin inside red cells, myoglobin inside myocytes, and artificial cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) dissolved in plasma. Metabolic oxygen replacement can be defined as cell-bound and cell-free delivery. Cell-bound delivery is retarded by the slow diffusion of oxygen in plasma and interstitial fluids. The 40% hematocrit of normal blood compensates for the delay, coping with the fast oxygen consumption by mitochondria. Facilitated oxygen diffusion by HBOCs corrects for the slow diffusion, making cell-free delivery relatively independent from P(50). At all oxygen affinities, HBOCs produce hyperoxygenations that are compensated by vasoconstrictions. There is a strict direct correlation between the rate of oxygen replacement and hemoglobin content of blood. The free energy loss of the gradient adds a relevant regulation of tissues oxygenation. Oxygen is retained intravascularly by the limited permeability to gases of vessel walls.

  9. Mimicking Oxygen delivery and waste removal functions of blood.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaifa; Barralet, Jake E

    2017-02-15

    In addition to immunological and wound healing cell and platelet delivery, ion stasis and nutrient supply, blood delivers oxygen to cells and tissues and removes metabolic wastes. For decades researchers have been trying to develop approaches that mimic these two immediately vital functions of blood. Oxygen is crucial for the long-term survival of tissues and cells in vertebrates. Hypoxia (oxygen deficiency) and even at times anoxia (absence of oxygen) can occur during organ preservation, organ and cell transplantation, wound healing, in tumors and engineering of tissues. Different approaches have been developed to deliver oxygen to tissues and cells, including hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), normobaric hyperoxia therapy (NBOT), using biochemical reactions and electrolysis, employing liquids with high oxygen solubility, administering hemoglobin, myoglobin and red blood cells (RBCs), introducing oxygen-generating agents, using oxygen-carrying microparticles, persufflation, and peritoneal oxygenation. Metabolic waste accumulation is another issue in biological systems when blood flow is insufficient. Metabolic wastes change the microenvironment of cells and tissues, influence the metabolic activities of cells, and ultimately cause cell death. This review examines advances in blood mimicking systems in the field of biomedical engineering in terms of oxygen delivery and metabolic waste removal.

  10. S-nitrosylation: integrator of cardiovascular performance and oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Saptarsi M; Stamler, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of oxygen to tissues is the primary function of the cardiovascular system. NO, a gasotransmitter that signals predominantly through protein S-nitrosylation to form S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) in target proteins, operates coordinately with oxygen in mammalian cellular systems. From this perspective, SNO-based signaling may have evolved as a major transducer of the cellular oxygen-sensing machinery that underlies global cardiovascular function. Here we review mechanisms that regulate S-nitrosylation in the context of its essential role in "systems-level" control of oxygen sensing, delivery, and utilization in the cardiovascular system, and we highlight examples of aberrant S-nitrosylation that may lead to altered oxygen homeostasis in cardiovascular diseases. Thus, through a bird's-eye view of S-nitrosylation in the cardiovascular system, we provide a conceptual framework that may be broadly applicable to the functioning of other cellular systems and physiological processes and that illuminates new therapeutic promise in cardiovascular medicine.

  11. Frontal cerebral cortex blood flow, oxygen delivery and oxygenation during normoxic and hypoxic exercise in athletes

    PubMed Central

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Habazettl, Helmut; Athanasopoulos, Dimitris; Andrianopoulos, Vasilis; Cherouveim, Evgenia; Wagner, Harrieth; Roussos, Charis; Wagner, Peter D; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During maximal hypoxic exercise, a reduction in cerebral oxygen delivery may constitute a signal to the central nervous system to terminate exercise. We investigated whether the rate of increase in frontal cerebral cortex oxygen delivery is limited in hypoxic compared to normoxic exercise. We assessed frontal cerebral cortex blood flow using near-infrared spectroscopy and the light-absorbing tracer indocyanine green dye, as well as frontal cortex oxygen saturation ( %) in 11 trained cyclists during graded incremental exercise to the limit of tolerance (maximal work rate, WRmax) in normoxia and acute hypoxia (inspired O2 fraction (), 0.12). In normoxia, frontal cortex blood flow and oxygen delivery increased (P < 0.05) from baseline to sub-maximal exercise, reaching peak values at near-maximal exercise (80% WRmax: 287 ± 9 W; 81 ± 23% and 75 ± 22% increase relative to baseline, respectively), both leveling off thereafter up to WRmax (382 ± 10 W). Frontal cortex % did not change from baseline (66 ± 3%) throughout graded exercise. During hypoxic exercise, frontal cortex blood flow increased (P = 0.016) from baseline to sub-maximal exercise, peaking at 80% WRmax (213 ± 6 W; 60 ± 15% relative increase) before declining towards baseline at WRmax (289 ± 5 W). Despite this, frontal cortex oxygen delivery remained unchanged from baseline throughout graded exercise, being at WRmax lower than at comparable loads (287 ± 9 W) in normoxia (by 58 ± 12%; P = 0.01). Frontal cortex % fell from baseline (58 ± 2%) on light and moderate exercise in parallel with arterial oxygen saturation, but then remained unchanged to exhaustion (47 ± 1%). Thus, during maximal, but not light to moderate, exercise frontal cortex oxygen delivery is limited in hypoxia compared to normoxia. This limitation could potentially constitute the signal to limit maximal exercise capacity in hypoxia. PMID:21727220

  12. Acute oxygen therapy: a review of prescribing and delivery practices

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Joyce L; Wark, Peter AB; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen is a commonly used drug in the clinical setting and like other drugs its use must be considered carefully. This is particularly true for those patients who are at risk of type II respiratory failure in whom the risk of hypercapnia is well established. In recent times, several international bodies have advocated for the prescription of oxygen therapy in an attempt to reduce this risk in vulnerable patient groups. Despite this guidance, published data have demonstrated that there has been poor uptake of these recommendations. Multiple interventions have been tested to improve concordance, and while some of these interventions show promise, the sustainability of these interventions are less convincing. In this review, we summarize data that have been published on the prevalence of oxygen prescription and the accurate and appropriate administration of this drug therapy. We also identify strategies that have shown promise in facilitating changes to oxygen prescription and delivery practice. There is a clear need to investigate the barriers, facilitators, and attitudes of clinicians in relation to the prescription of oxygen therapy in acute care. Interventions based on these findings then need to be designed and tested to facilitate the application of evidence-based guidelines to support sustained changes in practice, and ultimately improve patient care. PMID:27307722

  13. Systemic oxygen delivery and consumption in dogs with heartworm disease.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, H; Kitoh, K; Yasuda, K; Sasaki, Y

    1995-02-01

    To investigate systemic oxygen (O2) transport, we calculated the oxygen delivery index (Do2I), oxygen consumption index (Vo2I) and oxygen extraction ratio (ER) in dogs with heartworm (HW) disease. The Do2I was 770 +/- 331 ml/min/kg in dogs mildly affected with pulmonary HW disease showing respiratory signs, mild anemia and mild cardiac insufficiency (n = 34); 238 +/- 155 ml/min/kg in dogs with ascitic pulmonary HW disease (n = 7); and 577 +/- 320 ml/min/kg in dogs with caval syndrome (CS) which survived (n = 15) or died (n = 7) after surgical HW removal. The Do2I was lower (P < 0.01) in all HW-infected groups, especially in ascites and CS-non-surviving dogs, than in HW-free dogs (n = 11, 1041 +/- 264 ml/min/kg). The Vo2I was higher in some mildly affected dogs (161 +/- 88 ml/min/kg), and lower (P < 0.01) in ascitic dogs (45 +/- 53 ml/min/kg) than in HW-free dogs (123 +/- 44 ml/min/kg). The ER was higher (P < 0.01) in all HW-infected groups than in HW-free dogs. The Do2I correlated significantly with Vo2I (r = 0.84, P < 0.01), and the Vo2I correlated significantly with ER (r = 0.48, P < 0.01). The Do2I correlated significantly with arterial O2 tension (r = 0.33), serum LDH (r = -0.46) and CK (r = -0.46) activities, serum urea nitrogen (UN, r = -0.32) and lactic acid (LA, r = -0.39) concentrations and cardiac index (r = 0.64).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Inner Retinal Oxygen Delivery, Metabolism, and Extraction Fraction in Ins2Akita Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Norman P.; Wanek, Justin; Felder, Anthony E.; Brewer, Katherine C.; Joslin, Charlotte E.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal nonperfusion and hypoxia are important factors in human diabetic retinopathy, and these presumably inhibit energy production and lead to cell death. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of diabetes on inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism in a mouse model of diabetes. Methods Phosphorescence lifetime and blood flow imaging were performed in spontaneously diabetic Ins2Akita (n = 22) and nondiabetic (n = 22) mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age to measure retinal arterial (O2A) and venous (O2V) oxygen contents and total retinal blood flow (F). Inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) and metabolism (MO2) were calculated as F ∗ O2A and F ∗ (O2A − O2V), respectively. Oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), which equals MO2/DO2, was calculated. Results DO2 at 12 weeks were 112 ± 40 and 97 ± 29 nL O2/min in nondiabetic and diabetic mice, respectively (NS), and 148 ± 31 and 85 ± 37 nL O2/min at 24 weeks, respectively (P < 0.001). MO2 were 65 ± 31 and 66 ± 27 nL O2/min in nondiabetic and diabetic mice at 12 weeks, respectively, and 79 ± 14 and 54 ± 28 nL O2/min at 24 weeks, respectively (main effects = NS). At 12 weeks OEF were 0.57 ± 0.17 and 0.67 ± 0.09 in nondiabetic and diabetic mice, respectively, and 0.54 ± 0.07 and 0.63 ± 0.08 at 24 weeks, respectively (main effect of diabetes: P < 0.01). Conclusions Inner retinal MO2 was maintained in diabetic Akita mice indicating that elevation of the OEF adequately compensated for reduced DO2 and prevented oxidative metabolism from being limited by hypoxia. PMID:27802520

  15. Comparison of six oxygen delivery systems for COPD patients at rest and during exercise.

    PubMed

    Braun, S R; Spratt, G; Scott, G C; Ellersieck, M

    1992-09-01

    Five different oxygen-conserving devices were tested in each of ten oxygen-dependent patients with COPD who had met the NOTT criteria for continuous oxygen use. They were tested on room air, their prescribed continuous oxygen flow and then on each of the five devices. The devices which delivered a bolus of oxygen during early inspiration or increased oxygen delivery as the respiratory rate increased did better than those devices which delivered oxygen at a normal flow rate during inspiration or a fixed portion of inspiration. In at least one of the subjects each device was associated with desaturation to less than 80 percent during a 12-min walk. It is concluded that oxygen-conserving devices vary in their ability to maintain SaO2 levels during exercise. It is recommended that a home oxygen evaluation include measurement of an exercise SaO2 utilizing the prescribed oxygen delivery system.

  16. Singlet Oxygen Delivery Through the Porous Cap of a Hollow-Core Fiber Optic Device†

    PubMed Central

    Zamadar, Matibur; Aebisher, David

    2012-01-01

    The development of the first photosensitizer/fiber optic device is reported. An oxygen-flowing fiber-capped configuration is used for the application of heterogeneous, spatially confined singlet oxygen delivery in aqueous media. This is a unique device, unlike other heterogeneous photosensitizers, in which local concentrations of singlet oxygen can be delivered via introduction and withdrawal of the fiber tip. PMID:19929010

  17. Thenar oxygen saturation and invasive oxygen delivery measurements in critically ill patients in early septic shock.

    PubMed

    Mesquida, Jaume; Gruartmoner, Guillem; Martínez, Maria Luisa; Masip, Jordi; Sabatier, Caroline; Espinal, Cristina; Artigas, Antonio; Baigorri, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    This prospective study was aimed to test the hypothesis that tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (StO₂) measured noninvasively using near-infrared spectroscopy is a reliable indicator of global oxygen delivery (DO₂) measured invasively using a pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) in patients with septic shock. The study setting was a 26-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit at a university hospital. Subjects were adult patients in septic shock who required PAC hemodynamic monitoring for resuscitation. Interventions included transient ischemic challenge on the forearm. After blood pressure normalization, hemodynamic and oximetric PAC variables and, simultaneously, steady-state StO₂ and its changes from ischemic challenge (deoxygenation and reoxygenation rates) were measured. Fifteen patients were studied. All the patients had a mean arterial pressure above 65 mmHg. The DO₂ index (iDO₂) range in the studied population was 215 to 674 mL O₂/min per m. The mean mixed venous oxygen saturation value was 61% ± 10%, mean cardiac index was 3.4 ± 0.9 L/min per m, and blood lactate level was 4.6 ± 2.7 mmol/L. Steady-state StO₂ significantly correlated with iDO₂, arterial and venous O₂ content, and O₂ extraction ratio. A StO₂ cutoff value of 75% predicted iDO₂ below 450, with a sensitivity of 0.9 and a specificity of 0.9. In patients in septic shock and normalized MAP, low StO₂ reflects extremely low iDO₂. Steady-state StO₂ does not correlate with moderately low iDO₂, indicating poor sensitivity of StO₂ to rule out hypoperfusion.

  18. Comparison of the efficacy of a demand oxygen delivery system with continuous low flow oxygen in subjects with stable COPD and severe oxygen desaturation on walking.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, C. M.; Bell, J.; Wedzicha, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Provision of ambulatory oxygen using an intermittent pulsed flow regulated by a demand oxygen delivery system (DODS) greatly increases the limited supply time of standard portable gaseous cylinders. The efficacy of such a system has not previously been studied during submaximal exercise in subjects with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in whom desaturation is likely to be great and where usage is often most appropriate. METHODS: Fifteen subjects with severe COPD and oxygen desaturation underwent six minute walk tests performed in random order to compare the efficacy of a demand oxygen delivery system (DODS) with continuous flow oxygen. Walk distance, breathlessness, oxygen saturation, resting time, and recovery time (objective and subjective) were recorded and compared for each walk. RESULTS: Breathing continuous oxygen compared with baseline air breathing improved mean walk distance (295 m versus 271 m) and recovery time (47 seconds versus 112 seconds), whilst the lowest recorded saturation (81% versus 74%) and time desaturated below 90% (201 seconds versus 299 seconds) were reduced. When the DODS was compared with air breathing only the walk distance changed (283 m versus 271 m). A comparison of the DODS with continuous oxygen breathing showed the DODS to be less effective at oxygenating subjects with inferior lowest saturation (78% versus 81%), time spent below 90% (284 seconds versus 201 seconds), time to objective recovery (83 seconds versus 47 seconds), and walk distance (283 m versus 295 m). CONCLUSIONS: Neither of the delivery systems was able to prevent desaturation in these subjects. The use of continuous flow oxygen, however, was accompanied by improvements in oxygenation, walk distance, and recovery time compared with air breathing. The DODS produced only a small increase in walk distance without elevation of oxygen saturation, but was inferior to continuous flow oxygen in most of the measured variables when compared

  19. HYDRAULIC FRACTURING TO IMPROVE NUTRIENT AND OXYGEN DELIVERY FOR IN SITU BIORECLAMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The in situ delivery of nutrients and oxygen in soil is a serious problem in implementing in situ biodegradation. Current technology requires ideal site conditions to provide the remediating organisms with the nutrients and oxygen required for their metabolism, but...

  20. Leg oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise is slowed by a marked reduction in oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter M; Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Secher, Niels H; Damsgaard, Rasmus; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2013-08-01

    The present study examined whether a marked reduction in oxygen delivery, unlike findings in moderate-intensity exercise, would slow leg oxygen uptake (Vo2) kinetics during intense exercise (86 ± 3% of incremental test peak power). Seven healthy males (26 ± 1 years, means ± SE) performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise (60 ± 3 W) for 4 min in a control setting (CON) and with arterial infusion of N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine and indomethacin in the working leg to reduce blood flow by inhibiting formation of nitric oxide and prostanoids (double blockade; DB). In DB leg blood flow (LBF) and oxygen delivery during the first minute of exercise were 25-50% lower (P < 0.01) compared with CON (LBF after 10 s: 1.1 ± 0.2 vs. 2.5 ± 0.3 l/min and 45 s: 2.7 ± 0.2 vs. 3.8 ± 0.4 l/min) and 15% lower (P < 0.05) after 2 min of exercise. Leg Vo2 in DB was attenuated (P < 0.05) during the first 2 min of exercise (10 s: 161 ± 26 vs. 288 ± 34 ml/min and 45 s: 459 ± 48 vs. 566 ± 81 ml/min) despite a higher (P < 0.01) oxygen extraction in DB. Net leg lactate release was the same in DB and CON. The present study shows that a marked reduction in oxygen delivery can limit the rise in Vo2 during the initial part of intense exercise. This is in contrast to previous observations during moderate-intensity exercise using the same DB procedure, which suggests that fast-twitch muscle fibers are more sensitive to a reduction in oxygen delivery than slow-twitch fibers.

  1. Oxygen delivery for ambulatory patients. How the Micro-Trach increases mobility.

    PubMed

    Heimlich, H J

    1988-11-01

    Transtracheal oxygen delivery with the Micro-Trach is state-of-the-art treatment for patients requiring long-term oxygen therapy. The Micro-Trach diminishes dyspnea because it bypasses the anatomic dead space in the respiratory tract. It eliminates the waste of oxygen that escapes from the nose and mouth when a nasal cannula is used. Therefore, a small oxygen container lasts longer, increasing the patient's mobility. The patient's appetite improves because oxygen is not diverted during deglutition, and the senses of smell and taste are restored. Rehabilitation is enhanced through increased mobility and improved nutrition. Transtracheal instillation of saline solution cleanses the respiratory tract and stimulates coughing, opening occluded air passages. There are fewer lung infections and hospitalizations for infective exacerbations of disease. Prescribed saline solution, mucolytics, and antibiotics can also be instilled through the Micro-Trach to treat cystic fibrosis. This use and others are still being explored.

  2. Oxygen delivery, consumption, and conversion to reactive oxygen species in experimental models of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Eshaq, Randa S.; Wright, William S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal tissue receives its supply of oxygen from two sources – the retinal and choroidal circulations. Decreases in retinal blood flow occur in the early stages of diabetes, with the eventual development of hypoxia thought to contribute to pathological neovascularization. Oxygen consumption in the retina has been found to decrease in diabetes, possibly due to either a reduction in neuronal metabolism or to cell death. Diabetes also enhances the rate of conversion of oxygen to superoxide in the retina, with experimental evidence suggesting that mitochondrial superoxide not only drives the overall production of reactive oxygen species, but also initiates several pathways leading to retinopathy, including the increased activity of the polyol and hexosamine pathways, increased production of advanced glycation end products and expression of their receptors, and activation of protein kinase C. PMID:24936440

  3. Regulation of brain blood flow and oxygen delivery in elite breath-hold divers

    PubMed Central

    Willie, Christopher K; Ainslie, Philip N; Drvis, Ivan; MacLeod, David B; Bain, Anthony R; Madden, Dennis; Maslov, Petra Zubin; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-01-01

    The roles of involuntary breathing movements (IBMs) and cerebral oxygen delivery in the tolerance to extreme hypoxemia displayed by elite breath-hold divers are unknown. Cerebral blood flow (CBF), arterial blood gases (ABGs), and cardiorespiratory metrics were measured during maximum dry apneas in elite breath-hold divers (n=17). To isolate the effects of apnea and IBM from the concurrent changes on ABG, end-tidal forcing (‘clamp') was then used to replicate an identical temporal pattern of decreasing arterial PO2 (PaO2) and increasing arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) while breathing. End-apnea PaO2 ranged from 23  to 37 mm Hg (30±7 mm Hg). Elevation in mean arterial pressure was greater during apnea than during clamp reaching +54±24% versus 34±26%, respectively; however, CBF increased similarly between apnea and clamp (93.6±28% and 83.4±38%, respectively). This latter observation indicates that during the overall apnea period IBM per se do not augment CBF and that the brain remains sufficiently protected against hypertension. Termination of apnea was not determined by reduced cerebral oxygen delivery; despite 40% to 50% reductions in arterial oxygen content, oxygen delivery was maintained by commensurately increased CBF. PMID:25370857

  4. Cerebral cortex oxygen delivery and exercise limitation in patients with COPD.

    PubMed

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Louvaris, Zafeiris; Habazettl, Helmut; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios; Wagner, Harrieth; Roussos, Charis; Wagner, Peter D; Zakynthinos, Spyros

    2013-02-01

    In healthy humans, cerebral oxygen desaturation during exercise affects motor unit recruitment, while oxygen supplementation enhances cerebral oxygenation and work capacity. It remains unknown whether in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the well-documented improvement in exercise tolerance with oxygen supplementation may also be partly due to the increase in cerebral oxygenation. Using near infrared spectroscopy, we measured both frontal cerebral cortex blood flow (CBF) using indocyanine green dye and cerebrovascular oxygen saturation (S(t,O(2))) in 12 COPD patients during constant-load exercise to exhaustion at 75% of peak capacity. Subjects exercised while breathing air, 100% oxygen or normoxic heliox, the latter two in balanced order. Time to exhaustion while breathing air was less than for either oxygen or heliox (mean±sem 394±35 versus 670±43 and 637±46 s, respectively). Under each condition, CBF increased from rest to exhaustion. At exhaustion, CBF was higher while breathing air and heliox than oxygen (30.9±2.3 and 31.3±3.5 versus 26.6±3.2 mL·min(-1) per 100 g, respectively), compensating for the lower arterial oxygen content (C(a,O(2))) in air and heliox, and leading to similar cerebral cortex oxygen delivery (CQ(O(2)) for air was 5.3±0.4, for oxygen was 5.5±0.6 and for heliox was 5.6±1.0 mL O(2) per min per 100 g). In contrast, end-exercise S(t,O(2)) was greater while breathing oxygen compared with air or heliox (67±4 versus 57±3 and 53±3%, respectively), reflecting C(a,O(2)) rather than CQ(O(2)). Prolonged time to exhaustion by breathing oxygen and heliox, despite these having a similar CQ(O(2)) to air, a lower S(t,O(2)) with heliox than oxygen, and yet similar endurance time and similar S(t,O(2)) in air and heliox despite greater endurance with heliox, do not support the hypothesis that an improvement in cerebral cortex oxygen availability plays a contributing role in increasing exercise capacity with oxygen or

  5. Multimodal optical imaging system for in vivo investigation of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Srinivasan, Vivek J.; Gorczynska, Iwona; Fujimoto, James G.; Boas, David A.; Sakadžić, Sava

    2015-01-01

    Improving our understanding of brain function requires novel tools to observe multiple physiological parameters with high resolution in vivo. We have developed a multimodal imaging system for investigating multiple facets of cerebral blood flow and metabolism in small animals. The system was custom designed and features multiple optical imaging capabilities, including 2-photon and confocal lifetime microscopy, optical coherence tomography, laser speckle imaging, and optical intrinsic signal imaging. Here, we provide details of the system’s design and present in vivo observations of multiple metrics of cerebral oxygen delivery and energy metabolism, including oxygen partial pressure, microvascular blood flow, and NADH autofluorescence. PMID:26713212

  6. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver-oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-07-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars-van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes.

  7. Atomic scale observation of oxygen delivery during silver–oxygen nanoparticle catalysed oxidation of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yonghai; Yuchi, Datong; Guan, Pengfei; Xu, Jia; Guo, Lin; Liu, Jingyue

    2016-01-01

    To probe the nature of metal-catalysed processes and to design better metal-based catalysts, atomic scale understanding of catalytic processes is highly desirable. Here we use aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy to investigate the atomic scale processes of silver-based nanoparticles, which catalyse the oxidation of multi-wall carbon nanotubes. A direct semi-quantitative estimate of the oxidized carbon atoms by silver-based nanoparticles is achieved. A mechanism similar to the Mars–van Krevelen process is invoked to explain the catalytic oxidation process. Theoretical calculations, together with the experimental data, suggest that the oxygen molecules dissociate on the surface of silver nanoparticles and diffuse through the silver nanoparticles to reach the silver/carbon interfaces and subsequently oxidize the carbon. The lattice distortion caused by oxygen concentration gradient within the silver nanoparticles provides the direct evidence for oxygen diffusion. Such direct observation of atomic scale dynamics provides an important general methodology for investigations of catalytic processes. PMID:27406595

  8. [Delivery room resuscitation with room air and oxygen in newborns. State of art, recommendations].

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Ryszard; Musialik-Swietlińska, Ewa; Swietliński, Janusz; Pawlik, Dorota; Bober, Klaudiusz

    2008-01-01

    The authors present and discuss the current data, concerning delivery room resuscitation with oxygen and room air in neonates. On the ground of the results obtained from literature and the Polish National Survey on Paediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care, 2007/2008 issue, the authors give the following proposals regarding optimal oxygen treatment: 1. there is a need for optimizing tissue oxygenation in order to prevent injury caused by radical oxygen species; 2. newborn resuscitation should be monitored by measuring the haemoglobin saturation - the values above 90%, found in resuscitated newborn within the first minutes of life may be dangerous and cause tissue injury; 3. starting the resuscitation with oxygen concentration lower than 40% and adjusting it according to the effects of the procedure - the less mature infant the lower oxygen concentration at the beginning of resuscitation; 4. heart rate >100/min and SatO2Hb between 70-80% within the first minutes of life should not be an indication for increasing oxygen concentration.

  9. Do Physical Proximity and Availability of Adequate Infrastructure at Public Health Facility Increase Institutional Delivery? A Three Level Hierarchical Model Approach.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rachana; Ladusingh, Laishram

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the inter-district and inter-village variation of utilization of health services for institutional births in EAG states in presence of rural health program and availability of infrastructures. District Level Household Survey-III (2007-08) data on delivery care and facility information was used for the purpose. Bivariate results examined the utilization pattern by states in presence of correlates of women related while a three-level hierarchical multilevel model illustrates the effect of accessibility, availability of health facility and community health program variables on the utilization of health services for institutional births. The study found a satisfactory improvement in state Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa, importantly, in Bihar and Uttaranchal. The study showed that increasing distance from health facility discouraged institutional births and there was a rapid decline of more than 50% for institutional delivery as the distance to public health facility exceeded 10 km. Additionally, skilled female health worker (ANM) and observed improved public health facility led to significantly increase the probability of utilization as compared to non-skilled ANM and not-improved health centers. Adequacy of essential equipment/laboratory services required for maternal care significantly encouraged deliveries at public health facility. District/village variables neighborhood poverty was negatively related to institutional delivery while higher education levels in the village and women's residing in more urbanized districts increased the utilization. "Inter-district" variation was 14 percent whereas "between-villages" variation for the utilization was 11 percent variation once controlled for all the three-level variables in the model. This study suggests that the mere availability of health facilities is necessary but not sufficient condition to promote utilization until the quality of service is inadequate and inaccessible considering

  10. Do Physical Proximity and Availability of Adequate Infrastructure at Public Health Facility Increase Institutional Delivery? A Three Level Hierarchical Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rachana; Ladusingh, Laishram

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the inter-district and inter-village variation of utilization of health services for institutional births in EAG states in presence of rural health program and availability of infrastructures. District Level Household Survey-III (2007–08) data on delivery care and facility information was used for the purpose. Bivariate results examined the utilization pattern by states in presence of correlates of women related while a three-level hierarchical multilevel model illustrates the effect of accessibility, availability of health facility and community health program variables on the utilization of health services for institutional births. The study found a satisfactory improvement in state Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa, importantly, in Bihar and Uttaranchal. The study showed that increasing distance from health facility discouraged institutional births and there was a rapid decline of more than 50% for institutional delivery as the distance to public health facility exceeded 10 km. Additionally, skilled female health worker (ANM) and observed improved public health facility led to significantly increase the probability of utilization as compared to non-skilled ANM and not-improved health centers. Adequacy of essential equipment/laboratory services required for maternal care significantly encouraged deliveries at public health facility. District/village variables neighborhood poverty was negatively related to institutional delivery while higher education levels in the village and women’s residing in more urbanized districts increased the utilization. “Inter-district” variation was 14 percent whereas “between-villages” variation for the utilization was 11 percent variation once controlled for all the three-level variables in the model. This study suggests that the mere availability of health facilities is necessary but not sufficient condition to promote utilization until the quality of service is inadequate and inaccessible

  11. Exercise limitations by the oxygen delivery and utilization systems in aging and disease: coordinated adaptation and deadaptation of the lung-heart muscle axis - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory fitness (aerobic exercise capacity) is one of the most important prerequisites for successful aging in human beings and depends on adequate oxygen transport by the respiratory and circulatory systems from environmental air to the working muscles and the efficient utilization of oxygen by the mitochondria. A linear dose-response relation between aerobic exercise capacity, morbidity, mortality, and quality of life is well documented. The process of normal aging is associated with a variable reduction in functional capacity of the main organs involved in oxygen delivery and utilization. Integrated changes of the heart-lung muscle axis are termed here 'coordinated deadaptation', e.g. due to aging and disease, in contrast to the beneficial effects of 'coordinated adaptation', e.g. resulting from exercise training. Physical inactivity in aging persons initiates a circulus vitiosus resulting in coordinated deadaptation of the oxygen delivery and utilization systems mainly affecting the heart-muscle axis. Whereas in the healthy elderly the deadaptation process starts from inactive locomotor muscles, the lung or the heart represent the origin in patients suffering from respiratory or cardiovascular diseases. Specific exercise training programs, considering the state of cardiorespiratory health and physical activity, are the most important and almost the only effective intervention to avoid or to break the circulus vitiosus, thereby promoting quality and expectancy of life in aging humans.

  12. Is venous blood drawn from femoral access adequate to estimate the central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels in critically ill patients?

    PubMed Central

    Marti, Yara Nishiyama; de Freitas, Flávio Geraldo Rezende; de Azevedo, Rodrigo Palácio; Leão, Milena; Bafi, Antônio Tonete; Machado, Flavia Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to test if venous blood drawn from femoral access can be used to estimate the central venous oxygen saturation and arterial lactate levels in critically ill patients. Methods Bland-Altman analysis and Spearman correlations were used to compare the femoral venous oxygen saturation and central venous oxygen saturation as well as arterial lactate levels and femoral lactate. A pre-specified subgroup analysis was conducted in patients with signs of hypoperfusion. In addition, the clinical agreement was also investigated. Results Blood samples were obtained in 26 patients. In 107 paired samples, there was a moderate correlation (r = 0.686, p < 0.0001) between the central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation with a bias of 8.24 ± 10.44 (95% limits of agreement: -12.23 to 28.70). In 102 paired samples, there was a strong correlation between the arterial lactate levels and femoral lactate levels (r = 0.972, p < 0.001) with a bias of -2.71 ± 9.86 (95% limits of agreement: -22.03 to 16.61). The presence of hypoperfusion did not significantly change these results. The clinical agreement for venous saturation was inadequate, with different therapeutic decisions in 22.4% of the situation; for lactate, this was the case only in 5.2% of the situations. Conclusion Femoral venous oxygen saturation should not be used as a surrogate of central venous oxygen saturation. However, femoral lactate levels can be used in clinical practice, albeit with caution. PMID:26761471

  13. Root Effect Haemoglobins in Fish May Greatly Enhance General Oxygen Delivery Relative to Other Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Rummer, Jodie L.; Brauner, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    The teleost fishes represent over half of all extant vertebrates; they occupy nearly every body of water and in doing so, occupy a diverse array of environmental conditions. We propose that their success is related to a unique oxygen (O2) transport system involving their extremely pH-sensitive haemoglobin (Hb). A reduction in pH reduces both Hb-O2 affinity (Bohr effect) and carrying capacity (Root effect). This, combined with a large arterial-venous pH change (ΔpHa-v) relative to other vertebrates, may greatly enhance tissue oxygen delivery in teleosts (e.g., rainbow trout) during stress, beyond that in mammals (e.g., human). We generated oxygen equilibrium curves (OECs) at five different CO2 tensions for rainbow trout and determined that, when Hb-O2 saturation is 50% or greater, the change in oxygen partial pressure (ΔPO2) associated with ΔpHa-v can exceed that of the mammalian Bohr effect by at least 3-fold, but as much as 21-fold. Using known ΔpHa-v and assuming a constant arterial-venous PO2 difference (Pa-vO2), Root effect Hbs can enhance O2 release to the tissues by 73.5% in trout; whereas, the Bohr effect alone is responsible for enhancing O2 release by only 1.3% in humans. Disequilibrium states are likely operational in teleosts in vivo, and therefore the ΔpHa-v, and thus enhancement of O2 delivery, could be even larger. Modeling with known Pa-vO2 in fish during exercise and hypoxia indicates that O2 release from the Hb and therefore potentially tissue O2 delivery may double during exercise and triple during some levels of hypoxia. These characteristics may be central to performance of athletic fish species such as salmonids, but may indicate that general tissue oxygen delivery may have been the incipient function of Root effect Hbs in fish, a trait strongly associated with the adaptive radiation of teleosts. PMID:26436414

  14. Monocytic delivery of therapeutic oxygen bubbles for dual-modality treatment of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chia; Shen, Ming-Yin; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Sung-Chyr; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Wu, Pei-Hsuan; Chang, Chien-Wen; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-12-28

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a powerful technique photochemically tailored for activating apoptosis of malignant cells. Although PDT has shown promise in several clinical applications, malignant cells in hypoxic regions are often resistant to PDT due to the transport limitation of therapeutics and the oxygen-dependent nature of PDT. Herein, we present an innovative strategy for overcoming the limits of PDT in tumor hypoxia using bone marrow-derived monocytes as cellular vehicles for co-transport of oxygen and red light activatable photosensitizer, chlorin e6 (Ce6). Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle/Ce6/oxygen-loaded polymer bubbles were prepared and internalized into tumortropic monocytes. These functional bubbles were found harmless to cellular hosts without external triggers. Nevertheless, the therapeutic monocytes exhibited a superior performance in inhibiting tumor growth on Tramp-C1 tumor-bearing mice (C57BL/6J) upon the treatments of tumors with high frequency magnetic field and red light laser (660 nm). Histological examinations of the tumor sections confirmed the successful cellular transport of therapeutic payloads to tumor hypoxia and the pronounced antitumor effect elicited by combined hyperthermia/photodynamic therapy along with the additional oxygen supply. This work demonstrates that this oxygen/therapeutic co-delivery via tumortropic monocytes toward tumor hypoxia is promising for improving PDT efficacy.

  15. Stress-mediated progression of solid tumors: effect of mechanical stress on tissue oxygenation, cancer cell proliferation and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mpekris, Fotios; Angeli, Stelios; Pirentis, Athanassios P.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen supply plays a central role in cancer cell proliferation. While vascular density increases at the early stages of carcinogenesis, mechanical solid stresses developed during growth compress tumor blood vessels and, thus, drastically reduce the supply of oxygen, but also the delivery of drugs at inner tumor regions. Among other effects, hypoxia and reduced drug delivery compromise the efficacy of radiation and chemo/nano therapy, respectively. In the present study, we developed a mathematical model of tumor growth to investigate the interconnections among tumor oxygenation that supports cancer cell proliferation, the heterogeneous accumulation of mechanical stresses owing to tumor growth, the non-uniform compression of intratumoral blood vessels due to the mechanical stresses, and the insufficient delivery of oxygen and therapeutic agents because of vessel compression. We found that the high vascular density and increased cancer cell proliferation often observed in the periphery compared to the interior of a tumor can be attributed to heterogeneous solid stress accumulation. Highly vascularized peripheral regions are also associated with greater oxygenation compared with the compressed, less vascularized inner regions. We also modeled the delivery of drugs of two distinct sizes, namely chemotherapy and nanomedicine. Model predictions suggest that drug delivery is affected negatively by vessel compression independently of the size of the therapeutic agent. Finally, we demonstrated the applicability of our model to actual geometries, employing a breast tumor model derived from MR images. PMID:25968141

  16. Evidence of Preserved Oxidative Capacity and Oxygen Delivery in the Plantar Flexor Muscles With Age.

    PubMed

    Hart, Corey R; Layec, Gwenael; Trinity, Joel D; Liu, Xin; Kim, Seong-Eun; Groot, H Jonathan; Le Fur, Yann; Sorensen, Jacob R; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Richardson, Russell S

    2015-09-01

    Studies examining the effect of aging on skeletal muscle oxidative capacity have yielded equivocal results; however, these investigations may have been confounded by differences in oxygen (O(2)) delivery, physical activity, and small numbers of participants. Therefore, we evaluated skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and O(2) delivery in a relatively large group (N = 40) of young (22 ± 2 years) and old (73 ± 7 years) participants matched for physical activity. After submaximal dynamic plantar flexion exercise, phosphocreatine (PCr) resynthesis ((31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy), muscle reoxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy), and popliteal artery blood flow (Doppler ultrasound) were measured. The phosphocreatine recovery time constant (Tau) (young: 33 ± 16; old: 30 ± 11 seconds), maximal rate of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis (young: 25 ± 9; old: 27 ± 8 mM/min), and muscle reoxygenation rates determined by the deoxyhemoglobin/myoglobin recovery Tau (young: 48 ± 5; old: 47 ± 9 seconds) were similar between groups. Similarly, although tending to be higher in the old, there were no significant age-related differences in postexercise popliteal blood flow (area under the curve: young: 1,665 ± 227 vs old: 2,404 ± 357 mL, p = .06) and convective O(2) delivery (young: 293 ± 146 vs old: 404 ± 191 mL, p = .07). In conclusion, when physical activity and O(2) delivery are similar, oxidative capacity in the plantar flexors is not affected by aging. These findings reveal that diminished skeletal muscle oxidative capacity is not an obligatory accompaniment to the aging process.

  17. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to

  18. Oxygen Delivery and Muscle Deoxygenation during Continuous, Long- and Short-Interval Exercise.

    PubMed

    Zafeiridis, A; Kounoupis, A; Dipla, K; Kyparos, A; Nikolaidis, M G; Smilios, I; Vrabas, I S

    2015-11-01

    This study compared the O2 delivery (a central determinant of VO2) and muscle deoxygenation (reflecting a peripheral determinant of VO2) during intense continuous, long-interval, and short-interval exercise protocols. Twelve young men completed the 3 protocols with equal overall effort. Simultaneous and continuous recordings of central hemodynamics, muscle oxygenation/deoxygenation and VO2 were performed. Peak responses for stroke volume and peripheral resistance did not differ among protocols, whereas peak cardiac output and VO2 were higher in long-interval vs. continuous and short-interval protocols with inactive rest phases (p<0.05). The average responses for all central parameters were higher in continuous and long-interval vs. short-interval exercise (p<0.05); average VO2 and exercise-time above 80% VO2max were also higher in continuous and long-interval vs. short-interval protocol (p<0.05). Muscle de-oxygenation (↑Δdeoxyhemoglobin,↓Δoxyhemoglobin, ↓muscle O2-saturation), as well as the mismatch of O2 delivery and utilization (Δdeoxyhemoglobin/VO2) were remarkably alike among protocols. In conclusion, all 3 protocols resulted in a great activation of central and peripheral determinants of VO2. When performed with equal overall effort, the intense continuous and interval modalities reveal similarities in muscle O2-utilization response, but differences in central hemodynamic and VO2 responses. Intense continuous and long-interval protocols exert a more commanding role on the cardiovascular system and VO2 response compared to short-interval exercise with inactive rest phases.

  19. Thigh oxygen uptake at the onset of intense exercise is not affected by a reduction in oxygen delivery caused by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter M; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Nybo, Lars; Mortensen, Stefan P; Sander, Mikael; Secher, Niels H; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-10-15

    In response to hypoxic breathing most studies report slower pulmonary oxygen uptake (Vo2) kinetics at the onset of exercise, but it is not known if this relates to an actual slowing of the Vo2 in the active muscles(.) The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether thigh Vo2 is slowed at the onset of intense exercise during acute exposure to hypoxia. Six healthy male subjects (25.8 ± 1.4 yr, 79.8 ± 4.0 kg, means ± SE) performed intense (100 ± 6 watts) two-legged knee-extensor exercise for 2 min in normoxia (NOR) and hypoxia [fractional inspired oxygen concentration (Fi(O2)) = 0.13; HYP]. Thigh Vo2 was measured by frequent arterial and venous blood sampling and blood flow measurements. In arterial blood, oxygen content was reduced (P < 0.05) from 191 ± 5 ml O2/l in NOR to 180 ± 5 ml O2/l in HYP, and oxygen pressure was reduced (P < 0.001) from 111 ± 4 mmHg in NOR to 63 ± 4 mmHg in HYP. Thigh blood flow was the same in NOR and HYP, and thigh oxygen delivery was consequently reduced (P < 0.05) in HYP, but femoral arterial-venous oxygen difference and thigh Vo(2) were similar in NOR and HYP. In addition, muscle lactate release was the same in NOR and HYP, and muscle lactate accumulation during the first 25 s of exercise determined from muscle biopsy sampling was also similar (0.35 ± 0.07 and 0.36 ± 0.07 mmol·kg dry wt(-1)·s(-1) in NOR and HYP). Thus the increase in thigh Vo2 was not attenuated at the onset of intense knee-extensor exercise despite a reduction in oxygen delivery and pressure.

  20. Infusion of ATP increases leg oxygen delivery but not oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense knee-extensor exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Christensen, Peter M; Mortensen, Stefan P; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-10-01

    The present study examined whether an increase in leg blood flow and oxygen delivery at the onset of intense exercise would speed the rate of rise in leg oxygen uptake. Nine healthy men (25 ± 1 years old, mean ± SEM) performed one-leg knee-extensor exercise (62 ± 3 W, 86 ± 3% of incremental test peak power) for 4 min during a control setting (CON) and with infusion of ATP into the femoral artery in order to increase blood flow before and during exercise. In the presence of ATP, femoral arterial blood flow and O2 delivery were higher (P < 0.001) at the onset of exercise and throughout exercise (femoral arterial blood flow after 10 s, 5.1 ± 0.5 versus 2.7 ± 0.3 l min(-1); after 45 s, 6.0 ± 0.5 versus 4.1 ± 0.4 l min(-1); after 90 s, 6.6 ± 0.6 versus 4.5 ± 0.4 l min(-1); and after 240 s, 7.0 ± 0.6 versus 5.1 ± 0.3 l min(-1) in ATP and CON conditions, respectively). Leg oxygen uptake was not different in ATP and CON conditions during the first 20 s of exercise but was lower (P < 0.05) in the ATP compared with CON conditions after 30 s and until the end of exercise (30 s, 436 ± 42 versus 549 ± 45 ml min(-1); and 240 s, 705 ± 31 versus 814 ± 59 ml min(-1) in ATP and CON, respectively). Lactate release was lower after 60, 120 and 180 s of exercise with ATP infusion. These results suggest that O2 delivery is not limiting the rise in skeletal muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of intense exercise.

  1. Advanced fluorocarbon-based systems for oxygen and drug delivery, and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Riess, J G; Krafft, M P

    1997-01-01

    Fluorocarbons and fluorocarbon-derived materials constitute a vast family of synthetic components that have a range of remarkable properties including exceptional chemical and biological inertness, gas-dissolving capacity, low surface tension, high fluidity, excellent spreading characteristics, unique hydro- and lipophobicity, high density, absence of protons, and magnetic susceptibility close to that of water. These properties lead to a diversity of products and applications as illustrated by those products that are already in advanced clinical trials, which comprise: 1) an injectable oxygen carrier, i.e. blood substitute, consisting of a fluorocarbon-in-water emulsion for use in surgery to alleviate the problems raised by the transfusion of homologous blood; the same emulsion is also being evaluated with cardiopulmonary bypass patients; 2) a neat fluorocarbon for treatment of acute respiratory failure by liquid ventilation; and 3) fluorocarbon-based or stabilized gas bubbles to be used as contrast agents for the assessment of heart function and detection of perfusion defects by ultrasound imaging. Proper selection of the fluorocarbon best suited for the intended application, formulation optimization, and advanced stabilization and processing procedures led to effective, ready-for-use products with minimal side-effects. Further highly fluorinated materials, including amphiphiles and various fluorocarbon-based colloidal systems that have potential as pulmonary, topical and ophthalmological drug delivery agents, and as skin protection barriers, are now being investigated. Such systems include drug-in-fluorocarbon suspensions, reverse water-in-fluorocarbon emulsions, oil-in-fluorocarbon emulsions, multiple emulsions, microemulsions, fluorocarbon gels, fluorinated liposomes, fluorinated tubules and other novel supramolecular systems.

