Science.gov

Sample records for adequate signal-to-noise ratio

  1. Signal-to-noise ratio determination circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) determination of an input is described, having signal components within a given frequency range and noise components, without actual measurement of the noise components. Bandpass limiter having a constant signal plus noise output level is connected to the output of the first filter, the signal-to-noise ratio of the input to the bandpass limiter being linearly related to the dbm level of signal components at the output. Calibration is connected to the bandpass limiter and is responsive to the signal components at the output to derive the SNR of the input to the determination circuit. The SNR determination circuit is disclosed for use in a diversity receiver having a plurality of input channels.

  2. Signal-to-noise ratios in coherent soft limiters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Expressions for the output signal-to-noise power ratio of a bandpass soft limiter followed by a coherent detection device are presented and discussed. It is found that a significant improvement in the output signal-to-noise ratio at low input SNRs can be achieved by such soft limiters as compared to hard limiters. This indicates that the soft limiter may be of some use in the area of threshold extension. Approximation methods for determining output signal-to-noise spectral densities are also presented.

  3. Algorithm for astronomical, point source, signal to noise ratio calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jayroe, R. R.; Schroeder, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    An algorithm was developed to simulate the expected signal to noise ratios as a function of observation time in the charge coupled device detector plane of an optical telescope located outside the Earth's atmosphere for a signal star, and an optional secondary star, embedded in a uniform cosmic background. By choosing the appropriate input values, the expected point source signal to noise ratio can be computed for the Hubble Space Telescope using the Wide Field/Planetary Camera science instrument.

  4. Radar antenna pointing for optimized signal to noise ratio.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter; Marquette, Brandeis

    2013-01-01

    The Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a radar echo signal will vary across a range swath, due to spherical wavefront spreading, atmospheric attenuation, and antenna beam illumination. The antenna beam illumination will depend on antenna pointing. Calculations of geometry are complicated by the curved earth, and atmospheric refraction. This report investigates optimizing antenna pointing to maximize the minimum SNR across the range swath.

  5. Estimating the signal-to-noise ratio of AVIRIS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Paul J.; Dungan, Jennifer L.

    1988-01-01

    To make the best use of narrowband airborne visible/infrared imaging spectrometer (AVIRIS) data, an investigator needs to know the ratio of signal to random variability or noise (signal-to-noise ratio or SNR). The signal is land cover dependent and varies with both wavelength and atmospheric absorption; random noise comprises sensor noise and intrapixel variability (i.e., variability within a pixel). The three existing methods for estimating the SNR are inadequate, since typical laboratory methods inflate while dark current and image methods deflate the SNR. A new procedure is proposed called the geostatistical method. It is based on the removal of periodic noise by notch filtering in the frequency domain and the isolation of sensor noise and intrapixel variability using the semi-variogram. This procedure was applied easily and successfully to five sets of AVIRIS data from the 1987 flying season and could be applied to remotely sensed data from broadband sensors.

  6. Filter distortion effects on telemetry signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, R.; Hurd, W.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of filtering on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of a coherently demodulated band-limited signal is determined in the presence of worse-case amplitude ripple. The problem is formulated mathematically as an optimization problem in the L2-Hilbert space. The form of the worst-cast amplitude ripple is specified, and the degradation in the SNR is derived in a closed form expression. It is shown that when the maximum passband amplitude ripple is 2 delta (peak to peak), the SNR is degraded by at most (1 - delta squared), even when the ripple is unknown or uncompensated. For example, an SNR loss of less than 0.01 dB due to amplitude ripple can be assured by keeping the amplitude ripple to under 0.42 dB.

  7. Study of signal-to-noise ratio in digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2009-02-01

    Mammography techniques have recently advanced from those using analog systems (the screen-film system) to those using digital systems; for example, computed radiography (CR) and flat-panel detectors (FPDs) are nowadays used in mammography. Further, phase contrast mammography (PCM)-a digital technique by which images with a magnification of 1.75× can be obtained-is now available in the market. We studied the effect of the air gap in PCM and evaluated the effectiveness of an antiscatter x-ray grid in conventional mammography (CM) by measuring the scatter fraction ratio (SFR) and relative signal-to-noise ratio (rSNR) and comparing them between PCM and the digital CM. The results indicated that the SFRs for the CM images obtained with a grid were the lowest and that these ratios were almost the same as those for the PCM images. In contrast, the rSNRs for the PCM images were the highest, which means that the scattering of x-rays was sufficiently reduced by the air gap without the loss of primary x-rays.

  8. Imaging signal-to-noise ratio of synthetic aperture ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2015-09-01

    On the basis of the Poisson photocurrent statistics in the photon-limited heterodyne detection, in this paper, the signal-to-noise ratios in the receiver in the time domain and on the focused 1-D image and 2-D image in the space domain are derived for both the down-looking and side-looking synthetic aperture imaging ladars using PIN or APD photodiodes. The major shot noises in the down-looking SAIL and the side-looking SAIL are, respectively, from the dark current of photodiode and the local beam current. It is found that the ratio of 1-D image SNR to receiver SNR is proportional to the number of resolution elements in the cross direction of travel and the ratio of 2-D image SNR to 1-D image SNR is proportional to the number of resolution elements in the travel direction. And the sensitivity, the effect of Fourier transform of sampled signal, and the influence of time response of detection circuit are discussed, too. The study will help to correctly design a SAIL system.

  9. Lateral line canal morphology and signal to noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Adrian; Herzog, Hendrik; Bleckmann, Horst

    2011-04-01

    The lateral line system of fish is important for many behaviors, including spatial orientation, prey detection, shoaling, intra specific communication and entraining. The smallest sensory unit of the lateral line is the neuromast that occurs free standing on the skin and in fluid filled canals. With aid of the lateral line fish perceive minute water motions. In their natural habitat fish are not only faced with biotic water motion but also with the abiotic fluctuations caused by various inanimate sources. The detection of meaningful signals is crucial for survival, and therefore animals should be able to separate meaningful signals from noise. Fishes live in various habitats (e.g. in still water or in running water). Therefore it is not surprising that the number and distribution of neuromasts as well as canal dimension, canal shape and canal branching patterns differ among fish species. We studied how lateral line canal parameters influence the filter properties of lateral line canals. To do so we exposed artificial lateral line canals, equipped with artificial neuromasts (sensors), to the vortex street shed by a submerged cylinder and to air bubble noise. We found that certain canal parameters significantly can enhance the signal to noise ratio.

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  11. High signal-to-noise ratio quantum well bolometer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmar, Stanley; Höglund, Linda; Andersson, Jan; Vieider, Christian; Savage, Susan; Ericsson, Per

    2006-09-01

    Novel single crystalline high-performance temperature sensing materials (quantum well structures) have been developed for the manufacturing of uncooled infrared bolometers. SiGe/Si and AlGaAs/GaAs quantum wells are grown epitaxially on standard Si and GaAs substrates respectively. The former use holes as charge carriers utilizing the discontinuities in the valence band structure, whereas the latter operate in a similar manner with electrons in the conduction band. By optimizing parameters such as the barrier height (by variation of the germanium/aluminium content respectively) and the fermi level E f (by variation of the quantum well width and doping level) these materials provide the potential to engineer layer structures with a very high temperature coefficient of resistance, TCR, as compared with conventional thin film materials such as vanadium oxide and amorphous silicon. In addition, the high quality crystalline material promises very low 1/f-noise characteristics promoting an outstanding signal to noise ratio and well defined and uniform material properties, A comparison between the two (SiGe/Si and AlGaAs/GaAs) quantum well structures and their fundamental theoretical limits are discussed and compared to experimental results. A TCR of 2.0%/K and 4.5%/K have been obtained experimentally for SiGe/Si and AlGaAs/GaAs respectively. The noise level for both materials is measured as being several orders of magnitude lower than that of a-Si and VOx. These uncooled thermistor materials can be hybridized with read out circuits by using conventional flip-chip assembly or wafer level adhesion bonding. The increased bolometer performance so obtained can either be exploited for increasing the imaging system performance, i. e. obtaining a low NETD, or to reduce the vacuum packaging requirements for low cost applications (e.g. automotive).

  12. Optimal signal-to-noise ratio in stochastic time-delayed bistable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shilong

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal signal-to-noise ratio in a stochastic time-delayed bistable system. By using the small delay approximation, we transform the time-delayed system into stochastic nondelayed differential equations to obtain the analytic expressions of the signal-to-noise ratio in different mechanisms. In the valid range of small delay approximation, we compare the peak values of signal-to-noise ratio curves and obtain the optimal signal-to-noise ratio. From the results, we find that the interplay of time delay and noise has a great influence on time-delayed bistable systems.

  13. Lidar signal-to-noise ratio improvements: Considerations and techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassebo, Yasser Y.

    The primary objective of this study is to improve lidar signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and hence extend attainable lidar ranges through reduction of the sky background noise (BGP), which dominates other sources of noise in daytime operations. This is particularly important for Raman lidar techniques where the Raman backscattered signal of interest is relatively weak compared with the elastic backscatter lidars. Two approaches for reduction of sky background noise are considered: (1) Improvements in lidar SNR by optimization of the design of the lidar receiver were examined by a series of simulations. This part of the research concentrated on biaxial lidar systems, where overlap between laser beam and receiver field of view (FOV) is an important aspect of noise considerations. The first optimized design evolved is a wedge shaped aperture. While this design has the virtue of greatly reducing background light, it is difficult to implement practically, requiring both changes in area and position with lidar range. A second more practical approach, which preserves some of the advantages of the wedge design, was also evolved. This uses a smaller area circular aperture optimally located in the image plane for desired ranges. Simulated numerical results for a biaxial lidar have shown that the best receiver parameters selection is one using a small circular aperture (field stop) with a small telescope focal length f, to ensure the minimum FOV that accepts all return signals over the entire lidar range while at the same time minimizing detected BGP and hence maximizing lidar SNR and attainable lidar ranges. The improvement in lidar SNR was up to 18%. (2) A polarization selection technique was implemented to reduce sky background signal for linearly polarized monostatic elastic backscatter lidar measurements. The technique takes advantage of naturally occurring polarization properties in scattered sky light, and then ensures that both the lidar transmitter and receiver track and

  14. Signal to Noise Ratios of Pulsed and Sinewave Modulated Direct Detection Lidar for IPDA Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratios have been derived for IPDA lidar using a direct detection receiver for both pulsed and sinewave laser modulation techniques, and the results and laboratory measurements are presented

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio for the wide field-planetary camera of the Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zissa, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios for the Wide Field Camera and Planetary Camera of the Space Telescope were calculated as a function of integration time. Models of the optical systems and CCD detector arrays were used with a 27th visual magnitude point source and a 25th visual magnitude per arc-sq. second extended source. A 23rd visual magnitude per arc-sq. second background was assumed. The models predicted signal-to-noise ratios of 10 within 4 hours for the point source centered on a signal pixel. Signal-to-noise ratios approaching 10 are estimated for approximately 0.25 x 0.25 arc-second areas within the extended source after 10 hours integration.

  16. [Improving the signal to noise ratio of spectroscopy for tongue inspection by optical modulation].

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Ling; Wu, Xiao-rong

    2012-01-01

    In order to solve the problem that the collected spectrum was influenced seriously by the environment light, optical modulation was used to improve the signal to noise ratio of spectroscopy-tongue inspection for the first time. First, reference light was modulated by reticle in this system; second, the reflect spectrum of the same measured object was collected under the condition that it was influenced by green, purple, red laser and environment light respectively; thirdly, the DFT was used to demodulate the collected spectrum data; the maximum harmonic components were extracted and normalized, then the spectral curve was drawn; by comparison, the spectral curves of the same measured object under different condition were almost the same. The experiment result showed that the optical modulation can remove the influence of the environment light; and this method can provide a new way to improve the signal to noise ratio of spectroscopy for tongue inspection. PMID:22497157

  17. Signal-to-noise ratio losses in full spectrum combining of signals with a downconverted subcarrier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Statman, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the results of the signal-to-noise ratio loss in the process of full spectrum combining of signals with a downconverted subcarrier under imperfect conditions. These imperfect conditions not only include the misalignment of the carrier, the subcarrier, and the symbols, but they also include the nonideal filtering in the subcarrier downconversion process, the cutoff of the data bandwidth, and the distortion in signal waveform.

  18. Periodic variations in the signal-to-noise ratios of signals received from the ICE spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadeau, T.

    1986-01-01

    Data from the ICE probe to comet Giacobini-Zinner are analyzed to determine the effects of spacecraft rotation upon the signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the two channels of data. In addition, long-term variations from sources other than rotations are considered. Results include a pronounced SNR variation over a period of three seconds (one rotation) and a lesser effect over a two minute period (possibly due to the receiving antenna conscan).

  19. Improving signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging based on spatial correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Tianyi; Chen, Qian; He, Weiji; Zou, Yunhao; Dai, Huidong; Gu, Guohua

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, compressive imaging based on spatial correlation (CISC), which uses second-order correlation with the measurement matrix, is introduced to improve the signal-to-noise ratio performance of compressive imaging (CI). Numerical simulations and experiments are performed as well. Referred to the results, it can be seen that CISC performs much better than CI in three common noise environments. This provides the great opportunity to pave the way for real applications.

  20. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Prediction and Validation for Space Shuttle GPS Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwu, Shian U.; Adkins, Antha A.; Loh, Yin-Chung; Brown, Lisa C.; Sham, Catherine C.; Kroll, Quin D.

    2002-01-01

    A deterministic method for Space Station Global Positioning System (GPS) Signal-To- Noise Ratio (SNR) predictions is proposed. The complex electromagnetic interactions between GPS antennas and surrounding Space Station structures are taken into account by computational electromagnetic technique. This computer simulator is capable of taking into account multipath effects from dynamically changed solar panels and thermal radiators. A comparison with recent collected Space Station GPS system flight experiment data is presented. The simulation results are in close agreement with flight data.

  1. Radiometric and signal-to-noise ratio properties of multiplex dispersive spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Barducci, Alessandro; Guzzi, Donatella; Lastri, Cinzia; Nardino, Vanni; Marcoionni, Paolo; Pippi, Ivan

    2010-10-01

    Recent theoretical investigations have shown important radiometric disadvantages of interferential multiplexing in Fourier transform spectrometry that apparently can be applied even to coded aperture spectrometers. We have reexamined the methods of noninterferential multiplexing in order to assess their signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, relying on a theoretical modeling of the multiplexed signals. We are able to show that quite similar SNR and radiometric disadvantages affect multiplex dispersive spectrometry. The effect of noise on spectral estimations is discussed.

  2. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of marine seismic data: A case study from offshore Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taeyoun; Jang, Seonghyung

    2016-11-01

    Subsurface imaging is difficult without removing the multiples intrinsic to most marine seismic data. Choosing the right multiple suppression method when working with marine data depends on the type of multiples and sometimes involves trial and error. A major amount of multiple energy in seismic data is related to the large reflectivity of the surface. Surface-related multiple elimination (SRME) is effective for suppressing free-surface-related multiples. Although SRME has some limitations, it is widely used because it requires no assumptions about the subsurface velocities, positions, and reflection coefficients of the reflector causing the multiples. The common reflector surface (CRS) stacking technique uses CRS reflectors rather than common mid-point (CMP) reflectors. It stacks more traces than conventional stacking methods and increases the signal-to-noise ratio. The purpose of this study is to address a process issue for multiple suppression with SRME and Radon filtering, and to increase the signal-to-noise ratio by using CRS stacking on seismic data from the eastern continental margin of Korea. To remove free surface multiples, SRME and Radon filtering are applied to attenuate the interbed multiples. Results obtained using synthetic data and field data show that the combination of SRME and Radon filtering is effective for suppressing free-surface multiples and peg-leg multiples. Applying CRS stacking to seismic data in which multiples have been eliminated increases the signal-to-noise ratio for the area examined, which is being considered for carbon dioxide capture and storage.

  3. Intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals in the Einstein Telescope. I. Signal-to-noise ratio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. A.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2011-02-15

    The Einstein Telescope (ET) is a proposed third-generation ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detector, for which the target is a sensitivity that is a factor of 10 better than Advanced LIGO and a frequency range that extends down to {approx}1 Hz. Such a third-generation interferometer will provide opportunities to test Einstein's theory of relativity in the strong field and will realize precision gravitational wave astronomy with a thousandfold increase in the expected number of events over the advanced ground-based detectors. A design study for ET is currently underway, so it is timely to assess the science that could be done with such an instrument. This paper is the first in a series that will carry out a detailed study of intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) for ET. In the context of ET, an IMRI is the inspiral of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole into an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH). In this paper we focus on the development of IMRI waveform models for circular and equatorial inspirals. We consider two approximations for the waveforms, which both incorporate the inspiral, merger, and ringdown phases in a consistent way. One approximation, valid for IMBHs of arbitrary spin, uses the transition model of Ori and Thorne [A. Ori and K. S. Thorne, Phys. Rev. D 62, 124022 (2000).] to describe the merger, and this is then matched smoothly onto a ringdown waveform. The second approximation uses the effective one body approach to model the merger phase of the waveform and is valid for nonspinning IMBHs. In this paper, we use both waveform models to compute signal-to-noise ratios for IMRI sources detectable by ET. At a redshift of z=1, we find typical signal-to-noise ratios for IMRI systems with masses 1.4M{sub {center_dot}}+100M{sub {center_dot}}, 10M{sub {center_dot}}+100M{sub {center_dot}}, 1.4M{sub {center_dot}}+500M{sub {center_dot}} and 10M{sub {center_dot}}+500M{sub {center_dot}} of {approx}10-25, {approx}40-80, {approx}3-15, and

  4. Signal type and signal-to-noise ratio interact to affect cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Grush, Leslie D

    2016-08-01

    Use of speech signals and background noise is emerging in cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) studies; however, the interaction between signal type and noise level remains unclear. Two experiments determined the interaction between signal type and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on CAEPs. Three signals (syllable /ba/, 1000-Hz tone, and the /ba/ envelope with 1000-Hz fine structure) with varying SNRs were used in two experiments, demonstrating signal-by-SNR interactions due to both envelope and spectral characteristics. When using real-world stimuli such as speech to evoke CAEPs, temporal and spectral complexity leads to differences with traditional tonal stimuli, especially when presented in background noise. PMID:27586784

  5. Signal to Noise Ratio Estimations for a Volcanic ASH Detection Lidar. Case Study: The Met Office

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoussis, George; Adam, Mariana; Avdikos, George

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we calculate the Signal-to-Noise (SNR) ratio of a 3-channel commercial (Raymetics) volcanic ash detection system, (LR111-D300), already operating under Met Office organization. The methodology for the accurate estimation is presented for day and nighttime conditions. The results show that SNR values are higher than 10 for ranges up to 13 km for both nighttime and daytime conditions. This is a quite good result compared with other values presented in bibliography and proves that such system is able to detect volcanic ash over a range of 20 km.

  6. Calculation of mutual information for nonlinear communication channel at large signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhov, I. S.; Reznichenko, A. V.; Turitsyn, S. K.

    2016-10-01

    Using the path-integral technique we examine the mutual information for the communication channel modeled by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation with additive Gaussian noise. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation is one of the fundamental models in nonlinear physics, and it has a broad range of applications, including fiber optical communications—the backbone of the internet. At large signal-to-noise ratio we present the mutual information through the path-integral, which is convenient for the perturbative expansion in nonlinearity. In the limit of small noise and small nonlinearity we derive analytically the first nonzero nonlinear correction to the mutual information for the channel.

  7. Enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio of pressure sensitive paint data by singular value decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuhoff, M.; Yorita, D.; Asai, K.; Alfredsson, P. H.

    2013-07-01

    When using pressure sensitive paint under unsteady conditions in low-speed applications, the signal-to-noise ratio is usually low and may hinder the proper evaluation of the acquired data. Here, we propose a new noise-filtering scheme that is based on singular value decomposition. As a test case, we evaluate the fluctuating pressure field due to unsteady vortex shedding on the side of a square cylinder. The proposed scheme resulted in a reduction of pixel noise of the order of two magnitudes which made it possible to obtain results regarding the spatial form of flow structures as well as the shedding frequency.

  8. Effects of noise suppression on intelligibility: dependency on signal-to-noise ratios.

    PubMed

    Hilkhuysen, Gaston; Gaubitch, Nikolay; Brookes, Mike; Huckvale, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The effects on speech intelligibility of three different noise reduction algorithms (spectral subtraction, minimal mean squared error spectral estimation, and subspace analysis) were evaluated in two types of noise (car and babble) over a 12 dB range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). Results from these listening experiments showed that most algorithms deteriorated intelligibility scores. Modeling of the results with a logit-shaped psychometric function showed that the degradation in intelligibility scores was largely congruent with a constant shift in SNR, although some additional degradation was observed at two SNRs, suggesting a limited interaction between the effects of noise suppression and SNR.

  9. Evaluating signal-to-noise ratios, loudness, and related measures as indicators of airborne sound insulation.

    PubMed

    Park, H K; Bradley, J S

    2009-09-01

    Subjective ratings of the audibility, annoyance, and loudness of music and speech sounds transmitted through 20 different simulated walls were used to identify better single number ratings of airborne sound insulation. The first part of this research considered standard measures such as the sound transmission class the weighted sound reduction index (R(w)) and variations of these measures [H. K. Park and J. S. Bradley, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 126, 208-219 (2009)]. This paper considers a number of other measures including signal-to-noise ratios related to the intelligibility of speech and measures related to the loudness of sounds. An exploration of the importance of the included frequencies showed that the optimum ranges of included frequencies were different for speech and music sounds. Measures related to speech intelligibility were useful indicators of responses to speech sounds but were not as successful for music sounds. A-weighted level differences, signal-to-noise ratios and an A-weighted sound transmission loss measure were good predictors of responses when the included frequencies were optimized for each type of sound. The addition of new spectrum adaptation terms to R(w) values were found to be the most practical approach for achieving more accurate predictions of subjective ratings of transmitted speech and music sounds. PMID:19739735

  10. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable. Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients. The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz-1 cm-1). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in deep

  11. Multiplane wave imaging increases signal-to-noise ratio in ultrafast ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Tiran, Elodie; Deffieux, Thomas; Correia, Mafalda; Maresca, David; Osmanski, Bruno-Felix; Sieu, Lim-Anna; Bergel, Antoine; Cohen, Ivan; Pernot, Mathieu; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-01

    Ultrafast imaging using plane or diverging waves has recently enabled new ultrasound imaging modes with improved sensitivity and very high frame rates. Some of these new imaging modalities include shear wave elastography, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast-enhanced imaging and functional ultrasound imaging. Even though ultrafast imaging already encounters clinical success, increasing even more its penetration depth and signal-to-noise ratio for dedicated applications would be valuable. Ultrafast imaging relies on the coherent compounding of backscattered echoes resulting from successive tilted plane waves emissions; this produces high-resolution ultrasound images with a trade-off between final frame rate, contrast and resolution. In this work, we introduce multiplane wave imaging, a new method that strongly improves ultrafast images signal-to-noise ratio by virtually increasing the emission signal amplitude without compromising the frame rate. This method relies on the successive transmissions of multiple plane waves with differently coded amplitudes and emission angles in a single transmit event. Data from each single plane wave of increased amplitude can then be obtained, by recombining the received data of successive events with the proper coefficients. The benefits of multiplane wave for B-mode, shear wave elastography and ultrafast Doppler imaging are experimentally demonstrated. Multiplane wave with 4 plane waves emissions yields a 5.8  ±  0.5 dB increase in signal-to-noise ratio and approximately 10 mm in penetration in a calibrated ultrasound phantom (0.7 d MHz(-1) cm(-1)). In shear wave elastography, the same multiplane wave configuration yields a 2.07  ±  0.05 fold reduction of the particle velocity standard deviation and a two-fold reduction of the shear wave velocity maps standard deviation. In functional ultrasound imaging, the mapping of cerebral blood volume results in a 3 to 6 dB increase of the contrast-to-noise ratio in deep

  12. Signal processing considerations for low signal to noise ratio laser Doppler and phase Doppler signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, K. M.; Wertheimer, G. D.; Bachalo, William D.

    1991-01-01

    The relative performance of current methods used for estimating the phase and the frequency in LDV and phase Doppler applications in low signal to noise ratio conditions is analyzed. These methods include the Fourier analysis and the correlation techniques. Three methods that use the correlation function for frequency and phase estimations are evaluated in terms of accuracy and speed of processing. These methods include: (1) the frequency estimation using zero crossings counting of the auto-correlation function, (2) the Blackman-Tukey method, and (3) the AutoRegressive method (AR). The relative performance of these methods is evaluated and compared with the Fourier analysis method which provides the optimum performance in terms of the Maximum Likelihood (ML) criteria.

  13. Symbol signal-to-noise ratio loss in square-wave subcarrier downconversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feria, Y.; Statman, J.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents the simulated results of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss in the process of a square-wave subcarrier down conversion. In a previous article, the SNR degradation was evaluated at the output of the down converter based on the signal and noise power change. Unlike in the previous article, the SNR loss is defined here as the difference between the actual and theoretical symbol SNR's for the same symbol-error rate at the output of the symbol matched filter. The results show that an average SNR loss of 0.3 dB can be achieved with tenth-order infinite impulse response (IIR) filters. This loss is a 0.2-dB increase over the SNR degradation in the previous analysis where neither the signal distortion nor the symbol detector was considered.

  14. Degradation of signal-to-noise ratio due to amplitude distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadr, Ramin; Shahshahani, Mehrdad; Hurd, William J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of filtering on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a coherently demodulated band-limited signal is determined in the presence of worst-case amplitude ripple. The problem is formulated as an optimizaton in the Hilbert space L2. The form of the worst-case amplitude ripple is specified, and the degradation in the SNR is derived in closed form. It is shown that, when the maximum passband amplitude ripple is 2Delta (peak-to-peak), the SNR is degraded by at most (1-Delta-squared), even when the ripple is unknown or uncompensated. For example, an SNR loss of less than 0.01 dB due to amplitude ripple can be assured by keeping the amplitude ripple under 0.42 dB.

  15. Modulation of Auditory Signal-to-Noise Ratios by Efferent Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tomchik, Seth M.; Lu, Zhongmin

    2006-01-01

    One of the primary challenges that sensory systems face is extracting relevant information from background noise. In the auditory system, the ear receives efferent feedback, which may help it extract signals from noise. Here we directly test the hypothesis that efferent activity increases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ear, using the relatively simple teleost ear. Tone-evoked saccular potentials were recorded before and after efferent stimulation, and the SNR of the responses was calculated. In quiet conditions, efferent stimulation suppressed saccular responses to a tone, reducing the SNR. However, when masking noise was added, efferent stimulation increased the SNR of the saccular responses within a range of stimulus combinations. These data demonstrate that auditory efferent feedback can increase SNR in conditions where a signal is masked by noise, thereby enhancing the encoding of signals in noise. Efferent feedback thus performs a fundamental signal processing function, helping the animal to hear sounds in difficult listening conditions. PMID:16554519

  16. Shuttle bit rate synchronizer. [signal to noise ratios and error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huey, D. C.; Fultz, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A shuttle bit rate synchronizer brassboard unit was designed, fabricated, and tested, which meets or exceeds the contractual specifications. The bit rate synchronizer operates at signal-to-noise ratios (in a bit rate bandwidth) down to -5 dB while exhibiting less than 0.6 dB bit error rate degradation. The mean acquisition time was measured to be less than 2 seconds. The synchronizer is designed around a digital data transition tracking loop whose phase and data detectors are integrate-and-dump filters matched to the Manchester encoded bits specified. It meets the reliability (no adjustments or tweaking) and versatility (multiple bit rates) of the shuttle S-band communication system through an implementation which is all digital after the initial stage of analog AGC and A/D conversion.

  17. Multi-images deconvolution improves signal-to-noise ratio on gated stimulated emission depletion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Castello, Marco; Diaspro, Alberto; Vicidomini, Giuseppe

    2014-12-08

    Time-gated detection, namely, only collecting the fluorescence photons after a time-delay from the excitation events, reduces complexity, cost, and illumination intensity of a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope. In the gated continuous-wave- (CW-) STED implementation, the spatial resolution improves with increased time-delay, but the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) reduces. Thus, in sub-optimal conditions, such as a low photon-budget regime, the SNR reduction can cancel-out the expected gain in resolution. Here, we propose a method which does not discard photons, but instead collects all the photons in different time-gates and recombines them through a multi-image deconvolution. Our results, obtained on simulated and experimental data, show that the SNR of the restored image improves relative to the gated image, thereby improving the effective resolution.

  18. Theoretical analysis of signal-to-noise ratios for transient evoked otoacoustic emission recordings.

    PubMed

    Lineton, Ben

    2013-09-01

    Recordings of transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs) suffer from two main sources of contamination: Random noise and the stimulus artifact. The stimulus artifact can be substantially reduced by using a derived non-linear recording paradigm. Three such paradigms are analyzed, called here the level derived non-linear (LDNL), the double-evoked (DE), and the rate derived non-linear (RDNL) paradigms. While these methods successfully reduce the stimulus artifact, they lead to an increase in contamination by random noise. In this study, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) achievable by these three paradigms is compared using a common theoretical framework. This analysis also allows the optimization of the parameters of the RDNL paradigm to achieve the maximum SNR. Calculations based on the analysis with typical parameters used in practice suggest that when ranked in terms of their SNR for a given averaging time, RDNL performs best followed by the LDNL and DE paradigms.

  19. Signal-to-noise Ratio and Combiner Weight Estimation for Symbol Stream Combining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vo, Q. D.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for signal to noise ratio (SNR) and symbol stream combiner weight estimation. The SNR estimator employs absolute value moments as in an earlier method. The main contribution is that a new algorithm is derived for the combiner weight estimator to remove the large bias at low SNRs. The new algorithm is simulated to combine two independent symbol streams at various SNRs. As an example, the combining two symbol streams at SNRs of -1 dB and -7 dB, conbiner weight estimates using 1000 samples for the -1 dB stream and 10,000 samples for the -7 dB stream achieve an output SNR of -0.039 dB, which is just 0.012 dB below the theoretical limit achievable with perfect knowledge of the SNRs.

  20. Photoacoustic correlation signal-to-noise ratio enhancement by coherent averaging and optical waveform optimization.

    PubMed

    Telenkov, Sergey A; Alwi, Rudolf; Mandelis, Andreas

    2013-10-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging of biological tissues using laser diodes instead of conventional Q-switched pulsed systems provides an attractive alternative for biomedical applications. However, the relatively low energy of laser diodes operating in the pulsed regime, results in generation of very weak acoustic waves, and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the detected signals. This problem can be addressed if optical excitation is modulated using custom waveforms and correlation processing is employed to increase SNR through signal compression. This work investigates the effect of the parameters of the modulation waveform on the resulting correlation signal and offers a practical means for optimizing PA signal detection. The advantage of coherent signal averaging is demonstrated using theoretical analysis and a numerical model of PA generation. It was shown that an additional 5-10 dB of SNR can be gained through waveform engineering by adjusting the parameters and profile of optical modulation waveforms.

  1. The behavior of quantization spectra as a function of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    An expression for the spectrum of quantization error in a discrete-time system whose input is a sinusoid plus white Gaussian noise is derived. This quantization spectrum consists of two components: a white-noise floor and spurious harmonics. The dithering effect of the input Gaussian noise in both components of the spectrum is considered. Quantitative results in a discrete Fourier transform (DFT) example show the behavior of spurious harmonics as a function of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). These results have strong implications for digital reception and signal analysis systems. At low SNRs, spurious harmonics decay exponentially on a log-log scale, and the resulting spectrum is white. As the SNR increases, the spurious harmonics figure prominently in the output spectrum. A useful expression is given that roughly bounds the magnitude of a spurious harmonic as a function of the SNR.

  2. Analysis of Responsivity and Signal-to-Noise Ratio in PEPT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Quan; Guo, Shu-Xu; Li, Zhao-Han; Song, Jing-Yi; Chang, Yu-Chun

    2012-11-01

    We analyze the responsivity and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a punchthrough enhanced phototransistor (PEPT). Measurement results show that the PEPT exhibits a good response to light over a wide range of intensity. Because the responsivity is still as high as 106 A/W when the bias voltage is as low as 0.2 V, the device is suitable for ultra-low voltage applications. Meanwhile, with 1-10 μA bias current, the PEPT shows the best performance for the responsivity and SNR. When incident light is as low as 3.8 × 10-8 W/cm2, the responsivity reaches approximately 108 A/W. The super high responsivity of PEPTs makes it possible to fabricate small sized photodetector.

  3. Pilot Signal Design for Massive MIMO Systems: A Received Signal-To-Noise-Ratio-Based Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Jungho; Kim, Donggun; Lee, Yuni; Sung, Youngchul

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the pilot signal design for massive MIMO systems to maximize the training-based received signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is considered under two channel models: block Gauss-Markov and block independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) channel models. First, it is shown that under the block Gauss-Markov channel model, the optimal pilot design problem reduces to a semi-definite programming (SDP) problem, which can be solved numerically by a standard convex optimization tool. Second, under the block i.i.d. channel model, an optimal solution is obtained in closed form. Numerical results show that the proposed method yields noticeably better performance than other existing pilot design methods in terms of received SNR.

  4. Normal-hearing listener preferences of music as a function of signal-to-noise-ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Jillian G.

    2005-04-01

    Optimal signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) for speech discrimination are well-known, well-documented phenomena. Discrimination preferences and functions have been studied for both normal-hearing and hard-of-hearing populations, and information from these studies has provided clearer indices on additional factors affecting speech discrimination ability and SNR preferences. This knowledge lends itself to improvements in hearing aids and amplification devices, telephones, television and radio transmissions, and a wide arena of recorded media such as movies and music. This investigation was designed to identify the preferred signal-to-background ratio (SBR) of normal-hearing listeners in a musical setting. The signal was the singer's voice, and music was considered the background. Subjects listened to an unfamiliar ballad with a female singer, and rated seven different SBR treatments. When listening to melodic motifs with linguistic content, results indicated subjects preferred SBRs similar to those in conventional speech discrimination applications. However, unlike traditional speech discrimination studies, subjects did not prefer increased levels of SBR. Additionally, subjects had a much larger acceptable range of SBR in melodic motifs where the singer's voice was not intended to communicate via linguistic means, but by the pseudo-paralinguistic means of vocal timbre and harmonic arrangements. Results indicate further studies investigating perception of singing are warranted.

  5. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer R.; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-01-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  6. Geostatistical estimation of signal-to-noise ratios for spectral vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Lei; Zhang, Li; Rover, Jennifer; Wylie, Bruce K.; Chen, Xuexia

    2014-10-01

    In the past 40 years, many spectral vegetation indices have been developed to quantify vegetation biophysical parameters. An ideal vegetation index should contain the maximum level of signal related to specific biophysical characteristics and the minimum level of noise such as background soil influences and atmospheric effects. However, accurate quantification of signal and noise in a vegetation index remains a challenge, because it requires a large number of field measurements or laboratory experiments. In this study, we applied a geostatistical method to estimate signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for spectral vegetation indices. Based on the sample semivariogram of vegetation index images, we used the standardized noise to quantify the noise component of vegetation indices. In a case study in the grasslands and shrublands of the western United States, we demonstrated the geostatistical method for evaluating S/N for a series of soil-adjusted vegetation indices derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. The soil-adjusted vegetation indices were found to have higher S/N values than the traditional normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and simple ratio (SR) in the sparsely vegetated areas. This study shows that the proposed geostatistical analysis can constitute an efficient technique for estimating signal and noise components in vegetation indices.

  7. Intrinsic low pass filtering improves signal-to-noise ratio in critical-point flexure biosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ankit; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2014-08-25

    A flexure biosensor consists of a suspended beam and a fixed bottom electrode. The adsorption of the target biomolecules on the beam changes its stiffness and results in change of beam's deflection. It is now well established that the sensitivity of sensor is maximized close to the pull-in instability point, where effective stiffness of the beam vanishes. The question: “Do the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the limit-of-detection (LOD) also improve close to the instability point?”, however remains unanswered. In this article, we systematically analyze the noise response to evaluate SNR and establish LOD of critical-point flexure sensors. We find that a flexure sensor acts like an effective low pass filter close to the instability point due to its relatively small resonance frequency, and rejects high frequency noise, leading to improved SNR and LOD. We believe that our conclusions should establish the uniqueness and the technological relevance of critical-point biosensors.

  8. Human evoked cortical activity to signal-to-noise ratio and absolute signal level.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Tremblay, Kelly L; Stecker, G Christopher; Tolin, Wendy M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of signal level and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the latency and amplitude of evoked cortical activity to further our understanding of how the human central auditory system encodes signals in noise. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) were recorded from 15 young normal-hearing adults in response to a 1000 Hz tone presented at two tone levels in quiet and while continuous background noise levels were varied in five equivalent SNR steps. These 12 conditions were used to determine the effects of signal level and SNR level on CAEP components P1, N1, P2, and N2. Based on prior signal-in-noise experiments conducted in animals, we hypothesized that SNR, would be a key contributor to human CAEP characteristics. As hypothesized, amplitude increased and latency decreased with increasing SNR; in addition, there was no main effect of tone level across the two signal levels tested (60 and 75 dB SPL). Morphology of the P1-N1-P2 complex was driven primarily by SNR, highlighting the importance of noise when recording CAEPs. Results are discussed in terms of the current interest in recording CAEPs in hearing aid users.

  9. Investigation of signal-to-noise ratio in frequency-domain multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yide; Khan, Aamir A; Vigil, Genevieve D; Howard, Scott S

    2016-07-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has enabled three-dimensional quantitative molecular microscopy in vivo. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and thus the imaging rate of MPM-FLIM, which is fundamentally limited by the shot noise and fluorescence saturation, has not been quantitatively studied yet. In this paper, we investigate the SNR performance of the frequency-domain (FD) MPM-FLIM with two figures of merit: the photon economy in the limit of shot noise, and the normalized SNR in the limit of saturation. The theoretical results and Monte Carlo simulations find that two-photon FD-FLIM requires 50% fewer photons to achieve the same SNR as conventional one-photon FLIM. We also analytically show that the MPM-FD-FLIM can exploit the DC and higher harmonic components generated by nonlinear optical mixing of the excitation light to improve SNR, reducing the required number of photons by an additional 50%. Finally, the effect of fluorophore saturation on the experimental SNR performance is discussed. PMID:27409702

  10. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jinzhen; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-05-15

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  11. Reproducibility of magnetic resonance spectroscopy in correlation with signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Okada, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Setsu; Nakamoto, Yuji; Kohara, Nobuo; Senda, Michio

    2007-11-15

    An increased amount of myoinositol (mI) relative to creatine (Cr) by proton MR spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) measurement gives a useful aid for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous results of test-retest measurement of mI, however, have shown variability more than twice as large as for other metabolites. The aims of this study were to analyze test-retest variability of (1)H-MRS measurements in correlation with signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Ten subjects clinically suspected of mild AD were examined twice (2-14 days apart) with (1)H-MRS measurements of voxels placed at anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. The percent differences between two measurements (%differences) of mI/Cr showed a significant linear trend to decrease as average SNR increased, but %differences of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/Cr and choline (Cho)/Cr did not. The average of %differences was 10.5, 15.0 and 20.8 for NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr, respectively, indicating a prominent deterioration of mI/Cr measurement reproducibility, which decreased to 6.96, 15.4 and 9.87, respectively, when the analysis was limited to measurements with SNR over 25. The results indicate that MRS measurements with high SNR should be used to obtain reliable assessments of mI/Cr as accurate diagnostic indicator of AD in clinical MR examinations. PMID:17900878

  12. Perceptually optimized gain function for cochlear implant signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Stefan J; Dawson, Pam W; Hersbach, Adam A

    2012-01-01

    Noise reduction in cochlear implants has achieved significant speech perception improvements through spectral subtraction and signal-to-noise ratio based noise reduction techniques. Current methods use gain functions derived through mathematical optimization or motivated by normal listening psychoacoustic experiments. Although these gain functions have been able to improve speech perception, recent studies have indicated that they are not optimal for cochlear implant noise reduction. This study systematically investigates cochlear implant recipients' speech perception and listening preference of noise reduction with a range of gain functions. Results suggest an advantageous gain function and show that gain functions currently used for noise reduction are not optimal for cochlear implant recipients. Using the cochlear implant optimised gain function, a 27% improvement over the current advanced combination encoder (ACE) stimulation strategy in speech weighted noise and a 7% improvement over current noise reduction strategies were observed in babble noise conditions. The optimized gain function was also most preferred by cochlear implant recipients. The CI specific gain function derived from this study can be easily incorporated into existing noise reduction strategies, to further improve listening performance for CI recipients in challenging environments.

  13. On the signal-to-noise ratio in IUE high-dispersion spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leckrone, David S.; Adelman, Saul J.

    1989-01-01

    An observational and data reduction technique for fixed pattern noise (FPN) and random noise (RN) in fully extracted IUE high-dispersion spectra is described in detail, along with actual empirical values of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) achieved. A co-addition procedure, involving SWP and LWR cameras observations of the same spectrum at different positions in the image format, provides a basis to disentangle FPN from RN, allowing each average amplitude, within a given wavelength interval, to be estimated as a function of average flux number. Empirical curves, derived with the noise algorithm, make it possible to estimate the S/N in individual spectra at the wavelengths investigated. The average S/N at the continuum level in well-exposed stellar spectra varies from 10 to 20, for the orders analyzed, depending on position in the spectral format. The co-addition procedure yields an improvement in S/N by factors ranging from 2.3 to 2.9. Direct measurements of S/N in narrow, line-free wavelength intervals of individual and co-added spectra for weak-lined stars yield comparable, or in some cases somewhat higher, S/N values and improvement factors.

  14. Downhole microseismic monitoring for low signal-to-noise ratio events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hang; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Microseismic monitoring plays an important role in the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas/oil production. The accuracy of event location is an essential issue in microseismic monitoring. The data obtained from downhole monitoring system usually show a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the recorded data from the surface. For small microseismic events, however, P waves recorded in a downhole array may be very weak, while S waves are generally dominant and strong. Numerical experiments suggest that inverting S-wave arrival times alone is not sufficient to constrain event locations. In this study, we perform extensive location tests with various noise effects using a grid search method that matches the travel time data of the S wave across a recording array. We conclude that fitting S-wave travel time data along with at least one P-wave travel time of the same event can significantly improve location accuracy. In practice, picking S-wave arrival time data and at least one P-wave pick is possible for many small events. We demonstrate that fitting the combination of the travel time data is a robust approach, which can help increase the number of microseismic events to be located accurately during hydraulic fracturing.

  15. Optimizing the Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio of MRI Strip Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ananda; Bottomley, Paul A.

    2007-01-01

    An MRI detector is formed from a conducting strip separated by a dielectric substrate from a ground plane, and tuned to a quarter-wavelength. By distributing discrete tuning elements along the strip, the geometric design may be adjusted to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for a given application. Here a numerical electromagnetic (EM) method of moments (MoM) is applied to determine the length, width, substrate thickness, dielectric constant, and number of tuning elements that yield the best intrinsic SNR (ISNR) of the strip detector at 1.5 Tesla. The central question of how strip performance compares with that of a conventional optimized loop coil is also addressed. The numerical method is validated against the known ISNR performance of loop coils, and its ability to predict the tuning capacitances and performance of seven experimental strip detectors of varying length, width, substrate thickness, and dielectric constant. We find that strip detectors with low-dielectric constant, moderately thin-substrate, and length about 1.3 (±0.2) times the depth of interest perform best. The ISNR of strips is comparable to that of loops (i.e., higher close to the detector but lower at depth). The SNR improves with two inherently-decoupled strips, whose sensitivity profile is well-suited to parallel MRI. The findings are summarized as design “rules of thumb.” PMID:16724302

  16. Polarization-discrimination technique to maximize the lidar signal-to-noise ratio for daylight operations.

    PubMed

    Hassebo, Yasser Y; Gross, Barry; Oo, Min; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Samir

    2006-08-01

    The impact and potential of a polarization-selection technique to reduce the sky background signal for linearly polarized monostatic elastic backscatter lidar measurements are examined. Taking advantage of naturally occurring polarization properties in scattered skylight, we devised a polarization-discrimination technique in which both the lidar transmitter and the receiver track and minimize detected sky background noise while maintaining maximum lidar signal throughput. Lidar elastic backscatter measurements, carried out continuously during daylight hours at 532 nm, show as much as a factor of square root 10 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over conventional unpolarized schemes. For vertically pointing lidars, the largest improvements are limited to the early morning and late afternoon hours, while for lidars scanning azimuthally and in elevation at angles other than vertical, significant improvements are achievable over more extended time periods with the specific times and improvement factors depending on the specific angle between the lidar and the solar axes. The resulting diurnal variations in SNR improvement sometimes show an asymmetry with the solar angle that analysis indicates can be attributed to changes in observed relative humidity that modifies the underlying aerosol microphysics and observed optical depth.

  17. Noise analysis and signal-to-noise ratio model of gain modulation laser imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Zhipeng; Li, Sining; Zhang, Dayong; Lu, Wei

    2015-10-01

    Gain modulation imaging technique is one of the prominent schemes for scannerless lidar. By controlling the gate width, it's easy to suppress backscatter noise and make the image more accurately. Imaging range and accuracy of gain modulation laser imaging become a research focus at present. According to the principle of imaging, the signal energy and the noise energy reaching the imager can be found. Further signal-to-noise ratio can be obtained. Previous theoretical models consider only linear gain condition. However the influence of laser pulse width and other factors are less taken into consideration. These models will have a certain deviation with the actual one. By simulating the nonlinear gain with consideration of the laser pulse width and lambert spherical radiation, more accurate SNR model of gain modulation laser imaging is obtained. On this basis, the established SNR model can be used to estimate the experimental distance with good imaging effect. It provides the theoretical basis for subsequent experiment system parameter selection and image processing.

  18. Signal-to-noise ratio comparison of encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gas MRI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, L.; Venkatesh, A. K.; Albert, M. S.; Panych, L. P.

    2001-01-01

    Some non-Fourier encoding methods such as wavelet and direct encoding use spatially localized bases. The spatial localization feature of these methods enables optimized encoding for improved spatial and temporal resolution during dynamically adaptive MR imaging. These spatially localized bases, however, have inherently reduced image signal-to-noise ratio compared with Fourier or Hadamad encoding for proton imaging. Hyperpolarized noble gases, on the other hand, have quite different MR properties compared to proton, primarily the nonrenewability of the signal. It could be expected, therefore, that the characteristics of image SNR with respect to encoding method will also be very different from hyperpolarized noble gas MRI compared to proton MRI. In this article, hyperpolarized noble gas image SNRs of different encoding methods are compared theoretically using a matrix description of the encoding process. It is shown that image SNR for hyperpolarized noble gas imaging is maximized for any orthonormal encoding method. Methods are then proposed for designing RF pulses to achieve normalized encoding profiles using Fourier, Hadamard, wavelet, and direct encoding methods for hyperpolarized noble gases. Theoretical results are confirmed with hyperpolarized noble gas MRI experiments. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Post-embedding tem signal-to-noise ratio of S-100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Lee, D. H.; Martin, D.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the reactivity of purified S-100 antiserum in immuno-electron microscopy by counting the number of gold particles per microns 2 over inner ear tissues embedded in different media. Sections containing predominantly Schwann's cell cytoplasm and nucleus, afferent fiber axoplasm and myelin sheath of chick cochleae were reacted with anti-S-100 IgG, an antibody to a calcium binding protein of neuronal tissues, then labeled with anti-IgG-gold conjugate. This investigation was conducted because previously published procedures, unmodified, did not yield acceptable results. Preparation of all specimens was identical. Only the medium (PolyBed 812, Araldite or Spurr epoxies; and LR White, LR Gold or Lowicryl plastics) was changed. The medium was made the changing variable because antigens available in post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy are decreased by heat, either used and/or released during polymerization of the embedding medium. The results indicate that: (a) none of the embedding media above provided optimal signal-to-noise ratio for all parts of the nerve stained in the same section; (b) aggregation of gold particles over cells was highest in embedding media with high background labeling over areas devoid of tissue (noise); (c) aggregation occurred randomly throughout both cellular and acellular regions; and (d) particles aggregated less and were distributed more evenly in tissues from media yielding good ultrastructural integrity.

  20. Analysis for signal-to-noise ratio of hyper-spectral imaging FTIR interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xun-niu; Zheng, Wei-jian; Lei, Zheng-gang; Wang, Hai-yang; Fu, Yan-peng

    2013-08-01

    Signal-to-noise Ratio of hyper-spectral imaging FTIR interferometer system plays a decisive role on the performance of the instrument. It is necessary to analyze them in the development process. Based on the simplified target/background model, the energy transfer model of the LWIR hyper-spectral imaging interferometer has been discussed. The noise equivalent spectral radiance (NESR) and its influencing factors of the interferometer system was analyzed, and the signal-to-noise(SNR) was calculated by using the properties of NESR and incident radiance. In a typical application environment, using standard atmospheric model of USA(1976 COESA) as a background, and set a reasonable target/background temperature difference, and take Michelson spatial modulation Fourier Transform interferometer as an example, the paper had calculated the NESR and the SNR of the interferometer system which using the commercially LWIR cooled FPA and UFPA detector. The system noise sources of the instrument were also analyzed in the paper. The results of those analyses can be used to optimize and pre-estimate the performance of the interferometer system, and analysis the applicable conditions of use different detectors. It has important guiding significance for the LWIR interferometer spectrometer design.

  1. Development of output signal-to-noise ratio tester for microchannel plate and fluorescent screen component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xinglin; Qiu, Yafeng; Zhou, Jin; Qian, Yunsheng

    The core components of Image intensifier is microchannel plate (MCP) and fluorescent screen component. The present paper deeply studies output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) characteristics of MCP and fluorescent screen component. A tester system using to the evaluation of characteristics of the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component, consists of a vacuum system, a surface electron source, mechanical mechanism components ,a high-voltage power supply system, a signal processing system, communication interfaces, a data acquisition and control system, computer system, and testing software. a hot cathode used as an electron source, generates a surface electron flow to provide the input signal. A photomultiplier tube is used to detection faceplate output brightness of the light spot. Then, the output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is processed with a combination of methods of the hardware filter and digital filtering software. The output SNR of MCP and fluorescent screen component is measured under different conditions, and the results are analyzed. This test system Provide a technical to promote the image intensifier research, and experience to testing other parameters or in other areas of research.

  2. Coherent dual-comb spectroscopy at high signal-to-noise ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Coddington, I.; Swann, W. C.; Newbury, N. R.

    2010-10-15

    Two coherent frequency combs are used to measure the full complex response of a sample in a configuration analogous to a dispersive Fourier transform spectrometer, infrared time domain spectrometer, or a multiheterodyne laser spectrometer. This dual-comb spectrometer retains the frequency accuracy and resolution of the reference underlying the stabilized combs. We discuss the specific design of our coherent dual-comb spectrometer and demonstrate the potential of this technique by measuring the overtone vibration of hydrogen cyanide, centered at 194 THz (1545 nm). We measure the fully normalized, complex response of the gas over a 9 THz bandwidth at 220 MHz frequency resolution yielding 41,000 resolution elements. The average spectral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over the 9 THz bandwidth is 2500 for both the magnitude and phase of the measured spectral response and the peak SNR is 4000. This peak SNR corresponds to a fractional absorption sensitivity of 0.05% and a phase sensitivity of 250 microradians. As the spectral coverage of combs expands, coherent dual-comb spectroscopy could provide high-frequency accuracy and resolution measurements of a complex sample response across a range of spectral regions. Work of U. S. government, not subject to copyright.

  3. Pelvic imaging with phased-array coils: quantitative assessment of signal-to-noise ratio improvement.

    PubMed

    Hayes, C E; Dietz, M J; King, B F; Ehman, R L

    1992-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of two different pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging phased arrays were compared with that of the body coil. Each array consisted of two coils placed anteriorly and two posteriorly, oriented transversely in one array and longitudinally in the other. S/N measurements were obtained in an adjustable water-filled phantom that stimulated the shape and radio-frequency loading effects of various-size patients. Depending on the simulated anterior-posterior thickness of the patient, the S/N produced by the longitudinal array ranged from 2.3 to 3.1 times higher than that of the body coil. The S/N of the transverse array was 3.1 to 3.4 times higher. The increased coil sensitivity permits imaging with shorter acquisition times, smaller fields of view, finer resolution, and/or thinner sections. Two examples in patients demonstrate the enhanced imaging capability of the phased arrays.