  2. A randomised controlled trial of an automated oxygen delivery algorithm for preterm neonates receiving supplemental oxygen without mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, James; Gómez, John Jairo; Araque Campo, Robinson; Matiz Rubio, Alejandro; Sola, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    Aim Providing consistent levels of oxygen saturation (SpO2) for infants in neonatal intensive care units is not easy. This study explored how effectively the Auto-Mixer® algorithm automatically adjusted fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) levels to maintain SpO2 within an intended range in extremely low birth weight infants receiving supplemental oxygen without mechanical ventilation. Methods Twenty extremely low birth weight infants were randomly assigned to the Auto-Mixer® group or the manual intervention group and studied for 12 h. The SpO2 target was 85–93%, and the outcomes were the percentage of time SpO2 was within target, SpO2 variability, SpO2 >95%, oxygen received and manual interventions. Results The percentage of time within intended SpO2 was 58 ± 4% in the Auto-Mixer® group and 33.7 ± 4.7% in the manual group, SpO2 >95% was 26.5% vs 54.8%, average SpO2 and FiO2 were 89.8% vs 92.2% and 37% vs 44.1%, and manual interventions were 0 vs 80 (p < 0.05). Brief periods of SpO2 < 85% occurred more frequently in the Auto-Mixer® group. Conclusion The Auto-Mixer® effectively increased the percentage of time that SpO2 was within the intended target range and decreased the time with high SpO2 in spontaneously breathing extremely low birth weight infants receiving supplemental oxygen. PMID:24813808

  3. Use of a High-Flow Oxygen Delivery System in a Critically Ill Patient with Dementia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    a high oxygen concentration. Key words: high-flow oxygen, palliative care , hypoxemia. [Respir Care 2008;53(12):1739–1743] Introduction We have...The use of supplemental oxygen to relieve dyspnea in palliative care is controversial. It is not clear that supple- mental oxygen actually reduces...rior to conventional nasal cannula and equivalent to nasal continuous positive airway pressure in pediatric patients. In neonatal intensive care unit

  4. Where the O2 goes to: preservation of human fetal oxygen delivery and consumption at high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, Lucrecia; Heredia, Gladys; Illsley, Nicholas P; Torricos, Tatiana; Dolan, Caitlin; Echalar, Lourdes; Tellez, Wilma; Maldonado, Ivan; Brimacombe, Michael; Balanza, Elfride; Vargas, Enrique; Zamudio, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    Fetal growth is decreased at high altitude (> 2700 m). We hypothesized that variation in fetal O2 delivery might account for both the altitude effect and the relative preservation of fetal growth in multigenerational natives to high altitude. Participants were 168 women of European or Andean ancestry living at 3600 m or 400 m. Ancestry was genetically confirmed. Umbilical vein blood flow was measured using ultrasound and Doppler. Cord blood samples permitted calculation of fetal O2 delivery and consumption. Andean fetuses had greater blood flow and oxygen delivery than Europeans and weighed more at birth, regardless of altitude (+208 g, P < 0.0001). Fetal blood flow was decreased at 3600 m (P < 0.0001); the decrement was similar in both ancestry groups. Altitude-associated decrease in birth weight was greater in Europeans (−417 g) than Andeans (−228 g, P < 0.005). Birth weight at 3600 m was > 200 g lower for Europeans at any given level of blood flow or O2 delivery. Fetal haemoglobin concentration was increased, decreased, and the fetal / curve was left-shifted at 3600 m. Fetuses receiving less O2 extracted more (r2= 0.35, P < 0.0001). These adaptations resulted in similar fetal O2 delivery and consumption across all four groups. Increased umbilical venous O2 delivery correlated with increased fetal O2 consumption per kg weight (r2= 0.50, P < 0.0001). Blood flow (r2= 0.16, P < 0.001) and O2 delivery (r2= 0.17, P < 0.001) correlated with birth weight at 3600 m, but not at 400 m (r2= 0.04, and 0.03, respectively). We concluded that the most pronounced difference at high altitude is reduced fetal blood flow, but fetal haematological adaptation and fetal capacity to increase O2 extraction indicates that deficit in fetal oxygen delivery is unlikely to be causally associated with the altitude- and ancestry-related differences in fetal growth. PMID:19074967

  5. Erythrocytes and the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery: role of erythrocyte count and oxygenation state of haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Secher, Niels H; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2006-04-01

    Blood flow to dynamically contracting myocytes is regulated to match O(2) delivery to metabolic demand. The red blood cell (RBC) itself functions as an O(2) sensor, contributing to the control of O(2) delivery by releasing the vasodilators ATP and S-nitrosohaemoglobin with the offloading of O(2) from the haemoglobin molecule. Whether RBC number is sensed remains unknown. To investigate the role of RBC number, in isolation and in combination with alterations in blood oxygenation, on muscle and systemic perfusion, we measured local and central haemodynamics during one-legged knee-extensor exercise ( approximately 50% peak power) in 10 healthy males under conditions of normocythaemia (control), anaemia, anaemia + plasma volume expansion (PVX), anaemia + PVX + hypoxia, polycythaemia, polycythaemia + hyperoxia and polycythaemia + hypoxia, which changed either RBC count alone or both RBC count and oxyhaemoglobin. Leg blood flow (LBF), cardiac output (Q) and vascular conductance did not change with either anaemia or polycythaemia alone. However, LBF increased with anaemia + PVX (28 +/- 4%) and anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (46 +/- 6%) and decreased with polycythaemia + hyperoxia (18 +/- 5%). LBF and Q with anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (8.0 +/- 0.5 and 15.8 +/- 0.7 l min(-1), respectively) equalled those during maximal knee-extensor exercise. Collectively, LBF and vascular conductance were intimately related to leg arterial-venous (a-v) O(2) difference (r(2)= 0.89-0.93; P < 0.001), suggesting a pivotal role of blood O(2) gradients in muscle microcirculatory control. The systemic circulation accommodated to the changes in muscle perfusion. Our results indicate that, when coping with severe haematological challenges, local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and O(2) delivery primarily senses alterations in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and, to a lesser extent, alterations in the number of RBCs and haemoglobin molecules.

  6. Erythrocytes and the regulation of human skeletal muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery: role of erythrocyte count and oxygenation state of haemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, José; Mortensen, Stefan P; Dawson, Ellen A; Secher, Niels H; Damsgaard, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Blood flow to dynamically contracting myocytes is regulated to match O2 delivery to metabolic demand. The red blood cell (RBC) itself functions as an O2 sensor, contributing to the control of O2 delivery by releasing the vasodilators ATP and S-nitrosohaemoglobin with the offloading of O2 from the haemoglobin molecule. Whether RBC number is sensed remains unknown. To investigate the role of RBC number, in isolation and in combination with alterations in blood oxygenation, on muscle and systemic perfusion, we measured local and central haemodynamics during one-legged knee-extensor exercise (∼50% peak power) in 10 healthy males under conditions of normocythaemia (control), anaemia, anaemia + plasma volume expansion (PVX), anaemia + PVX + hypoxia, polycythaemia, polycythaemia + hyperoxia and polycythaemia + hypoxia, which changed either RBC count alone or both RBC count and oxyhaemoglobin. Leg blood flow (LBF), cardiac output (Q) and vascular conductance did not change with either anaemia or polycythaemia alone. However, LBF increased with anaemia + PVX (28 ± 4%) and anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (46 ± 6%) and decreased with polycythaemia + hyperoxia (18 ± 5%). LBF and Q with anaemia + PVX + hypoxia (8.0 ± 0.5 and 15.8 ± 0.7 l min−1, respectively) equalled those during maximal knee-extensor exercise. Collectively, LBF and vascular conductance were intimately related to leg arterial–venous (a–v) O2 difference (r2 = 0.89–0.93; P < 0.001), suggesting a pivotal role of blood O2 gradients in muscle microcirculatory control. The systemic circulation accommodated to the changes in muscle perfusion. Our results indicate that, when coping with severe haematological challenges, local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow and O2 delivery primarily senses alterations in the oxygenation state of haemoglobin and, to a lesser extent, alterations in the number of RBCs and haemoglobin molecules. PMID:16439430

  7. Near-infrared spectroscopic assessment of oxygen delivery to free flaps on monkeys following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Ding, Haishu; Cai, Zhigang; Wang, Guangzhi; Zhao, Fuyun

    2002-04-01

    In recent studies, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been considered as a potentially ideal noninvasive technique for the postoperative monitoring of plastic surgery. In this study, free flaps were raised on rhesus monkeys' forearms and oxygen delivery to these flaps was monitored following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen. Optical fibers were adopted in the probe of the oximeter so that the detection could be performed in reflectance mode. The distance between emitter and detector can be adjusted easily to achieve the best efficacy. Different and repeatable patterns of changes were measured following vascular occlusions (arterial occlusion, venous occlusion and total occlusion) on flaps. It is clear that the near-infrared spectroscopy is capable of postoperatively monitoring vascular problems in flaps. NIRS showed high sensitivity to detect the dynamic changes in flaps induced by inhalation of pure oxygen in this study. The experimental results indicated that it was potential to assess tissue viability utilizing the dynamic changes induced by a noninvasive stimulation. It may be a new assessing method that is rapid, little influenced by other factors and brings less discomfort to patients.

  8. Oxygen Delivering Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Ashley L.; Rindone, Alexandra N.; Grayson, Warren L.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue engineering (TE) has provided promising strategies for regenerating tissue defects, but few TE approaches have been translated for clinical applications. One major barrier in TE is providing adequate oxygen supply to implanted tissue scaffolds, since oxygen diffusion from surrounding vasculature in vivo is limited to the periphery of the scaffolds. Moreover, oxygen is also an important signaling molecule for controlling stem cell differentiation within TE scaffolds. Various technologies have been developed to increase oxygen delivery in vivo and enhance the effectiveness of TE strategies. Such technologies include hyperbaric oxygen therapy, perfluorocarbon- and hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers, and oxygen-generating, peroxide-based materials. Here, we provide an overview of the underlying mechanisms and how these technologies have been utilized for in vivo TE applications. Emerging technologies and future prospects for oxygen delivery in TE are also discussed to evaluate the progress of this field towards clinical translation. PMID:27453782

  9. Development of a Solid Chlorate Backup Oxygen Delivery System for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Dunlap, Cameron; Haas, Jon; Weislogel, Mark; Lewis, John; Meyers, Karen; McKernan, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Program requires that there always be a 45 calendar day contingency supply of breathing oxygen. In the early assembly stages, there is only one flight system, the Russian Solid Fuel Oxygen Generator (SFOG), that can meet that requirement. To better ensure the contingency oxygen supply, the Crew and Thermal Systems Division was directed to develop a flight hardware system that can meet all contingency oxygen requirements for ISS. Such a system, called the Backup Oxygen Candle System (BOCS), has been built and tested. The BOCS consists of 33 chlorate candles, a thermal containment apparatus, support equipment and packaging. The thermal containment apparatus utilizes the O2 produced by the candle as the motive stream in an ejector to passively cool the candle during operation.

  10. Ultrasound mediated delivery of oxygen and LLL12 loaded stimuli responsive microdroplets for the treatment of hypoxic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshun; Yuan, Shuai; Tian, Jilai; Martin, Kyle A; Song, Jinhua; Li, Chenglong; Wang, Zhigang; Lin, Jiayuh; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X

    2017-03-21

    LLL12 exhibits high specificity for inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation and dimerization, and inducing apoptosis to constitutively activated STAT3 cancer cells without cytotoxicity to normal cells with dormant STAT3. However, clinical deployment of LLL12 in cancer treatment is hindered by its low bioavailability and hypoxia-induced resistance. To overcome these limitations, we encapsulate both oxygen and LLL12 in stimuli responsive microdroplets (SRMs) by a gas-driven coaxial flow focusing (CFF) process for ultrasound mediated treatment of hypoxic cancer cells. Our benchtop experiments demonstrate that the CFF process is able to produce SRMs with uniform size distribution, large oxygen loading capacity, high LLL12 encapsulation efficiency, well protection of bioactivity, and steadily long shelf time. The in vitro therapeutic studies in pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and CAPAN-1) demonstrate the immediate release of oxygen and LLL12 in exposure to therapeutic ultrasound pulses as well as the improved anticancer effects under hypoxic conditions. The findings suggest that the proposed oxygen and LLL12 loaded SRMs provide a promising drug delivery strategy for more effective treatment of hypoxic cancer cells.

  11. Ultrasound mediated delivery of oxygen and LLL12 loaded stimuli responsive microdroplets for the treatment of hypoxic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinshun; Yuan, Shuai; Tian, Jilai; Martin, Kyle A.; Song, Jinhua; Li, Chenglong; Wang, Zhigang; Lin, Jiayuh; Si, Ting; Xu, Ronald X.

    2017-01-01

    LLL12 exhibits high specificity for inhibiting STAT3 phosphorylation and dimerization, and inducing apoptosis to constitutively activated STAT3 cancer cells without cytotoxicity to normal cells with dormant STAT3. However, clinical deployment of LLL12 in cancer treatment is hindered by its low bioavailability and hypoxia-induced resistance. To overcome these limitations, we encapsulate both oxygen and LLL12 in stimuli responsive microdroplets (SRMs) by a gas-driven coaxial flow focusing (CFF) process for ultrasound mediated treatment of hypoxic cancer cells. Our benchtop experiments demonstrate that the CFF process is able to produce SRMs with uniform size distribution, large oxygen loading capacity, high LLL12 encapsulation efficiency, well protection of bioactivity, and steadily long shelf time. The in vitro therapeutic studies in pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and CAPAN-1) demonstrate the immediate release of oxygen and LLL12 in exposure to therapeutic ultrasound pulses as well as the improved anticancer effects under hypoxic conditions. The findings suggest that the proposed oxygen and LLL12 loaded SRMs provide a promising drug delivery strategy for more effective treatment of hypoxic cancer cells. PMID:28322306

  12. A Prototype Cryogenic Oxygen Storage and Delivery Subsystem for Advanced Spacesuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Overbeeke, Arend; Hodgson, Edward; Paul, Heather; Geier, Harold; Bradt, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Future spacesuit systems for the exploration of Mars will need to be much lighter than current designs while at the same time reducing the consumption of water for crew cooling. One of the technology paths NASA has identified to achieve these objectives is the replacement of current high pressure oxygen storage technology in EVA systems with cryogenic technology that can simultaneously reduce the mass of tankage required for oxygen storage and enable the use of the stored oxygen as a means of cooling the EVA astronaut. During the past year NASA has funded Hamilton Sundstrand production of a prototype system demonstrating this capability in a design that will allow the cryogenic oxygen to be used in any attitude and gravity environment. This paper will describe the design and manufacture of the prototype system and present the results of preliminary testing to verify its performance characteristics. The potential significance and application of the system will also be discussed.

  13. Pulsed Dose Delivery of Oxygen in Mechanically Ventilated Pigs with Acute Lung Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    atropine (0.54 mg/kg). They were then intubated with 7.5 French endotracheal tubes. A surgical plane of anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane...patients often require intubation and mechanical ventilation with supplemental oxygen and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). To date, the...circuit, directly at the endotracheal tube. We used the SeQual Eclipse II, which was selected for its oxygen generating capabilities, as it is capable

  14. Fluorescent boronate-based polymer nanoparticles with reactive oxygen species (ROS)-triggered cargo release for drug-delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Eliézer; Höcherl, Anita; Janoušková, Olga; Jäger, Alessandro; Hrubý, Martin; Konefał, Rafał; Netopilik, Miloš; Pánek, Jiří; Šlouf, Miroslav; Ulbrich, Karel; Štěpánek, Petr

    2016-03-01

    A new drug-delivery system of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) bearing pinacol-type boronic ester and alkyne moieties displaying triggered self-immolative polymer degradation in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the capability of cellular imaging is presented. The NPs specifically release their drug cargo under concentrations of ROS that are commonly found in the intracellular environment of certain tumors and of inflamed tissues and exhibit significant cytotoxicity to cancer cells compared to their non-ROS-responsive counterparts.A new drug-delivery system of polymer nanoparticles (NPs) bearing pinacol-type boronic ester and alkyne moieties displaying triggered self-immolative polymer degradation in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the capability of cellular imaging is presented. The NPs specifically release their drug cargo under concentrations of ROS that are commonly found in the intracellular environment of certain tumors and of inflamed tissues and exhibit significant cytotoxicity to cancer cells compared to their non-ROS-responsive counterparts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00791k

  15. The effect of intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor on inner retinal oxygen delivery and metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Blair, Norman P; Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-yu; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is stimulated by hypoxia and plays an important role in pathologic vascular leakage and neovascularization. Increased VEGF may affect inner retinal oxygen delivery (DO2) and oxygen metabolism (MO2), however, quantitative information is lacking. We tested the hypotheses that VEGF increases DO2, but does not alter MO2. In 10 rats, VEGF was injected intravitreally into one eye, whereas balanced salt solution (BSS) was injected into the fellow eye, 24 h prior to imaging. Vessel diameters and blood velocities were determined by red-free and fluorescent microsphere imaging, respectively. Vascular PO2 values were derived by phosphorescence lifetime imaging of an intravascular oxyphor. Retinal blood flow, vascular oxygen content, DO2 and MO2 were calculated. Retinal arterial and venous diameters were larger in VEGF-injected eyes compared to control eyes (P < 0.03), however no significant difference was observed in blood velocity (P = 0.21). Thus, retinal blood flow was greater in VEGF-injected eyes (P = 0.007). Retinal vascular PO2 and oxygen content were similar between control and VEGF-injected eyes (P > 0.11), while the arteriovenous oxygen content difference was marginally lower in VEGF-injected eyes (P = 0.05). DO2 was 950 ± 340 and 1380 ± 650 nL O2/min in control and VEGF-injected eyes, respectively (P = 0.005). MO2 was 440 ± 150 and 490 ± 190 nL O2/min in control and VEGF-injected eyes, respectively (P = 0.31). Intravitreally administered VEGF did not alter MO2 but increased DO2, suggesting VEGF may play an offsetting role in conditions characterized by retinal hypoxia.

  16. A Fiberoptic (Photodynamic Therapy Type) Device with a Photosensitizer and Singlet Oxygen Delivery Probe Tip for Ovarian Cancer Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Bartusik, Dorota; Aebisher, David; Ghogare, Ashwini; Ghosh, Goutam; Abramova, Inna; Hasan, Tayyaba; Greer, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    A portable “fiber optic-based sensitizer delivery” device has been developed and studied. Before there might be success in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and anti-bacterial ambitions, an understanding of basic factors on device performance were needed. Thus, the device was examined for the localized delivery of sensitizer molecules in ovarian cancer cells and production of high concentrations of singlet oxygen for their eradication in vitro. The device-tip releases stored pheophorebide by attack of singlet oxygen from sensitized oxygen gas delivered through the hollow fiber using 669-nm laser light. The performance of the device was enhanced when configured with a fluorosiliane tip by virtue of its Teflon-like property compared to a conventional glass tip (greater sensitizer quantities photoreleased and laterally diffused, and greater amounts of ovarian OVCAR-5 cancer cell killing). No cell damage was observed at 2.2 N of force applied by the probe tip itself, an amount used for many of the experiments described here. PMID:23495787

  17. Hyperthermic Overdrive: Oxygen Delivery does Not Limit Thermal Tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mölich, Andreas B.; Förster, Thomas D.; Lighton, John R. B.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of thermal tolerance limits in animals are controversial. In many aquatic species, it is thought that the inability to deliver sufficient oxygen at high temperatures is more critical than impairment of molecular functions of the mitochondria. However, terrestrial insects utilize a tracheal system, and the concept of a mismatch between metabolic demand and circulatory performance might not apply to them. Using thermo-limit respirometry, it has been shown earlier in Drosophila melanogaster that CO2 release rates at temperatures above the upper thermal limit (CTmax) exceed the rate at CTmax. The nature of this post-CTmax, or “post-mortal” peak, is unknown. Either its source is increased aerobic mitochondrial respiration (hyperthermic overdrive), or an anaerobic process such as liberation of stored CO2 from the hemolymph. The post-mortal peak of CO2 release was found to be oxygen dependent. As the rate of CO2 emission is a conservative indicator of rate of O2 consumption, aerobic flux at the thermal limit is submaximal, which contradicts the theory that oxygen availability limits metabolic activity at high temperatures in insects. Consequently, the tracheal system should be capable of delivering sufficient oxygen for aerobic activity of the mitochondria at and above Ctmax. PMID:23438104

  18. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  19. A Physiological and Human Factors Evaluation of a Novel Personal Helicopter Oxygen Delivery System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    color vision performance using the Farnsworth- Munsell 15 Hue desaturation test at the 4 moderate altitude of 12,000’. Pulse oximetry is also a widely...below provided capability for oxygen production, charging of the portable system, as well as in-flight use by aircrew. The system was tested for its...compatibility with current Aircrew Assemblies, Night Vision Goggles, aircrew duties, and emergency egress. The system was also tested on pilot

  20. Spectroscopy and imaging of oxygen delivery to tissue under strenuous conditions (NIR in athletes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Britton; Nioka, Shoko; Long, Hong; Xie, Chunhua; Ma, XuHui; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Luo, Qingming

    2000-04-01

    It was demonstrated that the dynamics of muscle oxygen utilization can readily be measured using dual wavelength hemoglobin oximetry. This method can be used for muscle training exercise and also for evaluation of exercise performance where the anaerobic threshold must be avoided. It was shown that CW imaging technology gives images along the surface of the muscle while the time resolved spectroscopy gives images transverse to the muscle.

  1. Design, fabrication, test, and delivery of a high-pressure oxygen/RP-1 injector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, L.; Gross, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of the design analyses for a liquid rocket injector using oxygen and RP-1 propellants at high chamber pressures of 20,682 kPa (3000 psia) is presented. This analytical investigation includes combustion efficiency versus injector element type, combustion stability, and combustor cooling requirements. The design and fabrication of a subscale injector/acoustic resonantor assembly capable of providing a nominal thrust of 222K N (50,000 lbF) is presented.

  2. Effects of Enhanced Oxygen Delivery by Perfluorocarbons in Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    cerebral oxygenation and mitochondrial function after fluid percussion brain injury in rats. Neurosurgery 2004; 54:1223–1230. 11. Spiess B...recovery after lateral fluid percussion brain injury in rats. Neurosurgery 2008; 4 :799-806. 14. Basso DM, Beattie MS, Bresnahan JC, Anderson DK, Faden AI...been shown to cause significant mechanical damage to the parenchyma, in particular the microvasculature leading to plasma fluid leaks, reduction of

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of sensitizer drug photorelease chemistry: Micro-optic method applied to singlet oxygen generation and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Goutam

    This thesis summarizes a new micro-optic method for singlet oxygen generation and sensitizer drug delivery, which include i) synthesis and evaluation of a first generation device for drug delivery from native and fluorinated silica probe tips, ii) synthesis of PEG conjugated sensitizers to study phototoxicity in ovarian cancer cells, and iii) synthesis and evaluation of tris-PEGylated chlorin conjugated fluorinated silica for its future integration into the device to use as a 2nd generation device. A first generation micro-optic device was developed that works by sparging O2 gas and light generating cytotoxic singlet oxygen that cleaves the covalently attached drug (sensitizer) from the probe tip at the distal end of the fiber. The aim is to develop a 1st and 2nd generation device for site specific delivery of photosensitizer and singlet oxygen to overcome the challenges involved in systemic administration of the sensitizer. Synthesis and evaluation of drug (pheophorbide-a) delivery applying micro-optic method from native and fluorinated silica probe tip was achieved. The amount of sensitizer photocleavage depends on the loading level of sensitizer onto the probe tips. We also found that photorelease efficiency depends on the nature of the solvents where sensitizer is photocleaved. For example, no photorelease was observed in an aqueous solvent where sensitizer remained adsorbed to the native silica probe-tip. But, 90% photocleavage was obtained in octanol. A significant amount of photosensitizer (formate ester of pyropheophorbide- a) diffused into the liposome when photocleavage study was carried out in liposome. Substantial increase of photorelease was observed in organic solvent when pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) sensitizer was attached to the partially fluorinated porous Vycor glass. We also explored sensitizer photorelease from the fluorinated silica surface at various temperatures and we found that autocatalytic photorelease happened at room temperature and above

  4. Eat and run: prioritization of oxygen delivery during elevated metabolic states.

    PubMed

    Hicks, James W; Bennett, Albert F

    2004-12-15

    The principal function of the cardiopulmonary system is the matching of oxygen and carbon dioxide transport to the metabolic requirements of different tissues. Increased oxygen demands (VO2), for example during physical activity, result in a rapid compensatory increase in cardiac output and redistribution of blood flow to the appropriate skeletal muscles. These cardiovascular changes are matched by suitable ventilatory increments. This matching of cardiopulmonary performance and metabolism during activity has been demonstrated in a number of different taxa, and is universal among vertebrates. In some animals, large increments in aerobic metabolism may also be associated with physiological states other than activity. In particular, VO2 may increase following feeding due to the energy requiring processes associated with prey handling, digestion and ensuing protein synthesis. This large increase in VO2 is termed "specific dynamic action" (SDA). In reptiles, the increase in VO2 during SDA may be 3-40-fold above resting values, peaking 24-36 h following ingestion, and remaining elevated for up to 7 days. In addition to the increased metabolic demands, digestion is associated with secretion of H+ into the stomach, resulting in a large metabolic alkalosis (alkaline tide) and a near doubling in plasma [HCO3-]. During digestion then, the cardiopulmonary system must meet the simultaneous challenges of an elevated oxygen demand and a pronounced metabolic alkalosis. This paper will compare and contrast the patterns of cardiopulmonary response to similar metabolic increments in these different physiological states (exercise and/or digestion) in a variety of reptiles, including the Burmese python, Python morulus, savannah monitor lizard, Varanus exanthematicus, and American alligator Alligator mississipiensis.

  5. An automated system for oxygen-18 water recovery and fluorine-18 delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueller, Michael J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Schlyer, David J.

    2005-12-01

    BNL has recently purchased an EBCO TR-19 cyclotron for routine isotope production. A system has been built to recover oxygen-18 enriched water from the fluorine-18 target, and then transport the F-18 a distance of 50 m to a shielded dose splitter. The remotized system provides the operator with feedback on flow rates and radiation levels during processing. Recovery of the 2.6 mL of enriched water and transport of the F-18 to the radiochemistry labs takes under 10 min, with more than 80% of the activity arriving in the chemistry lab.

  6. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-shan; Li, Su-zhi; Cao, Tie-sheng

    2016-01-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (−17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution. PMID:27503416

  7. Effects of race and sex on cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen delivery and blood flow distribution in response to high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Yang; Ren, Li-Hua; Li, Li; Wang, Zhen; Liu, Shan-Shan; Li, Su-Zhi; Cao, Tie-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    To assess racial, sexual, and regional differences in cerebral hemodynamic response to high altitude (HA, 3658 m). We performed cross-sectional comparisons on total cerebral blood flow (TCBF = sum of bilateral internal carotid and vertebral arterial blood flows = QICA + QVA), total cerebrovascular resistance (TCVR), total cerebral oxygen delivery (TCOD) and QVA/TCBF (%), among six groups of young healthy subjects: Tibetans (2-year staying) and Han (Han Chinese) at sea level, Han (2-day, 1-year and 5-year) and Tibetans at HA. Bilateral ICA and VA diameters and flow velocities were derived from duplex ultrasonography; and simultaneous measurements of arterial pressure, oxygen saturation, and hemoglobin concentration were conducted. Neither acute (2-day) nor chronic (>1 year) responses showed sex differences in Han, except that women showed lower TCOD compared with men. Tibetans and Han exhibited different chronic responses (percentage alteration relative to the sea-level counterpart value) in TCBF (‑17% vs. 0%), TCVR (22% vs. 12%), TCOD (0% vs. 10%) and QVA/TCBF (0% vs. 2.4%, absolute increase), with lower resting TCOD found in SL- and HA-Tibetans. Our findings indicate racial but not sex differences in cerebral hemodynamic adaptations to HA, with Tibetans (but not Han) demonstrating an altitude-related change of CBF distribution.

  8. Influence of expiratory flow-limitation during exercise on systemic oxygen delivery in humans.

    PubMed

    Aliverti, A; Dellacà, R L; Lotti, P; Bertini, S; Duranti, R; Scano, G; Heyman, J; Lo Mauro, A; Pedotti, A; Macklem, P T

    2005-10-01

    To determine the effects of exercise with expiratory flow-limitation (EFL) on systemic O(2) delivery, seven normal subjects performed incremental exercise with and without EFL at approximately 0.8 l s(-1) (imposed by a Starling resistor in the expiratory line) to determine maximal power output under control (W'(max,c)) and EFL (W'(max,e)) conditions. W'(max,e) was 62.5% of W'(max,c), and EFL exercise caused a significant fall in the ventilatory threshold. In a third test, after exercising at W'(max,e) without EFL for 4 min, EFL was imposed; exercise continued for 4 more minutes or until exhaustion. O(2) consumption (V'(O)(2)) was measured breath-by-breath for the last 90 s of control, and for the first 90 s of EFL exercise. Assuming that the arterio-mixed venous O(2) content remained constant immediately after EFL imposition, we used V'(O)(2) as a measure of cardiac output (Q'(c)). Q'(c) was also calculated by the pulse contour method with blood pressure measured continuously by a photo-plethysmographic device. Both sets of data showed a decrease of Q'(c) due to a decrease in stroke volume by 10% (p < 0.001 for V'(O)(2)) with EFL and remained decreased for the full 90 s. Concurrently, arterial O(2) saturation decreased by 5%, abdominal, pleural and alveolar pressures increased, and duty cycle decreased by 43%. We conclude that this combination of events led to a decrease in venous return secondary to high expiratory pressures, and a decreased duty cycle which decreased O(2) delivery to working muscles by approximately 15%.

  9. AltitudeOmics: effect of ascent and acclimatization to 5260 m on regional cerebral oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Subudhi, Andrew W; Fan, Jui-Lin; Evero, Oghenero; Bourdillon, Nicolas; Kayser, Bengt; Julian, Colleen G; Lovering, Andrew T; Roach, Robert C

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral hypoxaemia associated with rapid ascent to high altitude can be life threatening; yet, with proper acclimatization, cerebral function can be maintained well enough for humans to thrive. We investigated adjustments in global and regional cerebral oxygen delivery (DO2) as 21 healthy volunteers rapidly ascended and acclimatized to 5260 m. Ultrasound indices of cerebral blood flow in internal carotid and vertebral arteries were measured at sea level, upon arrival at 5260 m (ALT1; atmospheric pressure 409 mmHg) and after 16 days of acclimatization (ALT16). Cerebral DO2 was calculated as the product of arterial oxygen content and flow in each respective artery and summed to estimate global cerebral blood flow. Vascular resistances were calculated as the quotient of mean arterial pressure and respective flows. Global cerebral blood flow increased by ∼70% upon arrival at ALT1 (P < 0.001) and returned to sea-level values at ALT16 as a result of changes in cerebral vascular resistance. A reciprocal pattern in arterial oxygen content maintained global cerebral DO2 throughout acclimatization, although DO2 to the posterior cerebral circulation was increased by ∼25% at ALT1 (P = 0.032). We conclude that cerebral DO2 is well maintained upon acute exposure and acclimatization to hypoxia, particularly in the posterior and inferior regions of the brain associated with vital homeostatic functions. This tight regulation of cerebral DO2 was achieved through integrated adjustments in local vascular resistances to alter cerebral perfusion during both acute and chronic exposure to hypoxia.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide filled poly(methyl methacrylate) microcapsules: potential oxygen delivery materials.

    PubMed

    Mallepally, Rajendar R; Parrish, Chance C; Mc Hugh, Mark A M; Ward, Kevin R

    2014-11-20

    This paper describes the synthesis of H₂O₂-H₂O filled poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microcapsules as potential candidates for controlled O₂ delivery. The microcapsules are prepared by a water-in-oil solvent emulsion and evaporation method. The results of this study describe the effect of process parameters on the characteristics of the microcapsules and on their in vitro performance. The size of the microcapsules, as determined from scanning electron microscopy, ranges from ∼5 to 30 μm and the size distribution is narrow. The microcapsules exhibit an internal morphology with entrapped H₂O₂-H₂O droplets randomly distributed in the PMMA continuous phase. In vitro release studies of 4.5 wt% H₂O₂-loaded microcapsules show that ∼70% of the H₂O₂ releases in 24h. This corresponds to a total O₂ production of ∼12 cc/gram of dry microcapsules. Shelf-life studies show that the microcapsules retain ∼84 wt% of the initially loaded H₂O₂ after nine months storage at 2-8 °C, which is an attractive feature for clinical applications.

  11. Donor preoperative oxygen delivery and post-extubation hypoxia impact donation after circulatory death hypoxic cholangiopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chirichella, Thomas J; Dunham, C Michael; Zimmerman, Michael A; Phelan, Elise M; Mandell, M Susan; Conzen, Kendra D; Kelley, Stephen E; Nydam, Trevor L; Bak, Thomas E; Kam, Igal; Wachs, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate donation after circulatory death (DCD) orthotopic liver transplant outcomes [hypoxic cholangiopathy (HC) and patient/graft survival] and donor risk-conditions. METHODS: From 2003-2013, 45 DCD donor transplants were performed. Predonation physiologic data from UNOS DonorNet included preoperative systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, pH, SpO2, PaO2, FiO2, and hemoglobin. Mean arterial blood pressure was computed from the systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Donor preoperative arterial O2 content was computed as [hemoglobin (gm/dL) × 1.37 (mL O2/gm) × SpO2%) + (0.003 × PaO2)]. The amount of preoperative donor red blood cell transfusions given and vasopressor use during the intensive care unit stay were documented. Donors who were transfused ≥ 1 unit of red-cells or received ≥ 2 vasopressors in the preoperative period were categorized as the red-cell/multi-pressor group. Following withdrawal of life support, donor ischemia time was computed as the number-of-minutes from onset of diastolic blood pressure < 60 mmHg until aortic cross clamping. Donor hypoxemia time was the number-of-minutes from onset of pulse oximetry < 80% until clamping. Donor hypoxia score was (ischemia time + hypoxemia time) ÷ donor preoperative hemoglobin. RESULTS: The 1, 3, and 5 year graft and patient survival rates were 83%, 77%, 60%; and 92%, 84%, and 72%, respectively. HC occurred in 49% with 16% requiring retransplant. HC occurred in donors with increased age (33.0 ± 10.6 years vs 25.6 ± 8.4 years, P = 0.014), less preoperative multiple vasopressors or red-cell transfusion (9.5% vs 54.6%, P = 0.002), lower preoperative hemoglobin (10.7 ± 2.2 gm/dL vs 12.3 ± 2.1 gm/dL, P = 0.017), lower preoperative arterial oxygen content (14.8 ± 2.8 mL O2/100 mL blood vs 16.8 ± 3.3 mL O2/100 mL blood, P = 0.049), greater hypoxia score >2.0 (69.6% vs 25.0%, P = 0.006), and increased preoperative mean arterial pressure (92.7 ± 16.2 mmHg vs 83.8 ± 18.5 mmHg, P = 0

  12. Combined sonodynamic and antimetabolite therapy for the improved treatment of pancreatic cancer using oxygen loaded microbubbles as a delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Conor; Kamila, Sukanta; Owen, Joshua; Nesbitt, Heather; Callan, Bridgeen; Borden, Mark; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Hamoudi, Rifat A; Taylor, Mark A; Stride, Eleanor; McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F

    2016-02-01

    In this manuscript we describe the preparation of an oxygen-loaded microbubble (O2MB) platform for the targeted treatment of pancreatic cancer using both sonodynamic therapy (SDT) and antimetabolite therapy. O2MB were prepared with either the sensitiser Rose Bengal (O2MB-RB) or the antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil (O2MB-5FU) attached to the microbubble (MB) surface. The MB were characterised with respect to size, physical stability and oxygen retention. A statistically significant reduction in cell viability was observed when three different pancreatic cancer cell lines (BxPc-3, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1), cultured in an anaerobic cabinet, were treated with both SDT and antimetabolite therapy compared to either therapy alone. In addition, a statistically significant reduction in tumour growth was also observed when ectopic human xenograft BxPC-3 tumours in SCID mice were treated with the combined therapy compared to treatment with either therapy alone. These results illustrate not only the potential of combined SDT/antimetabolite therapy as a stand alone treatment option in pancreatic cancer, but also the capability of O2-loaded MBs to deliver O2 to the tumour microenvironment in order to enhance the efficacy of therapies that depend on O2 to mediate their therapeutic effect. Furthermore, the use of MBs to facilitate delivery of O2 as well as the sensitiser/antimetabolite, combined with the possibility to activate the sensitiser using externally applied ultrasound, provides a more targeted approach with improved efficacy and reduced side effects when compared with conventional systemic administration of antimetabolite drugs alone.

  13. Small-for-gestational age and large-for-gestational age thresholds to predict infants at risk of adverse delivery and neonatal outcomes: are current charts adequate? An observational study from the Born in Bradford cohort

    PubMed Central

    Norris, T; Johnson, W; Farrar, D; Tuffnell, D; Wright, J; Cameron, N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Construct an ethnic-specific chart and compare the prediction of adverse outcomes using this chart with the clinically recommended UK-WHO and customised birth weight charts using cut-offs for small-for-gestational age (SGA: birth weight <10th centile) and large-for-gestational age (LGA: birth weight >90th centile). Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Born in Bradford (BiB) study, UK. Participants 3980 White British and 4448 Pakistani infants with complete data for gestational age, birth weight, ethnicity, maternal height, weight and parity. Main outcome measures Prevalence of SGA and LGA, using the three charts and indicators of diagnostic utility (sensitivity, specificity and area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC)) of these chart-specific cut-offs to predict delivery and neonatal outcomes and a composite outcome. Results In White British and Pakistani infants, the prevalence of SGA and LGA differed depending on the chart used. Increased risk of SGA was observed when using the UK-WHO and customised charts as opposed to the ethnic-specific chart, while the opposite was apparent when classifying LGA infants. However, the predictive utility of all three charts to identify adverse clinical outcomes was poor, with only the prediction of shoulder dystocia achieving an AUROC>0.62 on all three charts. Conclusions Despite being recommended in national clinical guidelines, the UK-WHO and customised birth weight charts perform poorly at identifying infants at risk of adverse neonatal outcomes. Being small or large may increase the risk of an adverse outcome; however, size alone is not sensitive or specific enough with current detection to be useful. However, a significant amount of missing data for some of the outcomes may have limited the power needed to determine true associations. PMID:25783424

  14. Intracellular delivery of the reactive oxygen species generating agent D-penicillamine upon conjugation to poly-L-glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Saurabh; Mumper, Russell J

    2010-06-07

    D-penicillamine is an aminothiol that is cytotoxic to cancer cells and generates dose dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) via copper catalyzed oxidation. However, the delivery of D-pen to cancer cells remains a challenge due to its high hydrophilicity, highly reactive thiol group and impermeability to the cell membrane. To overcome this challenge, we investigated a novel poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) conjugate of D-pen (PGA-D-pen) where D-pen was conjugated to PGA modified with 2-(2-pyridyldithio)-ethylamine (PDE) via disulfide bonds. Confocal microscopy and cell uptake studies showed that the fluorescently labeled PGA-D-pen was taken up by human leukemia cells (HL-60) in a time dependent manner. Treatment of HL-60, murine leukemia cells (P388) and human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-468) with PGA-D-pen resulted in dose dependent cytotoxicity and elevation of intracellular ROS levels. PGA-D-pen induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells which was verified by Annexin V binding. The in vivo evaluation of the conjugate in the P388 murine leukemia model (intraperitoneal) resulted in significant enhancement in the survival of CD2F1 mice over vehicle control.

  15. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E

    2014-01-15

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin.

  16. Cytochrome c oxidase response to changes in cerebral oxygen delivery in the adult brain shows higher brain-specificity than haemoglobin☆

    PubMed Central

    Kolyva, Christina; Ghosh, Arnab; Tachtsidis, Ilias; Highton, David; Cooper, Chris E.; Smith, Martin; Elwell, Clare E.

    2014-01-01

    The redox state of cerebral mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (Δ[oxCCO]) is a signal with strong potential as a non-invasive, bedside biomarker of cerebral metabolic status. We hypothesised that the higher mitochondrial density of brain compared to skin and skull would lead to evidence of brain-specificity of the Δ[oxCCO] signal when measured with a multi-distance near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system. Measurements of Δ[oxCCO] as well as of concentration changes in oxygenated (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxygenated haemoglobin (Δ[HHb]) were taken at multiple source-detector distances during systemic hypoxia and hypocapnia (decrease in cerebral oxygen delivery), and hyperoxia and hypercapnia (increase in cerebral oxygen delivery) from 15 adult healthy volunteers. Increasing source-detector spacing is associated with increasing light penetration depth and thus higher sensitivity to cerebral changes. An increase in Δ[oxCCO] was observed during the challenges that increased cerebral oxygen delivery and the opposite was observed when cerebral oxygen delivery decreased. A consistent pattern of statistically significant increasing amplitude of the Δ[oxCCO] response with increasing light penetration depth was observed in all four challenges, a behaviour that was distinctly different from that of the haemoglobin chromophores, which did not show this statistically significant depth gradient. This depth-dependence of the Δ[oxCCO] signal corroborates the notion of higher concentrations of CCO being present in cerebral tissue compared to extracranial components and highlights the value of NIRS-derived Δ[oxCCO] as a brain-specific signal of cerebral metabolism, superior in this aspect to haemoglobin. PMID:23707584

  17. Effects of resuscitation with polymerized porcine hemoglobin (pPolyHb) on hemodynamic stability and oxygen delivery in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Fang; Yan, Kunping; Pan, Wencan; Xu, Lijuan; Liu, Huifang; Yan, Chengbin; Chen, Chao; Zhu, Hongli

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of polymerized porcine hemoglobin (pPolyHb) on hemodynamic stability and oxygen delivery in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. Rats underwent controlled hemorrhage, resulting in the loss of 65% of their blood volume in 90 minutes. The results showed that pPolyHb was superior to hetastarch and saline, and similar to whole blood, in restoring hemodynamic stability and reversing anaerobic metabolism caused by hemorrhage. Furthermore, pPolyHb improved oxygen supply and increased blood oxygen content. These data suggest that pPolyHb can be effective in improving tissue perfusion under conditions of severe hemorrhagic shock.