  4. Signal-to-noise ratio in the membrane potential of the owl's auditory coincidence detectors

    PubMed Central

    Funabiki, Kazuo; Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Kempter, Richard; Carr, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Owls use interaural time differences (ITDs) to locate a sound source. They compute ITD in a specialized neural circuit that consists of axonal delay lines from the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and coincidence detectors in the nucleus laminaris (NL). Recent physiological recordings have shown that tonal stimuli induce oscillatory membrane potentials in NL neurons (Funabiki K, Ashida G, Konishi M. J Neurosci 31: 15245–15256, 2011). The amplitude of these oscillations varies with ITD and is strongly correlated to the firing rate. The oscillation, termed the sound analog potential, has the same frequency as the stimulus tone and is presumed to originate from phase-locked synaptic inputs from NM fibers. To investigate how these oscillatory membrane potentials are generated, we applied recently developed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis techniques (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010) to the intracellular waveforms obtained in vivo. Our theoretical prediction of the band-limited SNRs agreed with experimental data for mid- to high-frequency (>2 kHz) NL neurons. For low-frequency (≤2 kHz) NL neurons, however, measured SNRs were lower than theoretical predictions. These results suggest that the number of independent NM fibers converging onto each NL neuron and/or the population-averaged degree of phase-locking of the NM fibers could be significantly smaller in the low-frequency NL region than estimated for higher best-frequency NL. PMID:22933726

  5. Simulation of signal-to-noise ratio for the laser range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Weiwei; Chen, Qianrong; Hao, Yongwang; Guo, Hao; Zhang, Wenpan

    2015-10-01

    The laser active imaging system is widely used in night vision, underwater imaging, three-dimension scene imaging and other civilian applications, and the system's detected range increase greatly comparing with the passive imaging system. In recent years, with rapid development of sensor and laser source technique, the laser range-gated imaging system is achieved based on high peak power pulsed laser and gated intensified CCD(ICCD), and it is well known for its properties such as high suppression of backscatter noise from fog and other obscurants, high resolution, long detection range and direct visualization. However, the performance of the laser range-gated imaging system is seriously affected by many factors, and the relationships between system's Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) and influence factors are not further elaborated. In this paper, the simulation of SNR for the laser range-gated imaging system is studied. The principle of the laser range-gated imaging system is shown firstly, and the range equation is derived by means of deducing laser illuminating model according to the principle of laser radar and the characters of objects and the detectors. And then, the sources of noise are analyzed by accurately modeling all noise sources in the detection system, the model of SNR for laser range-gated imaging system is established. Finally, the relationships between SNR of system and influence factors such as gating time, laser pulse width and repetition frequency are discussed, and correspondingly the solutions are proposed.

  6. The differential Howland current source with high signal to noise ratio for bioimpedance measurement system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinzhen; Qiao, Xiaoyan; Wang, Mengjun; Zhang, Weibo; Li, Gang; Lin, Ling

    2014-05-01

    The stability and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the current source circuit are the important factors contributing to enhance the accuracy and sensitivity in bioimpedance measurement system. In this paper we propose a new differential Howland topology current source and evaluate its output characters by simulation and actual measurement. The results include (1) the output current and impedance in high frequencies are stabilized after compensation methods. And the stability of output current in the differential current source circuit (DCSC) is 0.2%. (2) The output impedance of two current circuits below the frequency of 200 KHz is above 1 MΩ, and below 1 MHz the output impedance can arrive to 200 KΩ. Then in total the output impedance of the DCSC is higher than that of the Howland current source circuit (HCSC). (3) The SNR of the DCSC are 85.64 dB and 65 dB in the simulation and actual measurement with 10 KHz, which illustrates that the DCSC effectively eliminates the common mode interference. (4) The maximum load in the DCSC is twice as much as that of the HCSC. Lastly a two-dimensional phantom electrical impedance tomography is well reconstructed with the proposed HCSC. Therefore, the measured performance shows that the DCSC can significantly improve the output impedance, the stability, the maximum load, and the SNR of the measurement system.

  7. Optimization of near-infrared spectroscopic process monitoring at low signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Hendrik; Reich, Gabriele

    2011-03-15

    An approach for the optimization of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic process monitoring at low signal-to-noise ratio is presented. It compromises the combined adjustment of different measurement variables and data pretreatments considering the prediction error, economic aspects of the application, and process constraints. The integration time, light intensity, and number of averaged spectra were varied; their mutual influence on the prediction error of partial least squares (PLS) models (i.e., root-mean-square error of cross-validation (RMSECV)) was evaluated in the laboratory. At low signal levels, the spectral uncertainty had a strong impact on the prediction error. It leveled off with increasing values of all three parameters and was finally dominated by other sources of uncertainty. The experimental findings could be characterized and explained by a mathematical equation, which was deduced from theoretical principles. The knowledge about the interaction of the measurement variables allowed their combined adjustment resulting in a reduced impact of spectral uncertainty on the prediction error (i.e., root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP)) without additional costs or process modifications. Moreover, a convenient procedure to compensate the stray light caused by strongly absorbing windows was developed. The whole approach was successfully applied to a challenging process, namely, the NIR inline monitoring of the liquid content of two model substances in a rotating suspension dryer.

  8. Signal-to-noise ratio-based quality assessment method for ICESat/GLAS waveform data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Sheng; Wang, Cheng; Li, Guicai; Pan, Feifei; Xi, Xiaohuan; Luo, Shezhou

    2014-10-01

    Data quality determines the accuracy of results associated with remote sensing data processing and applications. However, few effective studies have been carried out on quality assessment methods for the full-waveform light detecting and ranging data. Using the geoscience laser altimeter system (GLAS) waveform data as an example, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-based waveform quality assessment method is proposed to analyze the relationship between the SNR and its controlling factors, i.e., laser type, laser using time, topographic relief, and land cover type, and study the impacts of these factors on the quality of the GLAS waveform data. Results show that the SNR-based data quality assessment method can quantitatively and effectively assess the GLAS waveform data quality. The SNR linearly attenuates with the laser using time, and the attenuation rate varies with laser type. The topographic relief is inversely correlated with the SNR of the GLAS data. As the land cover structure (especially the vertical structure) becomes more complex, the SNR of the GLAS data decreases. It was found that land cover types in descending order of the SNR values are desert, farmland, water body, grassland, city, and forest.

  9. Polarization-discrimination technique to maximize the lidar signal-to-noise ratio for daylight operations.

    PubMed

    Hassebo, Yasser Y; Gross, Barry; Oo, Min; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Samir

    2006-08-01

    The impact and potential of a polarization-selection technique to reduce the sky background signal for linearly polarized monostatic elastic backscatter lidar measurements are examined. Taking advantage of naturally occurring polarization properties in scattered skylight, we devised a polarization-discrimination technique in which both the lidar transmitter and the receiver track and minimize detected sky background noise while maintaining maximum lidar signal throughput. Lidar elastic backscatter measurements, carried out continuously during daylight hours at 532 nm, show as much as a factor of square root 10 improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) over conventional unpolarized schemes. For vertically pointing lidars, the largest improvements are limited to the early morning and late afternoon hours, while for lidars scanning azimuthally and in elevation at angles other than vertical, significant improvements are achievable over more extended time periods with the specific times and improvement factors depending on the specific angle between the lidar and the solar axes. The resulting diurnal variations in SNR improvement sometimes show an asymmetry with the solar angle that analysis indicates can be attributed to changes in observed relative humidity that modifies the underlying aerosol microphysics and observed optical depth. PMID:16855650

  10. Theoretical and experimental signal-to-noise ratio assessment in new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegtmeier Pedersen, A.; Abari, C. F.; Mann, J.; Mikkelsen, T.

    2014-06-01

    A new direction sensing continuous-wave Doppler lidar based on an image-reject homodyne receiver has recently been demonstrated at DTU Wind Energy, Technical University of Denmark. In this contribution we analyse the signal-to-noise ratio resulting from two different data processing methods both leading to the direction sensing capability. It is found that using the auto spectrum of the complex signal to determine the wind speed leads to a signal-to-noise ratio equivalent to that of a standard self-heterodyne receiver. Using the imaginary part of the cross spectrum to estimate the Doppler shift has the benefit of a zero-mean background spectrum, but comes at the expense of a decrease in the signal-to noise ratio by a factor of √2.

  11. Effects of spectrometer band pass, sampling, and signal-to-noise ratio on spectral identification using the Tetracorder algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swayze, G.A.; Clark, R.N.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Chrien, T.H.; Gorelick, N.S.

    2003-01-01

    Estimates of spectrometer band pass, sampling interval, and signal-to-noise ratio required for identification of pure minerals and plants were derived using reflectance spectra convolved to AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, VIMS, and other imaging spectrometers. For each spectral simulation, various levels of random noise were added to the reflectance spectra after convolution, and then each was analyzed with the Tetracorder spectra identification algorithm [Clark et al., 2003]. The outcome of each identification attempt was tabulated to provide an estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio at which a given percentage of the noisy spectra were identified correctly. Results show that spectral identification is most sensitive to the signal-to-noise ratio at narrow sampling interval values but is more sensitive to the sampling interval itself at broad sampling interval values because of spectral aliasing, a condition when absorption features of different materials can resemble one another. The band pass is less critical to spectral identification than the sampling interval or signal-to-noise ratio because broadening the band pass does not induce spectral aliasing. These conclusions are empirically corroborated by analysis of mineral maps of AVIRIS data collected at Cuprite, Nevada, between 1990 and 1995, a period during which the sensor signal-to-noise ratio increased up to sixfold. There are values of spectrometer sampling and band pass beyond which spectral identification of materials will require an abrupt increase in sensor signal-to-noise ratio due to the effects of spectral aliasing. Factors that control this threshold are the uniqueness of a material's diagnostic absorptions in terms of shape and wavelength isolation, and the spectral diversity of the materials found in nature and in the spectral library used for comparison. Array spectrometers provide the best data for identification when they critically sample spectra. The sampling interval should not be broadened to

  12. Low-dose, phase-contrast mammography with high signal-to-noise ratio

    PubMed Central

    Gromann, Lukas B.; Bequé, Dirk; Scherer, Kai; Willer, Konstantin; Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Herzen, Julia; Grandl, Susanne; Hellerhoff, Karin; Sperl, Jonathan I.; Pfeiffer, Franz; Cozzini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Differential phase-contrast X-ray imaging using a Talbot-Lau interferometer has recently shown promising results for applications in medical imaging. However, reducing the applied radiation dose remains a major challenge. In this study, we consider the realization of a Talbot-Lau interferometer in a high Talbot order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio for low-dose applications. The quantitative performance of π and π/2 systems at high Talbot orders is analyzed through simulations, and the design energy and X-ray spectrum are optimized for mammography. It is found that operation even at very high Talbot orders is feasible and beneficial for image quality. As long as the X-ray spectrum is matched to the visibility spectrum, the SNR continuously increases with the Talbot order for π-systems. We find that the optimal X-ray spectra and design energies are almost independent of the Talbot order and that the overall imaging performance is robust against small variations in these parameters. Discontinuous spectra, such as that from molybdenum, are less robust because the characteristic lines may coincide with minima in the visibility spectra; however, they may offer slightly better performance. We verify this hypothesis by realizing a prototype system with a mean fringe visibility of above 40% at the seventh Talbot order. With this prototype, a proof-of-principle measurement of a freshly dissected breast at reasonable compression to 4 cm is conducted with a mean glandular dose of only 3 mGy but with a high SNR. PMID:26977347

  13. Optimization of polarizer azimuth in improving signal-to-noise ratio in Kerr microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Lian, J; Xu, X J; Li, X; Li, P; Li, M M; Wang, Y; Liu, Y X

    2016-03-01

    The magneto optical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a widely used technique in magnetic domain imaging for its high surface sensitivity and external magnetic compatibility. Optimization of Kerr microscopy will improve the detecting sensitivity and provide high-quality domain images. In this work, we provide a method to optimize the polarizer azimuth in improving the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) in longitudinal Kerr microscopy with the generalized magneto optical ellipsometry. Detailed analysis of the MOKE signal and the noise components are provided to study the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth combinations. Results show that, for a fixed polarizer angle 1°, the laser intensity noise and the shot noise, which vary with the input laser power, have a similar amplitude and decline with the analyzer azimuth increasing. When the analyzer is set at the extinction place, the Johnson noise plays a dominate role in the total noise. Then, the S/N values are calculated to find the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth. Results show that the optimum polarizer and analyzer azimuth combination for Permalloy is (18.35°, 68.35°) under an incident angle of 45°. After that, the S/N of 200 nm Permalloy at different analyzer angles with the polarizer azimuth set at 18.35° is measured to verify the validity of the simulation results. At last, the S/N at different incident angles is calculated. Results show that the optimum incident angle of 200 nm Permalloy film to improve the S/N is 70.35° under the polarizer and analyzer angles set at the optimal combinations (18.35°, 68.35°).

  14. Garonne River monitoring from Signal-to-Noise Ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Darrozes, José; Ramillien, Guillaume; Bonneton, Philippe; Bonneton, Natalie; Detandt, Guillaume; Roques, Manon; Orseau, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for water level monitoring through the last decades. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and a classical GNSS receiver. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, classical SNR analysis method used to estimate the variations of the reflecting surface height h(t) has a limited domain of validity due to its variation rate dh/dt(t) assumed to be negligible. In [1], authors solve this problem with a "dynamic SNR method" taking the dynamic of the surface into account to conjointly estimate h(t) and dh/dt(t) over areas characterized by high amplitudes of tides. If the performance of this dynamic SNR method is already well-established for ocean monitoring [1], it was not validated in continental areas (i.e., river monitoring). We carried out a field study during 3 days in August and September, 2015, using a GNSS antenna to measure the water level variations in the Garonne River (France) in Podensac located 140 km downstream of the estuary mouth. In this site, the semi-diurnal tide amplitude reaches ~5 m. The antenna was located ~10 m above the water surface, and reflections of the GNSS electromagnetic waves on the Garonne River occur until 140 m from the antenna. Both classical SNR method and dynamic SNR method are tested and results are compared. [1] N. Roussel, G. Ramillien, F. Frappart, J. Darrozes, A. Gay, R. Biancale, N. Striebig, V. Hanquiez, X. Bertin, D. Allain : "Sea level monitoring and sea state estimate using a single geodetic receiver", Remote Sensing of Environment 171 (2015) 261-277.

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement of silicon nanowires biosensor with rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Gao, Anran; Zou, Nengli; Dai, Pengfei; Lu, Na; Li, Tie; Wang, Yuelin; Zhao, Jianlong; Mao, Hongju

    2013-09-11

    Herein, we describe a novel approach for rapid, label-free and specific DNA detection by applying rolling circle amplification (RCA) based on silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) for the first time. Highly responsive SiNWs were fabricated with a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible anisotropic self-stop etching technique which eliminated the need for hybrid method. The probe DNA was immobilized on the surface of SiNW, followed by sandwich hybridization with the perfectly matched target DNA and RCA primer that acted as a primer to hybridize the RCA template. The RCA reaction created a long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product and thus enhanced the electronic responses of SiNW significantly. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a figure-of-merit was analyzed to estimate the signal enhancement and possible detection limit. The nanosensor showed highly sensitive concentration-dependent conductance change in response to specific target DNA sequences. Because of the binding of an abundance of repeated sequences of RCA products, the SNR of >20 for 1 fM DNA detection was achieved, implying a detection floor of 50 aM. This RCA-based SiNW biosensor also discriminated perfectly matched target DNA from one-base mismatched DNA with high selectivity due to the substantially reduced nonspecific binding onto the SiNW surface through RCA. The combination of SiNW FET sensor with RCA will increase diagnostic capacity and the ability of laboratories to detect unexpected viruses, making it a potential tool for early diagnosis of gene-related diseases. PMID:23937430

  16. Contrast gain, signal-to-noise ratio, and linearity in light-adapted blowfly photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Response properties of short-type (R1-6) photoreceptors of the blowfly (Calliphora vicina) were investigated with intracellular recordings using repeated sequences of pseudorandomly modulated light contrast stimuli at adapting backgrounds covering 5 log intensity units. The resulting voltage responses were used to determine the effects of adaptational regulation on signal-to-noise ratios (SNR), signal induced noise, contrast gain, linearity and the dead time in phototransduction. In light adaptation the SNR of the photoreceptors improved more than 100-fold due to (a) increased photoreceptor voltage responses to a contrast stimulus and (b) reduction of voltage noise at high intensity backgrounds. In the frequency domain the SNR was attenuated in low frequencies with an increase in the middle and high frequency ranges. A pseudorandom contrast stimulus by itself did not produce any additional noise. The contrast gain of the photoreceptor frequency responses increased with mean illumination and the gain was best fitted with a model consisting of two second order and one double pole of first order. The coherence function (a normalized measure of linearity and SNR) of the frequency responses demonstrated that the photoreceptors responded linearly (from 1 to 150 Hz) to the contrast stimuli even under fairly dim conditions. The theoretically derived and the recorded phase functions were used to calculate phototransduction dead time, which decreased in light adaptation from approximately 5-2.5 ms. This analysis suggests that the ability of fly photoreceptors to maintain linear performance under dynamic stimulation conditions results from the high early gain followed by delayed compressive feed-back mechanisms. PMID:7807062

  17. Effect of signal to noise ratio on the speech perception ability of older adults

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Elahe; Ashayeri, Hassan; Jafari, Zahra; Zarrin Dast, Mohammad Reza; Kamali, Koorosh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Speech perception ability depends on auditory and extra-auditory elements. The signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) is an extra-auditory element that has an effect on the ability to normally follow speech and maintain a conversation. Speech in noise perception difficulty is a common complaint of the elderly. In this study, the importance of SNR magnitude as an extra-auditory effect on speech perception in noise was examined in the elderly. Methods: The speech perception in noise test (SPIN) was conducted on 25 elderly participants who had bilateral low–mid frequency normal hearing thresholds at three SNRs in the presence of ipsilateral white noise. These participants were selected by available sampling method. Cognitive screening was done using the Persian Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) test. Results: Independent T- test, ANNOVA and Pearson Correlation Index were used for statistical analysis. There was a significant difference in word discrimination scores at silence and at three SNRs in both ears (p≤0.047). Moreover, there was a significant difference in word discrimination scores for paired SNRs (0 and +5, 0 and +10, and +5 and +10 (p≤0.04)). No significant correlation was found between age and word recognition scores at silence and at three SNRs in both ears (p≥0.386). Conclusion: Our results revealed that decreasing the signal level and increasing the competing noise considerably reduced the speech perception ability in normal hearing at low–mid thresholds in the elderly. These results support the critical role of SNRs for speech perception ability in the elderly. Furthermore, our results revealed that normal hearing elderly participants required compensatory strategies to maintain normal speech perception in challenging acoustic situations. PMID:27390712

  18. The Effect of Classroom Amplification on the Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Classrooms while Class Is in Session

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Jeffery B.; Blair, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure the signal-to-noise ratios in classrooms while class was in session and students were interacting with the teacher and each other. Method: Measurements of noise and reverberation were collected for 5 different classrooms in 3 different schools while class was in session. Activities taking place…

  19. A Measure of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio of Microarray Samples and Studies Using Gene Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Venet, David; Detours, Vincent; Bersini, Hugues

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of gene expression data can vary dramatically from platform to platform, study to study, and sample to sample. As reliable statistical analysis rests on reliable data, determining such quality is of the utmost importance. Quality measures to spot problematic samples exist, but they are platform-specific, and cannot be used to compare studies. Results As a proxy for quality, we propose a signal-to-noise ratio for microarray data, the “Signal-to-Noise Applied to Gene Expression Experiments”, or SNAGEE. SNAGEE is based on the consistency of gene-gene correlations. We applied SNAGEE to a compendium of 80 large datasets on 37 platforms, for a total of 24,380 samples, and assessed the signal-to-noise ratio of studies and samples. This allowed us to discover serious issues with three studies. We show that signal-to-noise ratios of both studies and samples are linked to the statistical significance of the biological results. Conclusions We showed that SNAGEE is an effective way to measure data quality for most types of gene expression studies, and that it often outperforms existing techniques. Furthermore, SNAGEE is platform-independent and does not require raw data files. The SNAGEE R package is available in BioConductor. PMID:23251415

  20. Techniques and software tools for estimating ultrasonic signal-to-noise ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Chien-Ping; Margetan, Frank J.; McKillip, Matthew; Engle, Brady J.; Roberts, Ronald A.

    2016-02-01

    At Iowa State University's Center for Nondestructive Evaluation (ISU CNDE), the use of models to simulate ultrasonic inspections has played a key role in R&D efforts for over 30 years. To this end a series of wave propagation models, flaw response models, and microstructural backscatter models have been developed to address inspection problems of interest. One use of the combined models is the estimation of signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) in circumstances where backscatter from the microstructure (grain noise) acts to mask sonic echoes from internal defects. Such S/N models have been used in the past to address questions of inspection optimization and reliability. Under the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center at ISU, an effort was recently initiated to improve existing research-grade software by adding graphical user interface (GUI) to become user friendly tools for the rapid estimation of S/N for ultrasonic inspections of metals. The software combines: (1) a Python-based GUI for specifying an inspection scenario and displaying results; and (2) a Fortran-based engine for computing defect signal and backscattered grain noise characteristics. The latter makes use of several models including: the Multi-Gaussian Beam Model for computing sonic fields radiated by commercial transducers; the Thompson-Gray Model for the response from an internal defect; the Independent Scatterer Model for backscattered grain noise; and the Stanke-Kino Unified Model for attenuation. The initial emphasis was on reformulating the research-grade code into a suitable modular form, adding the graphical user interface and performing computations rapidly and robustly. Thus the initial inspection problem being addressed is relatively simple. A normal-incidence pulse/echo immersion inspection is simulated for a curved metal component having a non-uniform microstructure, specifically an equiaxed, untextured microstructure in which the average

  1. Effects of Signal-to-Noise Ratio on Auditory Cortical Frequency Processing

    PubMed Central

    Teschner, Magnus J.; Seybold, Bryan A.; Malone, Brian J.; Hüning, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The neural mechanisms that support the robust processing of acoustic signals in the presence of background noise in the auditory system remain largely unresolved. Psychophysical experiments have shown that signal detection is influenced by the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the overall stimulus level, but this relationship has not been fully characterized. We evaluated the neural representation of frequency in rat primary auditory cortex by constructing tonal frequency response areas (FRAs) in primary auditory cortex for different SNRs, tone levels, and noise levels. We show that response strength and selectivity for frequency and sound level depend on interactions between SNRs and tone levels. At low SNRs, jointly increasing the tone and noise levels reduced firing rates and narrowed FRA bandwidths; at higher SNRs, however, increasing the tone and noise levels increased firing rates and expanded bandwidths, as is usually seen for FRAs obtained without background noise. These changes in frequency and intensity tuning decreased tone level and tone frequency discriminability at low SNRs. By contrast, neither response onset latencies nor noise-driven steady-state firing rates meaningfully interacted with SNRs or overall sound levels. Speech detection performance in humans was also shown to depend on the interaction between overall sound level and SNR. Together, these results indicate that signal processing difficulties imposed by high noise levels are quite general and suggest that the neurophysiological changes we see for simple sounds generalize to more complex stimuli. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Effective processing of sounds in background noise is an important feature of the mammalian auditory system and a necessary feature for successful hearing in many listening conditions. Even mild hearing loss strongly affects this ability in humans, seriously degrading the ability to communicate. The mechanisms involved in achieving high performance in background noise are not

  2. Enhanced signal-to-noise ratio estimation for tropospheric lidar channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Umar; Barragan, Rubén; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2016-04-01

    This works combines the fields of tropospheric lidar remote sensing and signal processing to come up with a robust signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimator apt for elastic and Raman channels. The estimator uses a combined low-pass / high-pass filtering scheme along with high-order statistics (kurtosis) to estimate the range-dependent signal and noise components with minimum distortion. While low-pass filtering is used to estimate the range-dependent signal level, high-pass filtering is used to estimate the noise component with minimum distortion. From this noise component estimate (a random realization) the noise level (e.g., variance) is computed as a function of range along with error bars. The minimum-distortion specification determines the optimal cut-off de-noising filter frequency and, in turn, the spatial resolution of the SNR estimation algorithm. The proposed SNR estimator has a much wider dynamic range of operation than well-known classic SNR estimation techniques, in which the SNR is directly computed from the mean and standard deviation of the measured noise-corrupted lidar signal along successive adjacent range intervals and where the spatial resolution is just a subjective input from the user's side. Aligned with ACTRIS (http://www.actris.net) WP on "optimization of the processing chain and Single-Calculus Chain (SCC)" the proposed topic is of application to assess lidar reception channel performance and confidence on the detected atmospheric morphology (e.g., cloud base and top, and location of aerosol layers). The SNR algorithm is tested against the classic SNR estimation approach using test-bed synthetic lidar data modelling the UPC multi-spectral lidar. Towards this end, the Nd:YAG UPC elastic-Raman lidar provides aerosol channels in the near-infrared (1064 nm), visible (532 nm), and ultra-violet (355 nm) as well as aerosol Raman and water-vapour channels with fairly varying SNR levels. The SNR estimator is also used to compare SNR levels between

  3. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measures Efficacy of Biological Computing Devices and Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Beal, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biological cells to perform computations has a broad range of important potential applications, including precision medical therapies, biosynthesis process control, and environmental sensing. Implementing predictable and effective computation, however, has been extremely difficult to date, due to a combination of poor composability of available parts and of insufficient characterization of parts and their interactions with the complex environment in which they operate. In this paper, the author argues that this situation can be improved by quantitative signal-to-noise analysis of the relationship between computational abstractions and the variation and uncertainty endemic in biological organisms. This analysis takes the form of a ΔSNRdB function for each computational device, which can be computed from measurements of a device’s input/output curve and expression noise. These functions can then be combined to predict how well a circuit will implement an intended computation, as well as evaluating the general suitability of biological devices for engineering computational circuits. Applying signal-to-noise analysis to current repressor libraries shows that no library is currently sufficient for general circuit engineering, but also indicates key targets to remedy this situation and vastly improve the range of computations that can be used effectively in the implementation of biological applications. PMID:26177070

  4. Signal-to-Noise Ratio Measures Efficacy of Biological Computing Devices and Circuits.

    PubMed

    Beal, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Engineering biological cells to perform computations has a broad range of important potential applications, including precision medical therapies, biosynthesis process control, and environmental sensing. Implementing predictable and effective computation, however, has been extremely difficult to date, due to a combination of poor composability of available parts and of insufficient characterization of parts and their interactions with the complex environment in which they operate. In this paper, the author argues that this situation can be improved by quantitative signal-to-noise analysis of the relationship between computational abstractions and the variation and uncertainty endemic in biological organisms. This analysis takes the form of a ΔSNRdB function for each computational device, which can be computed from measurements of a device's input/output curve and expression noise. These functions can then be combined to predict how well a circuit will implement an intended computation, as well as evaluating the general suitability of biological devices for engineering computational circuits. Applying signal-to-noise analysis to current repressor libraries shows that no library is currently sufficient for general circuit engineering, but also indicates key targets to remedy this situation and vastly improve the range of computations that can be used effectively in the implementation of biological applications. PMID:26177070

  5. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of thermal ghost imaging based on positive-negative intensity correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shu-Chun; Sun, Ming-Jie; Wu, Ling-An

    2016-05-01

    Ghost imaging with thermal light is a topic in optical imaging that has aroused great interest in recent years. However, the imaging quality must be greatly improved before the technology can be transferred from the lab to engineering applications. By means of correspondence ghost imaging (CGI) with a pseudo-thermal light source and appropriate sorting of the intensity fluctuations of the signal and reference beams, we obtain the positive and negative Hanbury Brown and Twiss intensity correlation characteristics of the optical field. Then, for ghost imaging of a transmissive binary object, we find that by subtracting the negative from the positive fluctuation frames of the presorted reference detector signals, the signal-to-noise ratio can be effectively increased, with almost all the background noise eliminated. Our results show that, compared with the generic CGI technique, the signal-to-noise ratio can be increased by nearly 60%.

  6. Limitation of the achievable signal-to-noise ratio in optical coherence tomography due to mismatch of the balanced receiver.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Carla Carmelo; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2004-09-01

    Owing to the limited spectral response of the fiber directional coupler used in a balanced optical coherence tomography configuration, the spectra are different in the two outputs. This affects unfavorably operation of the balanced photodetector unit. Excess photon noise makes a larger contribution than a directional coupler with a flat spectral response. A theoretical model is developed that shows that an optimum set of parameters may be defined to maximize the achievable signal-to-noise ratio. The model leads to a redefinition of the effective noise bandwidth, which takes into account the nonflat response of the directional coupler used. The model also predicts a limitation on the signal-to-noise ratio even when the stray reflectances in the interferometer are brought to zero. PMID:15449466

  7. Research on the enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio of light-addressable potentiometric sensor by optical focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dong; Liu, Shi-bin; Yin, Shi-min; Liang, Jin-tao

    2016-01-01

    For enhancing the response of light-addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS) and further improving its signal- to-noise ratio ( SNR), an optical focusing method is adopted. Experimental research and theoretical analysis reveal that the magnitude of responsive signal is increased by optical focusing, and the SNR is improved remarkably. These research results indicate that the optical focusing is an effective approach for improving SNR of LAPS.

  8. Real-time Signal-to-noise Ratio (SNR) Estimation for BPSK and QPSK Modulation Using the Active Communications Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and apparatus for estimating signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma of a composite input signal e(t) on a phase modulated (e.g., BPSK) communications link. A first demodulator receives the composite input signal and a stable carrier signal and outputs an in-phase output signal; a second demodulator receives the composite input signal and a phase-shifted version of the carrier signal and outputs a quadrature-phase output signal; and phase error theta(sub E)(t) contained within the composite input signal e(t) is calculated from the outputs of the first and second demodulators. A time series of statistically independent phase error measurements theta(sub E)(t(sub 1)), theta (sub E)(t(sub 2)),..., theta (sub E)(t(sub k)) is obtained from the composite input signal subtending a time interval delta t = t(sub k) - t(sub 1) whose value is small enough such that gamma(t) and sigma(t) can be taken to be constant in delta t. A biased estimate gamma(sup *) for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma if the composite input signal is calculated using maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques, and an unbiased estimate gamma(sup ^) for the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gamma of the composite input signal is determined from the biased estimate gamma(sup *), such as by use of a look-up table.

  9. Basic approach to define signal-to-noise ratio for adjacent pixels for an uncooled microbolometer FPA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürüm, Ulas

    2013-09-01

    To define the ratio of the signal of the desired pixel and the noise of adjacent pixels, noise and signal sources are theoretically identified. While defining these values, atmospheric attenuation, losses at transmitting surfaces and wave characteristics of light are considered. For presentation purposes, a standard NATO target is chosen as source object. The model has been developed for a simple optical design which is intentionally left defective to better address effects of aberrations to signal to noise ratio of adjacent pixels especially caused by diffraction.

  10. Use of independent component analysis to improve signal-to-noise ratio in multi-probe fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dao, L; Lucotte, B; Glancy, B; Chang, L-C; Hsu, L-Y; Balaban, R S

    2014-11-01

    In conventional multi-probe fluorescence microscopy, narrow bandwidth filters on detectors are used to avoid bleed-through artefacts between probes. The limited bandwidth reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection, often severely compromising one or more channels. Herein, we describe a process of using independent component analysis to discriminate the position of different probes using only a dichroic mirror to differentiate the signals directed to the detectors. Independent component analysis was particularly effective in samples where the spatial overlap between the probes is minimal, a very common case in cellular microscopy. This imaging scheme collects nearly all of the emitted light, significantly improving the image signal-to-noise ratio. In this study, we focused on the detection of two fluorescence probes used in vivo, NAD(P)H and ANEPPS. The optimal dichroic mirror cutoff frequency was determined with simulations using the probes spectral emissions. A quality factor, defined as the cross-channel contrast-to-noise ratio, was optimized to maximize signals while maintaining spatial discrimination between the probes after independent component analysis post-processing. Simulations indicate that a ∼3 fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio using the independent component analysis approach can be achieved over the conventional narrow-band filtering approach without loss of spatial discrimination. We confirmed this predicted performance from experimental imaging of NAD(P)H and ANEPPS in mouse skeletal muscle, in vivo. For many multi-probe studies, the increased sensitivity of this 'full bandwidth' approach will lead to improved image quality and/or reduced excitation power requirements.

  11. The signal to noise and distortion ratio for sigma delta ADC for SDR 3G/4G mobile receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Preeti; Verma, Ajay

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a Simulation for the test of SNDR (Signal to noise and Distortion ratio) in Sigma Delta ADC for SDR 3G and 4G mobile Receivers. Now a days, SNDR is one of the most important parameter which directly effects the performance of ADC. Simulation results show the Capability of the simulink to obtain SNDR for a 8 bit and 10 bit audio Sigma delta ADC. SNDR of ADC will always be less than SNR. The simulation model of second order Sigma Delta ADC is given in the paper. The SNR and SNDR have been taken into account.

  12. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Rose, H; Lehtinen, O; Biskupek, J; Kaiser, U

    2014-10-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions.

  13. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Rose, H; Lehtinen, O; Biskupek, J; Kaiser, U

    2014-10-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. PMID:24566042

  14. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation on SEM images using cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Kiani, M A; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2014-01-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay noise reduction filtering is designed to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. This approach is found to present better result when compared with two existing techniques: nearest neighbourhood and first-order interpolation. When applied to evaluate the quality of SEM images, noise can be eliminated efficiently with optimal choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time. PMID:24164248

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation on SEM images using cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing.

    PubMed

    Sim, K S; Kiani, M A; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2014-01-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay noise reduction filtering is designed to estimate signal-to-noise ratio of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. This approach is found to present better result when compared with two existing techniques: nearest neighbourhood and first-order interpolation. When applied to evaluate the quality of SEM images, noise can be eliminated efficiently with optimal choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time.

  16. Signal-to-noise ratio estimation in digital computer simulation of lowpass and bandpass systems with applications to analog and digital communications, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tranter, W. H.; Turner, M. D.

    1977-01-01

    Techniques are developed to estimate power gain, delay, signal-to-noise ratio, and mean square error in digital computer simulations of lowpass and bandpass systems. The techniques are applied to analog and digital communications. The signal-to-noise ratio estimates are shown to be maximum likelihood estimates in additive white Gaussian noise. The methods are seen to be especially useful for digital communication systems where the mapping from the signal-to-noise ratio to the error probability can be obtained. Simulation results show the techniques developed to be accurate and quite versatile in evaluating the performance of many systems through digital computer simulation.

  17. Stacked phased array coils for increasing the signal-to-noise ratio in magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Dandan Liang; Hon Tat Hui; Tat Soon Yeo; Bing Keong Li

    2013-02-01

    A new concept of using a stacked phased coil array to increase the signal-to-circuit noise ratio (SCNR) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. Unlike conventional phased coil arrays, the proposed stacked phased coil array is constructed by stacking the coil elements closely together in the vertical direction. Through a proper combination of the coil terminal voltages, the SCNR is shown to increase with the square root of the number of coil elements. A prototype two-element array is constructed and an experimental method is designed to determine the combiner coefficients in a simulated MRI electromagnetic field environment. The experimental results show that the mutual coupling effect among the array coils can be totally removed and the combiner output voltage increases with the number of coil elements. This demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  18. Superior signal-to-noise ratio of a new AA1 sequence for random-modulation continuous-wave lidar.

    PubMed

    Rybaltowski, Adam; Taflove, Allen

    2004-08-01

    In an earlier work [Proc. SPIE 4484, 216 (2001)] we proposed a new AA1 modulation sequence for random-modulation continuous-wave lidar. It possesses significantly better signal properties than other pseudorandom codes (the M, A1, and A2 sequences). We derive and compare the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the new AA1 sequence with those of previous modulation sequences. Using a figure of merit proposed for pseudorandom sequences in additive (and generally colored) noise, we show that the SNR of the AA1 sequence in 1/f noise can be as much as 50 times better than that of the commonly used M sequence. This improved SNR should permit as much as a 7:1 increase of the maximum lidar sensing range in baseband-modulation direct-detection infrared lidar with no significant changes to the transmitter and receiver.

  19. Aperture dependence of the mixing efficiency, the signal-to-noise ratio, and the speckle number in coherent lidar receivers.

    PubMed

    Leeb, W R; Winzer, P J; Kudielka, K H

    1998-05-20

    With the aid of the van Cittert-Zernike theorem we develop an analytical expression for the ensemble-averaged heterodyne mixing efficiency in coherent lidar receivers that are looking at a diffuse target that is in the receiver's far field. Our extremely simple and straightforward analysis shows that the dependence of the mixing efficiency on the receive aperture size dR first follows a parabolic decrease and later approaches a (dR)(-2) function. As a consequence, the signal-to-noise ratio does not increase proportionally to the aperture area but saturates. For the system model chosen, the heterodyne mixing efficiency exhibits the same functional dependence on the lidar geometry as the reciprocal of the number of speckle cells within the receive aperture.

  20. Resolution and signal-to-noise ratio improvement in confocal fluorescence microscopy using array detection and maximum-likelihood processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakade, Rohan; Walker, John G.; Phillips, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) is widely used in biological sciences because of its enhanced 3D resolution that allows image sectioning and removal of out-of-focus blur. This is achieved by rejection of the light outside a detection pinhole in a plane confocal with the illuminated object. In this paper, an alternative detection arrangement is examined in which the entire detection/image plane is recorded using an array detector rather than a pinhole detector. Using this recorded data an attempt is then made to recover the object from the whole set of recorded photon array data; in this paper maximum-likelihood estimation has been applied. The recovered object estimates are shown (through computer simulation) to have good resolution, image sectioning and signal-to-noise ratio compared with conventional pinhole CFM images.

  1. DWI based thermometry: the effects of b-values, resolutions, signal-to-noise ratio, and magnet strength.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Koji; Sakamoto, Ryo; Okada, Tomohisa; Sugimoto, Naozo; Togashi, Kaori

    2012-01-01

    Among MR methods, the most clinically applicable temperature measurement method at deep brain might be the diffusion-weighted image (DWI) thermometry. Although only applicable to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), it is thought to be potentially useful in assessing the thermal pathophysiology of the brain in both patients and healthy subjects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of b-value, pixel resolution, magnet strength and signal to noise ratio (SNR) for the DWI-thermometry with healthy volunteer. Formerly, an ADC from b=0 and b=1000 has been thought to be useful for diffusion thermometry, this study revealed b=200 to 800 was more appropriate for DWI thermometry. The SNR was strongly affected the results of DWI thermometry.

  2. Long-term signal-to-noise ratio at the input and output of amplitude-compression systems.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Graham; Johannesson, René Burmand

    2009-03-01

    We present measurements showing that the long-term signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at the output of an amplification system that includes amplitude compression may be higher or lower than the long-term SNR at the input, dependent on interactions among the actual long-term input SNR, the modulation characteristics of the signal and noise being mixed, and the amplitude compression characteristics of the system under test. The effects demonstrated with the measurements shown here have implications for choices of test methods when comparing alternative hearing aid systems. The results of speech-recognition tests intended to compare alternative systems may be misleading or misinterpreted if the above interactions are not considered.

  3. Empirical Evaluation of a New Method for Calculating Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) for Microarray Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-03-06

    Signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) thresholds for microarray data analysis were experimentally determined with an oligonucleotide array that contained perfect match (PM) and mismatch (MM) probes based upon four genes from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A new SNR calculation, called signal to both standard deviations ratio (SSDR) was developed, and evaluated along with other two methods, signal to standard deviation ratio (SSR), and signal to background ratio (SBR). At a low stringency, the thresholds of SSR, SBR, and SSDR were 2.5, 1.60 and 0.80 with oligonucleotide and PCR amplicon as target templates, and 2.0, 1.60 and 0.70 with genomic DNA as target templates. Slightly higher thresholds were obtained at the high stringency condition. The thresholds of SSR and SSDR decreased with an increase in the complexity of targets (e.g., target types), and the presence of background DNA, and a decrease in the composition of targets, while SBR remained unchanged under all situations. The lowest percentage of false positives (FP) and false negatives (FN) was observed with the SSDR calculation method, suggesting that it may be a better SNR calculation for more accurate determination of SNR thresholds. Positive spots identified by SNR thresholds were verified by the Student t-test, and consistent results were observed. This study provides general guidance for users to select appropriate SNR thresholds for different samples under different hybridization conditions.

  4. Relevancies of multiple-interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio for Anger-logic based PET detector designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    A fundamental challenge for PET block detector designs is to deploy finer crystal elements while limiting the number of readout channels. The standard Anger-logic scheme including light sharing (an 8 by 8 crystal array coupled to a 2×2 photodetector array with an optical diffuser, multiplexing ratio: 16:1) has been widely used to address such a challenge. Our work proposes a generalized model to study the impacts of two critical parameters on spatial resolution performance of a PET block detector: multiple interaction events and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). The study consists of the following three parts: (1) studying light output profile and multiple interactions of 511 keV photons within crystal arrays of different crystal widths (from 4 mm down to 1 mm, constant height: 20 mm); (2) applying the Anger-logic positioning algorithm to investigate positioning/decoding uncertainties (i.e., "block effect") in terms of peak-to-valley ratio (PVR), with light sharing, multiple interactions and photodetector SNR taken into account; and (3) studying the dependency of spatial resolution on SNR in the context of modulation transfer function (MTF). The proposed model can be used to guide the development and evaluation of a standard Anger-logic based PET block detector including: (1) selecting/optimizing the configuration of crystal elements for a given photodetector SNR; and (2) predicting to what extent additional electronic multiplexing may be implemented to further reduce the number of readout channels.

  5. Completeness - II. A signal-to-noise ratio approach for completeness estimators applied to galaxy magnitude-redshift surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Luís; Johnston, Russell; Hendry, Martin

    2010-06-01

    This is the second paper in our completeness series, which addresses some of the issues raised in the previous article by Johnston, Teodoro & Hendry, in which we developed statistical tests for assessing the completeness in apparent magnitude of magnitude-redshift surveys defined by two flux limits. The statistics, Tc and Tv, associated with these tests are non-parametric and defined in terms of the observed cumulative distribution function of sources; they represent powerful tools for identifying the true flux limit and/or characterizing systematic errors in magnitude-redshift data. In this paper, we present a new approach to constructing these estimators that resembles an `adaptive smoothing' procedure - i.e. by seeking to maintain the same amount of the information, as measured by the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), allocated to each galaxy. For consistency with our previous work, we apply our improved estimators to the Millennium Galaxy Catalogue and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey data, and demonstrate that one needs to use an S/N appropriately tailored for each individual catalogue to optimize the performance of the completeness estimators. Furthermore, unless such an adaptive procedure is employed, the assessment of completeness may result in a spurious outcome if one uses other estimators present in the literature which have not been designed taking into account `shot-noise' due to sampling.

  6. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of registered images by using light spatial noise portrait of camera's photosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2013-12-01

    Increase of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of registered images is important task in such fields as image encryption, digital holography, pattern recognition, etc. Method of image SNR increasing by using light spatial noise portrait (LSNP) of camera's photosensor is presented. Use of proposed LSNP compensation method is especially effective after application of other methods for SNR increasing that suppress temporal noise. Procedure of LSNP measurement is described. LSNP of camera Canon EOS 400D was measured. Analytical expressions for estimation of achievable SNR increase were derived. Using characteristics of obtained LSNP, numerical experiments on estimation of SNR increase were performed. It is obtained that typically utilizing of averaging over frames method allows to increase SNR up to 2 times. Consequent application of LSNP compensation method leads to 10 times SNR increase. These numerical experiments results confirm derived analytical expressions. In case of using more accurate LSNP compared to the obtained, SNR can be increased up to 50 times. Using cameras Canon EOS 400D and MegaPlus II ES11000, test experiments were performed. Experimental results are in good agreement with numerical ones. Experimentally obtained SNR increased 5 times compared to the original.

  7. Appraisal of the signal-to-noise-ratio of uni- and bipolar recordings of ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Ertl, M; Kirsch, V; Gerb, J; Boegle, R; Krafczyk, S; Dieterich, M

    2015-01-01

    Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) are a non-invasive method to investigate otolith function mediated via the superior vestibular nerve. However, the herein used recordings and protocols may alter within different studies. In particular the diverging use of electrode configuration regarding polarity or even electrode position varies across studies. Therefore, a systematic analysis and appraisal of the different electrode configuration seems mandatory. In this study we compared the quality of uni- and bipolar recordings based on the signal to noise ratio (SNR). We recoded oVEMPs using a uni- and bipolar electrode configuration simultaneously and compared the recorded amplitudes and latencies and calculated the SNR. The amplitudes recorded by the unipolar configurations were significantly (p < 0.01) increased compared to the bipolar configuration. However, the SNR of the bipolar setup was significantly better (p < 0.05) when compared to the unipolar setup. Additionally, we estimated a transfer function that enabled a comparison of uni- and bipolar recordings. To conclude, the variety of setups used for oVEMP recording hinder a comparison of results and unipolar electrode configurations have clear disadvantages.

  8. Temporal and spatial binning of TCSPC data to improve signal-to-noise ratio and imaging speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Beier, Hope T.

    2016-03-01

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is the most robust method for fluorescence lifetime imaging using laser scanning microscopes. However, TCSPC is inherently slow making it ineffective to capture rapid events due to the single photon product per laser pulse causing extensive acquisition time limitations and the requirement of low fluorescence emission efficiency to avoid bias of measurement towards short lifetimes. Furthermore, thousands of photons per pixel are required for traditional instrument response deconvolution and fluorescence lifetime exponential decay estimation. Instrument response deconvolution and fluorescence exponential decay estimation can be performed in several ways including iterative least squares minimization and Laguerre deconvolution. This paper compares the limitations and accuracy of these fluorescence decay analysis techniques to accurately estimate double exponential decays across many data characteristics including various lifetime values, lifetime component weights, signal-to-noise ratios, and number of photons detected. Furthermore, techniques to improve data fitting, including binning data temporally and spatially, are evaluated as methods to improve decay fits and reduce image acquisition time. Simulation results demonstrate that binning temporally to 36 or 42 time bins, improves accuracy of fits for low photon count data. Such a technique reduces the required number of photons for accurate component estimation if lifetime values are known, such as for commercial fluorescent dyes and FRET experiments, and improve imaging speed 10-fold.

  9. Increasing signal-to-noise ratio of reconstructed digital holograms by using light spatial noise portrait of camera's photosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2015-01-01

    Digital holography is technique which includes recording of interference pattern with digital photosensor, processing of obtained holographic data and reconstruction of object wavefront. Increase of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of reconstructed digital holograms is especially important in such fields as image encryption, pattern recognition, static and dynamic display of 3D scenes, and etc. In this paper compensation of photosensor light spatial noise portrait (LSNP) for increase of SNR of reconstructed digital holograms is proposed. To verify the proposed method, numerical experiments with computer generated Fresnel holograms with resolution equal to 512×512 elements were performed. Simulation of shots registration with digital camera Canon EOS 400D was performed. It is shown that solo use of the averaging over frames method allows to increase SNR only up to 4 times, and further increase of SNR is limited by spatial noise. Application of the LSNP compensation method in conjunction with the averaging over frames method allows for 10 times SNR increase. This value was obtained for LSNP measured with 20 % error. In case of using more accurate LSNP, SNR can be increased up to 20 times.

  10. Measuring saliency of features using signal-to-noise ratios for detection of electrocardiographic changes in partial epileptic patients.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2008-12-01

    Medical diagnostic accuracies can be improved when the pattern is simplified through representation by important features. The feature vector, which is comprised of the set of all features used to describe a pattern, is a reduced-dimensional representation of that pattern. By identifying a set of salient features, the noise in a classification model can be reduced, resulting in more accurate classification. In this study, a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) saliency measure was employed to determine saliency of input features of probabilistic neural networks (PNNs) used in classification of two types of electrocardiogram (ECG) beats (normal and partial epilepsy). In order to extract features representing the ECG signals, discrete wavelet transform was used. The PNNs used in the ECG signals classification were trained for the SNR screening method. The application results of the SNR screening method to the ECG signals demonstrated that classification accuracies of the PNNs with salient input features are higher than that of the PNNs with salient and non-salient input features. PMID:19058650

  11. Increasing the resolution and the signal-to-noise ratio of magnetic resonance sounding data using a central loop configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behroozmand, Ahmad A.; Auken, Esben; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Rejkjaer, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Surface nuclear magnetic resonance technique, also called magnetic resonance sounding (MRS), is an emerging geophysical method that can detect the presence and spatial variations of the subsurface water content directly. In this paper, we introduce the MRS central loop geometry, in which the receiver loop is smaller than the transmitter loop and placed in its centre. In addition, using a shielded receiver coil we show how this configuration greatly increases signal-to-noise ratio and improves the resolution of the subsurface layers compared to the typically used coincident loop configuration. We compare sensitivity kernels for different loop configurations and describe advantages of the MRS central loop geometry in terms of superior behaviour of the sensitivity function, increased sensitivity values, reduced noise level of the shielded receiver coil, improved resolution matrix and reduced instrument dead time. With no extra time and effort in the field, central-loop MRS makes it possible to reduce measurement time and to measure data in areas with high anthropogenic noise. The results of our field example agree well with the complementary data, namely airborne electromagnetics, borehole data, and the hydrologic model of the area.

  12. Double-maximum enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio gain via stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Duan, Fabing; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Abbott, Derek

    2014-08-01

    This paper studies the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain of a parallel array of nonlinear elements that transmits a common input composed of a periodic signal and external noise. Aiming to further enhance the SNR gain, each element is injected with internal noise components or high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations. We report that the SNR gain exhibits two maxima at different values of the internal noise level or of the sinusoidal vibration amplitude. For the addition of internal noise to an array of threshold-based elements, the condition for occurrence of stochastic resonance is analytically investigated in the limit of weak signals. Interestingly, when the internal noise components are replaced by high-frequency sinusoidal vibrations, the SNR gain displays the vibrational multiresonance phenomenon. In both considered cases, there are certain regions of the internal noise intensity or the sinusoidal vibration amplitude wherein the achieved maximal SNR gain can be considerably beyond unity for a weak signal buried in non-Gaussian external noise. Due to the easy implementation of sinusoidal vibration modulation, this approach is potentially useful for improving the output SNR in an array of nonlinear devices. PMID:25215715

  13. Theoretical Investigation of Random Noise-Limited Signal-to-Noise Ratio in MR-Based Electrical Properties Tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Kyun; Bulumulla, Selaka; Hancu, Ileana

    2015-11-01

    In magnetic resonance imaging-based electrical properties tomography (MREPT), tissue electrical properties (EPs) are derived from the spatial variation of the transmit RF field (B1(+)). Here we derive theoretically the relationship between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the electrical properties obtained by MREPT and the SNR of the input B1(+) data, under the assumption that the latter is much greater than unity, and the noise in B1(+) at different voxels is statistically independent. It is shown that for a given B1(+) data, the SNR of both electrical conductivity and relative permittivity is proportional to the square of the linear dimension of the region of interest (ROI) over which the EPs are determined, and to the square root of the number of voxels in the ROI. The relationship also shows how the SNR varies with the main magnetic field (B0) strength. The predicted SNR is verified through numerical simulations on a cylindrical phantom with an analytically calculated B1(+) map, and is found to provide explanation of certain aspects of previous experimental results in the literature. Our SNR formula can be used to estimate minimum input data SNR and ROI size required to obtain tissue EP maps of desired quality. PMID:25955582

  14. Optimizing MRI signal-to-noise ratio for quadrature unmatched RF coils: two preamplifiers are better than one.

    PubMed

    Sorgenfrei, B L; Edelstein, W A

    1996-07-01

    Using separate preamplifiers for the two outputs of a quadrature receive coil (and then combining the preamplifier outputs in a quadrature hybrid) provides a better signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than is obtained by directly combining the quadrature outputs in a hybrid followed by a single preamplifier. The advantage of the two-preamplifier configuration increases when the body coil impedance changes and is no longer matched to 50 ohms. Using 0.4 dB noise figure preamplifiers, theory predicts 1.53, 0.42, 0, 0.42, and 1.53 dB SNR advantage of the two-preamplifier configuration over the one-preamplifier arrangement at body coil impedances of 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ohms, respectively. Experimental hot/cold resistor noise figure measurements indicate 2.86, 0.65, 0.36, 0.83, and 1.40 dB noise figure advantage for the two preamplifier configuration relative to the one-preamplifier configuration at those impedances. Empirical gains larger than theoretically calculated are attributable to insertion losses of various circuit elements, such as the quadrature hybrid, for the one-preamplifier configuration.

  15. Measurement of duration and signal-to-noise ratio of astronomical transients using a Spectral Kurtosis spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Gary, Dale E.

    2016-08-01

    Following our prior theoretical and instrumental work addressing the problem of automatic real-time radio frequency interference (RFI) detection and excision from astronomical signals, the wideband Spectral Kurtosis (SK) spectrometer design we proposed is currently being considered as an alternative to the traditional spectrometers when building the new generation of radio instruments. The unique characteristic of an SK spectrometer is that it accumulates both power and power-squared, which are then used to compute an SK statistical estimator proven to be very effective in detecting and excising certain types of RFI signals. In this paper we introduce a novel measurement technique that exploits the power and power square statistics of an SK spectrometer to determine durations and signal-to-noise ratios of transient signals, whether they are RFI or natural signals, even when they are below the time resolution of the instrument. We demonstrate this novel experimental technique by analyzing a segment of data recorded by the Expanded Owens Valley Solar Array Subsystem Testbed (EST) during a solar radio burst in which microwave spike bursts occurred with durations shorter than the 20 ms time resolution of the instrument. The duration of one well-observed spike is quantitatively shown to be within a few percent of 8 ms despite the 20 ms resolution of the data.

  16. A design methodology using signal-to-noise ratio for plastic scintillation detectors design and performance optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Frédéric; Beddar, A. Sam; Guillot, Mathieu; Beaulieu, Luc; Gingras, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The design of novel plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) is impeded by the lack of a suitable framework to simulate and predict their performance. The authors propose to use the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to model the performance of PSDs that use charge-coupled devices (CCDs) as photodetectors. Methods: In PSDs using CCDs, the SNR is inversely related to the normalized standard deviation of the dose measurement. Thus, optimizing the SNR directly optimizes the system’s precision. In this work, a model of SNR as a function of the system parameters is derived for optical fiber-based PSD systems. Furthermore, this proposed model is validated using experimental results. A formula for the efficiency of fiber coupling to CCDs is derived and used to simulate the performance of a PSD under varying magnifications. Results: The proposed model is shown to simulate the experimental performance of an actual PSD to a suitable degree of accuracy under various conditions. Conclusions: The SNR constitutes a useful tool to simulate the dosimetric precision of PSDs. Using the SNR model, recommendations for the design and optimization of PSDs are provided. Using the same framework, recommendations for non-fiber-based PSDs are also provided. PMID:19994531

  17. The Impact of Receiver Aperture Design and Telescope Properties on LIDAR Signal-to-Noise Ratio Improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassebo, Yasser; El Sayed, Khaled

    2007-02-01

    Range and sensitivities of lidar measurements in daylight are limited by sky background noise power (BGP). This is particularly important for Raman lidar techniques where the Raman backscattered signal is relatively weak. This often restricts Raman lidar measurements to nighttime where BGP is absent. The background noise elimination is particularly important in daytime measurements in case where full overlap between laser beam and receiver telescope field-of-view (FOV) is necessary. Results of numerical simulations for a vertically pointing Lidar show that significant improvements in Lidar signal to noise ratio (SNR) can be obtained, by minimizing the detected sky BGP. This can be, optimally achieved if the receiver telescope aperture is properly designed to track lidar target images, which are range dependant. In this context, the connection between receiver telescope field of view and optimum aperture size are examined. The SNR improvements, which can be obtained in this manner, translate to corresponding improvements in Lidar range for backscatter schemes including Raman and DIAL.

  18. Optimization of signal-to-noise ratio for wireless light-emitting diode communication in modern lighting layouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizan, Luqman A.; Ab-Rahman, Mohammad S.; Hassan, Mazen R.; Bakar, A. Ashrif A.; Nordin, Rosdiadee

    2014-04-01

    White light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are predicted to be widely used in domestic applications in the future, because they are becoming widespread in commercial lighting applications. The ability of LEDs to be modulated at high speeds offers the possibility of using them as sources for communication instead of illumination. The growing interest in using these devices for both illumination and communication requires attention to combine this technology with modern lighting layouts. A dual-function system is applied to three models of modern lighting layouts: the hybrid corner lighting layout (HCLL), the hybrid wall lighting layout (HWLL), and the hybrid edge lighting layout (HELL). Based on the analysis, the relationship between the space adversity and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance is demonstrated for each model. The key factor that affects the SNR performance of visible light communication is the reliance on the design parameter that is related to the number and position of LED lights. The model of HWLL is chosen as the best layout, since 61% of the office area is considered as an excellent communication area and the difference between the area classification, Δp, is 22%. Thus, this system is applicable to modern lighting layouts.

  19. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study. PMID:24822441

  20. Speech intelligibility and recall of first and second language words heard at different signal-to-noise ratios.

    PubMed

    Hygge, Staffan; Kjellberg, Anders; Nöstl, Anatole

    2015-01-01

    Free recall of spoken words in Swedish (native tongue) and English were assessed in two signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conditions (+3 and +12 dB), with and without half of the heard words being repeated back orally directly after presentation [shadowing, speech intelligibility (SI)]. A total of 24 word lists with 12 words each were presented in English and in Swedish to Swedish speaking college students. Pre-experimental measures of working memory capacity (operation span, OSPAN) were taken. A basic hypothesis was that the recall of the words would be impaired when the encoding of the words required more processing resources, thereby depleting working memory resources. This would be the case when the SNR was low or when the language was English. A low SNR was also expected to impair SI, but we wanted to compare the sizes of the SNR-effects on SI and recall. A low score on working memory capacity was expected to further add to the negative effects of SNR and language on both SI and recall. The results indicated that SNR had strong effects on both SI and recall, but also that the effect size was larger for recall than for SI. Language had a main effect on recall, but not on SI. The shadowing procedure had different effects on recall of the early and late parts of the word lists. Working memory capacity was unimportant for the effect on SI and recall. Thus, recall appear to be a more sensitive indicator than SI for the acoustics of learning, which has implications for building codes and recommendations concerning classrooms and other workplaces, where both hearing and learning is important. PMID:26441765

  1. Experimental measurements of estimator bias and the signal-to-noise ratio for deconvolution from wave-front sensing.

    PubMed

    Dayton, D; Gonglewski, J; Rogers, S

    1997-06-10

    Deconvolution from wave-front sensing (DWFS) has been proposed as a method for achieving high-resolution images of astronomical objects from ground-based telescopes. The technique consists of the simultaneous measurement of a short-exposure focal-plane speckled image, as well as the wave front, by use of a Shack-Hartmann sensor placed at the pupil plane. In early studies it was suspected that some problems would occur in poor seeing conditions; however, it was usually assumed that the technique would work well as long as the wave-front sensor subaperture spacing was less than r(0) (L/r(0) < 1). Atmosphere-induced phase errors in the pupil of a telescope imaging system produce both phase errors and magnitude errors in the effective short-exposure optical transfer function (OTF) of the system. Recently it has been shown that the commonly used estimator for this technique produces biased estimates of the magnitude errors. The significance of this bias problem is that one cannot properly estimate or correct for the frame-to-frame fluctuations in the magnitude of the OTF but can do so only for fluctuations in the phase. An auxiliary estimate must also be used to correct for the mean value of the magnitude error. The inability to compensate for the magnitude fluctuations results in a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) that is less favorable for the technique than was previously thought. In some situations simpler techniques, such as the Knox-Thompson and bispectrum methods, which require only speckle gram data from the focal plane of the imaging system, can produce better results. We present experimental measurements based on observations of bright stars and the Jovian moon Ganymede that confirm previous theoretical predictions. PMID:18253416

  2. Enhancing the signal-to-noise ratio of X-ray diffraction profiles by smoothed principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zeng Ping; Morris, Julian; Martin, Elaine; Hammond, Robert B; Lai, Xiaojun; Ma, Caiyun; Purba, Elida; Roberts, Kevin J; Bytheway, Richard

    2005-10-15

    X-ray diffraction is one of the most widely applied methodologies for the in situ analysis of kinetic processes involving crystalline solids. However, due to its relatively high detection limit, it has only limited application in the context of crystallizations from liquids. Methods that can improve the detection limit of X-ray diffraction are therefore highly desirable. Signal processing approaches such as Savitzky-Golay, maximum likelihood, stochastic resonance, and wavelet transforms have been used previously to preprocess X-ray diffraction data. Since all these methods only utilize the frequency information contained in the single X-ray diffraction profile being processed to discriminate between the signals and the noise, they may not successfully identify very weak but important peaks especially when these weak signals are masked by severe noise. Smoothed principal component analysis (SPCA), which takes advantage of both the frequency information and the common variation within a set of profiles, is proposed as a methodology for the preprocessing of the X-ray diffraction data. Two X-ray diffraction data sets are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. The first was obtained from mannitol-methanol suspensions, and the second data set was generated from slurries of L-glutamic acid (GA) in methanol. The results showed that SPCA can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and hence lower the detection limits (approximately 0.389% g/mL for mannitol-methanol suspensions and 0.4 wt % for beta-form GA in GA-methanol slurries comprising mixtures of both alpha- and beta-forms of GA) thereby providing an important contribution to crystallization process performance monitoring.

  3. High signal-to-noise ratio acoustic sensor using phase shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2015-03-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices.

  4. Worldwide uncertainty assessments of ladar and radar signal-to-noise ratio performance for diverse low altitude atmospheric environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorino, Steven T.; Bartell, Richard J.; Krizo, Matthew J.; Caylor, Gregory; Moore, Kenneth P.; Harris, Thomas R.; Cusumano, Salvatore J.

    2010-06-01

    In this study of atmospheric effects on laser ranging and detection (ladar) and radar systems, the parameter space is explored using the Air Force Institute of Technology Center for Directed Energy's (AFIT/CDE) High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) parametric one-on-one engagement level model. The expected performance of ladar systems is assessed at a representative wavelength of 1.557 µm at a number of widely dispersed land and maritime locations worldwide. Radar system performance is assessed at 95 GHz and 250 GHz. Scenarios evaluated include both down looking oblique and vertical engagement geometries over ranges up to 3000 meters in which clear air aerosols and thin layers of fog, locally heavy rain, and low stratus cloud types are expected to occur. Seasonal and boundary layer variations are considered to determine optimum employment techniques to exploit or defeat the environmental conditions. Each atmospheric particulate/obscurant/hydrometeor is evaluated based on its wavelength-dependent forward and off-axis scattering characteristics and absorption effects on system interrogation. Results are presented in the form of worldwide plots of notional signal to noise ratio. The ladar and 95 GHz system types exhibit similar SNR performance for forward oblique clear air operation. 1.557 µm ladar performs well for vertical geometries in the presence of ground fog, but has no near-horizontal performance under such meteorological conditions. It also has no performance if low altitude stratus is present. 95 GHz performs well for both the fog and stratus layer cases, for both vertical and forward oblique geometries. The 250 GHz radar system is heavily impacted by water vapor absorption in all scenarios studied; however it is not as strongly affected by clouds and fog as the 1.557 µm ladar. Locally heavy rain will severely limit ladar system performance at these wavelengths. However, under heavy rain conditions ladar outperforms both radar

  5. Quality assurance in MRI breast screening: comparing signal-to-noise ratio in dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kousi, Evanthia; Borri, Marco; Dean, Jamie; Panek, Rafal; Scurr, Erica; Leach, Martin O.; Schmidt, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has been extensively used in breast cancer staging, management and high risk screening. Detection sensitivity is paramount in breast screening, but variations of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as a function of position are often overlooked. We propose and demonstrate practical methods to assess spatial SNR variations in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast examinations and apply those methods to different protocols and systems. Four different protocols in three different MRI systems (1.5 and 3.0 T) with receiver coils of different design were employed on oil-filled test objects with and without uniformity filters. Twenty 3D datasets were acquired with each protocol; each dataset was acquired in under 60 s, thus complying with current breast DCE guidelines. In addition to the standard SNR calculated on a pixel-by-pixel basis, we propose other regional indices considering the mean and standard deviation of the signal over a small sub-region centred on each pixel. These regional indices include effects of the spatial variation of coil sensitivity and other structured artefacts. The proposed regional SNR indices demonstrate spatial variations in SNR as well as the presence of artefacts and sensitivity variations, which are otherwise difficult to quantify and might be overlooked in a clinical setting. Spatial variations in SNR depend on protocol choice and hardware characteristics. The use of uniformity filters was shown to lead to a rise of SNR values, altering the noise distribution. Correlation between noise in adjacent pixels was associated with data truncation along the phase encoding direction. Methods to characterise spatial SNR variations using regional information were demonstrated, with implications for quality assurance in breast screening and multi-centre trials.

  6. [The radial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type low resolution stellar spectra at different signal-to-noise ratio].

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Fei; Luo, A-Li; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2014-02-01

    The radial velocity of the star is very important for the study of the dynamics structure and chemistry evolution of the Milky Way, is also an useful tool for looking for variable or special objects. In the present work, we focus on calculating the radial velocity of different spectral types of low-resolution stellar spectra by adopting a template matching method, so as to provide effective and reliable reference to the different aspects of scientific research We choose high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) spectra of different spectral type stellar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and add different noise to simulate the stellar spectra with different SNR. Then we obtain theradial velocity measurement accuracy of different spectral type stellar spectra at different SNR by employing a template matching method. Meanwhile, the radial velocity measurement accuracy of white dwarf stars is analyzed as well. We concluded that the accuracy of radial velocity measurements of early-type stars is much higher than late-type ones. For example, the 1-sigma standard error of radial velocity measurements of A-type stars is 5-8 times as large as K-type and M-type stars. We discuss the reason and suggest that the very narrow lines of late-type stars ensure the accuracy of measurement of radial velocities, while the early-type stars with very wide Balmer lines, such as A-type stars, become sensitive to noise and obtain low accuracy of radial velocities. For the spectra of white dwarfs stars, the standard error of radial velocity measurement could be over 50 km x s(-1) because of their extremely wide Balmer lines. The above conclusion will provide a good reference for stellar scientific study.

  7. Comparison of signal to noise ratios from spatial and frequency domain formulations of nonprewhitening model observers in digital mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Sisini, Francesco; Zanca, Federica; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Taibi, Angelo; Cardarelli, Paolo; Bosmans, Hilde

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: Image quality indices based upon model observers are promising alternatives to laborious human readings of contrast-detail images. This is especially appealing in digital mammography as limiting values for contrast thresholds determine, according to some international protocols, the acceptability of these systems in the radiological practice. The objective of the present study was to compare the signal to noise ratios (SNR) obtained with two nonprewhitening matched filter model observer approaches, one in the spatial domain and the other in the frequency domain, and with both of them worked out for disks as present in the CDMAM phantom. Methods: The analysis was performed using images acquired with the Siemens Novation and Inspiration digital mammography systems. The spatial domain formulation uses a series of high dose CDMAM images as the signal and a routine exposure of two flood images to calculate the covariance matrix. The frequency domain approach uses the mathematical description of a disk and modulation transfer function (MTF) and noise power spectrum (NPS) calculated from images. Results: For both systems most of the SNR values calculated in the frequency domain were in very good agreement with the SNR values calculated in the spatial domain. Both the formulations in the frequency domain and in the spatial domain show a linear relationship between SNR and the diameter of the CDMAM discs. Conclusions: The results suggest that both formulations of the model observer lead to very similar figures of merit. This is a step forward in the adoption of figures of merit based on NPS and MTF for the acceptance testing of mammography systems.

  8. Sea level estimate from multi-frequency signal-to-noise ratio data collected by a single geodetic receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Frappart, Frédéric; Ramillien, Guillaume; Darrozes, José; Cornu, Gwendolyne; Koummarasy, Khanithalath

    2016-04-01

    GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) altimetry has demonstrated a strong potential for sea level monitoring. Interference Pattern Technique (IPT) based on the analysis of the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) estimated by a GNSS receiver, presents the main advantage of being applicable everywhere by using a single geodetic antenna and receiver, transforming them to real tide gauges. Such a technique has already been tested in various configurations of acquisition of surface-reflected GNSS signals with an accuracy of a few centimeters. Nevertheless, the classical SNR analysis method for estimating the reflecting surface-antenna height is limited by an approximation: the vertical velocity of the reflecting surface must be negligible. Authors present a significant improvement of the SNR technique to solve this problem and broaden the scope of SNR-based tide monitoring. The performances achieved on the different GNSS frequency band (L1, L2 and L5) are analyzed. The method is based on a Least-Mean Square Resolution Method (LSM), combining simultaneous measurements from different GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS), which permits to take the dynamic of the surface into account. It was validated in situ [1], with an antenna placed at 60 meters above the Atlantic Ocean surface with variations reaching ±3 meters, and amplitude rate of the semi-diurnal tide up to 0.5 mm/s. Over the three months of SNR records on L1 frequency band for sea level determination, we found linear correlations of 0.94 by comparing with a classical tide gauge record. Our SNR-based time series was also compared to a tide theoretical model and amplitudes and phases of the main astronomical periods (6-, 12- and 24-h) were perfectly well detected. Waves and swell are also likely to be detected. If the validity of our method is already well-established with L1 band [1], the aim of our current study is to analyze the results obtained with the other GNSS frequency band: L2 and L5. L1 band seems to provide the best sea

  9. Spectral parameters and signal-to-noise ratio requirement for TANSAT hyper spectral remote sensor of atmospheric CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Yang, Zhong-Dong; Bi, Yan-Meng

    2014-11-01

    , the results indicate that sampling ratio should exceed 2 pixels/FWHM to ensure the accuracy of CO2 spectrum. Signal-to-noise ratio is one of the most important parameters of hyper spectral CO2 detectors to ensure the reliability of CO2 signal. SNR requirements of CO2 detector to different detection precisions are explored based on the radiance sensitivity factors. The results show that it is difficult to achieve the SNR to detect 1×10-6-4×10-6 CO2 concentration change in the boundary layer by solar shortwave infrared passive remote sensing, limited by the instrument development at present. However, the instrument SNR to detect 1% change in the CO2 column concentration is attainable. The results of this study are not only conductive to universal applications and guides on developing grating spectrometer, but also helpful to have a better understanding of the complexity of CO2 retrieval.

  10. Receiver Signal to Noise Ratios for IPDA Lidars Using Sine-wave and Pulsed Laser Modulation and Direct Detections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James B.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar can be used to remotely measure the column density of gases in the path to a scattering target [1]. The total column gas molecular density can be derived from the ratio of the laser echo signal power with the laser wavelength on the gas absorption line (on-line) to that off the line (off-line). 80th coherent detection and direct detection IPDA lidar have been used successfully in the past in horizontal path and airborne remote sensing measurements. However, for space based measurements, the signal propagation losses are often orders of magnitude higher and it is important to use the most efficient laser modulation and detection technique to minimize the average laser power and the electrical power from the spacecraft. This paper gives an analysis the receiver signal to noise ratio (SNR) of several laser modulation and detection techniques versus the average received laser power under similar operation environments. Coherent detection [2] can give the best receiver performance when the local oscillator laser is relatively strong and the heterodyne mixing losses are negligible. Coherent detection has a high signal gain and a very narrow bandwidth for the background light and detector dark noise. However, coherent detection must maintain a high degree of coherence between the local oscillator laser and the received signal in both temporal and spatial modes. This often results in a high system complexity and low overall measurement efficiency. For measurements through atmosphere the coherence diameter of the received signal also limits the useful size of the receiver telescope. Direct detection IPDA lidars are simpler to build and have fewer constraints on the transmitter and receiver components. They can use much larger size 'photon-bucket' type telescopes to reduce the demands on the laser transmitter. Here we consider the two most widely used direct detection IPDA lidar techniques. The first technique uses two CW

  11. Exact closed-form expressions for the performance of the split-symbol moments estimator of signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolinar, S.

    1990-01-01

    Previously, the performance of the split-symbol moments estimator (SSME) of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) has been evaluated by means of approximate expressions for the estimator mean and variance. These are asymptotic formulas in the sense that they become accurate as the number of estimator samples gets large. Here, exact closed-form expressions are obtained for the same quantities. These expressions confirm the accuracy of the previously derived asymptotic results, and, unlike the asymptotic formulas, they are useful even when the number of samples is small. It is also shown that the conventional split-symbol estimator can be trivially scaled to form a signal-to-noise ratio estimator which is precisely unbiased (as long as the estimate is based on more than two split-symbols).

  12. Measurement and analysis of perceivable signal-to-noise ratio for infrared imaging system with human vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Jing; Chang, Honghua; Ma, Lin

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between correct discrimination probability of the human eye and perceivable signal-to-noise (SNR) threshold is studied for different equilateral triangle sizes with specified luminance through combining theoretical calculation with practical experiment based on triangle orientation discrimination (TOD) performance evaluation method. Specifically, the simulation images of triangle patterns are generated by an infrared imaging system (IRIS) simulation model. And the perceivable SNRs for these images are calculated by establishing the system theoretical model and the human vision system model. Meanwhile, the Four-Alternative Forced-Choice experiment is performed. Experiment results of several observers are averaged statistically and the curves of perceivable SNR threshold which change with the correct discrimination probability are obtained. Finally, the analyses of these results show that these changes are in accordance with the psychometric function and that the fitting curves become steep with the increase of triangle sizes. These data and conclusions are helpful to modify the existing TOD performance model of an IRIS.

  13. Optimal control of the signal-to-noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle: The crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases

    SciTech Connect

    Lapert, M.; Glaser, S. J.; Assémat, E.; Sugny, D.

    2015-01-28

    We show to which extent the signal to noise ratio per unit time of a spin 1/2 particle can be maximized. We consider a cyclic repetition of experiments made of a measurement followed by a radio-frequency magnetic field excitation of the system, in the case of unbounded amplitude. In the periodic regime, the objective of the control problem is to design the initial state of the system and the pulse sequence which leads to the best signal to noise performance. We focus on two specific issues relevant in nuclear magnetic resonance, the crusher gradient and the radiation damping cases. Optimal control techniques are used to solve this non-standard control problem. We discuss the optimality of the Ernst angle solution, which is commonly applied in spectroscopic and medical imaging applications. In the radiation damping situation, we show that in some cases, the optimal solution differs from the Ernst one.

  14. Signal-to-noise ratio in direct-detection mid-infrared Random-Modulation Continuous-Wave lidar in the presence of colored additive noise.

    PubMed

    Rybaltowski, A; Taflove, A

    2001-10-01

    We have derived the signal-to-noise ratio in direct-detection Random-Modulation Continuous-Wave (RM-CW) lidar in the presence of colored additive noise. In contrast to a known formula derived for the photon shot-noise regime, which may adequately describe experimental conditions in the near-infrared, our result is applicable mainly at longer, mid-infrared wavelengths. Unlike the former formula, our result is explicitly dependent on the pseudorandom code (PRC) used for modulation. Three known modulation codes, the M-, A1-, and A2-sequence are compared and shown to have practically equivalent signal and noise properties (provided that clutter inherent in the A1- and A2-sequence is neglected), except that the M-sequence has a near-zero-frequency noise pickup that degrades its performance in real measurement systems. This difference provides an alternative explanation of a better performance of the A1-/A2-sequence in a previous experiment [3], carried out in the near-infrared. It suggests the presence of an additive noise component and thus some applicability of our result also in near-infrared lidar. A need for balanced sequences - particularly in the mid-infrared - is explained, although in a different way than previously suggested in near-infrared, photon shot noise-limited lidar. Additional, sinusoidal carrier modulation is considered and shown to have significant drawbacks. Our results allow comparison of given modulation sequences, and construction of improved ones. Interestingly, the improved sequences will possess less "random" characteristics, seemingly against the underlying concept of random modulation.

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio, contrast-to-noise ratio and pharmacokinetic modeling considerations in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Huang, Wei; Rooney, William D

    2012-11-01

    With advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI is approaching the capability to simultaneously deliver both high spatial and high temporal resolutions for clinical applications. However, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) considerations and their impacts regarding pharmacokinetic modeling of the time-course data continue to represent challenges in the design of DCE-MRI acquisitions. Given that many acquisition parameters can affect the nature of DCE-MRI data, minimizing tissue-specific data acquisition discrepancy (among sites and scanner models) is as important as synchronizing pharmacokinetic modeling approaches. For cancer-related DCE-MRI studies where rapid contrast reagent (CR) extravasation is expected, current DCE-MRI protocols often adopt a three-dimensional fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence to achieve spatial-temporal resolution requirements. Based on breast and prostate DCE-MRI data acquired with different FLASH sequence parameters, this paper elucidates a number of SNR and CNR considerations for acquisition optimization and pharmacokinetic modeling implications therein. Simulations based on region of interest data further indicate that the effects of intercompartmental water exchange often play an important role in DCE time-course data modeling, especially for protocols optimized for post-CR SNR.

  16. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the beat note between a frequency comb and a tunable laser using a dynamically tracking optical filter.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Hugo; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Genest, Jérôme

    2016-09-15

    An acousto-optic filter is locked to a tunable continuous wave (CW) laser so that a frequency comb can be dynamically filtered around the wavelength of the CW source. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the heterodyne beat note between the comb and the CW laser is improved by a factor of up to 19 dB. Furthermore, a SNR of more than 56 dB in 100 kHz is obtained over an 85 nm wavelength span. This technique could enable wideband, agile, and cycle-slip-free phase tracking of a beat note across a full comb spectrum. PMID:27628370

  17. Improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the beat note between a frequency comb and a tunable laser using a dynamically tracking optical filter.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Hugo; Deschênes, Jean-Daniel; Genest, Jérôme

    2016-09-15

    An acousto-optic filter is locked to a tunable continuous wave (CW) laser so that a frequency comb can be dynamically filtered around the wavelength of the CW source. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the heterodyne beat note between the comb and the CW laser is improved by a factor of up to 19 dB. Furthermore, a SNR of more than 56 dB in 100 kHz is obtained over an 85 nm wavelength span. This technique could enable wideband, agile, and cycle-slip-free phase tracking of a beat note across a full comb spectrum.

  18. The effect of audibility, signal-to-noise ratio, and temporal speech cues on the benefit from fast-acting compression in modulated noise.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Henrik L; Olofsson, Ake; Hagerman, Björn

    2005-07-01

    The objective of the experiment was to investigate three aspects that might contribute to the benefit of fast-acting compression seen in normal-hearing listeners. Six normal-hearing listeners were tested with speech recognition in a fully modulated noise (FUM) either through a fast-acting compressor or through linear amplification. In the first experiment, three different presentation levels of the FUM noise (15, 30, and 45 dB SL) were tested. The second experiment manipulated the control signal of the compressor independently of the audio input signal at four signal-to-noise ratios (-15, 10, -5, and 0 dB). A signal correlated noise version of the speech signal was tested in the third experiment at three speech-to-noise ratios (-20, -15 and -10 dB). Results showed that performance was better with compression than with linear amplification through all of the tested conditions at least when the signal-to-noise ratio was negative. The results suggest that other aspects of the hearing impairment than those simulated here are involved in the degraded performance seen for some hearing-impaired listeners with fast-acting compression.

  19. A novel technique for determination of two dimensional signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor of an antiscatter grid in digital radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nøtthellen, Jacob; Konst, Bente; Abildgaard, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: to present a new and simplified method for pixel-wise determination of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor KSNR of an antiscatter grid, when used with a digital imaging system. The method was based on approximations of published formulas. The simplified estimate of K2SNR may be used as a decision tool for whether or not to use an antiscatter grid. Methods: the primary transmission of the grid Tp was determined with and without a phantom present using a pattern of beam stops. The Bucky factor B was measured with and without a phantom present. Hence K2SNR maps were created based on Tp and B. A formula was developed to calculate K2SNR from the measured Bs without using the measured Tp. The formula was applied on two exposures of anthropomorphic phantoms, adult legs and baby chest, and on two homogeneous poly[methyl methacrylate] (PMMA) phantoms, 5 cm and 10 cm thick. The results from anthropomorphic phantoms were compared to those based on the beam stop method. The results for the PMMA-phantoms were compared to a study that used a contrast-detail phantom. Results: 2D maps of K2SNR over the entire adult legs and baby chest phantoms were created. The maps indicate that it is advantageous to use the antiscatter grid for imaging of the adult legs. For baby chest imaging the antiscatter grid is not recommended if only the lung regions are of interest. The K2SNR maps based on the new method correspond to those from the beam stop method, and the K2SNR from the homogenous phantoms arising from two different approaches also agreed well with each other. Conclusion: a method to measure 2D K2SNR associated with grid use in digital radiography system was developed and validated. The proposed method requires four exposures and use of a simple formula. It is fast and provides adequate estimates for K2SNR.

  20. Tests of variable-band multilayers designed for investigating optimal signal-to-noise vs artifact signal ratios in Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography (DDSA) imaging systems

    SciTech Connect

    Boyers, D.; Ho, A.; Li, Q.; Piestrup, M.; Rice, M.; Tatchyn, R.

    1993-08-01

    In recent work, various design techniques were applied to investigate the feasibility of controlling the bandwidth and bandshape profiles of tungsten/boron-carbon (W/B{sub 4}C) and tungsten/silicon (W/Si) multilayers for optimizing their performance in synchrotron radiation based angiographical imaging systems at 33 keV. Varied parameters included alternative spacing geometries, material thickness ratios, and numbers of layer pairs. Planar optics with nominal design reflectivities of 30%--94% and bandwidths ranging from 0.6%--10% were designed at the Stanford Radiation Laboratory, fabricated by the Ovonic Synthetic Materials Company, and characterized on Beam Line 4-3 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, in this paper we report selected results of these tests and review the possible use of the multilayers for determining optimal signal to noise vs. artifact signal ratios in practical Dual-Energy Digital Subtraction Angiography systems.

  1. Penetrating Peptide-Bioconjugated Persistent Nanophosphors for Long-Term Tracking of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells with Superior Signal-to-Noise Ratio.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shu-Qi; Chi, Chong-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Reliable long-term in vivo tracking of stem cells is of great importance in stem cell-based therapy and research. Fluorescence imaging with in situ excitation has significant autofluorescence background, which results in poor signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Here we report TAT penetrating peptide-bioconjugated long persistent luminescence nanoparticles (LPLNP-TAT) for long-term tracking of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) without constant external excitation. LPLNP-TAT exhibits near-infrared emitting, red light renewable capability, and superior in vivo imaging depth and SNR compared with conventional organic dye and quantum dots. Our findings show that LPLNP-TAT can successfully label ASC without impairing their proliferation and differentiation and can effectively track ASC in skin-regeneration and tumor-homing models. We believe that LPLNP-TAT represents a new generation of cell tracking probes and will have broad application in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26942557

  2. Dynamic Response and Signal to Noise Ratio Investigation of NIR-FBG Dynamic Sensing System for Monitoring Thin- walled Composite Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafizi, Z. M.; Epaarachchi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Optical fiber systems for dynamic response measurement become an attractive study nowadays especially in the field of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). This work presents the investigation of an optical fiber sensor system utilizing Near Infra-Red Fiber Bragg Grating (NIR-FBG) sensor for SHM of a thin-walled composite structure. In this study, a comparison between the experimental result and simulation study using finite element analysis has been presented. By comparing both results, the FBG dynamic sensing system was shown to have an excellent capability in acquiring dynamic response due to flexural wave propagations. In the meantime, a signal to noise ratio (SNR) study was also performed to several FBG dynamic sensor systems; particularly to see the comparison between NIR-FBG sensor and 1550 nm FBG sensor. Furthermore, with a proper configuration, an NIR-FBG system was proved to have better performance than the 1550 nm based FBG sensor.

  3. Optimization of wide-angle seismic signal-to-noise ratios and P-wave transmission in Kenya

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacob, A.W.B.; Vees, R.; Braile, L.W.; Criley, E.

    1994-01-01

    In previous refraction and wide-angle reflection experiments in the Kenya Rift there were problems with poor signal-noise ratios which made good seismic interpretation difficult. Careful planning and preparation for KRISP 90 has substantially overcome these problems and produced excellent seismic sections in a difficult environment. Noise levels were minimized by working, as far as possible, at times of the day when conditions were quiet, while source signals were optimized by using dispersed charges in water where it was available and waterfilled boreholes in most cases where it was not. Seismic coupling at optimum depth in water has been found to be more than 100 times greater than it is in a borehole in dry loosely compacted material. Allowing for the source coupling, a very marked difference has been found between the observation ranges in the rift and those on the flanks, where the observation ranges are greater. These appear to indicate a significant difference in seismic transmission through the two types of crust. ?? 1994.

  4. Principal component analysis with pre-normalization improves the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in positron emission tomography studies of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razifar, Pasha; Engler, Henry; Blomquist, Gunnar; Ringheim, Anna; Estrada, Sergio; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats

    2009-06-01

    This study introduces a new approach for the application of principal component analysis (PCA) with pre-normalization on dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. These images are generated using the amyloid imaging agent N-methyl [11C]2-(4'-methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole ([11C]PIB) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy volunteers (HVs). The aim was to introduce a method which, by using the whole dataset and without assuming a specific kinetic model, could generate images with improved signal-to-noise and detect, extract and illustrate changes in kinetic behavior between different regions in the brain. Eight AD patients and eight HVs from a previously published study with [11C]PIB were used. The approach includes enhancement of brain regions where the kinetics of the radiotracer are different from what is seen in the reference region, pre-normalization for differences in noise levels and removal of negative values. This is followed by slice-wise application of PCA (SW-PCA) on the dynamic PET images. Results obtained using the new approach were compared with results obtained using reference Patlak and summed images. The new approach generated images with good quality in which cortical brain regions in AD patients showed high uptake, compared to cerebellum and white matter. Cortical structures in HVs showed low uptake as expected and in good agreement with data generated using kinetic modeling. The introduced approach generated images with enhanced contrast and improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and discrimination power (DP) compared to summed images and parametric images. This method is expected to be an important clinical tool in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia.

  5. Principal component analysis with pre-normalization improves the signal-to-noise ratio and image quality in positron emission tomography studies of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Razifar, Pasha; Engler, Henry; Blomquist, Gunnar; Ringheim, Anna; Estrada, Sergio; Långström, Bengt; Bergström, Mats

    2009-06-01

    This study introduces a new approach for the application of principal component analysis (PCA) with pre-normalization on dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) images. These images are generated using the amyloid imaging agent N-methyl [(11)C]2-(4'-methylaminophenyl)-6-hydroxy-benzothiazole ([(11)C]PIB) in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy volunteers (HVs). The aim was to introduce a method which, by using the whole dataset and without assuming a specific kinetic model, could generate images with improved signal-to-noise and detect, extract and illustrate changes in kinetic behavior between different regions in the brain. Eight AD patients and eight HVs from a previously published study with [(11)C]PIB were used. The approach includes enhancement of brain regions where the kinetics of the radiotracer are different from what is seen in the reference region, pre-normalization for differences in noise levels and removal of negative values. This is followed by slice-wise application of PCA (SW-PCA) on the dynamic PET images. Results obtained using the new approach were compared with results obtained using reference Patlak and summed images. The new approach generated images with good quality in which cortical brain regions in AD patients showed high uptake, compared to cerebellum and white matter. Cortical structures in HVs showed low uptake as expected and in good agreement with data generated using kinetic modeling. The introduced approach generated images with enhanced contrast and improved signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and discrimination power (DP) compared to summed images and parametric images. This method is expected to be an important clinical tool in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of dementia.

  6. Low voltage-driven oxide phototransistors with fast recovery, high signal-to-noise ratio, and high responsivity fabricated via a simple defect-generating process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Myeong Gu; Kim, Ye Kyun; Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Cho, Sung Woon; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-01

    We have demonstrated that photo-thin film transistors (photo-TFTs) fabricated via a simple defect-generating process could achieve fast recovery, a high signal to noise (S/N) ratio, and high sensitivity. The photo-TFTs are inverted-staggered bottom-gate type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) TFTs fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD)-derived Al2O3 gate insulators. The surfaces of the Al2O3 gate insulators are damaged by ion bombardment during the deposition of the IGZO channel layers by sputtering and the damage results in the hysteresis behavior of the photo-TFTs. The hysteresis loops broaden as the deposition power density increases. This implies that we can easily control the amount of the interface trap sites and/or trap sites in the gate insulator near the interface. The photo-TFTs with large hysteresis-related defects have high S/N ratio and fast recovery in spite of the low operation voltages including a drain voltage of 1 V, positive gate bias pulse voltage of 3 V, and gate voltage pulse width of 3 V (0 to 3 V). In addition, through the hysteresis-related defect-generating process, we have achieved a high responsivity since the bulk defects that can be photo-excited and eject electrons also increase with increasing deposition power density.

  7. Low voltage-driven oxide phototransistors with fast recovery, high signal-to-noise ratio, and high responsivity fabricated via a simple defect-generating process.

    PubMed

    Yun, Myeong Gu; Kim, Ye Kyun; Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Cho, Sung Woon; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that photo-thin film transistors (photo-TFTs) fabricated via a simple defect-generating process could achieve fast recovery, a high signal to noise (S/N) ratio, and high sensitivity. The photo-TFTs are inverted-staggered bottom-gate type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) TFTs fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD)-derived Al2O3 gate insulators. The surfaces of the Al2O3 gate insulators are damaged by ion bombardment during the deposition of the IGZO channel layers by sputtering and the damage results in the hysteresis behavior of the photo-TFTs. The hysteresis loops broaden as the deposition power density increases. This implies that we can easily control the amount of the interface trap sites and/or trap sites in the gate insulator near the interface. The photo-TFTs with large hysteresis-related defects have high S/N ratio and fast recovery in spite of the low operation voltages including a drain voltage of 1 V, positive gate bias pulse voltage of 3 V, and gate voltage pulse width of 3 V (0 to 3 V). In addition, through the hysteresis-related defect-generating process, we have achieved a high responsivity since the bulk defects that can be photo-excited and eject electrons also increase with increasing deposition power density. PMID:27553518

  8. Low voltage-driven oxide phototransistors with fast recovery, high signal-to-noise ratio, and high responsivity fabricated via a simple defect-generating process

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Myeong Gu; Kim, Ye Kyun; Ahn, Cheol Hyoun; Cho, Sung Woon; Kang, Won Jun; Cho, Hyung Koun; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    We have demonstrated that photo-thin film transistors (photo-TFTs) fabricated via a simple defect-generating process could achieve fast recovery, a high signal to noise (S/N) ratio, and high sensitivity. The photo-TFTs are inverted-staggered bottom-gate type indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) TFTs fabricated using atomic layer deposition (ALD)-derived Al2O3 gate insulators. The surfaces of the Al2O3 gate insulators are damaged by ion bombardment during the deposition of the IGZO channel layers by sputtering and the damage results in the hysteresis behavior of the photo-TFTs. The hysteresis loops broaden as the deposition power density increases. This implies that we can easily control the amount of the interface trap sites and/or trap sites in the gate insulator near the interface. The photo-TFTs with large hysteresis-related defects have high S/N ratio and fast recovery in spite of the low operation voltages including a drain voltage of 1 V, positive gate bias pulse voltage of 3 V, and gate voltage pulse width of 3 V (0 to 3 V). In addition, through the hysteresis-related defect-generating process, we have achieved a high responsivity since the bulk defects that can be photo-excited and eject electrons also increase with increasing deposition power density. PMID:27553518

  9. Signal to Noise Ratio in Digital Lock-in Detection for Multiple Intensity-Modulated Signals in CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, S.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Nehrir, A. R.; Campbell, J. F.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, N. M.; Obland, M. D.; Ismail, S.; Meadows, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometers (LASs) for the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) column mixing ratio from both air- and space-borne platforms. The LAS system uses high-power fiber lasers/amplifiers in the 1.57-um CO2 absorption band and the 1.26-um O2 absorption band in the transmitters and simultaneous digital lock-in detection for the multiple intensity-modulated signals with different modulation waveforms , such as simple sinusoidal waves at different frequencies, associated with different wavelengths in the receivers. The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in the system is of interest for the system designs and the performance prediction of airborne and space-borne implementations in the future. This paper will discuss the properties of the signals and various noises in the LAS system, especially for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection with a single detector for the multiple intensity-modulated signals at different frequencies. The numerical simulation of the SNR for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in terms of relative intensity of the multiple modulated signals and the integration time, and an initial experimental verification will be presented.

  10. Signal-to-noise ratio and spectral linewidth improvements between 1.5 and 7 Tesla in proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Otazo, Ricardo; Mueller, Bryon; Ugurbil, Kamil; Wald, Lawrence; Posse, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    This study characterizes gains in sensitivity and spectral resolution of proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with increasing magnetic field strength (B(0)). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit volume and unit time, and intrinsic linewidth (LW) of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured with PEPSI at 1.5, 3, 4, and 7 Tesla on scanners that shared a similar software and hardware platform, using circularly polarized (CP) and eight-channel phased-array (PA) head coils. Data were corrected for relaxation effects and processed with a time-domain matched filter (MF) adapted to each B(0). The SNR and LW measured with PEPSI were very similar to those measured with conventional point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) SI. Measurements with the CP coil demonstrated a nearly linear SNR gain with respect to B(0) in central brain regions. For the PA coil, the SNR-B(0) relationship was less than linear, but there was a substantial SNR increase in comparison to the CP coil. The LW in units of ppm decreased with B(0), resulting in improved spectral resolution. These studies using PEPSI demonstrated linear gains in SNR with respect to B(0), consistent with theoretical expectations, and a decrease in ppm LW with increasing B(0).

  11. Children’s Recall of Words Spoken in Their First and Second Language: Effects of Signal-to-Noise Ratio and Reverberation Time

    PubMed Central

    Hurtig, Anders; Keus van de Poll, Marijke; Pekkola, Elina P.; Hygge, Staffan; Ljung, Robert; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    Speech perception runs smoothly and automatically when there is silence in the background, but when the speech signal is degraded by background noise or by reverberation, effortful cognitive processing is needed to compensate for the signal distortion. Previous research has typically investigated the effects of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and reverberation time in isolation, whilst few have looked at their interaction. In this study, we probed how reverberation time and SNR influence recall of words presented in participants’ first- (L1) and second-language (L2). A total of 72 children (10 years old) participated in this study. The to-be-recalled wordlists were played back with two different reverberation times (0.3 and 1.2 s) crossed with two different SNRs (+3 dBA and +12 dBA). Children recalled fewer words when the spoken words were presented in L2 in comparison with recall of spoken words presented in L1. Words that were presented with a high SNR (+12 dBA) improved recall compared to a low SNR (+3 dBA). Reverberation time interacted with SNR to the effect that at +12 dB the shorter reverberation time improved recall, but at +3 dB it impaired recall. The effects of the physical sound variables (SNR and reverberation time) did not interact with language. PMID:26834665

  12. Using optical fibers with different modes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter measurements

    PubMed Central

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; Shelton, Brent J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. The dual-wavelength diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter is an emerging technique enabling simultaneous measurements of blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in deep tissues. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial when applying DCS technologies in the study of human tissues where the detected signals are usually very weak. In this study, single-mode, few-mode, and multimode fibers are compared to explore the possibility of improving the SNR of DCS flow-oximeter measurements. Experiments on liquid phantom solutions and in vivo muscle tissues show only slight improvements in flow measurements when using the few-mode fiber compared with using the single-mode fiber. However, light intensities detected by the few-mode and multimode fibers are increased, leading to significant SNR improvements in detections of phantom optical property and tissue blood oxygenation. The outcomes from this study provide useful guidance for the selection of optical fibers to improve DCS flow-oximeter measurements. PMID:23455963

  13. Using optical fibers with different modes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow-oximeter measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lian; Lin, Yu; Shang, Yu; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2013-03-01

    The dual-wavelength diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter is an emerging technique enabling simultaneous measurements of blood flow and blood oxygenation changes in deep tissues. High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is crucial when applying DCS technologies in the study of human tissues where the detected signals are usually very weak. In this study, single-mode, few-mode, and multimode fibers are compared to explore the possibility of improving the SNR of DCS flow-oximeter measurements. Experiments on liquid phantom solutions and in vivo muscle tissues show only slight improvements in flow measurements when using the few-mode fiber compared with using the single-mode fiber. However, light intensities detected by the few-mode and multimode fibers are increased, leading to significant SNR improvements in detections of phantom optical property and tissue blood oxygenation. The outcomes from this study provide useful guidance for the selection of optical fibers to improve DCS flow-oximeter measurements.

  14. Passive remote sensing of pollutant clouds by Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry: signal-to-noise ratio as a function of spectral resolution.

    PubMed

    Harig, Roland

    2004-08-10

    In a passive infrared remote sensing measurement, the spectral radiance difference caused by the presence of a pollutant cloud is proportional to the difference between the temperature of the cloud and the brightness temperature of the background (first-order approximation). In many cases, this difference is of the order of a few kelvins. Thus the measured signals are small, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is one of the most important quantities to be optimized in passive remote sensing. A model for the SNR resulting from passive remote sensing measurements with a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer is presented. Analytical expressions for the SNR of a single Lorentzian line for the limiting cases of high and low spectral resolutions are derived. For constant measurement time the SNR increases with decreasing spectral resolution, i.e., low spectral resolutions yield the highest SNRs. For a single scan of the interferometer, a spectral resolution that maximizes the SNR exists. The calculated SNRs are in good agreement with the measured SNRs.

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio of a mouse brain (13) C CryoProbe™ system in comparison with room temperature coils: spectroscopic phantom and in vivo results.

    PubMed

    Sack, M; Wetterling, F; Sartorius, A; Ende, G; Weber-Fahr, W

    2014-06-01

    MRI and MRS in small rodents demand very high sensitivity. Cryogenic transmit/receive radiofrequency probes (CryoProbes) designed for (1) H MRI of mouse brain provide an attractive option for increasing the performance of small-animal MR systems. As the Larmor frequency of (13) C nuclei is four times lower than that for (1) H nuclei, an even larger sensitivity improvement is expected for (13) C applications. The aim of this work was to evaluate the performance of a prototype (13) C CryoProbe™ for mouse brain MRS. To investigate the possible gain of the (13) C CryoProbe™, we acquired localized single-voxel (13) C spectra and chemical shift images of a dimethyl sulfoxide phantom with the CryoProbe™, as well as with two room temperature resonators. The cryogenically cooled resonator achieved approximately four-fold higher signal-to-noise ratio in phantom tests when compared with the best-performing room temperature coil. In addition, we present localized (13) C spectra of mouse brain obtained with the CryoProbe™, as well as with one of the room temperature coils, demonstrating the performance in vivo. In summary, the cryogenic cooling technique significantly enhances the (13) C signal sensitivity at 9.4 T and enables the investigation of metabolism within mouse brain.

  16. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Yi; Li, Da-Yu; Hu, Li-Fa; Mu, Quan-Quan; Yang, Cheng-Liang; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor (S-H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S-H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 61205021, and 61405194) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Extended use of incremental signal-to-noise ratio as reliability criterion for multiple-slope wide-dynamic-range image capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Mobile applications present new image quality challenges. Automotive vision requires reliable capture of scene detail. Photospace measurements have shown that the extremely wide intrascene dynamic range of traffic scenes necessitates wide-dynamic-range (WDR) technology. Multiple-slope complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology adaptively extends dynamic range by partially resetting the pixel, resulting in a response curve with piecewise linear slopes of progressively increasing compression. As compression and thus dynamic range increase, a trade-off against detail loss is observed. Incremental signal-to-noise ratio (iSNR) has been proposed in ISO/TC42 standards for determining dynamic range, and this work describes how to adapt these to WDR. Measurements and computer simulations reveal that the observed trade-off between WDR extension and the loss of local detail can be explained by a drop in iSNR at each reset point. If a reset is not timed optimally, then iSNR may drop below the detection limit causing an iSNR hole to appear within the dynamic range. Thus iSNR has extended utility: it not only determines the dynamic range limits but also defines dynamic range as the luminance range where detail detection is reliable. It has become the critical criterion when maximizing dynamic range to maintain the minimum necessary level of detection reliability.

  18. Signal-to-noise ratio and parallel imaging performance of commercially available phased array coils in 3.0 T brain magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Tsukasa; Shirata, Kensei; Urikura, Atsushi; Ito, Michitoshi; Nakaya, Yoshihiro

    2015-07-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and parallel imaging (PI) performance of two commercial phased-array coils (PACs) were examined in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain. All measurements were performed on a 3.0 T MRI instrument. The SNR and PI performance were evaluated with 32-channel and 15-channel PACs. A gradient echo sequence was used for obtaining images of a phantom. SNR and geometry factor (g-factor) maps were calculated from two images with identical parameters. Horizontal and vertical profiles were taken through the SNR maps in the axial plane. The average g-factor was measured in a circular region of interest in the g-factor maps for the axial plane. The SNR map of the 32-channel coil showed a higher SNR than that of the 15-channel coil at the phantom's posterior and lateral surfaces. The SNR profiles for the 32-channel coil also showed a 1.3-fold increase at the phantom's center. The average g-factor of the 32-channel coil was lower than that of the 15-channel coil at the same acceleration factor. These results indicate that the 32-channel coil can provide a higher spatial resolution and/or a faster imaging speed. Horizontal and vertical profiles are useful for evaluation of the performance of commercially available PACs.

  19. Signal-to-noise ratio and spectral linewidth improvements between 1.5 and 7 Tesla in proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Otazo, Ricardo; Mueller, Bryon; Ugurbil, Kamil; Wald, Lawrence; Posse, Stefan

    2006-12-01

    This study characterizes gains in sensitivity and spectral resolution of proton echo-planar spectroscopic imaging (PEPSI) with increasing magnetic field strength (B(0)). Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) per unit volume and unit time, and intrinsic linewidth (LW) of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), and choline (Cho) were measured with PEPSI at 1.5, 3, 4, and 7 Tesla on scanners that shared a similar software and hardware platform, using circularly polarized (CP) and eight-channel phased-array (PA) head coils. Data were corrected for relaxation effects and processed with a time-domain matched filter (MF) adapted to each B(0). The SNR and LW measured with PEPSI were very similar to those measured with conventional point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) SI. Measurements with the CP coil demonstrated a nearly linear SNR gain with respect to B(0) in central brain regions. For the PA coil, the SNR-B(0) relationship was less than linear, but there was a substantial SNR increase in comparison to the CP coil. The LW in units of ppm decreased with B(0), resulting in improved spectral resolution. These studies using PEPSI demonstrated linear gains in SNR with respect to B(0), consistent with theoretical expectations, and a decrease in ppm LW with increasing B(0). PMID:17094090

  20. Development of a quick speech-in-noise test for measuring signal-to-noise ratio loss in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killion, Mead C.; Niquette, Patricia A.; Gudmundsen, Gail I.; Revit, Lawrence J.; Banerjee, Shilpi

    2004-10-01

    This paper describes a shortened and improved version of the Speech in Noise (SIN™) Test (Etymotic Research, 1993). In the first two of four experiments, the level of a female talker relative to that of four-talker babble was adjusted sentence by sentence to produce 50% correct scores for normal-hearing subjects. In the second two experiments, those sentences-in-babble that produced either lack of equivalence or high across-subject variability in scores were discarded. These experiments produced 12 equivalent lists, each containing six sentences, with one sentence at each adjusted signal-to-noise ratio of 25, 20, 15, 10, 5, and 0 dB. Six additional lists were also made equivalent when the scores of particular pairs were averaged. The final lists comprise the ``QuickSIN'' test that measures the SNR a listener requires to understand 50% of key words in sentences in a background of babble. The standard deviation of single-list scores is 1.4 dB SNR for hearing-impaired subjects, based on test-retest data. A single QuickSIN list takes approximately one minute to administer and provides an estimate of SNR loss accurate to +/-2.7 dB at the 95% confidence level. .

  1. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement on SEM images using a cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay filters and weighted least squares error.

    PubMed

    Kiani, M A; Sim, K S; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2015-05-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing using weighted least squares error filter is enhanced for scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. A diversity of sample images is captured and the performance is found to be better when compared with the moving average and the standard median filters, with respect to eliminating noise. This technique can be implemented efficiently on real-time SEM images, with all mandatory data for processing obtained from a single image. Noise in images, and particularly in SEM images, are undesirable. A new noise reduction technique, based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay and weighted least squares error method, is developed. We apply the combined technique to single image signal-to-noise ratio estimation and noise reduction for SEM imaging system. This autocorrelation-based technique requires image details to be correlated over a few pixels, whereas the noise is assumed to be uncorrelated from pixel to pixel. The noise component is derived from the difference between the image autocorrelation at zero offset, and the estimation of the corresponding original autocorrelation. In the few test cases involving different images, the efficiency of the developed noise reduction filter is proved to be significantly better than those obtained from the other methods. Noise can be reduced efficiently with appropriate choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time. PMID:25676007

  2. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope with a high-signal-to-noise ratio, high stability, and high-speed imaging for live cell observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Takimoto, Shinichi; Hashimoto, Takeshi

    2007-02-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, which can produce images of specific molecules without staining, has attracted the attention of researchers, as it matches the need for molecular imaging and pathway analysis of live cells. In particular, there have been an increasing number of CARS experimental results regarding lipids in live cells, which cannot be fluorescently tagged while keeping the cells alive. One of the important applications of lipid research is for the metabolic syndrome. Since the metabolic syndrome is said to be related to the lipids in lipocytes, blood, arterial vessels, and so on, the CARS technique is expected to find application in this field. However, CARS microscopy requires a pair of picosecond laser pulses, which overlap both temporally and spatially. This makes the optical adjustments of a CARS microscope challenging. The authors developed a CARS unit that includes optics for easy and stable adjustment of the overlap of these laser pulses. Adding the CARS unit to a laser scanning microscope provides CARS images of a high signal-to-noise ratio, with an acquisition rate as high as 2 microseconds per pixel. Thus, images of fast-moving lipid droplets in Hela cells were obtained.