  18. The effects of altitude/hypoxic training on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity in elite athletes – a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hun-young; Hwang, Hyejung; Park, Jonghoon; Lee, Seongno; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed as a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing effectiveness of altitude/hypoxic training (experimental) versus sea-level training (control) on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity of elite athletes in Korea. [Methods] Databases (Research Information Service System, Korean studies Information Service System, National Assembly Library) were for randomized controlled trials comparing altitude/hypoxic training versus sea-level training in elite athletes. Studies published in Korea up to December 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Oxygen delivery capacity of the blood was quantified by red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), erythropoietin (EPO); and aerobic exercise capacity was quantified by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). RBC, Hb, Hct, VO2max represented heterogeneity and compared post-intervention between altitude/hypoxic training and sea-level training in elite athletes by a random effect model meta-analysis. EPO represented homogeneity and meta-analysis performed by a fixed effect model. Eight independent studies with 156 elite athletes (experimental: n = 82, control: n = 74) were included in the metaanalysis. [Results] RBC (4.499×105 cell/ul, 95 % CI: 2.469 to 6.529), Hb (5.447 g/dl, 95 % CI: 3.028 to 7.866), Hct (3.639 %, 95 % CI: 1.687 to 5.591), EPO (0.711 mU/mL, 95% CI: 0.282 to 1.140), VO2max (1.637 ml/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.599 to 1.400) showed significantly greater increase following altitude/hypoxic training, as compared with sea-level training. [Conclusion] For elite athletes in Korea, altitude/ hypoxic training appears more effective than sea-level training for improvement of oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:27298808

  19. Balancing the Risks and Benefits of Oxygen Therapy in Critically III Adults

    PubMed Central

    Mutlu, Gökhan M.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen therapy is an integral part of the treatment of critically ill patients. Maintenance of adequate oxygen delivery to vital organs often requires the administration of supplemental oxygen, sometimes at high concentrations. Although oxygen therapy is lifesaving, it may be associated with deleterious effects when administered for prolonged periods at high concentrations. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular responses to hypoxia and high levels of oxygen and review the current guidelines for oxygen therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:23546490

  20. Should we be giving high concentration oxygen to all patients treated in an ambulance?

    PubMed

    Lavery, G G; Corris, P A

    2012-03-01

    Oxygen is one of the most widely used drugs. It is important to recognise that oxygen administration carries risks as well as benefits. While adequate oxygen saturation of arterial blood is an important factor in tissue oxygen delivery, oxygen administration to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can lead to decompensated type II respiratory failure. In this debate, Dr Lavery makes the case that high concentration oxygen should be given to all patients treated in an ambulance, while Professor Corris argues against this position.

  1. A comparison of 4% succinylated gelatin solution versus normal saline in stable normovolaemic sheep: global haemodynamic, regional blood flow and oxygen delivery effects.

    PubMed

    Wan, L; Bellomo, R; May, C N

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effects on regional blood flow and regional oxygen delivery of 4% succinylated gelatin solution (Gelofusine, B. Braun) with those of normal saline. This was a randomised, controlled, cross-over large animal study, which took place at the animal laboratory of university physiology institute. The subjects were seven merino cross-ewes. We implanted flow probes around the aorta, coronary, renal and mesenteric arteries. We randomised animals to observation (control), normal saline (one litre over 15 minutes) or Gelofusine (one litre over 15 minutes). We measured central haemodynamics, organ blood flows, arterial blood gases and haemoglobin every 30 minutes for 210 minutes. Compared to control, both Gelofusine and normal saline significantly and similarly increased mean arterial pressure, stroke volume, cardiac output and central venous pressure in the first hour (P < 0.05). Such changes, however, were transient except for the increase in cardiac output seen with Gelofusine. Normal saline significantly increased mesenteric blood flow in the first hour (P < 0.05), while Gelofusine caused a specific, sustained and progressive increase in renal blood flow and conductance (P < 0.05). Both fluids increased urine output and creatinine clearance (P < 0.05), but, due to haemodilution, both decreased renal oxygen delivery in the first hour (P < 0.05). Normal saline and Gelofusine have transient, volume expansion-related systemic haemodynamic effects, which are greater for Gelofusine. Saline had a more pronounced early effect on mesenteric blood flow, while Gelofusine had a sustained and progressive greater effect on renal blood flow. The transient increase in urine output and creatinine clearance seen with both fluids occurred while renal oxygen delivery decreased.

  2. Critical State of Energy Metabolism in Brain Slices: The Principal Role of Oxygen Delivery and Energy Substrates in Shaping Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Anton; Zilberter, Yuri

    2011-01-01

    The interactive vasculo-neuro-glial system controlling energy supply in the brain is absent in vitro where energy provision is determined by experimental conditions. Despite the fact that neuronal activity is extremely energy demanding, little has been reported on the state of energy metabolism in submerged brain slices. Without this information, the arbitrarily chosen oxygenation and metabolic provisions make questionable the efficient oxidative metabolism in slices. We show that in mouse hippocampal slices (postnatal day 19–44), evoked neuronal discharges, spontaneous network activity (initiated by 4-aminopyridine), and synaptic stimulation-induced NAD(P)H autofluorescence depend strongly on the oxygen availability. Only the rate of perfusion as high as ~15 ml/min (95% O2) provided appropriate oxygenation of a slice. Lower oxygenation resulted in the decrease of both local field potentials and spontaneous network activity as well as in significant modulation of short-term synaptic plasticity. The reduced oxygen supply considerably inhibited the oxidation phase of NAD(P)H signaling indicating that the changes in neuronal activity were paralleled by the decrease in aerobic energy metabolism. Interestingly, the dependence of neuronal activity on oxygen tension was clearly shifted toward considerably larger pO2 values in slices when compared to in vivo conditions. With sufficient pO2 provided by a high perfusion rate, partial substitution of glucose in ACSF for β-hydroxybutyrate, pyruvate, or lactate enhanced both oxidative metabolism and synaptic function. This suggests that the high pO2 in brain slices is compulsory for maintaining oxidative metabolism, and glucose alone is not sufficient in fulfilling energy requirements during neuronal activity. Altogether, our results demonstrate that energy metabolism determines the functional state of neuronal network, highlighting the need for the adequate metabolic support to be insured in the in vitro experiments. PMID

  3. Oxides of LANTHANUM(1-X) Strontium(x) COBALT(1 - Iron(y) OXYGEN(3) for Oxygen and Electrical Delivery Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Lone-Wen Frank

    Perovskite-type compounds in the system La_{1-x}Sr_{x}Co _{1-y}Fe_{y}O_ {3-delta have been considered as potential cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the structural, electrical, thermochemical properties of these compositions. The first and second papers of this dissertation dealt with the material synthesis, crystal structure, thermal expansion, thermogravimetry, electrical conductivity, and thermoelectricity of La_{0.8 }Sr_{0.2}Co_{1-y}Fe _{y}O_3 (y = 0-1) and La_{1-x}Sr_{x}Co _{0.2}Fe_{0.8}O_3 (x = 0-1) in air, respectively. Electrical conductivities and thermal expansion coefficients for these compositions were found to increase with Sr and Co contents. The unique temperature and composition dependence of the electrical conductivity observed in both systems were semi-empirically modeled by incorporating several mechanisms which include the hopping conduction of small polarons, a thermally activated charge disproportionation of Co^{3+ }, the ionic compensation by oxygen vacancy, and a preferential electronic compensation of acceptor by forming Fe^{4+} over Co^{4+}.. Phase stability, oxygen content, electrical conductivity, and Seebeck coefficient of La_ {1-x}Sr_{x}Co_{0.2 }Fe_{0.8}O_{3-delta } (x = 0, 0.2, 0.4) as function of temperature and oxygen activity were reported in the third paper. Both the oxygen deficiency and phase stability of compositions with y = 0.8 were found considerably high. It has been demonstrated that the degree of oxygen deficiency in these compositions significantly influences their structural and electrical properties, especially in the high temperature region.

  4. Maternal oxygen delivery is not related to altitude- and ancestry-associated differences in human fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio, Stacy; Postigo, Lucrecia; Illsley, Nicholas P; Rodriguez, Carmelo; Heredia, Gladys; Brimacombe, Michael; Echalar, Lourdes; Torricos, Tatiana; Tellez, Wilma; Maldonado, Ivan; Balanza, Elfride; Alvarez, Tatiana; Ameller, Julio; Vargas, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    Fetal growth is reduced at high altitude, but the decrease is less among long-resident populations. We hypothesized that greater maternal uteroplacental O2 delivery would explain increased fetal growth in Andean natives versus European migrants to high altitude. O2 delivery was measured with ultrasound, Doppler and haematological techniques. Participants (n= 180) were pregnant women of self-professed European or Andean ancestry living at 3600 m or 400 m in Bolivia. Ancestry was quantified using ancestry-informative single nucleotide polymorphims. The altitude-associated decrement in birth weight was 418 g in European versus 236 g in Andean women (P < 0.005). Altitude was associated with decreased uterine artery diameter, volumetric blood flow and O2 delivery regardless of ancestry. But the hypothesis was rejected as O2 delivery was similar between ancestry groups at their respective altitudes of residence. Instead, Andean neonates were larger and heavier per unit of O2 delivery, regardless of altitude (P < 0.001). European admixture among Andeans was negatively correlated with birth weight at both altitudes (P < 0.01), but admixture was not related to any of the O2 transport variables. Genetically mediated differences in maternal O2 delivery are thus unlikely to explain the Andean advantage in fetal growth. Of the other independent variables, only placental weight and gestational age explained significant variation in birth weight. Thus greater placental efficiency in O2 and nutrient transport, and/or greater fetal efficiency in substrate utilization may contribute to ancestry- and altitude-related differences in fetal growth. Uterine artery O2 delivery in these pregnancies was 99 ± 3 ml min−1, ∼5-fold greater than near-term fetal O2 consumption. Deficits in maternal O2 transport in third trimester normal pregnancy are unlikely to be causally associated with variation in fetal growth. PMID:17510190

  5. Right-to-left shunt has modest effects on CO2 delivery to the gut during digestion, but compromises oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Malte, Christian Lind; Malte, Hans; Reinholdt, Lærke Rønlev; Findsen, Anders; Hicks, James W; Wang, Tobias

    2017-02-15

    By virtue of their cardiovascular anatomy, reptiles and amphibians can shunt blood away from the pulmonary or systemic circuits, but the functional role of this characteristic trait remains unclear. It has been suggested that right-to-left (R-L) shunt (recirculation of systemic blood within the body) fuels the gastric mucosa with acidified and CO2-rich blood to facilitate gastric acid secretion during digestion. However, in addition to elevating PCO2 , R-L shunt also reduces arterial O2 levels and would compromise O2 delivery during the increased metabolic state of digestion. Conversely, arterial PCO2  can also be elevated by lowering ventilation relative to metabolism (i.e. reducing the air convection requirement, ACR). Based on a mathematical analysis of the relative roles of ACR and R-L shunt on O2 and CO2 levels, we predict that ventilatory modifications are much more effective for gastric CO2 supply with only modest effects on O2 delivery. Conversely, elevating CO2 levels by means of R-L shunt would come at a cost of significant reductions in O2 levels. The different effects of altering ACR and R-L shunt on O2 and CO2 levels are explained by the differences in the effective blood capacitance coefficients.

  6. Quantitative assessment of the balance between oxygen delivery and consumption in the rat brain after transient ischemia with T2 -BOLD magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kettunen, Mikko I; Gröhn, Olli H J; Silvennoinen, M Johanna; Penttonen, Markku; Kauppinen, Risto A

    2002-03-01

    The balance between oxygen consumption and delivery in the rat brain after exposure to transient ischemia was quantitatively studied with single-spin echo T2-BOLD (blood oxygenation level-dependent) magnetic resonance imaging at 4.7 T. The rats were exposed to graded common carotid artery occlusions using a modification of the four-vessel model of Pulsinelli. T2, diffusion, and cerebral blood volume were quantified with magnetic resonance imaging, and CBF was measured with the hydrogen clearance method. A transient common carotid artery occlusion below the CBF value of approximately 20 mL x 100 g(-1) x min(-1) was needed to yield a T2 increase of 4.6 +/- 1.2 milliseconds (approximately 9% of cerebral T2) and 6.8 +/- 1.7 milliseconds (approximately 13% of cerebral T2) after 7 and 15 minutes of ischemia, respectively. Increases in CBF of 103 +/- 75% and in cerebral blood volume of 29 +/- 20% were detected in the reperfusion phase. These hemodynamic changes alone could account for only approximately one third of the T2 increase in luxury perfusion, suggesting that a substantial increase in blood oxygen saturation (resulting from reduced oxygen extraction by the brain) is needed to explain the magnetic resonance imaging observation.

  7. Control of the Position of Oxygen Delivery in Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 by Amino Acid Side Chains within a Gas Migration Channel.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Lara; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-04-22

    Understanding gas migration pathways is critical to unraveling structure-function relationships in enzymes that process gaseous substrates such as O2, H2, and N2 This work investigates the role of a defined pathway for O2 in regulating the peroxidation of linoleic acid by soybean lipoxygenase 1. Computational and mutagenesis studies provide strong support for a dominant delivery channel that shuttles molecular oxygen to a specific region of the active site, thereby ensuring the regio- and stereospecificity of product. Analysis of reaction kinetics and product distribution in channel mutants also reveals a plasticity to the gas migration pathway. The findings show that a single site mutation (I553W) limits oxygen accessibility to the active site, greatly increasing the fraction of substrate that reacts with oxygen free in solution. They also show how a neighboring site mutation (L496W) can result in a redirection of oxygen toward an alternate position of the substrate, changing the regio- and stereospecificity of peroxidation. The present data indicate that modest changes in a protein scaffold may modulate the access of small gaseous molecules to enzyme-bound substrates.

  8. Development of a Minimal-Bulk Oxygen Delivery Product to Enhance Survival During Hemorrhagic Shock/Studies Regarding the Use of Perfluorocarbon- Derived Intravascular Microbubbles from Oxygen Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    TREATED PIGS A few minu tes after th e Hextend infusion was initiated, th e arterial pr essures started to incr ease gradually as demonstrated in Figure...Until the end of treatment both panels displays SAP (systolic arterial pressure) and DAP (diastolic arterial pr essure ) as mean ± SE, after...toxicity, high pressu re nervous syndrome, work to lerance at pr essure , hyperbaric oxygen treatment for decompression sickness and clinical use

  9. 2H,3H-decafluoropentane-based nanodroplets: new perspectives for oxygen delivery to hypoxic cutaneous tissues.

    PubMed

    Prato, Mauro; Magnetto, Chiara; Jose, Jithin; Khadjavi, Amina; Cavallo, Federica; Quaglino, Elena; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Benintende, Emilio; Varetto, Gianfranco; Argenziano, Monica; Troia, Adriano; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP)-based oxygen-loaded nanobubbles (OLNBs) were previously proposed as adjuvant therapeutic tools for pathologies of different etiology sharing hypoxia as a common feature, including cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. Here we introduce a new platform of oxygen nanocarriers, based on 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (DFP) as core fluorocarbon. These new nanocarriers have been named oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) since DFP is liquid at body temperature, unlike gaseous PFP. Dextran-shelled OLNDs, available either in liquid or gel formulations, display spherical morphology, ~600 nm diameters, anionic charge, good oxygen carrying capacity, and no toxic effects on human keratinocytes after cell internalization. In vitro OLNDs result more effective in releasing oxygen to hypoxic environments than former OLNBs, as demonstrated by analysis through oxymetry. In vivo, OLNDs effectively enhance oxy-hemoglobin levels, as emerged from investigation by photoacoustic imaging. Interestingly, ultrasound (US) treatment further improves transdermal oxygen release from OLNDs. Taken together, these data suggest that US-activated, DFP-based OLNDs might be innovative, suitable and cost-effective devices to topically treat hypoxia-associated pathologies of the cutaneous tissues.

  10. 2H,3H-Decafluoropentane-Based Nanodroplets: New Perspectives for Oxygen Delivery to Hypoxic Cutaneous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Jithin; Khadjavi, Amina; Cavallo, Federica; Quaglino, Elena; Panariti, Alice; Rivolta, Ilaria; Benintende, Emilio; Varetto, Gianfranco; Argenziano, Monica; Troia, Adriano; Cavalli, Roberta; Guiot, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP)-based oxygen-loaded nanobubbles (OLNBs) were previously proposed as adjuvant therapeutic tools for pathologies of different etiology sharing hypoxia as a common feature, including cancer, infection, and autoimmunity. Here we introduce a new platform of oxygen nanocarriers, based on 2H,3H-decafluoropentane (DFP) as core fluorocarbon. These new nanocarriers have been named oxygen-loaded nanodroplets (OLNDs) since DFP is liquid at body temperature, unlike gaseous PFP. Dextran-shelled OLNDs, available either in liquid or gel formulations, display spherical morphology, ~600 nm diameters, anionic charge, good oxygen carrying capacity, and no toxic effects on human keratinocytes after cell internalization. In vitro OLNDs result more effective in releasing oxygen to hypoxic environments than former OLNBs, as demonstrated by analysis through oxymetry. In vivo, OLNDs effectively enhance oxy-hemoglobin levels, as emerged from investigation by photoacoustic imaging. Interestingly, ultrasound (US) treatment further improves transdermal oxygen release from OLNDs. Taken together, these data suggest that US-activated, DFP-based OLNDs might be innovative, suitable and cost-effective devices to topically treat hypoxia-associated pathologies of the cutaneous tissues. PMID:25781463

  11. Poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles as delivery agents for photodynamic therapy: enhancing singlet oxygen release and photototoxicity by surface PEG coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boix-Garriga, Ester; Acedo, Pilar; Casadó, Ana; Villanueva, Angeles; Stockert, Juan Carlos; Cañete, Magdalena; Mora, Margarita; Lluïsa Sagristá, Maria; Nonell, Santi

    2015-09-01

    Poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are being considered as nanodelivery systems for photodynamic therapy. The physico-chemical and biological aspects of their use remain largely unknown. Herein we report the results of a study of PLGA NPs for the delivery of the model hydrophobic photosensitizer ZnTPP to HeLa cells. ZnTPP was encapsulated in PLGA with high efficiency and the NPs showed negative zeta potentials and diameters close to 110 nm. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coating, introduced to prevent opsonization and clearance by macrophages, decreased the size and zeta potential of the NPs by roughly a factor of two and improved their stability in the presence of serum proteins. Photophysical studies revealed two and three populations of ZnTPP and singlet oxygen in uncoated and PEGylated NPs, respectively. Singlet oxygen is confined within the NPs in bare PLGA while it is more easily released into the external medium after PEG coating, which contributes to a higher photocytotoxicity towards HeLa cells in vitro. PLGA NPs are internalized by endocytosis, deliver their cargo to lysosomes and induce cell death by apoptosis upon exposure to light. In conclusion, PLGA NPs coated with PEG show high potential as delivery systems for photodynamic applications.

  12. Poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles as delivery agents for photodynamic therapy: enhancing singlet oxygen release and photototoxicity by surface PEG coating.

    PubMed

    Boix-Garriga, Ester; Acedo, Pilar; Casadó, Ana; Villanueva, Angeles; Stockert, Juan Carlos; Cañete, Magdalena; Mora, Margarita; Sagristá, Maria Lluïsa; Nonell, Santi

    2015-09-11

    Poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) are being considered as nanodelivery systems for photodynamic therapy. The physico-chemical and biological aspects of their use remain largely unknown. Herein we report the results of a study of PLGA NPs for the delivery of the model hydrophobic photosensitizer ZnTPP to HeLa cells. ZnTPP was encapsulated in PLGA with high efficiency and the NPs showed negative zeta potentials and diameters close to 110 nm. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coating, introduced to prevent opsonization and clearance by macrophages, decreased the size and zeta potential of the NPs by roughly a factor of two and improved their stability in the presence of serum proteins. Photophysical studies revealed two and three populations of ZnTPP and singlet oxygen in uncoated and PEGylated NPs, respectively. Singlet oxygen is confined within the NPs in bare PLGA while it is more easily released into the external medium after PEG coating, which contributes to a higher photocytotoxicity towards HeLa cells in vitro. PLGA NPs are internalized by endocytosis, deliver their cargo to lysosomes and induce cell death by apoptosis upon exposure to light. In conclusion, PLGA NPs coated with PEG show high potential as delivery systems for photodynamic applications.

  13. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  14. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  15. Blood flow mechanics and oxygen transport and delivery in the retinal microcirculation: multiscale mathematical modeling and numerical simulation.

    PubMed

    Causin, Paola; Guidoboni, Giovanna; Malgaroli, Francesca; Sacco, Riccardo; Harris, Alon

    2016-06-01

    The scientific community continues to accrue evidence that blood flow alterations and ischemic conditions in the retina play an important role in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. Many factors influence retinal hemodynamics and tissue oxygenation, including blood pressure, blood rheology, oxygen arterial permeability and tissue metabolic demand. Since the influence of these factors on the retinal circulation is difficult to isolate in vivo, we propose here a novel mathematical and computational model describing the coupling between blood flow mechanics and oxygen ([Formula: see text]) transport in the retina. Albeit in a simplified manner, the model accounts for the three-dimensional anatomical structure of the retina, consisting in a layered tissue nourished by an arteriolar/venular network laying on the surface proximal to the vitreous. Capillary plexi, originating from terminal arterioles and converging into smaller venules, are embedded in two distinct tissue layers. Arteriolar and venular networks are represented by fractal trees, whereas capillary plexi are represented using a simplified lumped description. In the model, [Formula: see text] is transported along the vasculature and delivered to the tissue at a rate that depends on the metabolic demand of the various tissue layers. First, the model is validated against available experimental results to identify baseline conditions. Then, a sensitivity analysis is performed to quantify the influence of blood pressure, blood rheology, oxygen arterial permeability and tissue oxygen demand on the [Formula: see text] distribution within the blood vessels and in the tissue. This analysis shows that: (1) systemic arterial blood pressure has a strong influence on the [Formula: see text] profiles in both blood and tissue; (2) plasma viscosity and metabolic consumption rates have a strong influence on the [Formula: see text] tension at the level of the retinal ganglion cells; and (3) arterial [Formula: see text

  16. Bloodless reperfusion with the oxygen carrier HBOC-201 in acute myocardial infarction: a novel platform for cardioprotective probes delivery.

    PubMed

    García-Ruiz, Jose M; Galán-Arriola, Carlos; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; Aguero, Jaume; Sánchez-González, Javier; García-Alvarez, Ana; Nuno-Ayala, Mario; Dubé, Gregory P; Zafirelis, Zafiris; López-Martín, Gonzalo J; Bernal, Juan A; Lara-Pezzi, Enrique; Fuster, Valentín; Ibáñez, Borja

    2017-03-01

    Reperfusion, despite being required for myocardial salvage, is associated with additional injury. We hypothesize that infarct size (IS) will be reduced by a period of bloodless reperfusion with hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) before blood-flow restoration. In the pig model, we first characterized the impact of intracoronary perfusion with a fixed volume (600 ml) of a pre-oxygenated acellular HBOC, HBOC-201, on the healthy myocardium. HBOC-201 was administered through the lumen of the angioplasty balloon (i.e., distal to the occlusion site) immediately after onset of coronary occlusion at 1, 0.7, 0.4, or 0.2 ml/kg/min for 12, 17, 30, and 60 min, respectively, followed by blood-flow restoration. Outcome measures were systemic hemodynamics and LV performance assessed by the state-of-the-art cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. The best performing HBOC-201 perfusion strategies were then tested for their impact on LV performance during myocardial infarction, in pigs subjected to 45 min mid-left anterior descending (LAD) coronary occlusion. At the end of the ischemia duration, pigs were randomized to regular reperfusion (blood-only reperfusion) vs. bloodless reperfusion (perfusion with pre-oxygenated HBOC-201 distal to the occlusion site), followed by blood-flow restoration. Hemodynamics and CMR-measured LV performance were assessed at 7- and 45-day follow-up. In modifications of the HBOC-201 procedure, glucose and insulin were included to support cardiac metabolism. A total of 66 pigs were included in this study. Twenty healthy pigs (5 per infusion protocol) were used in the study of healthy myocardium. Intracoronary administration of HBOC-201 (600 ml) at varying rates, including a flow of 0.4 ml/kg/min (corresponding to a maximum perfusion time of 30 min), did not damage the healthy myocardium. Slower perfusion (longer infusion time) was associated with permanent LV dysfunction and myocardial necrosis. A total of 46 pigs underwent MI induction

  17. Transport and peripheral bioactivities of nitrogen oxides carried by red blood cell hemoglobin: role in oxygen delivery.

    PubMed

    Sonveaux, Pierre; Lobysheva, Irina I; Feron, Olivier; McMahon, Timothy J

    2007-04-01

    The biology of NO (nitric oxide) is poorly explained by the activity of the free radical NO ((.)NO) itself. Although (.)NO acts in an autocrine and paracrine manner, it is also in chemical equilibrium with other NO species that constitute stable stores of NO bioactivity. Among these species, S-nitrosylated hemoglobin (S-nitrosohemoglobin; SNO-Hb) is an evolved transducer of NO bioactivity that acts in a responsive and exquisitely regulated manner to control cardiopulmonary and vascular homeostasis. In SNO-Hb, O(2) sensing is dynamically coupled to formation and release of vasodilating SNOs, endowing the red blood cell (RBC) with the capacity to regulate its own principal function, O(2) delivery, via regulation of blood flow. Analogous, physiological actions of RBC SNO-Hb also contribute to central nervous responses to blood hypoxia, the uptake of O(2) from the lung to blood, and baroreceptor-mediated control of the systemic flow of blood. Dysregulation of the formation, export, or actions of RBC-derived SNOs has been implicated in human diseases including sepsis, sickle cell anemia, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Delivery of SNOs by the RBC can be harnessed for therapeutic gain, and early results support the logic of this approach in the treatment of diseases as varied as cancer and neonatal pulmonary hypertension.

  18. 5 CFR 919.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate evidence. 919.900 Section 919.900 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 919.900 Adequate...

  19. Light-triggered liposomal cargo delivery platform incorporating photosensitizers and gold nanoparticles for enhanced singlet oxygen generation and increased cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kautzka, Zofia; Clement, Sandhya; Goldys, Ewa M; Deng, Wei

    2017-01-01

    We developed light-triggered liposomes incorporating 3–5 nm hydrophobic gold nanoparticles and Rose Bengal (RB), a well-known photosensitizer used for photodynamic therapy. Singlet oxygen generated by these liposomes with 532 nm light illumination was characterized for varying the molar ratio of lipids and gold nanoparticles while keeping the amount of RB constant. Gold nanoparticles were found to enhance the singlet oxygen generation rate, with a maximum enhancement factor of 1.75 obtained for the molar ratio of hydrogenated soy l-α-phosphatidylcholine:1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-(hexanoylamine):gold of 57:5:17 compared with liposomes loaded with RB alone. The experimental results could be explained by the local electric field enhancement caused by gold nanoparticles. We further assessed cellular cytotoxicity of gold-loaded liposomes by encapsulating an antitumor drug, doxorubicin (Dox); such Dox-loaded liposomes were applied to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116) and exposed to light. Gold-loaded liposomes containing RB and Dox where Dox release was triggered by light were found to exhibit higher cytotoxicity compared with the liposomes loaded with RB and Dox alone. Our results indicate that gold-loaded liposomes incorporating photosensitizers may serve as improved agents in photodynamic therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:28203076

  20. A Hand-held Fiber-optic Implement for the Site-specific Delivery of Photosensitizer and Singlet Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Adaickapillai; Kopkalli, Yasemin; Ghosh, Goutam; Ghogare, Ashwini; Minnis, Mihaela; Kruft, Bonnie I.; Zamadar, Matibur; Aebisher, David; Davenport, Lesley; Greer, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed a fiber optic device that internally flows triplet oxygen and externally produces singlet oxygen, causing a reaction at the (Z)-1,2-dialkoxyethene spacer group, freeing a pheophorbide sensitizer upon the fragmentation of a reactive dioxetane intermediate. The device can be operated and sensitizer photorelease observed using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. We demonstrate the preference of sensitizer photorelease when the probe tip is in contact with octanol or lipophilic media. A first-order photocleavage rate constant of 1.13 h−1 was measured in octanol where dye desorption was not accompanied by readsorption. When the probe tip contacts aqueous solution, the photorelease was inefficient because most of the dye adsorbed on the probe tip, even after the covalent ethene spacer bonds have been broken. The observed stability of the free sensitizer in lipophilic media is reasonable even though it is a pyropheophorbide-a derivative that carries a p-formylbenzylic alcohol substituent at the carboxylic acid group. In octanol or lipid systems, we found that the dye was not susceptible to hydrolysis to pyropheophorbide-a, otherwise a pH effect was observed in a binary methanol-water system (9:1) at pH below 2 or above 8. PMID:21790616

  1. A bench evaluation of fraction of oxygen in air delivery and tidal volume accuracy in home care ventilators available for hospital use

    PubMed Central

    Baboi, Loredana; Subtil, Fabien

    2016-01-01

    Background Turbine-powered ventilators are not only designed for long-term ventilation at home but also for hospital use. It is important to verify their capabilities in delivering fraction of oxygen in air (FIO2) and tidal volume (VT). Methods We assessed the FIO2 accuracy and the VT delivery in four home care ventilators (HCV) on the bench. The four HCV were Astral 150, Elisée 150, Monnal T50 and Trilogy 200 HCV, which were connected to a lung model (ASL 5000). For assessing FIO2 accuracy, lung model was set to mimic an obstructive lung and HCV were set in volume controlled mode (VC). They supplied with air, 3 or 15 L/min oxygen and FIO2 was measured by using a ventilator tester (Citrex H4TM). For the VT accuracy, the lung model was set in a way to mimic three adult configurations (normal, obstructive, or restrictive respiratory disorder) and one pediatric configuration. Each HCV was set in VC. Two VT (300 and 500 mL) in adult lung configuration and one 50 mL VT in pediatric lung configuration, at two positive end expiratory pressures 5 and 10 cmH2O, were tested. VT accuracy was measured as volume error (the relative difference between set and measured VT). Statistical analysis was performed by suing one-factor ANOVA with a Bonferroni correction for multiple tests. Results For Astral 150, Elisée 150, Monnal T50 and Trilogy 200, FIO2 averaged 99.2%, 93.7%, 86.3%, and 62.1%, respectively, at 15 L/min oxygen supplementation rate (P<0.001). Volume error was 0.5%±0%, −38%±0%, −9%±0%, −29%±0% and −36%±0% for pediatric lung condition (P<0.001). In adult lung configurations, Monnal T50 systematically over delivered VT and Trilogy 150 was sensitive to lung configuration when VT was set to 300 mL at either positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). Conclusions HCV are different in terms of FIO2 efficiency and VT delivery. PMID:28149559

  2. Event-related changes of the prefrontal cortex oxygen delivery and metabolism during driving measured by hyperspectral fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Nosrati, Reyhaneh; Vesely, Kristin; Schweizer, Tom A.; Toronov, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advancements in optical spectroscopy allow for the construction of hyperspectral (broadband) portable tissue oximeters. In a series of our recent papers we have shown that hyperspectral NIRS (hNIRS) has similar or better capabilities in the absolute tissue oximetry as frequency-domain NIRS, and that hNIRS is also very efficient in measuring temporal changes in tissue hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation. In this paper, we extend the application of hNIRS to the measurement of event-related hemodynamic and metabolic functional cerebral responses during simulated driving. In order to check if hNIRS can detect event-related changes in the brain, we measured the concentration changes of oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin and of the oxidized state of cytochrome c oxidase, on the right and left prefrontal cortices (PFC) simultaneously during simulated driving on sixteen healthy right-handed participants (aged between 22–32). We used our in-house hNIRS system based on a portable spectrometer with cooled CCD detector and a driving simulator with a fully functional steering wheel and foot pedals. Each participant performed different driving tasks and participants were distracted during some driving conditions by asking general knowledge true/false questions. Our findings suggest that more complex driving tasks (non-distracted) deactivate PFC while distractions during driving significantly activate PFC, which is in agreement with previous fMRI results. Also, we found the changes in the redox state of the cytochrome C oxidase to be very consistent with those in the concentrations of HbO2 and HHb. Overall our findings suggest that in addition to the suitability of absolute tissue oximetry, hyperspectral NIRS may also offer advantages in functional brain imaging. In particular, it can be used to measure the metabolic functional brain activity during actual driving. PMID:27446658

  3. Effect of setting high APRV guided by expiratory inflection point of pressure-volume curve on oxygen delivery in canine models of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia-Qiong; Xu, Hong-Yang; Li, Mao-Qin; Chen, Jing-Yu

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of setting high airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) pressure guided by an expiratory inflection point of pressure-volume (PV) curve following lung recruitment maneuver (RM) on oxygen delivery (DO2) in canine models of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) was examined. Canine models of severe ARDS were established by intravenous injection of oleic acid. After injection of sedative muscle relaxants, a PV curve plotted using the super-syringe technique, and the pressure at lower inflection point (LIP) at the inhale branch and the pressure at the point of maximum curvature (PMC) at the exhale branch were measured. The ventilation mode was biphasic positive airway pressure (BiPAP), an inspiration to expiration ratio of 1:2, and Phigh 40 cm H2O, Plow 25 cm H2O. Phigh was decreased to 30 cm H2O after 90 sec. The dogs were randomized into 3 groups after RM, i.e., Blip group, BiPAP Plow = LIP+2 cm H2O; Bpmc group, BiPAP Plow = PMC; and Apmc group. In the APRV group, Phigh was set as PMC, with an inspiratory duration of 4 sec and expiratory duration of 0.4 sec. PMC was 18±1.4 cm H2O, and LIP was 11±1.3 cm H2O. Thirty seconds after RM was stabilized, it was set as 0 h. Hemodynamics, oxygenation and DO2 were measured at 0, 1, 2 and 4 h after RM in ARDS dogs. The results demonstrated: i) cardiac index (CI) in the 3 groups, where CI was significantly decreased in the Bpmc group at 0, 1, 2 and 4 h after RM compared to prior to RM (P<0.05) as well as in the Blip and Apmc groups (P<0.05). CI in the Blip and Apmc groups was not significantly altered prior to and after RM. ii) Oxygenation at 0, 1, 2 and 4 h in the 3 groups was improved after RM and the oxygenation indices for the 3 groups at 1 and 2 h were not significantly different (P>0.05). However, the oxygenation index in the Blip group at 4 h was significantly lower than those at 0 h for the Apmc and Bpmc groups (P<0.05). Oxygenation for the Apmc group at 4 h was higher

  4. Remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia for labor – monitoring of newborn heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation during the first 24 hours after delivery

    PubMed Central

    Konefał, Halina; Jaskot, Brygida; Pastuszka, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is no available information about the effects of remifentanil labor analgesia on newborns’ vital signs in the first hours after delivery. The aim of the study was to assess changes in the heart rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation during the first 24 h of neonatal life after using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for labor analgesia. Material and methods Forty-four full-term neonates, 23 from intravenous PCA remifentanil labor anesthesia 0.2 µg/kg, repeated not more frequently than every 2 min, and 21 born to mothers without any pharmacological forms of analgesia, were studied. Heart rate, oxygen saturation, and systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were monitored using a Nellcor Oxi Max monitor N5500 (Tyco Healthcare), and recorded at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h. Results No significant differences in heart rate (p = 0.54; p = 0.26; p = 0.60; p = 0.83), oxygen saturation (p = 0.21; p = 0.27; p = 0.61; p = 0.9) and DBP (p = 0.98; p = 0.31; p = 0.83; p = 0.58) between the groups at 1 h, 6 h, 12 h and 24 h. Newborns from the remifentanil group had lower SBP at 1 h of life (59 mm Hg vs. 68.5 mm Hg) but the difference was just on the borderline of statistical significance (p > 0.06). There were no significant differences in SBP between the groups at 6 h (p = 0.65), 12 h (p = 0.11), and 24 h (p = 0.89) of life. Conclusions Remifentanil PCA analgesia during labor does not significantly modify the oxygen saturation, heart rate and blood pressure in infants during the first day of their life. Therefore, further studies are needed to explain the observed trend for arterial hypotension in the first hour of life in infants born to mothers treated with remifentanil. PMID:24049531

  5. Targeted O2 delivery by low-p50 hemoglobin: a new basis for hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    We have proposed new criteria for a successful cell-free, hemoglobin-based O2 carrier. These include increased molecular radius, increased viscosity, increased oncotic pressure, and reduced p50. A new molecule, MalPEG-Hb, formulated at 4.2g/dL in lactated Ringer's solution (MP4), has been produced according to these new criteria. MP4 has a p50 of 5-6 mm Hg, oncotic pressure of 49mm Hg and viscosity of 2.2cPs. After 50% exchange transfusion with MP4, rats survive a 60% controlled hemorrhage in spite of total hemoglobin of 7.8 g/dL and plasma hemoglobin concentration of 1.6 g/dL. This model results in 50% mortality in control animals and 100% mortality in animals exchange-transfused with either crosslinked or polymerized hemoglobin. Oxygen supply to tissue was measured directly in the hamster skinfold model, in which O2 release in precapillary and capillary vessels can be quantified. The data demonstrate that the effectiveness of MP4 results from its ability to conserve O2 in precapillary vessels and release O2 in capillaries, thereby "targeting" O2 to hypoxic tissue. Preservation of functional capillary density and prevention of vasoconstriction further contribute to the effectiveness of this new formulation.

  6. Enhanced intracellular delivery of the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating copper chelator D-penicillamine via a novel gelatin--D-penicillamine conjugate.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Anshul; Wadhwa, Saurabh; Mumper, Russell J

    2008-07-01

    D-Penicillamine (D-pen) is an established copper chelator. We have recently shown that the copper-catalyzed D-pen oxidation generates concentration-dependent hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2). Additionally, D-pen coincubated with cupric sulfate resulted in cytotoxicity in human leukemia and breast cancer cells due to the extracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The inherent physicochemical properties of D-pen such as its short in vivo half-life, low partition coefficient, and rapid metal catalyzed oxidation limit its intracellular uptake and the potential utility as an anticancer agent in vivo. Therefore, to enhance the intracellular delivery and to protect the thiol moiety of D-pen, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel gelatin-D-pen conjugate. D-pen was covalently coupled to gelatin with a biologically reversible disulfide bond with the aid of a heterobifunctional cross-linker ( N-succinimidyl-3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate) (SPDP). Additionally, fluorescein-labeled gelatin-D-pen conjugate was synthesized for cell uptake studies. D-pen alone was shown not to enter leukemia cells. In contrast, the qualitative intracellular uptake of the conjugate in human leukemia cells (HL-60) was shown with confocal microscopy. The conjugate exhibited slow cell uptake (over the period of 48 to 72 h). A novel HPLC assay was developed to simultaneously quantify both D-pen and glutathione in a single run. The conjugate was shown to completely release D-pen in the presence of glutathione (1 mM) in approximately 3 h in PBS buffer, pH 7.4. The gelatin-D-pen conjugate resulted in significantly greater cytotoxicity compared to free D-pen, gelatin alone, and a physical mixture of gelatin and D-pen in human leukemia cells. Further studies are warranted to assess the potential of D-pen conjugate in the delivery of D-pen as a ROS generating anticancer agent.

  7. Curcumin-coordinated nanoparticles with improved stability for reactive oxygen species-responsive drug delivery in lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Cheng-Qiong; Xing, Lei; Cui, Peng-Fei; Qiao, Jian-Bin; He, Yu-Jing; Chen, Bao-An; Jin, Liang; Jiang, Hu-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Background The natural compound curcumin (Cur) can regulate growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines, although its clinical applications are restricted by extreme water insolubility and instability. To overcome these hurdles, we fabricated a Cur-coordinated reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoparticle using the interaction between boronic acid and Cur. Materials and methods We synthesized a highly biocompatible 4-(hydroxymethyl) phenylboronic acid (HPBA)-modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-grafted poly(acrylic acid) polymer (PPH) and fabricated a Cur-coordinated ROS-responsive nanoparticle (denoted by PPHC) based on the interaction between boronic acid and Cur. The mean diameter of the Cur-coordinated PPHC nanoparticle was 163.8 nm and its zeta potential was −0.31 mV. The Cur-coordinated PPHC nanoparticle improved Cur stability in physiological environment and could timely release Cur in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). PPHC nanoparticles demonstrated potent antiproliferative effect in vitro in A549 cancer cells. Furthermore, the viability of cells treated with PPHC nanoparticles was significantly increased in the presence of N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), which blocks Cur release through ROS inhibition. Simultaneously, the ROS level measured in A549 cells after incubation with PPHC nanoparticles exhibited an obvious downregulation, which further proved that ROS depression indeed influenced the therapeutic effect of Cur in PPHC nanoparticles. Moreover, pretreatment with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) significantly impaired the cytotoxic effect of Cur in A549 cells in vitro while causing less damage to the activity of Cur in PPHC nanoparticle. Conclusion The Cur-coordinated nanoparticles developed in this study improved Cur stability, which could further release Cur in a ROS-dependent manner in cancer cells. PMID:28182160

  8. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  9. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  10. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  11. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  12. Influenza 2005-2006: vaccine supplies adequate, but bird flu looms.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2005-11-01

    Influenza vaccine supplies appear to be adequate for the 2005-2006 season, though delivery has been somewhat delayed. However, in the event of a pandemic of avian flu-considered inevitable by most experts, although no one knows when it will happen-the United States would be woefully unprepared.

  13. From system to organ to cell: oxygenation and perfusion measurement in anesthesia and critical care.

    PubMed

    Schober, Patrick; Schwarte, Lothar A

    2012-08-01

    Maintenance or restoration of adequate tissue oxygenation is a main goal of anesthesiologic and intensive care patient management. Pathophysiological disturbances which interfere with aerobic metabolism may occur at any stage in the oxygen cascade from atmospheric gas to the mitochondria, and there is no single monitoring modality that allows comprehensive determination of "the oxygenation". To facilitate early detection of tissue hypoxia (or hyperoxia) and to allow a goal directed therapy targeted at the underlying problem, the anesthesiologist and intensive care physician require a thorough understanding of the numerous determinants that influence cellular oxygenation. This article reviews the basic physiology of oxygen uptake and delivery to tissues as well as the options to monitor determinants of oxygenation at different stages from the alveolus to the cell.

  14. Individual and contextual determinants of adequate maternal health care services in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Achia, Thomas N O; Mageto, Lillian E

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to examine individual and community level factors associated with adequate use of maternal antenatal health services in Kenya. Individual and community level factors associated with adequate use of maternal health care (MHC) services were obtained from the 2008-09 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey data set. Multilevel partial-proportional odds logit models were fitted using STATA 13.0 to quantify the relations of the selected covariates to adequate MHC use, defined as a three-category ordinal variable. The sample consisted of 3,621 women who had at least one live birth in the five-year period preceding this survey. Only 18 percent of the women had adequate use of MHC services. Greater educational attainment by the woman or her partner, higher socioeconomic status, access to medical insurance coverage, and greater media exposure were the individual-level factors associated with adequate use of MHC services. Greater community ethnic diversity, higher community-level socioeconomic status, and greater community-level health facility deliveries were the contextual-level factors associated with adequate use of MHC. To improve the use of MHC services in Kenya, the government needs to design and implement programs that target underlying individual and community level factors, providing focused and sustained health education to promote the use of antenatal, delivery, and postnatal care.

  15. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors.A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L.The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg.In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L.