  3. High signal-to-noise ratio sensing with Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor based on auto gain control of electron multiplying CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhao-Yi; Li, Da-Yu; Hu, Li-Fa; Mu, Quan-Quan; Yang, Cheng-Liang; Cao, Zhao-Liang; Xuan, Li

    2016-09-01

    High signal-to-noise ratio can be achieved with the electron multiplying charge-coupled-device (EMCCD) applied in the Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor (S–H WFS) in adaptive optics (AO). However, when the brightness of the target changes in a large scale, the fixed electron multiplying (EM) gain will not be suited to the sensing limitation. Therefore an auto-gain-control method based on the brightness of light-spots array in S–H WFS is proposed in this paper. The control value is the average of the maximum signals of every light spot in an array, which has been demonstrated to be kept stable even under the influence of some noise and turbulence, and sensitive enough to the change of target brightness. A goal value is needed in the control process and it is predetermined based on the characters of EMCCD. Simulations and experiments have demonstrated that this auto-gain-control method is valid and robust, the sensing SNR reaches the maximum for the corresponding signal level, and especially is greatly improved for those dim targets from 6 to 4 magnitude in the visual band. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174274, 61205021, and 61405194) and the State Key Laboratory of Applied Optics, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. Signal-to-noise ratio enhancement on SEM images using a cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay filters and weighted least squares error.

    PubMed

    Kiani, M A; Sim, K S; Nia, M E; Tso, C P

    2015-05-01

    A new technique based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay smoothing using weighted least squares error filter is enhanced for scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. A diversity of sample images is captured and the performance is found to be better when compared with the moving average and the standard median filters, with respect to eliminating noise. This technique can be implemented efficiently on real-time SEM images, with all mandatory data for processing obtained from a single image. Noise in images, and particularly in SEM images, are undesirable. A new noise reduction technique, based on cubic spline interpolation with Savitzky-Golay and weighted least squares error method, is developed. We apply the combined technique to single image signal-to-noise ratio estimation and noise reduction for SEM imaging system. This autocorrelation-based technique requires image details to be correlated over a few pixels, whereas the noise is assumed to be uncorrelated from pixel to pixel. The noise component is derived from the difference between the image autocorrelation at zero offset, and the estimation of the corresponding original autocorrelation. In the few test cases involving different images, the efficiency of the developed noise reduction filter is proved to be significantly better than those obtained from the other methods. Noise can be reduced efficiently with appropriate choice of scan rate from real-time SEM images, without generating corruption or increasing scanning time.

  5. Long-distance fiber Bragg grating sensor system with a high optical signal-to-noise ratio based on a tunable fiber ring laser configuration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Yun-Jiang; Ran, Zeng-Ling; Chen, Rong-Rui

    2006-09-15

    A novel tunable fiber ring laser configuration with a combination of bidirectional Raman amplification and dual erbium-doped fiber (EDF) amplification is proposed for realizing high optical signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), long-distance, quasi-distributed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing systems with large capacities and low cost. The hybrid Raman-EDF amplification configuration arranged in the ring laser can enhance the optical SNR of FBG sensor signals significantly owing to the good combination of the high gain of the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and the low noise of the Raman amplification. Such a sensing system can support a large number of FBG sensors because of the use of a tunable fiber Fabry-Perot filter located within the ring laser and spatial division multiplexing for expansion of sensor channels. Experimental results show that an excellent optical SNR of approximately 60 dB has been achieved for a 50 km transmission distance with a low Raman pump power of approximately 170 mW at a wavelength of 1455 nm and a low EDFA pump power of approximately 40 mW at a wavelength of 980 nm, which is the highest optical SNR achieved so far for a 50 km long FBG sensor system, to our knowledge. PMID:16936857

  6. Signal-to-Noise Ratios of the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) for Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) system has been developed at NASA Langley Research Center to advance technologies in support of the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission and to demonstrate them initially from a high-altitude airborne platform. With a multiple fiber-amplifier-based Swept-Frequency Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (SF-IM-CW) high-power laser transmitter and a multiple-aperture receiver, the ACES system provides simultaneous measurements of the differential optical depth at the 1571-nm CO2 absorption line and the associated range between the transmitter and target on an airborne platform. The precise measurement of the CO2 differential optical depth and the range, determined by signal amplitudes and phases in the ACES returns, together with the temperature, pressure, and water vapor information at the same location, make it possible to retrieve the column-averaged CO2 dry air mixing ratio (XCO2). The Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNRs) of both return-signal amplitudes and phases of three simultaneously-received SF-IM-CW signals in the ACES system directly affect the measurement precision of the differential optical depths and the ranges between the ACES system and the Earth's surface or the tops of intermediate cloud layers. In this paper, we present results from numerical simulations and experimental measurements of ACES SNRs based on the laboratory-determined system parameters and flight experiments over ocean and land areas. These results will be used in the design of an IM-CW CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar system for ASCENDS mission.

  7. Measuring time-domain spectral induced polarization in the on-time: decreasing acquisition time and increasing signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, Per-Ivar; Dahlin, Torleif; Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben

    2015-12-01

    Combined resistivity and time-domain direct current induced polarization (DCIP) measurements are traditionally carried out with a 50% duty cycle current waveform, taking the resistivity measurements during the on-time and the IP measurements during the off-time. One drawback with this method is that only half of the acquisition time is available for resistivity and IP measurements, respectively. In this paper, this limitation is solved by using a current injection with 100% duty cycle and also taking the IP measurements in the on-time. With numerical modelling of current waveforms with 50% and 100% duty cycles we show that the waveforms have comparable sensitivity for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters and that signal level is increased up to a factor of 2 if the 100% duty cycle waveform is used. The inversion of field data acquired with both waveforms confirms the modelling results and shows that it is possible to retrieve similar inversion models with either of the waveforms when inverting for the spectral Cole-Cole parameters with the waveform of the injected current included in the forward computations. Consequently, our results show that on-time measurements of IP can reduce the acquisition time by up to 50% and increase the signal-to-noise ratio by up to 100% almost without information loss. Our findings can contribute and have a large impact for DCIP surveys in general and especially for surveys where time and reliable data quality are important factors. Specifically, the findings are of value for DCIP surveys conducted in urban areas where anthropogenic noise is an issue and the heterogeneous subsurface demands time-consuming 3D acquisitions.

  8. Correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) and clinical image quality for chest imaging with a computed radiography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. S.; Wood, T. J.; Saunderson, J. R.; Beavis, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    This work assessed the appropriateness of the signal-to-noise ratio improvement factor (KSNR) as a metric for the optimisation of computed radiography (CR) of the chest. The results of a previous study in which four experienced image evaluators graded computer simulated chest images using a visual grading analysis scoring (VGAS) scheme to quantify the benefit of using an anti-scatter grid were used for the clinical image quality measurement (number of simulated patients  =  80). The KSNR was used to calculate the improvement in physical image quality measured in a physical chest phantom. KSNR correlation with VGAS was assessed as a function of chest region (lung, spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragm), and as a function of x-ray tube voltage in a given chest region. The correlation of the latter was determined by the Pearson correlation coefficient. VGAS and KSNR image quality metrics demonstrated no correlation in the lung region but did show correlation in the spine and diaphragm/retrodiaphragmatic regions. However, there was no correlation as a function of tube voltage in any region; a Pearson correlation coefficient (R) of  -0.93 (p  =  0.015) was found for lung, a coefficient (R) of  -0.95 (p  =  0.46) was found for spine, and a coefficient (R) of  -0.85 (p  =  0.015) was found for diaphragm. All demonstrate strong negative correlations indicating conflicting results, i.e. KSNR increases with tube voltage but VGAS decreases. Medical physicists should use the KSNR metric with caution when assessing any potential improvement in clinical chest image quality when introducing an anti-scatter grid for CR imaging, especially in the lung region. This metric may also be a limited descriptor of clinical chest image quality as a function of tube voltage when a grid is used routinely.

  9. Metals in the z ˜ 3 intergalactic medium: results from an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES quasar spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; Pomante, E.; Carswell, R. F.; Viel, M.; Barai, P.; Becker, G. D.; Calura, F.; Cupani, G.; Fontanot, F.; Haehnelt, M. G.; Kim, T.-S.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Rorai, A.; Tescari, E.; Vanzella, E.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the abundance and distribution of metals in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at ≃ 2.8 through the analysis of an ultra-high signal-to-noise ratio UVES spectrum of the quasar HE0940-1050. In the C IV forest, our deep spectrum is sensitive at 3 σ to lines with column density down to log NCIV ≃ 11.4 and in 60 percent of the considered redshift range down to ≃ 11.1. In our sample, all H I lines with log NHI ≥ 14.8 show an associated C IV absorption. In the range 14.0 ≤ log NHI < 14.8, 43 percent of H I lines has an associated C IV absorption. At log NHI < 14.0, the detection rates drop to <10 percent, possibly due to our sensitivity limits and not to an actual variation of the gas abundance properties. In the range log NHI ≥ 14, we observe a fraction of H I lines with detected C IV a factor of 2 larger than the fraction of H I lines lying in the circum-galactic medium (CGM) of relatively bright Lyman-break galaxies hosted by dark matter halos with ˜ 1012 M⊙ (Rudie et al. 2012). The comparison of our results with the output of a grid of photoionization models and of two cosmological simulations implies that the volume filling factor of the IGM gas enriched to a metallicity log Z/Z⊙ ≳ - 3 should be of the order of ˜10 - 13 percent. In conclusion, our results favour a scenario in which metals are found also outside the CGM of bright star-forming galaxies, possibly due to pollution by lower mass objects and/or to an early enrichment by the first sources.

  10. Enhancing signal to noise ratio by fine-tuning tapers of cladded/uncladded buffer rods in ultrasonic time domain reflectometry in smelters.

    PubMed

    Viumdal, Håkon; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-03-01

    Buffer rods (BR) as waveguides in ultrasonic time domain reflectometry (TDR) can somewhat extend the range of industrial applications of ultrasonics. Level, temperature and flow measurements involving elevated temperatures, corrosive fluids and generally harsh environments are some of the applications in which conventional ultrasonic transducers cannot be used directly in contact with the media. In such cases, BRs with some design modifications can make ultrasonic TDR measurements possible with limited success. This paper deals with TDR in conjunction with distance measurements in extremely hot fluids, using conventional ultrasonic transducers in combination with BRs. When using BRs in the ultrasonic measurement systems in extreme temperatures, problems associated with size and the material of the buffer, have to be addressed. The resonant frequency of the transducer and the relative size of the transducer with respect to the diameter of BR are also important parameters influencing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of the signal processing system used in the ultrasonic TDR. This paper gives an overview of design aspects related to the BRs with special emphasis on tapers and cladding used on BRs. As protective cladding, zirconium oxide-yttrium oxide composite was used, with its proven thermal stability in withstanding temperatures in rocket and jet engines up to 1650 °C. In general a BR should guide the signals through to the medium and from and back to the transducer without excessive attenuation and at the same time not exacerbate the noise in the measurement system. The SNR is the decisive performance indicator to consider in the design of BR based ultrasonic TDR, along with appropriate transducer, with suitable size and operating frequency. This work presents and analyses results from extensive experiments related to fine-tuning both geometry of and signals in cladded/uncladded BRs used in high temperature ultrasonic TDR with focus on overall performance based on

  11. Extended use of ISO 15739 incremental signal-to-noise ratio as reliability criterion for multiple-slope wide dynamic range image capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertel, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the emerging field of automotive vision, video capture is the critical front-end of driver assistance and active safety systems. Previous photospace measurements have shown that light levels in natural traffic scenes may contain an extremely wide intra-scene intensity range. This requires the camera to have a wide dynamic range (WDR) for it to adapt quickly to changing lighting conditions and to reliably capture all scene detail. Multiple-slope CMOS technology offers a cost-effective way of adaptively extending dynamic range by partially resetting (recharging) the CMOS pixel once or more often within each frame time. This avoids saturation and leads to a response curve with piecewise linear slopes of progressively increasing compression. It was observed that the image quality from multiple-slope image capture is strongly dependent on the control (height and time) of each reset barrier. As compression and thus dynamic range increase there is a trade-off against contrast and detail loss. Incremental signal-to-noise ratio (iSNR) is proposed in ISO 15739 for determining dynamic range. Measurements and computer simulations revealed that the observed trade-off between WDR extension and the loss of local detail could be explained by a drop in iSNR at each reset point. If a reset barrier is not optimally placed then iSNR may drop below the detection limit so that an 'iSNR hole' appears in the dynamic range. Thus ISO 15739 iSNR has gained extended utility: it not only measures the dynamic range limits but also defines dynamic range as the intensity range where detail detection is reliable. It has become a critical criterion when designing adaptive barrier control algorithms that maximize dynamic range while maintaining the minimum necessary level of detection reliability.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio improvements in laser flow diagnostics using time-resolved image averaging and high dynamic range imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giassi, Davide; Long, Marshall B.

    2016-08-01

    Two alternative image readout approaches are demonstrated to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in temporally resolved laser-based imaging experiments of turbulent phenomena. The first method exploits the temporal decay characteristics of the phosphor screens of image intensifiers when coupled to an interline-transfer CCD camera operated in double-frame mode. Specifically, the light emitted by the phosphor screen, which has a finite decay constant, is equally distributed and recorded over the two sequential frames of the detector so that an averaged image can be reconstructed. The characterization of both detector and image intensifier showed that the technique preserves the correct quantitative information, and its applicability to reactive flows was verified using planar Rayleigh scattering and tested with the acquisition of images of both steady and turbulent partially premixed methane/air flames. The comparison between conventional Rayleigh results and the averaged ones showed that the SNR of the averaged image is higher than the conventional one; with the setup used in this work, the gain in SNR was seen to approach 30 %, for both the steady and turbulent cases. The second technique uses the two-frame readout of an interline-transfer CCD to increase the image SNR based on high dynamic range imaging, and it was tested in an unsteady non-reactive flow of Freon-12 injected in air. The result showed a 15 % increase in the SNR of the low-pixel-count regions of an image, when compared to the pixels of a conventionally averaged one.

  13. Reduction of Influence of Decrease in Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Measurement of Change in Thickness of Arterial Wall Due to Heartbeat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Hideyuki; Kanai, Hiroshi; Hoshimiya, Nozomu; Koiwa, Yoshiro

    2000-05-01

    To diagnose early-stage atherosclerosis, for the local evaluation of the elasticity of the arterial wall it is necessary to increase the spatial resolution in the axial direction of the artery to several millimeters, which corresponds to the size of the lesion on the surface of the arterial wall. For this purpose, we previously proposed a method for measuring the small change in thickness of the arterial wall during the cardiac cycle [H. Kanai ηl.: IEEE Trans. UFFC 43 (1996) 791, H. Kanai ηl.: IEEE Trans. UFFC 44 (1997) 752 and H. Hasegawa ηl.: Electron. Lett. 33 (1997) 340]. The change in thickness cannot be measured from conventional B-mode or M-mode images because of its small amplitude of less than 100 micrometers. Though the change in thickness is useful for in vivo assessment of the local elasticity of the arterial wall, in some cases successful measurements based on only two consecutive echos fail because of the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the echos. To realize the practical use of the proposed method, this problem must be overcome. In this paper, we propose a method that is more robust in the presence of noise. In this method, more than two echos are employed to estimate their phase shift for reducing the influence of low SNR. Simulations provide an optimal value of the estimation period for each SNR. By evaluating the SNR of in vivo experimental data, the optimal estimation period is determined. In in vivo experiments using an optimal estimation period of 20 ms, the change in thickness can be measured with good reproducibility even in the case of a low SNR of 28 dB.

  14. Coefficient of Variation, Signal-to-Noise Ratio, and Effects of Normalization in Validation of Biomarkers from NMR-based Metabonomics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Goodpaster, Aaron M.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    A primary goal of metabonomics research is biomarker discovery for human diseases based on differences in metabolic profiles between healthy and diseased patient populations. One of the most significant challenges in biomarker discovery is validation, which implicitly depends on the coefficient of variation (CV) associated with the measurement technique. This paper investigates how the CV of metabolite resonances measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) depends on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and normalization method. CVs were calculated for NMR resonance peaks in a series of NMR spectra of five synthetic urine samples collected over an eight-month period. An inverse correlation was detected between SNR and CV for all normalization methods. Small peaks with SNR<15 tended to have larger CVs (15–30%) compared to peaks with the highest SNR>150, which typically had smaller CVs (5–10%). The inverse relationship between CV and SNR roughly obeyed a log10 dependence. Quotient normalization (QN) tended to produce smaller CVs for smaller peaks, but larger CVs for the strongest peaks in the data, compared to no normalization, normalization to total intensity (NTI) or normalization to an internal standard (NIS). Consequently, quotient normalization appears optimal for validating low concentration metabolites. NTI or NIS appear superior to QN for samples that have very small variation in total signal intensity. While the inverse relationship between CV and log10(SNR) did not strictly hold for all metabolites, weaker concentration metabolites will likely require more rigorous validation as potential biomarkers since they tend to have poorer reproducibility. PMID:24678137

  15. Coefficient of Variation, Signal-to-Noise Ratio, and Effects of Normalization in Validation of Biomarkers from NMR-based Metabonomics Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Goodpaster, Aaron M; Kennedy, Michael A

    2013-10-15

    A primary goal of metabonomics research is biomarker discovery for human diseases based on differences in metabolic profiles between healthy and diseased patient populations. One of the most significant challenges in biomarker discovery is validation, which implicitly depends on the coefficient of variation (CV) associated with the measurement technique. This paper investigates how the CV of metabolite resonances measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) depends on signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and normalization method. CVs were calculated for NMR resonance peaks in a series of NMR spectra of five synthetic urine samples collected over an eight-month period. An inverse correlation was detected between SNR and CV for all normalization methods. Small peaks with SNR<15 tended to have larger CVs (15-30%) compared to peaks with the highest SNR>150, which typically had smaller CVs (5-10%). The inverse relationship between CV and SNR roughly obeyed a log10 dependence. Quotient normalization (QN) tended to produce smaller CVs for smaller peaks, but larger CVs for the strongest peaks in the data, compared to no normalization, normalization to total intensity (NTI) or normalization to an internal standard (NIS). Consequently, quotient normalization appears optimal for validating low concentration metabolites. NTI or NIS appear superior to QN for samples that have very small variation in total signal intensity. While the inverse relationship between CV and log10(SNR) did not strictly hold for all metabolites, weaker concentration metabolites will likely require more rigorous validation as potential biomarkers since they tend to have poorer reproducibility.

  16. Application of input amplitude masks in image encryption with spatially incoherent illumination for increase of decrypted images signal-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Molodtsov, Dmitriy Y.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Shifrina, Anna V.

    2016-04-01

    The majority of existing methods of optical encryption use not only light intensity distribution, easily registered with photosensors, but also its phase distribution. This provides best encryption strength for fixed quantities of elements and phase levels in a mask. Downsides are holographic registration scheme used in order to register not only light intensity distribution but also its phase distribution and speckle noise occurring due to coherent illumination. That factors lead to very poor decryption quality when it comes from computer simulations to optical implementations. Method of optical encryption with spatially incoherent illumination does not have drawbacks inherent to coherent systems, however, as only light intensity distribution is considered, mean value of image to be encrypted is always above zero which leads to intensive zero spatial frequency peak in image spectrum. Therefore, in case of spatially incoherent illumination, image spectrum, as well as encryption key spectrum, cannot be white. If encryption is based on convolution operation, no matter coherent light used or not, Fourier spectrum amplitude distribution of encryption key should overlap Fourier spectrum amplitude distribution of image to be encrypted otherwise loss of information is unavoidable. Another factor affecting decrypted image quality is original image spectrum. Usually, most part of image energy is concentrated in area of low frequencies. Consequently, only this area in encrypted image contains information about original image, while other areas contain only noise. We propose to use additional encoding of input scene to increase size of the area containing useful information. This provides increase of signal-to-noise ratio in encrypted image and consequentially increases quality of decrypted images. Results of computer simulations of test images optical encryption with spatially incoherent illumination and additional input amplitude masks are presented.

  17. High signal-to-noise ratio acoustic sensor using phase-shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-06-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices

  18. Improved signal to noise ratio and sensitivity of an infrared imaging video bolometer on large helical device by using an infrared periscope

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Shwetang N. Sano, Ryuichi; Peterson, Byron J.; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Enokuchi, Akito; Takeyama, Norihide

    2014-07-15

    An Infrared imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) diagnostic is currently being used in the Large Helical Device (LHD) for studying the localization of radiation structures near the magnetic island and helical divertor X-points during plasma detachment and for 3D tomography. This research demands high signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity to improve the temporal resolution for studying the evolution of radiation structures during plasma detachment and a wide IRVB field of view (FoV) for tomography. Introduction of an infrared periscope allows achievement of a higher SNR and higher sensitivity, which in turn, permits a twofold improvement in the temporal resolution of the diagnostic. Higher SNR along with wide FoV is achieved simultaneously by reducing the separation of the IRVB detector (metal foil) from the bolometer's aperture and the LHD plasma. Altering the distances to meet the aforesaid requirements results in an increased separation between the foil and the IR camera. This leads to a degradation of the diagnostic performance in terms of its sensitivity by 1.5-fold. Using an infrared periscope to image the IRVB foil results in a 7.5-fold increase in the number of IR camera pixels imaging the foil. This improves the IRVB sensitivity which depends on the square root of the number of IR camera pixels being averaged per bolometer channel. Despite the slower f-number (f/# = 1.35) and reduced transmission (τ{sub 0} = 89%, due to an increased number of lens elements) for the periscope, the diagnostic with an infrared periscope operational on LHD has improved in terms of sensitivity and SNR by a factor of 1.4 and 4.5, respectively, as compared to the original diagnostic without a periscope (i.e., IRVB foil being directly imaged by the IR camera through conventional optics). The bolometer's field of view has also increased by two times. The paper discusses these improvements in apt details.

  19. Signal to Noise Ratio Estimation for a Space-borne Swept-Frequency Intensity-Modulated CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Lin, B.; Petway, L. B.; Ismail, S.; Campbell, J. F.; Bai, Y.; Harrison, F. W.; Refaat, T. F.; Obland, M. D.; Meadows, B.; Browell, E. V.

    2014-12-01

    The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) in the digital lock-in detection for a space-borne swept-frequency Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) has a direct influence on the accuracy of the CO2 measurement. According to the Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) method, we have theoretically analyzed a linear swept-frequency sine wave signal in an additive high Gaussian-distributed noise with a constant variance, which is a good approximation for the detector-noise-limited system or the solar background noise dominated space-borne IM-CW CO2 LAS. The general MLE equations for the amplitude and the phase of the swept-frequency IM_CW signal have been generated and solved by a nonlinear optimization procedure. The variances of the amplitude and the phase have been obtained by using the Cramer-Rao lower bound, a lower bound on the variance of the estimated parameters. Under the large sampling numbers, the SNR, signal amplitude divided by the square-root of the amplitude variance, increases as the square-root of the total sampling numbers. Thousands of numerical simulations with randomly generated uniform distributed Gaussian noise were completed for the statistical verification of the estimation. The estimation has also been applied to a space-borne IM-CW CO2 LAS with typical parameters under averaged daytime solar background to confirm the feasibilities of the instrument design of the space-borne IM-CW CO2 LAS.

  20. Examining the signal-to-noise ratio of oceanic temperature and salinity proxies with a focus on their potential to reconstruct density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslop, D.; Paul, A.

    2009-12-01

    Proxy reconstructions of temperature and salinity based on Mg/Ca and stable oxygen isotope ratios form the cornerstone of many palaeoceanographic studies. To assess the fidelity of a given proxy record and the extent to which its variability can be interpreted, it is essential to have an appreciation of the data’s signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This information, however, cannot usually be obtained from proxy records because the signal and noise contributions are inseparable. To investigate this problem we employ an Earth System Climate Model (ESCM) to assess the SNR of temperature and salinity proxy records simulated under forcing conditions similar to those of the “8.2 ka event”. A series of freshwater forcing scenarios, based on large meltwater pulses entering the North Atlantic via Hudson Bay, were simulated using the UVic ESCM. The magnitude of the resulting temperature and salinity anomalies produced at the surface and at intermediate water depths were then compared to accepted proxy uncertainties to yield SNR estimates throughout the Atlantic. Given this information it is then possible to determine for any given location how many replicate samples would need to be measured at each depth/time interval in order to achieve a predefined SNR for a specific magnitude of freshwater forcing. Clear spatial patterns are revealed, for large volume meltwater events a number of locations in the North Atlantic would require only a small number of replicate measurements per interval in order to achieve a reasonable SNR. In contrast other locations, such as the South Atlantic, would require many hundreds of replicates to be measured in order to improve the SNR to levels similar to those seen in the North. For smaller meltwater events nearly all locations in the Atlantic have a low SNR and would require large numbers of replicates to be measured in order to produce an interpretable signal. These ideas are extended to the equation of state and the number of replicate

  1. Multimodal integration of EEG and MEG data: a simulation study with variable signal-to-noise ratio and number of sensors.

    PubMed

    Babiloni, Fabio; Babiloni, Claudio; Carducci, Filippo; Romani, Gian Luca; Rossini, Paolo M; Angelone, Leonardo M; Cincotti, Febo

    2004-05-01

    Previous simulation studies have stressed the importance of the multimodal integration of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) data in the estimation of cortical current density. In such studies, no systematic variations of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and of the number of sensors were explicitly taken into account in the estimation process. We investigated effects of variable SNR and number of sensors on the accuracy of current density estimate by using multimodal EEG and MEG data. This was done by using as the dependent variable both the correlation coefficient (CC) and the relative error (RE) between imposed and estimated waveforms at the level of cortical region of interests (ROI). A realistic head and cortical surface model was used. Factors used in the simulations were: (1). the SNR of the simulated scalp data (with seven levels: infinite, 30, 20, 10, 5, 3, 1); (2). the particular inverse operator used to estimate the cortical source activity from the simulated scalp data (INVERSE, with two levels, including minimum norm and weighted minimum norm); and (3). the number of EEG or MEG sensors employed in the analysis (SENSORS, with three levels: 128, 61, 29 for EEG and 153, 61, or 38 in MEG). Analysis of variance demonstrated that all the considered factors significantly affect the CC and the RE indexes. Combined EEG-MEG data produced statistically significant lower RE and higher CC in source current density reconstructions compared to that estimated by the EEG and MEG data considered separately. These observations hold for the range of SNR values presented by the analyzed data. The superiority of current density estimation by multimodal integration of EEG and MEG was not due to differences in number of sensors between unimodal (EEG, MEG) and combined (EEG-MEG) inverse estimates. In fact, the current density estimate relative to the EEG-MEG multimodal integration involved 61 EEG plus 63 MEG sensors, whereas estimations carried out

  2. Identification of radionuclides for the spectroscopic radiation portal monitor for pedestrian screening under a low signal-to-noise ratio condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Eungi; Ko, Mincheol; Lee, Hakjae; Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun; Joo, Sung-Kwan; Lee, Kisung

    2014-09-01

    The spectroscopic radiation portal monitor (SPM) is widely used for homeland security. Many research groups are studying the radionuclide identification method which is one of the most important factors in the performance of the SPM using the large size of a thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl) detector. In this study, we developed the radionuclide identification method for the SPM for pedestrian screening using a single NaI(Tl) detector that is small in size (2 in.), which is much smaller than those in the existing studies under the low signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) condition. From the anomalous radionuclide spectrum, the noise component was effectively reduced by the wavelet decomposition and the proposed background subtraction method, and the signal component was enhanced by the principal component analysis. Finally, peak locations which have been determined by the peak search algorithm with a valley check method were compared with a pre-calibrated and constructed radionuclide database. To verify the radiation identification performance of the proposed method, experiments with various kinds of sources (137Cs, 133Ba, 22Na, and 57Co) and different SNR values (from distances of 10-150 cm and for scan times of 1-5 s) were performed. Although the high-SNR condition was explored as well, most experiments were conducted under the low-SNR condition to verify the robustness and reproducibility of the proposed algorithm. The results showed that over 98.3% of the single radionuclide detection rate was achieved regardless of which radionuclides were used, up to 50 cm under the worst SNR condition (1 s of scan time) and up to 90 cm under the best SNR condition (5 s of scan time). Furthermore we achieved accurate identification of multiple radionuclides at 40 cm with only 1 s of scan time. The results show that the proposed algorithm is competitive with the commercial method and our radionuclide identification method can be successfully applied to the SPM for pedestrian

  3. Assessment of the Speech Intelligibility Performance of Post Lingual Cochlear Implant Users at Different Signal-to-Noise Ratios Using the Turkish Matrix Test

    PubMed Central

    Polat, Zahra; Bulut, Erdoğan; Ataş, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spoken word recognition and speech perception tests in quiet are being used as a routine in assessment of the benefit which children and adult cochlear implant users receive from their devices. Cochlear implant users generally demonstrate high level performances in these test materials as they are able to achieve high level speech perception ability in quiet situations. Although these test materials provide valuable information regarding Cochlear Implant (CI) users’ performances in optimal listening conditions, they do not give realistic information regarding performances in adverse listening conditions, which is the case in the everyday environment. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the speech intelligibility performance of post lingual CI users in the presence of noise at different signal-to-noise ratio with the Matrix Test developed for Turkish language. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: The thirty post lingual implant user adult subjects, who had been using implants for a minimum of one year, were evaluated with Turkish Matrix test. Subjects’ speech intelligibility was measured using the adaptive and non-adaptive Matrix Test in quiet and noisy environments. Results: The results of the study show a correlation between Pure Tone Average (PTA) values of the subjects and Matrix test Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) values in the quiet. Hence, it is possible to asses PTA values of CI users using the Matrix Test also. However, no correlations were found between Matrix SRT values in the quiet and Matrix SRT values in noise. Similarly, the correlation between PTA values and intelligibility scores in noise was also not significant. Therefore, it may not be possible to assess the intelligibility performance of CI users using test batteries performed in quiet conditions. Conclusion: The Matrix Test can be used to assess the benefit of CI users from their systems in everyday life, since it is possible to perform intelligibility test with

  4. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio using iterative reconstruction in a 99m Tc-ECD split-dose injection protocol.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Takashi; Shinohara, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akihiro

    2003-08-01

    Split-dose injection using technetium-99m ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD) and consecutive SPET measurements performed before and after acetazolamide (ACZ) loading was used to estimate the cerebral perfusion reserve. The disadvantage of the split-dose method is that the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of ACZ-loaded images is decreased by subtraction of the 1st SPET data (rest) from the 2nd SPET data (ACZ loaded). To improve the S/N of reconstructed images, we implemented an iterative reconstruction algorithm including the term of remaining radioactivity in the brain from the 1st injection. It was expected that this method (the "addition method") would improve the S/N of rest and ACZ images compared with the conventional subtraction method owing to exclusion of the subtraction process. To evaluate the effect of statistical noise, we estimated the percentage coefficient of variation (%COV) as a function of total photon counts (from 1.35 to 86.5 Mcounts/slice) by Monte Carlo simulation with equal-volume split-dose injection. The %COV of the 2nd SPET study was higher than that of the 1st (e.g. 50.3% for the 1st and 80.5% for the 2nd at a total count of 2.70 Mcounts/slice) when using the conventional subtraction method. By contrast, the %COV of the 1st and 2nd SPET studies was almost equivalent (e.g. 43.1% for the 1st and 41.4% for the 2nd at a total count of 2.70 Mcounts/slice) when using the addition method. We also determined the optimal injection dose ratio of the 2nd to the 1st SPET study, which provides the equivalent %COV value between the 1st and 2nd images. With the subtraction method, the optimal injection dose ratio of the 2nd to the 1st SPET study was approximately 2.0, while with the addition method it was approximately 1.0. The absolute value of %COV at the optimal injection dose was about 54% and 43% with the subtraction method and the addition method, respectively. The addition method gave a lower %COV value than the subtraction method even at the

  5. Effects of exposure equalization on image signal-to-noise ratios in digital mammography: A simulation study with an anthropomorphic breast phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xinming; Lai Chaojen; Whitman, Gary J.; Geiser, William R.; Shen Youtao; Yi Ying; Shaw, Chris C.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The scan equalization digital mammography (SEDM) technique combines slot scanning and exposure equalization to improve low-contrast performance of digital mammography in dense tissue areas. In this study, full-field digital mammography (FFDM) images of an anthropomorphic breast phantom acquired with an anti-scatter grid at various exposure levels were superimposed to simulate SEDM images and investigate the improvement of low-contrast performance as quantified by primary signal-to-noise ratios (PSNRs). Methods: We imaged an anthropomorphic breast phantom (Gammex 169 ''Rachel,'' Gammex RMI, Middleton, WI) at various exposure levels using a FFDM system (Senographe 2000D, GE Medical Systems, Milwaukee, WI). The exposure equalization factors were computed based on a standard FFDM image acquired in the automatic exposure control (AEC) mode. The equalized image was simulated and constructed by superimposing a selected set of FFDM images acquired at 2, 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16, and 1/32 times of exposure levels to the standard AEC timed technique (125 mAs) using the equalization factors computed for each region. Finally, the equalized image was renormalized regionally with the exposure equalization factors to result in an appearance similar to that with standard digital mammography. Two sets of FFDM images were acquired to allow for two identically, but independently, formed equalized images to be subtracted from each other to estimate the noise levels. Similarly, two identically but independently acquired standard FFDM images were subtracted to estimate the noise levels. Corrections were applied to remove the excess system noise accumulated during image superimposition in forming the equalized image. PSNRs over the compressed area of breast phantom were computed and used to quantitatively study the effects of exposure equalization on low-contrast performance in digital mammography. Results: We found that the highest achievable PSNR improvement factor was 1.89 for

  6. Demonstration of improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of Thomson scattering signal obtained by using a multi-pass optical cavity on the Tokyo Spherical Tokamak-2

    SciTech Connect

    Togashi, H. Ejiri, A.; Nakamura, K.; Takase, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Furui, H.; Imamura, K.; Inada, T.; Nakanishi, A.; Oosako, T.; Shinya, T.; Tsuda, S.; Tsujii, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Kakuda, H.; Sonehara, M.; Wakatsuki, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Nagashima, Y.; Narihara, K.; and others

    2014-11-15

    The multi-pass Thomson scattering (TS) scheme enables obtaining many photons by accumulating multiple TS signals. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the accumulation number. In this study, we performed multi-pass TS measurements for ohmically heated plasmas, and the relationship between SNR and the accumulation number was investigated. As a result, improvement of SNR in this experiment indicated similar tendency to that calculated for the background noise dominant situation.

  7. Enlargement of the field of view and maintenance of a high signal-to-noise ratio using a two-element high-Tc superconducting array in a 3T MRI.

    PubMed

    Lin, In-Tsang; Yang, Hong-Chang; Chen, Jyh-Horng

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the enlargement of the field of view (FOV) and the maintenance of a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) through the use of two high-temperature superconducting (HTS) resonators in a 3T MRI. Two Bi(2)Sr(2)Ca(2)Cu(3)O(x) (Bi-2223) surface resonators, each of 4-cm diameter, were used in a 3T MRI. Professionally made copper resonators operate at 300 K, but each Bi-2223 resonator, operated at 77 K and demonstrated a 3.75 fold increase in SNR gain. For the same scanning time, the SNR of the images of a rat's brain and back, obtained using two small Bi-2223 surface resonators, was higher than that obtained using a single 8-cm surface resonator.

  8. A signal input coil made of superconducting thin film for improved signal-to-noise ratio in a high-Tc SQUID-based ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuen-Lin; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Ku, Yue-Bai; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wang, Li-Min; Horng, Herng-Er; Yang, Hong-Chang

    2013-11-01

    Resonant coupling schemes are commonly used in SQUID-based ultra-low field (ULF) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) systems to couple the spin relaxation signals from samples to the SQUID. Generally, in NMR systems, a resonant coupling scheme is composed of two solenoid coils which are made of enamel insulated wires and a capacitor connected in series. In this work, we tried to replace the metal solenoid input coil with a planar high-Tc superconducting spiral coil to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the ULF NMR signal. A measurement of the free induction decay signal of water protons was performed to demonstrate the improved performance of the system. This improvement is due to the fact that the planar superconducting spiral coil possesses a higher mutual inductance with the SQUID. Therefore, it is a promising way to enhance the SNR of high-Tc SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI systems.

  9. Improving Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Energy-Dispersive X-Ray (STEM-EDX) Spectrum Images Using Single-Atomic-Column Cross-Correlation Averaging.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Mkhoyan, K Andre

    2016-06-01

    Acquiring an atomic-resolution compositional map of crystalline specimens has become routine practice, thus opening possibilities for extracting subatomic information from such maps. A key challenge for achieving subatomic precision is the improvement of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of compositional maps. Here, we report a simple and reliable solution for achieving high-SNR energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy spectrum images for individual atomic columns. The method is based on standard cross-correlation aided by averaging of single-column EDX maps with modifications in the reference image. It produces EDX maps with minimal specimen drift, beam drift, and scan distortions. Step-by-step procedures to determine a self-consistent reference map with a discussion on the reliability, stability, and limitations of the method are presented here.

  10. Combination of highly nonlinear fiber, an optical bandpass filter, and a Fabry-Perot filter to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of a supercontinuum continuous-wave optical source.

    PubMed

    Nan, Yinbo; Huo, Li; Lou, Caiyun

    2005-05-20

    We present a theoretical study of a supercontinuum (SC) continuous-wave (cw) optical source generation in highly nonlinear fiber and its noise properties through numerical simulations based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Fluctuations of pump pulses generate substructures between the longitudinal modes that result in the generation of white noise and then in degradation of coherence and in a decrease of the modulation depths and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A scheme for improvement of the SNR of a multiwavelength cw optical source based on a SC by use of the combination of a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), an optical bandpass filter, and a Fabry-Perot (FP) filter is presented. Numerical simulations show that the improvement in modulation depth is relative to the HNLF's length, the 3-dB bandwidth of the optical bandpass filter, and the reflection ratio of the FP filter and that the average improvement in modulation depth is 13.7 dB under specified conditions. PMID:15929296

  11. Combination of highly nonlinear fiber, an optical bandpass filter, and a Fabry-Perot filter to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of a supercontinuum continuous-wave optical source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Yinbo; Huo, Li; Lou, Caiyun

    2005-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of a supercontinuum (SC) continuous-wave (cw) optical source generation in highly nonlinear fiber and its noise properties through numerical simulations based on the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Fluctuations of pump pulses generate substructures between the longitudinal modes that result in the generation of white noise and then in degradation of coherence and in a decrease of the modulation depths and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). A scheme for improvement of the SNR of a multiwavelength cw optical source based on a SC by use of the combination of a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF), an optical bandpass filter, and a Fabry-Perot (FP) filter is presented. Numerical simulations show that the improvement in modulation depth is relative to the HNLF's length, the 3-dB bandwidth of the optical bandpass filter, and the reflection ratio of the FP filter and that the average improvement in modulation depth is 13.7 dB under specified conditions.

  12. CROSS-CORRELATIONS OF THE Ly{alpha} FOREST WITH WEAK-LENSING CONVERGENCE. ANALYTICAL ESTIMATES OF SIGNAL-TO-NOISE RATIO AND IMPLICATIONS FOR NEUTRINO MASS AND DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto; Viel, Matteo; Das, Sudeep; Spergel, David N. E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2011-07-01

    We expect a detectable correlation between two seemingly unrelated quantities: the four-point function of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and the amplitude of flux decrements in quasar (QSO) spectra. The amplitude of CMB convergence in a given direction measures the projected surface density of matter. Measurements of QSO flux decrements trace the small-scale distribution of gas along a given line of sight. While the cross-correlation between these two measurements is small for a single line of sight, upcoming large surveys should enable its detection. This paper presents analytical estimates for the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for measurements of the cross-correlation between the flux decrement and the convergence, <{delta}F{kappa}>, and for measurements of the cross-correlation between the variance in flux decrement and the convergence, <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}>. For the ongoing BOSS (SDSS-III) and Planck surveys, we estimate an S/N of 30 and 9.6 for these two correlations. For the proposed BigBOSS and ACTPOL surveys, we estimate an S/N of 130 and 50, respectively. Since <({delta}F){sup 2}{kappa}>{proportional_to}{sigma}{sub 8}{sup 4}, the amplitude of these cross-correlations can potentially be used to measure the amplitude of {sigma}{sub 8} at z {approx} 2%-2.5% with BOSS and Planck and even better with future data sets. These measurements have the potential to test alternative theories for dark energy and to constrain the mass of the neutrino. The large potential signal estimated in our analytical calculations motivates tests with nonlinear hydrodynamic simulations and analyses of upcoming data sets.

  13. The Dependence of Signal-To-Noise Ratio (S/N) Between Star Brightness and Background on the Filter Used in Images Taken by the Vulcan Photometric Planet Search Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mena-Werth, Jose

    1998-01-01

    The Vulcan Photometric Planet Search is the ground-based counterpart of Kepler Mission Proposal. The Kepler Proposal calls for the launch of telescope to look intently at a small patch of sky for four year. The mission is designed to look for extra-solar planets that transit sun-like stars. The Kepler Mission should be able to detect Earth-size planets. This goal requires an instrument and software capable of detecting photometric changes of several parts per hundred thousand in the flux of a star. The goal also requires the continuous monitoring of about a hundred thousand stars. The Kepler Mission is a NASA Discovery Class proposal similar in cost to the Lunar Prospector. The Vulcan Search is also a NASA project but based at Lick Observatory. A small wide-field telescope monitors various star fields successively during the year. Dozens of images, each containing tens of thousands of stars, are taken any night that weather permits. The images are then monitored for photometric changes of the order of one part in a thousand. These changes would reveal the transit of an inner-orbit Jupiter-size planet similar to those discovered recently in spectroscopic searches. In order to achieve a one part in one thousand photometric precision even the choice of a filter used in taking an exposure can be critical. The ultimate purpose of an filter is to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of one's observation. Ideally, filters reduce the sky glow cause by street lights and, thereby, make the star images more distinct. The higher the S/N, the higher is the chance to observe a transit signal that indicates the presence of a new planet. It is, therefore, important to select the filter that maximizes the S/N.

  14. Influence of signal-to-noise ratio and temporal stability on computer-aided detection of mammographic microcalcifications in digitized screen-film and full-field digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarusso, Laura M.; Nishikawa, Robert M.

    2008-03-01

    Most computer-aided detection (CADe) schemes were developed for digitized screen-film mammography (dSFM) and are being transitioned to full-field digital mammography (FFDM). In this research, phantoms were used to relate image quality differences to the performance of the multiple components of our microcalcification CADe scheme, and to identify to what extent, if any, each CADe component is likely to require modification for FFDM. We compared multiple image quality metrics for a dSFM imaging chain (GE DMR, MinR-2000 and Lumisiys digitizer) and an FFDM system (GE Senographe 2000D) and related them to CADe performance for images of 1) contrast-detail phantom disks and 2) microcalcification phantoms (bone fragments and cadaver breasts). Higher object signal-to noise ratio (SNR) in FFDM compared with dSFM (p<0.05 for 62% of disks, and p>0.05 for 32% of disks) led to superior CADe signal and cluster detection FROC performance. Signal segmentation was comparable (p>0.05 for 74% of disks) in dSFM and FFDM and superior in FFDM (p<0.05) for 19% of disks. Better FFDM temporal stability led to more reproducible CADe performance. For microcalcification phantoms, seven of eight computer-calculated features performed better or comparably (p<0.05) at classifying true- and false-positive detections in FFDM. In conclusion, the image quality improvements offered by FFDM compared to dSFM led to comparable or improved performance of the multiple stages of our CADe scheme for microcalcification detection.

  15. When is an optimization not an optimization? Evaluation of clinical implications of information content (signal-to-noise ratio) in optimization of cardiac resynchronization therapy, and how to measure and maximize it.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Punam A; Willson, Keith; Stegemann, Berthold; van Geldorp, Irene E; Kyriacou, Andreas; Moraldo, Michela; Mayet, Jamil; Hughes, Alun D; Francis, Darrel P

    2011-05-01

    Impact of variability in the measured parameter is rarely considered in designing clinical protocols for optimization of atrioventricular (AV) or interventricular (VV) delay of cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). In this article, we approach this question quantitatively using mathematical simulation in which the true optimum is known and examine practical implications using some real measurements. We calculated the performance of any optimization process that selects the pacing setting which maximizes an underlying signal, such as flow or pressure, in the presence of overlying random variability (noise). If signal and noise are of equal size, for a 5-choice optimization (60, 100, 140, 180, 220 ms), replicate AV delay optima are rarely identical but rather scattered with a standard deviation of 45 ms. This scatter was overwhelmingly determined (ρ = -0.975, P < 0.001) by Information Content, [Formula: see text], an expression of signal-to-noise ratio. Averaging multiple replicates improves information content. In real clinical data, at resting, heart rate information content is often only 0.2-0.3; elevated pacing rates can raise information content above 0.5. Low information content (e.g. <0.5) causes gross overestimation of optimization-induced increment in VTI, high false-positive appearance of change in optimum between visits and very wide confidence intervals of individual patient optimum. AV and VV optimization by selecting the setting showing maximum cardiac function can only be accurate if information content is high. Simple steps to reduce noise such as averaging multiple replicates, or to increase signal such as increasing heart rate, can improve information content, and therefore viability, of any optimization process.

  16. Signal to Noise Analysis of iRadar sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzke, A; Top, P

    2009-09-10

    This document follows my process of testing; comparing; and contrasting several iRadars signal to noise ratios for both HH and VV polarization. A brief introduction is given explaining the basics of iRadar technology and what data I was collecting. The process section explains the steps I took to collect my data along with any procedures I followed. The analysis section compares and contrasts five different radars and the two different polarizations. The analysis also details the radars viewing limitations and area. Finally, the report delves into the effects of two radars interfering with each other. A conclusion goes over the success and findings of the project.

  17. Signal-to-noise issues in measuring nitrous oxide fluxes by the eddy covariance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicholas; Levy, Peter; Langford, Ben; Skiba, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Recently-developed fast-response gas analysers capable of measuring atmospheric N2O with high precision (< 50 ppt) at a rate of 10 Hz are becoming more widely available. These instruments are capable of measuring N2O fluxes using the eddy covariance method, with significantly less effort and uncertainty than previous instruments have allowed. However, there are still many issues to overcome in order to obtain accurate and reliable flux data. The signal-to-noise ratio of N2O measured using these instruments is still two to three orders of magnitude smaller than that of CO2. The low signal-to-noise ratio can lead to systematic uncertainties, in the eddy covariance method, the most significant being in the calculation of the time lag between gas analyser and anemometer by maximisation of covariance (Langford et al., 2015). When signal-to-noise ratio is relatively low, as it is with many N2O measurements, the maximisation of covariance method can systematically overestimate fluxes. However, if constant time lags are assumed, then fluxes will be underestimated. This presents a major issue for N2O eddy covariance measurements. In this presentation we will focus on the signal to noise ratio for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser (QCL). Eddy covariance flux measurements from multiple agricultural sites across the UK were investigated for potential uncertainties. Our presentation highlights some of these uncertainties when analysing eddy covariance data and offers suggestions as to how these issues may be minimised. Langford, B., Acton, W., Ammann, C., Valach, A. and Nemitz, E.: Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection, Atmos Meas Tech, 8(10), 4197-4213, doi:10.5194/amt-8-4197-2015, 2015.

  18. Signal-to-Noise Ratio in Physical Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Stu; Grube, Dan; Mokgwathi, Martin M.

    2010-01-01

    It is generally known that in educational settings, excessive noise masks what the teacher is saying; thus, and for maximum learning to occur, the teacher's voice must be highly intelligible to all children (Crandell, Smaldino, & Flexer, 1995). The difference between what the teacher is saying (signal) and the classroom noise level is commonly…

  19. Signal-to-Noise Characteristics of Solar MG II Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, P. C.; Floyd, L. E.

    1999-05-01

    Knowledge of the variations in solar ultraviolet irradiances is essential to understanding both the Sun and the behavior of the Earth's upper atmosphere. Since the solar ultraviolet radiation is absorbed by the atmosphere, the requisite measurements must be done from space. Reliable, approximately daily measurements of solar ultraviolet irradiances have been made since November 1978 by a variety of instruments (Numbus-7 SBUV, NOAA-9 and NOAA-11 SBUV/2, UARS SUSIM and SOLSTICE, and ERS-2 GOME). To overcome differences in spectral coverage and resolution and the challenges involved in the long-term calibrations of the instruments, a solar index suitable for use as a proxy for the solar ultraviolet (i.e., 100-400 nm) irradiances has been sought. The most popular indices for this purpose are the several Mg II indices based upon the Mg II k and h doublet near 280 nm; starting with the core-to-wing index developed by Heath and Schlesinger (J. Geophys. Res. 91, 8672, 1986) for the Nimbus-7 SBUV, they are calculated by taking the ratio of adjacent parts of the Mg II feature: one originating in the upper chromosphere that exhibits solar ultraviolet variations and the other, in the upper photosphere which is insensitive to solar variations. Because the ratio is of irradiances at nearby wavelengths, the Mg II indices mostly are not affected by temporal and spectral variations in the instrument responses. While there is an ongoing effort to combine the available Mg II indices into a single 20-year time series (i.e., Viereck and Puga, J. Geophys. Res., in press), we are investigating an alternate approach. We report here on the first step in that study: the characterization of the signal and noise properties of the several Mg II indices available. We use Fourier analysis to determine the amplitudes of a common signal (the 27-day variations) and of the high-frequency, day-to-day errors. Ultimately, the corresponding signal-to-noise ratios may be used to derive statistical

  20. Attention enhances stimulus representations in macaque visual cortex without affecting their signal-to-noise level.

    PubMed

    Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of the attentional modulation of neuronal responses in visual cortex varies with stimulus contrast. Whether the strength of these attentional influences is similarly dependent on other stimulus properties is unknown. Here we report the effect of spatial attention on responses in the medial-temporal area (MT) of macaque visual cortex to moving random dots pattern of various motion coherences, i.e. signal-to-noise ratios. Our data show that allocating spatial attention causes a gain change in MT neurons. The magnitude of this attentional modulation is independent of the attended stimulus' motion coherence, creating a multiplicative scaling of the neuron's coherence-response function. This is consistent with the characteristics of gain models of attentional modulation and suggests that attention strengthens the neuronal representation of behaviorally relevant visual stimuli relative to unattended stimuli, but without affecting their signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:27283275

  1. Attention enhances stimulus representations in macaque visual cortex without affecting their signal-to-noise level

    PubMed Central

    Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Treue, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of the attentional modulation of neuronal responses in visual cortex varies with stimulus contrast. Whether the strength of these attentional influences is similarly dependent on other stimulus properties is unknown. Here we report the effect of spatial attention on responses in the medial-temporal area (MT) of macaque visual cortex to moving random dots pattern of various motion coherences, i.e. signal-to-noise ratios. Our data show that allocating spatial attention causes a gain change in MT neurons. The magnitude of this attentional modulation is independent of the attended stimulus’ motion coherence, creating a multiplicative scaling of the neuron’s coherence-response function. This is consistent with the characteristics of gain models of attentional modulation and suggests that attention strengthens the neuronal representation of behaviorally relevant visual stimuli relative to unattended stimuli, but without affecting their signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:27283275

  2. Comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, Malcolm N.; Chan, Kam Wai Clifford; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-11-15

    We present a theoretical comparison of the signal-to-noise characteristics of quantum versus thermal ghost imaging. We first calculate the signal-to-noise ratio of each process in terms of its controllable experimental conditions. We show that a key distinction is that a thermal ghost image always resides on top of a large background; the fluctuations in this background constitutes an intrinsic noise source for thermal ghost imaging. In contrast, there is a negligible intrinsic background to a quantum ghost image. However, for practical reasons involving achievable illumination levels, acquisition times for thermal ghost images are often much shorter than those for quantum ghost images. We provide quantitative predictions for the conditions under which each process provides superior performance. Our conclusion is that each process can provide useful functionality, although under complementary conditions.

  3. Signal to Noise Studies on Thermographic Data with Fabricated Defects for Defense Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Rajic, Nik; Genest, Marc

    2006-01-01

    There is a growing international interest in thermal inspection systems for asset life assessment and management of defense platforms. The efficacy of flash thermography is generally enhanced by applying image processing algorithms to the observations of raw temperature. Improving the defect signal to noise ratio (SNR) is of primary interest to reduce false calls and allow for easier interpretation of a thermal inspection image. Several factors affecting defect SNR were studied such as data compression and reconstruction using principal component analysis and time window processing.

  4. A genetically encoded, high-signal-to-noise maltose sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Marvin, Jonathan S.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Echevarría, Ileabett M.; Looger, Loren L.

    2012-10-23

    We describe the generation of a family of high-signal-to-noise single-wavelength genetically encoded indicators for maltose. This was achieved by insertion of circularly permuted fluorescent proteins into a bacterial periplasmic binding protein (PBP), Escherichia coli maltodextrin-binding protein, resulting in a four-color family of maltose indicators. The sensors were iteratively optimized to have sufficient brightness and maltose-dependent fluorescence increases for imaging, under both one- and two-photon illumination. We demonstrate that maltose affinity of the sensors can be tuned in a fashion largely independent of the fluorescent readout mechanism. Using literature mutations, the binding specificity could be altered to moderate sucrose preference, but with a significant loss of affinity. We use the soluble sensors in individual E. coli bacteria to observe rapid maltose transport across the plasma membrane, and membrane fusion versions of the sensors on mammalian cells to visualize the addition of maltose to extracellular media. The PBP superfamily includes scaffolds specific for a number of analytes whose visualization would be critical to the reverse engineering of complex systems such as neural networks, biosynthetic pathways, and signal transduction cascades. We expect the methodology outlined here to be useful in the development of indicators for many such analytes.

  5. Brain–computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise

    PubMed Central

    Papageorgiou, T. Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M.; McHenry, Monica A.; White, Jason P.; LaConte, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Brain–computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects’ whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:23901117

  6. Brain-computer interfaces increase whole-brain signal to noise.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, T Dorina; Lisinski, Jonathan M; McHenry, Monica A; White, Jason P; LaConte, Stephen M

    2013-08-13

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) can convert mental states into signals to drive real-world devices, but it is not known if a given covert task is the same when performed with and without BCI-based control. Using a BCI likely involves additional cognitive processes, such as multitasking, attention, and conflict monitoring. In addition, it is challenging to measure the quality of covert task performance. We used whole-brain classifier-based real-time functional MRI to address these issues, because the method provides both classifier-based maps to examine the neural requirements of BCI and classification accuracy to quantify the quality of task performance. Subjects performed a covert counting task at fast and slow rates to control a visual interface. Compared with the same task when viewing but not controlling the interface, we observed that being in control of a BCI improved task classification of fast and slow counting states. Additional BCI control increased subjects' whole-brain signal-to-noise ratio compared with the absence of control. The neural pattern for control consisted of a positive network comprised of dorsal parietal and frontal regions and the anterior insula of the right hemisphere as well as an expansive negative network of regions. These findings suggest that real-time functional MRI can serve as a platform for exploring information processing and frontoparietal and insula network-based regulation of whole-brain task signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Signal-to-Noise Enhancement of a Nanospring Redox-Based Sensor by Lock-in Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Bakharev, Pavel V.; McIlroy, David N.

    2015-01-01

    A significant improvement of the response characteristics of a redox chemical gas sensor (chemiresistor) constructed with a single ZnO coated silica nanospring has been achieved with the technique of lock-in signal amplification. The comparison of DC and analog lock-in amplifier (LIA) AC measurements of the electrical sensor response to toluene vapor, at the ppm level, has been conducted. When operated in the DC detection mode, the sensor exhibits a relatively high sensitivity to the analyte vapor, as well as a low detection limit at the 10 ppm level. However, at 10 ppm the signal-to-noise ratio is 5 dB, which is less than desirable. When operated in the analog LIA mode, the signal-to-noise ratio at 10 ppm increases by 30 dB and extends the detection limit to the ppb range. PMID:26053754

  8. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-08-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens. PMID:19654762

  9. Advanced study of video signal processing in low signal to noise environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carden, F.

    1973-01-01

    Conventional analytical techniques used to determine and optimize phase-lock loop (PLL) characteristics are most often based on a model which is valid only if the intermediate frequency (IF) filter bandwidth is large compared to the PLL bandwidth and the phase error is small. An improved model (called the quasi-linear model) is developed which takes into account small IF filter bandwidths and nonlinear effects associated with large phase errors. By comparison of theoretical and experimental results it is demonstrated that the quasi-linear model accurately predicts PLL characteristics. This is true even for small IF filter bandwidths and large phase errors where the conventional model is invalid. The theoretical and experimental results are used to draw conclusions concerning threshold, multiplier output variance, phase error variance, output signal-to-noise ratio, and signal distortion. The relationship between these characteristics and IF filter bandwidth, modulating signal spectrum, and rms deviation is also determined.

  10. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

  11. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore » using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  12. Noise in Neural Networks: Thresholds, Hysteresis, and Neuromodulation of Signal-To-Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeler, James D.; Pichler, Elgar E.; Ross, John

    1989-03-01

    We study a neural-network model including Gaussian noise, higher-order neuronal interactions, and neuromodulation. For a first-order network, there is a threshold in the noise level (phase transition) above which the network displays only disorganized behavior and critical slowing down near the noise threshold. The network can tolerate more noise if it has higher-order feedback interactions, which also lead to hysteresis and multistability in the network dynamics. The signal-to-noise ratio can be adjusted in a biological neural network by neuromodulators such as norepinephrine. Comparisons are made to experimental results and further investigations are suggested to test the effects of hysteresis and neuromodulation in pattern recognition and learning. We propose that norepinephrine may ``quench'' the neural patterns of activity to enhance the ability to learn details.

  13. Ultrasonic correlator versus signal averager as a signal to noise enhancement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kishoni, Doron; Pietsch, Benjamin E.

    1990-01-01

    Ultrasonic inspection of thick and attenuating materials is hampered by the reduce amplitudes of the propagated waves to a degree that the noise is too high to enable meaningful interpretation of the data. In order to overcome the low signal to noise ratio (S/N), a correlation technique has been developed. In this method, a continuous pseudo-random pattern generated digitally is transmitted and detected by piezoelectric transducers. A correlation is performed in the instrument between the received signal and a variable delayed image of the transmitted one. The result is shown to be proportional to the impulse response of the investigated material, analogous to a signal received from a pulsed system, with an improved S/N ratio. The degree of S/N enhancement depends on the sweep rate. The correlator is described, and it is compared to the method of enhancing S/N ratio by averaging the signals. The similarities and differences between the two are highlighted and the potential advantage of the correlator system is explained.

  14. Spatial resolution, signal-to-noise and information capacity of linear imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Gureyev, Timur; Nesterets, Yakov; de Hoog, Frank

    2016-07-25

    A simple model for image formation in linear shift-invariant systems is considered, in which both the detected signal and the noise variance are varying slowly compared to the point-spread function of the system. It is shown that within the constraints of this model, the square of the signal-to-noise ratio is always proportional to the "volume" of the spatial resolution unit. In the case of Poisson statistics, the ratio of these two quantities divided by the incident density of the imaging particles (e.g. photons) represents a dimensionless invariant of the imaging system, which was previously termed the intrinsic imaging quality. The relationship of this invariant to the notion of information capacity of communication and imaging systems, which was previously considered by Shannon, Gabor and others, is investigated. The results are then applied to a simple generic model of quantitative imaging of weakly scattering objects, leading to an estimate of the upper limit for the amount of information about the sample that can be obtained in such experiments. It is shown that this limit depends only on the total number of imaging particles incident on the sample, the average scattering coefficient, the size of the sample and the number of spatial resolution units. PMID:27464167

  15. Signal-to-noise enhancement in ground-based intensity observations of solar p modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, Marvin E.

    1995-01-01

    Intensity observations of solar p modes are needed to form a complete picture of wave propagation in the photosphere. Ground-based intensity observations are severely hampered by terrestrial atmospheric noise. Partial cancellation of the noise power can be achieved if two spectra having disparate signal-to- noise ratios, and based on time series acquired simultaneously at the same site, are combined. A method of combining the spectra is suggested in which one amplitude is scaled and subtracted from the other. The result is squared yielding a positive-definite power density. To test the method, the intensity of light scattered by the Earth's atmnosphere was recorded at fifteen- second intervals in two narrow bands centered on 0.5 microns and 1.6 microns. When the two resulting spectra were combined, the noise power was attenuated by a factor of 2.7. The scale factor was varied about its optimum value, revealing that noise peaks have a different siganture than signal peaks, and opening up the possibility of a new tool in discrimination against noise peaks. Maxima at symmetry-allowed frequencies and minima at symmetry- forbidden frequencies indicate that the possibility that these results are obtained by chance is only 6.1 x 10(exp -4). The positions of these maxima and minima also support the solar-cycle dependent frequency shifts found by Palle, Regulo, and Roca Cortes.

  16. Bayesian image recovery for dendritic structures under low signal-to-noise conditions.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, Geoffrey; Paninski, Liam

    2009-03-01

    Experimental research seeking to quantify neuronal structure constantly contends with restrictions on image resolution and variability. In particular, experimentalists often need to analyze images with very low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In many experiments, dye toxicity scales with the light intensity; this leads experimentalists to reduce image SNR in order to preserve the viability of the specimen. In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach for estimating the neuronal shape given low-SNR observations. This Bayesian framework has two major advantages. First, the method effectively incorporates known facts about 1) the image formation process, including blur and the Poisson nature of image noise at low intensities, and 2) dendritic shape, including the fact that dendrites are simply-connected geometric structures with smooth boundaries. Second, we may employ standard Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques for quantifying the posterior uncertainty in our estimate of the dendritic shape. We describe an efficient computational implementation of these methods and demonstrate the algorithm's performance on simulated noisy two-photon laser-scanning microscopy images. PMID:19211329

  17. Fault Reactivation Analysis Using Microearthquake Clustering Based on Signal-to-Noise Weighted Waveform Similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, Michael; Groos, Jörn C.; Ritter, Joachim R. R.

    2016-07-01

    The cluster formation of about 2000 induced microearthquakes (mostly M L < 2) is studied using a waveform similarity technique based on cross-correlation and a subsequent equivalence class approach. All events were detected within two separated but neighbouring seismic volumes close to the geothermal powerplants near Landau and Insheim in the Upper Rhine Graben, SW Germany between 2006 and 2013. Besides different sensors, sampling rates and individual data gaps, mainly low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the recordings at most station sites provide a complication for the determination of a precise waveform similarity analysis of the microseismic events in this area. To include a large number of events for such an analysis, a newly developed weighting approach was implemented in the waveform similarity analysis which directly considers the individual SNRs across the whole seismic network. The application to both seismic volumes leads to event clusters with high waveform similarities within short (seconds to hours) and long (months to years) time periods covering two magnitude ranges. The estimated relative hypocenter locations are spatially concentrated for each single cluster and mirror the orientations of mapped faults as well as interpreted rupture planes determined from fault plane solutions. Depending on the waveform cross-correlation coefficient threshold, clusters can be resolved in space to as little as one dominant wavelength. The interpretation of these observations implies recurring fault reactivations by fluid injection with very similar faulting mechanisms during different time periods between 2006 and 2013.

  18. Direct Signal-to-Noise Quality Comparison between an Electronic and Conventional Stethoscope aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Cole, Richard; Ebert, Doug; Bauer, Pete

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Evaluation of heart, lung, and bowel sounds is routinely performed with the use of a stethoscope to help detect a broad range of medical conditions. Stethoscope acquired information is even more valuable in a resource limited environments such as the International Space Station (ISS) where additional testing is not available. The high ambient noise level aboard the ISS poses a specific challenge to auscultation by stethoscope. An electronic stethoscope's ambient noise-reduction, greater sound amplification, recording capabilities, and sound visualization software may be an advantage to a conventional stethoscope in this environment. Methods: A single operator rated signal-to-noise quality from a conventional stethoscope (Littman 2218BE) and an electronic stethoscope (Litmann 3200). Borborygmi, pulmonic, and cardiac sound quality was ranked with both stethoscopes. Signal-to-noise rankings were preformed on a 1 to 10 subjective scale with 1 being inaudible, 6 the expected quality in an emergency department, 8 the expected quality in a clinic, and 10 the clearest possible quality. Testing took place in the Japanese Pressurized Module (JPM), Unity (Node 2), Destiny (US Lab), Tranquility (Node 3), and the Cupola of the International Space Station. All examinations were conducted at a single point in time. Results: The electronic stethoscope's performance ranked higher than the conventional stethoscope for each body sound in all modules tested. The electronic stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 7 and 10 in all modules tested. In comparison, the traditional stethoscope's sound quality was rated between 4 and 7. The signal to noise ratio of borborygmi showed the biggest difference between stethoscopes. In the modules tested, the auscultation of borborygmi was rated between 5 and 7 by the conventional stethoscope and consistently 10 by the electronic stethoscope. Discussion: This stethoscope comparison was limited to a single operator. However, we

  19. Regionalization and calibration of seismic discriminants, path effects and signal-to-noise for station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A.J.; Walter, W.R.

    1997-07-01

    We report measurements and analysis of regional seismic phase amplitude ratios and signal-to-noise for earthquakes observed at the International Monitoring System primary station ABKT (Alibek, Turkmenistan). We measured noise and phase amplitudes of the regional phases Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg in four frequency bands between 0.75-9.0 Hz. Measurements were made in both the time and frequency domains. The spatial variation of amplitude ratios (e.g., Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg, Pn/Sn, Pg/Sn) and signal-to-noise (phase/noise) reveal significant path effect differences between the Hindu Kush, Kazahk Platform, Iranian Plateau and Caspian Sea. In order to represent this behavior, we have investigated several techniques for characterizing the data. These techniques are: 1) correlation with along-path distance and waveguide properties; 2) sector analysis; and 3) spatial averaging. Along-path waveguide properties, such as mean elevation and rms topographic slope are found to be the strongest factors related to Pg/Lg amplitude ratios at the lowest frequencies (<3.0 Hz). Other path properties such as mean crustal thickness and basement depth are not strongly correlated with Pg/Lg ratios. For sector analysis we divided the data into four (4) azimuthal sectors and characterized the data within each sector by a distance trend. Sectors were chosen based on the behavior of Pn/Lg, Pg/Lg and Pn/Sn amplitude ratios as well as topographic and tectonic character. Results reveal significant reduction (up to a factor of two) in the scatter of the Pn/Lg and Pg/Lg amplitude ratios for the sectorized data compared to the entire data set from all azimuths. Spatial averaging involves smoothing and interpolation for the ratios projected at the event location. Methods such as cap averaging and kriging will be presented at the meeting. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies.

    PubMed

    Parks, Nathan A; Gannon, Matthew A; Long, Stephanie M; Young, Madeleine E

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB ) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets.

  1. Improved ASTM G72 Test Method for Ensuring Adequate Fuel-to-Oxidizer Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harper, Susana Tapia

    2016-01-01

    The ASTM G72/G72M-15 Standard Test Method for Autogenous Ignition Temperature of Liquids and Solids in a High-Pressure Oxygen-Enriched Environment is currently used to evaluate materials for the ignition susceptibility driven by exposure to external heat in an enriched oxygen environment. Testing performed on highly volatile liquids such as cleaning solvents has proven problematic due to inconsistent test results (non-ignitions). Non-ignition results can be misinterpreted as favorable oxygen compatibility, although they are more likely associated with inadequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios. Forced evaporation during purging and inadequate sample size were identified as two potential causes for inadequate available sample material during testing. In an effort to maintain adequate fuel-to-oxidizer ratios within the reaction vessel during test, several parameters were considered, including sample size, pretest sample chilling, pretest purging, and test pressure. Tests on a variety of solvents exhibiting a range of volatilities are presented in this paper. A proposed improvement to the standard test protocol as a result of this evaluation is also presented. Execution of the final proposed improved test protocol outlines an incremental step method of determining optimal conditions using increased sample sizes while considering test system safety limits. The proposed improved test method increases confidence in results obtained by utilizing the ASTM G72 autogenous ignition temperature test method and can aid in the oxygen compatibility assessment of highly volatile liquids and other conditions that may lead to false non-ignition results.

  2. Signal-to-noise optimization and evaluation of a home-made visible diode-array spectrophotometer

    PubMed Central

    Raimundo, Jr., Ivo M.; Pasquini, Celio

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a simple low-cost multichannel visible spectrophotometer built with an RL512G EGG-Reticon photodiode array. A symmetric Czerny-Turner optical design was employed; instrument control was via a single-board microcomputer based on the 8085 Intel microprocessor. Spectral intensity data are stored in the single-board's RAM and then transferred to an IBM-AT 3865X compatible microcomputer through a RS-232C interface. This external microcomputer processes the data to recover transmittance, absorbance or relative intensity of the spectra. The signal-to-noise ratio and dynamic range were improved by using variable integration times, which increase during the same scan; and by the use of either weighted or unweighted sliding average of consecutive diodes. The instrument is suitable for automatic methods requiring quasi-simultaneous multiwavelength detections, such as multivariative calibration and flow-injection gradient scan techniques. PMID:18924979

  3. Improving signal-to-noise in the direct imaging of exoplanets and circumstellar disks with MLOCI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahhaj, Zahed; Cieza, Lucas A.; Mawet, Dimitri; Yang, Bin; Canovas, Hector; de Boer, Jozua; Casassus, Simon; Ménard, François; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Liu, Michael C.; Biller, Beth A.; Nielsen, Eric L.; Hayward, Thomas L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a new algorithm designed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of point and extended source detections around bright stars in direct imaging data.One of our innovations is that we insert simulated point sources into the science images, which we then try to recover with maximum S/N. This improves the S/N of real point sources elsewhere in the field. The algorithm, based on the locally optimized combination of images (LOCI) method, is called Matched LOCI or MLOCI. We show with Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) data on HD 135344 B and Near-Infrared Coronagraphic Imager (NICI) data on several stars that the new algorithm can improve the S/N of point source detections by 30-400% over past methods. We also find no increase in false detections rates. No prior knowledge of candidate companion locations is required to use MLOCI. On the other hand, while non-blind applications may yield linear combinations of science images that seem to increase the S/N of true sources by a factor >2, they can also yield false detections at high rates. This is a potential pitfall when trying to confirm marginal detections or to redetect point sources found in previous epochs. These findings are relevant to any method where the coefficients of the linear combination are considered tunable, e.g., LOCI and principal component analysis (PCA). Thus we recommend that false detection rates be analyzed when using these techniques. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  4. Laboratory Study of the Noticeability and Annoyance of Sounds of Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sneddon, Matthew; Howe, Richard; Pearsons, Karl; Fidell, Sanford

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a study of the noticeability and annoyance of intruding noises to test participants who were engaged in a distracting foreground task. Ten test participants read material of their own choosing while seated individually in front of a loudspeaker in an anechoic chamber. One of three specially constructed masking noise environments with limited dynamic range was heard at all times. A laboratory computer produced sounds of aircraft and ground vehicles as heard at varying distances at unpredictable intervals and carefully controlled levels. Test participants were instructed to click a computer mouse at any time that a noise distinct from the background noise environment came to their attention, and then to indicate their degree of annoyance with the noise that they had noticed. The results confirmed that both the noticeability of noise intrusions and their annoyance were closely related to their audibility.

  5. Visual motherese? Signal-to-noise ratios in toddler-directed television

    PubMed Central

    Wass, Sam V; Smith, Tim J

    2015-01-01

    Younger brains are noisier information processing systems; this means that information for younger individuals has to allow clearer differentiation between those aspects that are required for the processing task in hand (the ‘signal’) and those that are not (the ‘noise’). We compared toddler-directed and adult-directed TV programmes (TotTV/ATV). We examined how low-level visual features (that previous research has suggested influence gaze allocation) relate to semantic information, namely the location of the character speaking in each frame. We show that this relationship differs between TotTV and ATV. First, we conducted Receiver Operator Characteristics analyses and found that feature congestion predicted speaking character location in TotTV but not ATV. Second, we used multiple analytical strategies to show that luminance differentials (flicker) predict face location more strongly in TotTV than ATV. Our results suggest that TotTV designers have intuited techniques for controlling toddler attention using low-level visual cues. The implications of these findings for structuring childhood learning experiences away from a screen are discussed. PMID:24702791

  6. Computational signal-to-noise ratio analysis for optical quadrature microscopy.

    PubMed

    Warger, William C; DiMarzio, Charles A

    2009-02-16

    Optical quadrature microscopy (OQM) was invented in 1997 to reconstruct a full-field image of quantitative phase, and has been used to count the number of cells in live mouse embryos. Here we present a thorough SNR analysis that incorporates noise terms for fluctuations in the laser, aberrations within the individual paths of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and imperfections within the beamsplitters and CCD cameras to create a model for the resultant phase measurements. The current RMS error of the OQM phase images has been calculated to be 0.08 radians from substituting images from the instrumentation into the model.

  7. Speed of response, pile-up, and signal to noise ratio in liquid ionization calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, J.

    1989-06-01

    Although liquid ionization calorimeters have been mostly used up to now with slow readout, their signals have a fast rise time. However, it is not easy to get this fast component of the pulse out of the calorimeter. For this purpose a new connection scheme of the electrodes, the electrostatic transformer, is presented. This technique reduces the detector capacitance while keeping the number of channels at an acceptable level. Also it allows the use of transmission lines to bring signals from the electrodes to the preamplifiers which could be located in an accessible area. With room temperature liquids the length of these cables can be short, keeping the added noise at a reasonable level. Contributions to the error on the energy measurement from pile up and electronics noise are studied in detail. Even on this issue, room temperature liquids (TMP/TMS) are found to be competitive with cold liquid argon at the expense of a moderately higher gap voltage.

  8. Visual Motherese? Signal-to-Noise Ratios in Toddler-Directed Television

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wass, Sam V.; Smith, Tim J.

    2015-01-01

    Younger brains are noisier information processing systems; this means that information for younger individuals has to allow clearer differentiation between those aspects that are required for the processing task in hand (the "signal") and those that are not (the "noise"). We compared toddler-directed and adult-directed TV…

  9. Signal to Noise Ratio Characterization of Coherent Doppler Lidar Backscattered Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelazim, Sameh; Santoro, David; Arend, Mark; Moshary, Fred; Ahmed, Sam

    2016-06-01

    An eye-safe coherent Doppler Lidar (CDL) system for wind measurement was developed and tested at the Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York (CCNY). The system employs a 1542 nm fiber laser to leverage components' availability and affordability of the telecommunication industry. A balanced detector with a bandwidth extending from dc to 125 MHz is used to eliminate the common mode relative intensity noise (RIN). The system is shot noise limited i.e., the dominant component of received signals' noise is the shot noise. Wind velocity can be measured under nominal aerosol loading and atmospheric turbulence conditions for ranges up to 3 km while pointing vertically with 0.08 m/s precision.

  10. Bootstrap Signal-to-Noise Confidence Intervals: An Objective Method for Subject Exclusion and Quality Control in ERP Studies

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Nathan A.; Gannon, Matthew A.; Long, Stephanie M.; Young, Madeleine E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of event-related potential (ERP) data includes several steps to ensure that ERPs meet an appropriate level of signal quality. One such step, subject exclusion, rejects subject data if ERP waveforms fail to meet an appropriate level of signal quality. Subject exclusion is an important quality control step in the ERP analysis pipeline as it ensures that statistical inference is based only upon those subjects exhibiting clear evoked brain responses. This critical quality control step is most often performed simply through visual inspection of subject-level ERPs by investigators. Such an approach is qualitative, subjective, and susceptible to investigator bias, as there are no standards as to what constitutes an ERP of sufficient signal quality. Here, we describe a standardized and objective method for quantifying waveform quality in individual subjects and establishing criteria for subject exclusion. The approach uses bootstrap resampling of ERP waveforms (from a pool of all available trials) to compute a signal-to-noise ratio confidence interval (SNR-CI) for individual subject waveforms. The lower bound of this SNR-CI (SNRLB) yields an effective and objective measure of signal quality as it ensures that ERP waveforms statistically exceed a desired signal-to-noise criterion. SNRLB provides a quantifiable metric of individual subject ERP quality and eliminates the need for subjective evaluation of waveform quality by the investigator. We detail the SNR-CI methodology, establish the efficacy of employing this approach with Monte Carlo simulations, and demonstrate its utility in practice when applied to ERP datasets. PMID:26903849

  11. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. I. Cascaded model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Chao; Yu, Bing; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system using a pulsed laser transmitter and a streak tube receiver to produce 3D range and intensity imagery. The STIL has recently attracted a great deal of interest and attention due to its advantages of wide azimuth field-of-view, high range and angle resolution, and high frame rate. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of STIL systems. A theoretical model for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of the STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver is presented, based on the linear cascaded systems theory of signal and noise propagation. The STIL system is decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Expressions for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. The work presented here is useful for the design and evaluation of STIL systems.

  12. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. I. Cascaded model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongru; Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Chen, Chao; Yu, Bing; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    Streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) is an active imaging system using a pulsed laser transmitter and a streak tube receiver to produce 3D range and intensity imagery. The STIL has recently attracted a great deal of interest and attention due to its advantages of wide azimuth field-of-view, high range and angle resolution, and high frame rate. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of STIL systems. A theoretical model for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of the STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver is presented, based on the linear cascaded systems theory of signal and noise propagation. The STIL system is decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Expressions for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. The work presented here is useful for the design and evaluation of STIL systems. PMID:23262622

  13. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. II. Theoretical analysis and discussion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Hongru; Yu, Bing; Chen, Chao; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    In the preceding paper (referred to here as paper I), we presented a general signal-to-noise performance analysis of a streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) system within the framework of linear cascaded systems theory. A cascaded model is proposed for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of a STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver. The STIL system can be decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Equations for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of an external intensified STIL system. The implementation of the cascaded model for predicting and evaluating the signal-to-noise performance of the external intensified STIL system is described. Some factors that limit the signal-to-noise performance of the external intensified STIL system are analyzed and discussed.

  14. Signal-to-noise performance analysis of streak tube imaging lidar systems. II. Theoretical analysis and discussion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Wang, Xiaopeng; Yang, Hongru; Yu, Bing; Chen, Chao; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Liang; Wu, Lipeng; Xue, Zhanli; Li, Gaoping; Wu, Baoning

    2012-12-20

    In the preceding paper (referred to here as paper I), we presented a general signal-to-noise performance analysis of a streak tube imaging lidar (STIL) system within the framework of linear cascaded systems theory. A cascaded model is proposed for characterizing the signal-to-noise performance of a STIL system with an internal or external intensified streak tube receiver. The STIL system can be decomposed into a series of cascaded imaging chains whose signal and noise transfer properties are described by the general (or the spatial-frequency dependent) noise factors (NFs). Equations for the general NFs of the cascaded chains (or the main components) in the STIL system are derived. This work investigates the signal-to-noise performance of an external intensified STIL system. The implementation of the cascaded model for predicting and evaluating the signal-to-noise performance of the external intensified STIL system is described. Some factors that limit the signal-to-noise performance of the external intensified STIL system are analyzed and discussed. PMID:23262623

  15. C IV LINE-WIDTH ANOMALIES: THE PERILS OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Denney, K. D.; Vestergaard, M.; Pogge, R. W.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M.; Assef, R. J.

    2013-09-20

    Comparison of six high-redshift quasar spectra obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope with previous observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey shows that failure to correctly identify absorption and other problems with accurate characterization of the C IV λ1549 emission line profile in low signal-to-noise (S/N) data can severely limit the reliability of single-epoch mass estimates based on the C IV emission line. We combine the analysis of these new high-quality data with a reanalysis of three other samples based on high-S/N spectra of the C IV emission line region. We find that a large scatter between the Hβ- and C IV-based masses remains even for this high-S/N sample when using the FWHM to characterize the broad-line region velocity dispersion and the standard virial assumption to calculate the mass. However, we demonstrate that using high-quality data and the line dispersion to characterize the C IV line width leads to a high level of consistency between C IV- and Hβ-based masses, with <0.3 dex of observed scatter and an estimated ∼0.2 dex intrinsic scatter, in the mass residuals.

  16. Signal to noise improvements with a new Far-IR rapid-scan Michelson Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmugl, C. J.; Williams, G. P.

    1994-08-01

    In this paper we discuss signal to noise issues in the infrared spectral region, presenting an update on instrumentation developments that have focused on this topic. We have been able to achieve reproducibilities in the 0.01 % range for spectra measured in around 1 minute on samples with an area of 1 sq mm illuminated with an fl 10 beam. We show how this result is consistent with the synchrotron source intensity and detector noise and we also show a comparison with a conventional globar source. For these new studies, a Nicolet(trademark) Impact 400 rapid scan Michelson Interferometer was modified by Pike Technologies and installed in vacuum at the U41R infrared beamline at the NSLS. The instrument is capable of scanning at an optical retardation rate of 3.2 cm/sec, and of a data collection frequency of 50 kHz triggered by the co-linear reference beam of a HeNe laser. A proprietary Nicolet(trademark) solid state beamsplitter was used to cover the range from 10-2500 cm(exp -1). Spectra were taken in reflection at grazing incidence off a single crystal Cu surface in ultra-high vacuum using liquid helium cooled detectors of the photoconductive type (Cu/Ge) or bolometric type (B/Si). The sample throughput for this system was 0.01 sq mm steradians.

  17. Signal-to-noise improvements with a new far-IR rapid scan Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschmugl, C. J.; Williams, G. P.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper signal-to-noise issues in the infrared spectral region are discussed, presenting an update on instrumentation developments that have focused on this topic. Reproducibilities in the 0.01% range for spectra measured in around 1 min on samples with an area of 1 mm2 illuminated with an f/10 beam were achieved. It is shown how this result is consistent with the synchrotron source intensity and detector noise and a comparison with a conventional globar source is also shown. For these new studies, a NicoletTM Impact 400 rapid scan Michelson interferometer was modified by Pike Technologies and installed in vacuum at the U4IR infrared beamline at the NSLS. The instrument is capable of scanning at an optical retardation rate of 3.2 cm/s, and of a data-collection frequency of 50 kHz triggered by the colinear reference beam of a HeNe laser. A proprietary NicoletTM solid-state beam splitter was used to cover the range from 10 to 2500 cm-1. Spectra were taken in reflection at grazing incidence off a single-crystal Cu surface in ultrahigh vacuum using liquid helium cooled detectors of the photoconductive type (Cu/Ge) or bolometric type (B/Si). The sample throughput for this system was 0.05 mm2 sr.

  18. The flat fielding and achievable signal-to-noise of the MAMA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Mary Elizabeth; Lindler, Don J.; Bohlin, Ralph C.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) was designed to achieve a signal-to-noise (S/N) of at least 100:1 per resolution element. Multi-Anode Microchannel Arrays (MAMA) observations during Servicing Mission Orbital Verification (SMOV) confirm that this specification can be met. From analysis of a single spectrum of GD153, with counting statistics of approximately 165 a S/N of approximately 125 is achieved per spectral resolution element in the far ultraviolet (FUV) over the spectral range of 1280A to 1455A. Co-adding spectra of GRW+7OD5824 to increase the counting statistics to approximately 300 yields a S/N of approximately 190 per spectral resolution element over the region extending from 1347A to 1480A in the FUV. In the near ultraviolet (NUV), a single spectrum of GRW+7OD5824 with counting statistics of approximately 200 yields a S/N of approximately 150 per spectral resolution element over the spectral region extending from 2167 to 2520A. Details of the flat field construction, the spectral extraction, and the definition of a spectral resolution element will be described in the text.

  19. Integrated spectra extraction based on signal-to-noise optimization using integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Arribas, S.; Colina, L.

    2012-03-01

    Aims: We explore the potential of a method to extract high signal-to-noise (S/N) integrated spectra of particular physical and/or morphological regions of a two-dimensional field using integral field spectroscopy (IFS) observations by applying an optimization procedure based on either continuum (stellar) or line (nebular) emission features. Methods: The optimization method is applied to a set of IFS VLT-VIMOS observations of (U)LIRG galaxies. We describe the advantages of the optimization by comparing the results with a fixed-aperture, single-spectrum case, and by implementing some statistical tests. Results: We demonstrate that the S/N of the IFS optimized integrated spectra is significantly higher than for the single-aperture unprocessed case. In some cases, the optimization based on the emission lines allows to characterize some of the source properties more reliably than with standard integration methods. We are able to clearly retrieve the weak continuum features, hence more precisely constrain the properties of the unresolved stellar population. The most suitable method for integrating spectra over (part of) the field-of-view ultimately depends on the science case, and may involve a trade off among the different variables (e.g. S/N, probe area, spatial resolution, etc.). we therefore provide an iterative user-friendly and versatile IDL algorithm that, in addition to the above-mentioned method, allows the user to spatially integrate spectra following more standard procedures. Our procedure is made available to the community as part of the PINGSoft IFS software package.

  20. Cosmic Origins Spectrograph: Flat Fields And Signal-to-noise Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahnow, David J.; Ake, T.; Burgh, E.; France, K.; Penton, S.; McPhate, J.; Keyes, C.; STScI COS Team; COS IDT Team

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) employs different microchannel plate detectors for its two channels: a cross delay line (XDL) for the FUV, and a multi-anode microchannel array (MAMA) for the NUV. These detectors show non-uniformities due to the intrinsic `chicken wire’ and moiré patterns of the microchannel plates, dead spots, hot regions, and for the XDL, shadowing by QE grid wires. Signal-to-noise (S/N) improvements can be achieved by applying a high-quality flat field during data reduction. For the highest S/N, multiple exposures can be taken using the FP-POS technique, where spectra are stepped to different locations on the detector. During the COS Servicing Mission Observatory Verification (SMOV) program, observations of bright astronomical targets and an internal deuterium lamp were made in both channels to investigate methodologies to improve the S/N of on-orbit observations. For the NUV channel, flat field exposures were obtained with the onboard lamp. Comparisons of the data with a flat field constructed from prelaunch data indicate that there have been no changes, so a high S/N flat has been built by combining ground and flight data. Analysis indicates that S/N = 100 per pixel is achievable using flat fielding alone. For the FUV channel, which does not have a ground flat of such high quality, exposures were obtained of white dwarfs at various cross-dispersion locations on the detector. Comparisons of different reduction techniques for this data set will be presented. Until high-quality flat fields are implemented in standard pipeline processing, high S/N spectra are best achieved by the FP-POS technique, which has demonstrated S/N of > 50 per resolution element.

  1. Comparison of three tissue composition measurement techniques using digital mammograms--a signal-to-noise study.

    PubMed

    Breitenstein, D S; Shaw, C C

    1998-08-01

    Tissue composition measurement may provide a quantitatively and physically meaningful method to objectively determine the "mammographic density" linked to breast cancer risk. A single energy hybrid (SEH) techniques is described for measuring the tissue composition on a pixel-by-pixel basis with a single digital mammogram. Theoretical models were derived and used to compute signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in tissue composition measurement using the SEH method. The results were compared with those computed for measurements using the dual kVp and dual screen methods. SNRs were theoretically related to the pixel area, total unattenuated detector exposure and fluence spectra of the incident X-rays. SNRs were computed for measurement of the adipose tissue thickness for a 6 cm thick breast, consisting of 50% of adipose tissue and 50% of glandular tissue. Effects of kVp and prepatient filtration were studied by computing the SNRs for various kVps and filters and optimal kVps and filters are determined. The results showed that the SNRs obtained with the SEH method is an order of magnitude better than the dual kVp method, which, in turn, is an order of magnitude better than the dual screen method. When using the optimal kVp's and no prepatient filtration, the SNRs were computed to be 84.2, 13.2, and 2.0 for the SEH, dual kVp, and dual screen methods, respectively. Prepatient filtration can improve the SNR by as much as 35% for the dual kVp and dual screen techniques with reasonable tube loading factors (8-10). PMID:9718504

  2. High signal-to-noise acoustic sensor using phase-shifted gratings interrogated by the Pound-Drever-Hall technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Peter; Comanici, Maria I.

    2014-11-01

    Optical fiber is made of glass, an insulator, and thus it is immune to strong electromagnetic interference. Therefore, fiber optics is a technology ideally suitable for sensing of partial discharge (PD) both in transformers and generators. Extensive efforts have been used to develop a cost effective solution for detecting partial discharge, which generates acoustic emission, with signals ranging from 30 kHz to 200 kHz. The requirement is similar to fiber optics Hydro Phone, but at higher frequencies. There are several keys to success: there must be at least 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) performance, which will ensure not only PD detection but later on provide diagnostics and also the ability to locate the origin of the events. Defects that are stationary would gradually degrade the insulation and result in total breakdown. Transformers currently need urgent attention: most of them are oil filled and are at least 30 to 50 years old, close to the end of life. In this context, an issue to be addressed is the safety of the personnel working close to the assets and collateral damage that could be caused by a tank explosion (with fire spilling over the whole facility). This paper will describe the latest achievement in fiber optics PD sensor technology: the use of phase shifted-fiber gratings with a very high speed interrogation method that uses the Pound-Drever-Hall technique. More importantly, this is based on a technology that could be automated, easy to install, and, eventually, available at affordable prices.

  3. Signal-to-Noise Enhancement Techniques for Quantum Cascade Absorption Spectrometers Employing Optimal Filtering and Other Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Disselkamp, Robert S.; Kelly, James F.; Sams, Robert L.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2002-09-01

    Optical feedback to the laser source in tunable diode laser spectroscopy (TDLS) is known to create intensity modulation noise due to elatoning and optical feedback (i.e., multiplicative technical noise) that usually limits spectral signal-to-noise (S/N). The large technical noise often limits absorption spectroscopy to noise floors 100-fold greater than the Poisson shot noise limit due to fluctuations in the laser intensity. The high output powers generated from quantum cascade (QC) lasers, along with their high gain, makes these injection laser systems especially susceptible to technical noise. In this article we discuss a method of using optimal filtering to reduce technical noise. We have observed S/N enhancements ranging from {approx}20% to a factor of {approx}50. The degree to which optimal filtering will enhance S/N depends on the similarity between the Fourier components of the technical noise and those of the signal, with lower S/N enhancements observed for more similar Fourier decompositions of the signal and technical noise. We also examine the linearity of optimal filtered spectra for both time and intensity. This was accomplished by creating a synthetic spectrum for the species being studied (CH4, N2O, CO2, H2O in ambient air) utilizing line-positions and line-widths with an assumed Voight-profile from a previous database (HITRAN). Agreement better than 0.036% in wavenumber, and 1.64% in intensity (up to a 260-fold intensity ratio employed), was observed. Our results suggest that rapid ex post facto digital optimal filtering can be used to enhance S/N for routine trace gas detection.

  4. A MARKOV CHAIN MONTE CARLO ALGORITHM FOR ANALYSIS OF LOW SIGNAL-TO-NOISE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Jewell, J. B.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Huey, Greg; Gorski, K. M.; Eriksen, H. K.; Wandelt, B. D. E-mail: h.k.k.eriksen@astro.uio.no

    2009-05-20

    We present a new Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm for cosmic microwave background (CMB) analysis in the low signal-to-noise regime. This method builds on and complements the previously described CMB Gibbs sampler, and effectively solves the low signal-to-noise inefficiency problem of the direct Gibbs sampler. The new algorithm is a simple Metropolis-Hastings sampler with a general proposal rule for the power spectrum, C {sub l}, followed by a particular deterministic rescaling operation of the sky signal, s. The acceptance probability for this joint move depends on the sky map only through the difference of {chi}{sup 2} between the original and proposed sky sample, which is close to unity in the low signal-to-noise regime. The algorithm is completed by alternating this move with a standard Gibbs move. Together, these two proposals constitute a computationally efficient algorithm for mapping out the full joint CMB posterior, both in the high and low signal-to-noise regimes.

  5. A Signal-to-Noise Crossover Dose as the Point of Departure for Health Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Portier, Christopher J.; Krewski, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background: The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) cancer bioassay database provides an opportunity to compare both existing and new approaches to determining points of departure (PoDs) for establishing reference doses (RfDs). Objectives: The aims of this study were a) to investigate the risk associated with the traditional PoD used in human health risk assessment [the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL)]; b) to present a new approach based on the signal-to-noise crossover dose (SNCD); and c) to compare the SNCD and SNCD-based RfD with PoDs and RfDs based on the NOAEL and benchmark dose (BMD) approaches. Methods: The complete NTP database was used as the basis for these analyses, which were performed using the Hill model. We determined NOAELs and estimated corresponding extra risks. Lower 95% confidence bounds on the BMD (BMDLs) corresponding to extra risks of 1%, 5%, and 10% (BMDL01, BMDL05, and BMDL10, respectively) were also estimated. We introduce the SNCD as a new PoD, defined as the dose where the additional risk is equal to the “background noise” (the difference between the upper and lower bounds of the two-sided 90% confidence interval on absolute risk) or a specified fraction thereof. Results: The median risk at the NOAEL was approximately 10%, and the default uncertainty factor (UF = 100) was considered most applicable to the BMDL10. Therefore, we chose a target risk of 1/1,000 (0.1/100) to derive an SNCD-based RfD by linear extrapolation. At the median, this approach provided the same RfD as the BMDL10 divided by the default UF. Conclusions: Under a standard BMD approach, the BMDL10 is considered to be the most appropriate PoD. The SNCD approach, which is based on the lowest dose at which the signal can be reliably detected, warrants further development as a PoD for human health risk assessment. PMID:21813365

  6. Signal-to-noise and acquisition duration improvements for a hybrid-PMT and photodiode-based multiwavelength diffuse optical tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Ghussein, Fadi; Mastanduno, Michael A.; Jiang, Shudong; Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-03-01

    A new optical parallel detection system of both frequency and continuous wave domains was developed to improve the data quality and accuracy in recovery of all breast optical properties. This new system combines frequency domain (FD) measurements using photomultiplier tubes and continuous wavelengths (CW) measurements using photodiode detectors in order to incorporate addition NIR wavelengths up to 948nm. The FD measurements use 6 wavelengths (660, 735, 785, 808, 826, and 849 nm) while the CW use three wavelengths (903, 912, and 948nm). The frequency domain part of the system is described in detail and steps taken to improve signal to noise ratio are discussed. Furthermore, different acquisition procedures were tested in order to reduce the duration of a complete 9 wavelength acquisition.

  7. Measuring gravitational waves from binary black hole coalescences. I. Signal to noise for inspiral, merger, and ringdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Éanna É.; Hughes, Scott A.

    1998-04-01

    We estimate the expected signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) from the three phases (inspiral, merger, and ringdown) of coalescing binary black holes (BBHs) for initial and advanced ground-based interferometers (LIGO-VIRGO) and for the space-based interferometer LISA. Ground-based interferometers can do moderate SNR (a few tens), moderate accuracy studies of BBH coalescences in the mass range of a few to about 2000 solar masses; LISA can do high SNR (of order 104), high accuracy studies in the mass range of about 105-108 solar masses. BBHs might well be the first sources detected by LIGO-VIRGO: they are visible to much larger distances-up to 500 Mpc by initial interferometers-than coalescing neutron star binaries (heretofore regarded as the ``bread and butter'' workhorse source for LIGO-VIRGO, visible to about 30 Mpc by initial interferometers). Low-mass BBHs (up to 50Msolar for initial LIGO interferometers, 100Msolar for advanced, 106Msolar for LISA) are best searched for via their well-understood inspiral waves; higher mass BBHs must be searched for via their poorly understood merger waves and/or their well-understood ringdown waves. A matched filtering search for massive BBHs based on ringdown waves should be capable of finding BBHs in the mass range of about 100Msolar-700Msolar out to ~200 Mpc for initial LIGO interferometers, and in the mass range of ~200Msolar to ~3000Msolar out to about z=1 for advanced interferometers. The required number of templates is of the order of 6000 or less. Searches based on merger waves could increase the number of detected massive BBHs by a factor of the order of 10 over those found from inspiral and ringdown waves, without detailed knowledge of the waveform shapes, using a noise monitoring search algorithm which we describe. A full set of merger templates from numerical relativity simulations could further increase the number of detected BBHs by an additional factor of up to ~4.

  8. Molecular change signal-to-noise criteria for interpreting experiments involving exposure of biological systems to weakly interacting electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Timothy E; Weaver, James C

    2005-05-01

    We describe an approach to aiding the design and interpretation of experiments involving biological effects of weakly interacting electromagnetic fields that range from steady (dc) to microwave frequencies. We propose that if known biophysical mechanisms cannot account for an inferred, underlying molecular change signal-to-noise ratio, (S/N)gen, of a observed result, then there are two interpretation choices: (1) there is an unknown biophysical mechanism with stronger coupling between the field exposure and the ongoing biochemical process, or (2) the experiment is responding to something other than the field exposure. Our approach is based on classical detection theory, the recognition that weakly interacting fields cannot break chemical bonds, and the consequence that such fields can only alter rates of ongoing, metabolically driven biochemical reactions, and transport processes. The approach includes both fundamental chemical noise (molecular shot noise) and other sources of competing chemical change, to be compared quantitatively to the field induced change for the basic case that the field alters a single step in a biochemical network. Consistent with pharmacology and toxicology, we estimate the molecular dose (mass associated with field induced molecular change per mass tissue) resulting from illustrative low frequency field exposures for the biophysical mechanism of voltage gated channels. For perspective, we then consider electric field-mediated delivery of small molecules across human skin and into individual cells. Specifically, we consider the examples of iontophoretic and electroporative delivery of fentanyl through skin and electroporative delivery of bleomycin into individual cells. The total delivered amount corresponds to a molecular change signal and the delivery variability corresponds to generalized chemical noise. Viewed broadly, biological effects due to nonionizing fields may include animal navigation, medical applications, and environmental

  9. An algorithm for the estimation of the signal-to-noise ratio in surface myoelectric signals generated during cyclic movements.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Valentina; Knaflitz, Marco

    2012-01-01

    In many applications requiring the study of the surface myoelectric signal (SMES) acquired in dynamic conditions, it is essential to have a quantitative evaluation of the quality of the collected signals. When the activation pattern of a muscle has to be obtained by means of single- or double-threshold statistical detectors, the background noise level e (noise) of the signal is a necessary input parameter. Moreover, the detection strategy of double-threshold detectors may be properly tuned when the SNR and the duty cycle (DC) of the signal are known. The aim of this paper is to present an algorithm for the estimation of e (noise), SNR, and DC of an SMES collected during cyclic movements. The algorithm is validated on synthetic signals with statistical properties similar to those of SMES, as well as on more than 100 real signals.

  10. Systematic analysis of signal-to-noise ratio in bipartite ghost imaging with classical and quantum light

    SciTech Connect

    Brida, G.; Fornaro, G. A.; Genovese, M.; Berchera, I. Ruo; Chekhova, M. V.; Lopaeva, E. D.

    2011-06-15

    We present a complete and exhaustive theory of signal-to-noiseratio in bipartite ghost imaging with classical (thermal) and quantum (twin beams) light. The theory is compared with experiment for both twin beams and thermal light in a certain regime of interest.

  11. An NMR Spectrometer-Computer Interface Experiment: Demonstrating How Signal Averaging Influences Signal-to-Noise Ratios.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henner, M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Presents an nmr spectrometer-computer interface experiment in digital acquisition of spectroscopic data, which is intended for students nearing the end of a master's degree in physical chemistry. (HM)

  12. Real-time in Situ Signal-to-noise Ratio Estimation for the Assessment of Operational Communications Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here formulates the rigorous statistical basis for the correct estimation of communication link SNR of a BPSK, QPSK, and for that matter, any M-ary phase-modulated digital signal from what is known about its statistical behavior at the output of the receiver demodulator. Many methods to accomplish this have been proposed and implemented in the past but all of them are based on tacit and unwarranted assumptions and are thus defective. However, the basic idea is well founded, i.e., the signal at the output of a communications demodulator has convolved within it the prevailing SNR characteristic of the link. The acquisition of the SNR characteristic is of the utmost importance to a communications system that must remain reliable in adverse propagation conditions. This work provides a correct and consistent mathematical basis for the proper statistical 'deconvolution' of the output of a demodulator to yield a measure of the SNR. The use of such techniques will alleviate the need and expense for a separate propagation link to assess the propagation conditions prevailing on the communications link. Furthermore, they are applicable for every situation involving the digital transmission of data over planetary and space communications links.

  13. Data reduction, radial velocities and stellar parameters from spectra in the very low signal-to-noise domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malavolta, Luca

    2013-10-01

    Large astronomical facilities usually provide data reduction pipeline designed to deliver ready-to-use scientific data, and too often as- tronomers are relying on this to avoid the most difficult part of an astronomer job Standard data reduction pipelines however are usu- ally designed and tested to have good performance on data with av- erage Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) data, and the issues that are related with the reduction of data in the very low SNR domain are not taken int account properly. As a result, informations in data with low SNR are not optimally exploited. During the last decade our group has collected thousands of spec- tra using the GIRAFFE spectrograph at Very Large Telescope (Chile) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) to determine the ge- ometrical distance and dynamical state of several Galactic Globular Clusters but ultimately the analysis has been hampered by system- atics in data reduction, calibration and radial velocity measurements. Moreover these data has never been exploited to get other informa- tions like temperature and metallicity of stars, because considered too noisy for these kind of analyses. In this thesis we focus our attention on data reduction and analysis of spectra with very low SNR. The dataset we analyze in this thesis comprises 7250 spectra for 2771 stars of the Globular Cluster M 4 (NGC 6121) in the wavelength region 5145-5360Å obtained with GIRAFFE. Stars from the upper Red Giant Branch down to the Main Sequence have been observed in very different conditions, including nights close to full moon, and reaching SNR - 10 for many spectra in the dataset. We will first review the basic steps of data reduction and spec- tral extraction, adapting techniques well tested in other field (like photometry) but still under-developed in spectroscopy. We improve the wavelength dispersion solution and the correction of radial veloc- ity shift between day-time calibrations and science observations by following a completely

  14. Training sensory signal-to-noise resolution in children with ADHD in a global mental health setting

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, J; Sagar, R; Joseph, A A; Gazzaley, A; Merzenich, M M

    2016-01-01

    Children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impaired focus on goal-relevant signals and fail to suppress goal-irrelevant distractions. To address both these issues, we developed a novel neuroplasticity-based training program that adaptively trains the resolution of challenging sensory signals and the suppression of progressively more challenging distractions. We evaluated this sensory signal-to-noise resolution training in a small sample, global mental health study in Indian children with ADHD. The children trained for 30 h over 6 months in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Training completers showed steady and significant improvements in ADHD-associated behaviors from baseline to post training relative to controls, and benefits sustained in a 6-month follow-up. Post-training cognitive assessments showed significant positive results for response inhibition and Stroop interference tests in training completers vs controls, while measures of sustained attention and short-term memory showed nonsignificant improvement trends. Further, training-driven improvements in distractor suppression correlated with the improved ADHD symptoms. This initial study suggests utility of signal-to-noise resolution training for children with ADHD; it emphasizes the need for further research on this intervention and substantially informs the design of a larger trial. PMID:27070409

  15. Seeing the Forest Through the Trees: Investigating Signal to Noise Problems in Regional Atmospheric Inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, A. E.; Denning, A. S.; Corbin, K. D.; Uliasz, M.; Zupanski, D.; Parazoo, N. C.