  16. Serum thyroglobulin reference intervals in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaojun; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhang, Xiaowen; Sun, Jie; Han, Cheng; Li, Chenyan; Li, Yongze; Teng, Xiaochun; Fan, Chenling; Liu, Aihua; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Chao; Weng, Jianping; Teng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to establish normal thyroglobulin (Tg) reference intervals (RIs) in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake according to the National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry (NACB) guidelines and to investigate the relationships between Tg and other factors. A total of 1317 thyroid disease-free adult subjects (578 men, 739 nonpregnant women) from 2 cities (Guangzhou and Nanjing) were enrolled in this retrospective, observational study. Each subject completed a questionnaire and underwent physical and ultrasonic examination. Serum Tg, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPOAb), Tg antibody (TgAb), and urinary iodine concentration (UIC) were measured. Reference groups were established on the basis of TSH levels: 0.5 to 2.0 and 0.27 to 4.2 mIU/L. The Tg RIs for Guangzhou and Nanjing were 1.6 to 30.0 and 1.9 to 25.8 ng/mL, respectively. No significant differences in Tg were found between genders or among different reference groups. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that TgAb, thyroid volume, goiter, gender, age, and TSH levels were correlated with Tg. In adults from regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake, we found that Tg may be a suitable marker of iodine status; gender-specific Tg RI was unnecessary; there was no difference between Tg RIs in regions with adequate and more than adequate iodine intake; and the TSH criterion for selecting the Tg reference population could follow the local TSH reference rather than 0.5 to 2.0 mIU/L. PMID:27902589

  17. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  18. The cytochrome ba3 oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus uses a single input channel for proton delivery to the active site and for proton pumping.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsin-Yang; Hemp, James; Chen, Ying; Fee, James A; Gennis, Robert B

    2009-09-22

    The heme-copper oxygen reductases are redox-driven proton pumps that generate a proton motive force in both prokaryotes and mitochondria. These enzymes have been divided into 3 evolutionarily related groups: the A-, B- and C-families. Most experimental work on proton-pumping mechanisms has been performed with members of the A-family. These enzymes require 2 proton input pathways (D- and K-channels) to transfer protons used for oxygen reduction chemistry and for proton pumping, with the D-channel transporting all pumped protons. In this work we use site-directed mutagenesis to demonstrate that the ba(3) oxygen reductase from Thermus thermophilus, a representative of the B-family, does not contain a D-channel. Rather, it utilizes only 1 proton input channel, analogous to that of the A-family K-channel, and it delivers protons to the active site for both O2 chemistry and proton pumping. Comparison of available subunit I sequences reveals that the only structural elements conserved within the oxygen reductase families that could perform these functions are active-site components, namely the covalently linked histidine-tyrosine, the Cu(B) and its ligands, and the active-site heme and its ligands. Therefore, our data suggest that all oxygen reductases perform the same chemical reactions for oxygen reduction and comprise the essential elements of the proton-pumping mechanism (e.g., the proton-loading and kinetic-gating sites). These sites, however, cannot be located within the D-channel. These results along with structural considerations point to the A-propionate region of the active-site heme and surrounding water molecules as the proton-loading site.

  19. UHMS position statement: topical oxygen for chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Feldmeier, J J; Hopf, H W; Warriner, R A; Fife, C E; Gesell, L B; Bennett, M

    2005-01-01

    A small body of literature has been published reporting the application of topical oxygen for chronic non-healing wounds . Frequently, and erroneously, this form of oxygen administration has been referred to as "topical hyperbaric oxygen therapy" or even more erroneously "hyperbaric oxygen therapy." The advocates of topical oxygen claim several advantages over systemic hyperbaric oxygen including decreased cost, increased safety, decreased complications and putative physiologic effects including decreased free radical formation and more efficient delivery of oxygen to the wound surface. With topical oxygen an airtight chamber or polyethylene bag is sealed around a limb or the trunk by either a constriction/tourniquet device or by tape and high flow (usually 10 liters per minute) oxygen is introduced into the bag and over the wound. Pressures just over 1.0 atmospheres absolute (atm abs) (typically 1.004 to 1.013 atm abs) are recommended because higher pressures could decrease arterial/capillary inflow. The premise for topical oxygen, the diffusion of oxygen into the wound adequate to enhance healing, is attractive (though not proven) and its delivery is certainly less complex and expensive than hyperbaric oxygen. When discussing the physiology of topical oxygen, its proponents frequently reference studies of systemic hyperbaric oxygen suggesting that mechanisms are equally applicable to both topical and systemic high pressure oxygen delivery. In fact, however, the two are very different. To date, mechanisms of action whereby topical oxygen might be effective have not been defined or substantiated. Conversely, cellular toxicities due to extended courses of topical oxygen have been reported, although, again these data are not conclusive, and no mechanism for toxicity has been examined scientifically. Generally, collagen production and fibroblast proliferation are considered evidence of improved healing, and these are both enhanced by hyperbaric oxygen therapy

  20. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  1. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section 716.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of...

  2. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo Ndebele's…

  3. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  4. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  5. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  6. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  7. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  8. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  9. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  10. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  11. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  12. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  13. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  14. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  15. Microvascular oxygen delivery-to-utilization mismatch at the onset of heavy-intensity exercise in optimally treated patients with CHF.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Barroco, Adriano; Nery, Luiz Eduardo; Almeida, Dirceu R; Neder, J Alberto

    2009-11-01

    Impaired muscle blood flow at the onset of heavy-intensity exercise may transiently reduce microvascular O(2) pressure and decrease the rate of O(2) transfer from capillary to mitochondria in chronic heart failure (CHF). However, advances in the pharmacological treatment of CHF (e.g., angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and third-generation beta-blockers) may have improved microvascular O(2) delivery to an extent that intramyocyte metabolic inertia might become the main locus of limitation of O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics. We assessed the rate of change of pulmonary Vo(2) (Vo(2)(p)), (estimated) fractional O(2) extraction in the vastus lateralis (approximately Delta[deoxy-Hb+Mb] by near-infrared spectroscopy), and cardiac output (Qt) during high-intensity exercise performed to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) in 10 optimally treated sedentary patients (ejection fraction = 29 + or - 8%) and 11 controls. Sluggish Vo(2)(p) and Qt kinetics in patients were significantly related to lower Tlim values (P < 0.05). The dynamics of Delta[deoxy-Hb+Mb], however, were faster in patients than controls [mean response time (MRT) = 15.9 + or - 2.0 s vs. 19.0 + or - 2.9 s; P < 0.05] with a subsequent response "overshoot" being found only in patients (7/10). Moreover, tauVo(2)/MRT-[deoxy-Hb+Mb] ratio was greater in patients (4.69 + or - 1.42 s vs. 2.25 + or - 0.77 s; P < 0.05) and related to Qt kinetics and Tlim (R = 0.89 and -0.78, respectively; P < 0.01). We conclude that despite the advances in the pharmacological treatment of CHF, disturbances in "central" and "peripheral" circulatory adjustments still play a prominent role in limiting Vo(2)(p) kinetics and tolerance to heavy-intensity exercise in nontrained patients.

  16. PEGylated FePt-Fe3O4 composite nanoassemblies (CNAs): in vitro hyperthermia, drug delivery and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS).

    PubMed

    Sahu, Niroj Kumar; Gupta, Jagriti; Bahadur, Dhirendra

    2015-05-21

    Chemothermal therapy is widely used in clinical applications for the treatment of tumors. However, the major challenge is the use of a multifunctional nano platform for significant regression of the tumor. In this study, a simple synthesis of highly aqueous stable, carboxyl enriched, PEGylated mesoporous iron platinum-iron(ii,iii) oxide (FePt-Fe3O4) composite nanoassemblies (CNAs) by a simple hydrothermal approach is reported. CNAs exhibit a high loading capacity ∼90 wt% of the anticancer therapeutic drug, doxorubicin (DOX) because of its porous nature and the availability of abundant negatively charged carboxylic groups on its surface. DOX loaded CNAs (CNAs + DOX) showed a pH responsive drug release in a cell-mimicking environment. Furthermore, the release was enhanced by the application of a alternating current magnetic field. CNAs show no appreciable cytotoxicity in mouse fibroblast (L929) cells but show toxic effects in cervical cancer (HeLa) cells at a concentration of ∼1 mg mL(-1). A suitable composition of CNAs with a concentration of 2 mg mL(-1) can generate a hyperthermic temperature of ∼43 °C. Also, CNAs, because of their Fe and Pt contents, have an ability to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide inside the cancer cells which helps to enhance its therapeutic effects. The synergistic combination of chemotherapy and ROS is very efficient for killing cancer cells.

  17. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  18. Region 9: Arizona Adequate Letter (10/14/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Jack P. Broadben,. Director, to Nancy Wrona and Dennis Smith informing them that Maricopa County's motor vehicle emissions budgets in the 2003 MAGCO Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  19. Region 6: Texas Adequate Letter (4/16/2010)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality determined 2021 motor vehicle emission budgets for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) for Beaumont/Port Arthur area adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  20. Region 2: New Jersey Adequate Letter (5/23/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This April 22, 2002 letter from EPA to the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection determined 2007 and 2014 Carbon Monoxide (CO) Mobile Source Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal

  1. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (10/29/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  2. Region 1: New Hampshire Adequate Letter (8/12/2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This July 9, 2008 letter from EPA to the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, determined the 2009 Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets (MVEBs) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the Federal Register (FR).

  3. Region 8: Colorado Adequate Letter (1/20/2004)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Greeleys' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes and will be announced in the FR.

  4. Region 8: Utah Adequate Letter (6/10/2005)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Utah Department of Environmental Quality determined Salt Lake Citys' and Ogdens' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  5. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  6. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  7. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  8. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  9. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.404 Adequate exploration plan. Before he may certify an application, the Administrator must...

  10. Region 6: New Mexico Adequate Letter (8/21/2003)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Carl Edlund, Director, to Alfredo Santistevan regarding MVEB's contained in the latest revision to the Albuquerque Carbon Monoxide State Implementation Plan (SIP) are adequate for transportation conformity purposes.

  11. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  12. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  13. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  14. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  15. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  16. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and privacy of such records..., by degaussing or by overwriting with the appropriate security software, in accordance...

  17. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... require access to and use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect... with the appropriate security software, in accordance with regulations of the Archivist of the...

  18. Region 9: Nevada Adequate Letter (3/30/2006)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Deborah Jordan, Director, to Leo M. Drozdoff regarding Nevada's motor vehicle emissions budgets in the 2005 Truckee Meadows CO Redesignation Request and Maintenance Plan are adequate for transportation conformity decisions.

  19. Monitoring Oxygen Status.

    PubMed

    Toffaletti, J G; Rackley, C R

    Although part of a common "blood gas" test panel with pH and pCO2, the pO2, %O2Hb, and related parameters are independently used to detect and monitor oxygen deficits from a variety of causes. Measurement of blood gases and cooximetry may be done by laboratory analyzers, point of care testing, noninvasive pulse oximetry, and transcutaneous blood gases. The specimen type and mode of monitoring oxygenation that are chosen may be based on a combination of urgency, practicality, clinical need, and therapeutic objectives. Because oxygen concentrations in blood are extremely labile, there are several highly important preanalytical practices necessary to prevent errors in oxygen and cooximetry results. Effective utilization of oxygen requires binding by hemoglobin in the lungs, transport in the blood, and release to tissues, where cellular respiration occurs. Hydrogen ion (pH), CO2, temperature, and 2,3-DPG all play important roles in these processes. Additional measurements and calculations are often used to interpret and locate the cause and source of an oxygen deficit. These include the Hb concentration, Alveolar-arterial pO2 gradient, pO2:FIO2 ratio, oxygenation index, O2 content and O2 delivery, and pulmonary dead space and intrapulmonary shunting. The causes of hypoxemia will be covered and, to illustrate how the oxygen parameters are used clinically in the diagnosis and management of patients with abnormal oxygenation, two clinical cases will be presented and described.

  20. Regulatory requirements for providing adequate veterinary care to research animals.

    PubMed

    Pinson, David M

    2013-09-01

    Provision of adequate veterinary care is a required component of animal care and use programs in the United States. Program participants other than veterinarians, including non-medically trained research personnel and technicians, also provide veterinary care to animals, and administrators are responsible for assuring compliance with federal mandates regarding adequate veterinary care. All program participants therefore should understand the regulatory requirements for providing such care. The author provides a training primer on the US regulatory requirements for the provision of veterinary care to research animals. Understanding the legal basis and conditions of a program of veterinary care will help program participants to meet the requirements advanced in the laws and policies.

  1. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana Tapia

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  2. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  3. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  4. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan, as... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL...

  5. Is the Stock of VET Skills Adequate? Assessment Methodologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blandy, Richard; Freeland, Brett

    In Australia and elsewhere, four approaches have been used to determine whether stocks of vocational education and training (VET) skills are adequate to meet industry needs. The four methods are as follows: (1) the manpower requirements approach; (2) the international, national, and industry comparisons approach; (3) the labor market analysis…

  6. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  7. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  8. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  9. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  10. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  11. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Companies. 108.200 Section 108.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION NEW MARKETS VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order...

  12. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation…

  13. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  14. 34 CFR 200.13 - Adequate yearly progress in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate yearly progress in general. 200.13 Section 200.13 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE...

  15. Region 9: Arizona Adequate Letter (11/1/2001)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a letter from Jack P. Broadbent, Director, Air Division to Nancy Wrona and James Bourney informing them of the adequacy of Revised MAG 1999 Serious Area Carbon Monoxide Plan and that the MAG CO Plan is adequate for Maricopa County.

  16. Army General Fund Adjustments Not Adequately Documented or Supported

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-26

    statements were unreliable and lacked an adequate audit trail. Furthermore, DoD and Army managers could not rely on the data in their accounting...risk that AGF financial statements will be materially misstated and the Army will not achieve audit readiness by the congressionally mandated...and $6.5 trillion in yearend adjustments made to Army General Fund data during FY 2015 financial statement compilation. We conducted this audit in

  17. [Early goal-directed therapy (EDGT) using continuous central venous oxygen saturation monitoring in a patient with septic shock].

    PubMed

    Oyama, Yoshimasa; Goto, Koji; Yamamoto, Shunsuke; Kusaka, Jyunya; Hidaka, Seigo; Shingu, Chihiro; Noguchi, Takayuki

    2008-04-01

    Septic shock is an adverse clinical condition resulting in multiple organ failure from global tissue hypoxia. The importance of initial treatment is widely recognized. Thus, guidelines for septic shock recommend early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) during the first six hours of treatment. Central venous oxygen saturation monitoring is useful to maintain adequate tissue oxygen delivery. A newly developed central venous oximetry catheter (PreSep Oximetery Catheter, Edwards Lifesciences) allows continuous and easy monitoring of central venous oxygen saturation. This report shows the usefulness of this catheter in a patient who developed septic shock during an emergency operation for perforated bowel. By using EGDT perioperatively with continuous central venous oximetry, multiple organ failure might be successfully avoided.

  18. Forceps Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... provider might limit the amount of time you push. Your baby is facing the wrong direction. A forceps delivery might be needed if your baby is facing up (occiput posterior position) rather than down (occiput anterior ...

  19. Delivery presentations

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000621.htm Delivery presentations To use the sharing features on this page, ... baby by cesarean birth (C-section) . Less Common Presentations With the brow-first position, the baby's head ...

  20. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  1. Genetic modification of preimplantation embryos: toward adequate human research policies.

    PubMed

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects.

  2. Elements for adequate informed consent in the surgical context.

    PubMed

    Abaunza, Hernando; Romero, Klaus

    2014-07-01

    Given a history of atrocities and violations of ethical principles, several documents and regulations have been issued by a wide variety of organizations. They aim at ensuring that health care and clinical research adhere to defined ethical principles. A fundamental component was devised to ensure that the individual has been provided the necessary information to make an informed decision regarding health care or participation in clinical research. This article summarizes the history and regulations for informed consent and discusses suggested components for adequate consent forms for daily clinical practice in surgery as well as clinical research.

  3. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  4. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stored as a gas or liquid in special tanks. These tanks can be delivered to your home and contain ... they won’t run out of oxygen. Portable tanks and oxygen concentrators may make it easier for ...

  5. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  6. Venous oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation.

  7. [Apneic oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, A V; Vyzhigina, M A; Parshin, V D; Fedorov, D S

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances in thoracic and tracheal surgery make the anaesthesiologist use different respiratory techniques during the operation. Apneic oxygenation is a one of alternative techniques. This method is relatively easy in use, does not require special expensive equipment and is the only possible technique in several clinical situations when other respiratory methods are undesirable or cannot be used. However there is no enough information about apneic oxygenation in Russian. This article reviews publications about apneic oxygenation. The review deals with experiments on diffusion respiration in animals, physiological changes during apneic oxygenation in man and defines clinical cases when apneic oxygenation can be used.

  8. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  9. Prostate cancer between prognosis and adequate/proper therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grozescu, T; Popa, F

    2017-01-01

    Knowing the indolent, non-invasive nature of most types of prostate cancer, as well as the simple fact that the disease seems more likely to be associated with age rather than with other factors (50% of men at the age of 50 and 80% at the age of 80 have it [1], with or without presenting any symptom), the big challenge of this clinical entity was to determine severity indicators (so far insufficient) to guide the physician towards an adequate attitude in the clinical setting. The risk of over-diagnosing and over-treating many prostate cancer cases (indicated by all the major European and American studies) is real and poses many question marks. The present paper was meant to deliver new research data and to reset the clinical approach in prostate cancer cases. PMID:28255369

  10. The cerebellopontine angle: does the translabyrinthine approach give adequate access?

    PubMed

    Fagan, P A; Sheehy, J P; Chang, P; Doust, B D; Coakley, D; Atlas, M D

    1998-05-01

    A long-standing but unfounded criticism of the translabyrinthine approach is the misperception that this approach does not give adequate access to the cerebellopontine angle. Because of what is perceived as limited visualization and operating space within the cerebellopontine angle, some surgeons still believe that the translabyrinthine approach is inappropriate for large acoustic tumors. In this study, the surgical access to the cerebellopontine angle by virtue of the translabyrinthine approach is measured and analyzed. The parameters are compared with those measured for the retrosigmoid approach. This series objectively confirms that the translabyrinthine approach offers the neurotologic surgeon a shorter operative depth to the tumor, via a similar-sized craniotomy. This permits superior visualization by virtue of a wider angle of surgical access. Such access is achieved with the merit of minimal cerebellar retraction.

  11. Barriers to adequate prenatal care utilization in American Samoa

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Nicola L; Brown, Carolyn; Nu’usolia, Ofeira; Ah-Ching, John; Muasau-Howard, Bethel; McGarvey, Stephen T

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the utilization of prenatal care in American Samoan women and to identify socio-demographic predictors of inadequate prenatal care utilization. Methods Using data from prenatal clinic records, women (n=692) were categorized according to the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index as having received adequate plus, adequate, intermediate or inadequate prenatal care during their pregnancy. Categorical socio-demographic predictors of the timing of initiation of prenatal care (week of gestation) and the adequacy of received services were identified using one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and independent samples t-tests. Results Between 2001 and 2008 85.4% of women received inadequate prenatal care. Parity (P=0.02), maternal unemployment (P=0.03), and both parents being unemployed (P=0.03) were negatively associated with the timing of prenatal care initation. Giving birth in 2007–2008, after a prenatal care incentive scheme had been introduced in the major hospital, was associated with earlier initiation of prenatal care (20.75 versus 25.12 weeks; P<0.01) and improved adequacy of received services (95.04% versus 83.8%; P=0.02). Conclusion The poor prenatal care utilization in American Samoa is a major concern. Improving healthcare accessibility will be key in encouraging women to attend prenatal care. The significant improvements in the adequacy of prenatal care seen in 2007–2008 suggest that the prenatal care incentive program implemented in 2006 may be a very positive step toward addressing issues of prenatal care utilization in this population. PMID:24045912

  12. The debate on continuous home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Díaz Lobato, Salvador; García González, José Luis; Mayoralas Alises, Sagrario

    2015-01-01

    Two studies published in the early 80s, namely the Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy Trial (NOTT) and the Medical Research Council Trial (MRC), laid the foundations for modern home oxygen therapy. Since then, little progress has been made in terms of therapeutic indications, and several prescription-associated problems have come to light. Advances in technology have gone hand in hand with growing disregard for the recommendations in clinical guidelines on oxygen therapy. The introduction of liquid oxygen brought with it a number of technical problems, clinical problems related to selecting candidate patients for portable delivery devices, and economic problems associated with the rising cost of the therapy. Continuous home oxygen therapy has been further complicated by the recent introduction of portable oxygen concentrators and the development in quick succession of a range of delivery devices with different levels of efficiency and performance. Modern oxygen therapy demands that clinicians evaluate the level of mobility of their patients and the mobility permitted by available oxygen sources, correctly match patients with the most appropriate oxygen source and adjust the therapy accordingly. The future of continuous home oxygen therapy lies in developing the ideal delivery device, improving the regulations systems and information channels, raise patient awareness and drive research.

  13. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-10-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.

  14. Retinal oxygen extraction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Werkmeister, René M.; Schmidl, Doreen; Aschinger, Gerold; Doblhoff-Dier, Veronika; Palkovits, Stefan; Wirth, Magdalena; Garhöfer, Gerhard; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Adequate function of the retina is dependent on proper oxygen supply. In humans, the inner retina is oxygenated via the retinal circulation. We present a method to calculate total retinal oxygen extraction based on measurement of total retinal blood flow using dual-beam bidirectional Doppler optical coherence tomography and measurement of oxygen saturation by spectrophotometry. These measurements were done on 8 healthy subjects while breathing ambient room air and 100% oxygen. Total retinal blood flow was 44.3 ± 9.0 μl/min during baseline and decreased to 18.7 ± 4.2 μl/min during 100% oxygen breathing (P < 0.001) resulting in a pronounced decrease in retinal oxygen extraction from 2.33 ± 0.51 μl(O2)/min to 0.88 ± 0.14 μl(O2)/min during breathing of 100% oxygen. The method presented in this paper may have significant potential to study oxygen metabolism in hypoxic retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy. PMID:26503332

  15. Studies in the Delivery of Ambulatory Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Robert; And Others

    A primary reason for increased government involvement in health care delivery resides in the acknowledged difficulty of the poor in obtaining adequate care. However, in the absence of knowledge about how health, health care, socio-economic status, race, ethnicity, and geographic location are related, policies aimed at implementing right to health…

  16. Systemic Crisis of Civilization: In Search for Adequate Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozin, Grigori

    In December 1972 a jumbo jet crashed in the Florida Everglades with the loss of 101 lives. The pilot, distracted by a minor malfunction, failed to note until too late the warning signal that - correctly - indicated an impending disaster. His sudden, astonished cry of Hey, what happening here? were his last words 1. Three decades after this tragic episode, as the Humankind approaches the threshold of the third Millennium, the problem of adequate reaction to warning signals of different nature and of distinguishing minor malfunctions in everyday life of society, in economy and technology as well as in evolution of biosphere from grave threats to the world community and the phenomenon of life on our planet remains crucial to human survival and the future of Civilization. Rational use of knowledge and technology available to the world community remains in this context the corner stone of discussions on the destiny of the intelligent life both on the planet Earth and in the Universe (the fact of intelligent life in the Universe is to be detected by the Humankind)…

  17. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  18. DARHT -- an adequate EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    In April 1996 the US District Court in Albuquerque ruled that the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), prepared by the Los Alamos Area Office, US Department of Energy (DOE), was adequate. The DARHT EIS had been prepared in the face of a lawsuit in only 10 months, a third of the time usually allotted for a DOE EIS, and for only a small fraction of the cost of a typical DOE EIS, and for only a small fraction of the cost of a typical DOE EIS. It subject was the first major facility to be built in decades for the DOE nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. It was the first EIS to be prepared for a proposal at DOE`s Los Alamos National Laboratory since 1979, and the first ever prepared by the Los Alamos Area Office. Much of the subject matter was classified. The facility had been specially designed to minimize impacts to a nearby prehistoric Native American ruin, and extensive consultation with American Indian Pueblos was required. The week that the draft EIS was published Laboratory biologists identified a previously unknown pair of Mexican spotted owls in the immediate vicinity of the project, bringing into play the consultation requirements of the Endangered Species Act. In spite of these obstacles, the resultant DARHT EIS was reviewed by the court and found to meet all statutory and regulatory requirements; the court praised the treatment of the classified material which served as a basis for the environmental analysis.

  19. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  20. Formulation strategies to improve oral peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sam; Ryan, Ben; Duffy, Aoife; Brayden, David J

    2014-05-01

    Delivery of peptides by the oral route greatly appeals due to commercial, patient convenience and scientific arguments. While there are over 60 injectable peptides marketed worldwide, and many more in development, most delivery strategies do not yet adequately overcome the barriers to oral delivery. Peptides are sensitive to chemical and enzymatic degradation in the intestine, and are poorly permeable across the intestinal epithelium due to sub-optimal physicochemical properties. A successful oral peptide delivery technology should protect potent peptides from presystemic degradation and improve epithelial permeation to achieve a target oral bioavailability with acceptable intra-subject variability. This review provides a comprehensive up-to-date overview of the current status of oral peptide delivery with an emphasis on patented formulations that are yielding promising clinical data.

  1. Oxygen Levels in Thermoplastic Microfluidic Devices during Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Christopher J.; Kasuya, Junichi; Pavesi, Andrea; Kamm, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a computational model to predict oxygen levels in microfluidic plastic devices during cell culture. This model is based on experimental evaluation of oxygen levels. Conditions are determined that provide adequate oxygen supply to two cell types, hepatocytes and endothelial cells, either by diffusion through the plastic device, or by supplying a low flow rate of medium. PMID:24302467

  2. Oxygen levels in thermoplastic microfluidic devices during cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Christopher J; Kasuya, Junichi; Pavesi, Andrea; Kamm, Roger D

    2014-02-07

    We developed a computational model to predict oxygen levels in microfluidic plastic devices during cell culture. This model is based on experimental evaluation of oxygen levels. Conditions are determined that provide adequate oxygen supply to two cell types, hepatocytes and endothelial cells, either by diffusion through the plastic device, or by supplying a low flow rate of medium.

  3. Delivery Innovations.

    PubMed

    2017-03-01

    The need for innovations in care delivery is recognized by providers, payers, and patients alike. Hospitals, physicians, and other clinicians are experimenting with new models of care designed to better meet patients' needs, reduce administrative burdens, and lower costs. The Affordable Care Act placed the Medicare and Medicaid programs at the center of a national effort to experiment with delivery and payment models designed to improve care and contain costs. These public-sector efforts have often aligned with private initiatives, such as the use of reference pricing-in which an insurer will only pay for a service at the price available from the lowest-cost provider. Employers in the public and private sectors have adopted value-based insurance design, in which copayments and deductibles are calibrated to the clinical benefit obtained from different services. Patients have the most to gain-or lose-from delivery innovations. Better, more efficient care should translate into better health and lower costs, but payment models designed to encourage innovation may have the unintended effect of limiting access to care.

  4. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  5. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  6. Are Vancomycin Trough Concentrations Adequate for Optimal Dosing?

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Gilmer; Jones, Brenda; Jelliffe, Roger W.; Drusano, George L.; Rodvold, Keith A.; Lodise, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The current vancomycin therapeutic guidelines recommend the use of only trough concentrations to manage the dosing of adults with Staphylococcus aureus infections. Both vancomycin efficacy and toxicity are likely to be related to the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC). We assembled richly sampled vancomycin pharmacokinetic data from three studies comprising 47 adults with various levels of renal function. With Pmetrics, the nonparametric population modeling package for R, we compared AUCs estimated from models derived from trough-only and peak-trough depleted versions of the full data set and characterized the relationship between the vancomycin trough concentration and AUC. The trough-only and peak-trough depleted data sets underestimated the true AUCs compared to the full model by a mean (95% confidence interval) of 23% (11 to 33%; P = 0.0001) and 14% (7 to 19%; P < 0.0001), respectively. In contrast, using the full model as a Bayesian prior with trough-only data allowed 97% (93 to 102%; P = 0.23) accurate AUC estimation. On the basis of 5,000 profiles simulated from the full model, among adults with normal renal function and a therapeutic AUC of ≥400 mg · h/liter for an organism for which the vancomycin MIC is 1 mg/liter, approximately 60% are expected to have a trough concentration below the suggested minimum target of 15 mg/liter for serious infections, which could result in needlessly increased doses and a risk of toxicity. Our data indicate that adjustment of vancomycin doses on the basis of trough concentrations without a Bayesian tool results in poor achievement of maximally safe and effective drug exposures in plasma and that many adults can have an adequate vancomycin AUC with a trough concentration of <15 mg/liter. PMID:24165176

  7. Is clinical measurement of anatomic axis of the femur adequate?

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Chuan

    2017-03-23

    Background and purpose - The accuracy of using clinical measurement from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the knee to determine an anatomic axis of the femur has rarely been studied. A radiographic technique with a full-length standing scanogram (FLSS) was used to assess the adequacy of the clinical measurement. Patients and methods - 100 consecutive young adult patients (mean age 34 (20-40) years) with chronic unilateral lower extremity injuries were studied. The pelvis and intact contralateral lower extremity images in the FLSS were selected for study. The angles between the tibial axis and the femoral shaft anatomic axis (S-AA), the piriformis anatomic axis (P-AA), the clinical anatomic axis (C-AA), and the mechanical axis (MA) were compared between sexes. Results - Only the S-AA and C-AA angles were statistically significantly different in the 100 patients (3.6° vs. 2.8°; p = 0.03). There was a strong correlation between S-AA, P-AA, and C-AA angles (r > 0.9). The average intersecting angle between MA and S-AA in the femur in the 100 patients was 5.5°, and it was 4.8° between MA and C-AA. Interpretation - Clinical measurement of an anatomic axis from the ASIS to the center of the knee may be an adequate and acceptable method to determine lower extremity alignment. The optimal inlet for antegrade femoral intramedullary nailing may be the lateral edge of the piriformis fossa.

  8. Brain Tissue Oxygen Monitoring in Neurocritical Care.

    PubMed

    De Georgia, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    Brain injury results from ischemia, tissue hypoxia, and a cascade of secondary events. The cornerstone of neurocritical care management is optimization and maintenance of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen and substrate delivery to prevent or attenuate this secondary damage. New techniques for monitoring brain tissue oxygen tension (PtiO2) are now available. Brain PtiO2 reflects both oxygen delivery and consumption. Brain hypoxia (low brain PtiO2) has been associated with poor outcomes in patients with brain injury. Strategies to improve brain PtiO2 have focused mainly on increasing oxygen delivery either by increasing CBF or by increasing arterial oxygen content. The results of nonrandomized studies comparing brain PtiO2-guided therapy with intracranial pressure/cerebral perfusion pressure-guided therapy, while promising, have been mixed. More studies are needed including prospective, randomized controlled trials to assess the true value of this approach. The following is a review of the physiology of brain tissue oxygenation, the effect of brain hypoxia on outcome, strategies to increase oxygen delivery, and outcome studies of brain PtiO2-guided therapy in neurocritical care.

  9. Atomic Oxygen Task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.

    1997-01-01

    This report details work performed by the Center for Applied Optics (CAO) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) on the contract entitled 'Atomic Oxygen Task' for NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (contract NAS8-38609, Delivery Order 109, modification number 1). Atomic oxygen effects on exposed materials remain a critical concern in designing spacecraft to withstand exposure in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment. The basic objective of atomic oxygen research in NASA's Materials & Processes (M&P) Laboratory is to provide the solutions to material problems facing present and future space missions. The objective of this work was to provide the necessary research for the design of specialized experimental test configurations and development of techniques for evaluating in-situ space environmental effects, including the effects of atomic oxygen and electromagnetic radiation on candidate materials. Specific tasks were performed to address materials issues concerning accelerated environmental testing as well as specifically addressing materials issues of particular concern for LDEF analysis and Space Station materials selection.

  10. Prevention of mother to child transmission lay counsellors: Are they adequately trained?

    PubMed

    Thurling, Catherine H; Harris, Candice

    2012-06-05

    South Africa's high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected women requires a comprehensive health care approach to pregnancy because of the added risk of their HIV status. As a result of the shortage of health care workers in South Africa, lay counsellors play important roles in the prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). There is no standardization of training of lay counsellors in South Africa, and training varies in length depending on the training organisation. The study aimed to investigate the training of lay counsellors by analysing their training curricula and interviewing lay counsellors about their perceptions of their training. A two phase research method was applied. Phase one documented an analysis of the training curricula. Phase two was semi-structured interviews with the participants. Purposive sampling was undertaken for this study. The total sample size was 13 people, with a final sample of 9 participants, determined at the point of data saturation. The research was qualitative, descriptive and contextual in design. The curricula analysed had different styles of delivery, and the approaches to learning and courses varied, resulting in inconsistent training outcomes. A need for supervision and mentorship in the working environment was also noted. The training of lay counsellors needs to be adapted to meet the extended roles that they are playing in PMTCT. The standardization of training programmes, and the incorporation of a system of mentorship in the work environment, would ensure that the lay counsellors are adequately prepared for their role in PMTCT.

  11. Case-Based Learning of Blood Oxygen Transport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, William H.

    2006-01-01

    A case study about carbon monoxide poisoning was used help students gain a greater understanding of the physiology of oxygen transport by the blood. A review of student answers to the case questions showed that students can use the oxygen-hemoglobin dissociation curve to make meaningful determinations of oxygen uptake and delivery. However, the…

  12. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... with electric motors Electric baseboard or space heaters Wood stoves, fireplaces, candles Electric blankets Hairdryers, electric razors, ... Therapy.aspx . Accessed February 9, 2016. National Fire Protection Association. Medical oxygen. Updated July 2013. www.nfpa. ...

  13. Insensitivity of cerebral oxygen transport to oxygen affinity of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Raymond C.; Fronticelli, Clara; Bucci, Enrico

    2008-01-01

    The cerebrovascular effects of exchange transfusion of various cell-free hemoglobins that possess different oxygen affinities are reviewed. Reducing hematocrit by transfusion of a non-oxygen-carrying solution dilates pial arterioles on the brain surface and increases cerebral blood flow to maintain a constant bulk oxygen transport to the brain. In contrast, transfusion of hemoglobins with P50 of 4–34 Torr causes constriction of pial arterioles that offsets the decrease in blood viscosity to maintain cerebral blood flow and oxygen transport. The autoregulatory constriction is dependent on synthesis of 20-HETE from arachidonic acid. This oxygen-dependent reaction is apparently enhanced by facilitated oxygen diffusion from the red cell to the endothelium arising from increased plasma oxygen solubility in the presence of low or high-affinity hemoglobin. Exchange transfusion of recombinant hemoglobin polymers with P50 of 3 and 18 Torr reduces infarct volume from experimental stroke. Cell-free hemoglobins do not require a P50 as high as red blood cell hemoglobin to facilitate oxygen delivery. PMID:18230370

  14. Inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen by oxygen tension and blood flow imaging in rat.

    PubMed

    Wanek, Justin; Teng, Pang-Yu; Albers, John; Blair, Norman P; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2011-09-01

    The metabolic function of inner retinal cells relies on the availability of nutrients and oxygen that are supplied by the retinal circulation. Assessment of retinal tissue vitality and function requires knowledge of both the rate of oxygen delivery and consumption. The purpose of the current study is to report a novel technique for assessment of the inner retinal metabolic rate of oxygen (MO(2)) by combined measurements of retinal blood flow and vascular oxygen tension (PO(2)) in rat. The application of this technology has the potential to broaden knowledge of retinal oxygen dynamics and advance understanding of disease pathophysiology.

  15. [Use of hyperbaric oxygenation for wound management].

    PubMed

    Berner, Juan Enrique; Vidal, Pedro; Will, Patrick; Castillo, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation consists in exposing patients to increased gas pressures while inhaling pure oxygen. It involves the use of hyperbaric chambers that can double or triple gas pressure inside them. Hyperbaric oxygenation may be useful in different clinical situations, but mostly for the treatment of decompression syndrome. In the last decades, it has been used for the management of different kinds of wounds. Hyperbaric oxygenation not only increases the delivery of oxygen to damaged tissues, but also stimulates angiogenesis, collagen synthesis, stem cell migration and local immune response. Clinical trials that have addressed the use of hyperbaric oxygenation are difficult to compare due to their heterogeneity in terms of experimental design, kind of injuries involved and assessment of outcome. Even though, most studies support the concept that hyperbaric oxygenation accelerates the healing process.

  16. Designing Bioactive Delivery Systems for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Hillary E.

    2010-01-01

    The direct infusion of macromolecules into defect sites generally does not impart adequate physiological responses. Without the protection of delivery systems, inductive molecules may likely redistribute away from their desired locale and are vulnerable to degradation. In order to achieve efficacy, large doses supplied at interval time periods are necessary, often at great expense and ensuing detrimental side effects. The selection of a delivery system plays an important role in the rate of re-growth and functionality of regenerating tissue: not only do the release kinetics of inductive molecules and their consequent bioactivities need to be considered, but also how the delivery system interacts and integrates with its surrounding host environment. In the current review, we describe the means of release of macromolecules from hydrogels, polymeric microspheres, and porous scaffolds along with the selection and utilization of bioactive delivery systems in a variety of tissue-engineering strategies. PMID:20676773

  17. The placental pursuit for an adequate oxidant balance between the mother and the fetus

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Emilio A.; Krause, Bernardo; Ebensperger, German; Reyes, Roberto V.; Casanello, Paola; Parra-Cordero, Mauro; Llanos, Anibal J.

    2014-01-01

    The placenta is the exchange organ that regulates metabolic processes between the mother and her developing fetus. The adequate function of this organ is clearly vital for a physiologic gestational process and a healthy baby as final outcome. The umbilico-placental vasculature has the capacity to respond to variations in the materno-fetal milieu. Depending on the intensity and the extensity of the insult, these responses may be immediate-, mediate-, and long-lasting, deriving in potential morphostructural and functional changes later in life. These adjustments usually compensate the initial insults, but occasionally may switch to long-lasting remodeling and dysfunctional processes, arising maladaptation. One of the most challenging conditions in modern perinatology is hypoxia and oxidative stress during development, both disorders occurring in high-altitude and in low-altitude placental insufficiency. Hypoxia and oxidative stress may induce endothelial dysfunction and thus, reduction in the perfusion of the placenta and restriction in the fetal growth and development. This Review will focus on placental responses to hypoxic conditions, usually related with high-altitude and placental insufficiency, deriving in oxidative stress and vascular disorders, altering fetal and maternal health. Although day-to-day clinical practice, basic and clinical research are clearly providing evidence of the severe impact of oxygen deficiency and oxidative stress establishment during pregnancy, further research on umbilical and placental vascular function under these conditions is badly needed to clarify the myriad of questions still unsettled. PMID:25009498

  18. Transtracheal oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Kent L; Schwartz, Michael D

    2011-02-01

    Transtracheal oxygen therapy (TTO) has been used for long-term oxygen therapy for nearly 30 years. Numerous investigators have explored the potential benefits of TTO. Those results are reviewed in this article. TTO is best viewed not as a catheter but as a program for care. This article discusses patient selection for TTO. Publications evaluating complications are reviewed. In the past, a modified Seldinger technique (MST) was used for the creation of the tracheocutaneous fistula. The rather long program required for tract maturation with MST was labor-intensive and required substantial patient education and monitoring, particularly during the immature tract phase. Minor complications were not infrequent. More recently, the Lipkin method has been used to create a surgical tract under conscious sedation with topical anesthesia. The procedure is safe and well tolerated. Transtracheal oxygen is initiated the day following the procedure. Similarly, the tract matures in 7 to 10 days rather than the 6 to 8 weeks with MST. More rapid healing time and superior tract characteristics substantially reduce complications. The TTO program tailored for the Lipkin procedure is shortened, streamlined, and much less labor-intensive. Optimal outcomes with the TTO program require a committed pulmonologist, respiratory therapist, nurse, and surgeon (for the Lipkin procedure). This article discusses new directions in the use of transtracheal gas delivery, including the management of obstructive sleep apnea. Preliminary investigations regarding transtracheal augmented ventilation are presented. These include nocturnal use in severe chronic lung disease and liberation from prolonged mechanical ventilation.

  19. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  20. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  1. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  2. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  3. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  4. Assisted delivery with forceps

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000509.htm Assisted delivery with forceps To use the sharing features on ... called vacuum assisted delivery . When is a Forceps Delivery Needed? Even after your cervix is fully dilated ( ...

  5. The oxygen paradox of neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Christoph; Royl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    The coupling of cerebral blood flow (CBF) to neuronal activity is well preserved during evolution. Upon changes in the neuronal activity, an incompletely understood coupling mechanism regulates diameter changes of supplying blood vessels, which adjust CBF within seconds. The physiologic brain tissue oxygen content would sustain unimpeded brain function for only 1 second if continuous oxygen supply would suddenly stop. This suggests that the CBF response has evolved to balance oxygen supply and demand. Surprisingly, CBF increases surpass the accompanying increases of cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2). However, a disproportionate CBF increase may be required to increase the concentration gradient from capillary to tissue that drives oxygen delivery. However, the brain tissue oxygen content is not zero, and tissue pO2 decreases could serve to increase oxygen delivery without a CBF increase. Experimental evidence suggests that CMRO2 can increase with constant CBF within limits and decreases of baseline CBF were observed with constant CMRO2. This conflicting evidence may be viewed as an oxygen paradox of neurovascular coupling. As a possible solution for this paradox, we hypothesize that the CBF response has evolved to safeguard brain function in situations of moderate pathophysiological interference with oxygen supply. PMID:24149931

  6. Adequate antigen availability: a key issue for novel approaches to tumor vaccination and tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2013-03-01

    A crucial parameter for activation of the anti-tumor immune response is an adequate antigen availability (AAA) defined here as the optimal tumor antigen dose and related antigen processing and MHC-II-restricted presentation necessary to efficiently trigger tumor-specific TH cells. We will discuss two distinct experimental systems: a) a preventive anti-tumor vaccination system; b) a therapy-induced anti-tumor vaccination approach. In the first case tumor cells are rendered constitutively MHC-II+ by transfecting them with the MHC-II transcriptional activator CIITA. Here AAA is generated by the function of tumor's newly expressed MHC-II molecules to present tumor-associated antigens to tumor-specific TH cells. In the second case, AAA is generated by treating established tumors with neovasculature-targeted TNFα. In conjuction with Melphalan, targeted TNFα delivery produces extensive areas of tumor necrosis that generate AAA capable of optimally activate tumor-specific TH cells which in turn activate CTL immune effectors. In both experimental systems tumor rejection and persistent and long-lived TH cell anti-tumor memory, responsible of defending the animals from subsequent challenges with tumor cells, are achieved. Based on these and other investigators' results we propose that AAA is a key element for triggering adaptive immune functions resulting in subversion from a pro-tumor to an anti-tumor microenvironment, tumor rejection and acquisition of anti-tumor immune memory. Hypotheses of neuro-immune networks involved in these approaches are discussed. These considerations are important also for the comprehension of how chemotherapy and/or radiation therapies may help to block and/or to eradicate the tumor and for the construction of suitable anti-tumor vaccine strategies.

  7. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Taylor, André D.

    2016-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. However, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. Here, we show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme's oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. This study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage. PMID:27759005

  8. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Taylor, André D.

    2016-10-01

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. However, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. Here, we show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme's oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. This study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage.

  9. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Thomsen, Julianne M; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J; Brudvig, Gary W; Taylor, André D

    2016-10-19

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. However, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. Here, we show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme's oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. This study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage.

  10. Inspection program improves bulk cement system delivery

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bannion, T. ); Guidroz, B.; Morris, G. )

    1993-12-20

    A recently implemented survey of pneumatically operated bulk cement-handling equipment offshore has improved bulk cement deliverability on several Gulf of Mexico rigs. The 30-point survey helps ensure an adequate rate of bulk cement delivery throughout the cement job. The inspection survey was developed because the source of many cement job failures was a lack of adequate, steady delivery of bulk cement to the cementing unit during the job. The job failures caused by flow interruptions, plugging of tools by chunks of set cement, and erratic flow resulted in poor primary cement jobs, many of which required remedial cementing jobs. A better-controlled flow of cement may help prevent these types of failure, thereby reducing the number of remedial cement operations. The paper describes the inspection procedures.