    2007-12-01

    Estimation of regional carbon fluxes from sparse atmospheric data by transport inversion is complicated by high- frequency variations in surface fluxes in both space and time. We assume that a forward coupled model of the vegetated land surface and atmosphere adequately captures most of the high-frequency variations (SiB-RAMS) as a `preprocessor` of input data from remote sensing and large-scale weather. We then use continuous CO2 observations and backward-in-time Lagrangian particle modeling to estimate persistent multiplicative biases in photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration, constraining the temporal pattern of these fluxes with the forward model. With a sparse network of continuous observing sites in North America, the inverse problem is still badly underconstrained for flux biases on the model grid scale. Previous studies have reduced the dimensionality of this problem by using large `regions` such as biomes or ecoregions, or by seeking a smooth solution in space. This could introduce substantial bias in the solution because the actual flux biases are likely to be quite heterogeneous. We have evaluated the degree to which carbon flux over large regions (500 to 1500 km) can be recovered when the true spatial pattern is not smooth. We performed ensembles of inversions for a 4-month case study in May- August, 2004 over North America with synthetic mid-day CO2 observations from a network of 8 towers. A smooth regional field of model biases was superposed with ensembles of various degrees of grid-scale `noise,` and these were then used to create synthetic concentration data. The pseudodata were then inverted to estimate gridded values of the biases, which were then combined with time-varying model fluxes to create regional maps of sources and sinks. We found that the degree to which corrections in regional fluxes are possible will depend on the relative amount of variance in the regional vs grid scales, but that the system is quite successful in estimating

  16. Quantitative Raman Spectroscopy when the Signal-to-Noise is Below the Limit of Quantitation due to Fluorescence Interference: Advantages of a Moving Window Sequentially Shifted Excitation Approach.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sarah; Cooper, John B

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a useful analytical tool. However, its application is often limited because shot noise from fluorescence obscures the Raman signal. In such cases, quantitative analysis is not possible when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) drops below two. A method is described for performing quantitative Raman spectroscopy that not only removes fluorescence backgrounds, but also results in a significant improvement in the SNR. The Raman data is extracted using a moving window sequentially shifted excitation algorithm. To demonstrate the capabilities of the method, a binary mixture of two analytes at varying concentrations is quantified in the presence of a highly fluorescent dye. Linear calibration plots were constructed and validated for the binary model using individual Raman peaks with SNR ranging from 0.073-12.6; r(2) values are greater than 0.96 in all cases, with all but the weakest peaks yielding values greater than 0.997. The presented method demonstrates a universal and autonomous approach for the quantitative analysis of highly fluorescent samples via Raman spectroscopy. The lower limit on the SNR ratio for quantitative Raman analysis with the described method is 0.1. In order to assess the effectiveness of the presented method, the entire set of experiments was also processed using the more common shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) approach. The advantages of the proposed method over SERDS are demonstrated for both the detection limit and the SNR of the processed spectra. PMID:27613308

  17. Technical note: signal-to-noise performance evaluation of a new 12-bit digitizer on time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hondo, Toshinobu; Kawai, Yousuke; Toyoda, Michisato

    2015-01-01

    Rapid acquisition of time-of-flight (TOF) spectra from fewer acquisitions on average was investigated using the newly introduced 12-bit digitizer, Keysight model U5303A. This is expected to achieve a spectrum acquisition 32 times faster than the commonly used 8-bit digitizer for an equal signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. Averaging fewer pulses improves the detection speed and chromatographic separation performance. However, increasing the analog-to-digital converter bit resolution for a high-frequency signal, such as a TOF spectrum, increases the system noise and requires the timing jitter (aperture error) to be minimized. We studied the relationship between the S/N ratio and the average number of acquisitions using U5303A and compared this with an 8-bit digitizer. The results show that the noise, measured as root-mean-square, decreases linearly to the square root of the average number of acquisitions without background subtraction, which means that almost no systematic noise existed in our signal bandwidth of interest (a few hundreds megahertz). In comparison, 8-bit digitizers that are commonly used in the market require 32 times more pulses with background subtraction.

  18. Signal-to-noise velocity peaks difference: a new method for evaluating the handwriting movement fluency in children with dysgraphia.

    PubMed

    Danna, Jérémy; Paz-Villagrán, Vietminh; Velay, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated handwriting movement dysfluency related to dysgraphia. A new variable, the Signal-to-Noise velocity peaks difference (SNvpd), was proposed to describe abnormal velocity fluctuations in cursive handwriting. This variable was compared to two variables most frequently used variables for assessing handwriting fluency. This comparison was carried out for three different groups, children with dysgraphia, proficient children, and adults, all of whom wrote the same single word. The adults were taken as the reference. Results revealed that, of the three variables studied, the SNvpd proved most efficient in discriminating children with dysgraphia, and that furthermore, it had the significant advantage of facilitating the localization of dysfluency peaks within a word. Our results also showed that the movement dysfluency of children with dysgraphia was specific to certain letters. In light of these results, we discuss the methodological and theoretical relevance of this new variable to the analysis of handwriting movement with the aim of characterizing dysgraphia.

  19. Determination of in-flight AVIRIS spectral, radiometric, spatial and signal-to-noise characteristics using atmospheric and surface measurements from the vicinity of the rare-earth-bearing carbonatite at Mountain Pass, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Vane, Gregg; Conel, James E.

    1988-01-01

    An assessment of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) performance was made for a flight over Mountain Pass, California, July 30, 1987. The flight data were reduced to reflectance using an empirical algorithm which compensates for solar, atmospheric and instrument factors. AVIRIS data in conjunction with surface and atmospheric measurements acquired concurrently were used to develop an improved spectral calibration. An accurate in-flight radiometric calibration was also performed using the LOWTRAN 7 radiative transfer code together with measured surface reflectance and atmospheric optical depths. A direct comparison with coincident Thematic Mapper imagery of Mountain Pass was used to demonstrate the high spatial resolution and good geometric performance of AVIRIS. The in-flight instrument noise was independently determined with two methods which showed good agreement. A signal-to-noise ratio was calculated using data from a uniform playa. This ratio was scaled to the AVIRIS reference radiance model, which provided a basis for comparison with laboratory and other in-flight signal-to-noise determinations.

  20. Signal-to-noise analysis for propagation of laser radiation through a tissue-like medium by diffuse photon-density waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netz, U. J.; Hielscher, A. H.; Scheel, A. K.; Beuthan, J.

    2007-04-01

    Biomedical optical imaging in the near-infrared (NIR) region provides the possibility to detect and determine pathological and functional changes in human tissue without the drawback of ionizing radiation. Of special promise is the application of this technology for the detection of joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). It has been shown that optical changes in the synovial fluid and the vasculature surrounding the joints can be detected with optical methods. Applying optical tomographic methods one should be able to localize and quantify these changes for detection of the onset of RA. The first studies have been limited to continuous wave imaging. However, it is well known that enhanced resolution and better separation between absorption and scattering properties of tissue can be achieved using intensity modulated light sources. Intensity modulation of laser light in the MHz region leads to propagation of so-called diffuse photon density waves (PDW) through the tissue In this study we report on basic experimental results to determine performance and sensitivity of PDW-transillumination of tissue like phantoms. We used a vector network analyzer to generate and analyze intensity modulation from 100 MHz up to 1 GHz via a diode laser and an avalanche photo diode. Scans were performed across phantoms containing a layer with different absorbing and scattering properties bounded by an edge. The thickness of the phantoms was chosen similar to human fingers to gain information for optimization of tomographic imaging of finger joints. We experimentally determined the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the system and compared the results to theoretical predictions. Noise and SNR of amplitude and phase depend on frequency of modulation. While the amplitude SNR decreases with frequency, phase SNR increases to assume a maximum value. We found that the inserted layer can be better characterized using phase information, which becomes more valuable as the source

  1. High Signal-to-Noise Echelle Spectroscopy of Quasar Absorption-Line Systems in the Direction of HS 1946+7658

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripp, Todd M.; Lu, Limin; Savage, Blair D.

    1996-02-01

    We have obtained a high signal-to-noise (40 <= S/N <= 80) high- resolution (FWHM = 20 km s^-1^) spectrum of the radio-quiet QSO HS 1946+7658 (z_em_ = 3.051) with the echelle spectrograph on the KPNO 4 m telescope. We detect 11 metal systems in the direction of this QSO, including two Mg II systems, five C IV systems, two damped Lyα systems, and two associated systems. We use the apparent column density technique and profile fitting to measure the heavy element column densities and to assess the effects of absorption-line saturation. Profile fitting indicates that three of the C IV systems are narrow with b < 8 km s^-1^. This implies that T < 50,000 K, and therefore these systems are probably photoionized. The abundance patterns in the damped Lyα systems are strikingly similar to those observed in low- metallicity Milky Way stars and suggest that these absorption lines are due to galaxies in early stages of chemical enrichment (see Lu et al.). The prominent associated system at z_abs_ = 3.0496,3.0504 is detected in H I, C II, CIV, SiII, Si III, Si IV, A1 II, Al III, and N V. The high ion column density ratios in this associated system imply that the gas is more highly ionized than the Galactic halo. The high degree of ionization is not surprising given the extraordinary luminosity of the QSO (Hagen et al.). To study ionization and abundances in this associated system, we compare the observed column densities to a series of CLOUDY models in which photoionization by the QSO is the dominant ionization mechanism. For the input radiation field, we have used the various spectral energy distributions of HS 1946+7658 observed by Kuhn et al. The model that best fits the observed column densities of singly and doubly ionized species has solar relative and absolute abundances, but models with absolute metallicities a few times greater than solar fit comparably well. None of the models produce enough Si IV and C IV, but the QSO flux near the ionization potentials of these

  2. Kea: A New Tool to Obtain Stellar Parameters from Low to Moderate Signal-to-noise and High-resolution Echelle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe Kea a new spectroscopic fitting method to derive stellar parameters from moderate to low signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. We developed this new tool to analyze the massive data set of the Kepler mission reconnaissance spectra that we have obtained at McDonald Observatory. We use Kea to determine effective temperatures (T eff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), surface gravity (log g), and projected rotational velocity (v{sin}i). Kea compares the observations to a large library of synthetic spectra that covers a wide range of different T eff, [Fe/H], and log g values. We calibrated Kea on observations of well-characterized standard stars (the Kepler field “platinum” sample) that range in T eff from 5000 to 6500 K, in [Fe/H] from -0.5 to +0.4 dex, and in log g from 3.2 to 4.6 dex. We then compared the Kea results from reconnaissance spectra of 45 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) to stellar parameters derived from higher signal-to-noise spectra obtained with Keck/HIRES. We find typical uncertainties of 100 K in T eff, 0.12 dex in [Fe/H], and 0.18 dex in log g. Named after Nestor notabilis an alpine parrot native to New Zealand.

  3. Improving Signal to Noise in Labeled Biological Specimens using Energy-Filtered TEM of sections with a Drift Correction Strategy and a Direct Detection Device

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Bouwer, James C.; Mackey, Mason R.; Bushong, Eric; Peltier, Steven T.; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy techniques are regularly used to build elemental maps of spatially distributed nanoparticles in materials and biological specimens. When working with thick biological sections, EELS techniques involving core-loss electrons often require exposures exceeding several minutes to provide sufficient signal to noise. Image quality with these long exposures is often compromised by specimen drift, which results in blurring and reduced resolution. To mitigate drift artifacts, a series of short exposure images can be acquired, aligned, and merged to form a single image. For samples where the target elements have extremely low signal yields, the use of CCD based detectors for this purpose can be problematic. At short acquisition times, the images produced by CCDs can be noisy and may contain fixed pattern artifacts that impact subsequent correlative alignment. Here we report on the use of direct electron detection devices (DDD’s) to increase the signal to noise as compared to CCD’s. A 3x improvement in signal is reported with a DDD vs. a comparably formatted CCD, with equivalent dose on each detector. With the fast rolling-readout design of the DDD, the duty cycle provides a major benefit, as there is no dead time between successive frames. PMID:24641915

  4. Improving signal to noise in labeled biological specimens using energy-filtered TEM of sections with a drift correction strategy and a direct detection device.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Ranjan; Bouwer, James C; Mackey, Mason R; Bushong, Eric; Peltier, Steven T; Xuong, Nguyen-Huu; Ellisman, Mark H

    2014-06-01

    Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy techniques are regularly used to build elemental maps of spatially distributed nanoparticles in materials and biological specimens. When working with thick biological sections, electron energy loss spectroscopy techniques involving core-loss electrons often require exposures exceeding several minutes to provide sufficient signal to noise. Image quality with these long exposures is often compromised by specimen drift, which results in blurring and reduced resolution. To mitigate drift artifacts, a series of short exposure images can be acquired, aligned, and merged to form a single image. For samples where the target elements have extremely low signal yields, the use of charge coupled device (CCD)-based detectors for this purpose can be problematic. At short acquisition times, the images produced by CCDs can be noisy and may contain fixed pattern artifacts that impact subsequent correlative alignment. Here we report on the use of direct electron detection devices (DDD's) to increase the signal to noise as compared with CCD's. A 3× improvement in signal is reported with a DDD versus a comparably formatted CCD, with equivalent dose on each detector. With the fast rolling-readout design of the DDD, the duty cycle provides a major benefit, as there is no dead time between successive frames. PMID:24641915

  5. Kea: A New Tool to Obtain Stellar Parameters from Low to Moderate Signal-to-noise and High-resolution Echelle Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we describe Kea a new spectroscopic fitting method to derive stellar parameters from moderate to low signal-to-noise, high-resolution spectra. We developed this new tool to analyze the massive data set of the Kepler mission reconnaissance spectra that we have obtained at McDonald Observatory. We use Kea to determine effective temperatures (T eff), metallicity ([Fe/H]), surface gravity (log g), and projected rotational velocity (v{sin}i). Kea compares the observations to a large library of synthetic spectra that covers a wide range of different T eff, [Fe/H], and log g values. We calibrated Kea on observations of well-characterized standard stars (the Kepler field “platinum” sample) that range in T eff from 5000 to 6500 K, in [Fe/H] from ‑0.5 to +0.4 dex, and in log g from 3.2 to 4.6 dex. We then compared the Kea results from reconnaissance spectra of 45 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) to stellar parameters derived from higher signal-to-noise spectra obtained with Keck/HIRES. We find typical uncertainties of 100 K in T eff, 0.12 dex in [Fe/H], and 0.18 dex in log g. Named after Nestor notabilis an alpine parrot native to New Zealand.

  6. Signal-to-noise ratio evaluation with draw tower fibre Bragg gratings (DTGs) for dynamic strain sensing at elevated temperatures and corrosive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pauw, B.; Lamberti, A.; Vanlanduit, S.; Van Tichelen, K.; Geernaert, T.; Berghmans, F.

    2014-05-01

    Measuring strain at the surface of a structure can help to estimate the dynamical properties of the structure under test. Such a structure can be a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor consisting of fuel pins. In this paper we demonstrate a method to integrate draw tower gratings (DTGs) in a fuel pin and we subject this pin to conditions close to those encountered in a heavy liquid metal (HLM) reactor. More specifically, we report on the performance of DTGs used as a strain sensor when immersed in HLM during thermal cycles (up to 300_C) for up to 700 hours.

  7. Attenuation of mirror image and enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio in a Talbot bands optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Bradu, Adrian; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2011-07-01

    A Fourier domain optical coherence tomography setup is presented built around an optical configuration that exhibits Talbot bands. A low astigmatism spectrometer is used, employing a spherical mirror and a cylindrical lens between a diffraction grating and a linear CCD camera. To produce Talbot bands, the two interferometer beams--object and reference--are laterally shifted in respect to each other in their way toward the diffraction grating. This allows attenuation of mirror terms and optimization of the sensitivity profile. We evaluate the optimization of the sensitivity profile with depth, in respect to its overall strength and its position peak, which can be shifted toward a larger optical path difference in the interferometer. We demonstrate the efficiency of such a configuration at large depths by imaging a thick phantom and human skin in vivo for different values of the lateral distance between the two beams. PMID:21806271

  8. Adaptive beamforming at very low frequencies in spatially coherent, cluttered noise environments with low signal-to-noise ratio and finite-averaging times

    PubMed

    Nuttall; Wilson

    2000-11-01

    Realistic simulations with spatially coherent noise have been run in order to compare the performance of adaptive beamforming (ABF), inverse beamforming (IBF), and conventional beamforming (CBF) for the case of finite-averaging times, where the actual spatial coherence of the acoustic field, or covariance matrix, is not known a priori, but must be estimated. These estimation errors cause large errors in the ABF estimate of the directionality of the acoustic field, partly because ABF is a highly nonlinear algorithm. In addition, it is shown that ABF is fundamentally limited in its suppression capability at very low frequency (VLF), based on the sidelobe level of the conventional beampattern in the direction of the noise interferer [G. L. Mohnkern, "Effects of Errors and Limitations on Interference Suppression," NOSC Technical Document 1478, Naval Ocean Systems Center (1989)]. The simulations include a low-level plane wave signal of interest, a stronger noise plane wave interferer, and spatially random background noise. Both IBF and ABF performed significantly better than CBF, and IBF's performance was slightly better than ABF's performance. The performances of IBF and the ABF algorithm, the minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) [A. H. Nuttall and D. W. Hyde, "Unified Approach to Optimum and Suboptimum Processing for Arrays," USL Report Number 992, Naval Underwater Systems Center, New London, CT (22 April 1969)] were recently compared independently [J. S. D. Solomon, A. J. Knight, and M. V. Greening, "Sonar Array Signal Processing for Sparse Linear Arrays," Defense Science and Technology Organization (DSTO) Technical Report (June 1999)] using measured data, with the result that IBF outperformed MVDR. This result is significant because MVDR requires orders of magnitude more processing power than IBF or CBF.

  9. [Evaluation of the signal-to-noise ratio--"Kullback information"--in the spectrum of cardiointervals in arterial hypertension patients depending on cosmophysical factors].

    PubMed

    Agulova, L P; Sarychev, V T; Koniaeva, E B; Tsyplukhin, K A

    1998-01-01

    It was shown that Kullback information (In) that is registered in a cardiogram, for example, during the arterial hypertension crisis can be used in medicinal diagnostics. Periods of In fluctuations from 2 to 12 days were revealed; some factors that influence In are shown to have a cosmophysical nature. PMID:9783074

  10. Nonlinear Shallow-Water Tides Observed with Excellent Signal-to-Noise Ratio by Two Geodetic Laser Strainmeters at the Canfranc (Spain) Underground Laboratory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescentini, L.; Amoruso, A.

    2014-12-01

    Comparisons between observed Earth strain tides and model predicted ocean tidal loading can give an independent mean to validate the ocean models and finally the whole modelling process. In particular, the accurate representation of non-linear tides, such as quater-diurnal and higher-frequency components, and of their loading effects is a challenging task to be accomplished in the next years. The Canfranc underground laboratory (LSC), excavated in the rock under the Central Pyrenees (Spain), is mainly devoted to the study of phenomena which needs "cosmic silence", as the detection of cosmic neutrinos or "dark matter" particles, but, as the site is located in one of the most active seismic areas in Western Europe, it also hosts a geodynamic facility capable to record the whole geodynamic spectrum, from near-field seismicity to tectonic deformation, including Earth tides.Using two near-orthogonally-oriented 70-m-long high-resolution laser strainmeters installed at LSC, we have obtained continuous precision measurements of local strain in terms of dL/L, where L is the interferometer length and dL its change over time. The laser strainmeters are operational since early 2012.Spectra show clear tidal peaks whose frequencies range from the diurnal band to at least 8 cicles per day (cpd). Tidal peaks at frequencies higher than 2 cpd are ascribable to ocean loading of non-linear constituents, mainly from the Bay of Biscay. Strain amplitudes of observed non-linear tides range from few 10^-12 (e. g. 3*M2+K2) to 4x10^-10 (M4).We will show comparisons between observations and predicted strain tides, computed using ocean-tide loading programs included in the SPOTL package (Agnew, 2013) and two ocean tidal models, namely TPXO8-atlas (enriched with the European Shelf 2008 regional solution) and FES2012.In particular, M4, MS4, and MN4 will be compared with predictions by both ocean tidal models, while MKS2 (semidiurnal band), N4, and M6 will be compared with predictions by FES2012 only.

  11. An Iterative Information-Reduced Quadriphase-Shift-Keyed Carrier Synchronization Scheme Using Decision Feedback for Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M.; Tkacenko, A.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous publication [1], an iterative closed-loop carrier synchronization scheme for binary phase-shift keyed (BPSK) modulation was proposed that was based on feeding back data decisions to the input of the loop, the purpose being to remove the modulation prior to carrier synchronization as opposed to the more conventional decision-feedback schemes that incorporate such feedback inside the loop. The idea there was that, with sufficient independence between the received data and the decisions on it that are fed back (as would occur in an error-correction coding environment with sufficient decoding delay), a pure tone in the presence of noise would ultimately be produced (after sufficient iteration and low enough error probability) and thus could be tracked without any squaring loss. This article demonstrates that, with some modification, the same idea of iterative information reduction through decision feedback can be applied to quadrature phase-shift keyed (QPSK) modulation, something that was mentioned in the previous publication but never pursued.

  12. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods

    PubMed Central

    Kissick, David J.; Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges. PMID:24817799

  13. On signals faint and sparse: The ACICA algorithm for blind de-trending of exoplanetary transits with low signal-to-noise

    SciTech Connect

    Waldmann, I. P.

    2014-01-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) has recently been shown to be a promising new path in data analysis and de-trending of exoplanetary time series signals. Such approaches do not require or assume any prior or auxiliary knowledge about the data or instrument in order to de-convolve the astrophysical light curve signal from instrument or stellar systematic noise. These methods are often known as 'blind-source separation' (BSS) algorithms. Unfortunately, all BSS methods suffer from an amplitude and sign ambiguity of their de-convolved components, which severely limits these methods in low signal-to-noise (S/N) observations where their scalings cannot be determined otherwise. Here we present a novel approach to calibrate ICA using sparse wavelet calibrators. The Amplitude Calibrated Independent Component Analysis (ACICA) allows for the direct retrieval of the independent components' scalings and the robust de-trending of low S/N data. Such an approach gives us an unique and unprecedented insight in the underlying morphology of a data set, which makes this method a powerful tool for exoplanetary data de-trending and signal diagnostics.

  14. Standardised mortality ratio based on the sum of age and percentage total body surface area burned is an adequate quality indicator in burn care: An exploratory review.

    PubMed

    Steinvall, Ingrid; Elmasry, Moustafa; Fredrikson, Mats; Sjoberg, Folke

    2016-02-01

    Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) based on generic mortality predicting models is an established quality indicator in critical care. Burn-specific mortality models are preferred for the comparison among patients with burns as their predictive value is better. The aim was to assess whether the sum of age (years) and percentage total body surface area burned (which constitutes the Baux score) is acceptable in comparison to other more complex models, and to find out if data collected from a separate burn centre are sufficient for SMR based quality assessment. The predictive value of nine burn-specific models was tested by comparing values from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a non-inferiority analysis using 1% as the limit (delta). SMR was analysed by comparing data from seven reference sources, including the North American National Burn Repository (NBR), with the observed mortality (years 1993-2012, n=1613, 80 deaths). The AUC values ranged between 0.934 and 0.976. The AUC 0.970 (95% CI 0.96-0.98) for the Baux score was non-inferior to the other models. SMR was 0.52 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for the most recent five-year period compared with NBR based data. The analysis suggests that SMR based on the Baux score is eligible as an indicator of quality for setting standards of mortality in burn care. More advanced modelling only marginally improves the predictive value. The SMR can detect mortality differences in data from a single centre. PMID:26700877

  15. Spectral identification of minerals using imaging spectrometry data: Evaluating the effects of signal to noise and spectral resolution using the tricorder algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swayze, Gregg A.; Clark, Roger N.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid development of sophisticated imaging spectrometers and resulting flood of imaging spectrometry data has prompted a rapid parallel development of spectral-information extraction technology. Even though these extraction techniques have evolved along different lines (band-shape fitting, endmember unmixing, near-infrared analysis, neural-network fitting, and expert systems to name a few), all are limited by the spectrometer's signal to noise (S/N) and spectral resolution in producing useful information. This study grew from a need to quantitatively determine what effects these parameters have on our ability to differentiate between mineral absorption features using a band-shape fitting algorithm. We chose to evaluate the AVIRIS, HYDICE, MIVIS, GERIS, VIMS, NIMS, and ASTER instruments because they collect data over wide S/N and spectral-resolution ranges. The study evaluates the performance of the Tricorder algorithm, in differentiating between mineral spectra in the 0.4-2.5 micrometer spectral region. The strength of the Tricorder algorithm is in its ability to produce an easily understood comparison of band shape that can concentrate on small relevant portions of the spectra, giving it an advantage over most unmixing schemes, and in that it need not spend large amounts of time reoptimizing each time a new mineral component is added to its reference library, as is the case with neural-network schemes. We believe the flexibility of the Tricorder algorithm is unparalleled among spectral-extraction techniques and that the results from this study, although dealing with minerals, will have direct applications to spectral identification in other disciplines.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF THE RADIUS OF NEUTRON STARS WITH HIGH SIGNAL-TO-NOISE QUIESCENT LOW-MASS X-RAY BINARIES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Guillot, Sebastien; Rutledge, Robert E.; Servillat, Mathieu; Webb, Natalie A. E-mail: rutledge@physics.mcgill.ca

    2013-07-20

    This paper presents the measurement of the neutron star (NS) radius using the thermal spectra from quiescent low-mass X-ray binaries (qLMXBs) inside globular clusters (GCs). Recent observations of NSs have presented evidence that cold ultra dense matter-present in the core of NSs-is best described by ''normal matter'' equations of state (EoSs). Such EoSs predict that the radii of NSs, R{sub NS}, are quasi-constant (within measurement errors, of {approx}10%) for astrophysically relevant masses (M{sub NS}>0.5 M{sub Sun }). The present work adopts this theoretical prediction as an assumption, and uses it to constrain a single R{sub NS} value from five qLMXB targets with available high signal-to-noise X-ray spectroscopic data. Employing a Markov chain Monte-Carlo approach, we produce the marginalized posterior distribution for R{sub NS}, constrained to be the same value for all five NSs in the sample. An effort was made to include all quantifiable sources of uncertainty into the uncertainty of the quoted radius measurement. These include the uncertainties in the distances to the GCs, the uncertainties due to the Galactic absorption in the direction of the GCs, and the possibility of a hard power-law spectral component for count excesses at high photon energy, which are observed in some qLMXBs in the Galactic plane. Using conservative assumptions, we found that the radius, common to the five qLMXBs and constant for a wide range of masses, lies in the low range of possible NS radii, R{sub NS}=9.1{sup +1.3}{sub -1.5} km (90%-confidence). Such a value is consistent with low-R{sub NS} equations of state. We compare this result with previous radius measurements of NSs from various analyses of different types of systems. In addition, we compare the spectral analyses of individual qLMXBs to previous works.

  17. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  18. Funding the Formula Adequately in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This report is a longevity, simulational study that looks at how the ratio of state support to local support effects the number of school districts that breaks the common school's funding formula which in turns effects the equity of distribution to the common schools. After nearly two decades of adequately supporting the funding formula, Oklahoma…

  19. Broadband inversion of 1J(CC) responses in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra.

    PubMed

    Reibarkh, Mikhail; Williamson, R Thomas; Martin, Gary E; Bermel, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Establishing the carbon skeleton of a molecule greatly facilitates the process of structure elucidation, both manual and computer-assisted. Recent advances in the family of ADEQUATE experiments demonstrated their potential in this regard. 1,1-ADEQUATE, which provides direct (13)C-(13)C correlation via (1)J(CC), and 1,n-ADEQUATE, which typically yields (3)J(CC) and (1)J(CC) correlations, are more sensitive and more widely applicable experiments than INADEQUATE and PANACEA. A recently reported modified pulse sequence that semi-selectively inverts (1)J(CC) correlations in 1,n-ADEQUATE spectra provided a significant improvement, allowing (1)J(CC) and (n)J(CC) correlations to be discerned in the same spectrum. However, the reported experiment requires a careful matching of the amplitude transfer function with (1)J(CC) coupling constants in order to achieve the inversion, and even then some (1)J(CC) correlations could still have positive intensity due to the oscillatory nature of the transfer function. Both shortcomings limit the practicality of the method. We now report a new, dual-optimized inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment, which provides more uniform inversion of (1)J(CC) correlations across the range of 29-82 Hz. Unlike the original method, the dual optimization experiment does not require fine-tuning for the molecule's (1)J(CC) coupling constant values. Even more usefully, the dual-optimized version provides up to two-fold improvement in signal-to-noise for some long-range correlations. Using modern, cryogenically-cooled probes, the experiment can be successfully applied to samples of ~1 mg under favorable circumstances. The improvements afforded by dual optimization inverted (1)J(CC) 1,n-ADEQUATE experiment make it a useful and practical tool for NMR structure elucidation and should facilitate the implementation and utilization of the experiment.

  20. 34 CFR 85.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate evidence. 85.900 Section 85.900 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient to support...

  1. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  2. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  3. 12 CFR 380.52 - Adequate protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate protection. 380.52 Section 380.52... ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AUTHORITY Receivership Administrative Claims Process § 380.52 Adequate protection. (a... interest of a claimant, the receiver shall provide adequate protection by any of the following means:...

  4. 21 CFR 1404.900 - Adequate evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adequate evidence. 1404.900 Section 1404.900 Food and Drugs OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 1404.900 Adequate evidence. Adequate evidence means information sufficient...

  5. Signal-to-noise limitations in white light holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribak, Erez; Breckinridge, James B.; Roddier, Claude; Roddier, Francois

    1988-01-01

    A simple derivation is given for the SNR in images reconstructed from incoherent holograms. Dependence is shown to be on the hologram SNR, object complexity, and the number of pixels in the detector. Reconstruction of involved objects becomes possible with high-dynamic-range detectors such as CCDs. White-light holograms have been produced by means of a rotational shear interferometer combined with a chromatic corrector. A digital inverse transform recreated the object.

  6. Asbestos/NESHAP adequately wet guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Shafer, R.; Throwe, S.; Salgado, O.; Garlow, C.; Hoerath, E.

    1990-12-01

    The Asbestos NESHAP requires facility owners and/or operators involved in demolition and renovation activities to control emissions of particulate asbestos to the outside air because no safe concentration of airborne asbestos has ever been established. The primary method used to control asbestos emissions is to adequately wet the Asbestos Containing Material (ACM) with a wetting agent prior to, during and after demolition/renovation activities. The purpose of the document is to provide guidance to asbestos inspectors and the regulated community on how to determine if friable ACM is adequately wet as required by the Asbestos NESHAP.

  7. Supervision of Student Teachers: How Adequate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Ken

    This study attempted to ascertain how adequately student teachers are supervised by college supervisors and supervising teachers. Questions to be answered were as follows: a) How do student teachers rate the adequacy of supervision given them by college supervisors and supervising teachers? and b) Are there significant differences between ratings…

  8. Small Rural Schools CAN Have Adequate Curriculums.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loustaunau, Martha

    The small rural school's foremost and largest problem is providing an adequate curriculum for students in a changing world. Often the small district cannot or is not willing to pay the per-pupil cost of curriculum specialists, specialized courses using expensive equipment no more than one period a day, and remodeled rooms to accommodate new…

  9. Toward More Adequate Quantitative Instructional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanSickle, Ronald L.

    1986-01-01

    Sets an agenda for improving instructional research conducted with classical quantitative experimental or quasi-experimental methodology. Includes guidelines regarding the role of a social perspective, adequate conceptual and operational definition, quality instrumentation, control of threats to internal and external validity, and the use of…

  10. An Adequate Education Defined. Fastback 476.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, M. Donald; Davis, E. E. (Gene)

    Court decisions historically have dealt with educational equity; now they are helping to establish "adequacy" as a standard in education. Legislatures, however, have been slow to enact remedies. One debate over education adequacy, though, is settled: Schools are not financed at an adequate level. This fastback is divided into three sections.…

  11. Iterative method to determine an averaged backscatter-to-extinction ratio in cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Elouragini, S; Flamant, P H

    1996-03-20

    An iterative method to determine an average backscatter-to-extinction ratio and extinction coefficient simultaneously in cirrus clouds is proposed. The method is based on Klett's inversion, which is constrained by the total optical depth. A signal-to-noise ratio greater than 3 at the cloud top is required for an error in the backscatter-to-extinction ratio lower than 20% to result. The method has been tested with simulated lidar signals. An application to an experimental lidar signal is discussed.

  12. CALIPSO lidar ratio retrieval over the ocean.

    PubMed

    Josset, Damien; Rogers, Raymond; Pelon, Jacques; Hu, Yongxiang; Liu, Zhaoyan; Omar, Ali; Zhai, Peng-Wang

    2011-09-12

    We are demonstrating on a few cases the capability of CALIPSO to retrieve the 532 nm lidar ratio over the ocean when CloudSat surface scattering cross section is used as a constraint. We are presenting the algorithm used and comparisons with the column lidar ratio retrieved by the NASA airborne high spectral resolution lidar. For the three cases presented here, the agreement is fairly good. The average CALIPSO 532 nm column lidar ratio bias is 13.7% relative to HSRL, and the relative standard deviation is 13.6%. Considering the natural variability of aerosol microphysical properties, this level of accuracy is significant since the lidar ratio is a good indicator of aerosol types. We are discussing dependencies of the accuracy of retrieved aerosol lidar ratio on atmospheric aerosol homogeneity, lidar signal to noise ratio, and errors in the optical depth retrievals. We are obtaining the best result (bias 7% and standard deviation around 6%) for a nighttime case with a relatively constant lidar ratio (in the vertical) indicative of homogeneous aerosol type.

  13. Traditional protection ratios in FM sound broadcasting - still appropriate for interference management?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, J.

    2011-12-01

    A detailed analysis of the measurement procedures recommended by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) shows that - with proper definition of audio quality - the FM broadcasting system can provide an audio signal-to-noise ratio of no better than 40 dB, when the interference in the neighboring channels exhausts the limits established by the internationally agreed protection ratios. Thus any attempt to relax the protection, be it motivated by the desire to implement additional FM or new digital services in the FM band, would inevitably degrade reception quality of existing services to levels hardly acceptable by broadcast listeners.

  14. Is a vegetarian diet adequate for children.

    PubMed

    Hackett, A; Nathan, I; Burgess, L

    1998-01-01

    The number of people who avoid eating meat is growing, especially among young people. Benefits to health from a vegetarian diet have been reported in adults but it is not clear to what extent these benefits are due to diet or to other aspects of lifestyles. In children concern has been expressed concerning the adequacy of vegetarian diets especially with regard to growth. The risks/benefits seem to be related to the degree of restriction of he diet; anaemia is probably both the main and the most serious risk but this also applies to omnivores. Vegan diets are more likely to be associated with malnutrition, especially if the diets are the result of authoritarian dogma. Overall, lacto-ovo-vegetarian children consume diets closer to recommendations than omnivores and their pre-pubertal growth is at least as good. The simplest strategy when becoming vegetarian may involve reliance on vegetarian convenience foods which are not necessarily superior in nutritional composition. The vegetarian sector of the food industry could do more to produce foods closer to recommendations. Vegetarian diets can be, but are not necessarily, adequate for children, providing vigilance is maintained, particularly to ensure variety. Identical comments apply to omnivorous diets. Three threats to the diet of children are too much reliance on convenience foods, lack of variety and lack of exercise.

  15. Adequate mathematical modelling of environmental processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chashechkin, Yu. D.

    2012-04-01

    In environmental observations and laboratory visualization both large scale flow components like currents, jets, vortices, waves and a fine structure are registered (different examples are given). The conventional mathematical modeling both analytical and numerical is directed mostly on description of energetically important flow components. The role of a fine structures is still remains obscured. A variety of existing models makes it difficult to choose the most adequate and to estimate mutual assessment of their degree of correspondence. The goal of the talk is to give scrutiny analysis of kinematics and dynamics of flows. A difference between the concept of "motion" as transformation of vector space into itself with a distance conservation and the concept of "flow" as displacement and rotation of deformable "fluid particles" is underlined. Basic physical quantities of the flow that are density, momentum, energy (entropy) and admixture concentration are selected as physical parameters defined by the fundamental set which includes differential D'Alembert, Navier-Stokes, Fourier's and/or Fick's equations and closing equation of state. All of them are observable and independent. Calculations of continuous Lie groups shown that only the fundamental set is characterized by the ten-parametric Galilelian groups reflecting based principles of mechanics. Presented analysis demonstrates that conventionally used approximations dramatically change the symmetries of the governing equations sets which leads to their incompatibility or even degeneration. The fundamental set is analyzed taking into account condition of compatibility. A high order of the set indicated on complex structure of complete solutions corresponding to physical structure of real flows. Analytical solutions of a number problems including flows induced by diffusion on topography, generation of the periodic internal waves a compact sources in week-dissipative media as well as numerical solutions of the same

  16. Stratospheric HBr mixing ratio obtained from far infrared emission spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. H.; Carli, B.; Barbis, A.

    1989-01-01

    Emission features of HBr isotopes have been identified in high-resolution FIR emission spectra obtained with a balloon-borne Fourier-transform spectrometer in the spring of 1979 at 32 deg N latitude. When six single-scan spectra at a zenith angle of 93.2 deg were averaged, two features of HBr isotopes at 50.054 and 50.069/cm were obtained with a signal-to-noise ratio of 2.5. The volume mixing ratio retrieved from the average spectrum is 2.0 x 10 to the -11th, which is assumed to be constant above 28 km, with an uncertainty of 35 percent. This stratospheric amount of HBr is about the same as the current level of tropospheric organic bromine compounds, 25 pptv. Thus HBr could be the major stratospheric bromine species.

  17. MR Scanner Systems Should Be Adequately Characterized in Diffusion-MRI of the Breast

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Marco; Sghedoni, Roberto; Iacconi, Chiara; Iori, Mauro; Traino, Antonio Claudio; Guerrisi, Maria; Mascalchi, Mario; Toschi, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Breast imaging represents a relatively recent and promising field of application of quantitative diffusion-MRI techniques. In view of the importance of guaranteeing and assessing its reliability in clinical as well as research settings, the aim of this study was to specifically characterize how the main MR scanner system-related factors affect quantitative measurements in diffusion-MRI of the breast. In particular, phantom acquisitions were performed on three 1.5 T MR scanner systems by different manufacturers, all equipped with a dedicated multi-channel breast coil as well as acquisition sequences for diffusion-MRI of the breast. We assessed the accuracy, inter-scan and inter-scanner reproducibility of the mean apparent diffusion coefficient measured along the main orthogonal directions () as well as of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI)-derived mean diffusivity (MD) measurements. Additionally, we estimated spatial non-uniformity of (NU) and MD (NUMD) maps. We showed that the signal-to-noise ratio as well as overall calibration of high strength diffusion gradients system in typical acquisition sequences for diffusion-MRI of the breast varied across MR scanner systems, introducing systematic bias in the measurements of diffusion indices. While and MD values were not appreciably different from each other, they substantially varied across MR scanner systems. The mean of the accuracies of measured and MD was in the range [−2.3%,11.9%], and the mean of the coefficients of variation for and MD measurements across MR scanner systems was 6.8%. The coefficient of variation for repeated measurements of both and MD was < 1%, while NU and NUMD values were <4%. Our results highlight that MR scanner system-related factors can substantially affect quantitative diffusion-MRI of the breast. Therefore, a specific quality control program for assessing and monitoring the performance of MR scanner systems for diffusion-MRI of the breast is

  18. The Relationship between the Student/Counselor Ratio and Schools' Success in Meeting Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Gloria Sample

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, President George W. Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) in an effort to improve the quality of education for all students and to ensure that students of disadvantaged circumstances were not unnoticed. School administrators in Mississippi are seeking ways to meet the requirements of NCLB and to increase the number of successful…

  19. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  20. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  1. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  2. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  3. 13 CFR 108.200 - Adequate capital for NMVC Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... VENTURE CAPITAL (âNMVCâ) PROGRAM Qualifications for the NMVC Program Capitalizing A Nmvc Company § 108.200 Adequate capital for NMVC Companies. You must meet the requirements of §§ 108.200-108.230 in order to... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for...

  4. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  5. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  6. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  7. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  8. 34 CFR 200.20 - Making adequate yearly progress.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Making adequate yearly progress. 200.20 Section 200.20... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Adequate Yearly Progress (ayp) § 200.20 Making... State data system; (vi) Include, as separate factors in determining whether schools are making AYP for...

  9. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  10. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  11. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  12. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  13. 40 CFR 716.25 - Adequate file search.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate file search. 716.25 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.25 Adequate file search. The scope of a person's responsibility to search records is limited to records in the location(s) where the...

  14. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  15. 9 CFR 305.3 - Sanitation and adequate facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sanitation and adequate facilities. 305.3 Section 305.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... OF VIOLATION § 305.3 Sanitation and adequate facilities. Inspection shall not be inaugurated if...

  16. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  17. 40 CFR 51.354 - Adequate tools and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adequate tools and resources. 51.354... Requirements § 51.354 Adequate tools and resources. (a) Administrative resources. The program shall maintain the administrative resources necessary to perform all of the program functions including...

  18. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  19. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  20. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  1. 10 CFR 1304.114 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. 1304.114 Section 1304.114 Energy NUCLEAR WASTE TECHNICAL REVIEW BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 1304.114 Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards. The Board has the responsibility for maintaining...

  2. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Capitalizing An Sbic § 107.200 Adequate capital...

  3. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  4. 21 CFR 201.5 - Drugs; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Drugs; adequate directions for use. 201.5 Section 201.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.5 Drugs; adequate directions for use....

  5. 7 CFR 4290.200 - Adequate capital for RBICs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate capital for RBICs. 4290.200 Section 4290.200 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE AND... Qualifications for the RBIC Program Capitalizing A Rbic § 4290.200 Adequate capital for RBICs. You must meet...

  6. "Something Adequate"? In Memoriam Seamus Heaney, Sister Quinlan, Nirbhaya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Seamus Heaney talked of poetry's responsibility to represent the "bloody miracle", the "terrible beauty" of atrocity; to create "something adequate". This article asks, what is adequate to the burning and eating of a nun and the murderous gang rape and evisceration of a medical student? It considers Njabulo…

  7. Are women with psychosis receiving adequate cervical cancer screening?

    PubMed Central

    Tilbrook, Devon; Polsky, Jane; Lofters, Aisha

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To investigate the rates of cervical cancer screening among female patients with psychosis compared with similar patients without psychosis, as an indicator of the quality of primary preventive health care. DESIGN A retrospective cohort study using medical records between November 1, 2004, and November 1, 2007. SETTING Two urban family medicine clinics associated with an academic hospital in Toronto, Ont. PARTICIPANTS A random sample of female patients with and without psychosis between the ages of 20 and 69 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of Papanicolaou tests in a 3-year period. RESULTS Charts for 51 female patients with psychosis and 118 female patients without psychosis were reviewed. Of those women with psychosis, 62.7% were diagnosed with schizophrenia, 19.6% with bipolar disorder, 17.6% with schizoaffective disorder, and 29.4% with other psychotic disorders. Women in both groups were similar in age, rate of comorbidities, and number of full physical examinations. Women with psychosis were significantly more likely to smoke (P < .0001), to have more primary care appointments (P = .035), and to miss appointments (P = .0002) than women without psychosis. After adjustment for age, other psychiatric illnesses, number of physical examinations, number of missed appointments, and having a gynecologist, women with psychosis were significantly less likely to have had a Pap test in the previous 3 years compared with women without psychosis (47.1% vs 73.7%, respectively; odds ratio 0.19, 95% confidence interval 0.06 to 0.58). CONCLUSION Women with psychosis are more than 5 times less likely to receive adequate Pap screening compared with the general population despite their increased rates of smoking and increased number of primary care visits. PMID:20393098

  8. Optimized Signal-To Ratio with Shot Noise Limited Detection in Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moester, M. J. B.; Ariese, F.; de Boer, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    We describe our set-up for Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy with shot noise limited detection for a broad window of biologically relevant laser powers. This set-up is used to demonstrate that the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SRS with shot noise limited detection is achieved with a time-averaged laser power ratio of 1:2 of the unmodulated and modulated beam. In SRS, two different coloured laser beams are incident on a sample. If the energy difference between them matches a molecular vibration of a molecule, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other. By applying amplitude modulation to one of the beams, the modulation transfer to the other beam can be measured. The efficiency of this process is a direct measure for the number of molecules of interest in the focal volume. Combined with laser scanning microscopy, this technique allows for fast and sensitive imaging with sub-micrometre resolution. Recent technological advances have resulted in an improvement of the sensitivity of SRS applications, but few show shot noise limited detection. The dominant noise source in this SRS microscope is the shot noise of the unmodulated, detected beam. Under the assumption that photodamage is linear with the total laser power, the optimal SNR shifts away from equal beam powers, where the most signal is generated, to a 1:2 power ratio. Under these conditions the SNR is maximized and the total laser power that could induce photodamage is minimized. Compared to using a 1:1 laser power ratio, we show improved image quality and a signal-to-noise ratio improvement of 8 % in polystyrene beads and C. Elegans worms. Including a non-linear damage mechanism in the analysis, we find that the optimal power ratio converges to a 1:1 ratio with increasing order of the non-linear damage mechanism.

  9. Computed Tomography Image Compressibility and Limitations of Compression Ratio-Based Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Pambrun, Jean-François; Noumeir, Rita

    2015-12-01

    Finding optimal compression levels for diagnostic imaging is not an easy task. Significant compressibility variations exist between modalities, but little is known about compressibility variations within modalities. Moreover, compressibility is affected by acquisition parameters. In this study, we evaluate the compressibility of thousands of computed tomography (CT) slices acquired with different slice thicknesses, exposures, reconstruction filters, slice collimations, and pitches. We demonstrate that exposure, slice thickness, and reconstruction filters have a significant impact on image compressibility due to an increased high frequency content and a lower acquisition signal-to-noise ratio. We also show that compression ratio is not a good fidelity measure. Therefore, guidelines based on compression ratio should ideally be replaced with other compression measures better correlated with image fidelity. Value-of-interest (VOI) transformations also affect the perception of quality. We have studied the effect of value-of-interest transformation and found significant masking of artifacts when window is widened. PMID:25804842

  10. Understanding Your Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001" requires all schools, districts/local education agencies (LEAs) and states to show that students are making Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP). NCLB requires states to establish targets in the following ways: (1) Annual Proficiency Target; (2) Attendance/Graduation Rates; and (3) Participation Rates.…

  11. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  12. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  13. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  14. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  15. 15 CFR 970.404 - Adequate exploration plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adequate exploration plan. 970.404...) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of...

  16. Adequate Schools and Inadequate Education: An Anthropological Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolcott, Harry F.

    To illustrate his claim that schools generally do a remarkably good job of schooling while the society makes inadequate use of other means to educate young people, the author presents a case history of a young American (identified pseudonymously as "Brad") whose schooling was adequate but whose education was not. Brad, jobless and homeless,…

  17. Comparability and Reliability Considerations of Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Kimberly S.; Maiti, Tapabrata; Dass, Sarat C.; Lim, Chae Young

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an estimate of Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) that will allow for reliable and valid comparisons among student subgroups, schools, and districts. A shrinkage-type estimator of AYP using the Bayesian framework is described. Using simulated data, the performance of the Bayes estimator will be compared to…

  18. 13 CFR 107.200 - Adequate capital for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adequate capital for Licensees. 107.200 Section 107.200 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS... operate actively in accordance with your Articles and within the context of your business plan,...

  19. Assessing Juvenile Sex Offenders to Determine Adequate Levels of Supervision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerdes, Karen E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This study analyzed the internal consistency of four inventories used by Utah probation officers to determine adequate and efficacious supervision levels and placement for juvenile sex offenders. Three factors accounted for 41.2 percent of variance (custodian's and juvenile's attitude toward intervention, offense characteristics, and historical…

  20. 4 CFR 200.14 - Responsibility for maintaining adequate safeguards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... identifiable personal data and automated systems shall be adequately trained in the security and privacy of... records in which identifiable personal data are processed or maintained, including all reports and output... personal records or data; must minimize, to the extent practicable, the risk that skilled technicians...

  1. Do Beginning Teachers Receive Adequate Support from Their Headteachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menon, Maria Eliophotou

    2012-01-01

    The article examines the problems faced by beginning teachers in Cyprus and the extent to which headteachers are considered to provide adequate guidance and support to them. Data were collected through interviews with 25 school teachers in Cyprus, who had recently entered teaching (within 1-5 years) in public primary schools. According to the…

  2. Trilinearity deviation ratio: a new metric for chemometric analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Pinkerton, David K; Parsons, Brendon A; Anderson, Todd J; Synovec, Robert E

    2015-04-29

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) is a well-established instrumental platform for complex samples. However, chemometric data analysis is often required to fully extract useful information from the data. We demonstrate that retention time shifting from one modulation to the next, Δ(2)tR, is not sufficient alone to quantitatively describe the trilinearity of a single GC×GC-TOFMS run for the purpose of predicting the performance of the chemometric method parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). We hypothesize that analyte peak width on second dimension separations, (2)Wb, also impacts trilinearity, along with Δ(2)tR. The term trilinearity deviation ratio, TDR, which is Δ(2)tR normalized by (2)Wb, is introduced as a quantitative metric to assess accuracy for PARAFAC of a GC×GC-TOFMS data cube. We explore how modulation ratio, MR, modulation period, PM, temperature programming rate, Tramp, sampling phase (in-phase and out-of-phase), and signal-to-noise ratio, S/N, all play a role in PARAFAC performance in the context of TDR. Use of a PM in the 1-2 s range provides an optimized peak capacity for the first dimension separation (500-600) for a 30 min run, with an adequate peak capacity for the second dimension separation (12-15), concurrent with an optimized two-dimensional peak capacity (6000-7500), combined with sufficiently low TDR values (0-0.05) to facilitate low quantitative errors with PARAFAC (0-0.5%). In contrast, use of a PM in the 5s or greater range provides a higher peak capacity on the second dimension (30-35), concurrent with a lower peak capacity on the first dimension (100-150) for a 30 min run, and a slightly reduced two-dimensional peak capacity (3000-4500), and furthermore, the data are not sufficiently trilinear for the more retained second dimension peaks in order to directly use PARAFAC with confidence.

  3. High Resolution Double-Focusing Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radke, J.; Deerberg, M.; Hilkert, A.; Schlüter, H.-J.; Schwieters, J.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years isotope ratio mass spectrometry has extended to the capability of quantifying very small isotope signatures related with low abundances and simultaneously detecting molecular masses such as isotopomers and isotopologues containing clumped isotopes. Some of those applications are limited by molecular interferences like different gas molecules with the same nominal mass, e.g. Ar/O2, adducts of the same molecule or of different molecules, and very small isotope abundances. The Thermo Scientific MAT 253 ULTRA is the next generation of high precision gas isotope ratio mass spectrometry, which combines a 10 KV gas ionization source (Thermo Scientific MAT 253) with a double focusing multi-collector mass analyzer (Thermo Scientific Neptune) and reduces those limitations by measuring isotope ratios on a larger dynamic range with high precision. Small ion beam requirements and high sensitivity are achieved by signal-to-noise improvements through enhanced ion beam amplification in faraday cups and ion counters. Interfering backgrounds, e.g. interfering isotopologues or isobaric ions of contaminants, are dramatically decreased by a dynamic range increase combined with high evacuation leading to undisturbed ion transmission through the double-focusing analyser. Furthermore, automated gain calibration for mathematical baseline corrections, switchable detector arrays, ion source control, analyser focusing and full data export is controlled under Isodat data control. New reference/sample strategies are under investigation besides incorporation of the continuous-flow technique and its versatile inlet devices. We are presenting first results and applications of the MAT 253 Ultra.

  4. Isotopic Ratios in Nitrile Species on Titan using ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molter, Edward; Nixon, Conor; Cordiner, Martin; Serigano, Joseph; Irwin, Patrick; Teanby, Nicholas; Charnley, Steven; Lindeberg, Johan

    2016-06-01

    The atmosphere of Titan is primarily composed of molecular nitrogen (N2, ˜98%) and methane (CH4, ˜2%), but also hosts a myriad of trace organic species. Two of the simplest and most abundant of these are hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and cyanoacetylene (HC3N). The advent of ALMA provides the opportunity to observe rotational transitions in these molecules and their isotopologues with unprecendented sensitivity and spatial resolution. We searched through the ALMA archive for publicly available high-resolution observations of Titan as a flux calibrator source taken between April and July 2014; each integration lasted around 160 seconds. Using spectra of HCN and HC3N isotopologues found in these data, we derive vertical abundance profiles and determine the isotopic ratios 14N/15N and 12C/13C in these molecules. We also report the detection of a new HCN isotopologue on Titan, H13C6 15N, and use a high signal-to-noise spectrum of DCN to determine the D/H ratio in HCN on Titan for the first time. These isotopic ratios are leveraged to constrain the physical and chemical processes occurring in Titan's atmosphere.

  5. [Abdominal cure procedures. Adequate use of Nobecutan Spray].

    PubMed

    López Soto, Rosa María

    2009-12-01

    Open abdominal wounds, complicated by infection and/or risk of eventration tend to become chronic and usually require frequent prolonged cure. Habitual changing of bandages develop into one of the clearest risk factors leading to the deterioration of perilesional cutaneous integrity. This brings with it new complications which draw out the evolution of the process, provoking an important deterioration in quality of life for the person who suffers this and a considerable increase in health costs. What is needed is a product and a procedure which control the risk of irritation, which protect the skin, which favor a patient's comfort and which shorten treatment requirements while lowering health care expenses. This report invites medical personnel to think seriously about the scientific rationale, and treatment practice, as to why and how to apply Nobecutan adequately, this reports concludes stating the benefits in the adequate use of this product. The objective of this report is to guarantee the adequate use of this product in treatment of complicated abdominal wounds. This product responds to the needs which are present in these clinical cases favoring skin care apt isolation and protection, while at the same time, facilitating the placement and stability of dressings and bandages used to cure wounds. In order for this to happen, the correct use of this product is essential; medical personnel must pay attention to precautions and recommendations for proper application. The author's experiences in habitual handling of this product during various years, included in the procedures for standardized cures for these wounds, corroborates its usefulness; the author considers use of this product to be highly effective while being simple to apply; furthermore, one succeeds in providing quality care and optimizes resources employed.

  6. Optimal detection pinhole for lowering speckle noise while maintaining adequate optical sectioning in confocal reflectance microscopes.

    PubMed

    Glazowski, Christopher; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2012-08-01

    Coherent speckle influences the resulting image when narrow spectral line-width and single spatial mode illumination are used, though these are the same light-source properties that provide the best radiance-to-cost ratio. However, a suitable size of the detection pinhole can be chosen to maintain adequate optical sectioning while making the probability density of the speckle noise more normal and reducing its effect. The result is a qualitatively better image with improved contrast, which is easier to read. With theoretical statistics and experimental results, we show that the detection pinhole size is a fundamental parameter for designing imaging systems for use in turbid media.

  7. Quantifying dose to the reconstructed breast: Can we adequately treat?

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Eugene; Marsh, Robin B.; Griffith, Kent A.; Moran, Jean M.; Pierce, Lori J.

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate how immediate reconstruction (IR) impacts postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) dose distributions to the reconstructed breast (RB), internal mammary nodes (IMN), heart, and lungs using quantifiable dosimetric end points. 3D conformal plans were developed for 20 IR patients, 10 autologous reconstruction (AR), and 10 expander-implant (EI) reconstruction. For each reconstruction type, 5 right- and 5 left-sided reconstructions were selected. Two plans were created for each patient, 1 with RB coverage alone and 1 with RB + IMN coverage. Left-sided EI plans without IMN coverage had higher heart Dmean than left-sided AR plans (2.97 and 0.84 Gy, p = 0.03). Otherwise, results did not vary by reconstruction type and all remaining metrics were evaluated using a combined AR and EI dataset. RB coverage was adequate regardless of laterality or IMN coverage (Dmean 50.61 Gy, D95 45.76 Gy). When included, IMN Dmean and D95 were 49.57 and 40.96 Gy, respectively. Mean heart doses increased with left-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion. Right-sided treatment plans and IMN inclusion increased mean lung V{sub 20}. Using standard field arrangements and 3D planning, we observed excellent coverage of the RB and IMN, regardless of laterality or reconstruction type. Our results demonstrate that adequate doses can be delivered to the RB with or without IMN coverage.

  8. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom. PMID:27370448

  9. N-step linear phase-shifting algorithms with optimum signal to noise phase demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, A.; Servin, M.; Estrada, J. C.; Rosu, H. C.

    2011-08-01

    A common way to test an optical wavefront is to use a phase-shifting interferometer along with (for example) a three-step linear phase-shifting algorithm (PSA). The following fundamental question arises: what phase step should be used? Typically, ? , ? or ? are used and, in fact, any phase step within the open interval ? can be employed. In the absence of any measuring noise, all these phase shifts yield the same estimate for the modulating phase. However, which of these phase steps ω 0 is the best to obtain the least noisy phase estimation from a temporal set of three noisy interferograms? Working in frequency space, a general procedure to obtain the optimum phase step ω 0 of a given linear N-step PSA is presented. This general procedure is exemplified for some particular linear PSAs, notably 3-, 5-, 7-, and 27-step PSAs.

  10. Resolution and signal-to-noise measurement of U.S. Army night-vision goggles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivamonte, Lorenzo A.

    1990-10-01

    The ability to quantitatively characterize the performance of night vision goggles (NVG) is being investigated because the present method of resolution evaluation relies on an imprecise, subjective pass/fail judgement by a trained observer viewing a test pattern. Variation in an observer's training, experience, psychological state, decision bias and visual acuity strongly affect his or her decision when required to decide if a marginal pair of goggles passes or fails. The controversy concerning the increase in commercial and military helicopter accidents involving NVG indicates a need to determine if 1) the use of defective or marginal NVG is a contributing factor to the increase in accidents or 2) the apparent correlation between NVG and accidents is simply due to the increased use of NVG in an expanded and inherently more dangerous flight envelope. The U.S. Army TMDE Support Group (USATSG) has developed instrumentation to augment the AN/3895 TS test set that presents high and low light level resolution targets to AN/PVS-5, AN/AVS-6 and AN/PVS-7 NVG. The NVG Resolution Augmentation to the AN/3895 TS presented here can also quantitatively measure image quality of other image producing systems which are normally viewed, adjusted or inspected by a human observer. The NVG Resolution Augmentation features a custom electronic circuit which provides a user-friendly interface between a commercially available CCD camera, monitor and oscilloscope. USATSG's Army Primary Standards Laboratory at the Redstone Arsenal is presently studying the possibility of a new measurement service by investigating various CCD camera/lens combinations in order to characterize a machine vision standard observer. A characterized image analysis system would enable absolute as well as relative measurements of image quality.

  11. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Beiersdorfer, P; Magee, E W; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Emig, J; Hell, N; Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Allan, P; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Hoarty, D J; Hobbs, L M R; James, S F

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  12. Lineshape spectroscopy with a very high resolution, very high signal-to-noise crystal spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiersdorfer, P.; Magee, E. W.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Hell, N.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Allan, P.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Hoarty, D. J.; Hobbs, L. M. R.; James, S. F.

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a high-resolution x-ray spectrometer for measuring the shapes of spectral lines produced from laser-irradiated targets on the Orion laser facility. The instrument utilizes a spherically bent crystal geometry to spatially focus and spectrally analyze photons from foil or microdot targets. The high photon collection efficiency resulting from its imaging properties allows the instrument to be mounted outside the Orion chamber, where it is far less sensitive to particles, hard x-rays, or electromagnetic pulses than instruments housed close to the target chamber center in ten-inch manipulators. Moreover, Bragg angles above 50° are possible, which provide greatly improved spectral resolution compared to radially viewing, near grazing-incidence crystal spectrometers. These properties make the new instrument an ideal lineshape diagnostic for determining plasma temperature and density. We describe its calibration on the Livermore electron beam ion trap facility and present spectral data of the K-shell emission from highly charged sulfur produced by long-pulse as well as short-pulse beams on the Orion laser in the United Kingdom.

  13. Signal-to-Noise Behavior for Matches to Gradient Direction Models of Corners in Images

    SciTech Connect

    Paglieroni, D W; Manay, S

    2007-02-09

    Gradient direction models for corners of prescribed acuteness, leg length, and leg thickness are constructed by generating fields of unit vectors emanating from leg pixels that point normal to the edges. A novel FFT-based algorithm that quickly matches models of corners at all possible positions and orientations in the image to fields of gradient directions for image pixels is described. The signal strength of a corner is discussed in terms of the number of pixels along the edges of a corner in an image, while noise is characterized by the coherence of gradient directions along those edges. The detection-false alarm rate behavior of our corner detector is evaluated empirically by manually constructing maps of corner locations in typical overhead images, and then generating different ROC curves for matches to models of corners with different leg lengths and thicknesses. We then demonstrate how corners found with our detector can be used to quickly and automatically find families of polygons of arbitrary position, size and orientation in overhead images.

  14. Utility of Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry for Drug-to-Antibody Ratio Measurements in Antibody-Drug Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Deyanova, Ekaterina G.; Passmore, David; Rangan, Vangipuram; Deshpande, Shrikant; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Chen, Guodong

    2015-06-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are emerging modalities in the pharmaceutical industry. Characterization of ADC's drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) becomes a key assessment because of its importance in ADC efficacy and safety. DAR characterization by conventional intact protein MS analysis, however, is challenging because of high heterogeneity of ADC samples. The analysis often requires protein deglycosylation, disulfide-bond reduction, or partial fragmentation. In this study, we illustrate the practical utility of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in a routine LC/MS workflow for DAR measurements. This strategy allows analyte "cleanup" in the gas phase, providing significant improvement of signal-to-noise ratios of ADC intact mass spectra for accurate DAR measurements. In addition, protein drift time analysis offers a new dimension in monitoring the changes of DAR in lot-to-lot analysis.

  15. Choices for achieving adequate dietary calcium with a vegetarian diet.

    PubMed

    Weaver, C M; Proulx, W R; Heaney, R

    1999-09-01

    To achieve adequate dietary calcium intake, several choices are available that accommodate a variety of lifestyles and tastes. Liberal consumption of dairy products in the diet is the approach of most Americans. Some plants provide absorbable calcium, but the quantity of vegetables required to reach sufficient calcium intake make an exclusively plant-based diet impractical for most individuals unless fortified foods or supplements are included. Also, dietary constituents that decrease calcium retention, such as salt, protein, and caffeine, can be high in the vegetarian diet. Although it is possible to obtain calcium balance from a plant-based diet in a Western lifestyle, it may be more convenient to achieve calcium balance by increasing calcium consumption than by limiting other dietary factors.

  16. Genetic Modification of Preimplantation Embryos: Toward Adequate Human Research Policies

    PubMed Central

    Dresser, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Citing advances in transgenic animal research and setbacks in human trials of somatic cell genetic interventions, some scientists and others want to begin planning for research involving the genetic modification of human embryos. Because this form of genetic modification could affect later-born children and their offspring, the protection of human subjects should be a priority in decisions about whether to proceed with such research. Yet because of gaps in existing federal policies, embryo modification proposals might not receive adequate scientific and ethical scrutiny. This article describes current policy shortcomings and recommends policy actions designed to ensure that the investigational genetic modification of embryos meets accepted standards for research on human subjects. PMID:15016248

  17. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  18. DARHT - an `adequate` EIS: A NEPA case study

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) Facility Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) provides a case study that is interesting for many reasons. The EIS was prepared quickly, in the face of a lawsuit, for a project with unforeseen environmental impacts, for a facility that was deemed urgently essential to national security. Following judicial review the EIS was deemed to be {open_quotes}adequate.{close_quotes} DARHT is a facility now being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship program. DARHT will be used to evaluate the safety and reliability of nuclear weapons, evaluate conventional munitions and study high-velocity impact phenomena. DARHT will be equipped with two accelerator-driven, high-intensity X-ray machines to record images of materials driven by high explosives. DARHT will be used for a variety of hydrodynamic tests, and DOE plans to conduct some dynamic experiments using plutonium at DARHT as well.

  19. ENSURING ADEQUATE SAFETY WHEN USING HYDROGEN AS A FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, D

    2007-01-22

    Demonstration projects using hydrogen as a fuel are becoming very common. Often these projects rely on project-specific risk evaluations to support project safety decisions. This is necessary because regulations, codes, and standards (hereafter referred to as standards) are just being developed. This paper will review some of the approaches being used in these evolving standards, and techniques which demonstration projects can implement to bridge the gap between current requirements and stakeholder desires. Many of the evolving standards for hydrogen-fuel use performance-based language, which establishes minimum performance and safety objectives, as compared with prescriptive-based language that prescribes specific design solutions. This is being done for several reasons including: (1) concern that establishing specific design solutions too early will stifle invention, (2) sparse performance data necessary to support selection of design approaches, and (3) a risk-adverse public which is unwilling to accept losses that were incurred in developing previous prescriptive design standards. The evolving standards often contain words such as: ''The manufacturer shall implement the measures and provide the information necessary to minimize the risk of endangering a person's safety or health''. This typically implies that the manufacturer or project manager must produce and document an acceptable level of risk. If accomplished using comprehensive and systematic process the demonstration project risk assessment can ease the transition to widespread commercialization. An approach to adequately evaluate and document the safety risk will be presented.

  20. Quantifying variability within water samples: the need for adequate subsampling.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Ian; Irvine, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    Accurate and precise determination of the concentration of nutrients and other substances in waterbodies is an essential requirement for supporting effective management and legislation. Owing primarily to logistic and financial constraints, however, national and regional agencies responsible for monitoring surface waters tend to quantify chemical indicators of water quality using a single sample from each waterbody, thus largely ignoring spatial variability. We show here that total sample variability, which comprises both analytical variability and within-sample heterogeneity, of a number of important chemical indicators of water quality (chlorophyll a, total phosphorus, total nitrogen, soluble molybdate-reactive phosphorus and dissolved inorganic nitrogen) varies significantly both over time and among determinands, and can be extremely high. Within-sample heterogeneity, whose mean contribution to total sample variability ranged between 62% and 100%, was significantly higher in samples taken from rivers compared with those from lakes, and was shown to be reduced by filtration. Our results show clearly that neither a single sample, nor even two sub-samples from that sample is adequate for the reliable, and statistically robust, detection of changes in the quality of surface waters. We recommend strongly that, in situations where it is practicable to take only a single sample from a waterbody, a minimum of three sub-samples are analysed from that sample for robust quantification of both the concentrations of determinands and total sample variability. PMID:17706740

  1. On Adequate Comparisons of Antenna Phase Center Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoen, S.; Kersten, T.

    2013-12-01

    One important part for ensuring the high quality of the International GNSS Service's (IGS) products is the collection and publication of receiver - and satellite antenna phase center variations (PCV). The PCV are crucial for global and regional networks, since they introduce a global scale factor of up to 16ppb or changes in the height component with an amount of up to 10cm, respectively. Furthermore, antenna phase center variations are also important for precise orbit determination, navigation and positioning of mobile platforms, like e.g. the GOCE and GRACE gravity missions, or for the accurate Precise Point Positioning (PPP) processing. Using the EUREF Permanent Network (EPN), Baire et al. (2012) showed that individual PCV values have a significant impact on the geodetic positioning. The statements are further supported by studies of Steigenberger et al. (2013) where the impact of PCV for local-ties are analysed. Currently, there are five calibration institutions including the Institut für Erdmessung (IfE) contributing to the IGS PCV file. Different approaches like field calibrations and anechoic chamber measurements are in use. Additionally, the computation and parameterization of the PCV are completely different within the methods. Therefore, every new approach has to pass a benchmark test in order to ensure that variations of PCV values of an identical antenna obtained from different methods are as consistent as possible. Since the number of approaches to obtain these PCV values rises with the number of calibration institutions, there is the necessity for an adequate comparison concept, taking into account not only the numerical values but also stochastic information and computational issues of the determined PCVs. This is of special importance, since the majority of calibrated receiver antennas published by the IGS origin from absolute field calibrations based on the Hannover Concept, Wübbena et al. (2000). In this contribution, a concept for the adequate

  2. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment.

  3. Improving access to adequate pain management in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Scholten, Willem

    2015-06-01

    There is a global crisis in access to pain management in the world. WHO estimates that 4.65 billion people live in countries where medical opioid consumption is near to zero. For 2010, WHO considered a per capita consumption of 216.7 mg morphine equivalents adequate, while Taiwan had a per capita consumption of 0.05 mg morphine equivalents in 2007. In Asia, the use of opioids is sensitive because of the Opium Wars in the 19th century and for this reason, the focus of controlled substances policies has been on the prevention of diversion and dependence. However, an optimal public health outcome requires that also the beneficial aspects of these substances are acknowledged. Therefore, WHO recommends a policy based on the Principle of Balance: ensuring access for medical and scientific purposes while preventing diversion, harmful use and dependence. Furthermore, international law requires that countries ensure access to opioid analgesics for medical and scientific purposes. There is evidence that opioid analgesics for chronic pain are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence. Barriers for access can be classified in the categories of overly restrictive laws and regulations; insufficient medical training on pain management and problems related to assessment of medical needs; attitudes like an excessive fear for dependence or diversion; and economic and logistical problems. The GOPI project found many examples of such barriers in Asia. Access to opioid medicines in Taiwan can be improved by analysing the national situation and drafting a plan. The WHO policy guidelines Ensuring Balance in National Policies on Controlled Substances can be helpful for achieving this purpose, as well as international guidelines for pain treatment. PMID:26068436

  4. Adequate iron stores and the 'Nil nocere' principle.

    PubMed

    Hollán, S; Johansen, K S

    1993-01-01

    There is a need to change the policy of unselective iron supplementation during periods of life with physiologically increased cell proliferation. Levels of iron stores to be regarded as adequate during infancy and pregnancy are still not well established. Recent data support the view that it is not justified to interfere with physiological adaptations developed through millions of years by sophisticated and precisely coordinated regulation of iron absorption, utilization and storage. Recent data suggest that the chelatable intracellular iron pool regulates the expression of proteins with central importance in cellular iron metabolism (TfR, ferritin, and erythroid 5-aminolevulinic synthetase) in a coordinately controlled way through an iron dependent cytosolic mRNA binding protein, the iron regulating factor (IRF). This factor is simultaneously a sensor and a regulator of iron levels. The reduction of ferritin levels during highly increased cell proliferation is a mirror of the increased density of TfRs. An abundance of data support the vigorous competition for growth-essential iron between microbial pathogens and their vertebrate hosts. The highly coordinated regulation of iron metabolism is probably crucial in achieving a balance between the blockade of readily accessible iron to invading organisms and yet providing sufficient iron for the immune system of the host. The most evident adverse clinical effects of excess iron have been observed in immunodeficient patients in tropical countries and in AIDS patients. Excess iron also increases the risk of initiation and promotion of malignant processes by iron binding to DNA and by the iron-catalysed release of free radicals. Oxygen radicals were shown to damage critical biomolecules leading, apart from cancer, to a variety of human disease states, including inflammation and atherosclerosis. They are also involved in processes of aging and thrombosis. Recent clinical trials have suggested that the use of iron

  5. A 10-bit ratio-independent cyclic ADC with offset canceling for a CMOS image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiming, Nie; Suying, Yao; Jiangtao, Xu; Zhaorui, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    A 10-bit ratio-independent switch-capacitor (SC) cyclic analog-to-digital converter (ADC) with offset canceling for a CMOS image sensor is presented. The proposed ADC completes an N-bit conversion in 1.5N clock cycles with one operational amplifier. Combining ratio-independent and polarity swapping techniques, the conversion characteristic of the proposed cyclic ADC is inherently insensitive both to capacitor ratio and to amplifier offset voltage. Therefore, the circuit can be realized in a small die area and it is suitable to serve as the column-parallel ADC in CMOS image sensors. A prototype ADC is fabricated in 0.18-μm one-poly four-metal CMOS technology. The measured results indicate that the ADC has a signal-to-noise and distortion ratio (SNDR) of 53.6 dB and a DNL of +0:12/-0:14 LSB at a conversion rate of 600 kS/s. The standard deviation of the offset variation of the ADC is reduced from 2.5 LSB to 0.5 LSB. Its power dissipation is 250 μW with a 1.8 V supply, and its area is 0.03 × 0.8 mm2.

  6. Acoustic Feature Optimization Based on F-Ratio for Robust Speech Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yanqing; Zhou, Yu; Zhao, Qingwei; Yan, Yonghong

    This paper focuses on the problem of performance degradation in mismatched speech recognition. The F-Ratio analysis method is utilized to analyze the significance of different frequency bands for speech unit classification, and we find that frequencies around 1kHz and 3kHz, which are the upper bounds of the first and the second formants for most of the vowels, should be emphasized in comparison to the Mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC). The analysis result is further observed to be stable in several typical mismatched situations. Similar to the Mel-Frequency scale, another frequency scale called the F-Ratio-scale is thus proposed to optimize the filter bank design for the MFCC features, and make each subband contains equal significance for speech unit classification. Under comparable conditions, with the modified features we get a relative 43.20% decrease compared with the MFCC in sentence error rate for the emotion affected speech recognition, 35.54%, 23.03% for the noisy speech recognition at 15dB and 0dB SNR (signal to noise ratio) respectively, and 64.50% for the three years' 863 test data. The application of the F-Ratio analysis on the clean training set of the Aurora2 database demonstrates its robustness over languages, texts and sampling rates.

  7. Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension Is Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Adequately Controlled Percentage of Adults with High Blood Pressure Whose Hypertension is Adequately Controlled Heart disease ... Survey. Age Group Percentage of People with High Blood Pressure that is Controlled by Age Group f94q- ...

  8. 76 FR 51041 - Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Hemoglobin Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in... Standards and Maintaining Adequate Iron Stores in Blood Donors.'' The purpose of this public workshop is to... donor safety and blood availability, and potential measures to maintain adequate iron stores in...

  9. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate directions for use. Adequate directions for use means directions under which the layman can use a device...

  10. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  11. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  12. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  13. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve Snowmachine (snowmobile) Operations § 13.960 Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? The superintendent will determine when snow cover is adequate for snowmachine use. The superintendent will follow...

  14. EMPIRICAL DETERMINATION OF EINSTEIN A-COEFFICIENT RATIOS OF BRIGHT [Fe II] LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Lorenzetti, D.; Alcalá, J. M.; Bacciotti, F.; Podio, L.; Bonito, R.; Stelzer, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Einstein spontaneous rates (A-coefficients) of Fe{sup +} lines have been computed by several authors with results that differ from each other by up to 40%. Consequently, models for line emissivities suffer from uncertainties that in turn affect the determination of the physical conditions at the base of line excitation. We provide an empirical determination of the A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines that would represent both a valid benchmark for theoretical computations and a reference for the physical interpretation of the observed lines. With the ESO-Very Large Telescope X-shooter instrument between 3000 Å and 24700 Å, we obtained a spectrum of the bright Herbig-Haro object HH 1. We detect around 100 [Fe II] lines, some of which with a signal-to-noise ratios ≥100. Among these latter lines, we selected those emitted by the same level, whose dereddened intensity ratios are direct functions of the Einstein A-coefficient ratios. From the same X-shooter spectrum, we got an accurate estimate of the extinction toward HH 1 through intensity ratios of atomic species, H I  recombination lines and H{sub 2} ro-vibrational transitions. We provide seven reliable A-coefficient ratios between bright [Fe II] lines, which are compared with the literature determinations. In particular, the A-coefficient ratios involving the brightest near-infrared lines (λ12570/λ16440 and λ13209/λ16440) are in better agreement with the predictions by the Quinet et al. relativistic Hartree-Fock model. However, none of the theoretical models predict A-coefficient ratios in agreement with all of our determinations. We also show that literature data of near-infrared intensity ratios better agree with our determinations than with theoretical expectations.

  15. Empirical Determination of Einstein A-coefficient Ratios of Bright [Fe II] Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannini, T.; Antoniucci, S.; Nisini, B.; Lorenzetti, D.; Alcalá, J. M.; Bacciotti, F.; Bonito, R.; Podio, L.; Stelzer, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Einstein spontaneous rates (A-coefficients) of Fe+ lines have been computed by several authors with results that differ from each other by up to 40%. Consequently, models for line emissivities suffer from uncertainties that in turn affect the determination of the physical conditions at the base of line excitation. We provide an empirical determination of the A-coefficient ratios of bright [Fe II] lines that would represent both a valid benchmark for theoretical computations and a reference for the physical interpretation of the observed lines. With the ESO-Very Large Telescope X-shooter instrument between 3000 Å and 24700 Å, we obtained a spectrum of the bright Herbig-Haro object HH 1. We detect around 100 [Fe II] lines, some of which with a signal-to-noise ratios >=100. Among these latter lines, we selected those emitted by the same level, whose dereddened intensity ratios are direct functions of the Einstein A-coefficient ratios. From the same X-shooter spectrum, we got an accurate estimate of the extinction toward HH 1 through intensity ratios of atomic species, H I recombination lines and H2 ro-vibrational transitions. We provide seven reliable A-coefficient ratios between bright [Fe II] lines, which are compared with the literature determinations. In particular, the A-coefficient ratios involving the brightest near-infrared lines (λ12570/λ16440 and λ13209/λ16440) are in better agreement with the predictions by the Quinet et al. relativistic Hartree-Fock model. However, none of the theoretical models predict A-coefficient ratios in agreement with all of our determinations. We also show that literature data of near-infrared intensity ratios better agree with our determinations than with theoretical expectations. Based on observations collected with X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope on Cerro Paranal (Chile), operated by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). Program ID: 092.C-0058(A).

  16. HD 53975: An O-type spectroscopic binary with a large mass ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gies, D. R.; Fullerton, A. W.; Bolton, C. T.; Bagnuolo, W. G., Jr.; Hahula, M. E.; Wiemker, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present radial velocities and line profiles of the O-type star HD 53975, which we find to be a spectroscopic binary with a period of 6.0173 days. Although there are no obvious signatures of the secondary in the line profiles, we have used the merit function of Shafter et al. (1980) to show that a secondary component is present in lines found in B-type spectra. We have compared the observed merit functions with merit functions for model profiles constructed assuming a main-sequence secondary, and this comparison consistently indicates a companion with a mass ratio of q = M(sub 2)/M(sub 1) = 0.23 +/- 0.04 and a magnitude difference Delta m = 3.3 +/- 0.4. We present a tomographic reconstruction of the spectrum of the secondary for these parameters. We suggest that other large mass ratio binaries may be found among the O stars when observed with high-resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopy.

  17. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view.

  18. Intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals in the Einstein Telescope. II. Parameter estimation errors

    SciTech Connect

    Huerta, E. A.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2011-02-15

    We explore the precision with which the Einstein Telescope will be able to measure the parameters of intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals, i.e., the inspirals of stellar mass compact objects into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). We calculate the parameter estimation errors using the Fisher Matrix formalism and present results of Monte Carlo simulations of these errors over choices for the extrinsic parameters of the source. These results are obtained using two different models for the gravitational waveform which were introduced in paper I of this series. These two waveform models include the inspiral, merger, and ringdown phases in a consistent way. One of the models, based on the transition scheme of Ori and Thorne [A. Ori and K. S. Thorne, Phys. Rev. D 62, 124022 (2000)], is valid for IMBHs of arbitrary spin; whereas, the second model, based on the effective-one-body approach, has been developed to cross-check our results in the nonspinning limit. In paper I of this series, we demonstrated the excellent agreement in both phase and amplitude between these two models for nonspinning black holes, and that their predictions for signal-to-noise ratios are consistent to within 10%. We now use these waveform models to estimate parameter estimation errors for binary systems with masses 1.4M{sub {circle_dot}}+100M{sub {circle_dot}}, 10M{sub {circle_dot}}+100M{sub {circle_dot}}, 1.4M{sub {circle_dot}}+500M{sub {circle_dot}}, and 10M{sub {circle_dot}}+500M{sub {circle_dot}} and various choices for the spin of the central IMBH. Assuming a detector network of three Einstein Telescopes, the analysis shows that for a 10M{sub {circle_dot}} compact object inspiralling into a 100M{sub {circle_dot}} IMBH with spin q=0.3, detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 30, we should be able to determine the compact object and IMBH masses, and the IMBH spin magnitude to fractional accuracies of {approx}10{sup -3}, {approx}10{sup -3.5}, and {approx}10{sup -3}, respectively. We also

  19. Approaches to high aspect ratio triangulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posenau, M.-A.

    1993-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics calculations, high aspect ratio, or stretched, triangulations are necessary to adequately resolve the features of a viscous flow around bodies. In this paper, we explore alternatives to the Delaunay triangulation which can be used to generate high aspect ratio triangulations of point sets. The method is based on a variation of the lifting map concept which derives Delaunay triangulations from convex hull calculations.

  20. Required signal-to-interference ratios for shortwave broadcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, George

    1997-09-01

    The required signal-to-Interference (RSI) ratio for a specified grade of HF radio service is the hourly median wanted signal power at the input of the receiver needed relative to the sum of the hourly median unwanted signal power and the hourly median radio noise power in the RF bandwidth of the receiver, adjusted so that the hourly median ratio will not fall below the RSI ratio more than a certain percentage of the time due to minute-to-minute fading within the hour. Shortwave listeners are well aware of the deleterious effects of cochannel and adjacent channel interference. This type of interference is especially prevalent in the overcrowded international broadcast bands where it is manifested by cross talk and a beat note produced in the receiver by the carrier of the unwanted signal. Yet little agreement exists as to the magnitude of the amplitude-modulated, double sideband (AM-DSB) interfering signal that can be tolerated by the listener. Numerous protection ratios have been proposed in the literature, as well as by elements of the International Telecommunication Union. These values tend to range from 17 dB [International Frequency Registration Board, 1989] to as high as 50 dB for "good commercial quality," offset in carrier frequency of 500 Hz and 10 dB short-term fade protection [CCIR, 1970]. In this paper, several significant experiments are reviewed for the purpose of normalizing their findings to a common set of parameters. The parameters relate to articulation scoring, type of noise (if used), fading of wanted and unwanted signals, type of interference, listener skill, bandwidth of the receiver, carrier frequency offset, etc. From this compilation of normalized data, RSI values are recommended as they relate to the desired broadcast quality and the signal-to-noise ratio of the wanted signal. The RSI ratios are compatible for use in HF sky wave prediction programs that contain appropriate RF noise and interference combining subroutines. The recommended

  1. Expected gain in the pyramid wavefront sensor with limited Strehl ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viotto, V.; Ragazzoni, R.; Bergomi, M.; Magrin, D.; Farinato, J.

    2016-09-01

    Context. One of the main properties of the pyramid wavefront sensor is that, once the loop is closed, and as the reference star image shrinks on the pyramid pin, the wavefront estimation signal-to-noise ratio can considerably improve. This has been shown to translate into a gain in limiting magnitude when compared with the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, in which the sampling on the wavefront is performed before the light is split into four quadrants, which does not allow the quality of the focused spot to increase. Since this property is strictly related to the size of the re-imaged spot on the pyramid pin, the better the wavefront correction, the higher the gain. Aims: The goal of this paper is to extend the descriptive and analytical computation of this gain that was given in a previous paper, to partial wavefront correction conditions, which are representative for most of the wide field correction adaptive optics systems. Methods: After focusing on the low Strehl ratio regime, we analyze the minimum spatial sampling required for the wavefront sensor correction to still experience a considerable gain in sensitivity between the pyramid and the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors. Results: We find that the gain can be described as a function of the sampling in terms of the Fried parameter.

  2. SPICE evaluation of the S/N ratio for Si microstrip detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Nardi, F.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.

    1999-10-01

    SPICE simulations of ac-coupled single-sided Si microstrip detectors connected to the PreShape 32 read-out chip have been performed in order to determine the geometrical characteristics (i.e., the strip pitch p and width w) which maximize the signal-to-noise ratio. All of the resistive and capacitive elements of the detector have been determined as a function of the w/p ratio by considering experimental and simulated data available in literature. The SPICE model the authors propose in this work takes into account all the main noise sources in the detector and read-out electronics. The minimum ionizing particle current signal shape has been introduced in the simulations. Two read-out configurations (every strip or every second strip) have been investigated for 6.4- and 12.8-cm-long detectors. The equivalent noise charge as determined by the simulations has been compared with analytical calculations, in order to determine the limits and the corrections to a simplified analytical noise model. Finally, general guidelines for the detector design have been proposed, based on the simulation results.

  3. A method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from the spectra of the LAMOST survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ji; Han, Chen; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Shi, Jian-Rong; Zhao, Jing-Kun; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Zhang, Hua-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Ci, Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Yue-Xiang; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Cao, Zi-Huang

    2016-07-01

    The [α/Fe] ratios in stars are good tracers to probe the formation history of stellar populations and the chemical evolution of the Galaxy. The spectroscopic survey of LAMOST provides a good opportunity to determine [α/Fe] of millions of stars in the Galaxy. We present a method of measuring the [α/Fe] ratios from LAMOST spectra using the template-matching technique of the LSP3 pipeline. We use three test samples of stars selected from the ELODIE and MILES libraries, as well as the LEGUE survey to validate our method. Based on the test results, we conclude that our method is valid for measuring [α/Fe] from low-resolution spectra acquired by the LAMOST survey. Within the range of the stellar parameters T eff = [5000, 7500] K, log g = [1.0, 5.0] dex and [Fe/H]= [-1.5, +0.5] dex, our [α/Fe] measurements are consistent with values derived from high-resolution spectra, and the accuracy of our [α/Fe] measurements from LAMOST spectra is better than 0.1 dex with spectral signal-to-noise higher than 20.

  4. Auditory masking in three pinnipeds: Aerial critical ratios and direct critical bandwidth measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southall, Brandon L.; Schusterman, Ronald J.; Kastak, David

    2003-09-01

    This study expands the limited understanding of pinniped aerial auditory masking and includes measurements at some of the relatively low frequencies predominant in many pinniped vocalizations. Behavioral techniques were used to obtain aerial critical ratios (CRs) within a hemianechoic chamber for a northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and a California sea lion (Zalophus californianus). Simultaneous, octave-band noise maskers centered at seven test frequencies (0.2-8.0 kHz) were used to determine aerial CRs. Narrower and variable bandwidth masking noise was also used in order to obtain direct critical bandwidths (CBWs). The aerial CRs are very similar in magnitude and in frequency-specific differences (increasing gradually with test frequency) to underwater CRs for these subjects, demonstrating that pinniped cochlear processes are similar both in air and water. While, like most mammals, these pinniped subjects apparently lack specialization for enhanced detection of specific frequencies over masking noise, they consistently detect signals across a wide range of frequencies at relatively low signal-to-noise ratios. Direct CBWs are 3.2 to 14.2 times wider than estimated based on aerial CRs. The combined masking data are significant in terms of assessing aerial anthropogenic noise impacts, effective aerial communicative ranges, and amphibious aspects of pinniped cochlear mechanics.

  5. Simultaneous suppression of noise and reverberation in cochlear implants using a ratio masking strategy

    PubMed Central

    Hazrati, Oldooz; Omid Sadjadi, Seyed; Loizou, Philipos C.; Hansen, John H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Cochlear implant (CI) recipients' ability to identify words is reduced in noisy or reverberant environments. The speech identification task for CI users becomes even more challenging in conditions where both reverberation and noise co-exist as they mask the spectro-temporal cues of speech in a rather complementary fashion. Ideal channel selection (ICS) was found to result in significantly more intelligible speech when applied to the noisy, reverberant, as well as noisy reverberant speech. In this study, a blind single-channel ratio masking strategy is presented to simultaneously suppress the negative effects of reverberation and noise on speech identification performance for CI users. In this strategy, noise power spectrum is estimated from the non-speech segments of the utterance while reverberation spectral variance is computed as a delayed and scaled version of the reverberant speech spectrum. Based on the estimated noise and reverberation power spectra, a weight between 0 and 1 is assigned to each time-frequency unit to form the final mask. Listening experiments conducted with CI users in two reverberant conditions (T60 = 0.6 and 0.8 s) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 15 dB indicate substantial improvements in speech intelligibility in both reverberant-alone and noisy reverberant conditions considered. PMID:24180786

  6. Resolution of five-component mixture using mean centering ratio and inverse least squares chemometrics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A comparative study of the use of mean centering of ratio spectra and inverse least squares for the resolution of paracetamol, methylparaben, propylparaben, chlorpheniramine maleate and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride has been achieved showing that the two chemometric methods provide a good example of the high resolving power of these techniques. Method (I) is the mean centering of ratio spectra which depends on using the mean centered ratio spectra in four successive steps that eliminates the derivative steps and therefore the signal to noise ratio is improved. The absorption spectra of prepared solutions were measured in the range of 220–280 nm. Method (II) is based on the inverse least squares that depend on updating developed multivariate calibration model. The absorption spectra of the prepared mixtures in the range 230–270 nm were recorded. Results The linear concentration ranges were 0–25.6, 0–15.0, 0–15.0, 0–45.0 and 0–100.0 μg mL-1 for paracetamol, methylparaben, propylparaben, chlorpheniramine maleate and pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, respectively. The mean recoveries for simultaneous determination were between 99.9-101.3% for the two methods. The two developed methods have been successfully used for prediction of five-component mixture in Decamol Flu syrup with good selectivity, high sensitivity and extremely low detection limit. Conclusion No published method has been reported for simultaneous determination of the five components of this mixture so that the results of the mean centering of ratio spectra method were compared with those of the proposed inverse least squares method. Statistical comparison was performed using t-test and F-ratio at P = 0.05. There was no significant difference between the results. PMID:24028626

  7. Calculation of the Cost of an Adequate Education in Kentucky: A Professional Judgment Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verstegen, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    What is an adequate education and how much does it cost? In 1989, Kentucky's State Supreme Court found the entire system of education unconstitutional--"all of its parts and parcels". The Court called for all children to have access to an adequate education, one that is uniform and has as its goal the development of seven capacities, including:…

  8. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  9. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exemptions for pesticides adequately... PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PESTICIDE REGISTRATION AND CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The...

  10. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  11. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  12. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  13. 21 CFR 801.5 - Medical devices; adequate directions for use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Medical devices; adequate directions for use. 801.5 Section 801.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 801.5 Medical devices; adequate...

  14. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  15. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  16. 40 CFR 152.20 - Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... regulated by another Federal agency. 152.20 Section 152.20 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Exemptions § 152.20 Exemptions for pesticides adequately regulated by another Federal agency. The pesticides... has determined, in accordance with FIFRA sec. 25(b)(1), that they are adequately regulated by...

  17. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  18. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  19. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and....568 Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination...

  20. 45 CFR 1159.15 - Who has the responsibility for maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent unauthorized disclosure or destruction of... of maintaining adequate technical, physical, and security safeguards to prevent...

  1. Combining double difference and amplitude ratio approaches for Q estimates at the NW Bohemia earthquake swarm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriegerowski, Marius; Cesca, Simone; Krüger, Frank; Dahm, Torsten; Horálek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Aside from the propagation velocity of seismic waves, their attenuation can provide a direct measure of rock properties in the sampled subspace. We present a new attenuation tomography approach exploiting relative amplitude spectral ratios of earthquake pairs. We focus our investigation on North West Bohemia - a region characterized by intense earthquake swarm activity in a confined source region. The inter-event distances are small compared to the epicentral distances to the receivers meeting a fundamental requirement of the method. Due to the similar event locations also the ray paths are very similar. Consequently, the relative spectral ratio is affected mostly by rock properties along the path of the vector distance and thus representative of the focal region. In order to exclude effects of the seismic source spectra, only the high frequency content beyond the corner frequency is taken into consideration. This requires high quality as well as high sampling records. Future improvements in that respect can be expected from the ICDP proposal "Eger rift", which includes plans to install borehole monitoring in the investigated region. 1D and 3D synthetic tests show the feasibility of the presented method. Furthermore, we demonstrate influences of perturbations in source locations and travel time estimates on the determination of Q. Errors in Q scale linearly with errors in the differential travel times. These sources of errors can be attributed to the complex velocity structure of the investigated region. A critical aspect is the signal-to-noise ratio, which imposes a strong limitation and emphasizes the demand for high quality recordings. Hence, the presented method is expected to benefit from bore hole installations. Since we focus our analysis on the NW Bohemia case study example, a synthetic earthquake catalog incorporating source characteristics deduced from preceding moment tensor inversions coupled with a realistic velocity model provides us with a realistic

  2. A multiple model SNR/RCS likelihood ratio score for radar-based feature-aided tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slocumb, Benjamin J.; Klusman, Michael E., III

    2005-09-01

    Most approaches to data association in target tracking use a likelihood-ratio based score for measurement-to-track and track-to-track matching. The classical approach uses a likelihood ratio based on kinematic data. Feature-aided tracking uses non-kinematic data to produce an "auxiliary score" that augments the kinematic score. This paper develops a nonkinematic likelihood ratio score based on statistical models for the signal-to-noise (SNR) and radar cross section (RCS) for use in narrowband radar tracking. The formulation requires an estimate of the target mean RCS, and a key challenge is the tracking of the mean RCS through significant "jumps" due to aspect dependencies. A novel multiple model approach is used track through the RCS jumps. Three solution are developed: one based on an α-filter, a second based on the median filter, and the third based on an IMM filter with a median pre-filter. Simulation results are presented that show the effectiveness of the multiple model approach for tracking through RCS transitions due to aspect-angle changes.

  3. Diphosphosinositol polyphosphates and energy metabolism: assay for ATP/ADP ratio.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Andreas; Barker, Christopher J; Berggren, Per-Olof; Illies, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Several inositol compounds undergo rapid cycles of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. These cycles are dependent on ATP and energy metabolism. Therefore, interfering with the cellular energy metabolism can change the concentration of rapidly turning over inositols. Many pharmacological inhibitors, apart from their intended action, also affect the energy metabolism of the cells and lower ATP. This can unspecifically influence rapidly turning over inositol phosphates. Thus, the ATP concentration should be checked when reduced inositol phosphates are observed after application of pharmacological inhibitors. A luminescence-based assay for the measurement of ATP and ADP is described. ATP is measured luminometrically using firefly luciferase. Detection of ADP is performed in a two-step enzymatic procedure: (1) The sample ATP is degraded to AMP and (2) ADP is phosphorylated to ATP, which can then be measured luminometrically. This method gives a better signal-to-noise ratio than other methods that do not degrade the sample ATP, but convert ADP directly to ATP and then measure the sum of ATP plus ADP.

  4. Signal noise ratio of small intestine myoelectrical signal recorded from external surface.

    PubMed

    Martinez-de-Juan, Jose L; Garcia-Casado, Javier; Ye, Yiyao; Guardiola, Jose L; Ponce, Jose L

    2006-01-01

    Electroenterogram (EEnG), which is the myoelectrical activity of the small bowel, can be non-invasively recorded from abdominal external surface. However, this bioelectrical signal is weak and noisy compared to internal recording from bowel serous layers, because of bioelectric transmission through abdominal layers. Furthermore, it is contaminated with several interferences from other biological activities as cardiac muscle (ECG), skeletal muscles (EMG), or respiration movements. The goal of present work is to study abdominal recording of EEnG and its signal-to-noise ratio by means of the coherence estimation technique. External and internal recordings were obtained simultaneously in 12 sessions, which went on more than two hours in six beagle dogs. Coherence function, based on periodograms, is estimated in periods of 15 minutes. Thus, SNR is calculated from coherence estimation for each recording session. Results show that SNR reaches a maximum value of 8.8 dB for 0.31 Hz, which corresponds to fundamental frequency of the EEnG slow wave. However, SNR is weak at frequencies upper 2 Hz, which corresponds to rapid action potentials (spike bursts) of the EEnG. In conclusion, slow wave can be clearly identified in abdominal recording; however spike bursts are contaminated by noise, attenuation and biological interferences.

  5. The Need for Domestic Violence Laws with Adequate Legal and Social Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmons, Willa M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the need for comprehensive domestic violence programs that include medical, legal, economic, psychological, and child care services. Although most states have family violence legislation, more work is needed to adequately implement these programs. (Author/JAC)

  6. Gravitational Wave Modelling of Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals and the Effective-One-Body Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolás

    2009-11-01

    Accurate and efficient models to calculate the gravitational wave response of the proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna are crucial for the accurate extraction of physical parameters from noisy data, especially for moderate signal-to-noise ratio events. One of the most challenging and interesting sources of such waves are extreme-mass ratio inspirals, where a small compact object winds into a supermassive black hole in a generic orbit. The interest in these sources stems from their ability to accurately map the spacetime around supermassive black holes, thus revealing otherwise inaccessible astrophysical information and allowing for exquisite tests of general relativity. The difficulty in modelling gravitational waves produced in such inspirals is two-fold. First, extreme-mass ratio orbits are generic, including zoom-whirl episodes where the small object pirouettes in the strong gravitational field of the supermassive black hole at large velocities. Second, gravitat! ional waves generated by these sources can contain millions of cycles in the detector's sensitivity band, and thus a small error in the modelling can lead to a large accumulated error in the template after a one-year observation. For these reasons, one must develop sophisticated techniques to approximate these waves as accurately and efficiently as possible. This article focuses on these techniques, explaining the difficulty in the modelling and suggesting possible routes to their resolution. We first set the stage through a brief summary of some of the current models available for constructing approximate extreme-mass ratio inspiral templates. We then introduce in detail a new scheme that combines ingredients from both black hole perturbation theory and the effective-one-body approach. We conclude with comparisons between this new scheme and Teukolsky-based waveforms for quasi-circular inspirals into non-spinning supermassive black holes.

  7. A new method for determining the 3He/4He ratio in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoine, M.; Vidal-Madjar, A.; Ferlet, R.

    1993-06-01

    We propose here an original method for estimating the 3He/4 Heratio in the local diffuse interstellar medium at a low cost from an observational point of view. The main idea is to measure the shift in radial velocity of the 4He λ537Å and λ584Å lines due to the presence of 3He in the red wing of these lines, and to compare the observed shift to the shifts obtained through numerical simulations for different 3He/4He ratios. We performed such simulations in order to reveal the efficiency of this method, using typical astrophysical conditions and instrumental parameters corresponding to the Lyman-FUSE mission. We find that this method should yield the 3He/4He ratio with a 1 σ uncertainty ˜50% at a spectral resolving power R=30 000 and a signal-to-noise ratio S/N=50. This method thus appears more adapted to a forehand estimation of the interstellar 3He/4He ratio than the standard profile fitting method, which should yield a 1 σ uncertainty of 10% at R=30 000 and S/N ≃ 290 (Hurwitz & Bowyer, t985). Finally, our method should be able to settle the evolutionary status of 3He if 3He has been significantly enhanced or depleted in the last 4.6 Gyr. Combined with the measurement of the deuterium abundance on the same line of sight (already programmed on HST), this might yield very important constraint on Big-Bang nucleosynthesis consistency.

  8. Accurate and automated image segmentation of 3D optical coherence tomography data suffering from low signal-to-noise levels.

    PubMed

    Su, Rong; Ekberg, Peter; Leitner, Michael; Mattsson, Lars

    2014-12-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has proven to be a useful tool for investigating internal structures in ceramic tapes, and the technique is expected to be important for roll-to-roll manufacturing. However, because of high scattering in ceramic materials, noise and speckles deteriorate the image quality, which makes automated quantitative measurements of internal interfaces difficult. To overcome this difficulty we present in this paper an innovative image analysis approach based on volumetric OCT data. The engine in the analysis is a 3D image processing and analysis algorithm. It is dedicated to boundary segmentation and dimensional measurement in volumetric OCT images, and offers high accuracy, efficiency, robustness, subpixel resolution, and a fully automated operation. The method relies on the correlation property of a physical interface and effectively eliminates pixels caused by noise and speckles. The remaining pixels being stored are the ones confirmed to be related to the target interfaces. Segmentation of tilted and curved internal interfaces separated by ∼10  μm in the Z direction is demonstrated. The algorithm also extracts full-field top-view intensity maps of the target interfaces for high-accuracy measurements in the X and Y directions. The methodology developed here may also be adopted in other similar 3D imaging and measurement technologies, e.g., ultrasound imaging, and for various materials. PMID:25606743

  9. Patient acceptance of adequately filled breast implants using the tilt test.

    PubMed

    Tebbetts, J B

    2000-07-01

    Adequate fill of any breast implant, regardless of shell characteristics, shape, or filler material, is important to prevent implant shell wrinkling, folding, or collapse that could potentially decrease the life of the implant. Implant shell life is a major factor that affects reoperation rates. The greater the necessity of reoperations, regardless of implant type, the greater the rate of local complications, necessitating additional surgery with additional risks and costs to patients. Palpable shell folding, visible wrinkling or rippling, palpable shifts of filler material, sloshing, and compromised aesthetic results can result from an under-filled implant. Any of these complications can necessitate reoperations with increased risks and costs to patients. This is a study of 609 consecutive patients from January of 1993 to December of 1998 who were given detailed preoperative informed consent and a choice of implant shape and type and who chose the increased firmness associated with an implant that is adequately filled to pass the tilt test. This study addresses two questions: (1) Will patients accept the increased firmness of an implant that is filled to pass the tilt test? and (2) Is adequate fill by the tilt test useful clinically to help reduce the incidence of postoperative rippling, wrinkling, and spontaneous deflation in saline implants? Patients were followed by postoperative examinations and questionnaires. No patient requested implant replacement to a softer implant postoperatively, and no reoperations were performed for visible rippling or wrinkling. The spontaneous deflation rate over this 6-year period was 9 of 1218 implants, or 0.739 percent. If patients will accept more firmness with an adequately filled implant, regardless of the filler material, surgeons might worry less about recommending an adequately filled implant to patients, and manufacturers might feel more comfortable producing adequately filled implants and redefining fill volumes for

  10. The Golden Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Hartley

    2004-01-01

    The Golden Ratio is sometimes called the "Golden Section" or the "Divine Proportion", in which three points: A, B, and C, divide a line in this proportion if AC/AB = AB/BC. "Donald in Mathmagicland" includes a section about the Golden Ratio and the ratios within a five-pointed star or pentagram. This article presents two computing exercises that…

  11. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2 dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3 dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles.

  12. A sensitive label-free amperometric immunosensor for alpha-fetoprotein based on gold nanorods with different aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunyang; Liu, Dali; Xu, Lin; Li, Qingling; Song, Jian; Xu, Sai; Xing, Ruiqing; Song, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    A simple and accurate label-free amperometric immunosensor for α-fetoprotein (AFP) detection is developed based on gold nanorods (GNRs) with different aspect ratio and compared with gold particles (GNPs). The positively charged GNRs and GNPs due to the surface immobilized cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) can adsorb the negatively charged AFP antibody (Ab) directly. The presence of the GNRs not only enhanced the immobilized amount of biomolecules, but also improved the electrochemical properties of the immunosensor. With the aid of GNRs, the electrochemical signal was greatly enhanced in comparison with GNPs. Under optimal conditions, the proposed immunosensor could detect AFP in a linear range from 0.1 to 200 ng/mL with a detection limit of 0.04 ng/mL (signal-to-noise ratio = 3), and it also possessed good reproducibility and storage stability. Moreover, the detection of AFP in five human serum samples also showed satisfactory accuracy. The proposed methodology was potentially attractive for clinical immunoassay. PMID:25909588

  13. 1 Tbit/inch2 Recording in Angular-Multiplexing Holographic Memory with Constant Signal-to-Scatter Ratio Schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Makoto; Ishii, Toshiki; Tanaka, Asato; Koga, Shogo; Hoshizawa, Taku

    2013-09-01

    We developed an iterative method for optimizing the exposure schedule to obtain a constant signal-to-scatter ratio (SSR) to accommodate various recording conditions and achieve high-density recording. 192 binary images were recorded in the same location of a medium in approximately 300×300 µm2 using an experimental system embedded with a blue laser diode with a 405 nm wavelength and an objective lens with a 0.85 numerical aperture. The recording density of this multiplexing corresponds to 1 Tbit/in.2. The recording exposure time was optimized through the iteration of a three-step sequence consisting of total reproduced intensity measurement, target signal calculation, and recording energy density calculation. The SSR of pages recorded with this method was almost constant throughout the entire range of the reference beam angle. The signal-to-noise ratio of the sampled pages was over 2.9 dB, which is higher than the reproducible limit of 1.5 dB in our experimental system.

  14. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-01-01

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent “on” to “off” state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm2) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  15. Highly photostable, reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein with high contrast ratio for live-cell superresolution microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Zhang, Mingshu; Li, Dong; He, Wenting; Peng, Jianxin; Betzig, Eric; Xu, Pingyong

    2016-09-13

    Two long-standing problems for superresolution (SR) fluorescence microscopy are high illumination intensity and long acquisition time, which significantly hamper its application for live-cell imaging. Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) have made it possible to dramatically lower the illumination intensities in saturated depletion-based SR techniques, such as saturated depletion nonlinear structured illumination microscopy (NL-SIM) and reversible saturable optical fluorescence transition microscopy. The characteristics of RSFPs most critical for SR live-cell imaging include, first, the integrated fluorescence signal across each switching cycle, which depends upon the absorption cross-section, effective quantum yield, and characteristic switching time from the fluorescent "on" to "off" state; second, the fluorescence contrast ratio of on/off states; and third, the photostability under excitation and depletion. Up to now, the RSFPs of the Dronpa and rsEGFP (reversibly switchable EGFP) families have been exploited for SR imaging. However, their limited number of switching cycles, relatively low fluorescence signal, and poor contrast ratio under physiological conditions ultimately restrict their utility in time-lapse live-cell imaging and their ability to reach the desired resolution at a reasonable signal-to-noise ratio. Here, we present a truly monomeric RSFP, Skylan-NS, whose properties are optimized for the recently developed patterned activation NL-SIM, which enables low-intensity (∼100 W/cm(2)) live-cell SR imaging at ∼60-nm resolution at subsecond acquisition times for tens of time points over broad field of view. PMID:27562163

  16. Sparse maximum harmonics-to-noise-ratio deconvolution for weak fault signature detection in bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Yonghao; Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang

    2016-10-01

    De-noising and enhancement of the weak fault signature from the noisy signal are crucial for fault diagnosis, as features are often very weak and masked by the background noise. Deconvolution methods have a significant advantage in counteracting the influence of the transmission path and enhancing the fault impulses. However, the performance of traditional deconvolution methods is greatly affected by some limitations, which restrict the application range. Therefore, this paper proposes a new deconvolution method, named sparse maximum harmonics-noise-ratio deconvolution (SMHD), that employs a novel index, the harmonics-to-noise ratio (HNR), to be the objective function for iteratively choosing the optimum filter coefficients to maximize HNR. SMHD is designed to enhance latent periodic impulse faults from heavy noise signals by calculating the HNR to estimate the period. A sparse factor is utilized to further suppress the noise and improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the filtered signal in every iteration step. In addition, the updating process of the sparse threshold value and the period guarantees the robustness of SMHD. On this basis, the new method not only overcomes the limitations associated with traditional deconvolution methods, minimum entropy deconvolution (MED) and maximum correlated kurtosis deconvolution (MCKD), but visual inspection is also better, even if the fault period is not provided in advance. Moreover, the efficiency of the proposed method is verified by simulations and bearing data from different test rigs. The results show that the proposed method is effective in the detection of various bearing faults compared with the original MED and MCKD.