  11. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  12. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  13. Ocular delivery of macromolecules

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Chun; Chiang, Bryce; Wu, Xianggen; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals are making increasing impact on medicine, including treatment of indications in the eye. Macromolecular drugs are typically given by physician-administered invasive delivery methods, because non--invasive ocular delivery methods, such as eye drops, and systemic delivery, have low bioavailability and/or poor ocular targeting. There is a need to improve delivery of biopharmaceuticals to enable less-invasive delivery routes, less-frequent dosing through controlled-release drug delivery and improved drug targeting within the eye to increase efficacy and reduce side effects. This review discusses the barriers to drug delivery via various ophthalmic routes of administration in the context of macromolecule delivery and discusses efforts to develop controlled-release systems for delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the eye. The growing number of macromolecular therapies in the eye needs improved drug delivery methods that increase drug efficacy, safety and patient compliance. PMID:24998941

  14. Nanocarriers for vascular delivery of antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Elizabeth; Simone, Eric; Wattamwar, Paritosh; Dziubla, Thomas; Muzykantov, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidant enzymes (AOEs) catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) detoxify harmful reactive oxygen species, but the therapeutic utility of AOEs is hindered by inadequate delivery. AOE modification by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and encapsulation in PEG-coated liposomes increases the AOE bioavailability and enhances protective effects in animal models. Pluronic-based micelles formed with AOEs show even more potent protective effects. Furthermore, polymeric nanocarriers (PNCs) based on PEG-copolymers protect encapsulated AOEs from proteolysis and improve delivery to the target cells, such as the endothelium lining the vascular lumen. Antibodies to endothelial determinants conjugated to AOEs or AOE carriers provide targeting and intracellular delivery. Targeted liposomes, protein conjugates and magnetic nanoparticles deliver AOEs to sites of vascular oxidative stress in the cardiovascular, pulmonary and nervous systems. Further advances in nanodevices for AOE delivery will provide a basis for the translation of this approach in the clinical domain. PMID:21929460

  15. The Effects of Postoperative Activity on Subcuranious Tissue Oxygen Tension and Blood Flow in Orthopedic Surgical Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    killing common surgical infection organisms as Staphylococcus aureus, E coli, Serratia marcescens, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris , and...healing of wounded tissue is the maintenance of adequate tissue oxygenation. Abundant molecular oxygen must be present for cellular processes of oxidative

  16. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  17. The Human Right to Adequate Housing: A Tool for Promoting and Protecting Individual and Community Health

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Bret

    2002-01-01

    The human right to adequate housing is enshrined in international law. The right to adequate housing can be traced to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was unanimously adopted by the world community in 1948. Since that time, the right to adequate housing has been reaffirmed on numerous occasions and further defined and elaborated. A key component of this right is habitability of housing, which should comply with health and safety standards. Therefore, the right to adequate housing provides an additional tool for advocates and others interested in promoting healthful housing and living conditions and thereby protecting individual and community health. PMID:11988432

  18. Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

  19. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... and Adequate Veterinary Care § 2.40 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and... veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section. (1) Each dealer and exhibitor shall employ...

  20. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE... adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  1. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  2. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  3. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  4. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  5. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  6. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  7. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  8. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  9. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  10. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  11. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  12. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438... Improvement Access Standards § 438.207 Assurances of adequate capacity and services. (a) Basic rule. The State... provides supporting documentation that demonstrates that it has the capacity to serve the...

  13. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  14. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall provide adequate veterinary care to its animals in compliance with this section: (1) Each research facility...

  15. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-01-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth’s surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850–542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635–542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5–4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth. PMID:24550467

  16. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Daniel B.; Ward, Lewis M.; Jones, CarriAyne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H.; Canfield, Donald E.

    2014-03-01

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  17. Oxygen requirements of the earliest animals.

    PubMed

    Mills, Daniel B; Ward, Lewis M; Jones, Carriayne; Sweeten, Brittany; Forth, Michael; Treusch, Alexander H; Canfield, Donald E

    2014-03-18

    A rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans is one of the most popular explanations for the relatively late and abrupt appearance of animal life on Earth. In this scenario, Earth's surface environment failed to meet the high oxygen requirements of animals up until the middle to late Neoproterozoic Era (850-542 million years ago), when oxygen concentrations sufficiently rose to permit the existence of animal life for the first time. Although multiple lines of geochemical evidence support an oxygenation of the Ediacaran oceans (635-542 million years ago), roughly corresponding with the first appearance of metazoans in the fossil record, the oxygen requirements of basal animals remain unclear. Here we show that modern demosponges, serving as analogs for early animals, can survive under low-oxygen conditions of 0.5-4.0% present atmospheric levels. Because the last common ancestor of metazoans likely exhibited a physiology and morphology similar to that of a modern sponge, its oxygen demands may have been met well before the enhanced oxygenation of the Ediacaran Period. Therefore, the origin of animals may not have been triggered by a contemporaneous rise in the oxygen content of the atmosphere and oceans. Instead, other ecological and developmental processes are needed to adequately explain the origin and earliest evolution of animal life on Earth.

  18. Oxygen distribution and consumption within the retina in vascularised and avascular retinas and in animal models of retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, D Y; Cringle, S J

    2001-03-01

    Maintenance of an adequate oxygen supply to the retina is critical for retinal function. In species with vascularised retinas, such as man, oxygen is delivered to the retina via a combination of the choroidal vascular bed, which lies immediately behind the retina, and the retinal vasculature, which lies within the inner retina. The high-oxygen demands of the retina, and the relatively sparse nature of the retinal vasculature, are thought to contribute to the particular vulnerability of the retina to vascular disease. A large proportion of retinal blindness is associated with diseases having a vascular component, and disrupted oxygen supply to the retina is likely to be a critical factor. Much attention has therefore been directed at determining the intraretinal oxygen environment in healthy and diseased eyes. Measurements of oxygen levels within the retina have largely been restricted to animal studies in which oxygen sensitive microelectrodes can be used to obtain high-resolution measurements of oxygen tension as a function of retinal depth. Such measurements can immediately identify which retinal layers are supplied with oxygen from the different vascular elements. Additionally, in the outer retinal layers, which do not have any intrinsic oxygen sources, the oxygen distribution can be analysed mathematically to quantify the oxygen consumption rate of specific retinal layers. This has revealed a remarkable heterogeneity of oxygen requirements of different components of the outer retina, with the inner segments of the photoreceptors being the dominant oxygen consumers. Since the presence of the retinal vasculature precludes such a simple quantitative analysis of local oxygen consumption within the inner retina, our understanding of the oxygen needs of the inner retinal components is much less complete. Although several lines of evidence suggest that in the more commonly studied species such as cat, pig, and rat, the oxygen demands of the inner retina as a whole is

  19. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  20. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  1. Evidence-based surgery for cesarean delivery: an updated systematic review.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Joshua D; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Rouse, Dwight J; Berghella, Vincenzo; Baxter, Jason K; Chauhan, Suneet P

    2013-10-01

    The objective of our systematic review was to provide updated evidence-based guidance for surgical decisions during cesarean delivery (CD). We performed an English-language MEDLINE, PubMed, and COCHRANE search with the terms, cesarean section, cesarean delivery, cesarean, pregnancy, and randomized trials, plus each technical aspect of CD. Randomized control trials (RCTs) involving any aspect of CD technique from Jan. 1, 2005, to Sept. 1, 2012, were evaluated to update a previous systematic review. We also summarized Cochrane reviews, systematic reviews, and metaanalyses if they included additional RCTs since this review. We identified 73 RCTs, 10 metaanalyses and/or systematic reviews, and 12 Cochrane reviews during this time frame. Recommendations with high levels of certainty as defined by the US Preventive Services Task Force favor pre-skin incision prophylactic antibiotics, cephalad-caudad blunt uterine extension, spontaneous placental removal, surgeon preference on uterine exteriorization, single-layer uterine closure when future fertility is undesired, and suture closure of the subcutaneous tissue when thickness is 2 cm or greater and do not favor manual cervical dilation, subcutaneous drains, or supplemental oxygen for the reduction of morbidity from infection. The technical aspect of CD with high-quality, evidence-based recommendations should be adopted. Although 73 RCTs over the past 8 years is encouraging, additional well-designed, adequately powered trials on the specific technical aspects of CD are warranted.

  2. Determining the Source of Water Vapor in a Cerium Oxide Electrochemical Oxygen Separator to Achieve Aviator Grade Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, John; Taylor, Dale; Martinez, James

    2014-01-01

    ]. Combined with a mechanical compressor, a Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Separator (SEOS) should be capable of producing ABO grade oxygen at pressures >2400 psia, on the space station. Feasibility tests using a SEOS integrated with a mechanical compressor identified an unexpected contaminant in the oxygen: water vapour was found in the oxygen product, sometimes at concentrations higher than 40 ppm (the ABO limit for water vapour is 7 ppm). If solid electrolyte membranes are really "infinitely selective" to oxygen as they are reported to be, where did the water come from? If water is getting into the oxygen, what other contaminants might get into the oxygen? Microscopic analyses of wafers, welds, and oxygen delivery tubes were performed in an attempt to find the source of the water vapour contamination. Hot and cold pressure decay tests were performed. Measurements of water vapour as a function of O2 delivery rate, O2 delivery pressure, and process air humidity levels were the most instructive in finding the source of water contamination (Fig 3). Water contamination was directly affected by oxygen delivery rate (doubling the oxygen production rate cut the water level in half). Water was affected by process air humidity levels and delivery pressure in a way that indicates the water was diffusing into the oxygen delivery system.

  3. Osmotic phenomena in application for hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

    PubMed

    Babchin, A; Levich, E; Melamed M D, Y; Sivashinsky, G

    2011-03-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment defines the medical procedure when the patient inhales pure oxygen at elevated pressure conditions. Many diseases and all injuries are associated with a lack of oxygen in tissues, known as hypoxia. HBO provides an effective method for fast oxygen delivery in medical practice. The exact mechanism of the oxygen transport under HBO conditions is not fully identified. The objective of this article is to extend the colloid and surface science basis for the oxygen transport in HBO conditions beyond the molecular diffusion transport mechanism. At a pressure in the hyperbaric chamber of two atmospheres, the partial pressure of oxygen in the blood plasma increases 10 times. The sharp increase of oxygen concentration in the blood plasma creates a considerable concentration gradient between the oxygen dissolved in the plasma and in the tissue. The concentration gradient of oxygen as a non-electrolyte solute causes an osmotic flow of blood plasma with dissolved oxygen. In other words, the molecular diffusion transport of oxygen is supplemented by the convective diffusion raised due to the osmotic flow, accelerating the oxygen delivery from blood to tissue. A non steady state equation for non-electrolyte osmosis is solved asymptotically. The solution clearly demonstrates two modes of osmotic flow: normal osmosis, directed from lower to higher solute concentrations, and anomalous osmosis, directed from higher to lower solute concentrations. The fast delivery of oxygen from blood to tissue is explained on the basis of the strong molecular interaction between the oxygen and the tissue, causing an influx of oxygen into the tissue by convective diffusion in the anomalous osmosis process. The transport of the second gas, nitrogen, dissolved in the blood plasma, is also taken into the consideration. As the patient does not inhale nitrogen during HBO treatment, but exhales it along with oxygen and carbon dioxide, the concentration of nitrogen in blood

  4. Vacuum-assisted delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000514.htm Vacuum-assisted delivery To use the sharing features on ... the baby through the birth canal. When is Vacuum-assisted Delivery Needed? Even after your cervix is ...

  5. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  6. A review of issues surrounding medically elective cesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Miesnik, Susan R; Reale, Barbara J

    2007-01-01

    The rate of cesarean delivery has increased dramatically over the past decade. Medically elective cesareans are a major factor contributing to this rise. This article discusses the most recent evidence on the perinatal risks of cesarean delivery versus vaginal birth, the economic impact of elective cesarean delivery, and ethical principles related to cesareans performed without medical indication. Physicians' rationales and responses to the issues are reviewed and the recommendations and guidelines of professional organizations are summarized. Available evidence does not lend support to a current shift in clinical practice. Research is needed to adequately compare outcomes of planned cesarean delivery and planned vaginal birth. Until evidence supports medically elective cesarean as a birth option that optimizes outcomes for low-risk mothers and their infants, obstetric care providers should continue to support evidenced-based decision making that includes advocacy for vaginal delivery as the optimal mode of birth.

  7. Oxygen diffusion: an enzyme-controlled variable parameter.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Wilhelm; Kunke, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Previous oxygen microelectrode studies have shown that the oxygen diffusion coefficient (DO₂) increases during extracellular PO₂ decreases, while intracellular PO₂ remained unchanged and thus cell function (spike activity of neurons). Oxygen dependency of complex multicellular organisms requires a stable and adequate oxygen supply to the cells, while toxic concentrations have to be avoided. Oxygen brought to the tissue by convection diffuses through the intercellular and cell membranes, which are potential barriers to diffusion. In gerbil brain cortex, PO₂ and DO₂ were measured by membrane-covered and by bare gold microelectrodes, as were also spike potentials. Moderate respiratory hypoxia was followed by a primary sharp drop of tissue PO₂ that recovered to higher values concomitant with an increase of DO₂. A drop in intracellular PO₂ recovered immediately. Studies on the abdominal ganglion of aplysia californica showed similar results.Heterogeneity is a feature of both normal oxygen supply to tissue and supply due to a wide range of disturbances in oxygen supply. Oxygen diffusion through membranes is variable thereby ensuring adequate intracellular PO₂. Cell-derived glucosamine oxidase seems to regulate the polymerization/depolymerisation ratio of membrane mucopolysaccharides and thus oxygen diffusion.Variability of oxygen diffusion is a decisive parameter for regulating the supply/demand ratio of oxygen supply to the cell; this occurs in highly developed animals as well as in species of a less sophisticated nature. Autoregulation of oxygen diffusion is as important as the distribution/perfusion ratio of the capillary meshwork and as the oxygen extraction ratio in relation to oxygen consumption of the cell. Oxygen diffusion resistance is the cellular protection against luxury oxygen supply (which can result in toxic oxidative species leading to mutagenesis).

  8. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David J.; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance (ANOVA) were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6–12 (n = 1203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in comprehension. Results suggest that there is considerable growth across the middle and high school years, particularly for adequate comprehenders in those text integration processes that maintain local coherence. Accuracy in text consistency judgments accounted for significant unique variance for passage-level, but not sentence-level comprehension, particularly for adequate comprehenders. PMID:26166946

  9. Using Multitheory Model of Health Behavior Change to Predict Adequate Sleep Behavior.

    PubMed

    Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj; Nahar, Vinayak K

    The purpose of this article was to use the multitheory model of health behavior change in predicting adequate sleep behavior in college students. A valid and reliable survey was administered in a cross-sectional design (n = 151). For initiation of adequate sleep behavior, the construct of behavioral confidence (P < .001) was found to be significant and accounted for 24.4% of the variance. For sustenance of adequate sleep behavior, changes in social environment (P < .02), emotional transformation (P < .001), and practice for change (P < .001) were significant and accounted for 34.2% of the variance.

  10. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-10-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In this report, Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to study the local environmentals of LSFT with various level of oxygen deficiency. Ionic valence state, magnetic interaction and influence of Ti on superexchange are discussed Stable crack growth studies on Dense OTM bars provided by Praxair were done at elevated temperature, pressure and elevated conditions. Post-fracture X-ray data of the OTM fractured at 1000 C in environment were refined by FullProf code and results indicate a distortion of the parent cubic perovskite to orthorhombic structure with reduced symmetry. TGA-DTA studies on the post-fracture samples also indicated residual effect arising from the thermal and stress history of the samples. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. The initial measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} are reported. Neutron diffraction measurements of the same composition are in agreement with both the stoichiometry and the kinetic behavior observed in coulometric titration measurements. A series of isotope transients under air separation mode (small gradient) were completed on the membrane of LSCrF-2828 at 900 C. Low pO{sub 2} atmospheres based on with CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have also been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The COCO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  11. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation.

  12. Region 8: Colorado Lamar and Steamboat Springs Adequate Letter (11/12/2002)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Lamar and Steamboat Springs particulate matter (PM10) maintenance plan for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate for transportation conformity purposes

  13. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency... floodplain management regulations meeting minimum requirements under the National Flood Insurance Program... they have brought their floodplain management regulations into compliance with the NFIP...

  14. Region 9: California Adequate / Inadequate Letter Attachment (5/30/2008)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This is a document that states that it has been found adequate for transportation conformitypurposes certain 8-hour ozone and PM2.5 motor vehicleemissions budgets in the 2007 South Coast StateImplementation Plan.

  15. On the mechanisms that limit oxygen uptake during exercise in acute and chronic hypoxia: role of muscle mass

    PubMed Central

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert; Saltin, Bengt

    2009-01-01

    exercise model allows for an adequate oxygen delivery (blood flow ×), with only a minor role of per se, when is more than 55 mmHg. PMID:19047206

  16. Colloidal drug delivery systems in vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Beg, Sarwar; Samad, Abdus; Nazish, Iram; Sultana, Ruksar; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Ahmad, Md Zaki; Akbar, Md

    2013-01-01

    Vaccines play a vital role in the field of community medicine to combat against several diseases of human existence. Vaccines primarily trigger the acquired immune system to develop long-lasting immunity against pathogens. Conventional approaches for vaccine delivery lacks potential to target a particular antigen to develop acquired immunity by specific antibodies. Recent advancements in vaccine delivery showed that inclusion of adjuvants in vaccine formulations or delivery of them in a carrier helps in achieving desired targeting ability, reducing the immunogenicity and significant augmentation in the immune response. Colloidal carriers (liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, proteosomes, virosomes and virus like particles (VLPs), antigen cochleates, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) have been widely explored for vaccine delivery. Further, surface engineering of these carriers with ligands, functional moieties and monoclonal antibodies tend to enhance the immune recognition potential of vaccines by differentiation of antigen specific memory T-cells. The current review, therefore, provides an updated account on the recent advancements in various colloidal delivery systems in vaccine delivery, outlining the mechanism of immune response initiated by them along with potential applications and marketed instances in an explicit manner.

  17. A unique mode of tissue oxygenation and the adaptive radiation of teleost fishes.

    PubMed

    Randall, D J; Rummer, J L; Wilson, J M; Wang, S; Brauner, C J

    2014-04-15

    Teleost fishes constitute 95% of extant aquatic vertebrates, and we suggest that this is related in part to their unique mode of tissue oxygenation. We propose the following sequence of events in the evolution of their oxygen delivery system. First, loss of plasma-accessible carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the gill and venous circulations slowed the Jacobs-Stewart cycle and the transfer of acid between the plasma and the red blood cells (RBCs). This ameliorated the effects of a generalised acidosis (associated with an increased capacity for burst swimming) on haemoglobin (Hb)-O2 binding. Because RBC pH was uncoupled from plasma pH, the importance of Hb as a buffer was reduced. The decrease in buffering was mediated by a reduction in the number of histidine residues on the Hb molecule and resulted in enhanced coupling of O2 and CO2 transfer through the RBCs. In the absence of plasma CA, nearly all plasma bicarbonate ultimately dehydrated to CO2 occurred via the RBCs, and chloride/bicarbonate exchange was the rate-limiting step in CO2 excretion. This pattern of CO2 excretion across the gills resulted in disequilibrium states for CO2 hydration/dehydration reactions and thus elevated arterial and venous plasma bicarbonate levels. Plasma-accessible CA embedded in arterial endothelia was retained, which eliminated the localized bicarbonate disequilibrium forming CO2 that then moved into the RBCs. Consequently, RBC pH decreased which, in conjunction with pH-sensitive Bohr/Root Hbs, elevated arterial oxygen tensions and thus enhanced tissue oxygenation. Counter-current arrangement of capillaries (retia) at the eye and later the swim bladder evolved along with the gas gland at the swim bladder. Both arrangements enhanced and magnified CO2 and acid production and, therefore, oxygen secretion to those specialised tissues. The evolution of β-adrenergically stimulated RBC Na(+)/H(+) exchange protected gill O2 uptake during stress and further augmented plasma disequilibrium states

  18. The oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Corsonello, A; Pedone, C; Scarlata, S; Zito, A; Laino, I; Antonelli-Incalzi, R

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen (O(2)) is a vital element. Shortage of O(2) results in deranged metabolism and important changes in vascular tone with opposite effects on the systemic and pulmonary circulation. During hypoxemia, oxidative stress exposes the organism to a sort of accelerated senescence as well as to several acute untoward effects. Thus, hypoxemia should be promptly recognized and treated, hopefully by measures tailored to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypoxemia. However, O(2) therapy remains the most common therapy of hypoxemia, but it must be carefully tailored to relieve hypoxemia without provoking hyperoxia or hypercarbia. Then, the individual response to O(2) as well as changing needs of O(2) during sleep or exercise must be evaluated to provide the best O(2) therapy. Hyperoxia, the effect of overcorrection of hypoxia, can dramatically impact the health status and threaten the survival of the newborn and, through different mechanisms and effects, the adult. A thorough knowledge of the pathophysiological bases of hypoxemia and O(2) storage and delivery devices is then mandatory to administer O(2) therapy guaranteeing for optimal correction of hypoxemia and minimizing the risk of hyperoxia. Consistent with this aim also is a careful scrutiny of instruments and procedures for monitoring the individual response to O(2) over time. Thus, at variance from classical pharmacological therapy, performing O(2) therapy requires a vast array of clinical and technical competences. The optimal integration of these competences is needed to optimize O(2) therapy on individual bases.

  19. Home Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen is rarely delivered in the older large, steel gas cylinders any longer since frequent and costly ... just like the compressed oxygen in the older steel cylinders. An important advantage of liquid oxygen is ...

  20. Meals served in Danish nursing homes and to Meals-on-Wheels clients may not offer nutritionally adequate choices.

    PubMed

    Beck, Anne Marie; Hansen, Kirsten S

    2010-01-01

    Underweight is a significant problem among older Danish nursing home residents and home-care clients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nutritional composition of the meals prepared for older adults in nursing homes and receiving Meals-on-Wheels deliveries, focusing on the menus most commonly served, including the standard menu (most commonly prepared), the energy and protein dense menu, and two types of texture modified menus (chopped and blended). Also, one portion of a homemade energy and protein dense drink was collected and analyzed. For each of the participating kitchens (N = 10), extra portions of different menus were made (3 days in a row). The meal samples (total n = 389) were analyzed for content of energy, protein, fat and carbohydrate. The findings were compared with recommendations regarding the foods to be served in Danish institutions. The nutrient content of the meals-on-wheels and nursing home meals, as well as that of the homemade energy and protein dense drink, varied considerably. The nursing home menus seldom or never fulfilled the recommendations. Our findings support the conclusion that meals served in Danish nursing homes and to meals-on-wheels clients do not consistently offer adequate nutritional intakes.

  1. Causes of preterm delivery.

    PubMed

    Gravett, M G

    1984-10-01

    Although major advances have been made in both obstetric care of the high-risk patient and in neonatal care, prematurity and its consequences remain the major contributor to perinatal mortality. The identification of maternal or obstetric risk factors associated with preterm delivery has enhanced our ability to provide special obstetric care to gravidas at increased risk. The selective management of patients at increased risk for preterm delivery may ultimately reduce the incidence of preterm births. Maternal genital infections are also associated with preterm delivery. Further research is needed to explore the pathogenesis of preterm delivery associated with genital infections, since infections may represent a potentially preventable cause of prematurity.

  2. High brain tissue oxygen tension during ventilation with 100% oxygen after fetal asphyxia in newborn sheep.

    PubMed

    Perez-de-Sa, Valeria; Cunha-Goncalves, Doris; Nordh, Anders; Hansson, Stefan; Larsson, Anders; Ley, David; Fellman, Vineta; Werner, Olof

    2009-01-01

    The optimal inhaled oxygen fraction for newborn resuscitation is still not settled. We hypothesized that short-lasting oxygen ventilation after intrauterine asphyxia would not cause arterial or cerebral hyperoxia, and therefore be innocuous. The umbilical cord of fetal sheep was clamped and 10 min later, after delivery, ventilation with air (n = 7) or with 100% oxygen for 3 (n = 6) or 30 min (n = 5), followed by air, was started. Among the 11 lambs given 100% oxygen, oxygen tension (PO2) was 10.7 (1.8-56) kPa [median (range)] in arterial samples taken after 2.5 min of ventilation. In those ventilated with 100% oxygen for 30 min, brain tissue PO2 (PbtO2) increased from less than 0.1 kPa in each lamb to individual maxima of 56 (30-61) kPa, whereas in those given oxygen for just 3 min, PbtO2 peaked at 4.2 (2.9-46) kPa. The maximal PbtO2 in air-ventilated lambs was 2.9 (0.8-5.4) kPa. Heart rate and blood pressure increased equally fast in the three groups. Thus, prolonged ventilation with 100% oxygen caused an increase in PbtO2 of a magnitude previously only reported under hyperbaric conditions. Reducing the time of 100% oxygen ventilation to 3 min did not consistently avert systemic hyperoxia.

  3. Visible light optical coherence tomography measures retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2015-01-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28 ± 0.08 μL min−1 (p < 0.001), and 0.20 ± 0.04 μL min−1 (p < 0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation. Results from an oxygen diffusion model based on previous oxygen electrode measurements corroborated our in vivo observations. We believe that vis-OCT has the potential to reveal the fundamental role of oxygen metabolism in various retinal diseases. PMID:26658555

  4. Importance of adequate exercise in the detection of coronary heart disease by radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.J.; Thrall, J.H.; Lo, K.; Pitt, B.

    1980-12-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculograms were obtained on 77 symptomatic patients without prior documented coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary artery disease was present by angiograms in 48. Radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was abnormal in 41 patients (overall sensitivity 85%). In 29 patients with normal coronary arteries, RNV was normal in 24 (specificity 83%). To determine if the exercise level affects sensitivity, the studies were graded for adequacy of exercise. It was considered adequate if patients developed (a) chest pain, or (b) ST segment depression of at least 1 mm, or (c) if they achieved a pressure rate product greater than 250. Among the 48 patients with coronary artery disease, 35 achieved adequate exercise. Thirty-three had an abnormal RNV (sensitivity 94%). In 13 patients who failed to achieve adequate exercise, RNV was abnormal in eight (sensitivity of only 62%). Some patients with coronary artery disease may have a normal ventricular response at inadequate levels of stress.

  5. [Prevention of ocular complications of herpes zoster ophthalmicus by adequate treatment with acyclovir].

    PubMed

    Borruat, F X; Buechi, E R; Piguet, B; Fitting, P; Zografos, L; Herbort, C P

    1991-05-01

    We compared the frequency of severe ocular complications secondary to Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (HZO) in 232 patients. They were divided into three groups: 1) patients without treatment (n = 164); 2) patients treated adequately (n = 48) with acyclovir (ACV; 5 x 800 mg/d orally and ophthalmic ointment 5 x /d for a minimum of 7 days, given within three days after skin eruption); and, 3) patients treated inadequately (n = 20) with ACV (only topical treatment, insufficient doses, interrupted treatment, delayed treatment). Patients with no treatment or with inadequate treatments showed the same frequency of severe ocular complications (21% (34/164) and 25% (5/20), respectively). In contrast, when adequate treatment of ACV was given complications occurred in only 4% (2/48) of cases. This study emphasizes the need for prompt (within three days after skin eruption) and adequate (5 x 800 mg/d for at least 7 days) treatment of ACV to prevent the severe complications of HZO.

  6. [Current aspects of ambulatory long-term oxygen therapy].

    PubMed

    Russi, W

    1988-03-19

    Longterm O2-therapy increases life expectancy in hypoxemic patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and may improve their quality of life as well. The efficiency of this treatment modality depends upon the duration of oxygen administration within 24 hours. Measures which prolong mobility through a long-lasting oxygen source improve patient compliance. Transtracheal oxygen delivery is a genuine advance in longterm O2-therapy. Other oxygen-conserving methods are of interest, but experience is lacking to assess their efficiency in longterm practice.

  7. Progress in antiretroviral drug delivery using nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Mallipeddi, Rama; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2010-01-01

    There are currently a number of antiretroviral drugs that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). More recently, antiretrovirals are being evaluated in the clinic for prevention of HIV infection. Due to the challenging nature of treatment and prevention of this disease, the use of nanocarriers to achieve more efficient delivery of antiretroviral drugs has been studied. Various forms of nanocarriers, such as nanoparticles (polymeric, inorganic, and solid lipid), liposomes, polymeric micelles, dendrimers, cyclodextrins, and cell-based nanoformulations have been studied for delivery of drugs intended for HIV prevention or therapy. The aim of this review is to provide a summary of the application of nanocarrier systems to the delivery of anti-HIV drugs, specifically antiretrovirals. For anti-HIV drugs to be effective, adequate distribution to specific sites in the body must be achieved, and effective drug concentrations must be maintained at those sites for the required period of time. Nanocarriers provide a means to overcome cellular and anatomical barriers to drug delivery. Their application in the area of HIV prevention and therapy may lead to the development of more effective drug products for combating this pandemic disease. PMID:20957115

  8. Broadband inversion of 1J(CC) responses in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra.

    PubMed

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Establishing the carbon skeleton of a molecule greatly facilitates the process of structure elucidation, both manual and computer-assisted. Recent advances in the family of ADEQUATE experiments demonstrated their potential in this regard. 1,1-ADEQUATE, which provides direct (13)C-(13)C correlation via (1)J(CC), and 1,n-ADEQUATE, which typically yields (3)J(CC) and (1)J(CC) correlations, are more sensitive and more widely applicable experiments than INADEQUATE and PANACEA. A recently reported modified pulse sequence that semi-selectively inverts (1)J(CC) correlations in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra provided a significant improvement, allowing (1)J(CC) and (n)J(CC) correlations to be discerned in the same spectrum. However, the reported experiment requires a careful matching of the amplitude transfer function with (1)J(CC) coupling constants in order to achieve the inversion, and even then some (1)J(CC) correlations could still have positive intensity due to the oscillatory nature of the transfer function. Both shortcomings limit the practicality of the method. We now report a new, dual-optimized inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment, which provides more uniform inversion of (1)J(CC) correlations across the range of 29-82 Hz. Unlike the original method, the dual optimization experiment does not require fine-tuning for the molecule's (1)J(CC) coupling constant values. Even more usefully, the dual-optimized version provides up to two-fold improvement in signal-to-noise for some long-range correlations. Using modern, cryogenically-cooled probes, the experiment can be successfully applied to samples of ~1 mg under favorable circumstances. The improvements afforded by dual optimization inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment make it a useful and practical tool for NMR structure elucidation and should facilitate the implementation and utilization of the experiment.

  9. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Melody S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2012-09-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent's race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth.

  10. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Darrell J.; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D.; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent’s race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth. PMID:22658579

  11. Effect of phosphate supplementation on oxygen delivery at high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. C.; Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Sharma, V. M.; Divekar, H. M.; Tyagi, A. K.; Panwar, M. R.; Swamy, Y. V.

    1987-09-01

    In the present communication, effect of low doses of phosphate supplementation on short-term high altitude adaptation has been examined. Studies were carried out in 36 healthy, male, sea-level residents divided in a double blind fashion into drug and placebo treated groups. 3.2 mmol of phosphate were given orally to each subject of the drug treated group once a day for 4 days on arrival at an altitude of 3,500 m. Sequential studies were done in the subjects in both groups on the 3rd, 7th, 14th and 21st day of their altitude stay. Haemoglobin, haematocrit, erythrocyte and reticulocyte counts increased to the similar extent in both groups. Blood pH, pO2 and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) did not differ between the two groups. On 3rd day of the altitude stay, inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG) levels in the drug treated group increased significantly as compared to the placebo group. No significant difference in inorganic phosphate and 2,3 DPG was observed later on in the two groups. Psychological and clinical tests also indicated that the drug treated subjects felt better as compared to the placebo treated subjects. The present study suggests that low doses of phosphate increases circulating 2,3-DPG concentration which in turn brings about beneficial effect towards short term high altitude adaptation.

  12. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOEpatents

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  13. Targeted delivery of magnetic aerosol droplets to the lung.

    PubMed

    Dames, Petra; Gleich, Bernhard; Flemmer, Andreas; Hajek, Kerstin; Seidl, Nicole; Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Bittmann, Iris; Bergemann, Christian; Weyh, Thomas; Trahms, Lutz; Rosenecker, Joseph; Rudolph, Carsten

    2007-08-01

    The inhalation of medical aerosols is widely used for the treatment of lung disorders such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, respiratory infection and, more recently, lung cancer. Targeted aerosol delivery to the affected lung tissue may improve therapeutic efficiency and minimize unwanted side effects. Despite enormous progress in optimizing aerosol delivery to the lung, targeted aerosol delivery to specific lung regions other than the airways or the lung periphery has not been adequately achieved to date. Here, we show theoretically by computer-aided simulation, and for the first time experimentally in mice, that targeted aerosol delivery to the lung can be achieved with aerosol droplets comprising superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles--so-called nanomagnetosols--in combination with a target-directed magnetic gradient field. We suggest that nanomagnetosols may be useful for treating localized lung disease, by targeting foci of bacterial infection or tumour nodules.

  14. The case against cesarean delivery on maternal request in labor.

    PubMed

    Burcher, Paul; Gabriel, Jazmine L; Campo-Engelstein, Lisa; Kiley, Kevin C

    2013-09-01

    The ethical obligations of an obstetrician to a patient who requests a cesarean delivery without maternal or fetal indication differ depending on whether the request is made before or during labor. Informed consent is an essential dimension of respecting patient autonomy, and the process of informed consent should be extensive for a cesarean delivery in the absence of maternal or fetal indications during active labor. For this reason, physicians should rarely grant a request for cesarean delivery made during active labor. Although physicians may think that declining a request for cesarean delivery is a violation of patient autonomy, they should also be concerned about the violation of patient autonomy that results if they are unable to adequately complete the process of informed consent during labor.

  15. Simultaneous sampling of tissue oxygenation and oxygen consumption in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Nugent, William H; Song, Bjorn K; Pittman, Roland N; Golub, Aleksander S

    2016-05-01

    Under physiologic conditions, microvascular oxygen delivery appears to be well matched to oxygen consumption in respiring tissues. We present a technique to measure interstitial oxygen tension (PISFO2) and oxygen consumption (VO2) under steady-state conditions, as well as during the transitions from rest to activity and back. Phosphorescence Quenching Microscopy (PQM) was employed with pneumatic compression cycling to achieve 1 to 10 Hz sampling rates of interstitial PO2 and simultaneous recurrent sampling of VO2 (3/min) in the exteriorized rat spinotrapezius muscle. The compression pressure was optimized to 120-130 mmHg without adverse effect on the tissue preparation. A cycle of 5s compression followed by 15s recovery yielded a resting VO2 of 0.98 ± 0.03 ml O2/100 cm(3)min while preserving microvascular oxygen delivery. The measurement system was then used to assess VO2 dependence on PISFO2 at rest and further tested under conditions of isometric muscle contraction to demonstrate a robust ability to monitor the on-kinetics of tissue respiration and the compensatory changes in PISFO2 during contraction and recovery. The temporal and spatial resolution of this approach is well suited to studies seeking to characterize microvascular oxygen supply and demand in thin tissues.

  16. Formality in Rhetorical Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skopec, Eric Wm.

    Formality in rhetorical delivery can be defined as a complex variable that represents the speaker's efforts to invoke sociocultural rules of audience control through the nonverbal components of the delivery. This document describes some of the aspects of formality, outlines its significance in rhetorical contexts, and evaluates the concept in…

  17. [The moon and delivery].

    PubMed

    Romero Martínez, Jorge; Guerrero Guijo, Inmaculada; Artura Serrano, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    In different cultures and mythologies, the moon is related with fertility, pregnancy and delivery. Professional obstetricians also notice an increase in care demands on the days when the moon is full. Many studies have been made which try to correlate delivery processes to the phases of the moon with contradictory results. The authors plan to try to find any basis in fact which support these popular beliefs and to discover if lunar phases bear an influence on the distribution of deliveries. They carried out a descriptive transversal study on a total of 1715 unassisted deliveries over the course of ten complete lunar cycles. The authors have carried out a descriptive and inferential analysis, a one way ANOVA and a Kruskal Wallis test on their three data bases which are general, primipara and multipara in which they contemplated the total number of deliveries per phase, the mean of each phase, as well as the central day in each phase of the lunar cycle. The differences found in the distribution of deliveries over the four lunar phases, along with the comparison of the means and the comparison of the number of deliveries on the central day in each phase are not statistically significant. The different phases in the lunar cycle and especially the full moon do not appear to have any influence over the distribution of deliveries in this study.

  18. Oxygen sensing and signaling.

    PubMed

    van Dongen, Joost T; Licausi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is an indispensable substrate for many biochemical reactions in plants, including energy metabolism (respiration). Despite its importance, plants lack an active transport mechanism to distribute oxygen to all cells. Therefore, steep oxygen gradients occur within most plant tissues, which can be exacerbated by environmental perturbations that further reduce oxygen availability. Plants possess various responses to cope with spatial and temporal variations in oxygen availability, many of which involve metabolic adaptations to deal with energy crises induced by low oxygen. Responses are induced gradually when oxygen concentrations decrease and are rapidly reversed upon reoxygenation. A direct effect of the oxygen level can be observed in the stability, and thus activity, of various transcription factors that control the expression of hypoxia-induced genes. Additional signaling pathways are activated by the impact of oxygen deficiency on mitochondrial and chloroplast functioning. Here, we describe the molecular components of the oxygen-sensing pathway.

  19. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology. PMID:26328879

  20. Hypoxia inducible factor-2α regulates the development of retinal astrocytic network by maintaining adequate supply of astrocyte progenitors.

    PubMed

    Duan, Li-Juan; Takeda, Kotaro; Fong, Guo-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Here we investigate the role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-2α in coordinating the development of retinal astrocytic and vascular networks. Three Cre mouse lines were used to disrupt floxed Hif-2α, including Rosa26(CreERT2), Tie2(Cre), and GFAP(Cre). Global Hif-2α disruption by Rosa26(CreERT2) led to reduced astrocytic and vascular development in neonatal retinas, whereas endothelial disruption by Tie2(Cre) had no apparent effects. Hif-2α deletion in astrocyte progenitors by GFAP(Cre) significantly interfered with the development of astrocytic networks, which failed to reach the retinal periphery and were incapable of supporting vascular development. Perplexingly, the abundance of strongly GFAP(+) mature astrocytes transiently increased at P0 before they began to lag behind the normal controls by P3. Pax2(+) and PDGFRα(+) astrocytic progenitors and immature astrocytes were dramatically diminished at all stages examined. Despite decreased number of astrocyte progenitors, their proliferation index or apoptosis was not altered. The above data can be reconciled by proposing that HIF-2α is required for maintaining the supply of astrocyte progenitors by slowing down their differentiation into non-proliferative mature astrocytes. HIF-2α deficiency in astrocyte progenitors may accelerate their differentiation into astrocytes, a change which greatly interferes with the replenishment of astrocyte progenitors due to insufficient time for proliferation. Rapidly declining progenitor supply may lead to premature cessation of astrocyte development. Given that HIF-2α protein undergoes oxygen dependent degradation, an interesting possibility is that retinal blood vessels may regulate astrocyte differentiation through their oxygen delivery function. While our findings support the consensus that retinal astrocytic template guides vascular development, they also raise the possibility that astrocytic and vascular networks may mutually regulate each other's development

  1. Accelerating change: Fostering innovation in healthcare delivery at academic medical centers.

    PubMed

    Ostrovsky, Andrey; Barnett, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Academic medical centers (AMCs) have the potential to be leaders in the era of healthcare delivery reform, but most have yet to display a commitment to delivery innovation on par with their commitment to basic research. Several institutional factors impede delivery innovation including the paucity of adequate training in design and implementation of new delivery models and the lack of established pathways for academic career advancement outside of research. This paper proposes two initiatives to jumpstart disruptive innovation at AMCs: an institutional "innovation incubator" program and a clinician-innovator career track coupled with innovation training programs.

  2. 75 FR 69648 - Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-15

    ... ENERGY Safety Analysis Requirements for Defining Adequate Protection for the Public and the Workers... designed to hold firmly in place. 10 CFR Part 830 imposes a requirement that a documented safety analysis... provide guidance on meeting the requirements imposed by DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis...

  3. 42 CFR 413.24 - Adequate cost data and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Adequate data capable of being audited is consistent with good business concepts and effective and efficient management of any organization, whether it is operated for profit or on a nonprofit basis. It is a... contract for services (for example, a management contract), directly assigning the costs to the...

  4. Prenatal zinc supplementation of zinc-adequate rats adversely affects immunity in offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that zinc (Zn) supplementation of Zn-adequate dams induced immunosuppressive effects that persist in the offspring after weaning. We investigated whether the immunosuppressive effects were due to in utero exposure and/or mediated via milk using a cross-fostering design. Pregnant...

  5. Towards Defining Adequate Lithium Trials for Individuals with Mental Retardation and Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of lithium with mentally retarded individuals with psychiatric conditions and/or behavior disturbances is discussed. The paper describes components of an adequate clinical trial and reviews case studies and double-blind cases. The paper concludes that aggression is the best indicator for lithium use, and reviews treatment parameters and…

  6. ADEQUATE SHELTERS AND QUICK REACTIONS TO WARNING: A KEY TO CIVIL DEFENSE.

    PubMed

    LYNCH, F X

    1963-11-08

    Case histories collected by investigators in Japan during 1945 illustrate both the effectiveness of shelters and the dangers inherent in apathy of the population, which suffered needless casualties by ignoring air raid warnintgs. Adequate shelters and immediate response to warnings are essential to survival in nuclear attack.

  7. Perceptions of Teachers in Their First Year of School Restructuring: Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The 2007-2008 school year marked the first year Florida's Title I schools that did not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for five consecutive years entered into restructuring as mandated by the "No Child Left Behind Act" of 2001. My study examines the perceptions of teacher entering into their first year of school restructuring due to…

  8. 45 CFR 1182.15 - Institute responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... record systems. These security safeguards shall apply to all systems in which identifiable personal data... data and automated systems shall be adequately trained in the security and privacy of personal data. (4... technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual...

  9. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and... financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination of costs payable by...

  10. Effect of tranquilizers on animal resistance to the adequate stimuli of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovich, Y. B.; Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tranquilizers on vestibulospinal reflexes and motor activity was studied in 900 centrifuged albino mice. Actometric studies have shown that the tranquilizers have a group capacity for increasing animal resistance to the action of adequate stimuli to the vestibular apparatus.

  11. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  12. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  13. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  14. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  15. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Adequate Yearly Progress among Urban, Suburban, and Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using national data from the 2007-08 School and Staffing Survey, we compared the relationships between parental involvement and school outcomes related to adequate yearly progress (AYP) in urban, suburban, and rural schools. Parent-initiated parental involvement demonstrated significantly positive relationships with both making AYP and staying off…

  16. Which Food Security Determinants Predict Adequate Vegetable Consumption among Rural Western Australian Children?

    PubMed

    Godrich, Stephanie L; Lo, Johnny; Davies, Christina R; Darby, Jill; Devine, Amanda

    2017-01-03

    Improving the suboptimal vegetable consumption among the majority of Australian children is imperative in reducing chronic disease risk. The objective of this research was to determine whether there was a relationship between food security determinants (FSD) (i.e., food availability, access, and utilisation dimensions) and adequate vegetable consumption among children living in regional and remote Western Australia (WA). Caregiver-child dyads (n = 256) living in non-metropolitan/rural WA completed cross-sectional surveys that included questions on FSD, demographics and usual vegetable intake. A total of 187 dyads were included in analyses, which included descriptive and logistic regression analyses via IBM SPSS (version 23). A total of 13.4% of children in this sample had adequate vegetable intake. FSD that met inclusion criteria (p ≤ 0.20) for multivariable regression analyses included price; promotion; quality; location of food outlets; variety of vegetable types; financial resources; and transport to outlets. After adjustment for potential demographic confounders, the FSD that predicted adequate vegetable consumption were, variety of vegetable types consumed (p = 0.007), promotion (p = 0.017), location of food outlets (p = 0.027), and price (p = 0.043). Food retail outlets should ensure that adequate varieties of vegetable types (i.e., fresh, frozen, tinned) are available, vegetable messages should be promoted through food retail outlets and in community settings, towns should include a range of vegetable purchasing options, increase their reliance on a local food supply and increase transport options to enable affordable vegetable purchasing.