  17. Self-reported segregation experience throughout the life course and its association with adequate health literacy.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Melody S; Gaskin, Darrell J; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D; Lachance, Christina; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2012-09-01

    Residential segregation has been shown to be associated with health outcomes and health care utilization. We examined the association between racial composition of five physical environments throughout the life course and adequate health literacy among 836 community health center patients in Suffolk County, NY. Respondents who attended a mostly White junior high school or currently lived in a mostly White neighborhood were more likely to have adequate health literacy compared to those educated or living in predominantly minority or diverse environments. This association was independent of the respondent's race, ethnicity, age, education, and country of birth.

  18. Comparative performance study of different sample introduction techniques for rapid and precise selenium isotope ratio determination using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP/MS).

    PubMed

    Elwaer, Nagmeddin; Hintelmann, Holger

    2007-11-01

    The analytical performance of five sample introduction systems, a cross flow nebulizer spray chamber, two different solvent desolvation systems, a multi-mode sample introduction system (MSIS), and a hydride generation (LI2) system were compared for the determination of Se isotope ratio measurements using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP/MS). The optimal operating parameters for obtaining the highest Se signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios and isotope ratio precision for each sample introduction were determined. The hydride generation (LI2) system was identified as the most suitable sample introduction method yielding maximum sensitivity and precision for Se isotope ratio measurement. It provided five times higher S/N ratios for all Se isotopes compared to the MSIS, 20 times the S/N ratios of both desolvation units, and 100 times the S/N ratios produced by the conventional spray chamber sample introduction method. The internal precision achieved for the (78)Se/(82)Se ratio at 100 ng mL(-1) Se with the spray chamber, two desolvation, MSIS, and the LI2 systems coupled to MC-ICP/MS was 150, 125, 114, 13, and 7 ppm, respectively. Instrument mass bias factors (K) were calculated using an exponential law correction function. Among the five studied sample introduction systems the LI2 showed the lowest mass bias of -0.0265 and the desolvation system showed the largest bias with -0.0321. PMID:17726602

  19. 75 FR 5893 - Suspension of Community Eligibility for Failure To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... FR 51735. Executive Order 13132, Federalism. This rule involves no policies that have ] federalism....C. 4001 et seq., Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, 3 CFR, 1978 Comp., p. 329; E.O. 12127, 44 FR... To Maintain Adequate Floodplain Management Regulations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management...

  20. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... interest (the stated rate of interest) on deferred or prepaid fixed rent at a single fixed rate (as defined in § 1.1273-1(c)(1)(iii)); (B) The stated rate of interest on fixed rent is no lower than 110 percent... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph...

  1. Towards Defining Adequate Lithium Trials for Individuals with Mental Retardation and Mental Illness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pary, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Use of lithium with mentally retarded individuals with psychiatric conditions and/or behavior disturbances is discussed. The paper describes components of an adequate clinical trial and reviews case studies and double-blind cases. The paper concludes that aggression is the best indicator for lithium use, and reviews treatment parameters and…

  2. How Much and What Kind? Identifying an Adequate Technology Infrastructure for Early Childhood Education. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Lindsay; Dossani, Rafiq; Johnson, Erin-Elizabeth; Wright, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    To realize the potential benefits of technology use in early childhood education (ECE), and to ensure that technology can help to address the digital divide, providers, families of young children, and young children themselves must have access to an adequate technology infrastructure. The goals for technology use in ECE that a technology…

  3. Evaluating the Reliability of Selected School-Based Indices of Adequate Reading Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Courtney E.

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined the stability (i.e., 4-month and 12-month test-retest reliability) of six selected school-based indices of adequate reading progress. The total sampling frame included between 3970 and 5655 schools depending on the index and research question. Each school had at least 40 second-grade students that had complete Oral…

  4. Understanding the pelvic pain mechanism is key to find an adequate therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Van Kerrebroeck, Philip

    2016-06-25

    Pain is a natural mechanism to actual or potential tissue damage and involves both a sensory and an emotional experience. In chronic pelvic pain, localisation of pain can be widespread and can cause considerable distress. A multidisciplinary approach is needed in order to fully understand the pelvic pain mechanism and to identify an adequate therapeutic approach.

  5. 33 CFR 155.4050 - Ensuring that the salvors and marine firefighters are adequate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ensuring that the salvors and marine firefighters are adequate. 155.4050 Section 155.4050 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION...

  6. Performance Effects of Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP): Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemelt, Steven W.

    2011-01-01

    As the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law moves through the reauthorization process, it is important to understand the basic performance impacts of its central structure of accountability. In this paper, I examine the effects of failure to make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) under NCLB on subsequent student math and reading performance at the school…

  7. Determining Adequate Yearly Progress in a State Performance or Proficiency Index Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erpenbach, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present an overview regarding how several states use a performance or proficiency index in their determination of adequate yearly progress (AYP) under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). Typically, indexes are based on one of two weighting schemes: (1) either they weight academic performance levels--also…

  8. The Relationship between Parental Involvement and Adequate Yearly Progress among Urban, Suburban, and Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Krenn, Huilan Y.

    2014-01-01

    Using national data from the 2007-08 School and Staffing Survey, we compared the relationships between parental involvement and school outcomes related to adequate yearly progress (AYP) in urban, suburban, and rural schools. Parent-initiated parental involvement demonstrated significantly positive relationships with both making AYP and staying off…

  9. Effect of tranquilizers on animal resistance to the adequate stimuli of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maksimovich, Y. B.; Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of tranquilizers on vestibulospinal reflexes and motor activity was studied in 900 centrifuged albino mice. Actometric studies have shown that the tranquilizers have a group capacity for increasing animal resistance to the action of adequate stimuli to the vestibular apparatus.

  10. Human milk feeding supports adequate growth in infants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite current nutritional strategies, premature infants remain at high risk for extrauterine growth restriction. The use of an exclusive human milk-based diet is associated with decreased incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but concerns exist about infants achieving adequate growth. The ...

  11. [Factors associated with adequate fruit and vegetable intake by schoolchildren in Santa Catarina State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Costa, Larissa da Cunha Feio; Vasconcelos, Francisco de Assis Guedes de; Corso, Arlete Catarina Tittoni

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to estimate fruit and vegetable intake and identify associated factors among schoolchildren in Santa Catarina State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 4,964 students from public and private schools in eight districts in the State, analyzing socioeconomic and anthropometric data and dietary intake. Adequate fruit and vegetable intake was defined as five or more servings per day. Poisson regression was performed to test associations between fruit and vegetable intake and independent variables (p < 0.05). Adequate intake was found in 2.7% of children, while 26.6% of the sample did not consume any fruits and vegetables. In the analysis of the association between independent variables and adequate fruit and vegetable intake in the total sample, only geographic region (residents in western Santa Catarina) and consumption of candy were significantly associated. In the stratified analysis by sex, for boys, only geographic region was associated, while among girls, region and candy consumption were significantly associated with adequate fruit and vegetable intake. The findings indicate the need for specific strategies in the school community to improve fruit and vegetable intake by schoolchildren.

  12. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  13. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  14. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  15. 42 CFR 438.207 - Assurances of adequate capacity and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Assurances of adequate capacity and services. 438.207 Section 438.207 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS MANAGED CARE Quality Assessment and...

  16. Percentage of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels Are Adequately Controlled

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adults with High Cholesterol Whose LDL Cholesterol Levels are Adequately Controlled High cholesterol can double a ... with High Cholesterol that is Controlled by Education Level 8k4c-k22f Download these data » Click on legends ...

  17. Perceptions of Teachers in Their First Year of School Restructuring: Failure to Make Adequate Yearly Progress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    The 2007-2008 school year marked the first year Florida's Title I schools that did not made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for five consecutive years entered into restructuring as mandated by the "No Child Left Behind Act" of 2001. My study examines the perceptions of teacher entering into their first year of school restructuring due to failure to…

  18. The Unequal Effect of Adequate Yearly Progress: Evidence from School Visits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Abigail B.; Clift, Jack W.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report insights, based on annual site visits to elementary and middle schools in three states from 2004 to 2006, into the incentive effect of the No Child Left Behind Act's requirement that increasing percentages of students make Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) in every public school. They develop a framework, drawing on the physics…

  19. Influenza 2005-2006: vaccine supplies adequate, but bird flu looms.

    PubMed

    Mossad, Sherif B

    2005-11-01

    Influenza vaccine supplies appear to be adequate for the 2005-2006 season, though delivery has been somewhat delayed. However, in the event of a pandemic of avian flu-considered inevitable by most experts, although no one knows when it will happen-the United States would be woefully unprepared. PMID:16315443

  20. Prenatal zinc supplementation of zinc-adequate rats adversely affects immunity in offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We previously showed that zinc (Zn) supplementation of Zn-adequate dams induced immunosuppressive effects that persist in the offspring after weaning. We investigated whether the immunosuppressive effects were due to in utero exposure and/or mediated via milk using a cross-fostering design. Pregnant...

  1. Inferential Processing among Adequate and Struggling Adolescent Comprehenders and Relations to Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Amy E.; Barnes, Marcia; Francis, David; Vaughn, Sharon; York, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Separate mixed model analyses of variance were conducted to examine the effect of textual distance on the accuracy and speed of text consistency judgments among adequate and struggling comprehenders across grades 6-12 (n = 1,203). Multiple regressions examined whether accuracy in text consistency judgments uniquely accounted for variance in…

  2. What Is the Cost of an Adequate Vermont High School Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rucker, Frank D.

    2010-01-01

    Access to an adequate education has been widely considered an undeniable right since Chief Justice Warren stated in his landmark decision that "Today, education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments...it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if he is denied the opportunity of an…

  3. Calculating and Reducing Errors Associated with the Evaluation of Adequate Yearly Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Richard

    In the Spring, 1996, issue of "CRESST Line," E. Baker and R. Linn commented that, in efforts to measure the progress of schools, "the fluctuations due to differences in the students themselves could conceal differences in instructional effects." This is particularly true in the context of the evaluation of adequate yearly progress required by…

  4. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, if a section 467 rental agreement provides for variable interest, the rental... date as the issue date) for the variable rates called for by the rental agreement. For purposes of...

  5. 26 CFR 1.467-2 - Rent accrual for section 467 rental agreements without adequate interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... provide for a variable rate of interest. For purposes of the adequate interest test under paragraph (b)(1) of this section, if a section 467 rental agreement provides for variable interest, the rental... date as the issue date) for the variable rates called for by the rental agreement. For purposes of...

  6. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  7. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  8. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  9. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  10. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  11. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  12. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  13. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  14. 9 CFR 2.40 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care (dealers and exhibitors). 2.40 Section 2.40 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Attending...

  15. 9 CFR 2.33 - Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attending veterinarian and adequate veterinary care. 2.33 Section 2.33 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.33 Attending veterinarian...

  16. 36 CFR 13.960 - Who determines when there is adequate snow cover?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who determines when there is adequate snow cover? 13.960 Section 13.960 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Denali National Park...

  17. 42 CFR 417.568 - Adequate financial records, statistical data, and cost finding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Adequate financial records, statistical data, and... financial records, statistical data, and cost finding. (a) Maintenance of records. (1) An HMO or CMP must maintain sufficient financial records and statistical data for proper determination of costs payable by...

  18. Rain radars for earth science geostationary platforms: Some possibilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S. P.; Moore, R. K.

    1989-01-01

    Results of a feasibility study for a geostationary rain radar are presented. A 2-cm wavelength radar with a 15 to 20 mm antenna will be useful for general scale meteorology. The transmitter power of 500 W with a pulse compression ratio of 200 will provide adequate signal-to-noise ratio for a rain rate of 1 mm/hour. Various problems associated with a geostationary radar and solutions are also discussed.

  19. Compression Ratio Adjuster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    New mechanism alters compression ratio of internal-combustion engine according to load so that engine operates at top fuel efficiency. Ordinary gasoline, diesel and gas engines with their fixed compression ratios are inefficient at partial load and at low-speed full load. Mechanism ensures engines operate as efficiently under these conditions as they do at highload and high speed.

  20. Offer/Acceptance Ratio.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Mimi

    1997-01-01

    Explores how human resource professionals, with above average offer/acceptance ratios, streamline their recruitment efforts. Profiles company strategies with internships, internal promotion, cooperative education programs, and how to get candidates to accept offers. Also discusses how to use the offer/acceptance ratio as a measure of program…

  1. Detecting isotopic ratio outliers

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, C.K.; Smith, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    An alternative method is proposed for improving isotopic ratio estimates. This method mathematically models pulse-count data and uses iterative reweighted Poisson regression to estimate model parameters to calculate the isotopic ratios. This computer-oriented approach provides theoretically better methods than conventional techniques to establish error limits and to identify outliers. 6 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Specialized ratio analysis.

    PubMed

    Wyer, J C; Salzinger, F H

    1983-01-01

    Many common management techniques have little use in managing a medical group practice. Ratio analysis, however, can easily be adapted to the group practice setting. Acting as broad-gauge indicators, financial ratios provide an early warning of potential problems and can be very useful in planning for future operations. The author has gathered a collection of financial ratios which were developed by participants at an education seminar presented for the Virginia Medical Group Management Association. Classified according to the human element, system component, and financial factor, the ratios provide a good sampling of measurements relevant to medical group practices and can serve as an example for custom-tailoring a ratio analysis system for your medical group.

  3. Hyper-entanglement based sensor with reduced measurement time and enhanced signal to interference ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James F.

    2014-05-01

    An array of hyper-entanglement based sensors made up of quantum hyper-entangled systems will be considered. Each hyper-entangled system will consists of a single hyper-entangled signal and single ancilla photon. The effect of noise in every mode as well as loss is included. The signal photon will experience classical loss and each ancilla photon will suffer a low level of loss. Forming an array offers the further advantage of a greater reduction in measurement time. It is shown mathematically that in the large d limit, where d is the number of modes, that different members of the array do not interfere with each other implying they can be put close together. This permits an enormous reduction in the measurement time, i.e. the time-on-target. Each hyper-entangled system making up the array receives a factor of d improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) and a factor of d reduction in measurement time. If M measurements are needed for a given level of resolution or decision quality then instead of having one hyper-entanglement pair, M hyper-entanglement pairs can be used. Unlike a classical radar or ladar, this system can image a target essentially with a snapshot from the many photon sources making up the array. Closed form results for the wave function, reduced density operator, gamma-expansion, probability of detection, probability of false alarm, SNR, SIR, Quantum Fisher information (QFI), quantum-Cramer-Rao lower bound (QCRLB), quantum Chernoff bound (QCB), and estimates for the number of required measurements are provided.

  4. STELLAR MASS-TO-LIGHT RATIOS FROM GALAXY SPECTRA: HOW ACCURATE CAN THEY BE?

    SciTech Connect

    Gallazzi, Anna; Bell, Eric F. E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu

    2009-12-01

    Stellar masses play a crucial role in the exploration of galaxy properties and the evolution of the galaxy population. In this paper, we explore the minimum possible uncertainties in stellar mass-to-light ratios (M {sub *}/L) from the assumed star formation history (SFH) and metallicity distribution, with the goals of providing a minimum set of requirements for observational studies. We use a large Monte Carlo library of SFHs to study as a function of galaxy spectral type and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) the statistical uncertainties of M {sub *}/L values using either absorption-line data or broadband colors. The accuracy of M {sub *}/L estimates can be significantly improved by using metal-sensitive indices in combination with age-sensitive indices, in particular for galaxies with intermediate-age or young stellar populations. While M {sub *}/L accuracy clearly depends on the spectral S/N, there is no significant gain in improving the S/N much above 50 pixel{sup -1} and limiting uncertainties of {approx}0.03 dex are reached. Assuming that dust is accurately corrected or absent and that the redshift is known, color-based M {sub *}/L estimates are only slightly more uncertain than spectroscopic estimates (at comparable spectroscopic and photometric quality), but are more easily affected by systematic biases. This is the case in particular for galaxies with bursty SFHs (high H{delta} {sub A} at fixed D4000 {sub n}), the M {sub *}/L of which cannot be constrained any better than {approx}0.15 dex with any indicators explored here. Finally, we explore the effects of the assumed prior distribution in SFHs and metallicity, finding them to be higher for color-based estimates.

  5. The stability and calibration of water vapor isotope ratio measurements during long-term deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, A.; Noone, D.; Berkelhammer, M.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Sato, P.

    2015-10-01

    With the recent advent of commercial laser absorption spectrometers, field studies measuring stable isotope ratios of hydrogen and oxygen in water vapor have proliferated. These pioneering analyses have provided invaluable feedback about best strategies for optimizing instrumental accuracy, yet questions still remain about instrument performance and calibration approaches for multi-year field deployments. With clear scientific potential for using these instruments to carry out monitoring of the hydrological cycle, this study examines the long-term stability of the isotopic biases associated with three cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometers - calibrated with different systems and approaches - at two remote field sites: Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, USA, and Greenland Environmental Observatory, Summit, Greenland. The analysis pays particular attention to the stability of measurement dependencies on water vapor concentration and also evaluates whether these so-called concentration dependences are sensitive to statistical curve-fitting choices or measurement hysteresis. The results suggest evidence of monthly-to-seasonal concentration-dependence variability - which likely stems from low signal-to-noise at the humidity-range extremes - but no long-term directional drift. At Mauna Loa, where the isotopic analyzer is calibrated by injection of liquid water standards into a vaporizer, the largest source of inaccuracy in characterizing the concentration dependence stems from an insufficient density of calibration points at low water vapor volume mixing ratios. In comparison, at Summit, the largest source of inaccuracy is measurement hysteresis associated with interactions between the reference vapor, generated by a custom dew point generator, and the sample tubing. Nevertheless, prediction errors associated with correcting the concentration dependence are small compared to total measurement uncertainty. At both sites, changes in measurement repeatability that are

  6. Comparing the precision of selenium isotope ratio measurements using collision cell and sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Elwaer, Nagmeddin; Hintelmann, Holger

    2008-03-15

    The performance of two different types of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) instruments for resolving spectral overlaps on Se isotopes was compared by means of selenium isotopic ratio measurements. Examined were a quadrupole-based, hexapole collisions cell CC-ICP-MS and a double-focusing sector field SF-ICP-MS. Due to the importance of precise and accurate isotope ratio determination in environmental, clinical and nutritional studies, a thorough investigation of the critical instrumental parameters of each technique was performed. A hydride generation system was coupled with SF-ICP-MS to maintain high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) at high mass resolution. However, 80Se+ was not completely separated from the argon dimer (40)Ar2+ at m/z=80, even in high-resolution mode. The same hydride generation system was coupled to a collision cell instrument and it was found that argon dimers are significantly reduced using a mixture of H2 and He gas with the cell. A lower mass bias of 2.5% per amu was determined for measured Se isotopes using the SF-ICP-MS instrument compared 3.6% observed for the CC-ICP-MS instrument. Under optimized conditions, the precision for Se isotope ratio measurements of both instruments was evaluated and compared measuring NIST-3149 Se standard solution. On average, the uncertainty determined by repeated measurements over the span of three individual measuring sessions in a period of 3 weeks ranged from 0.06% to 0.15% and 0.09% to 0.30% R.S.D. for the various isotope ratios using the CC-ICP-MS and SF-ICP-MS instrument, respectively. The detection limits (3) for total Se were determined by measuring 82Se and found to be 1.7 and 4.0 ng L(-1) for the CC-ICP-MS and SF-ICP-MS, respectively. PMID:18371869

  7. Ensuring smokers are adequately informed: reflections on consumer rights, manufacturer responsibilities, and policy implications

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, S; Liberman, J

    2005-01-01

    The right to information is a fundamental consumer value. Following the advent of health warnings, the tobacco industry has repeatedly asserted that smokers are fully informed of the risks they take, while evidence demonstrates widespread superficial levels of awareness and understanding. There remains much that tobacco companies could do to fulfil their responsibilities to inform smokers. We explore issues involved in the meaning of "adequately informed" smoking and discuss some of the key policy and regulatory implications. We use the idea of a smoker licensing scheme—under which it would be illegal to sell to smokers who had not demonstrated an adequate level of awareness—as a device to explore some of these issues. We also explore some of the difficulties that addiction poses for the notion that smokers might ever voluntarily assume the risks of smoking. PMID:16046703

  8. The concept of adequate causation and Max Weber's comparative sociology of religion.

    PubMed

    Buss, A

    1999-06-01

    Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, studied in isolation, shows mainly an elective affinity or an adequacy on the level of meaning between the Protestant ethic and the 'spirit' of capitalism. Here it is suggested that Weber's subsequent essays on 'The Economic Ethics of World Religions' are the result of his opinion that adequacy on the level of meaning needs and can be verified by causal adequacy. After some introductory remarks, particularly on elective affinity, the paper tries to develop the concept of adequate causation and the related concept of objective possibility on the basis of the work of v. Kries on whom Weber heavily relied. In the second part, this concept is used to show how the study of the economic ethics of India, China, Rome and orthodox Russia can support the thesis that the 'spirit' of capitalism, although it may not have been caused by the Protestant ethic, was perhaps adequately caused by it. PMID:15260028

  9. Ensuring smokers are adequately informed: reflections on consumer rights, manufacturer responsibilities, and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Chapman, S; Liberman, J

    2005-08-01

    The right to information is a fundamental consumer value. Following the advent of health warnings, the tobacco industry has repeatedly asserted that smokers are fully informed of the risks they take, while evidence demonstrates widespread superficial levels of awareness and understanding. There remains much that tobacco companies could do to fulfil their responsibilities to inform smokers. We explore issues involved in the meaning of "adequately informed" smoking and discuss some of the key policy and regulatory implications. We use the idea of a smoker licensing scheme-under which it would be illegal to sell to smokers who had not demonstrated an adequate level of awareness-as a device to explore some of these issues. We also explore some of the difficulties that addiction poses for the notion that smokers might ever voluntarily assume the risks of smoking. PMID:16046703

  10. Myth 19: Is Advanced Placement an Adequate Program for Gifted Students?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Shelagh A.

    2009-01-01

    Is it a myth that Advanced Placement (AP) is an adequate program for gifted students? AP is so covered with myths and assumptions that it is hard to get a clear view of the issues. In this article, the author finds the answer about AP by looking at current realties. First, AP is hard for gifted students to avoid. Second, AP never was a program…

  11. Birthweight ratio revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Brownlee, K G; Ng, P C; Roussounis, S H; Dear, P R

    1991-01-01

    In order to test the hypothesis suggested in a recent report that the birthweight ratio might be a useful predictor of several important clinical outcome measures in babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation, we examined the association between the birthweight ratio and aspects of both short and long term outcome in 436 Leeds babies of less than 31 weeks' gestation. Unlike the report, and contrary to what we had expected, we were unable to find any significant association between birthweight ratio and length of time on the ventilator, mortality, neurological outcome, or intellectual outcome. PMID:2025035

  12. Bioelement effects on thyroid gland in children living in iodine-adequate territory.

    PubMed

    Gorbachev, Anatoly L; Skalny, Anatoly V; Koubassov, Roman V

    2007-01-01

    Endemic goitre is a primary pathology of thyroid gland and critical medico social problem in many countries. A dominant cause of endemic goitre is iodine deficiency. However, besides primary iodine deficiency, the goitre may probably develop due to effects of other bioelement imbalances, essential to thyroid function maintenance. Here we studied 44 cases of endemic goitre in prepubertal children (7-10 y.o.) living in iodine-adequate territory. Thyroid volume was estimated by ultrasonometry. Main bioelements (Al, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, Mg, Mn, Pb, Se, Si, Zn) were determined in hair samples by ICP-OES/ICP-MS method. Relationships between hair content of bioelements and thyroid gland size were estimated by multiple regressions. The regression model revealed significant positive relations between thyroid volume and Cr, Si, Mn contents. However, the actual factor of thyroid gland increase was only Si excess in organism. Significant negative relations of thyroid volume were revealed with I, Mg, Zn, Se, Co and Cd. In spite of this, the actual factors of thyroid gland volume increasing were I, Co, Mg and Se deficiency. Total bioelement contribution in thyroid impairment was estimated as 24%. Thus, it was suggested that endemic goitre in iodine-adequate territory can be formed by bioelement imbalances, namely Si excess and Co, Mg, Se shortage as well as endogenous I deficiency in spite of iodine-adequate environment.

  13. Global Risk Assessment of Aflatoxins in Maize and Peanuts: Are Regulatory Standards Adequately Protective?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America. PMID:23761295

  14. Global risk assessment of aflatoxins in maize and peanuts: are regulatory standards adequately protective?

    PubMed

    Wu, Felicia; Stacy, Shaina L; Kensler, Thomas W

    2013-09-01

    The aflatoxins are a group of fungal metabolites that contaminate a variety of staple crops, including maize and peanuts, and cause an array of acute and chronic human health effects. Aflatoxin B1 in particular is a potent liver carcinogen, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk is multiplicatively higher for individuals exposed to both aflatoxin and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV). In this work, we sought to answer the question: do current aflatoxin regulatory standards around the world adequately protect human health? Depending upon the level of protection desired, the answer to this question varies. Currently, most nations have a maximum tolerable level of total aflatoxins in maize and peanuts ranging from 4 to 20ng/g. If the level of protection desired is that aflatoxin exposures would not increase lifetime HCC risk by more than 1 in 100,000 cases in the population, then most current regulatory standards are not adequately protective even if enforced, especially in low-income countries where large amounts of maize and peanuts are consumed and HBV prevalence is high. At the protection level of 1 in 10,000 lifetime HCC cases in the population, however, almost all aflatoxin regulations worldwide are adequately protective, with the exception of several nations in Africa and Latin America.

  15. An adequate Fe nutritional status of maize suppresses infection and biotrophic growth of Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fanghua; Albarouki, Emad; Lingam, Brahmasivasenkar; Deising, Holger B; von Wirén, Nicolaus

    2014-07-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for plant pathogens as well as for their host plants. As Fe plays a central role in pathogen virulence, most plants have evolved Fe-withholding strategies to reduce Fe availability to pathogens. On the other hand, plants need Fe for an oxidative burst in their basal defense response against pathogens. To investigate how the plant Fe nutritional status affects plant tolerance to a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen, we employed the maize-Colletotrichum graminicola pathosystem. Fungal infection progressed rapidly via biotrophic to necrotrophic growth in Fe-deficient leaves, while an adequate Fe nutritional status suppressed the formation of infection structures of C. graminicola already during the early biotrophic growth phase. As indicated by Prussian blue and 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining, the retarding effect of an adequate Fe nutritional status on fungal development coincided temporally and spatially with the recruitment of Fe to infection sites and a local production of H2 O2 . A similar coincidence between local Fe and H2 O2 accumulation was found in a parallel approach employing C. graminicola mutants affected in Fe acquisition and differing in virulence. These results indicate that an adequate Fe nutritional status delays and partially suppresses the fungal infection process and the biotrophic growth phase of C. graminicola, most likely via the recruitment of free Fe to the fungal infection site for a timely oxidative burst.

  16. 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio analysis in human breath using a 2 μm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mingguo; Cao, Zhensong; Liu, Kun; Wang, Guishi; Tan, Tu; Gao, Xiaoming; Chen, Weidong; Yinbo, Huang; Ruizhong, Rao

    2015-04-01

    The bacterium H. pylori is believed to cause peptic ulcer. H. pylori infection in the human stomach can be diagnosed through a CO2 isotope ratio measure in exhaled breath. A laser spectrometer based on a distributed-feedback semiconductor diode laser at 2 μm is developed to measure the changes of 13CO2/12CO2 isotope ratio in exhaled breath sample with the CO2 concentration of ~4%. It is characterized by a simplified optical layout, in which a single detector and associated electronics are used to probe CO2 spectrum. A new type multi-passes cell with 12 cm long base length , 29 m optical path length in total and 280 cm3 volume is used in this work. The temperature and pressure are well controlled at 301.15 K and 6.66 kPa with fluctuation amplitude of 25 mK and 6.7 Pa, respectively. The best 13δ precision of 0.06o was achieved by using wavelet denoising and Kalman filter. The application of denoising and Kalman filter not only improved the signal to noise ratio, but also shorten the system response time.

  17. Evaluation of scatter mitigation strategies for x-ray cone-beam CT: impact of scatter subtraction and anti-scatter grids on contrast-to-noise ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Lasio, Giovanni; Evans, Joshua; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2007-03-01

    The large contribution of scatter to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) x-ray projections significantly degrades image quality, both through streaking and cupping artifacts and by loss of low contrast boundary detectability. The goal of this investigation is to compare the efficacy of three widely used scatter mitigation methods: subtractive scatter correction (SSC); anti-scatter grids (ASG); and beam modulating with bowtie filters; for improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and cupping artifacts. A simple analytic model was developed to predict scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) and CNR as a function of cylindrical phantom thickness. In addition, CBCT x-ray projections of a CatPhan QA phantom were measured, using a Varian CBCT imaging system, and computed, using an inhouse Monte Carlo photon-transport code to more realistically evaluate the impact of scatter mitigation techniques. Images formed with uncorrected sinograms acquired without ASGs and bow-tie filter show pronounced cupping artifacts and loss of contrast. Subtraction of measured scatter profiles restores image uniformity and CT number accuracy, but does not improve CNR, since the improvement in contrast almost exactly offset by the increase in relative x-ray noise. ASGs were found to modestly improve CNR (up to 20%, depending ASG primary transmission and selectivity) only in body scans, while they can reduce CNR for head phantoms where SPR is low.

  18. First Look at the Upper Tropospheric Ozone Mixing Ratio From OMI Estimated Using the Cloud Slicing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhartia, P. K.; Ziemke, J.; Chandra, S.; Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Taylor, S.; Yang, K.; Ahn, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Cloud Slicing technique has emerged as a powerful tool for the study of ozone in the upper troposphere. In this technique one looks at the variation with cloud height of the above-cloud column ozone derived from the backscattered ultraviolet instruments, such as TOMS, to determine the ozone mixing ratio. For this technique to work properly one needs an instrument with relatively good horizontal resolution with very good signal to noise in measuring above-cloud column ozone. In addition, one needs the (radiatively) effective cloud pressure rather than the cloud-top pressure, for the ultraviolet photons received by a satellite instrument are scattered from inside the cloud rather than from the top. For this study we use data from the OMI sensor, which was recently launched on the EOS Aura satellite. OMI is a UV-Visible backscattering instrument with a nadir pixel size of 13 x 24 km. The effective cloud pressure is derived from a new algorithm based on Rotational Raman Scattering and O2-O2 absorption in the 340-400 nm band of OMI.

  19. First constraint on cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from two independent telescopes.

    PubMed

    van Weerdenburg, F; Murphy, M T; Malec, A L; Kaper, L; Ubachs, W

    2011-05-01

    A high signal-to-noise spectrum covering the largest number of hydrogen lines (90 H(2) lines and 6 HD lines) in a high-redshift object was analyzed from an observation along the sight line to the bright quasar source J2123-005 with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile). This delivers a constraint on a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio of Δμ/μ=(8.5 ± 3.6(stat) ± 2.2(syst))×10(-6) at redshift z(abs) = 2.059, which agrees well with a recently published result on the same system observed at the Keck telescope yielding Δμ/μ=(5.6 ± 5.5(stat) ± 2.9(syst))×10(-6). Both analyses used the same robust absorption line fitting procedures with detailed consideration of systematic errors. PMID:21635080

  20. First Look at the Upper Tropospheric Ozone Mixing Ratio from OMI Estimated using the Cloud Slicing Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhartia, Pawan K.; Ziemke, Jerry; Chandra, Sushil; Joiner, Joanna; Vassilkov, Alexandra; Taylor, Steven; Yang, Kai; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2004-01-01

    The Cloud Slicing technique has emerged as a powerful tool for the study of ozone in the upper troposphere. In this technique one looks at the variation with cloud height of the above-cloud column ozone derived from the backscattered ultraviolet instruments, such as TOMS, to determine the ozone mixing ratio. For this technique to work properly one needs an instrument with relatively good horizontal resolution with very good signal to noise in measuring above-cloud column ozone. In addition, one needs the (radiatively) effective cloud pressure rather than the cloud-top pressure, for the ultraviolet photons received by a satellite instrument are scattered from inside the cloud rather than from the top. For this study we use data from the OMI sensor, which was recently launched on the EOS Aura satellite. OMI is a W-Visible backscattering instrument with a nadir pixel size of 13 x 24 km. The effective cloud pressure is derived from a new algorithm based on Rotational Raman Scattering and O2-O2, absorption in the 340-400 nm band of OMI.

  1. First constraint on cosmological variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio from two independent telescopes.

    PubMed

    van Weerdenburg, F; Murphy, M T; Malec, A L; Kaper, L; Ubachs, W

    2011-05-01

    A high signal-to-noise spectrum covering the largest number of hydrogen lines (90 H(2) lines and 6 HD lines) in a high-redshift object was analyzed from an observation along the sight line to the bright quasar source J2123-005 with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile). This delivers a constraint on a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio of Δμ/μ=(8.5 ± 3.6(stat) ± 2.2(syst))×10(-6) at redshift z(abs) = 2.059, which agrees well with a recently published result on the same system observed at the Keck telescope yielding Δμ/μ=(5.6 ± 5.5(stat) ± 2.9(syst))×10(-6). Both analyses used the same robust absorption line fitting procedures with detailed consideration of systematic errors.

  2. First Constraint on Cosmological Variation of the Proton-to-Electron Mass Ratio from Two Independent Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Weerdenburg, F. van; Kaper, L.; Murphy, M. T.; Malec, A. L.; Ubachs, W.

    2011-05-06

    A high signal-to-noise spectrum covering the largest number of hydrogen lines (90 H{sub 2} lines and 6 HD lines) in a high-redshift object was analyzed from an observation along the sight line to the bright quasar source J2123-005 with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope (Paranal, Chile). This delivers a constraint on a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio of {Delta}{mu}/{mu}=(8.5{+-}3.6{sub stat{+-}}2.2{sub syst})x10{sup -6} at redshift z{sub abs}=2.059, which agrees well with a recently published result on the same system observed at the Keck telescope yielding {Delta}{mu}/{mu}=(5.6{+-}5.5{sub stat{+-}}2.9{sub syst})x10{sup -6}. Both analyses used the same robust absorption line fitting procedures with detailed consideration of systematic errors.

  3. Imaging the crustal structure of the valley of Mexico and higher mode identification using H/V spectral ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, D.; Campillo, M.; Sanchez-Sesma, F.; Singh, S. K.

    2012-04-01

    We reconstruct Rayleigh and Love waves from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at 19 broad-band stations of the MesoAmerica Seismic Experiment (MASE) and Valley of Mexico Experiment (VMEX). The cross-correlations are computed over 2 years of noise records for the 8 MASE stations and over 1 year for the 11 VMEX stations. We use surface waves with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to measure group velocity dispersion curves at period of 0.5 to 3 seconds. For paths within the soft quaternary sediments basin, the maximum energy is observed at velocity higher than expected for the fundamental mode. This observation suggests the importance of higher modes as the main vectors of energy in such complex structures. To perform a reliable inversion of the velocity structure beneath the valley, an identification of these dominants modes is required. To identify the modes of surface waves we use the spectral ratio of the horizontal components over the vertical component (H/V) measured on seismic coda. We compare the observed values with the theoretical H/V for the velocity model deduced from surface wave dispersion when assuming a particular mode. H/V ratio in the coda is computed under the hypothesis of equipartition of a diffuse field in a layered medium following Margerin et al. [2009] and Sánchez-Sesma et al. [2011]. We processed several events to ensure that the observed H/V is stable. The comparison of the modelled dispersion and H/V ratio allows for mode identification, and consequently to recover the velocity model of the structure. We conclude on the predominance of higher modes in our observations. The excitation of higher modes is key element of explanation for the long duration and amplification of the seismic signals observed in the Valley of Mexico.

  4. [Functional restoration--it depends on an adequate mixture of treatment].

    PubMed

    Pfingsten, M

    2001-12-01

    In the last 50 years conventional treatments have not been able to slow down the expanding chronic low back pain problem. However, nowadays health care has changed according to a broad biopsychosocial model of health, the positive effect of activity on health and healing, emphasis on function rather than pain or impairment, and reliance upon clinical evidence. In search for new solutions "functional restoration" (FR) programs have been developed. They include multidisciplinary treatment of patients in groups, consisting of 6-8 h of treatment a day, lasting 3 to 6 weeks and usually integrating intense physical and ergonomic training, psychological (behavioral) therapy, patient education, and instruction in social- and work-related issues. FR programs have yet to demonstrate their effectiveness in several countries. Controlled studies in the USA were very positive regarding the return-to-work rate, whereas studies in Scandinavian countries did not demonstrate similar results. Possible reasons for the different results concerning back-to-work ratios might be that study design, patient population, content of the program, and other external factors are different and studies as well as effects are therefore not directly comparable. According to several well-controlled studies, the most probable reason for this different effect may be that social and security (health care) systems and cultures differ among countries and that patients with chronic low back pain respond differently to this combination. Sick absenteeism and inability to work may be influenced by many factors besides pain that cannot be addressed by intervention or prevention programs, e.g., job satisfaction, education level, and the compensation systems. It may be that the lower economic benefit during sick leave in the United States leads to favorable results from functional restoration programs. Concerning the prediction of success, several studies have shown that medical background, diagnosis and physical

  5. [Functional restoration--it depends on an adequate mixture of treatment].

    PubMed

    Pfingsten, M

    2001-12-01

    In the last 50 years conventional treatments have not been able to slow down the expanding chronic low back pain problem. However, nowadays health care has changed according to a broad biopsychosocial model of health, the positive effect of activity on health and healing, emphasis on function rather than pain or impairment, and reliance upon clinical evidence. In search for new solutions "functional restoration" (FR) programs have been developed. They include multidisciplinary treatment of patients in groups, consisting of 6-8 h of treatment a day, lasting 3 to 6 weeks and usually integrating intense physical and ergonomic training, psychological (behavioral) therapy, patient education, and instruction in social- and work-related issues. FR programs have yet to demonstrate their effectiveness in several countries. Controlled studies in the USA were very positive regarding the return-to-work rate, whereas studies in Scandinavian countries did not demonstrate similar results. Possible reasons for the different results concerning back-to-work ratios might be that study design, patient population, content of the program, and other external factors are different and studies as well as effects are therefore not directly comparable. According to several well-controlled studies, the most probable reason for this different effect may be that social and security (health care) systems and cultures differ among countries and that patients with chronic low back pain respond differently to this combination. Sick absenteeism and inability to work may be influenced by many factors besides pain that cannot be addressed by intervention or prevention programs, e.g., job satisfaction, education level, and the compensation systems. It may be that the lower economic benefit during sick leave in the United States leads to favorable results from functional restoration programs. Concerning the prediction of success, several studies have shown that medical background, diagnosis and physical

  6. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt.

    PubMed

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8-10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100-199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  7. Are the current Australian sun exposure guidelines effective in maintaining adequate levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D?

    PubMed

    Kimlin, Michael; Sun, Jiandong; Sinclair, Craig; Heward, Sue; Hill, Jane; Dunstone, Kimberley; Brodie, Alison

    2016-01-01

    An adequate vitamin D status, as measured by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration, is important in humans for maintenance of healthy bones and muscle function. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was assessed in participants from Melbourne, Australia (37.81S, 144.96E), who were provided with the current Australian guidelines on sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy (25(OH)D ≥50 nmol/L). Participants were interviewed in February (summer, n=104) and August (winter, n=99) of 2013. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was examined as a function of measures of sun exposure and sun protection habits with control of key characteristics such as dietary intake of vitamin D, body mass index (BMI) and skin colour, that may modify this relationship. The mean 25(OH)D concentration in participants who complied with the current sun exposure guidelines was 67.3 nmol/L in summer and 41.9 nmol/L in winter. At the end of the study, 69.3% of participants who complied with the summer sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate, while only 27.6% of participants who complied with the winter sun exposure guidelines were 25(OH)D adequate at the end of the study. The results suggest that the current Australian guidelines for sun exposure for 25(OH)D adequacy are effective for most in summer and ineffective for most in winter. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'.

  8. Adequate Iodine Status in New Zealand School Children Post-Fortification of Bread with Iodised Salt

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emma; McLean, Rachael; Davies, Briar; Hawkins, Rochelle; Meiklejohn, Eva; Ma, Zheng Feei; Skeaff, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Iodine deficiency re-emerged in New Zealand in the 1990s, prompting the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt from 2009. This study aimed to determine the iodine status of New Zealand children when the fortification of bread was well established. A cross-sectional survey of children aged 8–10 years was conducted in the cities of Auckland and Christchurch, New Zealand, from March to May 2015. Children provided a spot urine sample for the determination of urinary iodine concentration (UIC), a fingerpick blood sample for Thyroglobulin (Tg) concentration, and completed a questionnaire ascertaining socio-demographic information that also included an iodine-specific food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). The FFQ was used to estimate iodine intake from all main food sources including bread and iodised salt. The median UIC for all children (n = 415) was 116 μg/L (females 106 μg/L, males 131 μg/L) indicative of adequate iodine status according to the World Health Organisation (WHO, i.e., median UIC of 100–199 μg/L). The median Tg concentration was 8.7 μg/L, which was <10 μg/L confirming adequate iodine status. There was a significant difference in UIC by sex (p = 0.001) and ethnicity (p = 0.006). The mean iodine intake from the food-only model was 65 μg/day. Bread contributed 51% of total iodine intake in the food-only model, providing a mean iodine intake of 35 μg/day. The mean iodine intake from the food-plus-iodised salt model was 101 μg/day. In conclusion, the results of this study confirm that the iodine status in New Zealand school children is now adequate. PMID:27196925

  9. Thrombography reveals thrombin generation potential continues to deteriorate following cardiopulmonary bypass surgery despite adequate hemostasis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond K; Sleep, Joseph R; Visner, Allison J; Raasch, David J; Lanza, Louis A; DeValeria, Patrick A; Torloni, Antonio S; Arabia, Francisco A

    2011-03-01

    The intrinsic and extrinsic activation pathways of the hemostatic system converge when prothrombin is converted to thrombin. The ability to generate an adequate thrombin burst is the most central aspect of the coagulation cascade. The thrombin-generating potential in patients following cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) may be indicative of their hemostatic status. In this report, thrombography, a unique technique for directly measuring the potential of patients' blood samples to generate adequate thrombin bursts, is used to characterize the coagulopathic profile in post-CPB patients. Post-CPB hemostasis is typically achieved with protamine reversal of heparin anticoagulation and occasionally supplemented with blood product component transfusions. In this pilot study, platelet poor plasma samples were derived from 11 primary cardiac surgery patients at five time points: prior to CPB, immediately post-protamine, upon arrival to the intensive care unit (ICU), 3 hours post-ICU admission, and 24 hours after ICU arrival. Thrombography revealed that the Endogenous Thrombin Potential (ETP) was not different between [Baseline] and [PostProtamine] but proceeded to deteriorate in the immediate postoperative period. At the [3HourPostICU] time point, the ETP was significantly lower than the [Baseline] values, 1233 +/- 591 versus 595 +/- 379 nM.min (mean +/- SD; n=9, p < .005), despite continued adequacy of hemostasis. ETPs returned to baseline values the day after surgery. Transfusions received, conventional blood coagulation testing results, and blood loss volumes are also presented. Despite adequate hemostasis, thrombography reveals an underlying coagulopathic process that could put some cardiac surgical patients at risk for postoperative bleeding. Thrombography is a novel technique that could be developed into a useful tool for perfusionists and physicians to identify coagulopathies and optimize blood management following CPB. PMID:21449230

  10. Chronic leg ulcer: does a patient always get a correct diagnosis and adequate treatment?

    PubMed

    Mooij, Michael C; Huisman, Laurens C

    2016-03-01

    Patients with chronic leg ulcers have severely impaired quality of life and account for a high percentage of annual healthcare costs. To establish the cause of a chronic leg ulcer, referral to a center with a multidisciplinary team of professionals is often necessary. Treating the underlying cause diminishes healing time and reduces costs. In venous leg ulcers adequate compression therapy is still a problem. It can be improved by training the professionals with pressure measuring devices. A perfect fitting of elastic stockings is important to prevent venous leg ulcer recurrence. In most cases, custom-made stockings are the best choice for this purpose. PMID:26916772

  11. Determining Adequate Margins in Head and Neck Cancers: Practice and Continued Challenges.

    PubMed

    Williams, Michelle D

    2016-09-01

    Margin assessment remains a critical component of oncologic care for head and neck cancer patients. As an integrated team, both surgeons and pathologists work together to assess margins in these complex patients. Differences in method of margin sampling can impact obtainable information and effect outcomes. Additionally, what distance is an "adequate or clear" margin for patient care continues to be debated. Ultimately, future studies and potentially secondary modalities to augment pathologic assessment of margin assessment (i.e., in situ imaging or molecular assessment) may enhance local control in head and neck cancer patients. PMID:27469263

  12. Nebulized antibiotics. An adequate option for treating ventilator-associated respiratory infection?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, A; Barcenilla, F

    2015-03-01

    Ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (VAT) is a frequent complication in critical patients. The 90% of those who develop it receive broad-spectrum antibiotic (ATB) treatment, without any strong evidence of its favorable impact. The use of nebulized ATB could be a valid treatment option, to reduce the use of systemic ATB and the pressure of selection on the local flora. Several studies suggest that an adequate nebulization technique can ensure high levels of ATB even in areas of lung consolidation, and to obtain clinical and microbiological cure. New studies are needed to properly assess the impact of treatment with nebulized ATB on the emergence of resistance.

  13. Developing an adequate "pneumatraumatology": understanding the spiritual impacts of traumatic injury.

    PubMed

    Bidwell, Duane R

    2002-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions and systematic theology are primary resources for chaplains and congregational pastors who care for victims of physical trauma. Yet these resources may not be adequate to address the spiritual impacts of trauma. This article proposes a preliminary "pneumatraumatology," drawing on early Christian asceticism and Buddhist mysticism to describe one way of understanding the spiritual impacts of traumatic injury. It also suggests possible responses to these impacts informed by narrative/constructionist perspectives and Breggemann's understanding of the dimensions of spiritual transformation in the Hebrew Bible.

  14. Maintaining Adequate CO2 Washout for an Advanced EMU via a New Rapid Cycle Amine Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Conger, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Over the past several years, NASA has realized tremendous progress in Extravehicular Activity (EVA) technology development. This has been evidenced by the progressive development of a new Rapid Cycle Amine (RCA) system for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (AEMU) Portable Life Support Subsystem (PLSS). The PLSS is responsible for the life support of the crew member in the spacesuit. The RCA technology is responsible for carbon dioxide (CO2) and humidity control. Another aspect of the RCA is that it is on-back vacuum-regenerable, efficient, and reliable. The RCA also simplifies the PLSS schematic by eliminating the need for a condensing heat exchanger for humidity control in the current EMU. As development progresses on the RCA, it is important that the sizing be optimized so that the demand on the PLSS battery is minimized. As well, maintaining the CO2 washout at adequate levels during an EVA is an absolute requirement of the RCA and associated ventilation system. Testing has been underway in-house at NASA Johnson Space Center and analysis has been initiated to evaluate whether the technology provides exemplary performance in ensuring that the CO2 is removed sufficiently and the ventilation flow is adequate for maintaining CO2 washout in the AEMU spacesuit helmet of the crew member during an EVA. This paper will review the recent developments of the RCA unit, testing planned in-house with a spacesuit simulator, and the associated analytical work along with insights from the medical aspect on the testing. 1

  15. A Recipe for Ratio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffett, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    Many learners still struggled to appreciate, and understand the difference between, the concepts of fractions and ratio. This is not just a UK phenomenon, which is demonstrated here by the use of a resource developed by the Wisconsin Centre for Education, in association with the Freudenthal Institute of the University of Utrecht, with a group of…

  16. Area Ratios of Quadrilaterals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David R.; Arcidiacono, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Shows that the ratio of the area of the quadrilateral formed by joining the kth points to the area of the original quadrilateral is constant whether it is convex or concave quadrilateral. Presents many geoboard or dot paper diagrams and geometrical expresssions. (YP)

  17. Tremor Depth and Vp/Vs Ratio from Moho Reflected Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, A. J.; Creager, K. C.; Ghosh, A.; Vidale, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    stacking techniques to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. Promising signals at the predicted times of P-PmP, P-SmP and S-P have been found in a small aperture, 80-station array that recorded the 2008 episodic tremor and slip (ETS) event. Furthermore, we have recorded the ongoing 2010 ETS event on the Array of Arrays, a set of eight small-aperture arrays on the northern Olympic Peninsula.

  18. Change in Seismic Attenuation of the Nojima Fault Zone Measured Using Spectral Ratios from Borehole Seismometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Y.; Tadokoro, K.; Nishigami, K.; Mori, J.

    2006-12-01

    We measured the seismic attenuation of the rock mass surrounding the Nojima fault, Japan, by estimating the P-wave quality factor, Qp, using spectral ratios derived from a multi-depth (800 m and 1800 m) seismometer array. We detected an increase of Qp in 2003-2006 compared to 1999-2000. Following the 1995 Kobe earthquake, the project "Fault Zone Probe" drilled three boreholes to depths of 500 m, 800 m, 1800 m, in Toshima, along the southern part of the Nojima fault. The 1800-m borehole was reported to reach the fault surface. One seismometer (TOS1) was installed at the bottom of the 800-m borehole in 1996 and another (TOS2) at the bottom of 1800-m borehole in 1997. The sampling rate of the seismometers is 100 Hz. The slope of the spectral ratios for the two stations plotted on a linear-log plot is -π t^{*}, where t^{*} is the travel time divided by the Qp for the path difference between the stations. For the estimation of Qp, we used events recorded by both TOS1 and TOS2 for periods of 1999-2000 and 2003-2006. To improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral ratios, we first calculated spectra ratios between TOS1 and TOS2 for each event and averaged the values over the earthquakes for each period. We used the events that occurred within 10 km from TOS2, and the numbers of events are 74 for 1999-2000 and 105 for 2003-2006. Magnitudes of the events range from M0.5 to M3.1. The average value of Qp for 1999-2000 increased significantly compared to 2003-2006. The attenuation of rock mass surrounding the fault in 2003-2006 is smaller than that in 1999-2000, which suggests that the fault zone became stiffer after the earthquake. At the Nojima fault, permeability measured by repeated pumping tests decreased with time from the Kobe earthquake, infering the closure of cracks and a fault healing process occurred The increase of Qp is another piece of evidence for the healing process of the Nojima fault zone. u.ac.jp/~kano/

  19. Accuracy and Uncertainty of Asymmetric Magnetization Transfer Ratio Quantification for Amide Proton Transfer (APT) Imaging at 3T: A Monte Carlo Study

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Qinwei; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Wei, Juan; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2014-01-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging offers a novel and powerful MRI contrast mechanism for quantitative molecular imaging based on the principle of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). Asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTRasym) quantification is crucial for Z-spectrum analysis of APT imaging, but is still challenging, particularly at clinical field strength. This paper studies the accuracy and uncertainty in the quantification of MTRasym for APT imaging at 3T, by using high-order polynomial fitting of Z-spectrum through Monte Carlo simulation. Results show that polynomial fitting is a biased estimator that consistently underestimates MTRasym. For a fixed polynomial order, the accuracy of MTRasym is almost constant with regard to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while the uncertainty decreases exponentially with SNR. The higher order polynomial fitting increases both the accuracy and the uncertainty of MTRasym. For different APT signal intensity levels, the relative accuracy and the absolute uncertainty keep constant for a fixed polynomial order. These results indicate the limitations and pitfalls of polynomial fitting for MTRasym quantification so better quantification technique for MTRasym estimation is warranted. PMID:24110892

  20. Accuracy and uncertainty of asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio quantification for amide proton transfer (APT) imaging at 3T: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Zhang, Qinwei; Wang, Yi-Xiang; Wei, Juan; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2013-01-01

    Amide proton transfer (APT) imaging offers a novel and powerful MRI contrast mechanism for quantitative molecular imaging based on the principle of chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST). Asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio (MTR(asym)) quantification is crucial for Z-spectrum analysis of APT imaging, but is still challenging, particularly at clinical field strength. This paper studies the accuracy and uncertainty in the quantification of MTR(asym) for APT imaging at 3T, by using high-order polynomial fitting of Z-spectrum through Monte Carlo simulation. Results show that polynomial fitting is a biased estimator that consistently underestimates MTR(asym). For a fixed polynomial order, the accuracy of MTR(asym) is almost constant with regard to signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) while the uncertainty decreases exponentially with SNR. The higher order polynomial fitting increases both the accuracy and the uncertainty of MTR(asym). For different APT signal intensity levels, the relative accuracy and the absolute uncertainty keep constant for a fixed polynomial order. These results indicate the limitations and pitfalls of polynomial fitting for MTR(asym) quantification so better quantification technique for MTR(asym) estimation is warranted.