  17. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall...

  18. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. (a) Each research facility shall have an attending veterinarian who shall...

  19. Identifying the Factors Impacting the Adequately Yearly Progress Performance in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Ju-Shan

    2013-01-01

    The NCLB (No Child Left Behind Act) specifies that states must develop AYP (adequate yearly progress) statewide measurable objectives for improved achievement by all students, including economically disadvantaged students, students from minority races, students with disabilities, and students with limited English proficiency. By the 2013-2014…

  20. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  1. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  2. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  3. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... workshop. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Hemoglobin... discuss blood donor hemoglobin and hematocrit qualification standards in the United States, its impact...

  4. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... adequate and well-controlled studies of a new animal drug is to distinguish the effect of the new animal... with one or more controls to provide a quantitative evaluation of drug effects. The protocol and the... for special circumstances. Examples include studies in which the effect of the new animal drug is...

  5. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... adequate and well-controlled studies of a new animal drug is to distinguish the effect of the new animal... with one or more controls to provide a quantitative evaluation of drug effects. The protocol and the... for special circumstances. Examples include studies in which the effect of the new animal drug is...

  6. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... adequate and well-controlled studies of a new animal drug is to distinguish the effect of the new animal... with one or more controls to provide a quantitative evaluation of drug effects. The protocol and the... for special circumstances. Examples include studies in which the effect of the new animal drug is...

  7. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... adequate and well-controlled studies of a new animal drug is to distinguish the effect of the new animal... with one or more controls to provide a quantitative evaluation of drug effects. The protocol and the... for special circumstances. Examples include studies in which the effect of the new animal drug is...

  8. 21 CFR 514.117 - Adequate and well-controlled studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... adequate and well-controlled studies of a new animal drug is to distinguish the effect of the new animal... with one or more controls to provide a quantitative evaluation of drug effects. The protocol and the... for special circumstances. Examples include studies in which the effect of the new animal drug is...

  9. 30 CFR 227.801 - What if a State does not adequately perform a delegated function?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... delegated function? 227.801 Section 227.801 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT DELEGATION TO STATES Performance Review § 227.801 What if a State does not adequately perform a delegated function? If your performance of the delegated function does...

  10. Science Education as a Contributor to Adequate Yearly Progress and Accountability Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judson, Eugene

    2010-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act requires states to measure the adequate yearly progress (AYP) of each public school and local educational agency (LEA) and to hold schools and LEAs accountable for failing to make AYP. Although it is required that science be assessed in at least three grades, the achievement results from science examinations are…

  11. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and... financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination of costs payable by...

  12. Understanding the pelvic pain mechanism is key to find an adequate therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2016-06-25

    Pain is a natural mechanism to actual or potential tissue damage and involves both a sensory and an emotional experience. In chronic pelvic pain, localisation of pain can be widespread and can cause considerable distress. A multidisciplinary approach is needed in order to fully understand the pelvic pain mechanism and to identify an adequate therapeutic approach.

  13. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  14. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  15. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  16. Human milk feeding supports adequate growth in infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite current nutritional strategies, premature infants remain at high risk for extrauterine growth restriction. The use of an exclusive human milk-based diet is associated with decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but concerns exist about infants achieving adequate growth. The ...

  17. Adequate Yearly Progress for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders through Research-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannest, Kimberly J.; Temple-Harvey, Kimberly K.; Mason, Benjamin A.

    2009-01-01

    Because schools are held accountable for the academic performance of all students, it is important to focus on academics and the need for effective teaching practices. Adequate yearly progress, a method of accountability that is part of the No Child Left Behind Act (2001), profoundly affects the education of students who have emotional and…

  18. How Much and What Kind? Identifying an Adequate Technology Infrastructure for Early Childhood Education. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Dossani, Rafiq; Johnson, Erin-Elizabeth; Wright, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    To realize the potential benefits of technology use in early childhood education (ECE), and to ensure that technology can help to address the digital divide, providers, families of young children, and young children themselves must have access to an adequate technology infrastructure. The goals for technology use in ECE that a technology…

  19. Variable responses of regional renal oxygenation and perfusion to vasoactive agents in awake sheep.

    PubMed

    Calzavacca, Paolo; Evans, Roger G; Bailey, Michael; Bellomo, Rinaldo; May, Clive N

    2015-11-15

    Vasoactive agents are used in critical care to optimize circulatory function, but their effects on renal tissue oxygenation in the absence of anesthesia remain largely unknown. Therefore, we assessed the effects of multiple vasoactive agents on regional kidney oxygenation in awake sheep. Sheep were surgically instrumented with pulmonary and renal artery flow probes, and combination fiber-optic probes, in the renal cortex and medulla, comprising a fluorescence optode to measure tissue Po2 and a laser-Doppler probe to assess tissue perfusion. Carotid arterial and renal venous cannulas enabled measurement of arterial pressure and total renal oxygen delivery and consumption. Norepinephrine (0.1 or 0.8 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) dose-dependently reduced cortical and medullary laser Doppler flux (LDF) and Po2 without significantly altering renal blood flow (RBF), or renal oxygen delivery or consumption. Angiotensin II (9.8 ± 2.1 μg/h) reduced RBF by 21%, renal oxygen delivery by 28%, oxygen consumption by 18%, and medullary Po2 by 38%, but did not significantly alter cortical Po2 or cortical or medullary LDF. Arginine vasopressin (3.3 ± 0.5 μg/h) caused similar decreases in RBF and renal oxygen delivery, but did not significantly alter renal oxygen consumption or cortical or medullary LDF or Po2. Captopril had no observable effects on cortical or medullary LDF or Po2, at a dose that increased renal oxygen delivery by 24%, but did not significantly alter renal oxygen consumption. We conclude that vasoactive agents have diverse effects on regional kidney oxygenation in awake sheep that are not predictable from their effects on LDF, RBF, or total renal oxygen delivery and consumption.

  20. Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation during Immediate Neonatal Transition and Resuscitation

    PubMed Central

    Pichler, Gerhard; Schmölzer, Georg M.; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition after birth in human neonates. Recommended routine monitoring, especially if resuscitation is needed, during this period includes arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate measured by pulse oximetry and electrocardiogram. However, there is increasing interest to monitor in addition with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) the oxygenation of the brain. There is a different pattern of increase between cerebral tissue oxygenation and arterial oxygen saturation during the immediate transition, with cerebral tissue oxygenation reaching a plateau faster than arterial oxygen saturation. Differences can be explained, since cerebral tissue oxygenation is not only affected by arterial oxygen saturation but also by cerebral blood flow, hemoglobin content, and cerebral oxygen consumption. Normal values have already been established for different devices, gestational ages, and modes of delivery in neonates without any medical support. Cerebral hypoxia during immediate transition might cause brain damage. In preterm neonates with cerebral hemorrhage evolving in the first week after birth, the cerebral tissue oxygenation is already lower in the first minutes after birth compared to preterm neonates without cerebral hemorrhage. Using cerebral NIRS in combination with intervention guidelines has been shown to reduce the burden of cerebral hypoxia in preterm neonates. Cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition seems to have an impact on outcome, whereby NIRS monitoring is feasible and has the advantage of continuous, non-invasive recording. The impact of NIRS monitoring and interventions on short- and long-term outcomes still need to be evaluated. PMID:28280719

  1. The effect of colic on oxygen extraction in horses.

    PubMed

    Cambier, C; Wierinckx, M; Grulke, S; Clerbaux, T; Serteyn, D; Detry, B; Liardet, M-P; Frans, A; Gustin, P

    2008-01-01

    Blood oxygen transport and oxygen extraction were assessed in horses with colic. A gravity score (GS) ranging from 1 to 3 was attributed to each colic case with healthy horses used as controls. Jugular venous and carotid arterial blood samples were collected and concentrations of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, adenosine triphosphate, inorganic phosphate and chloride were determined. pH and partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PCO(2)), and oxygen (PO(2)) were also measured. Oxygen equilibrium curves (OEC) were constructed under standard conditions and oxygen extraction ratios calculated. Haemoglobin oxygen affinity measured under standard conditions (P50(std)) was unchanged in colic horses compared with healthy controls. Horses with the highest GS, i.e. 3 had lower blood pH values than healthy animals. Arterial and venous partial pressures of oxygen at 50% haemoglobin saturation (P50(a) and P50(v)) were significantly higher in horses suffering from colic (GS=3) than in healthy horses. The oxygen extraction ratio was also significantly increased in colic horses with a GS of 3. A rise in the oxygen extraction ratio detected in the most severely affected animals seemed to reflect the compensatory properties of the oxygen transport system where extraction of oxygen from the blood increases when systemic oxygen delivery decreases, as might be anticipated in horses with colic.

  2. Cerebral Tissue Oxygenation during Immediate Neonatal Transition and Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Gerhard; Schmölzer, Georg M; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a review of cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition after birth in human neonates. Recommended routine monitoring, especially if resuscitation is needed, during this period includes arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate measured by pulse oximetry and electrocardiogram. However, there is increasing interest to monitor in addition with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) the oxygenation of the brain. There is a different pattern of increase between cerebral tissue oxygenation and arterial oxygen saturation during the immediate transition, with cerebral tissue oxygenation reaching a plateau faster than arterial oxygen saturation. Differences can be explained, since cerebral tissue oxygenation is not only affected by arterial oxygen saturation but also by cerebral blood flow, hemoglobin content, and cerebral oxygen consumption. Normal values have already been established for different devices, gestational ages, and modes of delivery in neonates without any medical support. Cerebral hypoxia during immediate transition might cause brain damage. In preterm neonates with cerebral hemorrhage evolving in the first week after birth, the cerebral tissue oxygenation is already lower in the first minutes after birth compared to preterm neonates without cerebral hemorrhage. Using cerebral NIRS in combination with intervention guidelines has been shown to reduce the burden of cerebral hypoxia in preterm neonates. Cerebral tissue oxygenation during immediate transition seems to have an impact on outcome, whereby NIRS monitoring is feasible and has the advantage of continuous, non-invasive recording. The impact of NIRS monitoring and interventions on short- and long-term outcomes still need to be evaluated.

  3. Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks

    MedlinePlus

    ... Delivery, and Postpartum Care Elective Delivery Before 39 Weeks • What is a “medically indicated” delivery? • What is ... the baby grow and develop during the last weeks of pregnancy? • What are the risks for babies ...

  4. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  5. Oxygen chemisorption cryogenic refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The present invention relates to a chemisorption compressor cryogenic refrigerator which employs oxygen to provide cooling at 60 to 100 K. The invention includes dual vessels containing an oxygen absorbent material, alternately heated and cooled to provide a continuous flow of high pressure oxygen, multiple heat exchangers for precooling the oxygen, a Joule-Thomson expansion valve system for expanding the oxygen to partially liquefy it and a liquid oxygen pressure vessel. The primary novelty is that, while it was believed that once oxygen combined with an element or compound the reaction could not reverse to release gaseous oxygen, in this case oxygen will indeed react in a reversible fashion with certain materials and will do so at temperatures and pressures which make it practical for incorporation into a cryogenic refrigeration system.

  6. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  7. Factors controlling oxygen utilization.

    PubMed

    Biaglow, John; Dewhirst, Mark; Leeper, Dennis; Burd, Randy; Tuttle, Steve

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate, theoretically, that oxygen diffusion distance is related to the metabolic rate of tumors (QO2) as well as the oxygen tension. The difference in QO2 rate between tumors can vary by as much as 80-fold. Inhibition of oxygen utilization by glucose or chemical inhibitors can improve the diffusion distance. Combining respiratory inhibitors with increased availability of oxygen will further improve the oxygen diffusion distance for all tumors. A simple means for inhibiting oxygen consumption is the use of glucose (the Crabtree effect). The inhibition of tumor oxygen utilization by glucose occurs in R323OAc mammary carcinoma and 9L glioma cells. However, stimulation of oxygen consumption is observed with glucose in the Q7 hepatoma cell line. MIBG, a known inhibitor of oxygen utilization, blocks oxygen consumption in 9L, but is weakly inhibitory with the Q7. Q7 tumor cells demonstrate an anomalous behavior of glucose and MIBG on oxygen consumption. Our results clearly demonstrate the necessity for comparing effects of different agents on different tumor cells. Generalizations cannot be made with respect to the choice of inhibitor for in vivo use. Our work shows that oxygen consumption also can be inhibited with malonate and chlorosuccinate. These substrates may be effective in vivo, where glucose is low and glutamine is the major substrate. Our results indicate that information about individual tumor substrate-linked metabolic controls may be necessary before attempting to inhibit oxygen utilization in vivo for therapeutic benefit.

  8. The concept of adequate causation and Max Weber's comparative sociology of religion.

    PubMed

    Buss, A

    1999-06-01

    Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, studied in isolation, shows mainly an elective affinity or an adequacy on the level of meaning between the Protestant ethic and the 'spirit' of capitalism. Here it is suggested that Weber's subsequent essays on 'The Economic Ethics of World Religions' are the result of his opinion that adequacy on the level of meaning needs and can be verified by causal adequacy. After some introductory remarks, particularly on elective affinity, the paper tries to develop the concept of adequate causation and the related concept of objective possibility on the basis of the work of v. Kries on whom Weber heavily relied. In the second part, this concept is used to show how the study of the economic ethics of India, China, Rome and orthodox Russia can support the thesis that the 'spirit' of capitalism, although it may not have been caused by the Protestant ethic, was perhaps adequately caused by it.

  9. Ensuring smokers are adequately informed: reflections on consumer rights, manufacturer responsibilities, and policy implications

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, S; Liberman, J

    2005-01-01

    The right to information is a fundamental consumer value. Following the advent of health warnings, the tobacco industry has repeatedly asserted that smokers are fully informed of the risks they take, while evidence demonstrates widespread superficial levels of awareness and understanding. There remains much that tobacco companies could do to fulfil their responsibilities to inform smokers. We explore issues involved in the meaning of "adequately informed" smoking and discuss some of the key policy and regulatory implications. We use the idea of a smoker licensing scheme—under which it would be illegal to sell to smokers who had not demonstrated an adequate level of awareness—as a device to explore some of these issues. We also explore some of the difficulties that addiction poses for the notion that smokers might ever voluntarily assume the risks of smoking. PMID:16046703

  10. Breastfeeding After Cesarean Delivery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breastfeeding Crying & Colic Diapers & Clothing Feeding & Nutrition Preemie Sleep Teething & Tooth Care Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Baby > Breastfeeding > Breastfeeding After Cesarean Delivery Ages & Stages ...

  11. Transdermal delivery of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, Haripriya; Banga, Ajay K

    2011-03-01

    Transdermal delivery of peptides and proteins avoids the disadvantages associated with the invasive parenteral route of administration and other alternative routes such as the pulmonary and nasal routes. Since proteins have a large size and are hydrophilic in nature, they cannot permeate passively across the skin due to the stratum corneum which allows the transport of only small lipophilic drug molecules. Enhancement techniques such as chemical enhancers, iontophoresis, microneedles, electroporation, sonophoresis, thermal ablation, laser ablation, radiofrequency ablation and noninvasive jet injectors aid in the delivery of proteins by overcoming the skin barrier in different ways. In this review, these enhancement techniques that can enable the transdermal delivery of proteins are discussed, including a discussion of mechanisms, sterility requirements, and commercial development of products. Combination of enhancement techniques may result in a synergistic effect allowing increased protein delivery and these are also discussed.

  12. Delivery of twins.

    PubMed

    Hofmeyr, G J; Drakeley, A J

    1998-03-01

    The delivery of twins presents considerable challenges to the obstetric team, particularly in terms of decision-making, technical skills required and the need to respond quickly to changing circumstances. There is a serious lack of sound evidence upon which to base decisions concerning the method of delivery of twins. The trend towards the routine use of caesarean section is not supported by evidence of improved outcome for the infants, while maternal outcome is compromised. Specific circumstances that may have a bearing on the need for caesarean section include gestational age, presentation of the twins and chorionicity/amnionicity. Caesarean section does not eliminate the chance of fetal trauma during delivery, particularly for premature twins. The techniques of twin delivery, whether vaginal or by caesarean section, require thorough preparation for all possible eventualities, and skilled teamwork. Particular attention should be paid to emotional needs during labour, birth and afterwards, of the parents of twins.

  13. Delivery by Cesarean Section

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Delivery by Cesarean Section Page Content Article Body More than one mother in three gives birth by Cesarean section in the United States (it is also called ...

  14. Project Delivery Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Thomas G.

    2003-01-01

    Describes project delivery methods that are replacing the traditional Design/Bid/Build linear approach to the management, design, and construction of new facilities. These variations can enhance construction management and teamwork. (SLD)

  15. Myth 19: Is Advanced Placement an Adequate Program for Gifted Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Shelagh A.

    2009-01-01

    Is it a myth that Advanced Placement (AP) is an adequate program for gifted students? AP is so covered with myths and assumptions that it is hard to get a clear view of the issues. In this article, the author finds the answer about AP by looking at current realties. First, AP is hard for gifted students to avoid. Second, AP never was a program…

  16. Which Food Security Determinants Predict Adequate Vegetable Consumption among Rural Western Australian Children?

    PubMed Central

    Godrich, Stephanie L.; Lo, Johnny; Davies, Christina R.; Darby, Jill; Devine, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Improving the suboptimal vegetable consumption among the majority of Australian children is imperative in reducing chronic disease risk. The objective of this research was to determine whether there was a relationship between food security determinants (FSD) (i.e., food availability, access, and utilisation dimensions) and adequate vegetable consumption among children living in regional and remote Western Australia (WA). Caregiver-child dyads (n = 256) living in non-metropolitan/rural WA completed cross-sectional surveys that included questions on FSD, demographics and usual vegetable intake. A total of 187 dyads were included in analyses, which included descriptive and logistic regression analyses via IBM SPSS (version 23). A total of 13.4% of children in this sample had adequate vegetable intake. FSD that met inclusion criteria (p ≤ 0.20) for multivariable regression analyses included price; promotion; quality; location of food outlets; variety of vegetable types; financial resources; and transport to outlets. After adjustment for potential demographic confounders, the FSD that predicted adequate vegetable consumption were, variety of vegetable types consumed (p = 0.007), promotion (p = 0.017), location of food outlets (p = 0.027), and price (p = 0.043). Food retail outlets should ensure that adequate varieties of vegetable types (i.e., fresh, frozen, tinned) are available, vegetable messages should be promoted through food retail outlets and in community settings, towns should include a range of vegetable purchasing options, increase their reliance on a local food supply and increase transport options to enable affordable vegetable purchasing. PMID:28054955

  17. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Li, Jinyang; Schwab, Mark J.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Taylor, André D.

    2016-10-19

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. But, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. We show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme’s oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociated oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. Our study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage.

  18. Heme biomolecule as redox mediator and oxygen shuttle for efficient charging of lithium-oxygen batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; ...

    2016-10-19

    One of the greatest challenges with lithium-oxygen batteries involves identifying catalysts that facilitate the growth and evolution of cathode species on an oxygen electrode. Heterogeneous solid catalysts cannot adequately address the problematic overpotentials when the surfaces become passivated. But, there exists a class of biomolecules which have been designed by nature to guide complex solution-based oxygen chemistries. We show that the heme molecule, a common porphyrin cofactor in blood, can function as a soluble redox catalyst and oxygen shuttle for efficient oxygen evolution in non-aqueous Li-O2 batteries. The heme’s oxygen binding capability facilitates battery recharge by accepting and releasing dissociatedmore » oxygen species while benefiting charge transfer with the cathode. We reveal the chemical change of heme redox molecules where synergy exists with the electrolyte species. Our study brings focus to the rational design of solution-based catalysts and suggests a sustainable cross-link between biomolecules and advanced energy storage.« less

  19. Global risk assessment of aflatoxins in maize and peanuts: are regulatory standards adequately protective?

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Stacy, Shaina L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America.

  20. Global Risk Assessment of Aflatoxins in Maize and Peanuts: Are Regulatory Standards Adequately Protective?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  1. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-18

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery.

  2. Oil & gas in the 1990`s and beyond: Adequate supplies, growing demand, flat prices

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.L.

    1995-06-01

    Long term petroleum market fundamentals are clear: supplies are adequate and world demand will continue to grow steadily. Adequate supplies insure that prices will not increase significantly, on average, till the end of the 1990`s, probably much beyond. Despite plentiful supply and modest price increases, there will be peaks and valleys in the price graph as productive capacity is used up, then expanded. Tens of billions of dollars will be needed over the next decade to expand producing capacity. World oil consumption will increase at about 1.5% per year, at least for the next decade. Demand in Asia and Latin America will grow several times faster than this average world rate. World natural gas demand will grow at more then 2% per year well past 2000. Oil and gas companies around the world have changed the way they operate to survive the market realities of the 1990`s. restructuring, outsourcing, and partnering will continue as increasing costs and flat prices squeeze profits. Energy use patterns will change. Fuel and other product specifications will change. Market shares of oil and gas will shift. But opportunities abound in this new market environment. Growing markets always provide opportunities. Technology has helped operators dramatically lower finding, developing, and producing costs. The petroleum age is far from being over. Growing markets, adequate supply, affordable products, and a 60% market share. Those are the signs of an industry with a bright future.

  3. Current strategies for the restoration of adequate lordosis during lumbar fusion

    PubMed Central

    Barrey, Cédric; Darnis, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Not restoring the adequate lumbar lordosis during lumbar fusion surgery may result in mechanical low back pain, sagittal unbalance and adjacent segment degeneration. The objective of this work is to describe the current strategies and concepts for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. Theoretical lordosis can be evaluated from the measurement of the pelvic incidence and from the analysis of spatial organization of the lumbar spine with 2/3 of the lordosis given by the L4-S1 segment and 85% by the L3-S1 segment. Technical aspects involve patient positioning on the operating table, release maneuvers, type of instrumentation used (rod, screw-rod connection, interbody cages), surgical sequence and the overall surgical strategy. Spinal osteotomies may be required in case of fixed kyphotic spine. AP combined surgery is particularly efficient in restoring lordosis at L5-S1 level and should be recommended. Finally, not one but several strategies may be used to achieve the need for restoration of adequate lordosis during fusion surgery. PMID:25621216

  4. A test for adequate wastewater treatment based on glutathione S transferase isoenzyme profile.

    PubMed

    Grammou, A; Samaras, P; Papadimitriou, C; Papadopoulos, A I

    2013-04-01

    Discharge to the environment of treated or non-treated municipal wastewater imposes several threats to coastal and estuarine ecosystems which are difficult to assess. In our study we evaluate the use of the isoenzyme profile of glutathione S transferase (GST) in combination with the kinetic characteristics of the whole enzyme and of heme peroxidase, as a test of adequate treatment of municipal wastewater. For this reason, Artemia nauplii were incubated in artificial seawater prepared by wastewater samples, such as secondary municipal effluents produced by a conventional activated sludge unit and advanced treated effluents produced by the employment of coagulation, activated carbon adsorption and chlorination as single processes or as combined ones. Characteristic changes of the isoenzyme pattern and the enzymes' kinetic properties were caused by chlorinated secondary municipal effluent or by secondary non-chlorinated effluent. Advanced treatment by combination of coagulation and/or carbon adsorption resulted to less prominent changes, suggesting more adequate treatment. Our results suggest that GST isoenzyme profile in combination with the kinetic properties of the total enzyme family is a sensitive test for the evaluation of the adequateness of the treatment of reclaimed wastewater and the reduction of potentially harmful compounds. Potentially, it may offer a 'fingerprint' characteristic of a particular effluent and probably of the treatment level it has been subjected.

  5. Oxygen supersaturated fluid using fine micro/nanobubbles

    PubMed Central

    Matsuki, Noriaki; Ishikawa, Takuji; Ichiba, Shingo; Shiba, Naoki; Ujike, Yoshihito; Yamaguchi, Takami

    2014-01-01

    Microbubbles show peculiar properties, such as shrinking collapse, long lifetime, high gas solubility, negative electric charge, and free radical production. Fluids supersaturated with various gases can be easily generated using microbubbles. Oxygen microbubble fluid can be very useful for oxygen delivery to hypoxic tissues. However, there have been no reports of comparative investigations into adding fluids containing oxygen fine micro/nanobubbles (OFM-NBs) to common infusion solutions in daily medical care. In this study, it was demonstrated that OFMNBs can generate oxygen-supersaturated fluids, and they may be sufficiently small to infuse safely into blood vessels. It was found that normal saline solution is preferable for generating an oxygen-rich infusion fluid, which is best administered as a 30-minute intravenous infusion. It was also concluded that dextran solution is suitable for drug delivery substances packing oxygen gas over a 1-hour intravenous infusion. In addition, normal saline solution containing OFMNBs was effective for improving blood oxygenation. Thus, the use of OFMNB-containing fluids is a potentially effective novel method for improving blood oxygenation in cases involving hypoxia, ischemic diseases, infection control, and anticancer chemoradiation therapies. PMID:25285003

  6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002375.htm Hyperbaric oxygen therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy uses a special pressure chamber to increase ...

  7. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  9. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  10. Oxygen boost pump study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An oxygen boost pump is described which can be used to charge the high pressure oxygen tank in the extravehicular activity equipment from spacecraft supply. The only interface with the spacecraft is the +06 6.205 Pa supply line. The breadboard study results and oxygen tank survey are summarized and the results of the flight-type prototype design and analysis are presented.

  11. Oxygen sensitive microwells.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David T

    2010-12-07

    Oxygen tension is critical in a number of cell pathways but is often overlooked in cell culture. One reason for this is the difficulty in modulating and assessing oxygen tensions without disturbing the culture conditions. Toward this end, a simple method to generate oxygen-sensitive microwells was developed through embossing polystyrene (PS) and platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone (PtOEPK) thin films. In addition to monitoring the oxygen tension, microwells were employed in order to isolate uniform clusters of cells in microwells. The depth and width of the microwells can be adapted to different experimental parameters easily by altering the thin film processing or embossing stamp geometries. The thin oxygen sensitive microwell substrate is also compatible with high magnification modalities such as confocal imaging. The incorporation of the oxygen sensor into the microwells produces measurements of the oxygen tension near the cell surface. The oxygen sensitive microwells were calibrated and used to monitor oxygen tensions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells (MDCKs) cultured at high and low densities as a proof of concept. Wells 500 µm in diameter seeded with an average of 330 cells exhibited an oxygen level of 12.6% whereas wells seeded with an average of 20 cells per well exhibited an oxygen level of 19.5%, a 35.7% difference. This platform represents a new tool for culturing cells in microwells in a format amenable to high magnification imaging while monitoring the oxygen state of the culture media.

  12. Indicators: Dissolved Oxygen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is the amount of oxygen that is present in water. It is an important measure of water quality as it indicates a water body's ability to support aquatic life. Water bodies receive oxygen from the atmosphere and from aquatic plants.

  13. Hypoxemia (Low Blood Oxygen)

    MedlinePlus

    Symptoms Hypoxemia (low blood oxygen) By Mayo Clinic Staff Hypoxemia is a below-normal level of oxygen in your blood, specifically in the arteries. Hypoxemia ... of breath. Hypoxemia is determined by measuring the oxygen level in a blood sample taken from an ...

  14. Delivery of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barratt, M. R.; Billica, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The microgravity environment presents several challenges for delivering effective cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Chest compressions must be driven by muscular force rather than by the weight of the rescuer's upper torso. Airway stabilization is influenced by the neutral body posture. Rescuers will consist of crew members of varying sizes and degrees of physical deconditioning from space flight. Several methods of CPR designed to accommodate these factors were tested in the one G environment, in parabolic flight, and on a recent shuttle flight. Methods: Utilizing study participants of varying sizes, different techniques of CPR delivery were evaluated using a recording CPR manikin to assess adequacy of compressive force and frequency. Under conditions of parabolic flight, methods tested included conventional positioning of rescuer and victim, free floating 'Heimlich type' compressions, straddling the patient with active and passive restraints, and utilizing a mechanical cardiac compression assist device (CCAD). Multiple restrain systems and ventilation methods were also assessed. Results: Delivery of effective CPR was possible in all configurations tested. Reliance on muscular force alone was quickly fatiguing to the rescuer. Effectiveness of CPR was dependent on technique, adequate restraint of the rescuer and patient, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR was adequate but rapidly fatiguing. The CCAD was able to provide adequate compressive force but positioning was problematic. Conclusions: Delivery of effective CPR in microgravity will be dependent on adequate resuer and patient restraint, technique, and rescuer size and preference. Free floating CPR may be employed as a stop gap method until patient restraint is available. Development of an adequate CCAD would be desirable to compensate for the effects of deconditioning.

  15. Patterns of dissolved oxygen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest slough and tide channel.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and tide channels are habitats or migratory corridors for societally prized salmonids. These fish have high oxygen requirements, and an adequate level of dissolved oxygen is considered an important gauge of a PNW water body’s condition. W...

  16. Patterns of dissolved oxygen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest slough and tide channel - CERF 2015

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pacific Northwest (PNW) estuaries and tide channels are habitats or migratory corridors for societally prized salmonids. These fish have high oxygen requirements, and an adequate level of dissolved oxygen is considered an important gauge of a PNW water body’s condition. W...

  17. Visible light optical coherence tomography measure retinal oxygen metabolic response to systemic oxygenation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Ji; Liu, Wenzhong; Chen, Siyu; Backman, Vadim; Sheibani, Nader; Sorenson, Christine M.; Fawzi, Amani A.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Zhang, Hao F.

    2016-03-01

    The lack of capability to quantify oxygen metabolism noninvasively impedes both fundamental investigation and clinical diagnosis of a wide spectrum of diseases including all the major blinding diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Using visible light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we demonstrated accurate and robust measurement of retinal oxygen metabolic rate (rMRO2) noninvasively in rat eyes. The rMRO2 was calculated by concurrent measurement of blood flow and blood oxygen saturation (sO2). Blood flow was calculated by the principle of Doppler optical coherence tomography, where the phase shift between two closely spaced A-lines measures the axial velocity. The distinct optical absorption spectra of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin provided the contrast for sO2 measurement, combined with the spectroscopic analysis of vis-OCT signal within the blood vessels. We continuously monitored the regulatory response of oxygen consumption to a progressive hypoxic challenge. We found that both oxygen delivery, and rMRO2 increased from the highly regulated retinal circulation (RC) under hypoxia, by 0.28+/-0.08 μL/min (p<0.001), and 0.20+/-0.04 μL/min (p<0.001) per 100 mmHg systemic pO2 reduction, respectively. The increased oxygen extraction compensated for the deficient oxygen supply from the poorly regulated choroidal circulation (CC).

  18. Precision delivery of unguided submunitions from a tactical standoff missile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrich, R. D.; Beaty, J. R.

    1986-06-01

    The extension of a low cost tactical weapon to missions involving area targets requires the accurate dispensing of unguided submunitions. For a terminally guided weapon, proportional navigation can no longer be used, since it cannot compensate for the ballistics of the submunition. A terminal guidance algorithm was developed to control the weapon trajectory between the midcourse flight path and the point of dispense. The algorithm incorporates submunition drag characteristics to assure high accuracy. The algorithm also assures adequate arming time for the submunitions and adequate time for the pattern to develop. The second element of accurate submunition delivery is the dispensing or expulsion mechanism, which ejects the payload out of the canister. The ejection mechanism must provide the desired pattern size, shape, and density. Air bag technology is employed to assure satisfactory ejection forces with adequate repeatability. The current study is theoretical in nature, relying on digital simulation to substantiate conclusions on patterns and accuracy.

  19. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; X.-D Zhou; Q. Cai; J. Yang; W.B. Yelon; W.J. James; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2004-05-01

    the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  20. What happens to plant mitochondria under low oxygen? An omics review of the responses to low oxygen and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Shingaki-Wells, Rachel; Millar, A Harvey; Whelan, James; Narsai, Reena

    2014-10-01

    Floods can rapidly submerge plants, limiting oxygen to the extent that oxidative phosphorylation no longer generates adequate ATP supplies. Low-oxygen tolerant plants, such as rice, are able to adequately respond to low oxygen by successfully remodelling primary and mitochondrial metabolism to partially counteract the energy crisis that ensues. In this review, we discuss how plants respond to low-oxygen stress at the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomic and enzyme activity levels, particularly focusing on mitochondria and interacting pathways. The role of reactive oxygen species and nitrite as an alternative electron acceptor as well as their links to respiratory chain components is discussed. By making intra-kingdom as well as cross-kingdom comparisons, conserved mechanisms of anoxia tolerance are highlighted as well as tolerance mechanisms that are specific to anoxia-tolerant rice during germination and in coleoptiles. We discuss reoxygenation as an often overlooked, yet essential stage of this environmental stress and consider the possibility that changes occurring during low oxygen may also provide benefits upon re-aeration. Finally, we consider what it takes to be low-oxygen tolerant and argue that alternative mechanisms of ATP production, glucose signalling, starch/sucrose signalling as well as reverse metabolism of fermentation end products promote the survival of rice after this debilitating stress.

  1. Singlet oxygen in photosensitization.

    PubMed

    Moan, Johan; Juzenas, Petras

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen is a ubiquitous element and a vitally important substance for life on the Earth, and especially for human life. Living organisms need oxygen for most, if not all, of their cellular functions. On the other hand, oxygen can produce metabolites that are toxic and potentially lethal to the same cells. Being reactive and chemically unstable reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the most important metabolites that initiate reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions under physiological conditions. Oxygen in its excited singlet state (1O2) is probably the most important intermediate in such reactions. Since the discovery of oxygen by Joseph Priestley in 1775 it has been recognized that oxygen can be both beneficial and harmful to life.

  2. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  3. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  4. Oxygen, ecology, and the Cambrian radiation of animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Erik A.; Frieder, Christina A.; Raman, Akkur V.; Girguis, Peter R.; Levin, Lisa A.; Knoll, Andrew H.

    2013-08-01

    The Proterozoic-Cambrian transition records the appearance of essentially all animal body plans (phyla), yet to date no single hypothesis adequately explains both the timing of the event and the evident increase in diversity and disparity. Ecological triggers focused on escalatory predator-prey "arms races" can explain the evolutionary pattern but not its timing, whereas environmental triggers, particularly ocean/atmosphere oxygenation, do the reverse. Using modern oxygen minimum zones as an analog for Proterozoic oceans, we explore the effect of low oxygen levels on the feeding ecology of polychaetes, the dominant macrofaunal animals in deep-sea sediments. Here we show that low oxygen is clearly linked to low proportions of carnivores in a community and low diversity of carnivorous taxa, whereas higher oxygen levels support more complex food webs. The recognition of a physiological control on carnivory therefore links environmental triggers and ecological drivers, providing an integrated explanation for both the pattern and timing of Cambrian animal radiation.

  5. Oxygen, ecology, and the Cambrian radiation of animals.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Erik A; Frieder, Christina A; Raman, Akkur V; Girguis, Peter R; Levin, Lisa A; Knoll, Andrew H

    2013-08-13

    The Proterozoic-Cambrian transition records the appearance of essentially all animal body plans (phyla), yet to date no single hypothesis adequately explains both the timing of the event and the evident increase in diversity and disparity. Ecological triggers focused on escalatory predator-prey "arms races" can explain the evolutionary pattern but not its timing, whereas environmental triggers, particularly ocean/atmosphere oxygenation, do the reverse. Using modern oxygen minimum zones as an analog for Proterozoic oceans, we explore the effect of low oxygen levels on the feeding ecology of polychaetes, the dominant macrofaunal animals in deep-sea sediments. Here we show that low oxygen is clearly linked to low proportions of carnivores in a community and low diversity of carnivorous taxa, whereas higher oxygen levels support more complex food webs. The recognition of a physiological control on carnivory therefore links environmental triggers and ecological drivers, providing an integrated explanation for both the pattern and timing of Cambrian animal radiation.

  6. International Space Station United States Oxygen Generator Development Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Robert J.; Mason, Richard K.

    2000-01-01

    A life test of a liquid anode feed oxygen generator assembly (OGA) using SPE(R) (United Technologies Corporation, Hamilton Sundstrand Division) membrane technology was terminated in June of 1999. In the total 15,658 hours of operation at MSFC since delivery in 1995, the OGA has produced 2,103 kilograms (kg) (4,632 pounds mass (lbm)) of oxygen, and 263 kg (579 lbm) of hydrogen. Evaluation of cell stack characteristics and oxygen and hydrogen hydrophilic/hydrophobic membrane separators will be discussed.

  7. Clinical review: use of venous oxygen saturations as a goal - a yet unfinished puzzle.

    PubMed

    van Beest, Paul; Wietasch, Götz; Scheeren, Thomas; Spronk, Peter; Kuiper, Michaël

    2011-01-01

    Shock is defined as global tissue hypoxia secondary to an imbalance between systemic oxygen delivery and oxygen demand. Venous oxygen saturations represent this relationship between oxygen delivery and oxygen demand and can therefore be used as an additional parameter to detect an impaired cardiorespiratory reserve. Before appropriate use of venous oxygen saturations, however, one should be aware of the physiology. Although venous oxygen saturation has been the subject of research for many years, increasing interest arose especially in the past decade for its use as a therapeutic goal in critically ill patients and during the perioperative period. Also, there has been debate on differences between mixed and central venous oxygen saturation and their interchangeability. Both mixed and central venous oxygen saturation are clinically useful but both variables should be used with insightful knowledge and caution. In general, low values warn the clinician about cardiocirculatory or metabolic impairment and should urge further diagnostics and appropriate action, whereas normal or high values do not rule out persistent tissue hypoxia. The use of venous oxygen saturations seems especially useful in the early phase of disease or injury. Whether venous oxygen saturations should be measured continuously remains unclear. Especially, continuous measurement of central venous oxygen saturation as part of the treatment protocol has been shown a valuable strategy in the emergency department and in cardiac surgery. In clinical practice, venous oxygen saturations should always be used in combination with vital signs and other relevant endpoints.

  8. Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Iouri Balachov, PhD

    2007-10-15

    In response to DOE's Solicitation for Grant Applications DE-PS36-03GO93007, 'Hydrogen Production and Delivery Research', SRI International (SRI) proposed to conduct work under Technical Topic Area 5, Advanced Electrolysis Systems; Sub-Topic 5B, High-Temperature Steam Electrolysis. We proposed to develop a prototype of a modular industrial system for low-cost generation of H{sub 2} (<$2/kg) by steam electrolysis with anodic depolarization by CO. Water will be decomposed electrochemically into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} on the cathode side of a high-temperature electrolyzer. Oxygen ions will migrate through an oxygen-ion-conductive solid oxide electrolyte. Gas mixtures on the cathode side (H{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O) and on the anode side (CO + CO{sub 2}) will be reliably separated by the solid electrolyte. Depolarization of the anodic process will decrease the electrolysis voltage, and thus the electricity required for H{sub 2} generation and the cost of produced H{sub 2}. The process is expected to be at least 10 times more energy-efficient than low-temperature electrolysis and will generate H{sub 2} at a cost of approximately $1-$1.5/kg. The operating economics of the system can be made even more attractive by deploying it at locations where waste heat is available; using waste heat would reduce the electricity required for heating the system. Two critical targets must be achieved: an H{sub 2} production cost below $2/kg, and scalable design of the pilot H{sub 2} generation system. The project deliverables would be (1) a pilot electrolysis system for H{sub 2} generation, (2) an economic analysis, (3) a market analysis, and (4) recommendations and technical documentation for field deployment. DOE was able to provide only 200K out of 1.8M (or about 10% of awarded budget), so project was stopped abruptly.

  9. Are the current Australian sun exposure guidelines effective in maintaining adequate levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D?

    PubMed

    Kimlin, Michael; Sun, Jiandong; Sinclair, Craig; Heward, Sue; Hill, Jane; Dunstone, Kimberley; Brodie, Alison

    2016-01-01

    An adequate vitamin D status, as measured by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration, is important in humans for maintenance of healthy bones and muscle function. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was assessed in participants from Melbourne, Australia (37.81S, 144.96E), who were provided with the current Australian guidelines on sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy (25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L). Participants were interviewed in February (summer, n=104) and August (winter, n=99) of 2013. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was examined as a function of measures of sun exposure and sun protection habits with control of key characteristics such as dietary intake of vitamin D, body mass index (BMI) and skin colour, that may modify this relationship. The mean 25(OH)D concentration in participants who complied with the current sun exposure guidelines was 67.3 nmol/L in summer and 41.9 nmol/L in winter. At the end of the study, 69.3% of participants who complied with the summer sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate, while only 27.6% of participants who complied with the winter sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate at the end of the study. The results suggest that the current Australian guidelines for sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy are effective for most in summer and ineffective for most in winter. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  10. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8–10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100–199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  11. The Nigerian health care system: Need for integrating adequate medical intelligence and surveillance systems

    PubMed Central

    Welcome, Menizibeya Osain

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: As an important element of national security, public health not only functions to provide adequate and timely medical care but also track, monitor, and control disease outbreak. The Nigerian health care had suffered several infectious disease outbreaks year after year. Hence, there is need to tackle the problem. This study aims to review the state of the Nigerian health care system and to provide possible recommendations to the worsening state of health care in the country. To give up-to-date recommendations for the Nigerian health care system, this study also aims at reviewing the dynamics of health care in the United States, Britain, and Europe with regards to methods of medical intelligence/surveillance. Materials and Methods: Databases were searched for relevant literatures using the following keywords: Nigerian health care, Nigerian health care system, and Nigerian primary health care system. Additional keywords used in the search were as follows: United States (OR Europe) health care dynamics, Medical Intelligence, Medical Intelligence systems, Public health surveillance systems, Nigerian medical intelligence, Nigerian surveillance systems, and Nigerian health information system. Literatures were searched in scientific databases Pubmed and African Journals OnLine. Internet searches were based on Google and Search Nigeria. Results: Medical intelligence and surveillance represent a very useful component in the health care system and control diseases outbreak, bioattack, etc. There is increasing role of automated-based medical intelligence and surveillance systems, in addition to the traditional manual pattern of document retrieval in advanced medical setting such as those in western and European countries. Conclusion: The Nigerian health care system is poorly developed. No adequate and functional surveillance systems are developed. To achieve success in health care in this modern era, a system well grounded in routine surveillance and medical

  12. Nanomedicine in pulmonary delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Heidi M; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Wu, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The lung is an attractive target for drug delivery due to noninvasive administration via inhalation aerosols, avoidance of first-pass metabolism, direct delivery to the site of action for the treatment of respiratory diseases, and the availability of a huge surface area for local drug action and systemic absorption of drug. Colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery offer many advantages such as the potential to achieve relatively uniform distribution of drug dose among the alveoli, achievement of improved solubility of the drug from its own aqueous solubility, a sustained drug release which consequently reduces dosing frequency, improves patient compliance, decreases incidence of side effects, and the potential of drug internalization by cells. This review focuses on the current status and explores the potential of colloidal carriers (ie, nanocarrier systems) in pulmonary drug delivery with special attention to their pharmaceutical aspects. Manufacturing processes, in vitro/in vivo evaluation methods, and regulatory/toxicity issues of nanomedicines in pulmonary delivery are also discussed. PMID:20054434

  13. Nebulized antibiotics. An adequate option for treating ventilator-associated respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Barcenilla, F

    2015-03-01

    Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) is a frequent complication in critical patients. The 90% of those who develop it receive broad-spectrum antibiotic (ATB) treatment, without any strong evidence of its favorable impact. The use of nebulized ATB could be a valid treatment option, to reduce the use of systemic ATB and the pressure of selection on the local flora. Several studies suggest that an adequate nebulization technique can ensure high levels of ATB even in areas of lung consolidation, and to obtain clinical and microbiological cure. New studies are needed to properly assess the impact of treatment with nebulized ATB on the emergence of resistance.

  14. Computer synthesis of human motion as a part of an adequate motion analysis experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexandre A.; Sholukha, Victor A.; Zinkovsky, Anatoly V.

    1999-05-01

    The role of problem of computer synthesis of a human motion for a traditional problem of control generalized and muscular forces determination is discussed. It is emphasized significance of computer model choice for adequate analysis kinematic and dynamic experimental data. On the basis of an imitation computer model influence of model's parameters values is demonstrated. With help of non-stationary constraints we can simulate human motions that satisfy to the most significant parameters of the concerned class of motion. Some results of simulation are discussed. We arrive at a conclusion that for correct interpretation of an experiment mixed problem of bodies system dynamics must be solved.

  15. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly...

  16. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  17. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly...

  18. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices, and Surgical Dressings § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is...

  19. 42 CFR 414.226 - Oxygen and oxygen equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oxygen and oxygen equipment. 414.226 Section 414... Equipment and Prosthetic and Orthotic Devices § 414.226 Oxygen and oxygen equipment. (a) Payment rules—(1) Oxygen equipment. Payment for rental of oxygen equipment is made based on a monthly fee schedule...

  20. Recent advances in liposome surface modification for oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Xuan; Huang, Lin; Gauthier, Mario; Yang, Guang; Wang, Qun

    2016-05-01

    Oral delivery via the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the dominant route for drug administration. Orally delivered liposomal carriers can enhance drug solubility and protect the encapsulated theraputic agents from the extreme conditions found in the GI tract. Liposomes, with their fluid lipid bilayer membrane and their nanoscale size, can significantly improve oral absorption. Unfortunately, the clinical applications of conventional liposomes have been hindered due to their poor stability and availability under the harsh conditions typically presented in the GI tract. To overcome this problem, the surface modification of liposomes has been investigated. Although liposome surface modification has been extensively studied for oral drug delivery, no review exists so far that adequately covers this topic. The purpose of this paper is to summarize and critically analyze emerging trends in liposome surface modification for oral drug delivery.

  1. Transcutaneous antigen delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi-Young; Shin, Meong-Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization refers to the topical application of antigens onto the epidermis. Transcutaneous immunization targeting the Langerhans cells of the skin has received much attention due to its safe, needle-free, and noninvasive antigen delivery. The skin has important immunological functions with unique roles for antigen-presenting cells such as epidermal Langerhans cells and dermal dendritic cells. In recent years, novel vaccine delivery strategies have continually been developed; however, transcutaneous immunization has not yet been fully exploited due to the penetration barrier represented by the stratum corneum, which inhibits the transport of antigens and adjuvants. Herein we review recent achievements in transcutaneous immunization, focusing on the various strategies for the enhancement of antigen delivery and vaccination efficacy. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(1): 17-24] PMID:23351379

  2. Metrology for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Peter; Klein, Stephan

    2015-08-01

    In various recently published studies, it is argued that there are underestimated risks with infusion technology, i.e., adverse incidents believed to be caused by inadequate administration of the drugs. This is particularly the case for applications involving very low-flow rates, i.e., <1 ml/h and applications involving drug delivery by means of multiple pumps. The risks in infusing are caused by a lack of awareness, incompletely understood properties of the complete drug delivery system and a lack of a proper metrological infrastructure for low-flow rates. Technical challenges such as these were the reason a European research project "Metrology for Drug Delivery" was started in 2011. In this special issue of Biomedical Engineering, the results of that project are discussed.

  3. Modulating temporal and spatial oxygenation over adherent cellular cultures.

    PubMed

    Oppegard, Shawn C; Nam, Ki-Hwan; Carr, Janai R; Skaalure, Stacey C; Eddington, David T

    2009-09-03

    Oxygen is a key modulator of many cellular pathways, but current devices permitting in vitro oxygen modulation fail to meet the needs of biomedical research. A microfabricated insert for multiwell plates has been developed to more effectively control the temporal and spatial oxygen concentration to better model physiological phenomena found in vivo. The platform consists of a polydimethylsiloxane insert that nests into a standard multiwell plate and serves as a passive microfluidic gas network with a gas-permeable membrane aimed to modulate oxygen delivery to adherent cells. Equilibration time is on the order of minutes and a wide variety of oxygen profiles can be attained based on the device design, such as the cyclic profile achieved in this study, and even oxygen gradients to mimic those found in vivo. The proper biological consequences of the device's oxygen delivery were confirmed in cellular models via a proliferation assay and western analysis of the upregulation of hypoxia inducible transcription factor-1alpha. These experiments serve as a demonstration for the platform as a viable tool to increase experimental throughput and permit novel experimental possibilities in any biomedical research lab.

  4. The effect of hyperbaric oxygen on severe anemia.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Keith W

    2012-01-01

    As a respiratory pigment, hemoglobin allows blood to carry unnaturally high levels of nascent, molecular oxygen at one atmosphere of pressure in chemical solution to capillary beds and post-capillary venules supplying parenchymal cells of all organ systems in the body. When hemoglobin drops to critical levels to disallow proper oxygen delivery, hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be used as bridge therapy to emergently supply oxygen. Hyperbaric-administered oxygen allows oxygen to be dissolved in increased concentration in red blood cell-poor plasma or crystalloid/ colloid-diluted intravascular fluids in a volume-resuscitated patient. Additionally in both subacutely and chronically anemic patients, pulsed, intermittently provided normobaric or hyperbaric oxygen induces an increase in red blood cell/hemoglobic mass. Transfusions of separate donor red blood cells are transplantations of tissue not uncomplicated by immunomodulatory reactions. In the long term, autologous blood products may be less problematic than transfused, homologous packed red blood cells to reduce patient oxygen debt in illness or injury. Hyperbaric oxygen can reduce oxygen debt decisively in the polar clinical extremes of exsanguination with cardiopulmonary arrest all the way to resuscitation of the severely anemic patient who cannot be transfused with red blood cells for religious reasons, immunologic reasons, or blood availability problems. A hyperbaric oxygen treatment is equivalent in wholesale cost to a unit of packed red blood cells in the western world. By controversy, but true, hyperbaric oxygen provides a low-technology, cost-competitive means of pharmacologically reducing accumulated oxygen debt in the anemic, injured or critically ill patient with little side effect. To address severe anemia in trauma or illness, the future may well afford the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the military far-forward, in pre-hospital EMS settings, in trauma center emergency departments, in operative and

  5. The lung mechanical behavior change with 100% oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hsuan-Tso

    In medicine, delivery of hyperbaric oxygen to the lung is necessary and quite common to use for critical care. However, it is known that too much oxygen, under different conditions, can be toxic. For example, at an oxygen fraction of 50% at normal atmospheric pressure, the alveoli will show damage after long periods of exposure (several hours). Prolonged or high oxygen concentrations (up to 50%) can cause oxidative damage to cell membranes, the collapse of the alveoli in the lungs, retinal detachment, and seizures. Oxygen toxicity is managed by reducing the exposure to elevated oxygen levels. The possible mechanisms of oxygen toxicity are not fully understood, but the two main hypotheses in literature are direct point out cellular damage or surfactant dysfunction. Most previous studies have focused on long-term (greater than 4 hours) exposure and the effects on lung. Very little is known regarding the short-term effects of oxygen on lung. In this study, we choose to investigate short-term (five tidal volume) changes in lung under oxygen. To test this, we measured any sensitive mechanical behavior change in the lung using indentation. In the experiments, we measured excised mammalian lungs inflated with air or 100% oxygen, to different pressure (4, 12, 25cmH2O) and different indenter displacement (1, 2, 3mm). Our results show the lung becomes stiffer even when exposed to oxygen in the short term. In addition, inflating air again, the lung mechanical property shows some reversible behavior. This phenomenon is more obvious at low inflation pressure than in high pressure after exposure oxygen. We suggest that pulmonary surfactant plays an important role in the observed change. Also, we can say that the exposure time for oxygen toxicity to occur could be shorted that previously thought short-term. This conclusion is important to understand and accommodate oxygen toxicity in the lung.

  6. [Incidence of primary malignant lesions in clinically benign teratoma: on the problem of adequate surgical procedure].

    PubMed

    Kindermann, G; Jung, E M; Maassen, V; Bise, K

    1996-08-01

    The Problem of an Adequate Surgical Approach: Frequency of malignant teratomas is, according to the literature, 2%-10%. Examining 194 own cases (1983-1993) it was 1.5%. We found one squamous cell carcinoma (0.5%). Additionally we found 2 immature teratomas (1%). We point out the different biological behaviour of malignant mature teratomas and immature teratomas. We agree with the majority of authors that the method of choice is the intact removal of all teratomas without iatrogen rupture or contamination of the abdominal cavity by contents of the teratoma. This adequate surgical procedure can and should be performed by laparotomy or laparoscopy with endobag. The often practised method of cutting open the cyst during laparoscopy, sucking off the contents or cutting the teratoma into pieces, has been proven to lead to implantation and worsening the prognosis in case of a malignant teratoma. Even the rinsing of the abdominal cavity, usually carried out with this method, could not compensate always for the disadvantage of this "dirty" endoscopical method compared with usual oncological standards. This is pointed out by case reports in the literature and the first analysis of a German survey with early-follow-up of 192 laparoscopically managed ovarian malignancies [11a]. The principle of intact removal of every teratoma should again be kept in mind.

  7. MRI can determine the adequate area for debridement in the case of Fournier's gangrene.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Akira; Fujita, Fumihiko; Tokai, Hirotaka; Ito, Yuichiro; Haraguchi, Masashi; Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    A 57-year-old man was transferred to our hospital because of gluteal pain. His right buttock had flare and swelling. Complete blood count showed leukocytosis, and renal failure was evident. Pelvic computed tomography (CT) revealed that the abscess, including gas, was widespread into the hypodermal tissue of the right buttock. Fournier's gangrene had been suspected, and immediate drainage was performed on the right buttock. The symptom and the condition improved rapidly, but on the day after the operation, the patient became drowsy and fell into endotoxic shock. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed strong inflammation along the entire fascia of the right femur and necrotizing fasciitis. MRI was very useful for identification of the necrotic range. Immediately, an emergency operation was performed; 3 wide incisions were made on the right thigh and crus for drainage. The patient was cared for intensively under a sedated condition, and irrigation and debridement were repeated every day. Culture of the pus revealed mixed infection of Escherichia coli and anaerobic bacteria, and a large quantity of antimicrobial drug was used. The inflammatory reaction decreased, and the patient's general condition tentatively improved. With Fournier's gangrene, initiating adequate surgical and medical treatment is essential. Therefore, MRI should be used in the early exact diagnosis of this disease to obtain knowledge of the extent of necrosis and to determine the adequate area for debridement.

  8. Duration of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Infectiousness under Adequate Therapy, as Assessed Using Induced Sputum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yousang; Shin, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Lee, Young Seok; Lee, Suh-Young; Park, So Young; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Changhwan

    2017-01-01

    Background A sputum culture is the most reliable indicator of the infectiousness of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB); however, a spontaneous sputum specimen may not be suitable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the infectious period in patients with non–drug-resistant (DR) PTB receiving adequate standard chemotherapy, using induced sputum (IS) specimens. Methods We evaluated the duration of infectiousness of PTB using a retrospective cohort design. Results Among the 35 patients with PTB, 22 were smear-positive. The rates of IS culture positivity from baseline to the sixth week of anti-tuberculosis medication in the smear-positive PTB group were 100%, 100%, 91%, 73%, 36%, and 18%, respectively. For smear-positive PTB cases, the median time of conversion to culture negativity was 35.0 days (range, 28.0–42.0 days). In the smear-negative PTB group (n=13), the weekly rates of positive IS culture were 100%, 77%, 39%, 8%, 0%, and 0%, respectively, and the median time to conversion to culture-negative was 21.0 days (range, 17.5–28.0 days). Conclusion The infectiousness of PTB, under adequate therapy, may persist longer than previously reported, even in patients with non-DR PTB. PMID:28119744

  9. Narita Target Heart Rate Equation Underestimates the Predicted Adequate Exercise Level in Sedentary Young Boys

    PubMed Central

    Siahkouhian, Marefat; Khodadadi, Davar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Optimal training intensity and the adequate exercise level for physical fitness is one of the most important interests of coaches and sports physiologists. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of the Narita et al target heart rate equation for the adequate exercise training level in sedentary young boys. Methods Forty two sedentary young boys (19.07±1.16 years) undertook a blood lactate transition threshold maximal treadmill test to volitional exhaustion with continuous respiratory gas measurements according to the Craig method. The anaerobic threshold (AT) of the participants then was calculated using the Narita target heart rate equation. Results Hopkin's spreadsheet to obtain confidence limit and the chance of the true difference between gas measurements and Narita target heart rate equation revealed that the Narita equation most likely underestimates the measured anaerobic threshold in sedentary young boys (168.76±15 vs. 130.08±14.36) (Difference ±90% confidence limit: 38.1±18). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed a poor agreement between the criterion method and Narita equation (ICC= 0.03). Conclusion According to the results, the Narita equation underestimates the measured AT. It seems that the Narita equation is a good predictor of aerobic not AT which can be investigated in the future studies. PMID:24427475

  10. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently and the ventilation flow is adequate for maintaining CO2 washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, testing planned in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing. 1

  11. Sublingual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Tarun; Jasti, Bhaskara; Li, Xiaoling

    2008-01-01

    The sublingual route is one of the early modes of administration for systemic drug delivery. This route avoids first-pass metabolism and affords quick drug entry into the systemic circulation. Attempts have been made to deliver various pharmacologically active agents, such as cardiovascular drugs, analgesics, and peptides, across the sublingual mucosa. In this review, the anatomical structure, blood supply, biochemical composition, transport pathways, permeation enhancement strategies, in vitro/in vivo models, and clinical investigations for the sublingual route of drug delivery is discussed.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy and preconditioning for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng-li; Feng, Hua; Xi, Guo-hua

    2016-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic methods for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke are still limited. The lack of oxygen supply is critical for brain injury following stroke. Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO), an approach through a process in which patients breathe in 100% pure oxygen at over 101 kPa, has been shown to facilitate oxygen delivery and increase oxygen supply. Hence, HBO possesses the potentials to produce beneficial effects on stroke. Actually, accumulated basic and clinical evidences have demonstrated that HBO therapy and preconditioning could induce neuroprotective functions via different mechanisms. Nevertheless, the lack of clinical translational study limits the application of HBO. More translational studies and clinical trials are needed in the future to develop effective HBO protocols. PMID:28217297

  13. Mapping tissue oxygen in vivo by photoacoustic lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qi; Morgounova, Ekaterina; Choi, Jeung-Hwan; Jiang, Chunlan; Bischof, John; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2013-03-01

    Oxygen plays a key role in the energy metabolism of living organisms. Any imbalance in the oxygen levels will affect the metabolic homeostasis and lead to pathophysiological diseases. Hypoxia, a status of low tissue oxygen, is a key factor in tumor biology as it is highly prominent in tumor tissues. However, clinical tools for assessing tissue oxygenation are limited. The gold standard is polarographic needle electrode which is invasive and not capable of mapping (imaging) the oxygen content in tissue. We applied the method of photoacoustic lifetime imaging (PALI) of oxygen-sensitive dye to small animal tissue hypoxia research. PALI is new technology for direct, non-invasive imaging of oxygen. The technique is based on mapping the oxygen-dependent transient optical absorption of Methylene Blue (MB) by pump-probe photoacoustic imaging. Our studies show the feasibility of imaging of dissolved oxygen distribution in phantoms. In vivo experiments demonstrate that the hypoxia region is consistent with the site of subcutaneously xenografted prostate tumor in mice with adequate spatial resolution and penetration depth.

  14. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  15. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  16. Integrated turbomachine oxygen plant

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; DePuy, Richard Anthony; Muthaiah, Veerappan

    2014-06-17

    An integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes a turbomachine and an air separation unit. One or more compressor pathways flow compressed air from a compressor through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. An air separation unit is operably connected to the one or more compressor pathways and is configured to separate the compressed air into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air. A method of air separation in an integrated turbomachine oxygen plant includes compressing a flow of air in a compressor of a turbomachine. The compressed flow of air is flowed through one or more of a combustor and a turbine expander of the turbomachine to cool the combustor and/or the turbine expander. The compressed flow of air is directed to an air separation unit and is separated into oxygen and oxygen-depleted air.

  17. Oxygen, a paradoxical element?

    PubMed

    Greabu, Maria; Battino, M; Mohora, Maria; Olinescu, R; Totan, Alexandra; Didilescu, Andreea

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen is an essential element for life on earth. No life may exist without oxygen. But in the last forty years, conclusive evidence demonstrated the double-edge sword of this element. In certain conditions, oxygen may produce reactive species, even free radicals. More, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) takes place everywhere: in air, nature or inside human bodies. The paradox of oxygen atom is entirely due to its peculiar electronic structure. But life began on earth, only when nature found efficient weapons against ROS, these antioxidants, which all creatures are extensibly endowed with. The consequences of oxygen activation in human bodies are only partly known, in spite of extensive scientific research on theoretical, experimental and clinical domains.

  18. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOEpatents

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  19. Continuous home oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ruiz, Francisco; Díaz Lobato, Salvador; Galdiz Iturri, Juan Bautista; García Rio, Francisco; Güell Rous, Rosa; Morante Velez, Fátima; Puente Maestu, Luis; Tàrrega Camarasa, Julia

    2014-05-01

    Oxygen therapy is defined as the therapeutic use of oxygen and consists of administering oxygen at higher concentrations than those found in room air, with the aim of treating or preventing hypoxia. This therapeutic intervention has been shown to increase survival in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and respiratory failure. Although this concept has been extended by analogy to chronic respiratory failure caused by respiratory and non-respiratory diseases, continuous oxygen therapy has not been shown to be effective in other disorders. Oxygen therapy has not been shown to improve survival in patients with COPD and moderate hypoxaemia, nor is there consensus regarding its use during nocturnal desaturations in COPD or desaturations caused by effort. The choice of the oxygen source must be made on the basis of criteria such as technical issues, patient comfort and adaptability and cost. Flow must be adjusted to achieve appropriate transcutaneous oxyhaemoglobin saturation correction.

  20. Systems and Components Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Systems and Components - Fuel Delivery System, Water Delivery System, Derrick Crane System, and Crane System Details - Marshall Space Flight Center, F-1 Engine Static Test Stand, On Route 565 between Huntsville and Decatur, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  1. Atomic Oxygen Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sharon K. R.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic oxygen, which is the most predominant species in low Earth orbit, is highly reactive and can break chemical bonds on the surface of a wide variety of materials leading to volatilization or surface oxidation which can result in failure of spacecraft materials and components. This presentation will give an overview of how atomic oxygen reacts with spacecraft materials, results of space exposure testing of a variety of materials, and examples of failures caused by atomic oxygen.

  2. Inner retinal oxygen metabolism in the 50/10 oxygen-induced retinopathy model

    PubMed Central

    Soetikno, Brian T.; Yi, Ji; Shah, Ronil; Liu, Wenzhong; Purta, Patryk; Zhang, Hao F.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) represents a major cause of childhood vision loss worldwide. The 50/10 oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model mimics the findings of ROP, including peripheral vascular attenuation and neovascularization. The oxygen metabolism of the inner retina has not been previously explored in this model. Using visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT), we measured the oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and blood flow within inner retinal vessels, enabling us to compute the inner retinal oxygen delivery (irDO2) and metabolic rate of oxygen (irMRO2). We compared these measurements between age-matched room-air controls and rats with 50/10 OIR on postnatal day 18. To account for a 61% decrease in the irDO2 in the OIR group, we found an overall statistically significant decrease in retinal vascular density affecting the superficial and deep retinal vascular capillary networks in rats with OIR compared to controls. Furthermore, matching the reduced irDO2, we found a 59% decrease in irMRO2, which we correlated with a statistically significant reduction in retinal thickness in the OIR group, suggesting that the decreased irMRO2 was due to decreased neuronal oxygen utilization. By exploring these biological and metabolic changes in great detail, our study provides an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of OIR model. PMID:26576731

  3. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  4. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  5. Measuring tissue oxygenation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soyemi, Olusola O. (Inventor); Soller, Babs R. (Inventor); Yang, Ye (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and systems for calculating tissue oxygenation, e.g., oxygen saturation, in a target tissue are disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods include: (a) directing incident radiation to a target tissue and determining reflectance spectra of the target tissue by measuring intensities of reflected radiation from the target tissue at a plurality of radiation wavelengths; (b) correcting the measured intensities of the reflectance spectra to reduce contributions thereto from skin and fat layers through which the incident radiation propagates; (c) determining oxygen saturation in the target tissue based on the corrected reflectance spectra; and (d) outputting the determined value of oxygen saturation.

  6. Document Delivery Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Nancy Melin

    1992-01-01

    Presents highlights of research that used industrywide surveys, focus groups, personal interviews, and industry-published data to explore the future of electronic information delivery in libraries. Topics discussed include CD-ROMs; prices; full-text products; magnetic tape leasing; engineering and technical literature; connections between online…

  7. Fluid delivery control system

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  8. Educational Telecommunications Delivery Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, John A., Ed.; Biedenbach, Joseph M., Ed.

    This monograph is a single volume reference manual providing an overall review of the current status and likely near future application of six major educational telecommunications delivery technologies. The introduction provides an overview to the usage and potential for these systems in the context of the major educational issues involved. Each…

  9. Choosing Training Delivery Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hybert, Peter R.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on decisionmaking about delivery media, and introduces CADDI's Performance-based, Accelerated, Customer-Stakeholder-driven Training & Development(SM) (PACT) Processes for training and development (T&D). Describes the media decisions that correspond with the design three levels of PACT: Curriculum Architecture Design, Modular Curriculum…

  10. Delivery of Peptides Via the Oral Route: Diabetes Treatment by Peptide-Loaded Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bouttefeux, Oriane; Beloqui, Ana; Preat, Veronique

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years, the interest of the pharmaceutical industry in the use of therapeutic peptides in diabetes treatment has been increased. However, these are restricted to parenteral administration. In order to mimic the natural physiological response, many efforts have been made towards oral peptide delivery in diabetes treatment. This review article aims to give an overview on the progress in the nanomedicine field towards the design and optimization of nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems capable of overcoming the harsh gastrointestinal environment and achieving an adequate bioavailability following oral administration. The reported data clearly illustrate the promise of nanomedicine for antidiabetic oral peptide delivery.

  11. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... disclosure or destruction of manual and automatic record systems. These security safeguards shall apply to... use of records contained in a system of records are adequately trained to protect the security and... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction...

  12. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  13. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  14. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  15. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  16. 21 CFR 740.10 - Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not been obtained.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) COSMETICS COSMETIC PRODUCT WARNING STATEMENTS Warning Statements § 740.10 Labeling of cosmetic products for which adequate substantiation of safety has not...

  17. Matching occupation and self: does matching theory adequately model children's thinking?

    PubMed

    Watson, Mark; McMahon, Mary

    2004-10-01

    The present exploratory-descriptive cross-national study focused on the career development of 11- to 14-yr.-old children, in particular whether they can match their personal characteristics with their occupational aspirations. Further, the study explored whether their matching may be explained in terms of a fit between person and environment using Holland's theory as an example. Participants included 511 South African and 372 Australian children. Findings relate to two items of the Revised Career Awareness Survey that require children to relate personal-social knowledge to their favorite occupation. Data were analyzed in three stages using descriptive statistics, i.e., mean scores, frequencies, and percentage agreement. The study indicated that children perceived their personal characteristics to be related to their occupational aspirations. However, how this matching takes place is not adequately accounted for in terms of a career theory such as that of Holland.

  18. Adequate connexin-mediated coupling is required for proper insulin production

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    To assess whether connexin (Cx) expression contributes to insulin secretion, we have investigated normal and tumoral insulin-producing cells for connexins, gap junctions, and coupling. We have found that the glucose-sensitive cells of pancreatic islets and of a rat insulinoma are functionally coupled by gap junctions made of Cx43. In contrast, cells of several lines secreting insulin abnormally do not express Cx43, gap junctions, and coupling. After correction of these defects by stable transfection of Cx43 cDNA, cells expressing modest levels of Cx43 and coupling, as observed in native beta-cells, showed an expression of the insulin gene and an insulin content that were markedly elevated, compared with those observed in both wild-type (uncoupled) cells and in transfected cells overexpressing Cx43. These findings indicate that adequate levels of Cx-mediated coupling are required for proper insulin production and storage. PMID:8522612

  19. Adaptive robust image registration approach based on adequately sampling polar transform and weighted angular projection function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhao; Tao, Feng; Jun, Wang

    2013-10-01

    An efficient, robust, and accurate approach is developed for image registration, which is especially suitable for large-scale change and arbitrary rotation. It is named the adequately sampling polar transform and weighted angular projection function (ASPT-WAPF). The proposed ASPT model overcomes the oversampling problem of conventional log-polar transform. Additionally, the WAPF presented as the feature descriptor is robust to the alteration in the fovea area of an image, and reduces the computational cost of the following registration process. The experimental results show two major advantages of the proposed method. First, it can register images with high accuracy even when the scale factor is up to 10 and the rotation angle is arbitrary. However, the maximum scaling estimated by the state-of-the-art algorithms is 6. Second, our algorithm is more robust to the size of the sampling region while not decreasing the accuracy of the registration.

  20. Precise femtosecond laser ablation of dental hard tissue: preliminary investigation on adequate laser parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hikov, Todor; Pecheva, Emilia; Montgomery, Paul; Antoni, Frederic; Leong-Hoi, Audrey; Petrov, Todor

    2017-01-01

    This work aims at evaluating the possibility of introducing state-of-the-art commercial femtosecond laser system in restorative dentistry by maintaining well-known benefits of lasers for caries removal, but also in overcoming disadvantages such as thermal damage of irradiated substrate. Femtosecond ablation of dental hard tissue is investigated by changing the irradiation parameters (pulsed laser energy, scanning speed and pulse repetition rate), assessed for enamel and dentin. The femtosecond laser system used in this work may be suitable for cavity preparation in dentin and enamel, due to the expected effective ablation and low temperature increase when using ultra short laser pulses. If adequate laser parameters are selected, this system seems to be promising for promoting a laser-assisted, minimally invasive approach in restorative dentistry.

  1. J-modulated ADEQUATE experiments using different kinds of refocusing pulses.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Christina M; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    Owing to the recent developments concerning residual dipolar couplings (RDCs), the interest in methods for the accurate determination of coupling constants is renascenting. We intended to use the J-modulated ADEQUATE experiment by Kövér et al. for the measurement of (13)C - (13)C coupling constants at natural abundance. The use of adiabatic composite chirp pulses instead of the conventional 180 degrees pulses, which compensate for the offset dependence of (13)C 180 degrees pulses, led to irregularities of the line shapes in the indirect dimension causing deviations of the extracted coupling constants. This behaviour was attributed to coupling evolution, during the time of the adiabatic pulse (2 ms), in the J-modulation spin echo. The replacement of this pulse by different kinds of refocusing pulses indicated that a pair of BIPs (broadband inversion pulses), which behave only partially adiabatic, leads to correct line shapes and coupling constants conserving the good sensitivity obtained with adiabatic pulses.

  2. A Nomogram to Predict Adequate Lymph Node Recovery before Resection of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-yu; Li, Cong; Gao, Wei; Yin, Xiao-wei; Luo, Qi-feng; Liu, Nan; Basnet, Shiva; Dai, Zhen-ling; Ge, Hai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Increased lymph node count (LNC) has been associated with prolonged survival in colorectal cancer (CRC), but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. The study aims to identify new predictors and develop a preoperative nomogram for predicting the probability of adequate LNC (≥ 12). 501 eligible patients were retrospectively selected to identify clinical-pathological factors associated with LNC ≥ 12 through univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The nomogram was built according to multivariate analyses of preoperative factors. Model performance was assessed with concordance index (c-index) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), followed by internal validation and calibration using 1000-resample bootstrapping. Clinical validity of the nomogram and LNC impact on stage migration were also evaluated. Multivariate analyses showed patient age, CA19-9, circulating lymphocytes, neutrophils, platelets, tumor diameter, histology and deposit significantly correlated with LNC (P < 0.05). The effects were marginal for CEA, anemia and CRC location (0.05 < P < 0.1). The multivariate analyses of preoperative factors suggested decreased age, CEA, CA19-9, neutrophils, proximal location, and increased platelets and diameter were significantly associated with increased probability of LNC ≥ 12 (P < 0.05). The nomogram achieved c-indexes of 0.75 and 0.73 before and after correction for overfitting. The AUC was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.70–0.79) and the clinically valid threshold probabilities were between 10% and 60% for the nomogram to predict LNC < 12. Additionally, increased probability of adequate LNC before surgery was associated with increased LNC and negative lymph nodes rather than increased positive lymph nodes, lymph node ratio, pN stages or AJCC stages. Collectively, the results indicate the LNC is multifactorial and irrelevant to stage migration. The significant correlations with preoperative circulating markers may

  3. Use of Linear Programming to Develop Cost-Minimized Nutritionally Adequate Health Promoting Food Baskets

    PubMed Central

    Tetens, Inge; Dejgård Jensen, Jørgen; Smed, Sinne; Gabrijelčič Blenkuš, Mojca; Rayner, Mike; Darmon, Nicole; Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Background Food-Based Dietary Guidelines (FBDGs) are developed to promote healthier eating patterns, but increasing food prices may make healthy eating less affordable. The aim of this study was to design a range of cost-minimized nutritionally adequate health-promoting food baskets (FBs) that help prevent both micronutrient inadequacy and diet-related non-communicable diseases at lowest cost. Methods Average prices for 312 foods were collected within the Greater Copenhagen area. The cost and nutrient content of five different cost-minimized FBs for a family of four were calculated per day using linear programming. The FBs were defined using five different constraints: cultural acceptability (CA), or dietary guidelines (DG), or nutrient recommendations (N), or cultural acceptability and nutrient recommendations (CAN), or dietary guidelines and nutrient recommendations (DGN). The variety and number of foods in each of the resulting five baskets was increased through limiting the relative share of individual foods. Results The one-day version of N contained only 12 foods at the minimum cost of DKK 27 (€ 3.6). The CA, DG, and DGN were about twice of this and the CAN cost ~DKK 81 (€ 10.8). The baskets with the greater variety of foods contained from 70 (CAN) to 134 (DGN) foods and cost between DKK 60 (€ 8.1, N) and DKK 125 (€ 16.8, DGN). Ensuring that the food baskets cover both dietary guidelines and nutrient recommendations doubled the cost while cultural acceptability (CAN) tripled it. Conclusion Use of linear programming facilitates the generation of low-cost food baskets that are nutritionally adequate, health promoting, and culturally acceptable. PMID:27760131

  4. [Quality of Mesorectal Excision ("Plane of Surgery") - Which Quality Targets are Adequate?].

    PubMed

    Hermanek, P; Merkel, S; Ptok, H; Hohenberger, W

    2015-12-01

    Today, the examination of rectal cancer specimens includes the obligate macroscopic assessment of the quality of mesorectal excision by the pathologist reporting the plane of surgery. The frequency of operations in the muscularis propria plane of surgery (earlier described as incomplete mesorectal excision) is essential. The quality of mesorectal excision is important for the prognosis, especially as local recurrences are observed more frequently after operations in the muscularis propria plane of surgery. For the definition of quality targets, data of 13 studies published between 2006 and 2012, each with more than 100 patients and adequate specialisation and experience of the surgeons (5413 patients), data of the prospective multicentric observation study "Quality Assurance - Rectal Cancer" (at the Institute for Quality Assurance in Operative Medicine at the Otto-von-Guericke University at Magdeburg) from 2005 to 2010 (8044 patients) and data of the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, from 1998 to 2011 (991 patients) were analysed. The total incidence of operations in the muscularis propria plane of surgery was 5.0 % (721/14 448). Even with adequate specialisation and experience of the surgeon, the frequency of operations in the muscularis propria plane of surgery is higher in abdominoperineal excisions than in sphincter-preserving surgery (8.4 vs. 2.8 %, p < 0.001). Thus, the quality target for the frequency of operations in the muscularis propria plane should be defined as < 5 % for sphincter-preserving procedures and as < 10 % for abdominoperineal excisions.

  5. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapic Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently enough and the ventilation flow is adequate enough to maintain CO2 1 Project Engineer, Space Suit and Crew Survival Systems Branch, Crew and Thermal Systems Division, 2101 NASA Parkway, Houston, TX 77058/EC5. washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, the testing results performed in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing.

  6. When one is not enough: prevalence and characteristics of homes not adequately protected by smoke alarms

    PubMed Central

    Peek-Asa, C; Allareddy, V; Yang, J; Taylor, C; Lundell, J; Zwerling, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has specific recommendations about the number, location, and type of smoke alarms that are needed to provide maximum protection for a household. No previous studies have examined whether or not homes are completely protected according to these guidelines. The authors describe the prevalence and home characteristics associated with compliance to recommendations for smoke alarm installation by the NFPA. Design, setting, and subjects: Data are from the baseline on-site survey of a randomized trial to measure smoke alarm effectiveness. The trial was housed in a longitudinal cohort study in a rural Iowa county. Of 1005 homes invited, 691 (68.8%) participated. Main outcome measures: Information about smoke alarm type, placement, and function, as well as home and occupant characteristics, was collected through an on-site household survey. Results: Although 86.0% of homes had at least one smoke alarm, only 22.3% of homes (approximately one in five) were adequately protected according to NFPA guidelines. Fourteen percent of homes had no functioning smoke alarms. More than half of the homes with smoke alarms did not have enough of them or had installed them incorrectly, and 42.4% of homes with alarms had at least one alarm that did not operate. Homes with at least one high school graduate were nearly four times more likely to be fully protected. Homes that had multiple levels, a basement, or were cluttered or poorly cleaned were significantly less likely to be fully protected. Conclusion: These findings indicate that consumers may not be knowledgeable about the number of alarms they need or how to properly install them. Occupants are also not adequately maintaining the alarms that are installed. PMID:16326772

  7. Residual triose phosphate isomerase activity and color measurements to determine adequate cooking of ground beef patties.

    PubMed

    Sair, A I; Booren, A M; Berry, B W; Smith, D M

    1999-02-01

    The objectives were to (i) compare the use of triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) activity and internal color scores for determination of cooking adequacy of beef patties and (ii) determine the effect of frozen storage and fat content on residual TPI activity in ground beef. Ground beef patties (24.4% fat) were cooked to five temperatures ranging from 60.0 to 82.2 degrees C. TPI activity decreased as beef patty cooking temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, no difference (P > 0.05) in activity (6.3 U/kg meat) was observed in patties cooked to 71.1 degrees C and above. Degree of doneness color scores, a* values and b* values, of ground beef patties decreased as internal temperature was increased from 60.0 to 71.1 degrees C; however, temperature had no effect on L* values. TPI activity in raw ground beef after five freeze-thaw cycles did not differ from the control. Three freeze-thaw cycles of raw ground beef resulted in a 57.2% decrease in TPI activity after cooking. TPI activity of cooked beef increased during 2 months of frozen storage, but TPI activity in ground beef stored for 3 months or longer did not differ from the unfrozen control. While past research has shown color to be a poor indicator of adequate thermal processing, our results suggest that undercooked ground beef patties could be distinguished from those that had been adequately cooked following U.S. Department of Agriculture guidelines using residual TPI activity as a marker.

  8. Method measuring oxygen tension and transport within subcutaneous devices

    PubMed Central

    Weidling, John; Sameni, Sara; Lakey, Jonathan R. T.; Botvinick, Elliot

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Cellular therapies hold promise to replace the implantation of whole organs in the treatment of disease. For most cell types, in vivo viability depends on oxygen delivery to avoid the toxic effects of hypoxia. A promising approach is the in situ vascularization of implantable devices which can mediate hypoxia and improve both the lifetime and utility of implanted cells and tissues. Although mathematical models and bulk measurements of oxygenation in surrounding tissue have been used to estimate oxygenation within devices, such estimates are insufficient in determining if supplied oxygen is sufficient for the entire thickness of the implanted cells and tissues. We have developed a technique in which oxygen-sensitive microparticles (OSMs) are incorporated into the volume of subcutaneously implantable devices. Oxygen partial pressure within these devices can be measured directly in vivo by an optical probe placed on the skin surface. As validation, OSMs have been incorporated into alginate beads, commonly used as immunoisolation devices to encapsulate pancreatic islet cells. Alginate beads were implanted into the subcutaneous space of Sprague–Dawley rats. Oxygen transport through beads was characterized from dynamic OSM signals in response to changes in inhaled oxygen. Changes in oxygen dynamics over days demonstrate the utility of our technology. PMID:25162910

  9. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  10. Optimizing drugs for local delivery.

    PubMed

    Collingwood, S; Lock, R; Searcey, M

    2009-12-01

    An international panel of speakers together with approximately 70 delegates were brought together by The Society for Medicines Research's symposium on Optimising Drugs for Local Delivery, held on June 11, 2009 at the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Horsham, UK. The focus of the conference was on the delivery of drugs direct to the site of action and the consequences of this delivery route on delivery technologies, formulation science and molecular design.

  11. Microprocessor controlled transdermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subramony, J Anand; Sharma, Ashutosh; Phipps, J B

    2006-07-06

    Transdermal drug delivery via iontophoresis is reviewed with special focus on the delivery of lidocaine for local anesthesia and fentanyl for patient controlled acute therapy such as postoperative pain. The role of the microprocessor controller in achieving dosimetry, alternating/reverse polarity, pre-programmed, and sensor-based delivery is highlighted. Unique features such as the use of tactile signaling, telemetry control, and pulsatile waveforms in iontophoretic drug delivery are described briefly.

  12. Development of the Childbirth Perception Scale (CPS): perception of delivery and the first postpartum week.

    PubMed

    Truijens, Sophie E M; Wijnen, Hennie A; Pommer, Antoinette M; Oei, S Guid; Pop, Victor J M

    2014-10-01

    Some caregivers suggest a more positive experience of childbirth when giving birth at home. Since properly developed instruments that assess women's perception of delivery and the early postpartum are missing, the aim of the current study is to develop a Childbirth Perception Scale (CPS). Three focus groups with caregivers, pregnant women, and women who recently gave birth were conducted. Psychometric properties of 23 candidate items derived from the interviews were tested with explorative factor analysis (EFA) (N = 495). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was performed in another sample of women (N = 483) and confirmed a 12-item CPS. The EFA in sample I suggested a two-component solution: a subscale 'perception of delivery' (six items) and a subscale 'perception of the first postpartum week' (six items). The CFA in sample II confirmed an adequate model fit and a good internal consistency (α = .82). Multivariate linear regression showed a positive effect of home delivery on perception of delivery in multiparous but not in primiparous women. The 12-item CPS with two dimensions (perception of delivery and perception of first postpartum week) has adequate psychometric properties. In multiparous women, home delivery showed to be independently related to more positive perception of delivery.

  13. Preliminary Study of Oxygen-Enhanced Longitudinal Relaxation in MRI: A Potential Novel Biomarker of Oxygenation Changes in Solid Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, James P.B.; Naish, Josephine H.; Parker, Geoff J.M.; Waterton, John C.; Watson, Yvonne; Jayson, Gordon C.; Buonaccorsi, Giovanni A.; Cheung, Sue; Buckley, David L.; McGrath, Deirdre M.; West, Catharine M.L.; Davidson, Susan E.; Roberts, Caleb; Mills, Samantha J.; Mitchell, Claire L.; Hope, Lynn; Ton, N. Chan; Jackson, Alan

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: There is considerable interest in developing non-invasive methods of mapping tumor hypoxia. Changes in tissue oxygen concentration produce proportional changes in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) longitudinal relaxation rate (R{sub 1}). This technique has been used previously to evaluate oxygen delivery to healthy tissues and is distinct from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Here we report application of this method to detect alteration in tumor oxygenation status. Methods and materials: Ten patients with advanced cancer of the abdomen and pelvis underwent serial measurement of tumor R{sub 1} while breathing medical air (21% oxygen) followed by 100% oxygen (oxygen-enhanced MRI). Gadolinium-based dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was then performed to compare the spatial distribution of perfusion with that of oxygen-induced DELTAR{sub 1}. Results: DELTAR{sub 1} showed significant increases of 0.021 to 0.058 s{sup -1} in eight patients with either locally recurrent tumor from cervical and hepatocellular carcinomas or metastases from ovarian and colorectal carcinomas. In general, there was congruency between perfusion and oxygen concentration. However, regional mismatch was observed in some tumor cores. Here, moderate gadolinium uptake (consistent with moderate perfusion) was associated with low area under the DELTAR{sub 1} curve (consistent with minimal increase in oxygen concentration). Conclusions: These results provide evidence that oxygen-enhanced longitudinal relaxation can monitor changes in tumor oxygen concentration. The technique shows promise in identifying hypoxic regions within tumors and may enable spatial mapping of change in tumor oxygen concentration.

  14. Oxygen sensitive paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whidby, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    Paper is impregnated with mixture of methylene blue and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Methylene blue is photo-reduced to leuco-form. Paper is kept isolated from oxygen until ready for use. Paper can be reused by photo-reduction after oxygen exposure.

  15. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  16. Preterm infants' behavioural indicators of oxygen decline during bottle feeding

    PubMed Central

    Thoyre, Suzanne M.; Carlson, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Background During the time when preterm infants' oral feeding skills are developing they often experience physiological instability and need assistance from caregivers to maintain adequate oxygenation. Assisting infants to maintain optimal oxygenation during oral feeding requires an understanding of how they express and aim to self-regulate their oxygen status. Aim The purpose of this study was to identify potential behavioural indicators of declining oxygenation during preterm infant early bottle-feeding. Method The design was explorative. Data were collected from a secondary analysis of 20 videotapes of preterm infant bottle feedings which included concurrent oxygen saturation data. In this analysis infant behaviours and quality of breathing were coded and compared across three periods: high oxygen saturation, immediately preceding an oxygen desaturation event, and during an oxygen desaturation event. Findings Infants gave limited behavioural indicators of declining oxygenation. Immediately prior to a desaturation event, they had an increase in eye flutter and were typically sucking and apnoeic. During a desaturation event, they typically relaxed their arms/hands and stopped sucking. Conclusions Reliance on preterm infant behavioural cues will be insufficient for detection of oxygen desaturation during oral feeding. Attention to changes in breath sounds and to the pattern of sucking are potentially important intervention strategies for the prevention of and appropriate response to oxygen decline during feeding. Sucking pauses may be a time when preterm infants aim to regulate their breathing pattern and thereby increase oxygenation. Interventions that focus on detection and minimization of apnoea during feeding, and which aim to protect infant sucking pauses, may reduce the number and severity of desaturation events preterm infants experience during bottle feeding. PMID:12950569

  17. Low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise does not limit muscle oxygen uptake.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Michael; Mortensen, Stefan P; Saltin, Bengt; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The effect of low blood flow at onset of moderate-intensity exercise on the rate of rise in muscle oxygen uptake was examined. Seven male subjects performed a 3.5-min one-legged knee-extensor exercise bout (24 +/- 1 W, mean +/- SD) without (Con) and with (double blockade; DB) arterial infusion of inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine) and cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) to inhibit the synthesis of nitric oxide and prostanoids, respectively. Leg blood flow and leg oxygen delivery throughout exercise was 25-50% lower (P < 0.05) in DB compared with Con. Leg oxygen extraction (arteriovenous O(2) difference) was higher (P < 0.05) in DB than in Con (5 s: 127 +/- 3 vs. 56 +/- 4 ml/l), and leg oxygen uptake was not different between Con and DB during exercise. The difference between leg oxygen delivery and leg oxygen uptake was smaller (P < 0.05) during exercise in DB than in Con (5 s: 59 +/- 12 vs. 262 +/- 39 ml/min). The present data demonstrate that muscle blood flow and oxygen delivery can be markedly reduced without affecting muscle oxygen uptake in the initial phase of moderate-intensity exercise, suggesting that blood flow does not limit muscle oxygen uptake at the onset of exercise. Additionally, prostanoids and/or nitric oxide appear to play important roles in elevating skeletal muscle blood flow in the initial phase of exercise.

  18. Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830°C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable

  19. Teacher Qualification and Instructional Delivery Modes at the Preschool Level in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odinko, Monica N.; Williams, Joanne M.; Donn, Gari

    2009-01-01

    Through this study researchers sought to evaluate the effects of qualification on instructional delivery modes of practicing preschool teachers in Nigeria. The sample consisted of 93 preschool teachers and 2,859 pupils aged 4 to 5 years. Schools were selected through stratified random sampling to ensure adequate representation of private, public,…

  20. Formulation and evaluation of nano based drug delivery system for the buccal delivery of acyclovir.

    PubMed

    Al-Dhubiab, Bandar E; Nair, Anroop B; Kumria, Rachna; Attimarad, Mahesh; Harsha, Sree

    2015-12-01

    Oral bioavailability of acyclovir is limited, primarily because of low permeability across the gastrointestinal membrane. The purpose of this study is the prospective evaluation of buccal films impregnated with acyclovir loaded nanospheres as a drug delivery system to improve systemic bioavailability. Acyclovir polymeric nanospheres were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. Nanospheres were embedded into buccoadhesive films (A1-A4) comprising of different concentrations of polymers (Eudragit RL 100, HPMC K15 and carbopol 974P). Films were characterized for physico-mechanical properties, mucoadhesive strength, hydration, drug release and ex vivo permeation. In vivo studies were carried out on rabbits to assess the pharmacokinetic profile of buccal film (A3) as compared to oral therapy. The prepared films demonstrated excellent physical properties, adequate hydration and buccoadhesive strength. In vitro drug release data inferred that the drug release was dependent on the composition of film. Ex vivo permeation studies indicated greater flux in film A3. In vivo studies revealed a significant enhancement in absorption of acyclovir (P<0.0001) with Cmax (~3 folds) and AUC0-α (~8 folds, P<0.0001) when compared to oral dosing. Moreover, the extended Tmax value (6h) signifies the potential of the prepared film to prolong acyclovir delivery. Given the promising results, the study concludes that the developed buccal film (A3) impregnated with acyclovir loaded nanospheres could be a promising approach for effective delivery of acyclovir.

  1. Atomic Oxygen Textured Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Hunt, Jason D.; Drobotij, Erin; Cales, Michael R.; Cantrell, Gidget

    1995-01-01

    Atomic oxygen can be used to microscopically alter the surface morphology of polymeric materials in space or in ground laboratory facilities. For polymeric materials whose sole oxidation products are volatile species, directed atomic oxygen reactions produce surfaces of microscopic cones. However, isotropic atomic oxygen exposure results in polymer surfaces covered with lower aspect ratio sharp-edged craters. Isotropic atomic oxygen plasma exposure of polymers typically causes a significant decrease in water contact angle as well as altered coefficient of static friction. Such surface alterations may be of benefit for industrial and biomedical applications. The results of atomic oxygen plasma exposure of thirty-three (33) different polymers are presented, including typical morphology changes, effects on water contact angle, and coefficient of static friction.

  2. Improvement of Photorhabdus temperata bioinsecticides production in low-cost media through adequate fermentation technology.

    PubMed

    Jallouli, Wafa; Jaoua, Samir; Zouari, Nabil

    2012-01-01

    To develop a cost effective process for bioinsecticides production by Photorhabdus temperata, dissolved oxygen (DO) requirements were investigated in both the complex and the optimized media using diluted seawater as a source of micronutrients. By varying DO concentrations, tolerance to hydrogen peroxide was shown to be medium dependant. Indeed, P. temperata cells grown in the complex medium, exhibited higher tolerance than cells grown in the optimized medium (OM). Tolerance to H(2)O(2) was shown to be related to intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation during soya bean meal or glucose assimilation, as shown by flow cytometry analysis. To avoid oxidative stress damages in P. temperata cells cultured in the OM, DO concentration should be constant 50% saturation throughout the fermentation. However, a DO-shift control strategy was demonstrated to be beneficial for P. temperata bioinsecticide production in the complex medium. By using such a strategy biomass, culturability, and oral toxicity reached 16.5 × 10(8), 1.15 × 10(8) cells/mL and 64.2%, respectively, thus was 16.19, 26.37, and 12.2% more than in the cultures carried out at a constant 50% saturation.

  3. Chitosan-Based Multifunctional Platforms for Local Delivery of Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seong-Chul; Yoo, Seung-Yup; Kim, Hyeongmin; Lee, Jaehwi

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan has been widely used as a key biomaterial for the development of drug delivery systems intended to be administered via oral and parenteral routes. In particular, chitosan-based microparticles are the most frequently employed delivery system, along with specialized systems such as hydrogels, nanoparticles and thin films. Based on the progress made in chitosan-based drug delivery systems, the usefulness of chitosan has further expanded to anti-cancer chemoembolization, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. For instance, chitosan has been used to develop embolic materials designed to efficiently occlude the blood vessels by which the oxygen and nutrients are supplied. Indeed, it has been reported to be a promising embolic material. For better anti-cancer effect, embolic materials that can locally release anti-cancer drugs were proposed. In addition, a complex of radioactive materials and chitosan to be locally injected into the liver has been investigated as an efficient therapeutic tool for hepatocellular carcinoma. In line with this, a number of attempts have been explored to use chitosan-based carriers for the delivery of various agents, especially to the site of interest. Thus, in this work, studies where chitosan-based drug delivery systems have successfully been used for local delivery will be presented along with future perspectives. PMID:28257059

  4. Mucoadhesive drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rahamatullah; Raj Singh, Thakur Raghu; Garland, Martin James; Woolfson, A David; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2011-01-01

    Mucoadhesion is commonly defined as the adhesion between two materials, at least one of which is a mucosal surface. Over the past few decades, mucosal drug delivery has received a great deal of attention. Mucoadhesive dosage forms may be designed to enable prolonged retention at the site of application, providing a controlled rate of drug release for improved therapeutic outcome. Application of dosage forms to mucosal surfaces may be of benefit to drug molecules not amenable to the oral route, such as those that undergo acid degradation or extensive first-pass metabolism. The mucoadhesive ability of a dosage form is dependent upon a variety of factors, including the nature of the mucosal tissue and the physicochemical properties of the polymeric formulation. This review article aims to provide an overview of the various aspects of mucoadhesion, mucoadhesive materials, factors affecting mucoadhesion, evaluating methods, and finally various mucoadhesive drug delivery systems (buccal, nasal, ocular, gastro, vaginal, and rectal). PMID:21430958

  5. Delivery strategies for antiparasitics.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Oliver; Kiderlen, Albrecht F

    2003-02-01

    Optimisation of drug carrier systems and drug delivery strategies that take into account the peculiarities of individual infectious agents and diseases are key elements of modern drug development. In the following, different aspects of a rational design for antiparasitic drug formulation will be reviewed, covering delivery systems such as nano- and microparticles, liposomes, emulsions and microemulsions, cochleates and bioadhesive macromolecules. Functional properties for each carrier system will be discussed as well as their therapeutic efficacy for parasitic diseases, including leishmaniasis, human African trypanosomiasis, human cryptosporidiosis, malaria and schistosomiasis. Critical issues for the application of drug carrier systems will be discussed, focusing on biopharmaceutical and pathophysiological parameters such as routes of application, improvement of body distribution and targeting intracellularly persisting pathogens.

  6. Pyomyositis after vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Gaughan, Eve; Eogan, Maeve; Holohan, Mary

    2011-07-07

    Pyomyositis is a purulent infection of skeletal muscle that arises from haematogenous spread, usually with abscess formation. It can develop after a transient bacteraemia of any cause. This type of infection has never been reported before in the literature after vaginal delivery. A 34-year-old woman had progressive severe pain in the left buttock and thigh and weakness in the left lower limb day 1 post spontaneous vaginal delivery. MRI showed severe oedema of the left gluteus, iliacus, piriformis and adductor muscles of the left thigh and a small fluid collection at the left hip joint. She was diagnosed with pyomyositis. She had fever of 37.9°C immediately postpartum and her risk factors for bacteraemia were a mild IV cannula-associated cellulitis and labour itself. She required prolonged treatment with antibiotics before significant clinical improvement was noted.

  7. Self-fill oxygen technology: benefits for patients, healthcare providers and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Hex, Nick; Setters, Jo; Little, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    “Non-delivery” home oxygen technologies that allow self-filling of ambulatory oxygen cylinders are emerging. They can offer a relatively unlimited supply of ambulatory oxygen in suitably assessed people who require long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT), providing they can use these systems safely and effectively. This allows users to be self-sufficient and facilitates longer periods of time away from home. The evolution and evidence base of this technology is reported with the experience of a national service review in Scotland (UK). Given that domiciliary oxygen services represent a significant cost to healthcare providers globally, these systems offer potential cost savings, are appealing to remote and rural regions due to the avoidance of cylinder delivery and have additional lower environmental impact due to reduced fossil fuel consumption and subsequently reduced carbon emissions. Evidence is emerging that self-fill/non-delivery oxygen systems can meet the ambulatory oxygen needs of many patients using LTOT and can have a positive impact on quality of life, increase time spent away from home and offer significant financial savings to healthcare providers. Educational aims Provide update for oxygen prescribers on options for home oxygen provision. Provide update on the evidence base for available self-fill oxygen technologies. Provide and update for healthcare commissioners on the potential cost-effective and environmental benefits of increased utilisation of self-fill oxygen systems. PMID:27408629

  8. Atomic Oxygen Fluence Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    This innovation enables a means for actively measuring atomic oxygen fluence (accumulated atoms of atomic oxygen per area) that has impinged upon spacecraft surfaces. Telemetered data from the device provides spacecraft designers, researchers, and mission managers with real-time measurement of atomic oxygen fluence, which is useful for prediction of the durability of spacecraft materials and components. The innovation is a compact fluence measuring device that allows in-space measurement and transmittance of measured atomic oxygen fluence as a function of time based on atomic oxygen erosion yields (the erosion yield of a material is the volume of material that is oxidized per incident oxygen atom) of materials that have been measured in low Earth orbit. It has a linear electrical response to atomic oxygen fluence, and is capable of measuring high atomic oxygen fluences (up to >10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm), which are representative of multi-year low-Earth orbital missions (such as the International Space Station). The durability or remaining structural lifetime of solar arrays that consist of polymer blankets on which the solar cells are attached can be predicted if one knows the atomic oxygen fluence that the solar array blanket has been exposed to. In addition, numerous organizations that launch space experiments into low-Earth orbit want to know the accumulated atomic oxygen fluence that their materials or components have been exposed to. The device is based on the erosion yield of pyrolytic graphite. It uses two 12deg inclined wedges of graphite that are over a grit-blasted fused silica window covering a photodiode. As the wedges erode, a greater area of solar illumination reaches the photodiode. A reference photodiode is also used that receives unobstructed solar illumination and is oriented in the same direction as the pyrolytic graphite covered photodiode. The short-circuit current from the photodiodes is measured and either sent to an onboard data logger, or

  9. Nanovehicular Intracellular Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    PROKOP, ALES; DAVIDSON, JEFFREY M.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of principles and barriers relevant to intracellular drug and gene transport, accumulation and retention (collectively called as drug delivery) by means of nanovehicles (NV). The aim is to deliver a cargo to a particular intracellular site, if possible, to exert a local action. Some of the principles discussed in this article apply to noncolloidal drugs that are not permeable to the plasma membrane or to the blood–brain barrier. NV are defined as a wide range of nanosized particles leading to colloidal objects which are capable of entering cells and tissues and delivering a cargo intracelullarly. Different localization and targeting means are discussed. Limited discussion on pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics is also presented. NVs are contrasted to micro-delivery and current nanotechnologies which are already in commercial use. Newer developments in NV technologies are outlined and future applications are stressed. We also briefly review the existing modeling tools and approaches to quantitatively describe the behavior of targeted NV within the vascular and tumor compartments, an area of particular importance. While we list “elementary” phenomena related to different level of complexity of delivery to cancer, we also stress importance of multi-scale modeling and bottom-up systems biology approach. PMID:18200527

  10. Delivery systems for brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2014-10-28

    Brachytherapy is described as the short distance treatment of cancer with a radioactive isotope placed on, in, or near the lesions or tumor to be treated. The main advantage of brachytherapy compared with external beam radiation (EBR) is the improved localized delivery of dose to the target volume of interest, thus normal tissue irradiation is reduced. The precise and targeted nature of brachytherapy provides a number of key benefits for the effective treatment of cancer such as efficacy, minimized risk of side effects, short treatment times, and cost-effectiveness. Brachytherapy devices have yielded promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. However, brachytherapy can only be used in localized and relatively small tumors. Although the introduction of new delivery devices allows the treatment of more complex tumor sites, with wider range of dose rate for improving treatment efficacy and reduction of side effects, a better understanding about the safety, efficacy, and accuracy of these systems is required, and further development of new techniques is warranted. Therefore, this review focuses on the delivery devices for brachytherapy and their application in prostate, breast, brain, and other tumor sites.

  11. Single compartment drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cima, Michael J.; Lee, Heejin; Daniel, Karen; Tanenbaum, Laura M.; Mantzavinou, Aikaterini; Spencer, Kevin C.; Ong, Qunya; Sy, Jay C.; Santini, John; Schoellhammer, Carl M.; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Drug design is built on the concept that key molecular targets of disease are isolated in the diseased tissue. Systemic drug administration would be sufficient for targeting in such a case. It is, however, common for enzymes or receptors that are integral to disease to be structurally similar or identical to those that play important biological roles in normal tissues of the body. Additionally, systemic administration may not lead to local drug concentrations high enough to yield disease modification because of rapid systemic metabolism or lack of sufficient partitioning into the diseased tissue compartment. This review focuses on drug delivery methods that physically target drugs to individual compartments of the body. Compartments such as the bladder, peritoneum, brain, eye and skin are often sites of disease and can sometimes be viewed as “privileged,” since they intrinsically hinder partitioning of systemically administered agents. These compartments have become the focus of a wide array of procedures and devices for direct administration of drugs. We discuss the rationale behind single compartment drug delivery for each of these compartments, and give an overview of examples at different development stages, from the lab bench to phase III clinical trials to clinical practice. We approach single compartment drug delivery from both a translational and a technological perspective. PMID:24798478

  12. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-05-01

    been admitted to the delivery side of the LSCrF-2828 membrane to produce the gradients which exist under syngas generation conditions. The CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures have normal isotopic {sup 18}O abundances. The evolution of {sup 18}O on the delivery side in these experiments after an {sup 18}O pulse on the air side reveals a wealth of information about the oxygen transport processes.

  13. Synthetic carriers of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dellacherie, E; Labrude, P; Vigneron, C; Riess, J G

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade, construction of artificial carriers of oxygen for transfusion purposes has evolved in three main directions, which can be reviewed as follows. The first approach consists of modifying hemoglobin (Hb), the natural oxygen carrier, in order to lower its oxygen affinity and increase its intravascular persistence. To achieve this aim, two basic procedures have been used: molecular and environmental modification. In the first case, Hb is modified with chemical reagents; the second requires encapsulation of Hb to obtain artificial erythrocytes. The second approach is based on the use of synthetic oxygen-carrying chelates that mimic the oxygenation function of Hb. The main products in this class are metalloporphyrins, whose chemical environment is designed to render them efficient as reversible carriers of oxygen in vivo. Finally, the third approach deals with the perfluorochemicals used in emulsified form. Perfluorochemical liquids are excellent gas solvents, but some problems remain unsolved with regard to their development as oxygen carriers in vivo: low O2 dissolving capacity, toxicity, and excretion.

  14. The Marine Air-Ground Team: Still Not Adequately Training for the Urban Fight/The Marine Air-Ground Team: Still Not Adequately Trained for the Urban Fight

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    1 The Marine Air-Ground Team: Still Not Adequately Training for the Urban Fight Subject Area Training EWS 2006...The Marine Air-Ground Team: Still Not Adequately Training for the Urban Fight Submitted by Captain RC Rybka to Majors GC Schreffler and RR...estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the

  15. Electrochemical oxygen concentrator as an oxygen compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) oxygen compressor is described which generates pressures of 3000 psi. The SPE is a cation exchange membrane with chemical compatibility, and has the capability of withstanding 5000 psi. Other features of the compressor described include: gasketless sealing, porus plate cell supports, and conductive cooling. Results are presented of a computer program which defines the power of the system as a function of density, temperature, pressure, membrane thickness, and water content.

  16. Cardiac catecholamines in rats fed copper deficient or copper adequate diets containing fructose or starch

    SciTech Connect

    Scholfield, D.J.; Fields, M.; Beal, T.; Lewis, C.G.; Behall, K.M. )

    1989-02-09

    The symptoms of copper (Cu) deficiency are known to be more severe when rats are fed a diet with fructose (F) as the principal carbohydrate. Mortality, in males, due to cardiac abnormalities usually occurs after five weeks of a 62% F, 0.6 ppm Cu deficient diet. These effects are not observed if cornstarch (CS) is the carbohydrate (CHO) source. Studies with F containing diets have shown increased catecholamine (C) turnover rates while diets deficient in Cu result in decreased norepinephrine (N) levels in tissues. Dopamine B-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) is a Cu dependent enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of dopamine (D) to N. An experiment was designed to investigate the effects of CHO and dietary Cu on levels of three C in cardiac tissue. Thirty-two male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed Cu deficient or adequate diets with 60% of calories from F or CS for 6 weeks. N, epinephrine (E) and D were measured by HPLC. Statistical analysis indicates that Cu deficiency tends to decrease N levels, while having the reverse effect on E. D did not appear to change. These findings indicate that Cu deficiency but not dietary CHO can affect the concentration of N and E in rat cardiac tissue.

  17. Radiation dose reduction in invasive cardiology by restriction to adequate instead of optimized picture quality.

    PubMed

    Kuon, Eberhard; Dorn, Christian; Schmitt, Moritz; Dahm, Johannes B

    2003-05-01

    In this study, the cinegraphic image intensifier entrance dose level for coronary angiography was changed in four steps from dose level A (0.041 microGy frame(-1)), allowing high contrast, but coarse mottled background, to level D (0.164 microGy frame(-1)), affording high transparency and sharpness. Using this new approach throughout the course of 404 consecutive cardiac catheterizations, we reduced patient radiation exposures down to 11 to 16% of currently typical values: i.e., mean dose area products of 5.97 Gy cm2 (n = 91), 6.73 (n = 113), 8.11 (n = 91), and 8.90 (n = 109); cinegraphic dose area products of 2.34, 3.64, 4.56, and 5.49; and cinegraphic dose area products frame(-1) of 13.3, 19.8, 27.0, and 30.2 mGy cm2, for levels A, B, C, and D, respectively. The number of cinegraphic frames ranged within 168 to 182 per case. Our results show that during catheterization interventionalists should vary image intensifier entrance dose levels in accordance with documented structure, angulation, and body mass index. With the exception of cases with special requirements, lower dose levels typically guarantee an adequate image quality.

  18. Adequate nutrient intake can reduce cardiovascular disease risk in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Reusser, Molly E; DiRienzo, Douglas B; Miller, Gregory D; McCarron, David A

    2003-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease kills nearly as many Americans each year as the next seven leading causes of death combined. The prevalence of cardiovascular disease and most of its associated risk factors is markedly higher and increasing more rapidly among African Americans than in any other racial or ethnic group. Improving these statistics may be simply a matter of improving diet quality. In recent years, a substantial and growing body of evidence has revealed that dietary patterns complete in all food groups, including nutrient-rich dairy products, are essential for preventing and reducing cardiovascular disease and the conditions that contribute to it. Several cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, insulin resistance syndrome, and obesity, have been shown to be positively influenced by dietary patterns that include adequate intake of dairy products. The benefits of nutrient-rich dietary patterns have been specifically tested in randomized, controlled trials emphasizing African American populations. These studies demonstrated proportionally greater benefits for African Americans without evidence of adverse effects such as symptoms of lactose intolerance. As currently promoted for the prevention of certain cancers and osteoporosis, regular consumption of diets that meet recommended nutrient intake levels might also be the most effective approach for reducing cardiovascular disease risk in African Americans.

  19. Are neurodegenerative disorder and psychotic manifestations avoidable brain dysfunctions with adequate dietary omega-3?

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2006-01-01

    The present mismatch between what our brain needs, and the modern diet neglects our marine heritage. Last century, the priority in nutrition and food production was to achieve a high protein diet and somatic growth and function. The dietary content of omega-3 (N-3) required by the brain was neglected although evidence for the essentiality of certain fatty acids was published in 1929 and specifically re-affirmed for omega 3 in the brain in the 1970s. Cognitive decline with age and neurodegenerative disorder with dementia are now rising. This review describes signs of N-3 deficit in Alzheimer and Parkinson Disease, where maximum change involves the primary sites: olfactory cortex and the hippocampus. The olfactory agnosia observed in schizophrenia supports an N-3 deficit as does a reduction of key ologodendrocyte- and myelin-related genes in this disorder and affective disorder, where a rise in dementia accords with a deficit of N-3 also in this disorder. N-3 normalizes cerebral excitability at all levels. That the two disorders are localized at the extremes of excitability, is supported by their opposing treatments: convulsant neuroleptics and anti-epileptic antidepressants. An adequate N-3 diet will probably prevent most psychotic episodes and prove that neurodegenerative disorder with dementia is also to a large extent not only preventable but avoidable.

  20. Are neurodegenerative disorder and psychotic manifestations avoidable brain dysfunctions with adequate dietary omega-3?

    PubMed

    Saugstad, Letten F

    2006-01-01

    The present mismatch between what our brain needs, and the modern diet neglects our marine heritage. Last century, the priority in nutrition and food production was to achieve a high protein diet and somatic growth and function. The dietary content of omega-3 (N-3) required by the brain was neglected although evidence for the essentiality of certain fatty acids was published in 1929 and specifically re-affirmed for omega 3 in the brain in the 1970s. Cognitive decline with age and neurodegenerative disorder with dementia are now rising. This review describes signs of N-3 deficit in Alzheimer and Parkinson Disease, where maximum change involves the primary sites: olfactory cortex and the hippocampus. The olfactory agnosia observed in schizophrenia supports an N-3 deficit as does a reduction of key ologodendrocyte- and myelin-related genes in this disorder and affective disorder, where a rise in dementia accords with a deficit of N-3 also in this disorder. N-3 normalizes cerebral excitability at all levels. That the two disorders are localized at the extremes of excitability, is supported by their opposing treatments: convulsant neuroleptics and anti-epileptic anti-depressants. An adequate N-3 diet will probably prevent most psychotic episodes and prove that neurodegenerative disorder with dementia is also to a large extent not only preventable but avoidable.

  1. Are image quality metrics adequate to evaluate the quality of geometric objects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Rushmeier, Holly E.

    2001-06-01

    Geometric objects are often represented by many millions of triangles or polygons, which limits the ease with which they can be transmitted and displayed electronically. This has lead to the development of many algorithms for simplifying geometric models, and to the recognition that metrics are required to evaluate their success. The goal is to create computer graphic renderings of the object that do not appear to be degraded to a human observer. The perceptual evaluation of simplified objects is a new topic. One approach has been to sue image-based metrics to predict the perceived degradation of simplified 3D models. Since that 2D images of 3D objects can have significantly different perceived quality, depending on the direction of the illumination, 2D measures of image quality may not adequately capture the perceived quality of 3D objects. To address this question, we conducted experiments in which we explicitly compared the perceived quality of animated 3D objects and their corresponding 2D still image projections. Our results suggest that 2D judgements do not provide a good predictor of 3D image quality, and identify a need to develop 'object quality metrics.'

  2. A high UV environment does not ensure adequate Vitamin D status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimlin, M. G.; Lang, C. A.; Brodie, A.; Harrison, S.; Nowak, M.; Moore, M. R.

    2006-12-01

    Queensland has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world and due to the high levels of solar UV in this region it is assumed that incidental UV exposure should provide adequate vitamin D status for the population. This research was undertaken to test this assumption among healthy free-living adults in south-east Queensland, Australia (27°S), at the end of winter. This research was approved by Queensland University of Technology Human Research Ethics Committee and conducted under the guidelines of the Declaration of Helsinki. 10.2% of the sample had serum vitamin D levels below 25nm/L (deficiency) and a further 32.3% had levels between 25nm/L and 50nm/L (insufficiency). Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency can occur at the end of winter, even in sunny climates. The wintertime UV levels in south-east Queensland (UV index 4-6) are equivalent to summertime UV levels in northern regions of Europe and the USA. These ambient UV levels are sufficient to ensure synthesis of vitamin D requirements. We investigated individual UV exposure (through a self reported sun exposure questionnaire) and found correlations between exposure and Vitamin D status. Further research is needed to explore the interactions between the solar UV environment and vitamin D status, particularly in high UV environments, such as Queensland.

  3. Determination of the need for selenium by chicks fed practical diets adequate in vitamin E

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, G.F. Jr.; Su, Q.; Liu, C.H.; Sinisalo, M.; Combs, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare the dietary needs for selenium (Se) by chicks fed either purified (amino acid-based) or practical (corn- and soy-based) diets that were adequate with respect to vitamin E (i.e., contained 100 IU/kg) and all other known nutrients with the single exception of Se (i.e., contained only 0.10 ppm Se). Studies were conducted in Ithaca using Single Comb White Leghorn chicks fed the purified basal diet and in Beijing using chicks of the same breed fed either the same purified basal diet or the practical diet formulated to be similar to that used in poultry production in some parts of China and the US. Results showed that each basal diet produced severe depletion of Se-dependent glutathione peroxidase (SeGSHpx) in plasma, liver and pancreas according to the same time-course, but that other consequences of severe uncomplicated Se deficiency were much more severe among chicks fed the purified diet (e.g., growth depression, pancreatic dysfunction as indicated by elevated plasma amylase and abnormal pancreatic histology). Chicks fed the practical Se-deficient diet showed reduced pancreas levels of copper, zinc and molybdenum and elevated plasma levels of iron; they required ca. 0.10 ppm dietary Se to sustain normal SeGSHpx in several tissues and to prevent elevated amylase in plasma. The dietary Se requirement of the chick is, therefore, estimated to be 0.10 ppm.

  4. Salt, blood pressure and cardiovascular risk: what is the most adequate preventive strategy? A Swiss perspective

    PubMed Central

    Burnier, Michel; Wuerzner, Gregoire; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-01-01

    Among the various strategies to reduce the incidence of non-communicable diseases reduction of sodium intake in the general population has been recognized as one of the most cost-effective means because of its potential impact on the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases. Yet, this strategic health recommendation of the WHO and many other international organizations is far from being universally accepted. Indeed, there are still several unresolved scientific and epidemiological questions that maintain an ongoing debate. Thus what is the adequate low level of sodium intake to recommend to the general population and whether national strategies should be oriented to the overall population or only to higher risk fractions of the population such as salt-sensitive patients are still discussed. In this paper, we shall review the recent results of the literature regarding salt, blood pressure and cardiovascular risk and we present the recommendations recently proposed by a group of experts of Switzerland. The propositions of the participating medical societies are to encourage national health authorities to continue their discussion with the food industry in order to reduce the sodium intake of food products with a target of mean salt intake of 5–6 grams per day in the population. Moreover, all initiatives to increase the information on the effect of salt on health and on the salt content of food are supported. PMID:26321959

  5. A test of the cerebellar hypothesis of dyslexia in adequate and inadequate responders to reading intervention.

    PubMed

    Barth, Amy E; Denton, Carolyn A; Stuebing, Karla K; Fletcher, Jack M; Cirino, Paul T; Francis, David J; Vaughn, Sharon

    2010-05-01

    The cerebellar hypothesis of dyslexia posits that cerebellar deficits are associated with reading disabilities and may explain why some individuals with reading disabilities fail to respond to reading interventions. We tested these hypotheses in a sample of children who participated in a grade 1 reading intervention study (n = 174) and a group of typically achieving children (n = 62). At posttest, children were classified as adequately responding to the intervention (n = 82), inadequately responding with decoding and fluency deficits (n = 36), or inadequately responding with only fluency deficits (n = 56). Based on the Bead Threading and Postural Stability subtests from the Dyslexia Screening Test-Junior, we found little evidence that assessments of cerebellar functions were associated with academic performance or responder status. In addition, we did not find evidence supporting the hypothesis that cerebellar deficits are more prominent for poor readers with "specific" reading disabilities (i.e., with discrepancies relative to IQ) than for poor readers with reading scores consistent with IQ. In contrast, measures of phonological awareness, rapid naming, and vocabulary were strongly associated with responder status and academic outcomes. These results add to accumulating evidence that fails to associate cerebellar functions with reading difficulties.

  6. Ipragliflozin effectively reduced visceral fat in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes under adequate diet therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Chiho; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ono, Kota; Sugawara, Hajime; Kameda, Reina; Ichiyama, Mei; Yamamoto, Kohei; Nomoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Akinobu; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-06-30

    To investigate if ipragliflozin, a novel sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, alters body composition and to identify variables associated with reductions in visceral adipose tissue in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This prospective observational study enrolled Japanese participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects were administered ipragliflozin (50 mg/day) once daily for 16 weeks. Body composition, visceral adipose tissue volume and plasma variables were measured at 0, 8, and 16-weeks. The subjects' lifestyle habits including diet and exercise were evaluated at baseline and 16 weeks. The primary endpoint was defined as the decrease of visceral adipose tissue mass. Twenty-four of 26 enrolled participants completed the study. The visceral adipose tissue decreased significantly (110 ± 33 to 101 ± 36 cm(2), p = 0.005) as well as other parameters for metabolic insufficiency including hemoglobin A1c. Seventy-one % of the total body weight reduction (-2.49 kg) was estimated by a decrease in fat mass (-1.77 kg), and the remaining reduction (22%) by water volume (-0.55 kg). A minor but significant reduction in the skeletal muscle index was also observed. Correlation analyses were performed to identify variables associated with changes in visceral adipose tissue and the only significant variable identified was diet therapy (Spearman's r = -0.416, p = 0.043). Ipragliflozin significantly decreased visceral adipose tissue, and improved parametres for metabolic dysfunction. Adequate diet therapy would be necessary to induce and enhance the therapeutic merit.

  7. Gaussian membership functions are most adequate in representing uncertainty in measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreinovich, V.; Quintana, C.; Reznik, L.

    1992-01-01

    In rare situations, like fundamental physics, we perform experiments without knowing what their results will be. In the majority of real-life measurement situations, we more or less know beforehand what kind of results we will get. Of course, this is not the precise knowledge of the type 'the result will be between alpha - beta and alpha + beta,' because in this case, we would not need any measurements at all. This is usually a knowledge that is best represented in uncertain terms, like 'perhaps (or 'most likely', etc.) the measured value x is between alpha - beta and alpha + beta.' Traditional statistical methods neglect this additional knowledge and process only the measurement results. So it is desirable to be able to process this uncertain knowledge as well. A natural way to process it is by using fuzzy logic. But, there is a problem; we can use different membership functions to represent the same uncertain statements, and different functions lead to different results. What membership function do we choose? In the present paper, we show that under some reasonable assumptions, Gaussian functions mu(x) = exp(-beta(x(exp 2))) are the most adequate choice of the membership functions for representing uncertainty in measurements. This representation was efficiently used in testing jet engines to airplanes and spaceships.

  8. Aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis for scattered sound in auditoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Molly K.; Xiang, Ning; Kleiner, Mendel

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this work was to apply an aurally-adequate time-frequency analysis technique to the analysis of sound scattering effects in auditoria. Time-frequency representations were developed as a motivated effort that takes into account binaural hearing, with a specific implementation of interaural cross-correlation process. A model of the human auditory system was implemented in the MATLAB platform based on two previous models [A. Härmä and K. Palomäki, HUTear, Espoo, Finland; and M. A. Akeroyd, A. Binaural Cross-correlogram Toolbox for MATLAB (2001), University of Sussex, Brighton]. These stages include proper frequency selectivity, the conversion of the mechanical motion of the basilar membrane to neural impulses, and binaural hearing effects. The model was then used in the analysis of room impulse responses with varying scattering characteristics. This paper discusses the analysis results using simulated and measured room impulse responses. [Work supported by the Frank H. and Eva B. Buck Foundation.

  9. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation guided cerebral protection in a parturient with Takayasu's arteritis undergoing cesarean section: a case report.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wei; Wang, Tianlong; Fu, Wenya; Wang, Fengying; Zhao, Lei

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this case report is to present the successful use of regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rScO2) monitoring guided cerebral protection for cesarean delivery in a parturient with Takayasu's arteritis at 38weeks' gestation. The parturient presented with impaired cerebral and renal perfusion. Titrated epidural anesthesia was performed. During the procedure, we used rScO2 guided cerebral protection strategies, which helped to optimize cerebral oxygen delivery and prevent cerebral complications.

  10. MRS evidence of adequate O2 supply in human skeletal muscle at the onset of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Russell S.; Wary, Claire; Wray, D. Walter; Hoff, Jan; Rossiter, Harry; Layec, Gwenael; Carlier, Pierre G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose At exercise onset, intramuscular oxidative energy production responds relatively slowly in comparison to the change in ATP demand. To determine if the slow kinetics of oxidative ATP production is due to inadequate O2 supply or metabolic inertia we studied the kinetics of intramyocellular deoxygenation (deoxy-myoglobin, Mb) and metabolism (phosphocreatine, PCr), using proton (1H) and phosphorus (31P) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in 6 healthy subjects (33 ± 5 yrs). Methods Specifically, utilizing dynamic plantar flexion exercise, rest to exercise and recovery was assessed at both 60% of maximum work rate (WRmax) (moderate intensity) and 80% of WRmax (heavy intensity). Results At exercise onset [PCr] fell without delay and with a similar time constant (τ) at both exercise intensities (~33 s). In contrast, the increase in deoxy-Mb was delayed at exercise onset by 5–7 s, after which it increased with kinetics (moderate τ = 37 ± 9 s, and heavy τ = 29 ± 6 s) that were not different from τPCr (p > 0.05). At cessation, deoxy-Mb recovered without a time delay and more rapidly (τ ~20 s) than PCr (τ ~33 s) (p < 0.05). Conclusion using a unique combination of in vivo MRS techniques with high time-resolution, this study revealed a delay in intramuscular de-oxygenation at the onset of exercise, and rapid re-oxygenation kinetics upon cessation. Together these data imply that intramuscular substrate-enzyme interactions, and not O2 availability, determine the exercise onset kinetics of oxidative metabolism in healthy human skeletal muscle. PMID:25830362

  11. Improved Arterial Blood Oxygenation Following Intravenous Infusion of Cold Supersaturated Dissolved Oxygen Solution

    PubMed Central

    Grady, Daniel J; Gentile, Michael A; Riggs, John H; Cheifetz, Ira M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND One of the primary goals of critical care medicine is to support adequate gas exchange without iatrogenic sequelae. An emerging method of delivering supplemental oxygen is intravenously rather than via the traditional inhalation route. The objective of this study was to evaluate the gas-exchange effects of infusing cold intravenous (IV) fluids containing very high partial pressures of dissolved oxygen (>760 mm Hg) in a porcine model. METHODS Juvenile swines were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Each animal received an infusion of cold (13 °C) Ringer’s lactate solution (30 mL/kg/hour), which had been supersaturated with dissolved oxygen gas (39.7 mg/L dissolved oxygen, 992 mm Hg, 30.5 mL/L). Arterial blood gases and physiologic measurements were repeated at 15-minute intervals during a 60-minute IV infusion of the supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution. Each animal served as its own control. RESULTS Five swines (12.9 ± 0.9 kg) were studied. Following the 60-minute infusion, there were significant increases in PaO2 and SaO2 (P < 0.05) and a significant decrease in PaCO2 (P < 0.05), with a corresponding normalization in arterial blood pH. Additionally, there was a significant decrease in core body temperature (P < 0.05) when compared to the baseline preinfusion state. CONCLUSIONS A cold, supersaturated dissolved oxygen solution may be intravenously administered to improve arterial blood oxygenation and ventilation parameters and induce a mild therapeutic hypothermia in a porcine model. PMID:25249764

  12. Placental Gas Exchange and the Oxygen Supply to the Fetus.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony M

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen supply of the fetus depends on the blood oxygen content and flow rate in the uterine and umbilical arteries and the diffusing capacity of the placenta. Oxygen consumption by the placenta is a significant factor and a potential limitation on availability to the fetus. The relevance of these several factors as well as responses to acute or sustained hypoxia has been explored in the sheep model. In addition, much has been learned in the context of hypobaric hypoxia by studying human populations that have resided at high altitude for varying periods of time. Embryonic development occurs under anaerobic conditions and even the fetus is adapted to a low oxygen environment. Nevertheless, there is a reserve capacity, and during acute hypoxia the fetus can counter a 50% reduction in oxygen delivery by increasing fractional extraction. During sustained hypoxia, on the other hand, fetal growth is slowed, although oxygen consumption is unaltered when corrected for fetal mass. Similarly, birth weight is reduced in humans living at high altitude even if the effect is tempered in those with a long highland ancestry. Placental mass changes little during sustained hypoxia in sheep or humans at high altitude. This conceals the fact that there are structural changes and that placental oxygen consumption is reduced. The underlying mechanisms are a current focus of research. One intriguing possibility is that increased anaerobic metabolism of glucose in the placenta spares oxygen for the fetus but reduces its supply of substrate and thereby limits fetal growth.

  13. Singlet oxygen kinetics in a double microwave discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitz, Greg A.; Lange, Matthew A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2004-09-01

    Chemical lasers offer the highest powers necessary for many weapons applications, but require significant logistical support in the delivery of specialized fuels to the battlefield. In the Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL), which is the weapon aboard the Airborne Laser (ABL), gaseous chlorine and liquid basic hydrogen peroxide are used to generate the singlet oxygen energy reservoir. The goal of the current multi-university research program is to demonstrate an oxygen-iodine laser with electrical discharge production of singlet oxygen. Typically, oxygen discharges are limited to about 15% yield for singlet oxygen. The electron excitation cross-sections as a function of E/N are well established. However, the kinetics for electron and singlet oxygen interactions is considerably more difficult to study. Optical diagnostics for O2(a, b), and O, have been applied to a double microwave discharge flow tube. By examining the difference in singlet oxygen kinetics between the two discharges in series, considerable information regarding the excited-state, excited-state interactions is obtained. Under certain discharge conditions, the O2(a) concentration significantly increases outside of the discharge, even after thermal effects are accounted.

  14. In vitro comparison of the delivery of gaseous microemboli and hemodynamic energy for a diagonal and a roller pump during simulated infantile cardiopulmonary bypass procedures.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Ranjodh; Wang, Shigang; Kunselman, Allen R; Ündar, Akif

    2014-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is used for a variety of procedures in pediatric patients. Flow settings of the CPB pump have dramatic effects on patient outcome, and gaseous microemboli delivery within the CPB circuit has been linked to neurological complications. To ensure the ongoing improvement of pediatric CPB, consistent evaluation and improvement of the equipment is necessary. In this study we analyze the Jostra HL-20 roller pump (Jostra USA, Austin, TX, USA) and a Medos Deltastream DP3 diagonal pump (MEDOS Medizintechnik AG, Stolberg, Germany) which has not yet received Food and Drug Administration approval. An infant CPB model with heparinized human blood is used to quantify the gaseous microemboli delivery (via an Emboli Detection and Classification Quantifier), as well as the hemodynamic energy delivered under flow rates of 400, 800, and 1200 mL/min. Results show that at most flow settings the DP3 delivers fewer microemboli than the Jostra roller pump at the pre-oxygenator site, with an exception at 1200 mL/min under pulsatile mode. The total volume and the number of gaseous microemboli greater than 40 μm in diameter were lower in the DP3 group. The HL-20 exhibits less stolen blood flow (except at 1200 mL/min) and oxygenator pressure drops in both pulsatile and nonpulsatile mode. Additionally, under pulsatile flow the DP3 delivers greater surplus hemodynamic energy. Both pumps produce relatively few microemboli and deliver adequate hemodynamic energy to the pseudo-patient, with the DP3 performing slightly better under most flow settings.

  15. Medical negligence lawsuits relating to labor and delivery.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Wayne R; Schifrin, Barry S

    2007-06-01

    Most allegations in obstetric lawsuits against obstetrician-gynecologists relate in some manner to the management of labor and delivery; few solely involve perceived flaws in prenatal or postpartum care. Although many of these cases accuse the defendant of not having properly monitored the fetus during labor for signs of oxygen deprivation, there is in most cases an underlying allegation regarding proper decision making about the timing and route of delivery. A perspective on accusations relating to the failure to identify or to act on intrapartum asphyxia has been presented elsewhere in this issue. This article focuses on legal allegations that arise from the conduct of labor and the timing of delivery, independent of those related to fetal monitoring.

  16. Contemporary Proton Therapy Systems Adequately Protect Patients from Exposure to Stray Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Giebeler, Annelise; Zhang Rui; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Woo, Shiao; Mohan, Radhe; Yepes, Pablo

    2009-03-10

    Proton beam therapy has provided safe and effective treatments for a variety of adult cancers. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in utilizing proton therapy for pediatric cancers because it allows better sparing of healthy tissues. Minimizing exposures of normal tissues is especially important in children because they are highly susceptible to consequential late effects, including the development of a radiogenic second cancer, which may occur years or even decades after treatment of the first cancer. While the dosimetric advantage of therapeutic proton beams is well understood, relatively little attention has been paid to the whole-body exposure to stray neutron radiation that is inherent in proton therapy. In this report, we review the physical processes that lead to neutron exposures, discuss the potential for mitigating these exposures using advanced proton beam delivery systems, and present a comparative analysis of predicted second cancer incidence following various external beam therapies. In addition, we discuss uncertainties in the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons for carcinogenesis and the impact that these uncertainties have on second-cancer risk predictions for survivors of adult and childhood cancer who receive proton therapy.

  17. Contemporary Proton Therapy Systems Adequately Protect Patients from Exposure to Stray Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhauser, Wayne D.; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Taddei, Phillip J.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Giebeler, Annelise; Zhang, Rui; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Yepes, Pablo; Woo, Shiao; Mohan, Radhe

    2009-03-01

    Proton beam therapy has provided safe and effective treatments for a variety of adult cancers. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in utilizing proton therapy for pediatric cancers because it allows better sparing of healthy tissues. Minimizing exposures of normal tissues is especially important in children because they are highly susceptible to consequential late effects, including the development of a radiogenic second cancer, which may occur years or even decades after treatment of the first cancer. While the dosimetric advantage of therapeutic proton beams is well understood, relatively little attention has been paid to the whole-body exposure to stray neutron radiation that is inherent in proton therapy. In this report, we review the physical processes that lead to neutron exposures, discuss the potential for mitigating these exposures using advanced proton beam delivery systems, and present a comparative analysis of predicted second cancer incidence following various external beam therapies. In addition, we discuss uncertainties in the relative biological effectiveness of neutrons for carcinogenesis and the impact that these uncertainties have on second-cancer risk predictions for survivors of adult and childhood cancer who receive proton therapy.

  18. 45 CFR 2508.10 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and automatic record..., and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and...

  19. 45 CFR 2508.10 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and automatic record..., and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and...

  20. 45 CFR 2508.10 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and automatic record..., and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of manual and...